WorldWideScience

Sample records for high school teaching

  1. Teaching Bioethics in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joana; Gomes, Carlos Costa; Jácomo, António; Pereira, Sandra Martins

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Bioethics Teaching in Secondary Education (Project BEST) aims to promote the teaching of bioethics in secondary schools. This paper describes the development and implementation of the programme in Portugal. Design: Programme development involved two main tasks: (1) using the learning tools previously developed by the US Northwest…

  2. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  3. Teaching the EPR Paradox at High School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Gesche

    1999-01-01

    Argues the importance of students at university and in the final years of high school gaining an appreciation of the principles of quantum mechanics. Presents the EPR gedanken experiment (thought experiment) as a method of teaching the principles of quantum mechanics. (Author/CCM)

  4. Suggestions for English Culture Teaching in High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Hongjuan

    2016-01-01

    With the implementation of the new High School English Curriculum Standards, more and more people have realized the importance of English culture teaching. To realize the goals of English teaching, teachers should cultivate students' culture awareness and develop their intercultural communicative competence. But in the actual teaching, culture teaching did not get real implementation. So the author puts forwards some suggestions for English culture teaching in high school.

  5. Teaching Innovation in High School Technology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Skaggs, Paul; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation is central to modern industry. It can and should be taught in schools. Not only does providing students a background in innovation benefit them later in life and industry, but it also promotes and further develops their critical thinking and collaboration skills. Despite the need for innovation, many have struggled with how to teach it.…

  6. Urban High School Teachers' Beliefs Concerning Essential Science Teaching Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rommel

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study addresses the link between urban high school science teachers' beliefs about essential teaching dispositions and student learning outcomes. The findings suggest that in order to help students to do well in science in urban school settings, science teachers should possess essential teaching dispositions which include…

  7. EARTHTIME: Teaching geochronology to high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Buchwaldt, Robert; McLean, Noah; Rioux, Matthew; Bowring, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    The authors taught an educational module developed as part of the EARTHTIME (www.earth-time.org) outreach initiative to 215 high school students from a Massachusetts (USA) High School as part of an "out-of-school" field trip. The workshop focuses on uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating of zircons and its application to solving a geological problem. The theme of our 2.5-hour module is the timing of the K-T boundary and a discussion of how geochronology can be used to evaluate the two main hypotheses for the cause of the concurrent extinction—the Chicxlub impact and the massive eruption of the Deccan Traps. Activities are divided into three parts: In the first part, the instructors lead hands-on activities demonstrating how rock samples are processed to isolate minerals by their physical properties. Students use different techniques, such as magnetic separation, density separation using non-toxic heavy liquids, and mineral identification with a microscope. We cover all the steps from sampling an outcrop to determining a final age. Students also discuss geologic features relevant to the K-T boundary problem and get the chance to examine basalts, impact melts and meteorites. In the second part, we use a curriculum developed for and available on the EARTHTIME website (http://www.earth-time.org/Lesson_Plan.pdf). The curriculum teaches the science behind uranium-lead dating using tables, graphs, and a geochronology kit. In this module, the students start by exploring the concepts of half-life and exponential decay and graphically solving the isotopic decay equation. Manipulating groups of double-sided chips labeled with U and Pb isotopes reinforces the concept that an age determination depends on the Pb/U ratio, not the absolute number of atoms present. Next, the technique's accuracy despite loss of parent and daughter atoms during analysis, as well as the use of isotopic ratios rather than absolute abundances, is explained with an activity on isotope dilution. Here the students

  8. Who's Teaching What in High School Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    During the 2012-13 school year, approximately 27,000 teachers taught at least one physics course in a U.S. high school. About one-third of those teachers have earned a degree in physics or physics education; the vast majority of the others have earned degrees in a variety of other science fields. About 53,000 physics classes were taught, ranging…

  9. Coaching and engaging. Developing teaching with CAS in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Henrik Peter; Grønbæk, Niels; Larsen, Claus Richard

    The extensive use of CAS at upper secondary school in Denmark provides a laboratory for research on the development of standards for CAS teaching. The poster focuses on action research into teachers developing lessons and student activities in an ongoing collaboration between university and high ...... schools on use of CAS in mathematics teaching. Coaches1 mediate design processes, reflection and documentation, and enable sharing. We discuss coaching as a valuable part of action research, and how to draw findings from the collaboration.......The extensive use of CAS at upper secondary school in Denmark provides a laboratory for research on the development of standards for CAS teaching. The poster focuses on action research into teachers developing lessons and student activities in an ongoing collaboration between university and high...

  10. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  11. Good Mathematics Teaching from Mexican High School Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sierra, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative research that identifies the characteristics of good mathematics teaching from the perspective of Mexican high school students. For this purpose, the social representations of a good mathematics teacher and a good mathematics class were identified in a group of 67 students. In order to obtain information, a…

  12. An Investigation into Physics Teaching in Senior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buabeng, Isaac; Ossei-Anto, Theophilus Aquinas; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the activities that go on in physics classrooms in Senior High Schools in Ghana. Specifically, the study sought to investigate the pattern of interaction and instructional methods used for teaching physics and level of coverage of physics syllabus. The survey design was employed for the study in which questionnaire was…

  13. Real World Connections in High School Mathematics Curriculum and Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Karakoç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Making real world connections in mathematics curricula and in teaching mathematics is generally viewed favorably within the educational community, however, little empirical research has examined how and why to use real world connections in mathematics education based on the views of experts. This study describes the feasibility of the use of real world connections according to high school mathematics teachers and academicians of mathematics education. Opinions of high school mathematics teachers (n=16 and academicians (n=8 about advantages, disadvantages, and examples of real world connections are elicited and reported. Teachers and academicians report several advantages of the use of real world connections in teaching mathematics as well as its disadvantages and limitations. Suggestions about dealing with limiting factors for using real world connections are also reported. Keywords: Mathematics curriculum, real world connections, mathematics teaching

  14. Teaching English through Online Games for Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastika Seli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language is an attractive activity both for the teacher and for the acceptor. They can interact together in this act. Teaching English is a challenge for the teachers to make the students interest in English because as we know English is not the first language for some countries in this world including Indonesia. There are various ways and ideas to teach English so that it can be fun and interest to be taught and to be learnt. But those ways and ideas also should be an up date method and also use a modern technology to be implemented. Along with the development of modern technology, the teachers should involve with it and make it as a part of English teaching tools. Two of the famous and sophisticated tools are computer and the internet. These things have a close relation to be urgent equipment for people. In this article, the writer wants to purpose the use of online games as a way to teach English for junior high school. Te article aims to give another teaching alternative in attracting the junior high school students to learn English in funny and enjoyable way. Through online games they do not only can play the various games but also indirectly they do the exercises of English skills.

  15. The Art of Teaching the Arts: A Workshop for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenberg Media, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "The Art of Teaching the Arts: A Workshop for High School Teachers" is an eight-part professional development workshop for use by high school dance, music, theatre, and visual art teachers. The workshop examines how principles of good teaching are carried out in teaching the arts at the high school level. In the eight one-hour video programs,…

  16. High school students' work engagement in practical teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current interest in introducing the dual education system into Serbian secondary education has drawn our attention to the question of students' self-perception in the process of practical teaching. The idea that underpins this paper is the supposition that students are affectively engaged with the work activities they perform. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES (Schaufeli et al., 2002 has been used for assessing students' work engagement in practical teaching. A study was conducted to examine the differences between high school students with mild intellectual disabilities and those with typical development with regard to aspects of work engagement defined as Energy, Commitment and Absorption. The sample was comprised of 248 students of vocational high schools in Serbia of both genders, of whom 111 with intellectual disabilities and 137 with typical development. The findings indicate that students with mild intellectual disabilities tend to rate their engagement in practical teaching more positively (t=7,457; p=0,001 than students with typical development. The paper provides a detailed analysis of the pedagogical implications of these findings and also outlines the limitations of the study, thus pointing the way for future research on this or related issues.

  17. Public Health Education: Teaching Epidemiology in High School Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiology instruction has expanded at the undergraduate level in part because it increases student critical thinking and scientific literacy, promotes students' perception of public health as both practical and relevant, and empowers students as independent, lifelong learners. Why then are more high schools not adopting epidemiology as a course requirement for students? Although prior iterations of high school epidemiology courses are noteworthy for incorporating active and participatory learning, embedding them into existing and continually shifting curricula is challenging and time-consuming, especially for teachers not trained in the field. It also may be argued that currently available epidemiology teaching resources emphasize content rather than thinking skills and therefore do not optimally promote students' personal engagement with, and in-depth understanding of, the mission and goals of public health. I propose a new framework for high school epidemiology that draws from progressive education ideology, including three critical elements: empowerment, authenticity, and transfer. I provide multiple examples to show how this framework has been used across a wide array of settings to hone epidemiology thinking skills in high school students.

  18. Low Cost DIY Lenses kit For High School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thepnurat, Meechai; Saphet, Parinya; Tong-on, Anusorn

    2017-09-01

    A set of lenses was fabricated from a low cost materials in a DIY (Do it yourself) process. The purpose was to demonstrate to teachers and students in high schools how to construct lenses by themselves with the local available materials. The lenses could be applied in teaching Physics, about the nature of a lens such as focal length and light rays passing through lenses in either direction, employing a set of simple laser pointers. This instrumental kit was made from a transparent 2 mm thick of acrylic Perspex. It was cut into rectangular pieces with dimensions of 2x15 cm2 and bent into curved shape by a hot air blower on a cylindrical wooden rod with curvature radii of about 3-4.5 cm. Then a pair of these Perspex were formed into a hollow thick lenses with a base supporting platform, so that any appropriate liquids could be filled in. The focal length of the lens was measured from laser beam drawing on a paper. The refractive index, n (n) of a filling liquid could be calculated from the measured focal length (f). The kit was low cost and DIY but was greatly applicable for optics teaching in high school laboratory.

  19. Rwsearch on Effective Teaching Materials for “Food Education” in Junior High School

    OpenAIRE

    渡部,佳美; 久山,明生; 三浦,芳助; 瀨山,一正; 西尾,佳代子

    2011-01-01

    Though food education in elementary and jinior high school has been promoted centrally by Nutrition Teachers since the Basic Law of Foof Education was esrablished, effective teaching materiales are yet to be found in the classroom. In Jine and December 2010, in an attempt to develop effective teaching materials for food education in jinior high schools, schools that employ nutrition educators were asked to use developmental teaching material - the “Dietary Habit Step-up Guide” - on an experim...

  20. The Junior High School Integrated Science: The Actual Teaching Process in the Perspective of an Ethnographer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kenneth; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey

    2016-01-01

    Science education at the Basic School (Primary and Junior High School) serves as the foundation upon which higher levels of science education are pivoted. This ethnographic study sought to investigate the teaching of Integrated Science at the Junior High School (JHS) level in the classrooms of two science teachers in two schools of differing…

  1. Urban Teacher Academy Project Toolkit: A Guide to Developing High School Teaching Career Academies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrigan, Anne; Schwartz, Shirley

    There is an urgent need not only to attract more people into the teaching profession but also to build a more diverse, highly qualified, and culturally sensitive teaching force that can meet the needs of a rapidly changing school-age population. This Toolkit takes best practices from high school teacher academies around the United States and…

  2. Prospective High School Physics Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Practices: From Traditionalist to Constructivist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Neset

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the teaching practices of prospective high school physics teachers with respect to their preference for teaching as a traditionalist or as a constructivist. To study the beliefs of prospective high school physics teachers on this subject, firstly, the Teacher Belief Survey was administered to 135…

  3. It's Time to Teach Jurisprudence in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Stephen C.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of a "government of laws and not of men," representing the philosophy called legal positivism, is developed historically as it might be presented to a secondary school class. Some of the practical benefits from the teaching of the philosophy of law are also discussed. (JH)

  4. Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science GEMS: Teaching Robotics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    find amusing but that we find of less educational value, like having the robots say comical things. Those who have more teaching time would doubtless...Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science GEMS: Teaching Robotics to High School Students by Edward M. Measure and Edward Creegan...TR-6220 January 2013 Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science (GEMS): Teaching Robotics to High School Students Edward M

  5. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  7. Still Motivated to Teach? A Study of School Context Variables, Stress and Job Satisfaction among Teachers in Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how teachers' working conditions or school context variables (job demands and job resources) were related to their teaching self-concept, teacher burnout, job satisfaction, and motivation to leave the teaching profession among teachers in Norwegian senior high school. Participants were 546 teachers in three counties in central…

  8. High-Tech School Bus Teaches Students on the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katims, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Last year, kindergarten through high school students in the rural Hector, Arkansas, School District barely had the technology resources that keep kids interested in math and science. This year, they potentially have the most advanced resources in the country--before they even step into the classroom. One school bus in Arkansas' Pope County has…

  9. A Learning Algorithm based on High School Teaching Wisdom

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Ninan Sajeeth

    2010-01-01

    A learning algorithm based on primary school teaching and learning is presented. The methodology is to continuously evaluate a student and to give them training on the examples for which they repeatedly fail, until, they can correctly answer all types of questions. This incremental learning procedure produces better learning curves by demanding the student to optimally dedicate their learning time on the failed examples. When used in machine learning, the algorithm is found to train a machine...

  10. TEACHING, COEXISTENCE AND ATTENDANCE AT A TECHNOLOGICAL HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Carranza-Peña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, which stems from ethnographic research, shows the importance of faculty intervention in the classroom setting in encouraging student attendance. Our findings indicate that the habitus the educator establishes can either encourage youth to continue their studies, or lead them to drop out, thus placing them at risk of addictions, illegal activities, unemployment or low-paid jobs. The Pedagogy of Hope therefore provides an option for effecting large-scale changes in personal, school, family, community and socio-economic conditions. The paper’s conclusions include providing training to teaching faculties on coexistence issues; ensuring coordination between school and family, and emphasizing an integral approach to education as means of promoting school attendance.

  11. Creative Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare in High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstfrey, Sherri R.

    William Shakespeare should be taught in high schools in an entertaining fashion so the high school student will appreciate his genius, keen insights, and talents. A strategy to accomplish this goal starts with simple material and progresses to the more difficult. Shakespeare's personal and historical background are presented in a short lecture,…

  12. Characteristics of High School Students' and Science Teachers' Cognitive Frame about Effective Teaching Method for High School Science Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Duk Ho; Park, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Kyu Seong

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the cognitive frame of high school students and inservice high school science teachers about effective teaching method, and we also explored how they understood about the teaching methods suggested by the 2009 revised Science Curriculum. Data were collected from 275 high school science teachers and 275 high school students. We analyzed data in terms of the words and the cognitive frame using the Semantic Network Analysis. The results were as follows. First, the teachers perceived that an activity oriented class was the effective science class that helped improve students'' problem-solving abilities and their inquiry skills. The students had the cognitive frame that their teacher had to present relevant and enough teaching materials to students, and that they should also receive assistance from teachers in science class to better prepare for college entrance exam. Second, both students and teachers retained the cognitive frame about the efficient science class that was not reflected 2009 revised Science Curriculum exactly. Especially, neither groups connected the elements of ''convergence'' as well as ''integration'' embedded across science subject areas to their cognitive frame nor cognized the fact that many science learning contents were closed related to one another. Therefore, various professional development opportunities should be offered so that teachers succinctly comprehend the essential features and the intents of the 2009 revised Science Curriculum and thereby implement it in their science lessons effectively. Keywords : semantic network analysis, cognitive frame, teaching method, science lesson

  13. Just Working with the Cellular Machine: A High School Game for Teaching Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Dumpel, Renata; Gomes da Silva, Luisa B.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Santos, Dilvani O.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Castro, Helena C.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology is a difficult comprehension subject due to its high complexity, thus requiring new teaching approaches. Herein, we developed an interdisciplinary board game involving the human immune system response against a bacterial infection for teaching molecular biology at high school. Initially, we created a database with several…

  14. Science school and culture school: improving the efficiency of high school science teaching in a system of mass science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Educational expansion in western countries has been achieved mainly by adding years to full-time education; however, this process has probably reduced efficiency. Sooner or later, efficiency must improve, with a greater educational attainment per year. Future societies will probably wish more people to study science throughout high school (aged c. 11-19 years) and the first college degree. 'Science' may be defined as any abstract, systematic and research-based discipline: including mathematics, statistics and the natural sciences, economics, music theory, linguistics, and the conceptual or quantitative social sciences. Since formal teaching is usually necessary to learn science, science education should be regarded as the core function of high schools. One standard way to improve efficiency is the 'division of labour', with increased specialization of function. Modern schools are already specialized: teachers are specialized according to age-group taught, subject matter expertise, and administrative responsibilities. School students are stratified by age and academic aptitude. I propose a further institutional division of school function between science education, and cultural education (including education in arts, sports, ethics, social interaction and good citizenship). Existing schools might split into 'science school' and 'culture school', reflected in distinct buildings and zones, separate administrative structures, and the recruitment of differently-specialized teaching personnel. Science school would be distinguished by its focus on education in disciplines which promote abstract systematic cognition. All students would spend some part of each day (how much would depend on their aptitude and motivation) in the 'science school'; experiencing a traditional-style, didactic, disciplined and rigorous academic education. The remainder of the students' time at school would be spent in the cultural division, which would focus on broader aspects, and aim to generate

  15. Using Design Sketch to Teach Bubble Sort in High School

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Jiu, Yi-Wen; Chen, Jason Jen-Yen

    2009-01-01

    Bubble Sort is simple. Yet, it seems a bit difficult for high school students. This paper presents a pedagogical methodology: Using Design Sketch to visualize the concepts in Bubble Sort, and to evaluate how this approach assists students to understand the pseudo code of Bubble Sort. An experiment is conducted in Wu-Ling Senior High School with 250 students taking part. The statistical analysis of experimental results shows that, for relatively high abstraction concepts, such as iteration num...

  16. Humbert Humbert and the Kids These Days: On Teaching "Lolita" in a High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigle, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In this reflective essay, an English teacher recounts failures and successes teaching Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita". The author considers both why and how the novel might be introduced to high school students.

  17. Sport Psychology Teaching Approaches for High School Coaches and Their Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.

    2017-01-01

    Coaches lacking a formal background in sport psychology may shy away from teaching these skills in favor of teaching physical skills with which they are more familiar. Other coaches may assume that athletes will learn sport psychology skills as a byproduct of their coaching pedagogy. Regardless, high school coaches are responsible for teaching…

  18. Improving physics teaching materials on sound for visually impaired students in high school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toenders, Frank G.C.; De Putter-Smits, Lesley G.A.; Sanders, Wendy T.M.; Den Brok, Perry

    2017-01-01

    When visually impaired students attend regular high school, additional materials are necessary to help them understand physics concepts. The time for teachers to develop teaching materials for such students is scarce. Visually impaired students in regular high school physics classes often use a

  19. Exploring Teaching Satisfaction of Public High School Teachers: Empirical Evidence from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükgöze, Hilal; Gün, Feyza

    2017-01-01

    The current paper primarily investigates teaching satisfaction of teachers working in public high schools of Ankara. The latter aim of this study is to determine whether teachers' satisfaction levels vary in relation to some demographic variables such as gender, education, type of high school, tenure, marital status, and membership to an…

  20. High School Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebolt, Kevin M.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze high school physical education teachers' beliefs about teaching students with disabilities in inclusive physical education. The participants (3 men, 2 women) were certified physical education teachers at four suburban high schools. The research method was descriptive-qualitative using a case study approach…

  1. Developing Teaching Materials PISA-Based for Mathematics and Science of Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somakim; Suharman, Andi; Madang, Kodri; Taufiq

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop valid and practical teaching materials for mathematics and science lesson PISA-based for junior high school students and to determine potential effects on students in scientific activity. Subjects of this study were students of Junior High School 9 Palembang (SMP Negeri 9 Palembang). The method used in this study is…

  2. Intelligent tutorial system for teaching of probability and statistics at high school in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gudino Penaloza, Miguel Gonzalez Mendoza, Neil Hernandez Gress, Jaime Mora Vargas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an intelligent tutoring system dedicated to teaching probability and statistics atthe preparatory school (or high school in Mexico. The system solution was used as a desktop computer and adapted tocarry a mobile environment for the implementation of mobile learning or m-learning. The system complies with the idea ofbeing adaptable to the needs of each student and is able to adapt to three different teaching models that meet the criteriaof three student profiles.

  3. Preparing prospective physics teachers to teach integrated science in junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyanto; Hartono; Nugroho, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    The physics education study program especially prepares its students to teach physics in senior high school, however in reality many its graduates have become science teachers in junior high school. Therefore introducing integrated science to prospective physics teachers is important, because based on the curriculum, science in the junior high school should be taught integratedly. This study analyzed integrated science teaching materials that developed by prospective physics teachers. Results from this study showed that majority of the integration materials that developed by the prospective physics teachers focused on topic with an overlapping concept or theme as connecting between two or three subjects.

  4. High school teachers' perspectives on effective approaches for teaching biology to students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Agnieszka

    The demands of national educational reforms require high school biology teachers to provide high quality instruction to students with and without special needs. The reforms, however, do not provide teachers with adequate teaching strategies to meet the needs of all students in the same context. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand high school biology teachers' perspectives, practices, and challenges in relation to teaching students with special needs. This approach was used to develop a substantive model for high school biology teachers who are challenged with teaching students with and without special needs. Data were collected via in-depth interviews with 15 high school teachers in a Midwestern school district. The data were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures in accordance with the grounded theory approach. Essential model components included skills and training for teachers, classroom management strategies, teaching strategies, and student skills. The emergent substantive theory indicated that that teacher preparation and acquired skills greatly influence the effectiveness of inclusion implementation. Key findings also indicated the importance of using of a variety of instructional strategies and classroom management strategies that address students' special needs and their learning styles. This study contributes to social change by providing a model for teaching students and effectively implementing inclusion in regular science classrooms. Following further study, this model may be used to support teacher professional development and improve teaching practices that in turn may improve science literacy supported by the national educational reforms.

  5. Teaching RLC Parallel Circuits in High-School Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alpár

    2015-01-01

    This paper will try to give an alternative treatment of the subject "parallel RLC circuits" and "resonance in parallel RLC circuits" from the Physics curricula for the XIth grade from Romanian high-schools, with an emphasis on practical type circuits and their possible applications, and intends to be an aid for both Physics…

  6. Teaching High-Ability Pupils in Early Primary School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Elma

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of the intervention 'Excel Kwadraat' in primary schools. This intervention aims to improve teachers’ differentiation practices in order to better anticipate pupil differences, including excellent or high-ability pupils. In the end, the intervention

  7. Teaching Ambition: A Case Study of High School Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draves, Tami

    2012-01-01

    Music teacher socialisation (MTS) has received increased attention in music education research, but few researchers have explored MTS with students during their primary socialisation, or pre-college, years. The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to examine the perspectives of high school music students who plan to pursue a music…

  8. Teaching Ethics to High School Students: Virtue Meets Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederjohn, M. Scott; Nygard, Kim; Wood, William C.

    2009-01-01

    When highly visible lapses in ethics occur, education gets some of the blame. Principals in the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis and the Enron scandal had been educated at Harvard and other elite business schools, where professional and moral ideals had arguably been replaced by a focus on profits at the expense of ethics. A long-standing tradition…

  9. Motueka High School Storied Experience: Teaching and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Tracey; Trafford, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 Motueka High School became involved in the Ministry of Education's Enhancing Effective Practice in Special Education (EEPiSE) project. The following is the story of how we integrated this action research project into our existing Enhanced Programme Funding (EPF). The project was supported by researcher Don Brown and led by our head of…

  10. Technological pedagogical content knowledge of junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wati, S.; Fitriana, L.; Mardiyana

    2018-04-01

    Linear equation is one of the topics in mathematics that are considered difficult. Student difficulties of understanding linear equation can be caused by lack of understanding this concept and the way of teachers teach. TPACK is a way to understand the complex relationships between teaching and content taught through the use of specific teaching approaches and supported by the right technology tools. This study aims to identify TPACK of junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation. The method used in the study was descriptive. In the first phase, a survey using a questionnaire was carried out on 45 junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation. While in the second phase, the interview involved three teachers. The analysis of data used were quantitative and qualitative technique. The result PCK revealed teachers emphasized developing procedural and conceptual knowledge through reliance on traditional in teaching linear equation. The result of TPK revealed teachers’ lower capacity to deal with the general information and communications technologies goals across the curriculum in teaching linear equation. The result indicated that PowerPoint constitutes TCK modal technological capability in teaching linear equation. The result of TPACK seems to suggest a low standard in teachers’ technological skills across a variety of mathematics education goals in teaching linear equation. This means that the ability of teachers’ TPACK in teaching linear equation still needs to be improved.

  11. Improving physics teaching materials on sound for visually impaired students in high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toenders, Frank G. C.; de Putter-Smits, Lesley G. A.; Sanders, Wendy T. M.; den Brok, Perry

    2017-09-01

    When visually impaired students attend regular high school, additional materials are necessary to help them understand physics concepts. The time for teachers to develop teaching materials for such students is scarce. Visually impaired students in regular high school physics classes often use a braille version of the physics textbook. Previously, we evaluated the physics learning environment of a blind high school student in a regular Dutch high school. In this research we evaluate the use of a revised braille textbook, relief drawings and 3D models. The research focussed on the topic of sound in grade 10.

  12. Methodology for the development of teaching vocational guidance from physics classes in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamila García-Carrión

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pre-university education has as one of its aims to achieve the polytechnic and vocational training of students, which is why it is necessary, vocational guidance thereof, to professions requiring the country, giving priority to teaching, hence this, which is a priority in the education system. The scientific research problem is expressed in the shortcomings revealed in the conception and development of the process of teaching vocational career orientation Physics, from the classes of this subject in high school. As an object the process of learning of physics in high school is required. the development of a methodology for the development of professional orientation of physics teaching career, from the classes of this subject in high school, based on an educational model that theoretically systematize the research and pre-professional approaches are proposed.

  13. Teaching quality: High school students' autonomy and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Jaime; Medina-Garrido, Elena; Ortega, Miriam

    2018-05-01

    How teachers manage class learning and interact with students affects students’ motivation and engagement. However, it could be that the effect of students’ representation of teaching quality on the students’ motivation varies between classes. Students from 90 classes participated in the study. We used multilevel random structural equation modeling to analyze whether the relationship of the students’ perception of teaching quality (as an indicator of the students’ mental representation) and students’ motivation varies between classes, and if this variability depends on the class assessment of teaching quality (as an indicator of teaching quality). The effect of teachers’ structure on the regression slope of student perception of student competence was .127. The effect of teachers’ autonomy support on the regression slope of student perception of student autonomy was .066. With this study we contribute a more detailed description of the relationship between teaching quality, competence and autonomy.

  14. High school students' work engagement in practical teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana Z.; Radić-Šestić Marina N.

    2017-01-01

    The current interest in introducing the dual education system into Serbian secondary education has drawn our attention to the question of students' self-perception in the process of practical teaching. The idea that underpins this paper is the supposition that students are affectively engaged with the work activities they perform. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) (Schaufeli et al., 2002) has been used for assessing students' work engagement in practical teaching. A study was conducted...

  15. Does Teaching Sequence Matter When Teaching High School Chemistry with Scientific Visualisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Five Canadian high school Chemistry classes in one school, taught by three different teachers, studied the concepts of dynamic chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier's Principle. Some students received traditional teacher-led explanations of the concept first and used an interactive scientific visualisation second, while others worked with the…

  16. Bildung - Then and Now in Danish High School and University Teaching and How to Integrate Bildung into Modern University Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    I the article the classical concept of Bildung as introduced by Humboldt and Kant is discussed and it is shown what impact Bildung has had in Danish high school and university teaching since 1800. Furthermore it is shown how Bildung in a new version, strictly connected to philosophy of science......, with great advantage can be integrated into modern university teaching, and some empirical results during the last three years at the Department of Economics giving the teory experimental evidence are mentioned....

  17. The Effect of Teaching the Entire Academic Year of High School Chemistry Utilizing Abstract Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Michael F. Z.; Escott, Patrick; Silva, Maritza; Barding, Gregory A., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the ability of high school chemistry students, with varying levels of math preparation, to experience learning-gains on state and district assessments as it relates to chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and kinetics. These advances were predicated on the use of a teaching style rooted in abstract reasoning. The…

  18. Teaching for Historical Understanding: Perspectives from a High School Social Studies Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the issue of history education and its failure to understand and implement the most effective teaching and learning strategies for the discipline. It did this by conducting interviews, observations, and a focus group with a group of history teachers in a suburban high school in New England. While aiming to explain…

  19. Professional Development in Person: Identity and the Construction of Teaching within a High School Science Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneroff, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    This is a narrative inquiry into the role of professional development in the construction of teaching practice by an exemplary urban high school science teacher. I collected data during 3 years of ethnographic participant observation in Marie Gonzalez's classroom. Marie told stories about her experiences in ten years of professional development…

  20. Awareness of Societal Issues among High School Biology Teachers Teaching Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Bloch, Ilit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how aware high school biology teachers are of societal issues (values, moral, ethic, and legal issues) while teaching genetics, genetics engineering, molecular genetics, human heredity, and evolution. The study includes a short historical review of World War II atrocities during the Holocaust when…

  1. Effects of Teaching Strategies on Student Motivation to Learn in High School Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toles, Ann

    2010-01-01

    To succeed in an increasing technological and global society, students need to develop strong mathematical and problem-solving skills. This qualitative grounded theory study examined student perceptions of the ways in which teaching strategies in high school mathematics classes affect student motivation to learn the subject. Study participants…

  2. High School Health-Education Teachers' Perceptions and Practices Related to Teaching HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Scott W.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Stone, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: HIV/AIDS is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States with individuals between the ages of 13 and 19 years being especially vulnerable for infection. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, perceptions, and instructional practices of high school health teachers toward teaching HIV prevention.…

  3. "Approaches to the Teaching of Special Relativity Theory in High School and University Textbooks of Argentina"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriassecq, Irene; Greca, Ileana Maria

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we presented an analysis of the representation of the special relativity theory (SRT) in the most used texts in high school, Polimodal level and university level in the teaching in the Argentine Republic, from a historic, epistemological and didactic perspective. The results show that none of the analyzed texts would allow a…

  4. A High School Student's Bill of Rights. Teaching Resources in the ERIC Database (TRIED) Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Stephen S.

    Designed to tap the rich collection of instructional techniques in the ERIC database, this compilation of lesson plans focuses on teaching high school students their Constitutional rights and responsibilities. The 40 lesson plans in the book cover the courts and basic rights, the rights of criminal suspects, the rights of minors and education law,…

  5. Canonical Pedagogical Content Knowledge by Cores for Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry at High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Clara; Cañada, Florentina; Garritz, Andoni; Mellado, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The topic of acid-base chemistry is one of the oldest in general chemistry courses and it has been almost continuously in academic discussion. The central purpose of documenting the knowledge and beliefs of a group of ten Mexican teachers with experience in teaching acid-base chemistry in high school was to know how they design, prepare and…

  6. TEACHING STRATEGIES FOR MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURAL STUDIES IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KELLY, JAMES

    THE THIRD PART OF A PROJECT TO DEVELOP APPROACHES TO TEACHING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ABOUT CULTURE AREAS OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD (SEE TE 499 984 AND TE 499 995), THIS TEACHERS' GUIDE FOR AN 8-WEEK COURSE ON THE MIDDLE EAST COVERS THE GOEGRAPHY, ECONOMY, POLITICS, AND CULTURE OF THE AREAS. IT ALSO DEALS WITH THE MAJOR HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN THE…

  7. The Implications of Selective Learning Models on Teaching Junior High School Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Roosevelt L.

    1978-01-01

    Providing practitioners with synopses, illustrations based on classroom experiences, and research findings, this article analyzes the learning models of Jean Piaget, Robert Gagne, Robert Karplus, David Ausubel, and Jerome Bruner in terms of the implications for teaching junior high school mathematics. (JC)

  8. The Use of Software in Academic Stream High School Mathematics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Simon; Fotou, Nikolaos; Monaghan, John

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on classroom observations of senior high school mathematics lessons with a focus on the use of digital technology. The observations were of teachers enrolled in an in-service course, Teaching Advanced Mathematics. The paper reports selected results and comments on: software that was observed to have been used; the use (or not)…

  9. Philosophical Questions about Teaching Philosophy: What's at Stake in High School Philosophy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    What is at stake in high school philosophy education, and why? Why is it a good idea to teach philosophy at this level? This essay seeks to address some issues that arose in revising the Ontario grade 12 philosophy curriculum documents, significant insights from philosophy teacher education, and some early results of recent research funded by the…

  10. Negotiating Ideologies about Teaching Writing in a High School English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Amy; Myers, Joy; Hester, Madison

    2014-01-01

    More research needs to examine how novice teachers successfully negotiate multiple ideologies with others in ways that allow them to construct preferred teaching identities. This qualitative study addressed that need by investigating how one high school English teacher negotiated contradictory ideologies related to writing instruction at her…

  11. High-School Chemistry Teaching through Environmentally Oriented Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandler, Daphna; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Blonder, Ron; Yayon, Malka; Hofstein, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Discussions held in the chemical education community have generated a variety of reports and recommendations for reforming the chemistry curriculum. The recommendations refer to teaching chemistry in the context of real-world issues. This has been suggested as a way to enhance students' motivation. It is suggested that real-world problems…

  12. MIT nuclear reactor laboratory high school teaching program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmez, I.

    1991-01-01

    For the last 6 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory's academic and scientific staff a have been conducting evening seminars for precollege science teachers, parents, and high school students from the New England area. These seminars, as outlined in this paper, are intended to give general information on nuclear technologies with specific emphasis on radiation physics, nuclear medicine, nuclear chemistry, and ongoing research activities at the MIT research reactor. The ultimate goal is to create interest or build on the already existing interest in science and technology by, for example, special student projects. Several small projects have already been completed ranging from environmental research to biological reactions with direct student involvement. Another outcome of these seminars was the change in attitudes of science teachers toward nuclear technology. Numerous letters have been received from the teachers and parents stating their previous lack of knowledge on the beneficial aspects of nuclear technologies and the subsequent inclusion of programs in their curriculum for educating students so that they may also develop a more positive attitude toward nuclear power

  13. ACS-Hach Programs: Supporting Excellence in High School Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Terri

    2009-05-01

    In January 2009, the ACS received a gift of approximately $33 million from the Hach Scientific Foundation, the largest gift in the society's 133-year history. The foundation's programs will be continued by the ACS and will complement pre-existing ACS resources that support high school chemistry teaching. Three activities serve as the pillars of the ACS-Hach programs—the High School Chemistry Grant Program, the Second Career Teacher Scholarship Program, and the Land Grant University Scholars Program. Collectively, the ACS-Hach programs support high school chemistry teaching and learning by responding to the needs of both in-service and pre-service secondary teachers. The goals of each of the ACS-Hach programs align well with the ACS Mission—to advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED ELECTROCHEMISTRY TEACHING MATERIAL BASED CONTEXTUAL FOR VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL IN MACHINE ENGINEERING DEPARTEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Widodo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry teaching at Vocational High School which tends to be theoretical and not directly connected to vocational lesson has caused students to have low interest, low motivation, and low achievement. The problem is becoming more complex due to limited time allotment and limited teaching materials. One of the efforts to solve the problem is by providing the relevant teaching material using contextual learning approach. The aims of this Research and Development (R&D research are: (1 to produce an appropriate chemistry teaching material on electrochemistry integrated with skill program subjects using Contextual approach for Vocational High School students of Machinery Engineering Department; (2 to know the feasibility of development result of teaching material. The development of the teaching material uses the 4D developmental model from Thiagarajan et al consisting of four phases namely Define, Design, Develop, and Desiminate. The dominate phase was not done. The scores of evaluation of the feasibility or the appropriateness of the product from the content expert are 88.75% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 91.25% (very feasible for the students’ book. The expert on media gave 89.25% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 89.9% (very feasible for the students’ book. The result of readability test shows that the teachers’ book is feasible (83.81% and the students’ book is very feasible (93.61%.

  15. Teachers’ Perceptions of the Problems faced in the Teaching of History in Senior High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Boadu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available History is an important school subject which conveys invaluable lessons from the past and whose worth transcends regional, national and cultural boundaries. Such a subject needs to be taught well in order to make learners gain deep appreciation of the relevance of their learning. However, effective teaching of history in Ghanaian schools has long been blighted by problems and challenges that have often gone unaddressed. With little empirical literature emerging from Ghana, this study, drawing on 32 history teachers from 18 senior high schools, examined history teachers’ perceptions of the problems faced in the teaching of history in the Cape Coast metropolis and Komenda, Edina, Eguafo, Abrim district in the Central Region of Ghana. The descriptive cross-sectional research design was used for the study and data were collected through questionnaires. The study found that overloaded syllabus, insufficient human and material resources, lack of support for the subject and large classes were the major problems facing the teaching of history. Based on the findings, the study concluded that the problems confronting the teaching of history in the two districts are administrative and pedagogical in nature. On this conclusion, it was recommended, among others, that syllabus content should be integrated to make it sync with the period given for its implementation. Also, the necessary resources should be provided to enhance the teaching of the subject.

  16. Professional development in person: identity and the construction of teaching within a high school science department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneroff, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    This is a narrative inquiry into the role of professional development in the construction of teaching practice by an exemplary urban high school science teacher. I collected data during 3 years of ethnographic participant observation in Marie Gonzalez's classroom. Marie told stories about her experiences in ten years of professional development focused on inquiry science teaching. I use a social practice theory lens to analyze my own stories as well as Marie's. I make the case that science teaching is best understood as mediated by socially-constructed identities rather than as the end-product of knowledge and beliefs. The cognitive paradigm for understanding teachers' professional learning fails to consistently produce transformations of teaching practice. In order to design professional development with science teachers that is generative of new knowledge, and is self-sustaining, we must understand how to build knowledge of how to problematize identities and consciously use social practice theory.

  17. Multiple Teaching Approaches, Teaching Sequence and Concept Retention in High School Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David

    2013-01-01

    Students in 4 Canadian high school physics classes completed instructional sequences in two key physics topics related to motion--Straight Line Motion and Newton's First Law. Different sequences of laboratory investigation, teacher explanation (lecture) and the use of computer-based scientific visualizations (animations and simulations) were…

  18. THE SYNERGISTIC SYLLABUS FOR TEACHING READING IN 32 TOURISM VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlis Qoidah Noor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The new Syllabus at 2013 Curriculum for vocational high school created many problems to apply in the class. Based on the Need Analysis, the writer develops a Synergistic Syllabus for teaching Reading in vocational high school. It contains the syllabus combined from Task- Based Learning, Situational Syllabus, Program of International Student Assessment ( PISA item test and Character Building. It is a R and D research uses three phases of Observation, Developing and Try Out. It is in a True Experimental Research. The main findings are Reading Skill cannot be taught effectively for some reasons. There is no appropriate syllabus for teaching Reading; most teachers need some models in a syllabus. The results are the Synergistic Syllabus for teaching Reading, a set of Reading Material for Teaching Reading and a set of the lesson plan for one semester at Grade X of Tourism VHS. It is measured through mean, median and t- Test. To Sum up Synergistic Syllabus can develop many aspects, the systematic and meaningful activities in the class, motivation and good attitude. The standardized item of assignment, and a sense of competition in Reading activities and the Synergistic Syllabus assist teachers in teaching Reading using 2013 curriculum in the class effectively.

  19. LEARN-TEACH: a pilot to boost Ocean Literacy in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Payne, Diana; Vogt, Bynna; Knappe, Charlotte; Riedel, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Raising the Ocean Literacy of all levels of society is now a policy priority for the European Commission. The long-term objective is better appreciation of the socio-economic benefits and ecosystem services that the marine environment provides, and encourage better stewardship of the seas. One long-term, and potentially self-sustainable, concept is to put sufficient mutual incentives in place so that researchers, teachers and students in high-schools science and mathematics classes accessorize school curricula with the latest marine research results and knowledge. Summary of preliminary teachers consultations at Copenhagen International School suggest that teachers are prepared and willing to include recent marine research, research data and knowledge in high school science classes and carry over the research data to mathematics/statistics classes and exercises. However the active participation of researchers is sought to provide guidance and translation of latest research findings, and point to real data sources. LEARN-TEACH Pilot`s main objective is to test a long-term scalable and locally applicable solution for engaging young people in marine environment issues and challenges. LEARN-TEACH sustainability of concept relies on mutual training and clear mutual incentives. For the teachers, it allows an opportunity to understand and inject recent research in the school curriculum in order to "increase the level of knowledge among the population of the marine environment". For the researchers, LEARN-TEACH is tailored as a tool for outreach and dissmination, as well as exposing young marine researchers to the challenges of translating and communicating research to non-academic audiences, and potentially an alternative career. The presentation will demonstrate how LEARN-TEACH can be embedded in every research grant in any EU region, and how it can add a competitive edge at research grant proposal evaluation. The content is based on the "Blue Schools" initiative of

  20. How to Develop the Emotional Factors of High School Students in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雅红

    2009-01-01

    The voice of "English education should achieve the emotional goals as well"has been getting higher and higher with the development of the times. In this paper, as the implementer of English courses, the author will explore the ways of how to develop the e-motional factors of high school students in English teaching, so as to achieve the purposes of the improvement of teaching efficiency and the promotion of students' all-round development in both aspects of physiology and psychology.

  1. TEACHER-STUDENTS DISCOURSE IN ENGLISH TEACHING AT HIGH SCHOOL (CLASSROOM DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamsyah Harahap

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available English classroom's process of teaching and learning is an important aspect of successful English teaching and learning. The analysis of classroom discourse is a very important form which the classroom process research has taken place. The present study focuses on SMA (high school English classroom discourse. The microethnography of Spradley was the research method deployed. Through a detailed description and analysis of the collected data referring to Sinclair and Coulthard’s classroom discourse analysis model, the problem of patterns of the classroom discourse is made clear. On the basis of the discourse patterns' problem found, a few strategies for high school English teachers are put forward through the teacher training in order to improve English teaching and learning at high school in Indonesia. The research results showed that teacher talk highly dominated the English classroom discourse; 94% of teacher-students talk. IRF Model of Sinclair and Coulthard was not found in the English classroom (only IF pattern and no lesson achieved.

  2. The implementation of integrated entrepreneurship material on dress making teaching in vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitri, Sicilia

    2018-03-01

    The aims of the research were: (1) To know the students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching by implementing Integrated Entrepreneur Material in Vocational High School, (2) The level of increasing of students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching by integrating Entrepreneurship Material in Vocational High School. By using experimental method this research was conducted in Magelang Vocational High School and applied pre-test post-test design. The samples in this research was XI grade of Fashion Technology Study Program. Observation sheet and documentation were used in this research as instruments. Data analyzed by using descriptive analyze and gain score. The result, there were: (1) students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching was high 88.6 and (2) the increasing of students' achievement was 0.61 it was medium category. The suggestion were: Integrated Entrepreneurship material can be applied in another subject matter, such as Men Wear, Tailoring, Children Wear, and The students who want to be a good entrepreneur, have to drill their skill in making dresses, and know about excellent service to the clients, marketing and make clients satisfaction.

  3. Teaching for Understanding and/or Teaching for the Examination in High School Physics. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelan, David; Wildy, Helen; Louden, William; Wallace, John

    2004-01-01

    Literature on the related notions of 'teaching for understanding' and 'exemplary teaching' tends to be interpreted as prescribing certain classroom approaches. These are usually the strategies often identified with constructivist teaching, which involve a redefinition of the teacher's role: rather than being seen as a source of knowledge and…

  4. Teacher Methods in Teaching Arabic: A Case Study of One Senior High School in Jambi City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Muspawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in one state senior high school in Jambi city aiming to get the whole picture about the methods of teachers in teaching Arabic vocabulary. We used a qualitative study with a case study approach. The participants of this research were teachers who taught Arabic vocabulary. The data were collected through interviews, documentation, and observation. The results showed that the methods used by the teachers in teaching Arabic vocabulary were mostly lecturing and demonstration. The obstacles faced by the teachers in Arabic vocabulary teaching were covered in several points namely, limited time allocation, teacher education background, infrastructure and lack of student interest in religious learning and expanding Arabic knowledge. We also presented the efforts by teachers to overcome the obstacles such as to motivate the students by telling them the importance of Arabic in international community as one of international students, to give practice tasks implementation, to sustainable evaluation and task.

  5. Epistemological foundation of the teaching-learning process of physics in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grethel Suárez-Stable

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper the principal fundaments of the teaching-learning process of the physics subject in the Senior High School are treated. The valuation of the conceptions more significant to this educational level that have signed the development of this process from an integrator researching approach taking into account the logical chain construction-integration-creation. The need of renew of the point of view regarding the teaching-learning of sciences in particular the physics, from power of the researching approach is discussed. Taking into account the development of the students though and the encourage toward a teaching learning based in new added values of the knowledge from the valuation of the significance of the experience, is analyzed in this paper

  6. The Journey of a Sandwich: Computer-Based Laboratory Experiments about the Human Digestive System in High School Biology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Andrej; Hajdinjak, Zdravka; Briski, Darko

    2008-01-01

    Teaching high school students about the digestive system can be a challenge for a teacher when s/he wants to overcome rote learning of facts without a deeper understanding of the physiological processes inside the alimentary tract. A series of model experiments illustrating the journey of a sandwich was introduced into teaching high school…

  7. Three Southern high school biology teachers' perspectives on teaching evolution: Sociocultural influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzer, Peggy Mckewen

    Organizations in science and science education call for students to have a thorough understanding of the theory of evolution. Yet many high school biology teachers do not teach evolution and/or include creationism in their instruction (National Academy of Science, 1998). Historically, the controversy surrounding evolution has created tension for teachers. This case study explored the sociocultural influences related to teaching evolution in three Southern 10th-grade public high school biology classrooms. It also explored the socially and culturally embedded influences on teachers' instructional goals and personal perspectives toward evolution as well as modification of instruction when evolution is taught. Theoretically framed using symbolic interactionism and sociocultural theory, data were collected between October 2003 and April 2004 and included classroom observations two to three times per week, artifacts, and in-depth interviews of the participating teachers, their science department chairpersons, their students, and a Protestant minister. The classroom teachers were unaware of the focus of the study until after evolution was taught. The analysis used in this study was an inductive, interpretative approach that allowed exploration of the sociocultural influences that affect how teachers teach evolution. The sociocultural influences and the lived experiences of each teacher created a continuum for teaching evolution. One of the participating teachers who was heavily involved in the community and one of its fundamentalist churches elected to avoid teaching evolution. Another participating teacher at the same school integrated the theory of evolution in every unit. The third teacher who taught in another school elected to teach evolution in a superficial manner to avoid conflict. The data revealed that the participating teachers' sociocultural situatedness influenced their decisions and instruction on evolution. The influence of strong religious beliefs within

  8. The Use of Telehealth to Teach Reproductive Health to Female Rural High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoost, Jennie Lee; Starcher, Rachael Whitley; King-Mallory, Rebecca Ann; Hussain, Nafeeza; Hensley, Christina Ann; Gress, Todd William

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the use of telehealth to teach reproductive health to rural areas with high rates of teen pregnancy. Prospective cohort study. Two high schools in rural West Virginia. High school female students who attended telehealth sessions. Teleconferencing equipment connected rural high schools to a distal academic institution. Telehealth sessions included reproductive health and life skills topics. Demographic information, session pre- and post-tests, and 6- month assessment was obtained. Reproductive health knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy were assessed at intervention and at 6 months, along with Likert scale evaluation of telehealth as an educational tool. Fifty-five students participated in the program with an average age of 16.14 (SD 1.24) years. Only 20% (10/50) of subjects' mothers and 12% (6/50) of subjects' fathers had achieved education beyond high school, and 20% (10/50) of subject's mothers had experienced teen pregnancies (age 18 or younger). Sexual activity was reported among 52% (26/50) of subjects, 4/50 (8%) reported desire to become pregnant within the next year, and 4/50 (8%) reported already pregnant. Thirty-seven students completed the 6-month follow-up survey. Reported condom use increased from 20% (10/50) at baseline to 40% (15/37) at 6 months (P = .04) and hormonal contraception use increased from 22% (11/50) to 38% (14/37) (P = .12). Report of human papillomavirus vaccination increased from 38% (10/26) to 70% (26/37) (P = .001) among all subjects. At 6 months, 91.8% (34/37) reported the use of telehealth was "very effective" as a means to teach the material. Telehealth is an effective tool to teach reproductive health to rural areas. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Case Study of the In-Class Use of a Video Game for Teaching High School History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William R.; Mong, Christopher J.; Harris, Constance A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the case of a sophomore high school history class where "Making History", a video game designed with educational purposes in mind, is used in the classroom to teach about World War II. Data was gathered using observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis. The high school was a rural school…

  10. Science teachers' beliefs about teaching and reform: Case studies from a restructured high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth A.

    A qualitative research study of the beliefs of three science teachers about teaching and educational reform was carried out at a restructured high school belonging to the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES), a nationally prominent restructuring movement. One problem of educational reform is to sustain change in the science classroom. A new wave of reform is shifting the focus away from curriculum changes and towards professionalism of teachers empowered to restructure schools. The beliefs of the teachers are key to decisions made in the classroom. The teachers and staff of Metro High School adopted the Ten Common Principles of CES as their guide to restructuring and sustaining change. Changes included increased authority for teachers in shared decision making, increased staff time for professional development, grouping students heterogeneously, grouping students and faculty in teams for extended time periods, and organizing instruction around small group and individual student study (student-centered). The theoretical framework centers on the constructivist theory of learning, particularly Vygotsky's socio-cultural model, and Bakhtin's dialogic function of language. Nespor's belief system model was used to describe the four characteristic features of beliefs: episodic memories, alternativity, existential presumption, and evaluative loading. My research questions were: What memories of teaching have influenced the teachers? What are the teachers' beliefs about the learning environment? What are the teachers' beliefs about their students? What are the teachers' beliefs about student activities? Interviews were the primary data source for the case studies of the three teachers, with additional data from lesson plans, photo-voice, and other artifacts. The teachers shared many common beliefs including that strong peer support is necessary for reform. The teachers' beliefs allied themselves to the majority of the common principles of CES, especially personalization and

  11. Initial Awareness as Perceived by a Group of Senior Students Majoring in High School Teaching in regards to their Own Teaching Process Focused on Assessment Activities

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    Gerardo Ignacio Sánchez-Sánchez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Developed in a regional campus of a university located 200 miles south of Santiago de Chile, the research showed the initial awareness of 50 senior students majoring in three High School Teaching Training Programs: Spanish Language; History; and Math, in regards to their own teaching process The qualitative approach used in this research is supported by the grounded theory. The critical incident technique was used to obtain the information about the individuals mentioned above, after their first period as in-practice High School teachers. Results show that the assessment teaching functions are mostly mentioned as essential to improve their teaching activities focused on the learning process of high school students. However, Teacher Training Programs should also emphasize real challenges and the abilities that a teacher must successfully develop during the process, instead of mainly focusing on measurement instruments and theoretical outlines

  12. Brazilian actions to promote physiology learning and teaching in secondary and high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; Granjeiro, Érica Maria; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Rocha, Maria José Alves

    2016-06-01

    Members of the Education Committee of the Brazilian Society of Physiology have developed multiple outreach models to improve the appreciation of science and physiology at the precollege level. The members of this committee act in concert with important Brazilian governmental strategies to promote training of undergraduate students in the teaching environment of secondary and high schools. One of these governmental strategies, the Programa Institucional de Bolsas de Iniciação à Docência, a Brazilian public policy of teaching enhancement implemented by the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) since 2007, represents a well-articulated public policy that can promote the partnership between University and Schools (7). Furthermore, the Program "Novos Talentos" (New Talents)/CAPES/Ministry of Education is another government initiative to bring together university and high-level technical training with the reality of Brazilian schools. Linked to the New Talents Program, in partnership with the British Council/Newton Fund, CAPES recently promoted the visit of some university professors that coordinate New Talents projects to formal and informal educational science spaces in the United Kingdom (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Brazil-United Kingdom International Cooperation Program) to qualify the actions developed in this area in Brazil, and one of us had the opportunity to participate with this. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  13. TEACHERS’ AND STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF MOTIVATIONAL TEACHING STRATEGIES IN AN INDONESIAN HIGH SCHOOL CONTEXT

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    Sri Puji Astuti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this multiple case study is to explore teachers’ and learners’ perceptions of motivational teaching strategies. The data were obtained from two schools in a small town in West Sumatra, Indonesia; one is from an international standard high school and the other is from a local high school. This study is underpinned by Dornyei's (2001 work on motivational teaching practice which consists of four phases on how a teacher motivates students in a language learning classroom, namely: creating motivational components, generating students’ motivation, maintaining motivation, and encouraging positive retrospective self-evaluation. This qualitative case study is intended to contextualise the research within the real life environment of an Indonesian secondary class- room (Yin, 2003. The findings indicate that there are two groups of motivational components. The first is the teachers’ rapport with students, including the encouragement given to students and the building of trust and respect with the students. The second relates to the teachers’ planning decisions such as the selection of classroom activities, the way feedback is given, the management of the classroom, and the choice of learning resources.

  14. Crossing borders: High school science teachers learning to teach the specialized language of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Jennifer Drake

    The highly specialized language of science is both challenging and alienating to adolescent readers. This study investigated how secondary science teachers learn to teach the specialized language of science in their classrooms. Three research questions guided this study: (a) what do science teachers know about teaching reading in science? (b) what understanding about the unique language demands of science reading do they construct through professional development? and (c) how do they integrate what they have learned about these specialized features of science language into their teaching practices? This study investigated the experience of seven secondary science teachers as they participated in a professional development program designed to teach them about the specialized language of science. Data sources included participant interviews, audio-taped professional development sessions, field notes from classroom observations, and a prior knowledge survey. Results from this study suggest that science teachers (a) were excited to learn about disciplinary reading practices, (b) developed an emergent awareness of the specialized features of science language and the various genres of science writing, and (c) recognized that the challenges of science reading goes beyond vocabulary. These teachers' efforts to understand and address the language of science in their teaching practices were undermined by their lack of basic knowledge of grammar, availability of time and resources, their prior knowledge and experiences, existing curriculum, and school structure. This study contributes to our understanding of how secondary science teachers learn about disciplinary literacy and apply that knowledge in their classroom instruction. It has important implications for literacy educators and science educators who are interested in using language and literacy practices in the service of science teaching and learning. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University

  15. Teaching Basic Life Support to Students of Public and Private High Schools

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    José Maria Gonçalves Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being recommended as a compulsory part of the school curriculum, the teaching of basic life support (BLS has yet to be implemented in high schools in most countries.Objectives:To compare prior knowledge and degree of immediate and delayed learning between students of one public and one private high school after these students received BLS training.Methods:Thirty students from each school initially answered a questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and use of the automated external defibrillator (AED. They then received theoretical-practical BLS training, after which they were given two theory assessments: one immediately after the course and the other six months later.Results:The overall success rates in the prior, immediate, and delayed assessments were significantly different between groups, with better performance shown overall by private school students than by public school students: 42% ± 14% vs. 30.2% ± 12.2%, p = 0.001; 86% ± 7.8% vs. 62.4% ± 19.6%, p < 0.001; and 65% ± 12.4% vs. 45.6% ± 16%, p < 0.001, respectively. The total odds ratio of the questions showed that the private school students performed the best on all three assessments, respectively: 1.66 (CI95% 1.26-2.18, p < 0.001; 3.56 (CI95% 2.57-4.93, p < 0.001; and 2.21 (CI95% 1.69-2.89, p < 0.001.Conclusions:Before training, most students had insufficient knowledge about CPR and AED; after BLS training a significant immediate and delayed improvement in learning was observed in students, especially in private school students.

  16. High school peer tutors teach MedlinePlus: a model for Hispanic outreach*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Debra G.; Olney, Cynthia A.; Wood, Fred B.; Hansen, Lucille; Bowden, Virginia M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to introduce the MedlinePlus Website to the predominantly Hispanic residents of the Lower Rio Grande Valley region of Texas by partnering with a health professions magnet high school (known as Med High). Methods: Community assessment was used in the planning stages and included pre-project focus groups with students and teachers. Outreach methods included peer tutor selection, train-the-trainer sessions, school and community outreach, and pre- and posttests of MedlinePlus training sessions. Evaluation methods included Web statistics; end-of-project interviews; focus groups with students, faculty, and librarians; and end-of-project surveys of students and faculty. Results: Four peer tutors reached more than 2,000 people during the project year. Students and faculty found MedlinePlus to be a useful resource. Faculty and librarians developed new or revised teaching methods incorporating MedlinePlus. The project enhanced the role of school librarians as agents of change at Med High. The project continues on a self-sustaining basis. Conclusions: Using peer tutors is an effective way to educate high school students about health information resources and, through the students, to reach families and community members. PMID:15858628

  17. Game Based Learning as a Means to Teach Climate Literacy in a High School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, M. K.; Tedesco, L.; Katz, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    As part of RPI's GK-12 graduate fellowship program (which involves graduate STEM fellows in K-12 education) a climate change board game activity was developed and implemented at inner city Troy High School in Troy, New York. The goal was to engage and teach two classes of the Earth Science General Repeat (GR) tenth grade students about climate change through a game-based leaning module. Students placed in the GR course had previously failed Earth Science, and had never passed a general science class in high school. In the past, these students have responded positively to hands-on activities. Therefore, an interactive board game activity was created to teach students about climate, explore how humans impact our environment, and address the future of climate change. The students are presented with a draft version of the game, created by the graduate fellow, and are asked to redesign the game for their peers in the other GR class. The students' version of the game is required to include certain aspects of the original game, for example, the climate change Trivia and Roadblock cards, but the design, addition of rules and overall layout are left to the students. The game-based learning technique allows the students to learn through a storyline, compete against each other, and challenge themselves to perfect their learning and understanding of climate change. The climate change board game activity also incorporates our cascade learning model, in which the graduate fellow designs the activity, works with a high school teacher, and implements the game with high school students. In addition, the activity emphasizes peer-to-peer learning, allowing each classroom to design the game for a different group of students. This allows the students to take leadership and gives them a sense of accomplishment with the completed board game. The nature of a board game also creates a dynamic competitive atmosphere, in which the students want to learn and understand the material to succeed

  18. Reflections on Teaching and Learning the Arts: A Middle-Grade Classroom and a High School for the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Rosemary; Brown, Tina Boyer

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary Barilla, a middle-grade language arts teacher, inspired by her own dedication to the arts, describes the ways she integrates the fine arts into her classroom program that is designed to teach reading and writing. Tina Boyer Brown, a founding teacher at The Chicago High School for the Arts (ChiArts®), describes the school as a place where…

  19. Expanding Knowledge Gaps: The Function of Fictions in Teaching Materials after the 2011 Swedish High School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeske, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The aim in the study is to analyze how work with fiction is organized in six textbooks for senior high school in Sweden after the school reform 2011. Research into Swedish teaching materials has been neglected in recent years and there is a knowledge gap about how the work with fictions is affected by the reform in 2011. In the study quantitative…

  20. Perceptions of High School Biology Teachers in Christian Schools on Relationships between Religious Beliefs and Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangahas, Ana Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed method study explored Christian teachers' beliefs in religious schools on evolution, their attitudes toward evolution, and their perceptions on the effect of those beliefs on the teaching of evolutionary content. Teachers (N = 52) from Association for Christian Schools International (ACSI) accredited schools in California and Hawaii…

  1. Communication: Guidelines for Teaching Business Correspondence in the High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Hilda F.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents guidelines for teaching secondary school students how to write better business letters, including basic skills, styles and formats of letters, and current trends in business correspondence. (MF)

  2. Teaching through mobile technology : a reflection from high school studies in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jantjies, Mmaki; Joy, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The use of mobile technology to support teaching and learning in schools, has extended technology learning tools in schools across different socio economic divides. There have been various studies throughout the world which reflect the improvement of such technology in schools. In this chapter we reflect on a series of studies conducted in developing countries with focus on Jantjies and Joy (2012,2013,2014,2015) studies. The studies were conducted in schools with the objective of providing te...

  3. Team Teaching School Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanko, John G.; Rogina, Raymond P.

    2005-01-01

    Graduate students preparing themselves for a career in school administration are typically apprehensive about the legal issues they will face in their first administrative position. After teaching school law for the first time, the author believed that there had to be a more effective way to reach these students rather than the traditional methods…

  4. STAD AS A STRATEGY OF TEACHING READING COMPREHENSION IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

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    Fitri Ferina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated whether there was a significant difference on students’ achievement in reading comprehension taught using STAD and lecture method. The sample was the eighth-graders of SMPN 3 Banjarmasin. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this research. The experimental group was taught using STAD while control group was taught using lecture method. A reading comprehension test as the instrument of collecting data was administered for both groups. Based on the research result using t-test, it was found that the t value was higher than t-table (2.39315 > 2.00 which means that there is a significant difference of achievement between the experimental group and control group. From these findings it can be interpreted that the use of STAD is more effective than lecture method in teaching reading comprehension for junior high school students. It is suggested for English teachers in Junior High School to use STAD in teaching reading since it is useful in improving students’ reading comprehension achievement.

  5. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  6. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING (CLT TO TEACH SPOKEN RECOUNTS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

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    Eri Rusnawati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menggambarkan penerapan metode Communicative Language Teaching/CLT untuk pembelajaran spoken recount. Penelitian ini menelaah data yang kualitatif. Penelitian ini mengambarkan fenomena yang terjadi di dalam kelas. Data studi ini adalah perilaku dan respon para siswa dalam pembelajaran spoken recount dengan menggunakan metode CLT. Subjek penelitian ini adalah para siswa kelas X SMA Negeri 1 Kuaro yang terdiri dari 34 siswa. Observasi dan wawancara dilakukan dalam rangka untuk mengumpulkan data dalam mengajarkan spoken recount melalui tiga aktivitas (presentasi, bermain-peran, serta melakukan prosedur. Dalam penelitian ini ditemukan beberapa hal antara lain bahwa CLT meningkatkan kemampuan berbicara siswa dalam pembelajaran recount. Berdasarkan pada grafik peningkatan, disimpulkan bahwa tata bahasa, kosakata, pengucapan, kefasihan, serta performa siswa mengalami peningkatan. Ini berarti bahwa performa spoken recount dari para siswa meningkat. Andaikata presentasi ditempatkan di bagian akhir dari langkah-langkah aktivitas, peforma spoken recount para siswa bahkan akan lebih baik lagi. Kesimpulannya adalah bahwa implementasi metode CLT beserta tiga praktiknya berkontribusi pada peningkatan kemampuan berbicara para siswa dalam pembelajaran recount dan bahkan metode CLT mengarahkan mereka untuk memiliki keberanian dalam mengonstruksi komunikasi yang bermakna dengan percaya diri. Kata kunci: Communicative Language Teaching (CLT, recount, berbicara, respon siswa

  7. Let's Poem: The Essential Guide to Teaching Poetry in a High-Stakes, Multimodal World (Middle through High School). Language & Literacy Practitioners Bookshelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This cutting-edge guide presents multiple approaches to teaching poetry at the middle and high school levels. The author provides field-tested activities with detailed how-to instructions, as well as advice for how educators can "justify" their teaching within a high-stakes curriculum environment. "Let's Poem" will show pre- and inservice teachers…

  8. Ionic Liquids as a Basis Context for Developing High school Chemistry Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernani; Mudzakir, A.; Sumarna, O.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to produce a map of connectedness highschool chemical content with the context of the modern chemical materials applications based on ionic liquids. The research method is content analysis of journal articles related to the ionic liquid materials and the textbooks of high school chemistry and textbooks of general chemistry at the university. The instrument used is the development format of basic text that connect and combine content and context. The results showed the connectedness between: (1) the context lubricants ionic liquid with the content of ionic bonding, covalent bonding, metal bonding, interaction between the particles of matter, the elements of main group, the elements of transition group, and the classification of macromolecules; (2) the context of fuel cell electrolite with the content of ionic bonding, covalent bonding, metal bonding, interaction between the particles of matter, Volta cell, and electrolysis cell; (3) the contect of nanocellulose with the content of ionic bonding, covalent bonding, metal bonding, interaction between the particles of matter, colloid, carbon compound, and the classification of macromolecules; and (4) the context of artificial muscle system with the content of ionic bond, covalent bond, metal bonding, interaction between the particles of matter, hydrocarbons, electrolytes and non-electrolytes, and the classification of macromolecules. Based on the result of this content analysis, the context of ionic liquid is predicted can be utilized for the enrichment of high school chemistry and has the potential to become teaching material’s context of high school chemistry in the future.

  9. Implementing A Flipped Classroom: A Case Study of Biology Teaching in A Greek High School

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    Angeliki GARIOU-PAPALEXIOU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of the model of the “flipped classroom” as a complementary method to school distance education in junior high school Biology. The “flipped classroom” model attempts a different way of organizing the educational process according to which the traditional methods of learning at school and studying at home are interchanged, the learners’ active involvement is supported, their autonomy is reinforced, ICT is utilized and learning occurs partially by distance (blended learning. We performed an action research implementing flipped classroom in Biology teaching in a class of 17 students attending the1st year of junior high school. The educational platform used was the Learning Activity Management System (LAMS. The findings were evaluated qualitative rather than quantitative, and can provide evidence about the prevailing situation. During the action research, it became evident that time management in the classroom was improved. Furthermore, it was observed that students’ involvement in the educational process was also improved. Students had already familiarized themselves with the cognitive aspect of the lesson before entering the class and they considered the learning process as an individual affair which does not only depend on the teacher. The implementation of digital activities accomplished by distance led to taking action and initiative and finally to active learning. School distance education combined with the radical development of ICT can be complementary with the use of various methods, like the “flipped learning”, and give a new perspective and potential to the limited choices of conventional education in the Greek educational system which is worth further investigation.

  10. An Investigation of the Practice of Effective Teaching Strategies in Three Islamic Senior High Schools in South Jakarta

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    Lia Aida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some research has argued that effective teachers significantly influence students’ performance. However, becoming effective teachers are not easy because they have to apply some strategies of effective teaching. For that reason, this paper intends to investigate whether  teachers from three Islamic Senior High Schools in South Jakarta practice effective teaching strategies. These schools have been considered good due to  the high mean score of English subject in Ujian Nasional. The framework of effective teaching follows the model developed by Creemers and Kyriakides, which relate teacher behavior in the classroom and student achievement . The framework consists of orientation, structuring, questioning, teaching modeling, applications, teacher role in making classroom a learning environment, management of time, and classroom assessment.

  11. The teach-learning process of high school students: a case of Educational Biology for teachers formation

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Laporta Chudo; Maria Cecília Sonzogno

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the teach-learning process of high school students, in the scope of Educational Biology. To plan and to develop a methodology with lesson strategies that facilitate the learning. To analyze, in the students vision, the positive and negative points in the process. Method. A research was developed -- of which had participated students of the first semester of the Pedagogy of a high school private institution in São Paulo city -- of the type action-research, with increased ...

  12. English Language Teaching Through Literature : An Application of English Poetry in the High School English Textbook to the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    濵口, 脩

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this present paper is to review the present state of English poetry in the high school English textbooks in Japan and to propose some practical application of English poems to the English language classroom. Several cases in which English poems are found in actual English high school textbooks are discussed, and then, since there seems to be no explanation of teaching English poems, with some notes of them and of reading English poems in general, some practical suggetions for impro...

  13. Reflections on implementing several models of teaching in a high school biology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Michael E.

    This research investigates the challenges faced in enacting instructional models that previous research has found to foster student learning. In order to complete this study, the researcher documented, through a strategy of reflective practice, his return to teaching high school science after having served for a time as a science specialist and instructional coach. The study develops quality personal insights and questions that may be used by other educators and researchers to investigate the enactment of these different models and strategies. The research is limited to the spring of the 2010 school year and use notes, journals, and planner documents from the 2008--2009 school year. In order to appreciate complex interactions, triangulation was made through dovetailing personal observations with requested observations of the campus assistant principal, the district science specialist, and an out of district observer. Also, a short questionnaire administered to the students in these classes. Throughout this study, the researcher demonstrates that it is feasible to use these models. However, such external factors as imposed curriculum and standardized testing play a large role in everyday decision making of this particular teacher. The sheer amount of content to be covered under the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) also influenced instructional decisions that were made. Choices about what strategy to use resided mainly within the teacher/researcher and were governed and affected mostly by his interactions with students and professional judgments about what would both bolster student understanding and help students score well on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS).

  14. Developing geogebra-assisted reciprocal teaching strategy to improve junior high school students’ abstraction ability, lateral thinking and mathematical persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priatna, N.; Martadiputra, B. A. P.; Wibisono, Y.

    2018-05-01

    The development of science and technology requires reform in the utilization of various resources for mathematics teaching and learning process. One of the efforts that can be made is the implementation of GeoGebra-assisted Reciprocal Teaching strategy in mathematics instruction as an effective strategy in improving students’ cognitive, affective, and psychomotor abilities. This research is intended to implement GeoGebra-assisted Reciprocal Teaching strategy in improving abstraction ability, lateral thinking, and mathematical persistence of junior high school students. It employed quasi-experimental method with non-random pre-test and post-test control design. More specifically, it used the 2x3 factorial design, namely the learning factors that included GeoGebra-assisted Reciprocal Teaching and conventional teaching learning, and levels of early mathematical ability (high, middle, and low). The subjects in this research were the eighth grade students of junior high school, taken with purposive sampling. The results of this research show: Abstraction and lateral abilities of students who were taught with GeoGebra-assisted Reciprocal Teaching strategy were significantly higher than those of students who received conventional learning. Mathematical persistence of students taught with GeoGebra-assisted Reciprocal Teaching strategy was also significantly higher than of those taught with conventional learning.

  15. An examination of the perceived teaching competencies of novice alternatively licensed and traditionally licensed high school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kathleen A.

    In most states, there are two routes to teacher licensure; traditional and alternative. The alternative route provides an accelerated entry into the classroom, often without the individual engaging in education coursework or a practicum. No matter the route, teaching skills continue to be learned by novice teachers while in the classroom with the guidance of a school-based mentor. In this study, the perceptions of mentor teachers of traditionally and alternatively licensed high school science teachers were compared with respect to mentees' science teaching competency. Further, the study explored the novice teachers' self-perception of their teaching competency. A survey, consisting of 56 Likert-type questions, was completed by mentors (N = 79) and novice high school science teachers (N = 83) in six northeastern states. The results revealed a statistically significant difference in the perceptions of the mentors of traditionally and alternatively licensed novice high school science teachers in the areas of general pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional growth, with more favorable perceptions recorded by mentors of traditionally licensed science teachers. There were no differences in the perceptions of the mentors with respect to novice high school teachers' content knowledge. There was no statistical difference in the self-perceptions of competency of the novice teachers. While alternative routes to licensure in science may be a necessity, the results of this study indicate that the lack of professional preparation may need to be addressed at the school level through the agency of the mentor. This study indicates that mentors must be prepared to provide alternatively licensed novice teachers with different assistance to that given to traditionally licensed novice teachers. School districts are urged to develop mentoring programs designed to develop the teaching competency of all novice teachers regardless of the route that led them

  16. Using cogenerative dialogue to afford the teaching and learning of biology in an urban high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otulaja, Femi Segun

    The body of research work presented in this dissertation integrates critical ethnography with video and conversation analyses in order to provide ways to articulate and understand the complexities associated with social life enactment as it unfolds during cogenerative dialogues and in the science classroom as the teacher and her students engage in science teaching and learning. The primary goal is to improve the teaching and learning of science in an urban science classroom at a public high school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In order to understand what is going on in the classroom and why, I worked with a female science teacher who identify as an African-American and her culturally diversified students in a biology class to examine teacher's and students' conscious and unconscious patterned actions, (i.e., classroom practices, that structure teaching and learning in the classroom. It is my belief that to improve science teaching and learning in the classroom, it is salient to improve science teacher's practices as a precursor to transforming students' practices. In order to ameliorate breaches in the fluency of encounters in the classroom, the teacher and her students need to establish and sustain critical, collaborative and collective conversations through cogen. I employ theoretical lenses of cultural sociology that I triangulate with sociology of emotions and critical pedagogy. I focus on culture as schemas and associated practices layered with the triple dialectics of agency, passivity and structure as new or hybridized/interstitial cultures that are produced get enacted in the science classroom to transform teacher's and her students' encounters with each other. The salient implication is that since encounters are imbued with emotions, teacher and her students learn to generate positive emotional energy during cogen that gets reproduced and transformed in the science classroom. Positive emotional energy creates resources that help to initiate and sustain

  17. Navigating emotions and identity: Learning to teach science in a high needs school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Karen J.

    As student populations in the United States become more diverse, teacher education programs are challenged to find innovative and effective ways to prepare teachers for the twenty-first century. However, the goal of "science for all" continues to elude many students in urban and high needs settings where science achievement gaps persist, teacher turnover is high, and novice teachers are often hired to fill those vacancies. Researchers have examined teachers' beliefs, attitudes, practices, as well as content and pedagogical knowledge and made progressive strides in illuminating the complexities of urban classrooms and how we can better prepare teachers for these settings. However, only recently have we begun to venture into the affective areas of teaching to investigate how these areas of human nature interact to influence instruction. This research follows three preservice teachers placed in a high needs school during their student teaching semester. In this case, a high need is described as a school with more than 30% of the students who meet the poverty criteria under section 1113(a)(f) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. This case study explored the connections between preservice teachers' emotions, identity and the implementation of student-centered science instruction during the participants' student teaching experience. Data collection included observations, interviews, and physical artifacts. The interviews included the Teachers' Pedagogical Philosophy Interview (Richardson & Simmons, 1994) and the Meta-Emotions Interview (Gottman, Katz & Hooven, 1997) as well as general interview questions that illuminated the participants' views on teaching, their emotions, life history and identity. Multiple naturalistic observations were used to describe the interactions between the preservice teachers and the students during the implementation of student-centered lessons. Physical artifacts included weekly journals and lesson plans. These artifacts

  18. Mexican high school students' social representations of mathematics, its teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sierra, Gustavo; Miranda-Tirado, Marisa

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports a qualitative research that identifies Mexican high school students' social representations of mathematics. For this purpose, the social representations of 'mathematics', 'learning mathematics' and 'teaching mathematics' were identified in a group of 50 students. Focus group interviews were carried out in order to obtain the data. The constant comparative style was the strategy used for the data analysis because it allowed the categories to emerge from the data. The students' social representations are: (A) Mathematics is…(1) important for daily life, (2) important for careers and for life, (3) important because it is in everything that surrounds us, (4) a way to solve problems of daily life, (5) calculations and operations with numbers, (6) complex and difficult, (7) exact and (6) a subject that develops thinking skills; (B) To learn mathematics is…(1) to possess knowledge to solve problems, (2) to be able to solve everyday problems, (3) to be able to make calculations and operations, and (4) to think logically to be able to solve problems; and (C) To teach mathematics is…(1) to transmit knowledge, (2) to know to share it, (3) to transmit the reasoning ability, and (4) to show how to solve problems.

  19. Who Teaches High School Physics? Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2014-01-01

    During the 2012-13 academic year, the authors collected data from a representative national sample of over 3,500 public and private high schools across the U.S. to inquire about physics availabilities and offerings. This report describes their findings.

  20. Assessment of the Policy Guidelines for the Teaching and Learning of Geography at the Senior High School Level in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababio, Bethel T.; Dumba, Hillary

    2014-01-01

    This article empirically assessed the extent to which geography teachers adhered to the Ghana Education Service policy guidelines on the teaching of geography at the Senior High School Level in Ghana. Census survey was used to collect data from seven geography teachers because of the researchers' objective of gaining a quick insight into the…

  1. Crossing Boundaries: Exploring Black Middle and Upper Class Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in High Poverty Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrea D.

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this study was to explore the perceptions of Black middle and upper class preservice teachers as they relate to teaching and learning in high poverty urban schools. Participants included 11 senior early childhood education preservice teachers at a historically Black college in the southeast region of the United States. The study was…

  2. Employing Microsoft Live@edu Cloud Platform to Assist in Teaching Chinese Reading for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ru-Chu; Cho, Chia-Liang; Tsai, Chih-Cheng; Lou, Shi-Jer

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate junior high school students' learning attitudes and learning effectiveness through administering Microsoft Live@edu to assist in teaching Chinese reading. Quasi-experimental approach was used and a total of 63 eighth grade students were divided into the experimental group (N = 32) and control group (N = 31).…

  3. Korean American Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of Teaching Profession in Multicultural Urban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonjung

    2018-01-01

    This study explores two Korean American social studies teachers' perceptions and experiences of the teaching profession in multicultural, urban public high schools. Drawing upon critical race theory (CRT) and its interconnection to the model minority myth, the most dominant form of racism against Asians as theoretical underpinnings, this study…

  4. Ionizing Radiation Measurements Using Low Cost Instruments for Teaching in College or High-School in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Vilela, D. C.; Migoto, V. G.; Gomes, M. P.; Martin, I. M.; Germano, J. S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation one of modern physics experimental teaching in colleges and high school can be easily implemented today due to low coasts of detectors and also electronic circuits and data acquisition interfaces. First it is interesting to show to young's students what is ionizing radiation and from where they appears near ground level? How it…

  5. A Teaching-Learning Sequence for the Special Relativity Theory at High School Level Historically and Epistemologically Contextualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriassecq, Irene; Greca, Ileana Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses some topics that stem from recent contributions made by the History, the Philosophy, and the Didactics of Science. We consider these topics relevant to the introduction of the Special Relativity Theory (SRT) in high school within a contextualized approach. We offer an outline of a teaching-learning sequence dealing with the…

  6. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  7. IYPT problems teach high school students about teamwork and the scientific method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanski, K.; Klishin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory work is often STEM students' primary exposure to key creative and communicative skills in the sciences, including experimental design, trouble shooting, team work, and oral presentations. The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) teaches these skills by inviting high school students to investigate simple unsolved systems instead of reproducing familiar results. Students work in teams to form hypotheses, gather data, and present their results orally in a tournament format. The IYPT has published 17 questions yearly since 1988, and its archives are an efficient source of experimental problems for outreach programs and have also been used for first-year undergraduate project classes (Planisic, 2009). We present insights and outcomes from two schools in which we introduced a new extracurricular program based on the IYPT model. Twenty-four students worked in small teams for three hours per day for six weeks. Surprisingly, most teams chose problems in unfamiliar subject areas such as fluid dynamics, and tailored their approaches to take advantage of individual skills including soldering, photography, and theoretical analysis. As the program progressed, students developed an increasingly intuitive understanding of the scientific method. They began to discuss the repeatability of their experiments without prompting, and were increasingly willing to describe alternative hypotheses.

  8. A cross-sectional study of biotechnology awareness and teaching in European high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschuren, Hervé; Heinzmann, Dominik; Faso, Carmen; Stupak, Martin; Arga, Kazim Yalçin; Hoerzer, Helen; Laizet, Yech'an; Leduchowska, Paulina; Silva, Nádia; Simková, Klára

    2010-12-31

    Undoubtedly, biotechnology has a tremendous impact on our daily lives. As a result of this and in parallel to the advancement of knowledge in this field of applied research, consumer awareness of the potential benefits and risks of this technology has steadily increased, leading to a thorough investigation of the public perception of biotechnology in the past years. Indeed, it has become clear that it is in the general interest of science and especially of applied research to inform the public of its advances. A promising next step is to strengthen biotechnology communication in scholastic institutions. In this paper, we investigate the perception of biotechnology in a specific target group, namely high-school students in the 16-20-year-old age range. We conducted a questionnaire-based survey on a total of 1410 students in six European countries to investigate students' perception, concern, scientific knowledge, and awareness. Our data revealed some unexpected patterns of acceptance and concern about biotechnology. Knowledge analysis indicated that pupils lack specific knowledge about biotechnological applications and their interest in biotechnology appeared to be linked to knowledge. Analysis of specific questions about teaching practices at schools suggests that a better targeted choice in media as vehicles for information together with selected speakers could be instrumental in increasing students' interest in science and more specifically in biotechnology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High Schools, Race, and America's Future: What Students Can Teach Us about Morality, Diversity, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    In "High Schools, Race, and America's Future", Lawrence Blum offers a lively account of a rigorous high school course on race and racism. Set in a racially, ethnically, and economically diverse high school, the book chronicles students' engagement with one another, with a rich and challenging academic curriculum, and with questions that relate…

  10. An Investigation of High School Social Studies Teachers' Understandings of Vocabulary Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Janis; Antuna, Marcos; Juarez, Lucinda; Wood, Karen D.; Vintinner, Jean

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on high school social studies teachers' understandings of and perspectives about vocabulary acquisition and instruction. The research questions were the following: (1) What do high school social studies teachers understand about vocabulary instruction? and (2) How do high school social studies teachers support…

  11. Using constructivist teaching strategies in high school science classrooms to cultivate positive attitudes toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Lory Elen

    This study investigated the premise that the use of constructivist teaching strategies (independent variable) in high school science classrooms can cultivate positive attitudes toward science (dependent variable) in high school students. Data regarding the relationship between the use of constructivist strategies and change in student attitude toward science were collected using the Science Attitude Assessment Tool (SAAT) (Heron & Beauchamp, 1996). The format of this study used the pre-test, post-test, control group-experimental group design. The subjects in the study were high school students enrolled in biology, chemistry, or environmental science courses in two high schools in the western United States. Ten teachers and twenty-eight classes, involving a total of 249 students participated in the study. Six experimental group teachers and four control group teachers were each observed an average of six times using the Science Observation Guide (Chapman, 1995) to measure the frequency of observed constructivist behaviors. The mean for the control group teachers was 12.89 and the mean for experimental group teachers was 20.67; F(1, 8) = 16.2, p =.004, revealing teaching behaviors differed significantly between the two groups. After a four month experimental period, the pre-test and post-test SAAT scores were analyzed. Students received a score for their difference in positive attitude toward science. The null hypothesis stating there would be no change in attitude toward science as a subject, between students exposed to constructivist strategies, and students not exposed to constructivist strategies was rejected F(1, 247) = 8.04, p =.005. The control group had a generally higher reported grade in their last science class than the experimental group, yet the control group attitude toward science became more negative (-1.18) while attitude toward science in the experimental group became more positive (+1.34) after the four-month period. An analysis of positive

  12. Teaching science to English Language Learners: Instructional approaches of high school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Betty-Vinca N.

    Students who are English Language Learners (ELLs) form the fastest growing segment of the American school population. Prompted by the call for scientific literacy for all citizens, science educators too have investigated the intersection of language and science instruction of ELLs. However these studies have typically been conducted with elementary students. Few studies have explored how high school science teachers, particularly those who have not received any special training, approach science instruction of ELLs and what supports them in this endeavor. This was a qualitative case study conducted with five science teachers in one small urban high school that predominantly served ELLs. The purpose of this study was to examine instructional approaches used by teachers to make science accessible to ELLs and the factors that supported or inhibited them in developing their instructional approaches. This goal encompassed the following questions: (a) how teachers viewed science instruction of ELLs, (b) how teachers designed a responsive program to teach science to ELLs, (c) what approaches teachers used for curriculum development and instruction, (d) how teachers developed classroom learning communities to meet the needs of ELLs. Seven instructional strategies and five perceived sources of support emerged as findings of this research. In summary, teachers believed that they needed to make science more accessible for their ELL students while promoting their literacy skills. Teachers provided individualized attention to students to provide relevant support. Teachers engaged their students in various types of active learning lessons in social contexts, where students worked on both hands-on and meaning-making activities and interacted with their peers and teachers. Teachers also created classroom communities and learning spaces where students felt comfortable to seek and give help. Finally, teachers identified several sources of support that influenced their instructional

  13. Evaluation of a School-Based Train-the-Trainer Intervention Program to Teach First Aid and Risk Reduction among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Ann K.; Pryor, Susan; Cormier, Cathy; Bateman, Aaron; Matzke, Brenda; Gilmore, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Farming is a hazardous occupation posing health risks from agricultural exposures for the farm owner and family members. First Aid for Rural Medical Emergencies (F.A.R.M.E.) was developed to support a train-the-trainer (TTT) program to prepare high school students to teach first aid skills and risk reduction through peer interaction.…

  14. Teaching High School Students to Manage Time: The Development of an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, Jeremy; Jackson, Teresa; Holtzman, Steven; Roberts, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the results of a quasi-experimental study conducted to examine the efficacy of a new time management intervention designed for high school students. Participants were 149 students from a highly selective private high school in the northeastern United States who were in the ninth grade. Half of the students participated in a…

  15. "Living with Volcanoes": Cross-Curricular Teaching in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Alison; Ayala, Gianna

    2015-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary high school geoarchaeology curriculum unit, titled "Living with Volcanoes," was created and tested in two pilot lessons with 30 high school students total studying geography and classical civilization in northern England. Students were highly engaged during the curriculum unit and showed positive learning gains…

  16. Teaching the Federal Budget, National Debt, and Budget Deficit: Findings from High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Anand R.; Ahn, Meesuk; Crocco, Margaret Smith; Grolnick, Maureen; Gaudelli, William; Walker, Erica N.

    2011-01-01

    The issues surrounding the federal budget, national debt, and budget deficit are complex, but not beyond the reach of young students. This study finds scant treatment of the federal budget, national debt, and budget deficit in high schools today. It is hardly surprising that high school teachers spend so little time discussing these topics in…

  17. Special Theory of Relativity in South Korean High School Textbooks and New Teaching Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Jinyeong

    2016-01-01

    South Korean high school students are being taught Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. In this article, I examine the portrayal of this theory in South Korean high school physics textbooks and discuss an alternative method used to solve the analyzed problems. This examination of how these South Korean textbooks present this theory has…

  18. Teaching and Learning in High School Reading Classes: Perspectives of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Janis; Wood, Karen; Smith, Kassandra; Zakaria, Nauff; Ramadan, Kimberly; Sykes, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated high school reading programs and participants focusing on the insider perspectives of teachers and their students. The study occurred in two sites, one in a Southern state and the other in an Eastern state. The participants, five high school reading teachers and two to three students in each of their reading…

  19. Development of instructional manual encouraging student active learning for high school teaching on fluid mechanics through Torricelli's tank experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwan, Suttinee; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Khemmani, Supitch

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to help students to perform Physics laboratory by themselves and to provide guidelines for high school teacher to develop active learning on fluid mechanics by using Torricelli's tank experiment. The research was conducted as follows: 1) constructed an appropriate Torricelli's tank experiment for high school teaching and investigated the condition for maximum water falling distance. As a consequence, it was found that the distance of the falling water measured from the experiment was shorter than that obtained from the theory of ideal fluid because of the energy loss during a flow, 2) developed instructional manual for high school teaching that encourages active learning by using problem based learning (PBL) approach, which is consistent with the trend of teaching and learning in 21st century. The content validity of our instructional manual using Index of Item-objective Congruence (IOC) as evaluated by three experts was over 0.67. The manual developed was therefore qualified for classroom practice.

  20. Motivational Strategies in Teaching English as Foreign Language: A Case Study in Junior High School 7 Kuningan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aprianto Budie Nugroho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze motivational strategies in teaching English as foreign language at 7th grade of Junior High School 7 Kuningan and to analyze students‟ attitudes towards motivational strategies that were applied by teachers in teaching EFL. The researchers used qualitative research by using classroom observation, interview, and questionnaires. The result taken from classroom observation and interview show teacher 1 and teacher 3 applied motivational strategies completely based on the phases of motivational strategies. Thus, the students responded these strategies positively. On the other hand, teacher 2 applied motivational strategies incompletely because the teacher missed the first phases. This was responded negatively by students. Therefore, the students were actively involved in teaching and learning process conducted by teacher 1 and teacher 2, but the students were passively involved in teaching and learning process conducted by teacher 2. Furthermore, the result taken from questionnaires shows that students gave positive attitudes towards the teacher 1 (88.25%, teacher 2 (79.02%, and teacher 3 (85.71%. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the way the teachers applied motivational strategies in teaching EFL determined students‟ attitudes towards motivational strategies applied by teachers in teaching EFL.

  1. FROM THE EXPIERENCE OF SOLFEGGIO TEACHING AT THE GNESIN MOSCOW HIGH SPECIAL MUSIC SCHOOL (COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZENKINA NADEJDA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to show the importance of solfeggio for training a professional musician and the practical use of this discipline under the conditions of some challenges of the contemporary educational reforms. Under these new conditions, solfeggio must exclude useless dull scholasticism, actively influence the development of musicality: memory, sense of rhythm, ear for harmony, ability for melodic improvisation. The interdisciplinary connections of solfeggio and other subjects (rhythmic, special class, Orff’s orchestra, taking place at the Gnessin Special Music School are especially important at present. The general problem of solfeggio teaching is the unity and balance of two poles: theory and practice, knowledge and ability.

  2. Effective science teaching in a high poverty middle school: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Georgette Wright

    This qualitative case study described the characteristics of science teachers in a high poverty urban middle school whose 2010 scores on South Carolina's Palmetto Assessment of State Standards (PASS) ranked second in the state. Data was obtained through classroom observations, open-ended interviews, school documents, and photographs taken inside the school from ten participants, who were seven science teachers, a science coach, and two administrators. Findings revealed a school culture that pursued warm and caring relationships with students while communicating high expectations for achievement, strong central leadership who communicated their vision and continuously checked for its implementation through informal conversations, frequent classroom observations, and test score analysis. A link between participants' current actions and their perception of prior personal and professional experiences was found. Participants related their classroom actions to the lives of the students outside of school, and evidenced affection for their students.

  3. Making a Math Teaching Aids of Junior High School Based on Scientific Approach Through an Integrated and Sustainable Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiastuti, E.; Mashuri

    2017-04-01

    Not all of teachers of Mathematics in Junior High School (JHS) can design and create teaching aids. Moreover, if teaching aids should be designed so that it can be used in learning through scientific approaches. The problem: How to conduct an integrated and sustainable training that the math teacher of JHS, especially in Semarang can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach? The purpose of this study to find a way of integrated and continuous training so that the math teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. This article was based on research with a qualitative approach. Through trials activities of resulting of training model, Focus Group Discussions (FGD), interviews, and triangulation of the results of the research were: (1) Produced a training model of integrated and sustainable that the mathematics teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. (2) In training, there was the provision of material and workshop (3) There was a mentoring in the classroom. (4) Sustainability of the consultation. Our advice: (1) the trainer should be clever, (2) the training can be held at the holidays, while the assistance during the holiday season was over.

  4. Effectiveness of health education teachers and school nurses teaching sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus prevention knowledge and skills in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S; Hayman, Laura L; Yoder, Laura D; Lovegreen, Loren D

    2015-03-01

    We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and tenth grade students in 10 schools. Twenty-seven facilitators (6 nurses, 21 teachers) provided programming; nurse-led classrooms were randomly assigned. Students taught by teachers were more likely to report their instructor to be prepared, comfortable with the material, and challenged them to think about their health than students taught by a school nurse. Both groups reported significant improvements in HIV/STI/condom knowledge immediately following the intervention, compared to controls. Yet, those taught by school nurses reported significant and sustained changes (up to 12 months after intervention) in attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy, whereas those taught by health education teachers reported far fewer changes, with sustained improvement in condom knowledge only. Both classroom teachers and school nurses are effective in conveying reproductive health information to high school students; however, teaching the technical (eg, condom use) and interpersonal (eg, negotiation) skills needed to reduce high-risk sexual behavior may require a unique set of skills and experiences that health education teachers may not typically have. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  5. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Ctr., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  6. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  7. Innovative teaching: Use of Screencast in the Agronomist Engineer High School of the UPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediola, Maria Angeles; Aguado, Pedro Luis; Espejo, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    In the last academic courses, the Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM) has supported the use of multimedia materials and methods in education and learning processes to improve the efficiency and impact obtained by faculty and students. With this aim during 2011-2012 course the multimedia method titled "Screencast" has been implemented in the subject "Plantas de Interés Agroalimentario" included in the curricula of the Agronomist Engineer High School. Next year will be apply in the subject "Soil Science" in the new degree. The Screencast tools allow record digital videos with sound directly into a computer so lecture and class can be recorded directly. The videos can be edited after including narrations, special effects as zoom, notes, images, etc. Screencast tools are simple use tools which are easy made tutorials, manuals, presentations and shows that help to students with different processes that are very hard to understand for students (1) (2). There are different Screencast tools in the market and after an evaluation process the most suitable for our need has been BB FlashBack Express (3) because is easy use, free and compatible with WEBCAM. This software allows export to Flash and AVI video formats. In our case the format chosen was the Flash format because the file sizes obtained were smaller than in AVI format. The use of BB FlashBack Express of the studied subject allowed make easy self-learning multimedia material and testing different methodologies and procedures for the use of this multimedia source in Internet. The BB FlashBack Express software was used during the course by teachers and students of this subject achieving a good improvement in the education and learning processes. The evaluation of the results obtained in the application of this method had shown that ability of students to use new technologies and spread their ideas has been increased as much into as outside classrooms. The materials made in this work had been joined to different

  8. How to Teach High-School Students "How Science Really Works?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Students, High-School; Winiarska, Anna; Parys-Wasylkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    One of the largest problems in Poland (as well as in the large part of the developed world) is that people do not understand how science works. Based on what they learned at school, they think that science is an aggregation of facts that you need to learn by heart. Based on media coverage of the science topics, they think it is a collection of curiosities about the two-headed-snakes. Based on the way in which science is shown in movies and TV series, they envision science as a magic performed in a white coat with usage of colorful fluids and magic spells such as "transformative hermeneutics of quantum gravity". As a result, our societies include a large number of people who "do not believe" in evolution, think that vaccinations are causing autism and that anthropogenic global warming is a myth. This is not very surprising, given that most people never had a chance to perform a real scientific experiment. Most of people, if they are lucky, are able to see some science demonstrations in the classrooms. They are of course very useful, but it is quite clear for everyone that (if everything goes well) the demonstration can end up in one, pre-defined way. The "real" scientific experiment, as a part of the scientific process, is when the outcome is unknown until the end of the entire process. In order to teach high-school students "How Science Really Works" we have developed a project lasting one year (grant from Foundation for Polish Science 26/UD/SKILLS/2015): 1) At first students learned about scientific method, science history and performed a simple scientific experiment. 2) Later, students developed an experiment that was answering a real, unanswered scientific problem (the problem was given by the Leading Scientist). The aim of the project was to determine influence of albedo and emissivity of rock particles laying on a surface of a glacier on the rate of cryoconite holes formation. The results of this experiment can be used to better determine the rate of melting

  9. Theoretical and historical process of teaching vocational guidance towards career fundamentals of Physics in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamila García-Carrión

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to reflex towards the foundations theoretical and historical of the professional pedagogical orientation process for the career physics from the senior high school, through which it has permitted to address the creation of practical proposals. For the transformation of the educative reality in the senior high school from the convergence of the professionals needs in this specialty in the territory and the needs and interest of the students in this educational level. From the theoretical point of view, we have awareness of the conception of the class as an interactive space for the mediatization of the relation of the students with the pedagogical profession.

  10. A STUDY ON ENGLISH TEACHERS’ TEACHING APPROACHES, METHODS, AND TECHNIQUES AT A STATE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN ENREKANG, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ita Sarmita Samad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at identifying the approaches, methods and techniques used by the English teachers at a state senior high school in Enrekang, Indonesia in teaching English as a foreign language. Furthermore, the consistency of the approaches, methods, and techniques is also identifed. This research applied explorative qualitative research design. The subjects were all of the English teachers in that school. They were chosen through purpossive sampling technique. They were interviewed and observed to get data regarding their teaching approach, method, and technique. Their lesson plan were copied to gain supporting data. Based on fndings and discussion, the approaches used by teacher 1 were communicative and behaviorism approach. Teacher 2 applied systemic functional linguistic and constructivism/ cognitivism. Most of the techniques used by teacher 1 reflected behaviorism approach or principles of grammar translation method while the techniques used by teacher 2 reflected both of behaviorism and constructivism. In the case of the consistency, the English teachers still showed a considerable inconsistency. Yet, comparing with teacher 1, teacher 2 was more consistent. It is concluded that the two English teachers still need further upgrading regarding approaches, methods, and techniques of teaching English as a foreign language.

  11. THE REALIZATION OF E-BOOKS FOR TEACHING AS REFLECTED BY EFL TEACHERS OF ISLAMIC JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL (MTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Priajana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at processing empirical data to know the realization e-book program in EFL teaching and learning process as reflected by English teachers of Islamic Junior High School (MTs in Indonesia. It is a descriptive research of which the approach is a cross sectional survey. The result of this study was expected to be the basis for the government to re-evaluate the implementation of the national project of School Electronic Books (BSE. Based on the result of data analysis, the program of e-books should be revised as considering several factors affecting its insufficient use by the EFL teachers of MTs. The use of E-book in teaching and learning in Indonesia EFL classroom had been beyond the teachers’ outlook. It revealed that e-book and its advantages were not well recognized by many teachers of MTs in Indonesia because of lack awareness of rapid growth of technology and information in this case the use of internet. Keywords: e-book, teaching and learning, program, implementation

  12. The teach-learning process of high school students: a case of Educational Biology for teachers formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Laporta Chudo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the teach-learning process of high school students, in the scope of Educational Biology. To plan and to develop a methodology with lesson strategies that facilitate the learning. To analyze, in the students vision, the positive and negative points in the process. Method. A research was developed -- of which had participated students of the first semester of the Pedagogy of a high school private institution in São Paulo city -- of the type action-research, with increased qualitative character of quantitative instruments; as a way of data collect, had been used questionnaires and field diary; the results had been converted in charts; after that, the data collected by the questionnaires had been analyzed according to the technique of the collective subject analysis. Results. The results had supplied important information to high school teachers reflection about teach-learning process, showing that the used strategies allowed student envolvement and participation, proximity with personal and professional reality, bigger interaction in the interpersonal relations and critical reflection. Conclusions. The theoretical referencial about adult learning, the active methodologies and the interpersonal relationship between professor and pupils, with the analysis of the students vision about the positive and negative points in the teach-learning process, had provided subsidies to believe a methodology and specific didactic strategies for adults and that must contemplate the teachers motivation and the pedagogical communication, including elements like creativity, up to date technician content and formative content to the future profession, experiences exchange, that allow an affective relationship teacher-student, with interaction and dialogue.

  13. Teaching About "Brain and Learning" in High School Biology Classes: Effects on Teachers' Knowledge and Students' Theory of Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Sanne; Jolles, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated a new teaching module about "Brain and Learning" using a controlled design. The module was implemented in high school biology classes and comprised three lessons: (1) brain processes underlying learning; (2) neuropsychological development during adolescence; and (3) lifestyle factors that influence learning performance. Participants were 32 biology teachers who were interested in "Brain and Learning" and 1241 students in grades 8-9. Teachers' knowledge and students' beliefs about learning potential were examined using online questionnaires. Results indicated that before intervention, biology teachers were significantly less familiar with how the brain functions and develops than with its structure and with basic neuroscientific concepts (46 vs. 75% correct answers). After intervention, teachers' knowledge of "Brain and Learning" had significantly increased (64%), and more students believed that intelligence is malleable (incremental theory). This emphasizes the potential value of a short teaching module, both for improving biology teachers' insights into "Brain and Learning," and for changing students' beliefs about intelligence.

  14. A teaching strategy for solving tasks integrating physics and artistic components in senior high school teacher’s training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito, Raúl Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at describing the results of a study intended to find a solution to shortcomings in the training of teacher of Physics, particularly in relation to the acquisition of an artistic cultural insight as a result of the process of learning Physics, which naturally hinders the fulfillment of junior high school general goal. A teaching strategy, centered in solving tasks of physics and artistic integrating nature, is suggested to contribute to enlarge cultural understanding and illustrating science and art relationship.

  15. A Study on Linking High-School Physics and Perfect Teaching Reformation of College Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Li, Qun; Gao, Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    For the students who have just entered colleges, learning university physics would be a challenge. This paper discusses how to make students who have just finished senior high school physics won't feel difficult in learning university physics and how to guide and cultivate the students' interest in the study of physics so to stimulate the…

  16. Teaching for Wisdom in an Intergenerational High-School-English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMichelis, Carey; Ferrari, Michel; Rozin, Tanya; Stern, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Although the psychological benefits of intergenerational learning environments have been well documented, no study has yet investigated wisdom as an outcome of intergenerational classroom engagement. In this study, Elders between the age 60-89 were recruited to participate in a high-school English classroom. We hypothesized that participating in…

  17. Behavioral Intervention for Teaching Tackling Skills to High School Football Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, John V.; Luiselli, James K.; Reed, Derek D.

    2010-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, football-related injuries accounted for 1,060,823 emergency room visits to U.S. hospitals (Mello, Myers, Christian, Palmisciano, & Linakis, 2009). Among high school football athletes, statistics reveal that for the period of 1984 to 1999, there were 63 injuries resulting in permanent disability (Mueller, 2001). Additional…

  18. Teaching Free Speech Values to High School Students: Keys to Persevering Despite the Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveslage, Thomas

    To examine why citizens today do not understand the U.S. Constitution and its provisions, a survey was conducted among 153 high school social studies, journalism, and English teachers to examine, among other things, how they taught about constitutional rights and how they rated their students' knowledge of the subject compared to students'…

  19. Green accounts & day high schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1997-01-01

    The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools.......The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools....

  20. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ellianna; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Barua, Prachurjya; Cooper, Ellie; Das, Debjani; Simone-Gonzalez, Luna; Sowah, Maxine; Valdez, Laura; BridgeUP: STEM

    2018-01-01

    BridgeUP: STEM (BridgeUP) is a program at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) that seeks to empower women by providing early-career scientists with research fellowships and high-school aged women with instruction in computer science and algorithmic methods. BridgeUP achieves this goal by employing post-baccalaureate women as Helen Fellows, who, in addition to conducting their own scientific research, mentor and teach high school students from the New York City area. The courses, targeted at early high-school students, are designed to teach algorithmic thinking and scientific methodology through the lens of computational science. In this poster we present the new BridgeUP astronomy curriculum created for 9th and 10th grade girls.The astronomy course we present is designed to introduce basic concepts as well as big data manipulation through a guided exploration of Gaia (DR1). Students learn about measuring astronomical distances through hands-on lab experiments illustrating the brightness/distance relationship, angular size calculations of the height of AMNH buildings, and in-depth Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram activities. Throughout these labs, students increase their proficiency in collecting and analyzing data, while learning to build and share code in teams. The students use their new skills to create color-color diagrams of known co-moving clusters (Oh et al. 2017) in the DR1 dataset using Python, Pandas and Matplotlib. We discuss the successes and lessons learned in the first implementation of this curriculum and show the preliminary work of six of the students, who are continuing with computational astronomy research over the current school year.

  1. Investigation on current statuses of radiation literacy of teachers and their radiation teaching in elementary and junior high schools in Kagoshima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutoku, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    From the present state of the expansion of radiation application base, it has been required to proceed with the correct radiation teaching in school education and teacher's radiation literacy will be questioned. In order to propose more effective ways of radiation teaching, the questionnaire survey on current statuses of radiation literacy of teachers and their radiation teaching in the public elementary and junior high schools in Kagoshima prefecture was carried out. The results of the questionnaire survey are summarized and the proposal is described in the present paper. (K. Kato)

  2. The Religion Teacher's Handbook: A Primer on the Vocation of Teaching Catholic High School Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueting, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    All Catholic school teachers are called to be evangelists and catechists. Religion teachers have a special duty to teach religion systematically in a classroom. This book is meant to be a handbook or guidebook with practical elements of teaching and sample lesson plans and projects.

  3. Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Roberts, Sarah; Newsam, Andy; Barclay, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to summarise the good, bad and (occasionally) ugly aspects of teaching astronomy in UK schools. It covers the most common problems reported by teachers when asked about covering the astronomy/space topics in school. Particular focus is given to the GCSE Astronomy qualification offered by Edexcel (which is currently the…

  4. Ionizing radiation measurements using low cost instruments for teaching in college or high-school in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Vilela, D. C.; Migoto, V. G.; Gomes, M. P.; Martin, I. M.; Germano, J. S. E.

    2017-11-01

    Ionizing radiation one of modern physics experimental teaching in colleges and high school can be easily implemented today due to low coasts of detectors and also electronic circuits and data acquisition interfaces. First it is interesting to show to young’s students what is ionizing radiation and from where they appears near ground level? How it is possible to measure these radiations and how to check intensities variation during day, night, dry and wet periods in the same school? For increasing interest and stimulation in others students how to proceed in making the graphics of the ionizing radiation and presenting him in real time using Web internet facilities? Many others facilities like calibration of the detector using low intensities radioactive ionizing radiation sources, make comparison of the measurements and discussions of the results should be possible between many groups of students from several schools in the region of Brazil. This paper presents the experimental procedures including detectors and associated electronic including data acquisition, graphics elaboration and Web internet procedures to discuss and exchanging data measurements from several schools.

  5. Teaching Evolution in New Jersey Public High Schools: Examining the Influence of Personal Belief and Religious Background on Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carlen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine relationships between New Jersey biology teachers' personal characteristics and religious backgrounds and the time spent and approach to teaching evolution. The research instrument chosen was a cross-sectional survey. Survey questions were presented in various forms: fill in, single response, Likert…

  6. Teaching schools as teacher education laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gravett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study emanated from the Integrated Strategic Planning Framework for Teacher Education and Development in South Africa. This Framework proposes that teaching schools should be established in the country to improve the teaching practicum component of pre-service teacher education. A generic qualitative study was undertaken to explore the affordances of a teaching school to enable student teacher learning for the teaching profession. The overarching finding of the study is that a teaching school holds numerous affordances for enabling meaningful student teacher learning for the teaching profession. However, the full affordances of a teaching school will not be realised if a teaching school is viewed merely as a practicum site. Foregrounding a laboratory view of practice work in a teaching school could enable true research-oriented teacher education. A teaching school as a teacher education laboratory would imply a deliberate inclusion of cognitive apprenticeship and an inquiry orientation to learning in the schoo

  7. Global Environmental Leadership and Sustainability: High School Students Teaching Environmental Science to Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S.; Tamsitt, V. M.

    2016-02-01

    A two week high school course for high-achieving 10th-12th graders was developed through the combined efforts of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Graduate Students and UC San Diego Academic Connections. For the high school students involved, one week was spent at SIO learning basic climate science and researching climate-related topics, and one week was spent in Washington D.C. lobbying Congress for an environmental issue of their choosing. The specific learning goals of the course were for students to (1) collect, analyze and interpret scientific data, (2) synthesize scientific research for policy recommendations, (3) craft and deliver a compelling policy message, and (4) understand and experience change. In this first year, 10 students conducted research on two scientific topics; sea level rise using pier temperature data and California rainfall statistics using weather stations. Simultaneous lessons on policy messaging helped students learn how to focus scientific information for non-scientists. In combining the importance of statistics from their Science lessons with effective communication from their Policy lessons, the students developed issue papers which highlighted an environmental problem, the solution, and the reason their solution is most effective. The course culminated in two days of meetings on Capitol Hill, where they presented their solutions to their Congressional and Senate Members, conversed with policymakers, and received constructive feedback. Throughout the process, the students effectively defined arguments for an environmental topic in a program developed by SIO Graduate Students.

  8. Assessment Of The Availability And Utilization Of Icts For Teaching And Learning In Secondary Schools - Case Of A High School In Kwekwe Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibanda Mavellas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper looked at the availability of common educational Information communications Technologies ICTs in secondary schools using a high school in Kwekwe Zimbabwe as a case study. Such technologies include computers radios televisions networks wireless technologies interactive boards internet email eLearning applications video conferencing and projectors just to mention but a few. It further assessed whether the available ICTs are being utilized by teachers and students looking at such usage activities as preparation for lessons lesson delivery issuing of assignments research and communications. The research further identified the factors that are hindering the ICT utilization in these schools among them lack of power supply insufficient resources fear of technology lack of interest ICT skills deficiency higher ICT cost and poor physical infrastructure. The findings were tabulated and analyzed. Recommendations were put forward on how to improve ICT availability and utilization at the school and schools in general for the betterment of teaching and learning. Conclusions were drawn from the findings.

  9. Inquiry Teaching in High School Chemistry Classrooms: The Role of Knowledge and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Gillian H.; Luft, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    The call for implementation of inquiry-based teaching in secondary classrooms has taken on a new sense of urgency, hence several instructions models are developed to assists teachers in implementing inquiry in their classrooms. The role of knowledge and beliefs in inquiry teaching are examined.

  10. Identifying Content Knowledge for Teaching Energy: Examples from High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy D.; Scherr, Rachel E.; Goodhew, Lisa M.; Daane, Abigail R.; Gray, Kara E.; Aker, Leanna B.

    2017-01-01

    "Content knowledge for teaching" is the specialized content knowledge that teachers use in practice the content knowledge that serves them for tasks of teaching such as revoicing students' ideas, choosing an instructional activity to address a student misunderstanding, and evaluating student statements. We describe a methodology for…

  11. The Pedagogical Challenges of Teaching High School Bioethics: Insights from the Exploring Bioethics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Mildred Z; Vannier, David; Chowning, Jeanne Ting; Miller, Jacqueline S; Paget, Katherine F

    2016-01-01

    A belief that high school students have the cognitive ability to analyze and assess moral choices and should be encouraged to do so but have rarely been helped to do so was the motivation for developing Exploring Bioethics, a six-module curriculum and teacher guide for grades nine through twelve on ethical issues in the life sciences. A multidisciplinary team of bioethicists, science educators, curriculum designers, scientists, and high school biology teachers worked together on the curriculum under a contract between the National Institutes of Health and Education Development Center, a nonprofit research and development organization with a long history of innovation in science education. At the NIH, the Department of Bioethics within the Clinical Center and the Office of Science Education within the Office of the Director guided the project.Our overarching goal for Exploring Bioethics was to introduce students to bioethics as a field of inquiry and to enable them to develop ethical reasoning skills so they could move beyond "gut reactions" to more nuanced positions. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  12. Design and Development Computer-Based E-Learning Teaching Material for Improving Mathematical Understanding Ability and Spatial Sense of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjanah; Dahlan, J. A.; Wibisono, Y.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to make a design and development computer-based e-learning teaching material for improving mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students. Furthermore, the particular aims are (1) getting teaching material design, evaluation model, and intrument to measure mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (2) conducting trials computer-based e-learning teaching material model, asessment, and instrument to develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (3) completing teaching material models of computer-based e-learning, assessment, and develop mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense of junior high school students; (4) resulting research product is teaching materials of computer-based e-learning. Furthermore, the product is an interactive learning disc. The research method is used of this study is developmental research which is conducted by thought experiment and instruction experiment. The result showed that teaching materials could be used very well. This is based on the validation of computer-based e-learning teaching materials, which is validated by 5 multimedia experts. The judgement result of face and content validity of 5 validator shows that the same judgement result to the face and content validity of each item test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense. The reliability test of mathematical understanding ability and spatial sense are 0,929 and 0,939. This reliability test is very high. While the validity of both tests have a high and very high criteria.

  13. Principles of Gestalt Psychology and Their Application to Teaching Junior High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Patricia E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses insightful learning, trace system,'' and laws of perception and Pragnanz in connection with problem solving and critical thinking in science teaching. Suggests 19 guidelines for sequencing curriculum and identifying activities for use in science classes. (CC)

  14. Teaching and Assessing Manipulative Motor Skills in High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article provides new ways to teach and assess motor skills in various lifetime sports such as tennis, golf, badminton, and other sports that students are likely to play as adults by focusing on five basic biomechanical principles.

  15. High School Biology Teachers' Knowledge Structure, Acceptance and Teaching of Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Michael L.; Mitchell, Melissa A.

    2002-01-01

    Determines teachers' conceptions of evolutionary theory using the technique of concept mapping. Discusses the methodology, the survey items, and concept map features. Makes specific recommendations for the teaching of evolution. (Contains 32 references.) (DDR)

  16. Development of Contextual Mathematics teaching Material integrated related sciences and realistic for students grade xi senior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helma, H.; Mirna, M.; Edizon, E.

    2018-04-01

    Mathematics is often applied in physics, chemistry, economics, engineering, and others. Besides that, mathematics is also used in everyday life. Learning mathematics in school should be associated with other sciences and everyday life. In this way, the learning of mathematics is more realstic, interesting, and meaningful. Needs analysis shows that required contextual mathematics teaching materials integrated related sciences and realistic on learning mathematics. The purpose of research is to produce a valid and practical contextual mathematics teaching material integrated related sciences and realistic. This research is development research. The result of this research is a valid and practical contextual mathematics teaching material integrated related sciences and realistic produced

  17. Learning to teach science in urban schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Zimmermann, Andrea

    2001-10-01

    Teaching in urban schools, with their problems of violence, lack of resources, and inadequate funding, is difficult. It is even more difficult to learn to teach in urban schools. Yet learning in those locations where one will subsequently be working has been shown to be the best preparation for teaching. In this article we propose coteaching as a viable model for teacher preparation and the professional development of urban science teachers. Coteaching - working at the elbow of someone else - allows new teachers to experience appropriate and timely action by providing them with shared experiences that become the topic of their professional conversations with other coteachers (including peers, the cooperating teacher, university supervisors, and high school students). This article also includes an ethnography describing the experiences of a new teacher who had been assigned to an urban high school as field experience, during which she enacted a curriculum that was culturally relevant to her African American students, acknowledged their minority status with respect to science, and enabled them to pursue the school district standards. Even though coteaching enables learning to teach and curricula reform, we raise doubts about whether our approaches to teacher education and enacting science curricula are hegemonic and oppressive to the students we seek to emancipate through education.

  18. Team Teaching at Upper Arlington School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Annette R.

    1968-01-01

    Team teaching has been used for 4 years in the 10th-grade English classes at Upper Arlington High School near Columbus, Ohio. Units are prepared, presented, and evaluated by teachers working together voluntarily. A 6-day American literature unit introducing Romanticism has been particularly successful. The contrasts between Neoclassicism and…

  19. Using Cogenerative Dialogs to Improve Science Teaching and Learning: Challenges and Solutions in High School Students' Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2018-05-01

    Internships in science research settings have received increasing attention as a means of helping students construct appropriate understandings, practices, tools, and language in scientific activities. To advance student-scientist partnerships beyond the status quo, the study aimed to investigate how cogenerative dialogs (cogens) may help high school students and scientists identify and address challenges collectively. The analysis identified nine major challenges discussed during cogens: (1) the quality and progress of scientific practice in laboratories, (2) the quality of scientists'/assistants' instructions in classrooms, (3) the quality of student participation in classrooms and homework, (4) students' absences, including arriving late or leaving early, (5) the quality of administrative support, (6) preparation for scientific presentations, (7) the process of deciding project topics, (8) students' peer interactions and communication, and (9) students' physiological needs. The three most salient challenges were "the quality and progress of scientific practice in laboratories" (39%), "the quality of scientists'/assistants' instructions in classrooms" (20%), and "the quality of student participation in classrooms and homework" (17%). The study shows that cogens allowed students and scientists to agree on teaching modifications that positively influenced teaching and learning processes during the internship, such that issues were reduced from the beginning to the closing stages. Importantly, the challenges and solutions identified by students and scientists in this study provide accounts of first-hand experience as well as insights to aid program directors or coordinators in designing a learning environment that can foster effective practice for internships by avoiding the issues identified in the study.

  20. Teaching about ‘Brain & Learning’ in high school biology classes: Effects on teachers’ knowledge and students’ theory of intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne eDekker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a new teaching module about ‘Brain&Learning’ using a controlled design. The module was implemented in high school biology classes and comprised three lessons: 1 brain processes underlying learning; 2 neuropsychological development during adolescence; and 3 lifestyle factors that influence learning performance. Participants were 32 biology teachers who were interested in ‘Brain&Learning’ and 1241 students in grades 8-9. Teachers’ knowledge and students’ beliefs about learning potential were examined using online questionnaires. Results indicated that before intervention, biology teachers were significantly less familiar with how the brain functions and develops than with its structure and with basic neuroscientific concepts (46% vs. 75% correct answers. After intervention, teachers’ knowledge of ‘Brain&Learning’ had significantly increased (64%, and more students believed that intelligence is malleable (incremental theory. This emphasizes the potential value of a short teaching module, both for improving biology teachers’ insights into ‘Brain&Learning’, and for changing students’ beliefs about intelligence.

  1. Development of contextual teaching and learning based science module for junior high school for increasing creativity of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniasari, H.; Sukarmin; Sarwanto

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this research are to analyze the the properness of contextual teaching and learning (CTL)-based science module for Junior High School for increasing students’ creativity and using CTL-based science module to increase students’ learning creativity. Development of CTL-based science module for Junior High School is Research and Development (R&D) using 4D Model consist of 4 steps: define, design, develop, and disseminate. Module is validated by 3 expert validators (Material, media, and language experts), 2 reviewer and 1 peer reviewer. . Based on the results of data analysis, it can be concluded that: the results of the validation, the average score of CTL-based science module is 88.28%, the value exceeded the value of the cut off score of 87.5%, so the media declared eligible for the study. Research shows that the gain creativity class that uses CTL-based science module has a gain of 0.72. Based on the results of the study showed that CTL-based science module effectively promotes creativity of students

  2. The Effect of Dynamic Geometry Software on the Vocational High School Students' Succes for Teaching Bisector and the Median Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihriban HACISALİHOĞLU KARADENİZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effect on the success of the students “Bisector and Median correspond at a point in a triangle” findings stated within Geometry course curriculum by using computer assisted teaching program Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad. During this study quasi experimental design was used on preliminary and posttest groups. This research was conducted on twenty five 10th grade students studying Computer Information Systems (CIS at Technical and Vocational High School. “A Success Test” consisting of 12 questions which had been previously formed through the observations of specialized teachers was used as preliminary and posttests. Each group was chosen without any meaningful difference between preliminary test results gathered. Two groups were formed due to preliminary test results: an experiment group T-10 class (13 students and a control group A-10A (12 students. It was targeted to access findings developed by Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad programmed in the experiment group but the control group wasn’t intervened. An independent sample t-test on pair comparison was used among different groups paired samples t-test was used on pair comparison among same groups. Findings achieved during the study revealed that Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad was more effective on students’ success than traditional teaching methods. A meaningful difference on behalf of the experiment group was determined within the independent sample t-test conducted on final test results. [t(23=3.176, p< .05]. These findings indicate that Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad software used in the experiment group is more effective on students’ success compared to traditional teaching methods used in control group.

  3. Design of an assessment to probe teachers' content knowledge for teaching: An example from energy in high school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia; Gitomer, Drew; Iaconangelo, Charles; Phelps, Geoffrey; Seeley, Lane; Vokos, Stamatis

    2018-06-01

    Research into teacher learning and practice over the last three decades shows that the teachers of a specific subject need to possess knowledge that is different from the knowledge of other content experts. Yet this specialized version of content knowledge that teachers need to plan instruction, respond to student ideas, and assess student understanding in real time is a theoretically elusive construct. It is crucial for the fields of precollege teacher preparation, teacher professional education, and postsecondary faculty professional development to (a) clarify the construct that underlies this specialized content knowledge, (b) operationalize it in some domain, (c) measure it in both static contexts and as it is enacted in the classroom, and (d) correlate its presence with "richness" of classroom instruction and its effect on student learning. This paper documents a piece of a multiyear, multi-institutional effort to investigate points (a)-(d) in the domain of energy in the first high school physics course. In particular, we describe the framework that we developed to clarify content knowledge for teaching in the context of high school energy learning. We then outline the process through which we developed, tested, and refined a "paper-and-pencil" assessment administered on a computer and discuss the substantive and psychometric features of several items based on a field test of the final form of the assessment. We choose to discuss these items for a dual purpose: to illustrate the application of our general framework and to present performance findings from a sample of 362 practicing high school teachers of physics.

  4. Design of an assessment to probe teachers’ content knowledge for teaching: An example from energy in high school physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Etkina

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Research into teacher learning and practice over the last three decades shows that the teachers of a specific subject need to possess knowledge that is different from the knowledge of other content experts. Yet this specialized version of content knowledge that teachers need to plan instruction, respond to student ideas, and assess student understanding in real time is a theoretically elusive construct. It is crucial for the fields of precollege teacher preparation, teacher professional education, and postsecondary faculty professional development to (a clarify the construct that underlies this specialized content knowledge, (b operationalize it in some domain, (c measure it in both static contexts and as it is enacted in the classroom, and (d correlate its presence with “richness” of classroom instruction and its effect on student learning. This paper documents a piece of a multiyear, multi-institutional effort to investigate points (a–(d in the domain of energy in the first high school physics course. In particular, we describe the framework that we developed to clarify content knowledge for teaching in the context of high school energy learning. We then outline the process through which we developed, tested, and refined a “paper-and-pencil” assessment administered on a computer and discuss the substantive and psychometric features of several items based on a field test of the final form of the assessment. We choose to discuss these items for a dual purpose: to illustrate the application of our general framework and to present performance findings from a sample of 362 practicing high school teachers of physics.

  5. A Comparative Study of the Use of Persian vs. English in Teaching English Grammar to Iranian Students in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrseresht, Kowsar; Gowhary, Habib; Azizifar, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the relationship between the use of Persian vs. English in teaching English grammar to Iranian students and their achievement in learning English grammar. The participants of this study include 50 female students from a junior high school in Mehran. The researcher randomly selected 2 groups, one group was taught through the…

  6. Students' Perceptions about the Use of Educational Games as a Tool for Teaching the Periodic Table of Elements at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, Jose´ María; Gil, M. L. Almoraima

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here was conducted to investigate the perceptions of high school students on the use of educational games as a tool for teaching the periodic table of elements in a chemistry class in Spain. The 127 students who participated in this study came from six different classes in grade 10 (15-16 years old). The students' perceptions of…

  7. Cultural Literacy Based Critical Reading Teaching Material with Active Reader Strategy for Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaianti, Vismaia S.; Damaianti, Lira Fessia; Mulyati, Yeti

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the findings of a study aimed at producing a set of cultural literacy-oriented critical reading teaching material. This material is developed as a countermeasure to the increasingly thin sensitivity of society, especially the students toward noble values of religion, custom, and culture. With this material student get a…

  8. Using a Disciplinary Literacy Framework to Teach High School Physics: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Brian P.; Henry, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    This action research study investigated the impact of teaching physics using a disciplinary literacy framework for instruction across all units in one academic year. Through a suite of vocabulary strategies and lessons that encourage students to write, speak, draw, mathematically translate, and design experiments, students learn to do physics by…

  9. Teaching High School Students Machine Learning Algorithms to Analyze Flood Risk Factors in River Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, R.; Aizenman, H.; Mei, E.; Choudhury, N.

    2013-12-01

    High School students interested in the STEM fields benefit most when actively participating, so I created a series of learning modules on how to analyze complex systems using machine-learning that give automated feedback to students. The automated feedbacks give timely responses that will encourage the students to continue testing and enhancing their programs. I have designed my modules to take the tactical learning approach in conveying the concepts behind correlation, linear regression, and vector distance based classification and clustering. On successful completion of these modules, students will learn how to calculate linear regression, Pearson's correlation, and apply classification and clustering techniques to a dataset. Working on these modules will allow the students to take back to the classroom what they've learned and then apply it to the Earth Science curriculum. During my research this summer, we applied these lessons to analyzing river deltas; we looked at trends in the different variables over time, looked for similarities in NDVI, precipitation, inundation, runoff and discharge, and attempted to predict floods based on the precipitation, waves mean, area of discharge, NDVI, and inundation.

  10. The effects of laboratory inquire-based experiments and computer simulations on high school students‘ performance and cognitive load in physics teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Branka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to examine the extent to which different teaching instructions focused on the application of laboratory inquire-based experiments (LIBEs and interactive computer based simulations (ICBSs improved understanding of physical contents in high school students, compared to traditional teaching approach. Additionally, the study examined how the applied instructions influenced students’ assessment of invested cognitive load. A convenience sample of this research included 187 high school students. A multiple-choice test of knowledge was used as a measuring instrument for the students’ performance. Each task in the test was followed by the five-point Likert-type scale for the evaluation of invested cognitive load. In addition to descriptive statistics, determination of significant differences in performance and cognitive load as well as the calculation of instructional efficiency of applied instructional design, computed one-factor analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test. The findings indicate that teaching instructions based on the use of LIBEs and ICBSs equally contribute to an increase in students’ performance and the reduction of cognitive load unlike traditional teaching of Physics. The results obtained by the students from the LIBEs and ICBSs groups for calculated instructional efficiency suggest that the applied teaching strategies represent effective teaching instructions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179010: The Quality of Education System in Serbia from European Perspective

  11. Maximizing the Production of Biogas in an Instructional Manipulative Designed to Teach Energy Concepts to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Shakira Renee

    In an effort to stress the benefits of the application of renewable energy to the next generation of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) professionals, instructional modules on energy and biogas were integrated into a summer camp curriculum that challenged students to apply STEAM concepts in the design and development of chain reaction machines. Each module comprised an interactive presentations and a hands-on component where students operated a manipulative relevant to the content. During summer 2013, this camp was implemented at two high schools in Arizona and one in Trinidad and Tobago. Assessments showed that the overall modules were effective in helping students learn and retain the information presented on energy and biogas production. To improve future implementations of these modules, specifically the module on biogas production, the anaerobic digester was redesigned. In addition, a designed experiment was conducted to determine how to optimize the influent and operational environment that is available in an average high school classroom to generate maximum biogas yield. Eight plug-flow anaerobic digesters made of PVC piping and fixtures were used in a 2x3 factorial design assessing: co-digestion (20mL or 50mL) used cooking oil, temperature (25°C or 40°C), and addition of inoculum (0mL or 200mL). Biogas production was captured at two intervals over a 30-day period, and the experiments were replicated three times. Results showed that temperature at 40°C significantly increased biogas production and should be used over 25°C when using anaerobic digesters. Other factors that may potentially increase biogas production are combination of temperature at 40°C and 50mL of used cooking oil. In the future, the improvements made in the design of the anaerobic digester, and the applications of the finding from the experimental design, are expected to lead to an improved manipulative for teaching students about biogas production.

  12. Remote-controlled optics experiment for supporting senior high school and undergraduate teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S. H.; Jim, K. L.; Mak, C. L.; Leung, C. W.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the development of a remote laboratory (RemoteLab) platform for practising technologyenhanced learning of optics. The development of RemoteLab enhances students' understanding of experimental methodologies and outcomes, and enable students to conduct experiments everywhere at all times. While the initial goal of the system was for physics major undergradutes, the sytem was also made available for senior secondary school students. To gauge the impact of the RemoteLab, we evaluated two groups of students, which included 109 physics 1st-year undergraduates and 11 students from a local secondary school. After the experiments, evaluation including questionnaire survey and interviews were conducted to collect data on students' perceptions on RemoteLab and implementation issues related to the platform. The surveys focused on four main topics, including user interface, experiment setup, booking system and learning process. The survey results indicated that most of the participants' views towards RemoteLab was positive.

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT COMPETENCY-BASED SYLLABUS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

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    Besral Besral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although competency has long been the major concern in ELT either in the EFL or ESL contexts, the rise of competency-based syllabus launched by the Ministry of National Education (2006 brought about significant issue among the English teachers in the country. One of the crucial issues is that how to transfer the concepts of competences into the syllabus design.  Since a syllabus does not only contain a list of subject content, but also how curriculum planners (teachers reflect their understanding and belief about nature of language and of language teaching and learning, the ELT must be carried out to achieve communicative competence. Current investigation on the practices of ELT, however, indicates that English teachers are still walking in place, leaving the CC as a big slogan in their jobs.

  14. Exploring Quality Teaching of Information and Communication Technology in New South Wales and Yenbai High Schools: A Comparative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Manh Thang

    This study compares ICT policy and curriculum and assessment practices between Australian and Vietnamese secondary schools, and investigates differences between these two school systems. Document analyses and case studies were used to examine the key differences in ICT curriculum and policy and assessment practices between Australian and Vietnamese secondary schools. The document analyses focused on the intended ICT policy and curriculum and assessment, as presented in official documents in both countries. Using a case study approach for in-depth examination, two secondary schools were selected (one from Yenbai province, Vietnam and one from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia). Two principals and three teachers were interviewed. Classroom teaching and assessment practices were observed, and principals and teachers' views were obtained through semi-structured interviews and extensive discussions. Findings from the two case studies were compared with the findings from the document analysis. This study explored and analysed differences in ICT teaching, learning, assessment, and achievement between Vietnamese and Australian secondary students. It was found that that Australian ICT school curricula and assessment differed markedly from the Vietnamese system. Student ICT achievement in these Australian and Vietnamese schools could not only be attributed to higher standards of intended ICT curricula and assessment, or teacher knowledge or classroom practices. These differences are better explained by economic and cultural factors, ICT policies and their degrees of implementation, and extra ICT curricula. In order to bridge the gap and implement adequate ICT curricula and policies, rigorous professional training in teaching and assessment is essential for both Australian and Vietnamese teachers. In order to improve Australian students' ICT achievement, achievement motivation must be addressed. Many challenging aspects were found in ICT policies and classrooms in the

  15. What High School Physics Teachers Teach: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    During the 2012-13 academic year, the Statistic Research Center (SRC) collected data from a representative national sample of over 3,500 public and private high schools across the U.S. to inquire about physics availabilities and offerings. This report describes their findings. SRC takes two different approaches to describe the characteristics of…

  16. The use of PowerPoint presentations in the teaching of vocational subjects: The preferences of medical high school students and their relationship to learning styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Dragana P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In medical vocational high schools teachers frequently use PowerPoint presentations. The study presented in this paper has sought to identify, on the one hand, the preferences of students of medical vocational high schools regarding PowerPoint presentations in the instruction of vocational subjects, and on the other, students' dominant learning styles, and also as to establish whether the differences in preferences were based on learning styles. In this cross-sectional study, responses from 170 students of three medical high schools were obtained using the questionnaire designed by Chan and Denner. The data were processed using the methods of descriptive and inferential statistics. The values obtained for Cronbach's alpha indicate that the questionnaire was reliable. In all three schools, PowerPoint presentations are used in the teaching of most vocational subjects. According to the findings, students prefer teaching that uses PowerPoint presentations, finding it more interesting than teaching that involves teachers writing on the board. On the other hand, students' responses indicate that PowerPoint presentations don't lead to greater classroom participation. The findings show that dominant learning styles contribute to differences in student preferences for classes in which teachers use PowerPoint presentations, but also indicate the need for further research.

  17. Utilizing public scientific web lectures to teach contemporary physics at the high school level: A case study of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulamit Kapon1,*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary public physics web lecture that was followed by a collaborative generic activity session. The collaborative session involved a guided critical reconstruction of the main arguments in the lecture, and a processing of the key analogical explanations. Then the students watched another exemplary web lecture on a different topic. The participants (N=14 were divided into two groups differing only in the order in which the lectures were presented. The students’ discussions during the activities show that they were able to reason and demonstrate conceptual progress, although the physics ideas in the lectures were far beyond their level in physics. The discussions during the collaborative session contributed significantly to the students’ understanding. We illustrate this point through an analysis of one of these discussions between two students on an analogical explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect that was presented in one of the lectures. The results from the tests that were administered to the participants several times during the intervention further support this contention.

  18. Utilizing public scientific web lectures to teach contemporary physics at the high school level: A case study of learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a teaching experiment designed to examine the learning (i.e., retention of content and conceptual development) that takes place when public scientific web lectures delivered by scientists are utilized to present advanced ideas in physics to students with a high school background in physics. The students watched an exemplary public physics web lecture that was followed by a collaborative generic activity session. The collaborative session involved a guided critical reconstruction of the main arguments in the lecture, and a processing of the key analogical explanations. Then the students watched another exemplary web lecture on a different topic. The participants (N=14) were divided into two groups differing only in the order in which the lectures were presented. The students’ discussions during the activities show that they were able to reason and demonstrate conceptual progress, although the physics ideas in the lectures were far beyond their level in physics. The discussions during the collaborative session contributed significantly to the students’ understanding. We illustrate this point through an analysis of one of these discussions between two students on an analogical explanation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect that was presented in one of the lectures. The results from the tests that were administered to the participants several times during the intervention further support this contention.

  19. Narrative Inquiry on the Teaching of STEM to Blind High School Students

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    Idalis Villanueva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elevate the experiences and voices of teachers who led the STEM informal education program summer series: National Federation of the Blind Engineering Quotient (NFB EQ. Through its integration with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM, NFB EQ opened opportunities from 2013–2016 in Baltimore, Maryland, for 60 blind students (Grades 9–12 to learn about engineering. The purpose of this narrative inquiry study was to understand how teachers foster interest towards STEM among blind students. The participants were two sighted teachers, one blind teacher, one sighted teacher–researcher, and one sighted researcher participant. We collected data in the form of field notes, semi-structured interviews, personal narratives, collective narratives, a focus group discussion, and teaching artifacts. We engaged in conversation analysis and used MAXQDA 12 software for data analysis. Guided by the principles of community of practices and universal design for learning, our results identified the importance of teacher awareness and positionalities in guiding blind students’ inclusion and identity in the STEM classroom. Findings also suggest teachers are in a unique position to allow or prevent inclusive opportunities from occurring in their classrooms.

  20. Credentialing high school psychology teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kenneth A

    2014-09-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula (American Psychological Association, 2013b) require a teacher with considerable psychology content knowledge to teach high school psychology courses effectively. In this study, I examined the initial teaching credential requirements for high school psychology teachers in the 50 states plus the District of Columbia. Thirty-four states (the District of Columbia is included as a state) require the social studies credential to teach high school psychology. An analysis of the items on standardized tests used by states to validate the content knowledge required to teach social studies indicates little or no presence of psychology, a reflection of psychology's meager presence in the social studies teacher preparation curricula. Thus, new teachers with the social studies teaching credential are not prepared to teach high school psychology according to the National Standards. Approval of The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (National Council for the Social Studies, 2013) presents an opportunity to advocate for establishing a psychology credential in the 34 states. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. The Teaching of Enzymes: A Low Cost Experimental Approach with High School Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A PINHEIRO

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The association of experimental methods with the traditional lecturing of Science themes is encouraged by several authors. The importance ofconducting experimental classes is undeniable, as practical activities motivate students to search for kno wledge. But this is not the reality in most publicschools in the inlands of Rio de Janeiro’s State, where several factors prevent teachers from using such didactic strategy.   The aim of this  work  was demonstrate  low -cost experimental activities, addressing the subject enzymes. The practice has been designed for being held in a common classroom. Lab glassware was replaced by alternative materials. Potato extract  (catalase source and commercial hydrogen peroxide were required. Concepts such as kinetic data  related to substrate concentration, time of reaction, pH andtemperature effects on enzymatic activity have been  explored with the students. Graphical representation of enzyme activity related to the above parameters has also been elaborated. The practice w as held in 10 schools distributed among 7 different cities. Questionnaires have been applied to the students before and after the practice and revealed that 86% of the students had never participated of a practical lesson and 49% were unaware of the functi on of enzymes. After practice, 68% of the students said that the enzymes catalyze biological reactions and 73% considered the practice important to their cognitive achievement. The evaluation of information obtained from students confirmed the lack of practical activities in public education, as well as the capacity that the practical activities have  to motivate the students in the knowledge formation process.

  2. Who Is Teaching Science in Our High Schools? Exploring Factors Influencing Pre-Service Secondary Science Teachers' Decisions to Pursue Teaching as a Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2017-01-01

    A central objective of recent government reports focused on the important role of education in preparing a skilled and dynamic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce, with effective teaching in secondary STEM classrooms reliant on the engagement and retention of high-quality STEM teachers (Office of the Chief Scientist,…

  3. An evaluation of applying the 'Critical thinking model' to teaching global warming to junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Hong, C.; Hsu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is a consequence of interaction among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. The causes of climate change are extremely complicated for scientists to explain. The fact that the global climate has kept warming in the past few decades is one example. It remains controversial for scientists whether this warming is the result of human activity or natural causes. This research aims to lead students to discuss the causes of global warming from distinct and controversial viewpoints to help the students realize the uncertainty and complicated characteristics of the global warming issue. The context of applying the critical thinking model to teaching the scientific concepts of climate change and global warming is designed for use in junior high schools. The videos of the upside concept 'An Inconvenient Truth' (a 2006 documentary film directed by Davis Guggenheim) and the reverse-side concept 'The Great Global Warming Swindle' (a 2007 documentary film made by British television producer/director Martin Durkin) about the global warming crisis are incorporated into lessons in order to guide students to make their own decisions appropriately when discussing the earth climate change crisis. A questionnaire, individual teacher interviews and observations in class were conducted to evaluate the curriculum. The pre-test and post-test questionnaires showed differences in the students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior towards the global warming phenomenon before and after attending the lessons. The results show that those students who attended the whole curriculum had a significant increase in their knowledge and behavior factors of global climate (P value <0.001*). However, there was no significant improvement in their attitudes between the pre-test and post-test questionnaires (P value=0.329). From the individual interviews, the teachers who gave the lessons indicated that this project could increase the interaction with their students during class

  4. West Nile Virus: Using Adapted Primary Literature in Mathematical Biology to Teach Scientific and Mathematical Reasoning in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Stephen P.; Macnab, John S.; Wonham, Marjorie; de Vries, Gerda

    2009-01-01

    This paper promotes the use of adapted primary literature as a curriculum and instruction innovation for use in high school. Adapted primary literature is useful for promoting an understanding of scientific and mathematical reasoning and argument and for introducing modern science into the schools. We describe a prototype adapted from a published…

  5. Use of the Published Lance Armstrong Cancer Story to Teach Health Science Content to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E. Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lance Armstrong (2000) authored a book titled "It's Not About the Bike -- My Journey Back to Life," regarding his battle with testicular cancer. It became a "New York Times" Bestseller and was selected by the "School Library Journal" as one of the "Best Adult Books for High School Students for 2001." The goal of the project described in this…

  6. The Chocolate Shop and Atomic Orbitals: A New Atomic Model Created by High School Students to Teach Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbital theory is a difficult subject for many high school and beginning undergraduate students, as it includes mathematical concepts not yet covered in the school curriculum. Moreover, it requires certain ability for abstraction and imagination. A new atomic orbital model "the chocolate shop" created "by" students…

  7. Can We Teach Parenting in Our Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2014-01-01

    The quality of parenting is a crucial factor in children's school success, and yet the schools teach almost nothing about parenting. This essay suggests ways in which we can teach about parenting without risking indoctrination or adding special courses.

  8. CO-OP JIGSAW TEAM PROJECTS: A COOPERATIVE TEACHING METHOD TO IMPROVE STUDENTS‘ SPEAKING SKILL (An Experimental Study in a Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Innova Citra Arum

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An effective speaking activity involves active students to participate and create a life communication. The ideal condition of English speaking class involves the students‘ effectiveness in participating teaching and learning process. Nevertheless, some problems are emerged and one of them is that they often get nervous to speak in front of many people when they are asked to present their work to their friends. This paper reveals an experiment study in teaching speaking in a senior high school in Lamongan, East Java. It discusses about the effectiveness of cooperative teaching method known as coop jigsaw team projects in teaching speaking. All tenth grade students were used as the population and eighty students were taken as sample being divided into experimental group taught using coop jigsaw team projects and control group taught using direct instruction. Cluster random sampling was applied as the technique to determine sample. To obtain the data of students‘ speaking score, a speaking test was conducted. The score was the average score resulted by two independent examiners. The data were analysed through descriptive and inferential analysis using two-sample t-test. The research hypothesised that coop jigsaw will result a better English speaking score rather than direct instruction method. The research finding using 95% significance level shows that coop jigsaw team projects was more effective in teaching speaking compared to direct instruction for the tenth grade students because the activities in coop jigsaw team project pushed the students to be more active and cooperative in learning speaking.

  9. Effect of Nanotechnology Instructions on Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chow-Chin; Sung, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we cooperate with senior high school teachers to understand current nanotechnology model of senior high school nanotechnology curriculum in Taiwan. Then design senior high school nanotechnology (nano-tech) curriculum to teach 503 senior high school students. After teaching the nano-tech curriculum we use the "Nanotechnology…

  10. Possible relationships between literacy-based instructional coaching and effects on high school teachers' self-efficacy and attitudes toward teaching reading in the content areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jessica Lynn

    Grounded in the Theory of Self-Efficacy and the Theory of Reasoned Action, this quantitative, correlational study examined if participation in literacy-based instructional coaching (one-on-one, small group) predicted both high school teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and teachers' attitudes toward teaching reading in the content areas measured by the Scale to Measure Attitudes Toward Teaching Reading in Content Classrooms. This study utilized a convenience sample of content teachers from three high schools in Northeastern Pennsylvania participating in a literacy coaching initiative. The volunteer sample of teachers completed the Likert-type questionnaires. The study used hierarchical regression analysis to determine values for each block of the regression models. The study correlated instances of literacy-based instructional coaching (one-on-one, small group) with the scores on the SMATTRCC and the TSES to examine predictive validity. Gender, years of experience, and content area were control variables in this study. The results of the first model indicated that there was a significant relationship between the number of coaching instances and attitudes toward teaching reading in the content area with participation in instructional coaching accounting for 9.6% of the variance in scores on the SMATTRCC. The results of the second model indicated that there was a significant relationship between the number of coaching instances and teachers' self-efficacy with participation in instructional coaching accounting for 6.1% of the variance in scores on the TSES.

  11. The University of Zambia School Teaching Experience: Is It Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chomba Manchishi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching practice exercises serve the purpose of orienting the teacher into real classroom situations where the novice puts his or her skills into practice. Education students at the University of Zambia (UNZA go through the school teaching experience after their third year of study. This comes after they have arguably completed enough content and methodology courses to teach. The purpose of this study was to establish the effectiveness of the UNZA school teaching experience. The research instruments used were interview guides, observation checklists, and focus group discussions. The respondents included 80 serving teachers, 80 student teachers, and 10 head teachers drawn from 10 high schools in the Lusaka District. In addition, 10 lecturers from UNZA were also sampled. The findings revealed that the design and delivery of the UNZA student teaching experience was not effective.

  12. Teaching Organizational Skills in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The transition to middle school is an educational milestone, marking significant and sometimes unspoken changes in expectations. The overriding expectation is that students will become more independent. This article discusses some tips that will help teachers in teaching organizational skills to middle school students. Middle school teachers…

  13. Teaching and learning cinema and visual languages through economics-business studies and law in high school: An experimental interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Poli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, little is being done to promote cinema studies and the ability to analyse films and/or multimedia works among high school students. Although Italian legislation provides guidelines on specific learning objectives, activities and content to be included in high school courses, film and media language is still not encouraged in schools. The pilot introduction of cinema at the C. Tenca High School in Milan had the aim of demonstrating the value of film as an educational and epistemological resource and fostering the development of innovative interdisciplinary teaching strategies. Themes related to cinematographic language, Economics-Business Studies and law were introduced and analysed via the exploration of early films (late 1800s and early 1900s. The students investigated the topics of advertising, building a brand name, online marketing and the role of the media in shaping public opinion. In order to enhance students’ skills in analysing interactive communications, we introduced the themes of data journalism and fact-checking. The results are discussed in terms of a possible role for Cinema in the study of Economics-Business Studies and Law and of how cinema might become an interdisciplinary resource for other school subjects.

  14. Effectiveness of Health Education Teachers and School Nurses Teaching Sexually Transmitted Infections/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Knowledge and Skills in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A.; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S.; Hayman, Laura L.; Yoder, Laura D.; Lovegreen, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Methods: Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and…

  15. CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES USED IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH BASED ON CURRICULUM 2013: A NATURALISTIC STUDY AT STATE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL OF SAWIT 1 BOYOLALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umi Nur Kurniliawati

    2016-08-01

    as observer, teacher as manager, teacher as model, teacher as counselor, teacher as controller, and teacher as evaluator. The students have roles as members of group, as tutor of other learners, as negotiator, as subject, and as monitor and evaluator of their own learning progress. There are some materials used by English teachers, such as: textbook, workbook, dictionary, photocopy exercises, powerpoint on LCD, audio like song, and videos from youtube. The conclusion of this research is that English teachers at State of Junior High School of Sawit 1 Boyolali used various classroom techniques which can improve the students’ ability. Various techniques can make the students interested in English teaching-learning process. It does not make the class monotonous. The students become more active and creative. Based on the results, apparently, classroom techniques used by the teachers have important role in the teaching-learning process.

  16. Using LEDs and Phosphorescent Materials to Teach High School Students Quantum Mechanics: A Guided-Inquiry Laboratory for Introductory High School Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William P.; Trotochaud, Alan; Sherman, Julia; Kazerounian, Kazem; Faraclas, Elias W.

    2009-01-01

    The quantization of electronic energy levels in atoms is foundational to a mechanistic explanation of the periodicity of elemental properties and behavior. This paper presents a hands-on, guided inquiry approach to teaching this concept as part of a broader treatment of quantum mechanics, and as a foundation for an understanding of chemical…

  17. The Implementation of Problem-Solving Based Laboratory Activities to Teach the Concept of Simple Harmonic Motion in Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iradat, R. D.; Alatas, F.

    2017-09-01

    Simple harmonic motion is considered as a relatively complex concept to be understood by students. This study attempts to implement laboratory activities that focus on solving contextual problems related to the concept. A group of senior high school students participated in this pre-experimental method from a group’s pretest-posttest research design. Laboratory activities have had a positive impact on improving students’ scientific skills, such as, formulating goals, conducting experiments, applying laboratory tools, and collecting data. Therefore this study has added to the theoretical and practical knowledge that needs to be considered to teach better complicated concepts in physics learning.

  18. TEACHING CHEMISTRY IN SCHOOLS: A CASE FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. ALUKO

    strategy on students' performance in secondary school chemistry. Two hundred and fifty ... cooperative instructional strategy and conventional teaching method. The cooperative ..... students good problem-solvers. 2. The curricula of the ...

  19. Analyzing the Function of Cartilage Replacements: A Laboratory Activity to Teach High School Students Chemical and Tissue Engineering Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Julie N.; Emady, Heather N.; Galas, Richards J., Jr.; Zhange, Rong; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; Liu, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    A cartilage tissue engineering laboratory activity was developed as part of the Exciting Discoveries for Girls in Engineering (EDGE) Summer Camp sponsored by the Women In Engineering Program (WIEP) at Purdue University. Our goal was to increase awareness of chemical engineering and tissue engineering in female high school students through a…

  20. Physics Teachers' Behavioral, Control and Normative Beliefs about Teaching Physics According to the National High School Physics Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    In Turkey, a new Turkish High School Physics Curriculum (THSPC) was put into practice, starting initially with the Grade 9 in the 2008-2009 education-year. When compared with the previous ones, this curriculum emphasized the importance of students' active involvement in learning, use of real-life contexts and development of new skills. Even though…

  1. The Role of WhatsApp in Teaching Vocabulary to Iranian EFL Learners at Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sanaz; Chalak, Azizeh

    2016-01-01

    The availability and the use of mobile messaging applications are increasingly widespread among the new generation of students in Iran. The present study aimed to investigate the role of WhatsApp in the vocabulary learning improvement of Iranian junior high school EFL students. Using a mixed method design, a group of 60 students including 30 male…

  2. Teaching and Learning in the Age of Trump: Increasing Stress and Hostility in America's High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John; Franke, Megan; Yun, Jung-Eun Ellie; Ishimoto, Michael; Diera, Claudia; Geller, Rebecca Cooper; Berryman, Anthony; Brenes, Tizoc

    2017-01-01

    This report examines whether the substance and tone of national political discourse during the first four months of the Trump administration affected U.S. public high school students. Throughout his campaign and in his presidency to date, Donald Trump has addressed a number of "hot-button" topics that call into question the status or…

  3. Recency or Relevance: A Quest for Pedagogical Framework in Teaching Philippine and World Literature in Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Bañez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pedagogical questions on whether recency or relevance of literary texts, and the importance of generic academic over discipline-based learning objectives as the core of literature instruction are increasingly becoming the interest of debates in senior high school education. Hence, this study determined the degree of importance of literary instruction in preparation for college education and workplace challenges as assessed by 38 Grade 11 students at Malvar Senior High School, Philippines during the school year 2016-2017. By employing the survey type of descriptive research with a self-made questionnaire, it was found out that the respondents assessed both recency and relevance as important consideration in selecting literary texts. They also perceived that discipline-based/work-oriented learning objectives, especially those that focus on honing their human relation skills, were relevant in preparing themselves for college education and workplace responsibilities. Moreover, the respondents preferred language-based activities that tend to provide the former opportunities and develop other complex skills which are important in tertiary education and workplace challenges. With these, revitalizing the literature instruction in the senior high school is highly recommended in this study.

  4. Teaching Physical Education in International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David LeRoy; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the opportunity of teaching physical education at international schools. Common challenges (e.g., communication differences, adapting to the host culture, teaching individuals from various cultural backgrounds) and positive aspects (e.g., smart and engaged students, a positive learning environment for teachers, great…

  5. Teaching Elementary School Children about Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Decar, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching elementary school students about Korea by introducing them to the country's folktales, clothing, art, music, and food. Includes a folktale adapted as a play and suggestions for teaching about traditional costumes, folk dances, music, and masks, as well as Korean mealtime and table manners. (GEA)

  6. Religious teaching in the school context

    OpenAIRE

    Garutti, Selson; CESUMAR

    2007-01-01

    On 22nd July 1997, the then president of the Brazilian Republic Fernando Henrique Cardoso signed the law no. 9.475/97, concerning religious teaching in schools. That law caused generalized confusion all round Brazil by making facultative religious teaching in schools, and disorganizing even further the already troubled subject “Religious Teaching”. We cannot lose sight of the disorganization installed in the year of 1996 by the confusion introduced by the new National Education Basis Guidelin...

  7. 新时期高中物理教学如何实施美育教育%On How to Realize Aesthetic Education in Senior High School Physics Teaching in the New Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬俊

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly interprets the aesthetic characteris-tics of senior high school physics teaching, researches and ana-lyzes the relationship between physics teaching and aesthetic teaching, and proposes the writer's own opinions on how to im-plement aesthetic education in senior high school physics teach-ing in the new situation.%  文章就高中物理学中所呈现的美学特征进行简要地阐述,对高中物理教学和审美教学之间的关系进行研究和分析,对于在新时期下高中物理教学如何实施美育教育,提出一些自己的看法。

  8. State of Mechanisms of Adaptation to Teaching Loads for High-school Students with Different Levels of Professional Preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Danilenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of functional adaptability of 69 high-school students with different levels of professional preparedness had been carried out. The dynamics of the indices of heart rate variability and hemodynamics indices during the academic year had been studied. The difference in adaptive capacity, depending on the personal characteristics of students, the level of preparedness of adolescents to professional choice had been shown.

  9. Teaching Practices, School Support and Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana Carolina Reyes; Noriega, José Angel Vera; Cuervo, Angel Alberto Valdés

    2017-01-01

    Research in recent years indicates that schools, and in particular teaching practices, play an essential role in preventing bullying. This study's aim is to investigate the direct and indirect relationships between permissive and direct intervention teacher practices, school support and bullying. In a non-probabilistic way, 386 (58.1%) boys and…

  10. Teaching Quality and Learning Creativity in Technical and Vocational Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembuan, D. R. E.; Rompas, P. T. D.; Mintjelungan, M.; Pantondate, T.; Kilis, B. M. H.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain information about the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning in a vocational high school in Indonesia. This research is a survey research. The sample used in this research is 50 teachers, selected by simple random sampling. Data were analyzed by using correlation analysis. The findings of this study are as follows: (1) There is a significant and positive correlation between teacher quality of teaching with the outcomes of student learning at the vocational high school; (2) There is a significant and positive correlation between learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning at the vocational high school, and (3) there is a significant and positive correlation between the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning at the school. That is, if the use of appropriate the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity, then the outcomes of student learning at the school. Finally it can be concluded that to improve the outcomes of student learning, it has to be followed by an improvement of teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity.

  11. A Qualitative Research on the Teaching Strategies and Class Applications of the High School Teachers Who Teach English in Turkey as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocer, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, whichever position the individuals work in, they feel the need to learn a foreign language even a second foreign language. In parallel with the need for a foreign language, the importance of the foreign language teaching increases. In language teaching, conditions such as the facilities of the environment, learner's features, the social…

  12. Effects of Gender on Teachers' Perceptions of School Environment, Teaching Efficacy, Stress and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van Dat

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how teachers' perceptions of school environment factors, teaching efficacy, teacher stress and job satisfaction, and to determine whether gender was a differentiating factor. A total of 387 Vietnamese junior high school teachers completed one questionnaire for four sections about school-level environment, teaching efficacy,…

  13. Pedagogical Moments as method for teaching optics in High School: what is necessary for us to see?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Briz Albuquerque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of optical is traditionally restricted to the geometrical aspects, disregarding physical phenomena. It is necessary to provoke a change in the traditional approach, by following more current parameters and curriculum guidelines to focus on the study and explanation of everyday phenomena. In this work, a thematic proposal for groups is presented, based on pedagogical moments. From the analysis of the audio transcriptions of one of the topics in a High School class, the potential and limitations of this activity, which provided an excellent learning opportunity for students, will be discussed. Other aspect observed was an increase of students’ interest in scientific topics.

  14. [Teaching evaluation at Medical School, UNAM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Gómez, Luz Elena; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Alaminos-Sager, Isabel Luisa

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a synthesis of what has been done in the Teaching Evaluation Program at the Medical School of the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM). The Program involves three questionnaires of the students' opinion that evaluate professors of the basic and sociomedical areas, microbiology and parasitology laboratory and surgery. Between 1994 and 2003, 134,811 questionnaires were answered to evaluate the teaching performance of 6262 professors of pregraduate students. Although the evaluation of teaching through a single way is insufficient, the results obtained allow us to affirm that the Medical School at UNAM has a good professor staff, as well as they are useful for the design of programs dedicated to the acknowledgment of excellence and the needs for teaching education.

  15. THE POPULARIZATION OF ASTRONOMY IN THE TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY: an experience in the middle and high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Balbino Cavalcante

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a very old man's concern to know the mysteries of the universe. Geography is defined as the study of the relationship between space and society, is, par excellence, discipline and interdisciplinary teaching should focus on various aspects of society and nature. The present study was aimed to popularize astronomy in Geography lessons of elementary and secondary public and private schools of the municipality the of Passa e Fica/RN, with reference to the achievement of the Olympiad of Astronomy and Astronautics - OBA, sponsored by the Institute Physics - UERJ in partnership with the Sociedade Astronômica Brasileira (SAB and the Agência Espacial Brasileira (AEB. The achievement of this Article, the following steps were undertaken: literature search and mapping, field survey;-class ride to Centro de Lançamento de Foguetes da Barreira do Inferno, em Natal/RN; lectures, telescopic observations, workshops for carrying out activities practices such as the sundial, replica rocket, compass; classroom discussion of the data collected, the material made with exposure and mobilization involving the school community and the Government. According to the results, interdisciplinary work between geography and astronomy produced a privileged space for the construction and popularization of scientific knowledge founded on the reality experienced by the student, always with a critical and constructive, which often is ignored in school work. RESUMO: É muito antiga a preocupação do homem em conhecer os mistérios do universo. A Geografia é definida como o estudo das relações entre o espaço e as sociedades, é, por excelência, uma disciplina interdisciplinar e seu ensino deve enfocar diversos aspectos da sociedade e da natureza. O presente trabalho teve objetivo de popularizar a Astronomia nas aulas de Geografia dos ensinos fundamental e médio das escolas públicas e particulares do município de Passa e Fica/RN; tendo como referência a realiza

  16. Teaching computer science at school: some ideas

    OpenAIRE

    Bodei, Chiara; Grossi, Roberto; Lagan?, Maria Rita; Righi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    As a young discipline, Computer Science does not rely on longly tested didactic procedures. This allows the experimentation of innovative teaching methods at schools, especially in early childhood education. Our approach is based on the idea that abstracts notions should be gained as the final result of a learning path made of concrete and touchable steps. To illustrate our methodology, we present some of the teaching projects we proposed.

  17. Subject related teaching in udeskole (outdoor school)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Karen Seierøe

    Subject related teaching in udeskole In this symposium, subject related teaching on a regular basis in the outdoors, known as udeskole will be described and discussed. Based on recent and ongoing research and development, the education taking the place of teaching into account of the learning...... will identify the necessity of doing research into the field, as 18,4% of all Danish schools is shown to have one or more classes working with udeskole (Barfod et al, 2016). Secondly, the subject related teaching in the outdoors will be exemplified by four research projects. First, the subject ‘Danish...... teaching in the outdoors will be supplemented with recent research upon barriers for using external learning environments ‘the open school’ in Skive Muncipiality. Closing the seminar will be a presentation of the national Danish Network UdeskoleNet and its application. Sources: Barfod, K., Ejbye-Ernst, N...

  18. The implementation of multiple intelligences based teaching model to improve mathematical problem solving ability for student of junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasni, Nurli; Fatimah, Siti; Yulanda, Syerli

    2017-05-01

    This research aims to achieve some purposes such as: to know whether mathematical problem solving ability of students who have learned mathematics using Multiple Intelligences based teaching model is higher than the student who have learned mathematics using cooperative learning; to know the improvement of the mathematical problem solving ability of the student who have learned mathematics using Multiple Intelligences based teaching model., to know the improvement of the mathematical problem solving ability of the student who have learned mathematics using cooperative learning; to know the attitude of the students to Multiple Intelligences based teaching model. The method employed here is quasi-experiment which is controlled by pre-test and post-test. The population of this research is all of VII grade in SMP Negeri 14 Bandung even-term 2013/2014, later on two classes of it were taken for the samples of this research. A class was taught using Multiple Intelligences based teaching model and the other one was taught using cooperative learning. The data of this research were gotten from the test in mathematical problem solving, scale questionnaire of the student attitudes, and observation. The results show the mathematical problem solving of the students who have learned mathematics using Multiple Intelligences based teaching model learning is higher than the student who have learned mathematics using cooperative learning, the mathematical problem solving ability of the student who have learned mathematics using cooperative learning and Multiple Intelligences based teaching model are in intermediate level, and the students showed the positive attitude in learning mathematics using Multiple Intelligences based teaching model. As for the recommendation for next author, Multiple Intelligences based teaching model can be tested on other subject and other ability.

  19. Development of Teaching Materials Based Interactive Scientific Approach towards the Concept of Social Arithmetic For Junior High School Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, M. K.; Pujiastuti, H.; Assaat, L. D.

    2017-02-01

    The scientific approach is the characteristic of the curriculum 2013. In learning to use a scientific approach, learning process consists of five stages: observe, ask, try, reasoning and convey. In the curriculum 2013 the source of learning is a book, print media, electronic and about nature or relevant learning resources. Most of the print instructional materials on the market does not appropriate in the curriculum 2013. Teaching materials with a scientific approach, beside that to the teaching materials should motivate students to not be lazy, do not get bored, and more eager to learn mathematics. So the development of scientific-based interactive teaching materials that if this approach to answer the challenge. The purpose of this research is to create teaching materials appropriate to the curriculum 2013 that is based on scientific approach and interactive. This study used research and developed methodology. The results of this study are scientific based interactive teaching materials can be used by learners. That can be used by learners are then expected to study teaching materials can be used in android smartphone and be used portable.

  20. Journalism Beyond High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the shift from high school journalism to college journalism for students. Describes the role of the high school journalism advisor in that process. Offers checklists for getting to know a college publication. Outlines ways high school journalism teachers can take advantage of journalism resources available at local colleges and…

  1. Evaluating High School IT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Since its inception in 1997, Cisco's curriculum has entered thousands of high schools across the U.S. and around the world for two reasons: (1) Cisco has a large portion of the computer networking market, and thus has the resources for and interest in developing high school academies; and (2) high school curriculum development teams recognize the…

  2. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  3. The Effect of Teaching Methods and Learning Styles on Students’ English Achievement (An Experimental Study at Junior High School 1 Pasangkayu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Munir

    2019-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research are to determine the effects of teaching methods (STAD and jigsaw and learning styles (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic on students’ English achievement. This research is an experimental study conducted at Junior High School Pasangkayu in 2014 with 213 sample which is selected stratified-randomly (n = 68. The results of the research are as follow: (1 English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than those of taught with jigsaw; (2 there is no significant difference in  English achievement among visual, auditory, and kinesthetic students; (3 there is any significant effect of interaction among teaching method and learning styles on students’ learning English achievement. The research also find out that for visual students, studying English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than that of students taught with jigsaw; for auditory students, learning English achievement  of students taught with jigsaw is better than that of students taught with STAD; and for kinesthetic students, English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than that of students taught with jigsaw. To sum up, STAD is more effective than jigsaw in improving students’ English achievement. STAD is suitable to improve English achievement of visual and kinesthetic students, and jigsaw is suitable to improve English achievement of auditory students.

  4. On the Legal Issues of Teaching Evolution in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to effectively teach evolution to all students, even those resistant to learning evolution, science teachers may question the extent to which religion can legally be discussed in the public high school science classroom. Evolution is taught from a variety of approaches, each of which has legal implications. Four approaches to teaching…

  5. Teaching History Then and Now: A Story of Stability and Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuban, Larry

    2016-01-01

    In "Teaching History Then and Now," Larry Cuban explores the teaching of history in American high schools during the past half-century. Drawing on his early career experience as a high school history educator and his more recent work as a historian of US education policy and practice, Cuban examines how determined reformers have and have…

  6. Teaching School Physics. A UNESCO Source Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John L., Ed.

    This UNESCO source book on teaching physics in schools provides a synthesis of views and policies prevalent throughout the world with respect to physics education. The book's contents are contributed by educators from several nations who have been able to give an international outlook in the discussion of various aspects of physics education. The…

  7. Teaching for Successful Intelligence Raises School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Torff, Bruce; Grigorenko, Elena

    1998-01-01

    A "successful intelligence" intervention improved school achievement for a group of 225 ethnically diverse third-graders, both on performance assessments measuring analytical, creative, and practical achievements and on conventional multiple-choice memory assessments. Teaching for triarchic thinking facilitates factual recall, because learning…

  8. Resources for Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Paul; Newsam, Andy; Roberts, Sarah; Mason, Tom; Baruch, John

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at a selection of resources currently available for use in the teaching of astronomy in UK schools. It is by no means an exhaustive list but it highlights a variety of free resources that can be used in the classroom to help engage students of all ages with astronomy and space science. It also lists several facilities with a…

  9. Effectiveness of the use of question-driven levels of inquiry based instruction (QD-LOIBI) assisted visual multimedia supported teaching material on enhancing scientific explanation ability senior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandi, A.; Muslim; Samsudin, A.; Hermita, N.; Supriyatman

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of the use of Question-Driven Levels of Inquiry Based Instruction (QD-LOIBI) assisted visual multimedia supported teaching materials on enhancing senior high school students scientific explanation ability has been studied. QD-LOIBI was designed by following five-levels of inquiry proposed by Wenning. Visual multimedia used in teaching materials included image (photo), virtual simulation and video phenomena. QD-LOIBI assisted teaching materials supported by visual multimedia were tried out on senior high school students at one high school in one district in West Java. A quasi-experiment method with design one experiment group (n = 31) and one control group (n = 32) were used. Experimental group were given QD-LOIBI assisted teaching material supported by visual multimedia, whereas the control group were given QD-LOIBI assisted teaching materials not supported visual multimedia. Data on the ability of scientific explanation in both groups were collected by scientific explanation ability test in essay form concerning kinetic gas theory concept. The results showed that the number of students in the experimental class that has increased the category and quality of scientific explanation is greater than in the control class. These results indicate that the use of multimedia supported instructional materials developed for implementation of QD-LOIBI can improve students’ ability to provide explanations supported by scientific evidence gained from practicum activities and applicable concepts, laws, principles or theories.

  10. The Influence of the Application of Personal Response Systems on the Effects of Teaching and Learning Physics at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Slawomir; Kimla, Damian; Jarosz, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    We report on the effectiveness of using interactive personal response systems in teaching physics in secondary schools. Our research were conducted over the period of 2013-2016 using the system called clickers. The idea is based on a reciprocal interaction allowing one to ask questions and receive immediate responses from all the students…

  11. Embedded Simultaneous Prompting Procedure to Teach STEM Content to High School Students with Moderate Disabilities in an Inclusive Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Sara; Collins, Belva C.; Knight, Victoria; Spriggs, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Effects of an embedded simultaneous prompting procedure to teach STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) content to three secondary students with moderate intellectual disabilities in an inclusive general education classroom were evaluated in the current study. Students learned discrete (i.e., geometric figures, science vocabulary, or use of…

  12. A Comparative Study on Beliefs of Grammar Teaching between High School English Teachers and Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fangfang; Lin, Yuewu

    2016-01-01

    Grammar is "a system of rules governing the conventional arrangement and relationship of words in a sentence" (Brown 1994) which can facilitate the acquisition of a foreign language and is conducive for cultivating comprehensive language competence. Most teachers regard grammar as a frame of English learning. The grammar teaching beliefs…

  13. Teaching Games for Understanding in American High-School Soccer: A Quantitative Data Analysis Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Stephen; Cushion, Christopher J.; Wegis, Heidi M.; Massa-Gonzalez, Ada N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous research examining the effectiveness of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach has been equivocal. This has been hampered by a dependence on a comparative (i.e., "which method is best?") theoretical framework. An alternative "practice-referenced" framework has the potential to examine the effectiveness of TGfU…

  14. Teachers' Views on Implementing Storytelling as a Way to Motivate Inquiry Learning in High-School Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ran; Yayon, Malka; Katchevich, Dvora; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Fortus, David; Eilks, Ingo; Hofstein, Avi

    2017-01-01

    Educational research and policy suggest inquiry as one of the most prominent ways of promoting effective science education. However, traditional approaches towards inquiry learning are not always sufficiently motivating for all learners. The EU-funded project, TEMI--Teaching Enquiry with Mysteries Incorporated, suggests that mysterious scientific…

  15. Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching STSE-Based High School Physics: Implications for Post-Secondary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Katarin

    2014-01-01

    Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE) education has received attention in educational research, policy, and science curricula development, yet less advancement has been made in moving theory into practice. There are many examples of STSE-based teaching in science at the elementary and secondary levels, yet little has focused…

  16. Teaching and learning cinema and visual languages through economics-business studies and law in high school: An experimental interdisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Poli; Fulvio Benussi

    2016-01-01

    In Italy, little is being done to promote cinema studies and the ability to analyse films and/or multimedia works among high school students. Although Italian legislation provides guidelines on specific learning objectives, activities and content to be included in high school courses, film and media language is still not encouraged in schools. The pilot introduction of cinema at the C. Tenca High School in Milan had the aim of demonstrating the value of film as an educational and epistemologi...

  17. Teaching law in medical schools: first, reflect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amy T

    2012-01-01

    Law is now routinely included in the medical school curriculum, often incorporated into bioethics and/or practice of medicine coursework. There seems to lack, however, a systematic understanding of what works in terms of getting across an effective depth and breadth of legal knowledge for medical students - or what such would even look like. Moreover, and more critically, while some literature addresses these what, when, how, and who questions, a more fundamental question is left unanswered: why teach law in medical school? This article suggests a process to reveal a more consensual understanding of this latter question. The author highlights findings and recommendations of some of the leading literature to date related to teaching law in medical schools, and also recent U.K. projects addressing legal teaching in medical schools. Reflecting on these materials and activities, the author suggests that we take a "pause" before we argue for more or different legal topics within the medical curriculum. Before we alter the curricula for more and/or different "law," first, it is critical to have a meaningful, stakeholder-driven, consensus-seeking discussion of the goals of legal education: why do we think it matters that medical students learn about "the law"? © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  18. Crustal movement and plate motion as observed by GPS baseline ranging - trial to make teaching materials for middle- and high-school earth science education by teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2009-12-01

    Japanese government established the system for renewing educational personnel certificates in 2007 and mandated the adoption of it in April 2009 (cf. “2007 White Paper on Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology”, available at http://www.mext.go.jp/english/). The new system shows that the valid period for each regular certificate after the renewal system adoption (April 1, 2009) is until the end of the fiscal year after ten years from satisfying the qualifications required for the certificate. Only persons who have attended over 30 hours and passed the examination in the certificate renewal courses before the expiration of the valid period can renew their certificate which is valid for next ten years. The purpose of this system is for teachers to acquire the latest knowledge and skills. Certificate renewal courses authorized by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan are offered by universities. Attendees will choose based on their specialty and awareness of issues from the various courses with education curriculums and. To renew their certificates, they should include (1) items regarding the latest trends and issues in education (12 hours) and (2) items regarding their speciality and other educational enhancement (three 6-hours course: total 18 hours). In 2008, before the adoption, provisional certificate renewal courses were offered for trial by more than 100 universities. The author offered a 6-hour course titled by “Development of teaching materials for school pupils to make understand the dynamic motion of the earth - utilising the results of the GPS ranging”. This course was targeted mainly for science teachers of middle- and high-schools. The goal of this course was for the attendees to understand the role of GPS ranging for the direct observation of the crustal movement and plate motion, and to produce the teaching materials possibly used in the classrooms. The offering of this course is aiming finally at

  19. Teaching Image-Processing Concepts in Junior High School: Boys' and Girls' Achievements and Attitudes towards Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Moshe; Asad, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Background: This research focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of a course on image-processing principles aimed at middle-school students. Purpose: The overarching purpose of the study was that of integrating the learning of subjects in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and linking the learning of these…

  20. On Teaching Problem Solving in School Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkki Pehkonen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with a brief overview of the situation throughout the world regarding problem solving. The activities of the ProMath group are then described, as the purpose of this international research group is to improve mathematics teaching in school. One mathematics teaching method that seems to be functioning in school is the use of open problems (i.e., problem fields. Next we discuss the objectives of the Finnish curriculum that are connected with problem solving. Some examples and research results are taken from a Finnish–Chilean research project that monitors the development of problem-solving skills in third grade pupils. Finally, some ideas on “teacher change” are put forward. It is not possible to change teachers, but only to provide hints for possible change routes: the teachers themselves should work out the ideas and their implementation.

  1. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-09-01

    students into a class research project that employs simple materials but leads to an elegant solution. It is highly likely that her students' conceptual understanding of solution properties, density, heat capacity, phase change, diffusion, and scientific inquiry was greatly enhanced by the experience. Other accounts of research by high school students in class, small-group, and individual settings will be published in future issues. I hope that the various approaches described will stimulate new ideas for student-conducted research to facilitate learning. One frustration that high school teachers and students may experience is difficult access to instrumentation needed to carry out investigations. Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) and other new technologies provide some relatively low-cost solutions to the problem, but the cost of specialized sensors can still be a barrier. In this issue a method for constructing an electrode for determining carbon dioxide concentration is described (p 1253). The article is not identified with Secondary School Chemistry mark (t) because it might not be of interest to a large number of high school teachers, but if the idea is appealing I encourage you to read the article. JCE has received several submissions from high school teachers describing devices constructed by their students, so I know there is some interest in low-cost build-it-yourself instrumentation. If you are among those who find this type of article interesting, please let me know. It will guide me in assigning the SSC icon to articles. Beginning Anew, Again For many readers, this issue will arrive only a few weeks or days before the beginning of the new school year. Others will already have begun the new school year. One of the joys of teaching lies in the cyclic nature of the school year. Ideas from summer workshops and conferences can be developed and implemented. Fresh faces in our classrooms provide another opportunity to try new approaches and to perfect proven teaching

  2. Improving the teaching and learning of science in a suburban junior high school on Long Island: Achieving parity through cogenerative dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Eileen Perman

    The research in this dissertation focuses on ways to improve the teaching and learning of science in a suburban junior high school on Long Island, New York. The study is my attempt to find ways to achieve parity in my classroom in terms of success in science. I was specifically looking for ways to encourage Black female students in my classroom and in other classrooms to continue their science education into the upper grades. The participants were the 27 students in the class, a friend of one of the students, and I, as the teacher-researcher. In order to examine the ways in which structure mediates the social and historical contexts of experiences in relation to teacher and student practices in the classroom, I used collaborative research; autobiographical reflection; the sociology of emotions; immigration, racialization, and ethnicity, and cogenerative dialogues (cogens) as tools. Cogenerative dialogues are a way for students and teachers to accept shared responsibility for teaching and learning. This study is of importance because of my school's very diverse student body. The school has a large minority population and therefore shares many of the characteristics of urban schools. In my study I look at why there are so few Black female students in the advanced science courses offered by our district and how this problem can be addressed. I used a variety of qualitative approaches including critical ethnography and micro analysis to study the teaching and learning of science. In addition to the usual observational, methodological, and theoretical field notes, I videotaped and audiotaped lessons and had discussions with students and teachers, one-on-one and in groups. In the first year the cogenerative group consisted of two Black female students. In the second year of the study there were four Black and one White-Hispanic female students in the cogen group. In my research I studied the interactions of the students between lessons and during laboratory activities as

  3. Teaching planetary sciences to elementary school teachers: Programs that work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Lebofsky, Nancy R.

    1993-01-01

    Planetary sciences can be used to introduce students to the natural world which is a part of their lives. Even children in an urban environment are aware of such phenomena as day and night, shadows, and the seasons. It is a science that transcends cultures, has been prominent in the news in recent years, and can generate excitement in young minds as no other science can. Planetary sciences also provides a useful tool for understanding other sciences and mathematics, and for developing problem solving skills which are important in our technological world. However, only 15 percent of elementary school teachers feel very well qualified to teach earth/space science, while better than 80 percent feel well qualified to teach reading; many teachers avoid teaching science; very little time is actually spent teaching science in the elementary school: 19 minutes per day in K-3 and 38 minutes per day in 4-6. While very little science is taught in elementary and middle school, earth/space science is taught at the elementary level in less than half of the states. It was pointed out that science is not generally given high priority by either teachers or school districts, and is certainly not considered on a par with language arts and mathematics. Therefore, in order to teach science to our youth, we must empower our teachers, making them familiar and comfortable with existing materials. In our earlier workshops, several of our teachers taught in classrooms where the majority of the students were Hispanic (over 90 percent). However, few space sciences materials existed in Spanish. Therefore, most of our materials could not be used effectively in the classroom. To address this issue, NASA materials were translated into Spanish and a series of workshops for bilingual classroom teachers from Tucson and surrounding cities was conducted. Our space sciences workshops and our bilingual classroom workshops and how they address the needs of elementary school teachers in Arizona are

  4. Who teaches science in Alagoas? A quantitative analysis of non-specialist teaching at primary and secondary schools in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Robert; Fireman, Elton; Gomes, Jose Renan

    2013-01-01

    While non-specialist teaching increasingly becomes an object of public interest, there is little data available on the actual educational background of teachers giving classes outside their specialisation. This work analyses the data collected by the Brazilian Ministry of Education from public and private schools in Alagoas (Brazil), with a special focus on science education at primary and secondary schools. We find that the phenomena of non-specialist teaching is highly subject specific. For...

  5. Fixing High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Reports from national education organizations in the US indicate the sorry state of high schools in the country that are accused of failing to adequately prepare their graduates for college or for the workforce, highlighting what is a serious problem in light of the troubled state of the US economy. The need to improve high schools is urgent and…

  6. High School Principals and the High School Journalism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study asked selected high school principals to respond to statements about the value of high school journalism to the high school student and about the rights and responsibilities of the high school journalist. These responses were then checked against such information as whether or not the high school principal had worked on a high school…

  7. Teaching Computation in Primary School without Traditional Written Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Concerns regarding the dominance of the traditional written algorithms in schools have been raised by many mathematics educators, yet the teaching of these procedures remains a dominant focus in in primary schools. This paper reports on a project in one school where the staff agreed to put the teaching of the traditional written algorithm aside,…

  8. The Analysis on Emotional Education in Vocational School English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰州职业技术学院 730070

    2015-01-01

    In the time of advancing quality education, emotion education has been paid more and more attention. English teaching is both language teaching progress and emotional communication progress. Therefore, emotional education is extremely important and indispensable in vocational school classroom teaching. However, the current application of vocational school emotional education in English classroom teaching is still relatively weak. Based on the theory of emotional education, this paper attempts to explore the methods and strategies of applying emotional education in vocational school English classroom teaching. It has important theoretical significance on promoting the comprehensive development of the vocational school students, improving English teaching effect, promoting the healthy and sustainable development of the vocational school education, and enriching and developing the emotional teaching psychology and cognitive psychology theory.

  9. An empirical study on perceptive teaching in junior middle school English in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifen He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the middle school English teaching has gotten a lot of achievements in China, some problems still exist, such as too much emphasis on words, grammars and structures. Perceptive teaching can be helpful for English teaching from a new perspective. There are three teaching procedures in the perceptive teaching: eliciting to acquire text meaning, creating situation to experience and comprehending to get the internal values in individuals. This thesis did the experimental research on English perspective teaching in middle school in China. The results show that in perceptive teaching, learners’ cognitive abilities can be improved; learners can show great interests in learning and shape positive attitudes; their learning methods can greatly be promoted. For different level learners, it shows that middle level learners can gain more benefit than the high level or low level learners in English perceptive teaching.

  10. High School Book Fairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Many secondary students have given up the joy of reading. When asked why they don't read for pleasure, students came up with many different reasons, the first being lack of time. High school students are busy with after school jobs, sports, homework, etc. With the growing number of students enrolled in AP classes, not only is there not much time…

  11. Investing in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Strapped for cash, a Massachusetts high school creates its own venture capital fund to incentivize teachers to create programs that improve student learning. The result has been higher test scores and higher job satisfaction. One important program is credited with helping close the achievement gap at the school, while others have helped ambitious…

  12. Antecedents of Teachers' Educational Beliefs about Mathematics and Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching among In-Service Teachers in High Poverty Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkin, Danya M.; Ekmekci, Adem; Papakonstantinou, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the antecedents of three types of educational beliefs about mathematics among 151 teachers predominantly working in high poverty schools. Studies across various countries have found that teachers in high poverty schools are less likely to enact instructional approaches that align with mathematics reform standards set by…

  13. Teaching the Anxiety of Learning a Foreign Language That Influences High School Students in Learning French as a Second Foreign Language "The Case of Denizli"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusçu, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons of anxiety levels of high school students who learn French as a second foreign language. The sample of the study consisted of four hundred fifty-six students from two high schools in Denizli province in 2015-2016 academic year. In this study, the effects of variables such as learners' gender,…

  14. Two Contrasting Approaches to Building High School Teacher Capacity to Teach About Local Climate Change Using Powerful Geospatial Data and Visualization Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The presentation will compare and contrast two different place-based approaches to helping high school science teachers use geospatial data visualization technology to teach about climate change in their local regions. The approaches are being used in the development, piloting, and dissemination of two projects for high school science led by the author: the NASA-funded Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) and the NSF funded Studying Topography, Orographic Rainfall, and Ecosystems with Geospatial Information Technology (STORE). DICCE is bringing an extensive portal of Earth observation data, the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure, to high school classrooms. STORE is making available data for viewing results of a particular IPCC-sanctioned climate change model in relation to recent data about average temperatures, precipitation, and land cover for study areas in central California and western New York State. Across the two projects, partner teachers of academically and ethnically diverse students from five states are participating in professional development and pilot testing. Powerful geospatial data representation technologies are difficult to implement in high school science because of challenges that teachers and students encounter navigating data access and making sense of data characteristics and nomenclature. Hence, on DICCE, the researchers are testing the theory that by providing a scaffolded technology-supported process for instructional design, starting from fundamental questions about the content domain, teachers will make better instructional decisions. Conversely, the STORE approach is rooted in the perspective that co-design of curricular materials among researchers and teacher partners that work off of "starter" lessons covering focal skills and understandings will lead to the most effective utilizations of the technology in the classroom. The projects' goals and strategies for student

  15. Humanizing the High School: The Power of Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.; Gagnepain, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what high schools can do to improve student relationships, highlighting a St. Louis area school's efforts to develop peer-mentoring and peer-mediation programs. Offers guidelines to help other schools develop a school culture that promotes caring, teaches constructive conflict resolution, and reduces potential for violence. (MLH)

  16. Using "To Kill a Mockingbird" as a Conduit for Teaching about the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Steffany Comfort

    2013-01-01

    The author primarily teaches traditional high school English texts in a largely white, middle-class school, but the method she uses allows her to address important issues relevant to students. One unit she teaches is an investigation of the criminal justice system and a variety of issues related to the school-to-prison pipeline. A crucial text…

  17. Attractor states in teaching and learning processes : a study of out-of-school science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geveke, Carla H.; Steenbeek, Henderien W.; Doornenbal, Jeannette M.; Van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2017-01-01

    In order for out-of-school science activities that take place during school hours but outside the school context to be successful, instructors must have sufficient pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) to guarantee high-quality teaching and learning. We argue that PCK is a quality of the

  18. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-08-01

    Care to Share? An Informal Syllabus Exchange A recent email message from Thomas Shiland, who teaches at Saratoga Springs Senior High School, noted that the process of revising the high school chemistry syllabus is underway in New York State. He expressed a strong interest in helping construct a chemistry syllabus that represents the best thinking about appropriate content. He wondered if it would be possible to develop a way in which different secondary chemistry syllabi could easily be exchanged. It is likely that readers from other states and countries are involved in a similar process and might also be interested in exchanging syllabi. Many states do not use the term syllabus to describe their guiding curricular document for chemistry but rather refer to it as a framework or as guidelines. In most cases, the document includes a list of key ideas or topics, performance indicators, and the major understandings associated with each key idea. Such documents would be appropriate for exchange among those of you involved in the revision process. If you are interested in arranging an exchange please contact me by email at j.e.howell@usm.edu or by mail at J. E. Howell, Box 5043, USM, Hattiesburg, MS39406-5043, USA. High School Day Information The High School Chemistry Program at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana will be held Sunday, August 22, 1999, at the Doubletree Hotel, 300 Canal Street. If you wish to register only for the High School Day activities, which includes a pass to the ACS Exposition, a special registration form is available from Lillie Tucker-Akin, 2800 Reynard Dr., Tupelo, MS38801; sci4me@aol.com; fax: 662/566-7906. Advance registration is 25 and the cost of the High School Luncheon is 12. Register in advance by August 1, 1999, or from 7:45 to 8:30 a.m. at the High School Day table in the conference room area of the Doubletree. The workshop schedule is shown below. Secondary School Feature Articles * Exploring the

  19. The Teach for America RockCorps, Year 1: Turning Authentic Research Experiences in Geophysics for STEM Teachers into Modeling Instruction™ in High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, D. R., Jr.; Neubauer, H.; Barber, T. J.; Griffith, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    National reform efforts such as the Next Generation Science Standards, Modeling Instruction™, and Project Lead the Way (PLTW) seek to more closely align K-12 students' STEM learning experiences with the practices of scientific and engineering inquiry. These reform efforts aim to lead students toward deeper understandings constructed through authentic scientific and engineering inquiry in classrooms, particularly via model building and testing, more closely mirroring the professional practice of scientists and engineers, whereas traditional instructional approaches have typically been lecture-driven. In this vein, we describe the approach taken in the first year of the Teach for America (TFA) RockCorps, a five-year, NSF-sponsored project designed to provide authentic research experiences for secondary teachers and foster the development of Geophysics-themed teaching materials through cooperative lesson plan development and purchase of scientific equipment. Initially, two teachers were selected from the local Dallas-Fort Worth Region of TFA to participate in original research studying the failure of rocks under impulsive loads using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB). For the teachers, this work provides a context from which to derive Geophysics-themed lesson plans for their courses, Physics/Pre-AP and Principles of Engineering (POE), offered at two large public high schools in Dallas ISD. The Physics course will incorporate principles of seismic wave propagation to allow students to develop a model of wave behavior, including velocity, refraction, and resonance, and apply the model to predict propagation properties of a variety of waves through multiple media. For the PLTW POE course, tension and compression testing of a variety of rock samples will be incorporated into materials properties and testing units. Also, a project will give a group of seniors in the PLTW Engineering Design and Development course at this certified NAF Academy of Engineering the

  20. Secondary school teachers' experiences of teaching pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... learners, and this requires a health facilitation model to enable teachers to assist pregnant learners such that they might better benefit from their schooling, and experience a positive health outcome. Key words: high risk pregnancy; learner pregnancy; school health services; teacher experiences; teenage pregnancy ...

  1. Timetabling at High Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias

    on the publicly available XHSTT format for modeling instances and solutions of the HSTP) and the Danish High School Timetabling Problem (DHSTP). For both problems a complex Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model is developed, and in both cases are empirical tests performed on a large number of real-life datasets......High school institutions face a number of important planning problems during each schoolyear. This Ph.D. thesis considers two of these planning problems: The High School Timetabling Problem (HSTP) and the Consultation Timetabling Problem (CTP). Furthermore a framework for handling various planning....... The second part contains the main scienti_c papers composed during the Ph.D. study. The third part of the thesis also contains scienti_c papers, but these are included as an appendix. In the HSTP, the goal is to obtain a timetable for the forthcoming school-year. A timetable consists of lectures scheduled...

  2. Teaching school children basic life support improves teaching and basic life support skills of medical students: A randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stefanie; Meier-Klages, Vivian; Michaelis, Maria; Sehner, Susanne; Harendza, Sigrid; Zöllner, Christian; Kubitz, Jens Christian

    2016-11-01

    The "kids save lives" joint-statement highlights the effectiveness of training all school children worldwide in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to improve survival after cardiac arrest. The personnel requirement to implement this statement is high. Until now, no randomised controlled trial investigated if medical students benefit from their engagement in the BLS-education of school children regarding their later roles as physicians. The objective of the present study is to evaluate if medical students improve their teaching behaviour and CPR-skills by teaching school children in basic life support. The study is a randomised, single blind, controlled trial carried out with medical students during their final year. In total, 80 participants were allocated alternately to either the intervention or the control group. The intervention group participated in a CPR-instructor-course consisting of a 4h-preparatory seminar and a teaching-session in BLS for school children. The primary endpoints were effectiveness of teaching in an objective teaching examination and pass-rates in a simulated BLS-scenario. The 28 students who completed the CPR-instructor-course had significantly higher scores for effective teaching in five of eight dimensions and passed the BLS-assessment significantly more often than the 25 students of the control group (Odds Ratio (OR): 10.0; 95%-CI: 1.9-54.0; p=0.007). Active teaching of BLS improves teaching behaviour and resuscitation skills of students. Teaching school children in BLS may prepare medical students for their future role as a clinical teacher and support the implementation of the "kids save lives" statement on training all school children worldwide in BLS at the same time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Teaching Cell Biology in Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francele de Abreu Carlan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic concepts of cell biology are essential for scientific literacy. However, because many aspects of cell theory and cell functioning are quite abstract, students experience difficulties understanding them. In this study, we investigated whether diverse teaching resources such as the use of replicas of Leeuwenhoek’s microscope, visualization of cells using an optical microscope, construction of three-dimensional cell models, and reading of a comic book about cells could mitigate the difficulties encountered when teaching cell biology to 8th-grade primary school students. The results suggest that these didactic activities improve students’ ability to learn concrete concepts about cell biology, such as the composition of living beings, growth, and cicatrization. Also, the development of skills was observed, as, for example, the notion of cell size. However, no significant improvements were observed in students’ ability to learn about abstract topics, such as the structures of subcellular organelles and their functions. These results suggest that many students in this age have not yet concluded Piaget’s concrete operational stage, indicating that the concepts required for the significant learning of abstract subjects need to be explored more thoroughly in the process of designing programs that introduce primary school students to cell biology.

  4. Little Schools on the Prairie Still Teach a Big Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindley, Mark M.

    1985-01-01

    Uses Cherry County, Nebraska, to exemplify current experiences of learning and teaching in a one-room school--Nebraska has 350 of the nation's nearly 800 one-room schools. Interviews parents and teachers who cherish their one-room schools because they provide quality education, convenience (relative to consolidated schools), and support for rural…

  5. Abstract Algebra for Algebra Teaching: Influencing School Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potential for aspects of abstract algebra to be influential for the teaching of school algebra (and early algebra). Using national standards for analysis, four primary areas common in school mathematics--and their progression across elementary, middle, and secondary mathematics--where teaching may be transformed by…

  6. Teaching - learning plan on nuclear energy for elementary school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    This is for teaching - learning curriculum about nuclear energy for elementary school students. It consist of four titles, which are I saved this much, learning energy through quiz, I work for nuclear power plant and would mayor build a nuclear power plant in our town? It was written to teach nuclear power plant and nuclear energy to elementary school students in easy way.

  7. Talking about teaching and learning mathematics in indigenous schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélida de Fátima Maia da Costa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To teach and to learn mathematics are not always conjugated concomitantly, particularly in the context of formal indigenous schools. This article puts in discussion some facts about the role of schools in indigenous communities, often mistakenly called Indian schools, as well as questions about the meaning of teaching mathematics in those contexts. Based on the concepts of ethnomathematics, it shows that a dialogue is possible between the traditional mathematical knowledge of various ethnic groups of the Amazon and the knowledge disseminated by formal school teaching practice.

  8. Confronting Barriers to Teaching Elementary Science: After-School Science Teaching Experiences for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Tina; Smith, Suzanne; Hallar, Brittan

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the transition of eight elementary preservice teachers into student teaching after participating in a science methods course that included a significant amount of teaching after-school science to elementary grade students. These eight participants had a chance to practice teaching inquiry-based science and to reform…

  9. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory Howell, J.

    1999-11-01

    many of our readers. The High School/College Interface Luncheon was part of the very rich day-long High School Program at the New Orleans ACS Meeting. Shown here (from left) are Glenn Crosby, the luncheon speaker; Lillie Tucker-Akin, the High School Day program chair; and Fred Johnson, Assistant Superintendent of Shelby County (TN) schools and Immediate Past President of NSTA. The recipient of the James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching is Frank G. Cardulla, who taught for many years at Niles North High School, Skokie, Illinois. His extensive record of service to fellow teachers includes editing the JCE "View from My Classroom" feature for several years and writing several articles, as well as his recent appointment to the JCE Board of Publication. The recipient of the George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education is Jerry A. Bell of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. An author of numerous articles appearing in JCE and a member of the JCE Board of Publication for several years, he currently serves as Board Chair. The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education Readers who attended the 15th BCCE in Waterloo, Ontario, know that much of the programming at these conferences is of interest to high school teachers. Many work shops, papers, and demonstrations are presented by high school teachers. There are many other outstanding papers and posters, plenary speakers, and exciting demonstrations. The 16th BCCE will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, July 30-August 3, 2000. Among the high school teachers already scheduled to present workshops at the 16th BCCE are George Hague, Lynn Hershey, and Jack Randall, and there will be many more before the program is completed. The High School Chemistry Program Chair is Tim Graham, Roosevelt High School (MI). The Organizing Committee is seeking the assistance of local sections of the American Chemical Society within a 300-mile radius of Ann Arbor in providing support for high school

  10. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-02-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles JCE Classroom Activity: #24. The Write Stuff: Using Paper Chromatography to Separate an Ink Mixture, p 176A Teaching Chemistry in the Midwinter Every year, forecasters around the world provide us with long-range predictions of what the seasons will afford us in the coming year. And each year, the weather provides a few surprises that the forecasters did not predict - such as a record amount of snow or record heat indexes, depending on where you live. Although the weatherman didn't predict it, we still must pull out our snow shovels or sun block and take the necessary steps to adapt to the situation. As teachers, we make predictions of teaching and learning goals that we aspire to achieve during a given year, and like the weather, the year brings surprises that aren't in line with our predictions. With that in mind, I would like to offer JCE as the scholastic snow shovel or sun shield you need to jump-start your class and reach the goals you have set. So find a warm (or cool) place, get comfortable, and spend some time with the February issue of JCE. Articles of General Interest in This Issue For readers living where snow falls, Williams's article on page 148 offers some historical background on the use of calcium chloride as a deicer. A diver that depends for its buoyancy upon gas given off by a chemical reaction is described by Derr, Lewis, and Derr in the article beginning on page 171. In her article appearing on pages 249-250, Wang describes a laboratory exercise that makes the mastery of solution preparation skills fun. The students' skill is tested by using the solutions they make to carry out the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction. For high school class applications I recommend use of 3% hydrogen peroxide, described as an option in the article. A well-organized approach to separating an ink mixture, with some possibly new twists, is laid out in the student- and teacher-friendly format of JCE Classroom Activity: #24, pages

  11. Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beineke, John A.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance" is an exploration of research, ideas, trends, and practices for educators who teach American history to adolescents from the middle grades through high school. Higher education faculty in history and professional education will also find the book germane to their work. Topics within the…

  12. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  13. Reshaping High School English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, Bruce

    This book takes up the question of what shape high school English studies should take in the coming years. It describes an English program that blends philosophical depth with classroom practicality. Drawing examples from commonly taught texts such as "Macbeth,""To Kill a Mockingbird," and "Lord of the Flies," the…

  14. National standards for high school psychology curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best of teachers to present all of psychology in a single course for students who begin with virtually no formal knowledge of psychology. The standards presented here constitute the first of two reports in this issue of the American Psychologist (January 2013) representing recent American Psychological Association (APA) policies that support high-quality instruction in the teaching of high school psychology. These standards provide curricular benchmarks for student learning in the high school course.

  15. "Read All about It," and Teach Kids Using School Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Raven

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation from Communicator, 29 (January 2006), 5-6, in which the author discusses the value of a newspaper as well as the benefits of having a student-run newspaper at a school and highlights the use of school newspapers as a teaching tool. A school newspaper is an excellent way for students to practice their writing and…

  16. REPRESENTATION OF ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS: POTENTIALY OF VIRTUAL GROUPS AS TOOLS FOR TEACHING- LEARNING IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Victor Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One tool that has been in evidence, especially among young people, is Facebook. It can be classified as a synchronous communication tool that allows communities of people with similar interests to discuss and exchange experiences in real time, promoting the sharing of information and the creation of collective knowledge, even if they being in different parts of the globe. In this paper we show that Facebook can be used as an educational tool to aid the work done in the classroom and the impact of creating closed groups in online social networking for educational purposes. The survey was conducted with a group of students at a private school in Bauru/SP. We investigated the interaction profile of students with a closed group created on Facebook and through a questionnaire analyzed whether students use virtual environments for personal or educational. The survey reveals students perceptions about relevant aspects and the potential use of this tool as teaching-learning strategy.

  17. Impact of virtual learning environment (VLE): A technological approach to genetics teaching on high school students' content knowledge, self-efficacy and career goal aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandi, Kamala M.

    This study examines the effect of a technology-based instructional tool 'Geniverse' on the content knowledge gains, Science Self-Efficacy, Technology Self-Efficacy, and Career Goal Aspirations among 283 high school learners. The study was conducted in four urban high schools, two of which have achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and two have not. Students in both types of schools were taught genetics either through Geniverse, a virtual learning environment or Dragon genetics, a paper-pencil activity embedded in traditional instructional method. Results indicated that students in all schools increased their knowledge of genetics using either type of instructional approach. Students who were taught using Geniverse demonstrated an advantage for genetics knowledge although the effect was small. These increases were more pronounced in the schools that had been meeting the AYP goal. The other significant effect for Geniverse was that students in the technology-enhanced classrooms increased in science Self-Efficacy while students in the non-technology enhanced classrooms decreased. In addition, students from Non-AYP schools showed an improvement in Science and Technology Self-Efficacy; however the effects were small. The implications of these results for the future use of technology-enriched classrooms were discussed. Keywords: Technology-based instruction, Self-Efficacy, career goals and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

  18. The distinction between key ideas in teaching school physics and key ideas in the discipline of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongyi

    2001-05-01

    The distinction between key ideas in teaching a high school science and key ideas in the corresponding discipline of science has been largely ignored in scholarly discourse about what science teachers should teach and about what they should know. This article clarifies this distinction through exploring how and why key ideas in teaching high school physics differ from key ideas in the discipline of physics. Its theoretical underpinnings include Dewey's (1902/1990) distinction between the psychological and the logical and Harré's (1986) epistemology of science. It analyzes how and why the key ideas in teaching color, the speed of light, and light interference at the high school level differ from the key ideas at the disciplinary level. The thesis is that key ideas in teaching high school physics can differ from key ideas in the discipline in some significant ways, and that the differences manifest Dewey's distinction. As a result, the article challenges the assumption of equating key ideas in teaching a high school science with key ideas in the corresponding discipline of science, and the assumption that having a college degree in science is sufficient to teach high school science. Furthermore, the article expands the concept of pedagogical content knowledge by arguing that key ideas in teaching high school physics constitute an essential component.

  19. THE TYPES OF REQUEST EXPRESSIONS USED IN NOVEL “HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS”: Their Appropriateness to ESL/EFL Teaching for Junior High School Students in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuzulul Isna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Novels can be authentic sources for learning ESL/EFL, especially in non-English speaking countries. They may present reliable learning references in the absence of native speakers. This article aims to identify the types of request expressions originated in novel “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” as well as their appropriateness for teaching ESL/EFL in aligment to current applied curriculum (2006 curriculum in junior high school level in Indonesia. This research employed a qualitative research which was based on content analysis methodology. The data analysis revealed the types of request expressions (Tsui, 1989 generated out of 110 items uttered by the characters in the novel. 65.5% of the finding matched the nine request expressions learning materials embedded in the 2006 curriculum. Indeed, this finding may significantly contribute to the addition of authentic English learning source, especially in teaching speaking skill.

  20. Implementation of Teaching Skills and Strategies in the Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choeda, Choeda; Kinley, Kinley

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Skills’ and ‘Teaching Strategies’ are two core (professional) modules offered at the two colleges of education in Bhutan to develop pedagogical knowledge and skills of student teachers. However, a tracer study (in press) done by Samtse College of Education [SCE] revealed teacher graduates...... of teaching skills and strategies in the schools. Teacher graduates, both male and female having working experience of three years and above, teaching in Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools, were selected as the participants in the study. Samples were drawn from the different parts of the country...... covering seventeen Dzongkhags. The study revealed adequate understanding of the concepts of professional modules. However, teachers were found to be grappling with the extra responsibilities affecting their planning to integrate skills and strategies into their teaching. Key words: Teaching skills...

  1. Using the System of Least Prompts to Teach Personal Hygiene Skills to a High School Student with Comorbid Visual Impairment and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Kristi M.; Walker, Virginia L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a workshop and follow-up coaching sessions on the implementation of the system of least prompts procedure by classroom team members and explored whether this intervention resulted in personal hygiene skill acquisition by a male high school student with comorbid visual impairment and autism…

  2. Research and Teaching: An Investigation of the Evolution of High School and Undergraduate Student Researchers' Understanding of Key Science Ethics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann

    2013-01-01

    High school and undergraduate research students were surveyed over the 10-week period of their summer research programs to investigate their understanding of key concepts in science ethics and whether their understanding changed over the course of their summer research experiences. Most of the students appeared to understand the issues relevant to…

  3. Comparing the Effects of Commercially Available and Custom-Made Video Prompting for Teaching Cooking Skills to High School Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Foster, Ashley L.; Bryant, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    The study compared the effects of using commercially available and custom-made video prompts on the completion of cooking recipes by four high school age males with a diagnosis of autism. An adapted alternating treatments design with continuous baseline, comparison, final treatment, and best treatment condition was used to compare the two…

  4. The Effectiveness of a Computer-Assisted Instruction Package in Supplementing Teaching of Selected Concepts in High School Chemistry: Writing Formulas and Balancing Chemical Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Camille L.

    Four classes of high school chemistry students (N=108) were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups to investigate the effectiveness of a computer assisted instruction (CAI) package during a unit on writing/naming of chemical formulas and balancing equations. Students in the experimental group received drill, review, and reinforcement…

  5. Investigating Your School's Science Teaching and Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mistilina; Bartiromo, Margo; Elko, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The authors report on their work with the Academy for Leadership in Science Instruction, a program targeted to help science teachers promote a science teaching and learning culture in their own schools.

  6. Contextual Teaching and Learning Approach of Mathematics in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvianiresa, D.; Prabawanto, S.

    2017-09-01

    The Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL) approach is an approach involving active students in the learning process to discover the concepts learned through to knowledge and experience of the students. Similar to Piaget’s opinion that learning gives students an actives trying to do new things by relating their experiences and building their own minds. When students to connecting mathematics with real life, then students can looking between a conceptual to be learned with a concept that has been studied. So that, students can developing of mathematical connection ability. This research is quasi experiment with a primary school in the city of Kuningan. The result showed that CTL learning can be successful, when learning used a collaborative interaction with students, a high level of activity in the lesson, a connection to real-world contexts, and an integration of science content with other content and skill areas. Therefore, CTL learning can be applied by techer to mathematics learning in primary schools.

  7. Repositioning teaching in Nigerian secondary schools using media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repositioning teaching in Nigerian secondary schools using media resources in a digital age. ... Lagos Journal of Library and Information Science ... that the new tools served as an added advantage on the traditional method of teaching and learning, especially in information delivery; channelled through media resources.

  8. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-01-01

    Ideas and Resources in This Issue This issue contains a broad spectrum of topics of potential interest to high school teachers, including chemical safety, history, demonstrations, laboratory activities, electrochemistry, small group learning, and instructional software. In his report on articles published recently in The Science Teacher, Steve Long includes annotated references from that journal, and also from JCE, that provide timely and practical information (pp 21-22). The chemical significance of several anniversaries that will occur in the year 2000 are discussed in an article by Paul Schatz (pp 11-14). Scientists and inventors mentioned include Dumas, Wöhler, Goodyear, Joliot-Curie, Krebs, Pauli, Kjeldahl, and Haworth. Several discoveries are also discussed, including development of the voltaic pile, the use of chlorine to purify water, and the discovery of element 97, berkelium. This is the fourth consecutive year that Schatz has written an anniversaries article (1-3). Although most readers probably do not plan to be teaching in the years 2097-3000, these articles can make a nice addition to your file of readily available historical information for use now in meeting NSES Content Standard G (4). In contrast to the short historical summaries, an in-depth account of the work of Herman Boerhaave is provided by Trinity School (NY) teacher Damon Diemente. You cannot recall having heard of Boerhaave? Diemente explains in detail how Boerhaave's scientific observations, imperfect though they were, contributed significantly to the understanding of temperature and heat by scientists who followed him. Chemical demonstrations attract the interest of most of us, and Kathy Thorsen discusses several that appeared in Chem 13 News during the past year (pp 18-20). Included are demonstrations relating to LeChâtelier's principle, electronegativity, and the synthesis and reactions of carbon monoxide. Ideas for investigating the hydrophobic nature of Magic Sand are given in JCE

  9. A National Survey of Teaching Artists Working in Schools: Background, Preparation, Efficacy and School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Scott; Fisk, Timarie

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have described the characteristics and employment situations of teaching artists in the United States. This study adds to that literature by describing the characteristics of teaching artists working in K-12 school environments, the nature of the classroom roles of such teaching artists, the professional development and supervision…

  10. English Teaching and Learning in Brazilian Regular Schools and Language Schools: A Study on Teachers' Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragozo, Carina Silva; Monawar, Mônica Deitos Stedile

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to diagnose, through a qualitative comparative study, the main differences concerning the teaching of English in Brazilian regular schools when compared to language schools. There has been a growing tendency of students to attend language schools while still having English classes at their regular schools, and this has led to a lot…

  11. Teachers' Perception of Team Teaching Middle School Mathematics in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perceptions of team teaching middle school mathematics in urban schools. The research questions focused on student academic performance and the impact that team teaching may have from the perspective of teachers. The theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, and Bruner formed the theoretical foundation…

  12. MODERN MEANS OF TEACHING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Iaburova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problems of teaching tools and resources used in the process of teaching foreign languages in primary school. The author gives the definition of the meanings “teaching resources”, “additional materials for teaching foreign languages», and their classification. The author pays attention to the fact that in the academic and upbringing process primary school teachers use different teaching resources in addition to the text-books as the basic means of teaching. That is why there is an evident reason for deep study of these kind materials, their classification. According to the way of presenting, teaching flash-cards and hand-outs as additional materials are pointed out. That is why the necessity of optimal and effective choice of these means of teaching depends on professional preparation of a teacher and teaching tools implementing in the academic process alongside with the text-books as the basic means of teaching foreign languages. The author notes that all these learning tools are not universal. They cannot completely replace a teacher or other learning tools. The author supports the idea of the need for optimum, deeply conscious and scientific approach to using additional educational resources in academic and upbringing process along with the textbook as the primary means of learning.

  13. Preparing Secondary Stem Teachers for High-Need Schools: Challenges of an Urban Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Rubén; Duchaine, Ellen L.; Reynosa, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Teaching residency programs that blend coursework with clinical experiences have emerged nationwide to prepare aspiring teachers for the demanding reality of teaching in high-need urban schools. The Teaching Residency Program for Critical Shortage Areas was created to help urban school districts with the challenge of recruiting and retaining…

  14. Standards for the High School Psychology Course. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganett, L. Lee

    The latest contribution to the content standards boom that began in the 1990s comes from the American Psychological Association (APA), which recently published "National Standards for the Teaching of High School Psychology." This Digest discusses: (1) the origin and purposes of the project to develop standards for high school psychology…

  15. CERN High School Teachers Training Programme meets DG

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    CERN's DG Rolf Heuer met with the participants of the High School Teachers Training Programme on 23 July 2014 for a Q&A Session. Following the interaction, he met with the HST Working Group collaborating on a lesson plan for teaching SESAME in high schools.

  16. Material Teaching Aids: Enhancement Tool for Teaching Essay Writing in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelia, Okonkwo Adaobi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of material teaching aids as enhancement tool for teaching essay writing in secondary schools in Ebonyi State. A 4-point Likert-scale questionnaire was used as the instrument. A trial test was conducted and tested for reliability and a value of 0.75 was obtained from the test. The instrument was…

  17. School Uniforms in Urban Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draa, Virginia Ann Bendel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the implementation of a mandatory uniform policy in urban public high schools improved school performance measures at the building level for rates of attendance, graduation, academic proficiency, and student conduct as measured by rates of suspensions and expulsions. Sixty-four secondary…

  18. School Gardens: Teaching and Learning outside the Front Door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, Rowena

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on two projects: one that investigated the impact of school gardens on primary children's learning and one that is currently exploring the pedagogies involved in teaching children in the garden. The evidence presented suggests that school gardens can be an interesting and effective way of engaging children with learning, but…

  19. What Teachers Want: Supporting Primary School Teachers in Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Angela; Schneider, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Impending change can provide us with the opportunity to rethink and renew the things that we do. The first phase of the Australian Curriculum implementation offers primary school teachers the chance to examine their approaches to science learning and teaching. This paper focuses on the perceptions of three primary school teachers regarding what…

  20. Education for Ethically Sensitive Teaching in Critical Incidents at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhimaki, Eija; Tirri, Kirsi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify and investigate critical incidents at school that require ethically sensitive teaching. This kind of knowledge is needed in teacher education to prepare future teachers for their profession. The data included narrative interviews with 12 teachers from four urban schools in Finland. Critical…

  1. How They Teach the Holocaust in Jewish Day Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Jeffrey Alan

    2017-01-01

    Though Holocaust education is of critical importance in the world of Jewish Day Schools, little research has been conducted about it. The purpose of this paper is to answer some critical questions about how they teach the Holocaust in Jewish Day Schools--the who, what, when, where, how, and why questions. Additionally, comparisons are made between…

  2. From Normal Schools to Primary Teaching Schools: historic journey of primary teachers’ training schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim António Sousa Pintassilgo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief outline of the teacher training schools in Portugal for what was traditionally known as primary education, starting in the second half of the nineteenth century, when such schools began functioning regularly.  Initially know as Primary Normal Schools, these institutions were renamed in 1930 to Primary Teaching Schools. In the second half of the 1980s, under full democracy, they were phased out, their place being taken by the Higher Schools of Education. In this article we seek to chronicle their evolution with a set of reflections on the ideals professed in their day, which are to be found primarily in training contexts and in textbooks. These principles deal mainly with such issues as the social roles to be played by the primary school teachers, the values inherent to the profession, pedagogical options considered to be legitimate and educational practices thought to be exemplary. We will analyse in particular the importance that the conceptions of the New School had in the construction of identity references during the republican period and their appropriation by the conservative pedagogy that circulated in the New State. We will also take into account the process of feminization, which left its own mark on the development of this teaching sector. Finally, we will outline a model of analysis for training institutions, using as our reference the case of Portugal. 

  3. Emotiogenic Cognitive Function of Modern School Teaching Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Любовь Васильевна Ерохина

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of emotional attractiveness of modern school educational texts and ecological/non-ecological influence upon pupils’ cognition in teaching communication. Reasoning is based on the thesis that - emotional attractiveness of modern school educational texts opposes their cognitive function. Emotional educational text profile and its components are under consideration. The article is concerned with ecological and cognitive and emotional asymmetry content. The material under focus is printed texts of some of modern school textbooks, teaching methodical aids, academic competitions, mass media information from the cognitive ecology point of view.

  4. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-04-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Amino Acid Wordsearch, by Terry L. Helser, p 495. Games, Puzzles, and Humor In honor of April Fools' Day this issue contains 22 pages devoted to games and puzzles that can be used to teach aspects of chemistry. Most are designed for high school and first-year college students. The lead article, p 481, contains an annotated bibliography of chemistry games, complete with a vendor list. Many of the annotated games must be purchased, but the other articles that follow in this issue describe some games and puzzles that require minimal preparation using a word processor and readily available materials. Actually, JCE has a long tradition of publishing games and puzzles for chemistry teachers and their students. Read the letter by Helser and the Editor's response, p 468, for some recent background. Not having counted articles over past years, I became curious and turned to the online index, accessed by way of http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/. Because I wanted to search the entire 75-year life of the Journal, I searched titles for the words "game", "puzzle", and "humor" and obtained a total of 85 hits from the three searches. After eliminating titles of articles that were not applicable, I found that at least 25 games, 48 puzzles, and 5 humor articles have appeared during the past 75 years. At an average of one per year, the JCE editors hardly can be accused of frivolity, but game, puzzle, and humor articles have been published. The term "game" did not appear in any titles during 1945-1970, "puzzle" did not appear from 1927 to 1953, and there was no mention of humor (in the titles) prior to 1974. What appears to be the earliest article (1929) about a game was authored by an undergraduate student at the University of Colorado (1). It was titled "Chemical Bank", and the game pieces were tokens cut from cork stoppers. Wire hooks were inserted in the side of the token to represent valence electrons available for bonding. Carbon contained 4 hooks

  5. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Pooja; Barai, Ishani; Prasad, Sunila; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  6. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  7. ANALYZING THE LEARNING STYLES OF JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND THE IMPLICATION TO ENGLISH TEACHING: A CASE STUDY AT SMPN I DAGANGAN MADIUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Arifin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A language is probably the most difficult set of skills a person could ever struggle to learn. There is no easy way to master a language, particularly a language which is not our first language. In the process of learning a language particularly a second language, there are many variables that determine the success of learning; one of the variables is learning styles. In a class made up of various learning styles, it is always necessary for language teachers to identify, respect, and work on the diversity of the learners’ differences. The study investigated the diverse learning styles employed by ESL students of SMPN 1 Dagangan, Madiun Regency of East Java. The students were classified into three levels of competence: high, middle, and low level competence. They were also classified based on gender: males and females. A set of questionnaire was distributed to fifteen students. To get deeper interpretation on their learning styles, the students were also interviewed. The students’ learning style preferences were identified based on their levels of competence and gender in order to investigate their differences. The data was analyzed qualitatively. The findings revealed that the students’ learning styles can be categorized into visual, auditory, kinesthethic, tactile, individual, and group learners. The results of the study indicated that there were some differences in using learning styles by the students of high, middle and low levels of competence. A little difference was also found in male and female students in using learning styles. Thus, it is important for teachers to be aware of their students learning styles. It is clear then that one factor which can lead to the success of a language teaching-learning process is the match between students` learning styles and the teaching methods used by the teachers.

  8. Teaching through Mnemonics in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite-McGough, Arianne

    2012-01-01

    Mnemonics and songs are used to help students excel and build are their knowledge in all content areas. This method of teaching and reinforcement of information helps students to commit new information to memory and continue to use this material throughout their lives. Using mnemonics is a lessons way to teach and make the classroom a unique…

  9. Why teaching English in junior school age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nery I. Calvet Valdés

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the historical antecedents of English teaching in Cuba and the world, as well as elements of the periodical study of six to ten years all student's development which justify the teaching of English at this age.

  10. The High Citadel: The Influence of Harvard Law School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Joel

    The history of Harvard Law School, a modern critique, and a proposed new model for American legal education are covered in this book by a Harvard Law graduate. Harvard Law School is called the "high citadel" of American legal education. Its admissions procedures, faculty selection, curriculum, teaching methods, and placement practices…

  11. Competence of primary school teachers to teach students with dislexia

    OpenAIRE

    Kogovšek, Darja

    2012-01-01

    The teacher is an expert in the provision of educational work, that should be qualified to teach also students with dyslexia. Teacher's knowledge of the causes and forms of dyslexia and ways of educating students with dyslexia is important to effectively adapt teaching methods. Therefore a major part of this thesis work is devoted to those aspects. There are also other factors exposed (family, school environment, collaboration with parents), which significantly contribute to providing the bes...

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-02-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Building the Interest of High School Students for Science-A PACT Ambassador Program To Investigate Soap Manufacturing and Industrial Chemistry, by Matthew Lynch, Nicholas Geary, Karen Hagaman, Ann Munson, and Mark Sabo, p 191. * Promoting Chemistry at the Elementary Level, by Larry L. Louters and Richard D. Huisman, p 196. * Is It Real Gold? by Harold H. Harris, p 198. * The "Big Dog-Puppy Dog" Analogy for Resonance, by Todd P. Silverstein, p 206. * The Fizz Keeper, a Case Study in Chemical Education, Equilibrium, and Kinetics, by Reed A. Howald, p 208. Staying on Top: Curricular Projects, Relativistic Effects, and Standard-State Pressure You may wonder why some articles are identified with the Secondary School Chemistry logo (*) this month even though at first glance they appear to be of greater interest to college faculty.1 The three articles discussed below are representative of three broad categories: (i) the interrelatedness of science teaching and learning, K-16+; (ii) new understandings of chemical phenomena; and (iii) information about the use of SI units. For each article I have highlighted the major point(s) and the reasons it may be of interest to high school teachers. First, the article "The NSF 'Systemic' Projects- A New Tradition" (G. M. Barrow, p 158) is a commentary on changes in post-secondary introductory chemistry courses in which a distinction is drawn between information management and individual understanding. The author is of the opinion that most students expect the former and that the NSF-funded systemic projects "will thrive only if they are consistent with their information-management mission". Three individuals provided responses to the commentary from their perspective. Has a student asked you why mercury is a liquid, or why gold is the most electronegative metal? "Gold Chemistry: The Aurophilic Attraction" by J. Bardají and A. Laguna (p 201) and "Why Gold and Copper Are Colored but Silver Is Not" by

  13. Improving School Effectiveness by Teaching Thinking Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenke, Larry L.

    This paper describes a plan to improve school effectiveness in the Tulsa (Oklahoma) Public Schools by incorporating instruction in thinking skills. The program selected by the school district was the Strategic Reasoning Program, based on Albert Upton's Design for Thinking and J. P. Guilford's Structure of the Intellect. The Strategic Reasoning…

  14. AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO TEACHING THE SUBJECT «TECHNOLOGY» IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Viktorovna Sleptsova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the author approach to the teaching of the subject «Technology» in a secondary school. Feature of the proposed approach is its focus on innovation behavior of students in the context of continuous technological education, aimed at the continuous creation of new or modification of existing technical and social systems, reducing the cost of resources, the achievement of high commercial effect. Shows an example of an innovative approach to teaching the subject «Technology of cooking» section of the «Cooking» of the Federal model programme «Technology». The role and place of the subject «Technology» in the psychological preparation of students for entrepreneurship, the formation of «habits of success», even at school age to play the «role model» entrepreneur in the field of industrial production, innovation and agriculture. Demonstrated an innovative approach to teaching the subject «Techno-logy» for productive socialization and social adaptation of graduates of secondary schools.Summary: identify ways and methods of performing teaching staff in secondary schools social order to prepare students for entrepreneurial activity.Methodology: theoretical analysis of the literature, scientific methods of comparison, ge-neralization, systematic approach.Results: the proposed innovative approach to the teaching of the subject «Technology» in a secondary school leads to increased interest in academic subject in grades 9-11 secondary schools, the development of students in sustainable entrepreneurial skills, increase the number of high school graduates, focusing on entrepreneurial activities in the fields of innovation and industrial production, craft activities and agriculture.Practical implication: pedagogy of secondary school.

  15. High school music classes enhance the neural processing of speech

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Adam; Krizman, Jennifer; Skoe, Erika; Johnston, Kathleen; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Should music be a priority in public education? One argument for teaching music in school is that private music instruction relates to enhanced language abilities and neural function. However, the directionality of this relationship is unclear and it is unknown whether school-based music training can produce these enhancements. Here we show that two years of group music classes in high school enhance the subcortical encoding of speech. To tease apart the relationships between music and neural...

  16. Using Interactive Animations to Enhance Teaching, Learning, and Retention of Respiration Pathway Concepts in Face-to-Face and Online High School, Undergraduate, and Continuing Education Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sederick C. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One major tool set teachers/instructors can use is online interactive animations, which presents content in a way that helps pique students' interest and differentiates instructional content.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collections (VCAC, developed from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Learning Center, has developed a series of online interactive animations that provide teacher/instructors and students with immersive learning tools for studying and understanding respiration processes.  These virtual tools work as powerful instructional devices to help explain and reinforce concepts of metabolic pathways that would normally be taught traditionally using static textbook pages or by neumonic flashcards. High school, undergraduate, and continuing education students of today learn and retain knowledge differently than their predecessors.  Now teachers face new challenges and must engage and assess students, within a small window during classroom instruction, but also have the skills to provide useful content in distance learning environments.  Educators have to keep up with changing trends in education as a result of technological advances, higher student/teacher ratios, and the influence of social media on education. It is critical for teachers/instructors to be able to present content that not only keeps students interested but also helps bridge learning gaps. VCAC provides high school, undergraduate, and continuing education biology or life science teachers/instructors with classroom strategies and tools for introducing respiration content through free open source online resources. VCAC content supports the development of more inquiry-based classroom and distance-learning environments that can be facilitated by teachers/instructors, which helps improve retention of important respiration subject content and problem-based learning skills for students.

  17. Co-teaching: teachers’ conceptions and practices in a School of Education in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Suárez-Diaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a descriptive study of two topics: 1 the correspondence between conceptions on co-teaching and the teaching practices of teachers at the School of Education in a private university in Lima; 2 the conditions that favor and restrict co-teaching, from the teachers’ perspective. Through interviews and documentary analysis, the idea of co-teaching as “team teaching” was found to be dominant, even though in practice, autonomy was favored, and teachers are beginning to use a combination of the “station teaching” and “one teach, one drift” models. The courses praised most highly by students were one course developed as “team teaching” and two developed with different degrees of autonomy. The main facilitating factors were personal ones; the main restricting factors were students’ ability and aspects relating to management.

  18. TEACHING ENTREPENEURSHIP AT ADMINISTRCTIONS SCHOOL IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ZULIA

    OpenAIRE

    René Hernandez; Karin Silvestri; Anjuli Alvarez; Joel Cobis

    2009-01-01

    The investigation is framed within the research management training developed in the Management Development Research Group at the University of Zulia. The goal was to determine the teaching undertaken in the management training of school administration from the University of Zulia. The methodology was descriptive, by field study the population was comprised of students from the course of administrative systems at the school of administration at East Coast Lake Maracaibo in 2007. The results w...

  19. Eratosthenes' teachings with a globe in a school yard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Božić, Mirjana; Ducloy, Martial

    2008-01-01

    A globe, in a school or university yard, which simulates the Earth's orientation in space, could be a very useful and helpful device for teaching physics, geometry, astronomy and the history of science. It would be very useful for science education to utilize the forthcoming International Year of the Planet Earth 2008 and the International Year of Astronomy 2009 by installing globes in many school and university courtyards

  20. Secondary School Mathematics Teachers' Attitude in Teaching Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Mulugeta Atnafu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Addis Ababa secondary school mathematics teachers’ attitude in teaching mathematics. 148 mathematics teachers were selected using cluster sampling from Addis Ababa administration region. The study used survey method of data collection and it includes both quantitative and qualitative research methods. From the independent t-test, ANOVA, tukey test and regression analysis, some of the results obtained were: the majority of the secondary school mathemati...

  1. Fashion Design: Designing a Learner-Active, Multi-Level High School Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane

    2009-01-01

    A high school fashion design teacher has much in common with the ringmaster of a three-ring circus. The challenges of teaching a hands-on course are to facilitate the entire class and to meet the needs of individual students. When teaching family and consumer sciences, the goal is to have a learner-active classroom. Revamping the high school's…

  2. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-01-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant…

  3. Rebellion in a High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Arthur L.

    The premise of this book is that high school rebellion is an "expression of alienation from socially present authorities." Such rebellion is a manifestation of "expressive alienation" and has the quality of hatred or sullenness. Rebellious high school students are likely to be non-utilitarian, negativistic, hedonistic, and to stress group…

  4. Analysing the Correlations between Primary School Teachers' Teaching Styles and Their Critical Thinking Disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Özgür

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to analyse the correlations between teaching styles primary school teachers prefer to use and their critical thinking disposition. The research was conducted with the participation of 380 primary school teachers teaching in schools located in Ankara. The study employs relational survey model. In this study "Teaching Styles…

  5. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Filiz

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify the relationship between elementary school teachers' ICT engagement with their attitudes towards technology. To this end, one hundred elementary school students were asked to fill out questionnaires related to their ICT knowledge, usage, and attitude towards technology. The results show that teachers' ICT knowledge and…

  6. Teaching Basic Quantum Mechanics in Secondary School Using Concepts of Feynman Path Integrals Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaro, Maria de los Angeles; Otero, Maria Rita; Arlego, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the teaching of basic quantum mechanics in high school. Rather than following the usual formalism, our approach is based on Feynman's path integral method. Our presentation makes use of simulation software and avoids sophisticated mathematical formalism. (Contains 3 figures.)

  7. Teachers' Trust in Role Partners, Intention to Continue in Teaching, and Schools Social Composition in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addi-Raccah, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    The study examines teachers' trust in their role partners and its relation to their intention to continue teaching at schools with high and low socioeconomic composition. Based on a questionnaire completed by 149 Israeli teachers in in-service training programs, and interviews with 10 teachers, it was found that teachers attribute different social…

  8. Restructuring Post-School Science Teaching Programmes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OFFICE USER

    system available to those passing out of the +2 level in Science stream. II) The first .... University Grants Commission, whole-heartedly supported the ... interdisciplinary curricula and stimulating teaching methods that evoke ... water or electricity supply. .... share with you for inclusiveness, there are several decisions taken by.

  9. Applied Linguistics and Primary School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sue, Ed.; McCartney, Elspeth, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Modern primary teachers must adapt literacy programmes and ensure efficient learning for all. They must also support children with language and literacy difficulties, children learning English as an additional language and possibly teach a modern foreign language. To do this effectively, they need to understand the applied linguistics research…

  10. Computer Use by School Teachers in Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Developing countries have a responsibility not merely to provide computers for schools, but also to foster a habit of infusing a variety of ways in which computers can be integrated in teaching-learning amongst the end users of these tools. Earlier researches lacked a systematic study of the manner and the extent of computer-use by teachers. The…

  11. Elementary School Teachers' Use of Technology during Mathematics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Various educational technologies have been advanced as potential vehicles to transform teaching and learning. Still, research studies have documented that primary school teachers struggle to integrate technology in meaningful ways. This article presents the findings of a year-long study in which the author frequently observed three primary school…

  12. Teaching Young Children How to Sing: One School's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In many schools, classroom teachers are responsible for the music experiences of young children. Children may learn songs, but may not learn "how" to sing. This article outlines simple teaching strategies to help young children develop listening and vocal habits leading to beautiful singing. The article discusses how the kindergarten classes at…

  13. Interdisciplinary Team Teaching versus Departmentalization in Middle Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alspaugh, John W.; Harting, Roger D.

    1998-01-01

    Studied the effects of interdisciplinary teaming versus departmentalization on student achievement in middle schools. Found no significant differences for reading, math, science, and social studies achievement. Results suggest that team teaching merits further investigation as a potential strategy for mediating the student achievement loss…

  14. Microcomputers in Schools as a Teaching and Learning Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, D. I.

    1986-01-01

    Presents the findings of a survey of comprehensive and independent schools' use of microcomputers as teaching and learning aids in economics. Results suggest that use is wide spread but not intensive. Teachers allocate few hours to computer programs per year, have difficulty finding suitable software, and fail to encourage use by girls. (JDH)

  15. Teaching Primary School Mathematics and Statistics: Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Robin; Harvey, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Here is the only reference book you will ever need for teaching primary school mathematics and statistics. It is full of exciting and engaging snapshots of excellent classroom practice relevant to "The New Zealand Curriculum" and national mathematics standards. There are many fascinating examples of investigative learning experiences,…

  16. Effect of Team Teaching on Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    students' achievement in Secondary School Business Studies in Onitsha. North Local Government ... research hypotheses were tested using t-test. ... It is not easy for one teacher in the conventional method to teach it to a group of student in ...

  17. The Employment of Pop Culture in Middle School English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨才英

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays,culture teaching is more emphasized in language teaching. But less attention is paid to the influence of pop culture in language teaching. The important role of pop culture in middle school English language teaching will be discussed in this thesis through its correlation with some factors in English language teaching.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in Washington state public high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Sheri; Quan, Linda

    2003-03-01

    To determine the best approaches for increasing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training opportunities for public high school students, we conducted a statewide survey of all 310 public high schools in Washington State. The findings describe CPR student training currently provided by high schools, barriers to providing, and strategies to increase CPR training of high school students. The response rate was 89% (276 schools) from a combination of mail and telephone surveys; 35% (n=97) reported that they did not provide any CPR student training. Of the 132 schools that provided CPR student training, 23% trained less than 10% of their students, and 39% trained more than 90% of their students. The majority of public high schools, 70%, did not have any teacher trained to teach CPR or had only one teacher with such training. Yet 80% of schools felt that CPR training is best provided in school settings. Schools perceived the greatest benefit of CPR training as providing students with the skill to save a life (43%). The most frequently identified barriers were logistical: limited time to teach the curriculum (24%), lack of funds (16%), and instructor scheduling difficulties (17%). Less than 5% of respondents voiced any opposition to CPR training, and that opposition was for logistical reasons. To increase CPR training, the single best strategies suggested were: increase funding, provide time in the curriculum, have more certified instructors, and make CPR student training a requirement.

  19. Teaching Competencies of Students Practice Teaching at Elementary Schools and Kindergartens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Fatimah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to describe the teaching competencies of English Education students practising at elementary schools and kindergartens based on the teacher supervisors’ view. The teaching competencies include the students’ competence on writing the lesson plan and their competence on practice teaching. To reach the objectives of the study, the researcher collected the data by distributing a questionnaire to the supervisors at schools. There were 41 schools consisting of TK ABA, SD Muhammadiyah, SD Negeri located in Yogyakarta (24, Sleman (1 and Bantul (16. The questionnaire used was based on the official assessment form published by Indonesian government for teacher’s certification. It contains some indicators of teaching competence, it uses Likert scales ranging from 1 to 5. The criteria are as follows: 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = rather poor, 4 = good, and 5 = excellent. The data were taken from proportionally random sampling of the supervisors. From the total number of 103 teacher supervisors, the researcher distributed 61 questionnaires. The supervisors represented the ones from different educational backgrounds. The findings show the following results. The competence of English Education students in composing the lesson plan, according to the teacher supervisors, is classified good (actual mean = 3.858, SD = 0.685, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.750. Further, their competence on practice teaching is also good (actual mean = 3.867, SD = 0.688, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.966. The two aspects of composing the lesson plan to improve are teaching material organization and the completeness of assessment instrument. The other two aspects to improve in teaching practice are contextual teaching and learning and class management.

  20. The Teach for America RockCorps, Year 2: Using Authentic Research Experiences in Geophysics for STEM Teachers to Inspire Earth Science-Themed Lessons in High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B.; Kassimu, R.; Borjas, C. N.; Griffith, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    Brooke Parsons1, Rahmatu Kassimu2, Christopher Borjas3, and W. Ashley Griffith31Uplift Hampton Preparatory High School, Dallas, TX, 75232 2H. Grady Spruce High School, Dallas, TX, 75217 3Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX, 76019 As Earth Science courses appear in fewer high school curricula, we seek to find creative ways to integrate Earth Science themes as contextual examples into other K-12 STEM courses in order to develop (A) Earth Science literacy, and (B) a pipeline of young talent into our field. This presentation details the efforts of the 2nd year Teach for America (TFA) Rock Corps, a five year NSF-sponsored partnership between TFA and the University of Texas at Arlington designed to provide STEM teachers with genuine research opportunities using components that can be extrapolated to develop dynamic Geophysics-themed lesson plans and materials for their classrooms. Two teachers were selected from the Dallas-Fort Worth region of TFA to participate in original research modeling off-fault damage that occurs during earthquakes in a lab setting using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB). In particular, we simulate a coseismic transient stress perturbation in a fault damage zone by combining traditional SHPB with a traveling harmonic oscillator: Two striker bars attached by an elastic spring are launched with a gas gun allowing us to create the double stress pulse expected during an earthquake rupture. This research affords teachers inspiration to implement Geophysics-themed lesson plans for their courses, Physics/Pre-AP Physics and Chemistry. The physics course will adopt principles of seismic wave propagation to teach concepts of impulse, momentum, conservation of energy, harmonic motion, wave velocity, wave propagation, and real world applications of waves. The chemistry course will implement geochemistry themed techniques into applying the scientific method, density, isotopic composition, p

  1. Constructivism in Teaching English for Special Purposes at Tertiary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Y. Polenova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at some principles of constructivism philosophy and the ways they are realized in ESP teaching at tertiary school. The purpose of this article is to describe constructivist teaching approach in enhancing students’ use of appropriate ESP learning strategies. Constructivism is a theory that emphasizes the active role of students in building understanding and making sense of the information. The constructivist teaching is learner-centered where students are actively involved in knowledge construction rather than passive listeners. Students construct knowledge by transforming, organizing, reorganizing previous knowledge through social interaction in construction of knowledge and understanding. The paper is an attempt to examine the principles of constructivist teaching and learning by providing analysis of features of constructivist theory and the organization of a constructivist classroom.

  2. L'impact de l'enseignement de la biologie sur la construction de la distinction entre normal et pathologique chez les eleves du secondaire Marocain (The Impact of Teaching Biology on the Way Moroccan High School Students Construe the Difference between Normal and Pathological).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khzami, Salah-Eddine; Favre, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Study of the distinction between the notions of the normal and the pathological among Moroccan high school students and their teachers of biology found that students confused the registers of the normal/abnormal with the healthy/pathological, a fact that is at odds with current teaching in biology. It also found a possible link to the values held…

  3. Teaching chemistry and other sciences to blind and low-vision students through hands-on learning experiences in high school science laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalo, Cary Alan

    2010-11-01

    Students with blindness and low vision (BLV) have traditionally been underrepresented in the sciences as a result of technological and attitudinal barriers to equal access in science laboratory classrooms. The Independent Laboratory Access for the Blind (ILAB) project developed and evaluated a suite of talking and audible hardware/software tools to empower students with BLV to have multisensory, hands-on laboratory learning experiences. This dissertation focuses on the first year of ILAB tool testing in mainstream science laboratory classrooms, and comprises a detailed multi-case study of four students with BLV who were enrolled in high school science classes during 2007--08 alongside sighted students. Participants attended different schools; curricula included chemistry, AP chemistry, and AP physics. The ILAB tools were designed to provide multisensory means for students with BLV to make observations and collect data during standard laboratory lessons on an equivalent basis with their sighted peers. Various qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments were used to determine whether the hands-on experiences facilitated by the ILAB tools had led to increased involvement in laboratory-goal-directed actions, greater peer acceptance in the students' lab groups, improved attitudes toward science, and increased interest in science. Premier among the ILAB tools was the JAWS/Logger Pro software interface, which made audible all information gathered through standard Vernier laboratory probes and visually displayed through Logger Pro. ILAB tools also included a talking balance, a submersible audible light sensor, a scientific talking stopwatch, and a variety of other high-tech and low-tech devices and techniques. While results were mixed, all four participating BLV students seemed to have experienced at least some benefit, with the effect being stronger for some than for others. Not all of the data collection instruments were found to reveal improvements for all

  4. The connection between teaching and learning: Linking teaching quality and metacognitive strategy use in primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieser, Svenja; Naumann, Alexander; Decristan, Jasmin; Fauth, Benjamin; Klieme, Eckhard; Büttner, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    In order for teaching to be successful, students need to be actively involved in learning. However, research on teaching effectiveness often neglects students' learning activities. Although it is assumed that effective teaching promotes the use of beneficial learning activities, empirical evidence for this connection is still limited. This study aimed to investigate the connection between effective teaching and reported learning activities. We hypothesize specific relations between a three-dimensional model of teaching quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, and classroom management) and students' reported use of metacognitive strategies. Students' intrinsic motivation is considered as a mediator and a moderator of this connection. N = 1,052 students from 53 German primary school classes and their science teachers participated. Data were collected through classroom or video observation and questionnaires over a period of approximately 2 months. Multilevel analysis was utilized to test our hypotheses. Each dimension of teaching quality positively predicted students' reported use of metacognitive strategies. For supportive climate, this connection was mediated by students' intrinsic motivation. Cognitive activation negatively predicted the slopes between students' reported metacognitive strategy use and motivation. The results support the notion that effective teaching is connected to learning activities and stress the importance of students' learning motivation. Results from the cross-level interaction could indicate that especially less motivated students' reported metacognitive strategy use might be supported by cognitively activating teaching. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  5. School education and democratic management of teaching: perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Augusto Campos Masson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the management of education from the debate on the democratic management of social institutions, in particular, the school. It reflects on the changes that have occurred in the school due to the presence of new students belonging to the subaltern classes and the possibility of the democratic management of teaching being an important instrument for overcoming school failure. It discusses aspects of Brazilian legislation on the theme and the possibilities arising from the growth of political conservatism oppose initiatives to democratic management of education.

  6. Putting Making into High School Computer Science Classrooms: Promoting Equity in Teaching and Learning with Electronic Textiles in "Exploring Computer Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Deborah Ann; Kafai, Yasmin; Nakajima, Tomoko; Goode, Joanna; Margolis, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Recent discussions of making have focused on developing out-of-school makerspaces and activities to provide more equitable and enriching learning opportunities for youth. Yet school classrooms present a unique opportunity to help broaden access, diversify representation, and deepen participation in making. In turning to classrooms, we want to…

  7. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  8. Lifelines for High School Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Lifelines project aims to establish a network of practicing high school teachers actively using climate change curricula by creating professional learning communities (PLCs) of teachers who, through remote meetings and workshops, maintain ongoing communication and sharing of best practices among colleagues to strengthen knowledge and promote effective teaching strategies. The project explores techniques to achieve the most effective teleconferencing meetings and workshops. This promotes not only teaching about minimizing environmental impacts of human activity, but minimizes environmental impacts of professional development — practicing what we preach. To date, Lifelines PLCs have set up websites and e-mail lists for sharing information. Teleconferences and webinars have been held using services such as Skype, ReadyTalk, and Wiggio. Many of the meetings have been recorded and archived for the benefit of members who could not attend in real-time.

  9. Teaching Citizenship in the Faith School: Qualitative Evidence from Separate Schools in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Caitlin; Burns, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how teachers teach and students learn about citizenship education in two faith-based schools in Northern Ireland. The data show that participants in the Catholic school were confident in their own identity; teachers encouraged active engagement with contentious, conflict-related debates and students…

  10. Emergent Communities of Practice: Secondary Schools' Interaction with Primary School Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael; Fisher, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an account of the response of secondary schools to the primary school foreign language teaching initiative recently introduced by the UK government. The paper also explores defining features of the process of cross-phase interaction and the role that knowledge and collaborative practice plays in generating change…

  11. Connecting university science experiences to middle school science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon; Laughran, Laura; Tamppari, Ray; Thomas, Perry

    1991-06-01

    Science teachers naturally rely on their university science experiences as a foundation for teaching middle school science. This foundation consists of knowledge far too complex for the middle level students to comprehend. In order for middle school science teachers to utilize their university science training they must search for ways to adapt their college experiences into appropriate middle school learning experience. The criteria set forth above provide broad-based guidelines for translating university science laboratory experiences into middle school activities. These guidelines are used by preservice teachers in our project as they identify, test, and organize a resource file of hands-on inquiry activities for use in their first year classrooms. It is anticipated that this file will provide a basis for future curriculum development as the teacher becomes more comfortable and more experienced in teaching hands-on science. The presentation of these guidelines is not meant to preclude any other criteria or considerations which a teacher or science department deems important. This is merely one example of how teachers may proceed to utilize their advanced science training as a basis for teaching middle school science.

  12. The Influence of Teaching Methods and Learning Environment to the Student's Learning Achievement of Craft and Entrepreneurship Subjects at Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawaroh

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to explain the influence of teacher's teaching methods and learning environment to the learning achievement in class XI with the competency of accounting expertise to the subjects of craft and entrepreneurship, according to the students, the subject was very heavy and dull. The population in this research are students in class…

  13. SENSE IT: Teaching STEM Principles to Middle and High School Students through the Design, Construction and Deployment of Water Quality Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, Liesl; Lowes, Susan; Stolkin, Rustam; Lin, Peiyi; Bonner, James; Kirkey, William; Ojo, Temitope

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and impact of an NSF-funded ITEST project designed to enrich science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education using educational modules that teach students to construct, program, and test a series of sensors used to monitor water quality. During the two years of the SENSE IT project, over 30…

  14. Understanding Global Change (UGC) as a Unifying Conceptual Framework for Teaching Ecology: Using UGC in a High School Biology Program to Integrate Earth Science and Biology, and to Demonstrate the Value of Modeling Global Systems in Promoting Conceptual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J.; Bean, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Global change science is ideal for NGSS-informed teaching, but presents a serious challenge to K-12 educators because it is complex and interdisciplinary- combining earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics. Global systems are themselves complex. Adding anthropogenic influences on those systems creates a formidable list of topics - greenhouse effect, climate change, nitrogen enrichment, introduced species, land-use change among them - which are often presented as a disconnected "laundry list" of "facts." This complexity, combined with public and mass-media scientific illiteracy, leaves global change science vulnerable to misrepresentation and politicization, creating additional challenges to teachers in public schools. Ample stand-alone, one-off, online resources, many of them excellent, are (to date) underutilized by teachers in the high school science course taken by most students: biology. The Understanding Global Change project (UGC) from the UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology has created a conceptual framework that organizes, connects, and explains global systems, human and non-human drivers of change in those systems, and measurable changes in those systems. This organization and framework employ core ideas, crosscutting concepts, structure/function relationships, and system models in a unique format that facilitates authentic understanding, rather than memorization. This system serves as an organizing framework for the entire ecology unit of a forthcoming mainstream high school biology program. The UGC system model is introduced up front with its core informational graphic. The model is elaborated, step by step, by adding concepts and processes as they are introduced and explained in each chapter. The informational graphic is thus used in several ways: to organize material as it is presented, to summarize topics in each chapter and put them in perspective, and for review and critical thinking exercises that supplement the usual end-of-chapter lists of

  15. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2001-05-01

    Literature Cited National Science Education Standards; National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1996; http://www. nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/. Principles and Standards for School Mathematics; National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Washington, DC, 2000; http://standards.nctm.org/. Visit CLIC, an Online Resource for High School Teachers at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/HS/

  16. The Potential of Teaching Schools in Enabling Student Teacher Learning for the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsaroop, Sarita; Gravett, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    In 2011 the Integrated Strategic Planning Framework for Teacher Education and Development in South Africa was promulgated. This framework proposes the establishment of teaching schools to strengthen pre-service teacher education. This study arises from this initiative. A generic qualitative study was undertaken to explore the views of research…

  17. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  18. The Stories of Our National Past: History and Heritage in a Jewish High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Sivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the teaching of history (the academic study of the past) and the teaching of heritage (meaningful stories tying people to a collective past). The research was conducted in a Jewish high school whose explicit mission involves teaching history through a US history course and heritage through an Israeli…

  19. "Flying the Plane while We Build It": A Case Study of an Early College High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Candace; Ongaga, Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the perceived failed promise of the comprehensive high school to effectively educate America's youth has generated a national interest in high school reform. One such area of reform is a movement to restructure high schools as small learning communities centered around unique curriculum and state-of-the-art teaching.…

  20. Merits of Undergraduate and High School Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, John

    2016-06-01

    When it comes to sports, everyone gets it; you have to play to really understand, experience, and learn what the game is all about. It would be ludicrous to teach basketball by practicing basketball fundamentals in the gym (layups, free throws, jump shots, dribbling, defense), reading about and attending professional basketball games, but never playing in a game. As important as classes and teaching laboratories may be in science education, there is simply no substitute for active engagement in scientific research to show students what science is all about and, perhaps even more importantly, to inspire and motivate them to become scientists or at least appreciate science. It is a widely held misconception that a student cannot really do meaningful, publishable scientific research until he/she is in graduate school. In actual fact, college undergraduates and even high school students can make original and significant scientific research contributions. Astronomical research, in particular, is very well suited to engage the beginning high school or college undergraduate researcher. The night sky’s inherent accessibility and also its inherent grandeur are natural draws for the curious student’s mind. And much can be learned and discovered using small telescopes. In sports, joining a team is a key aspect of the sports experience. Similarly in science, joining a research team and thereby entering a “community of scientific practice” is fundamental and transformational. As important as working with equipment and acquiring data happen to be in scientific research, this is only the beginning of the research process. Student researchers of all ages—particularly high school students and college undergraduates—have much to gain by giving presentations on their research, writing up their results for publication, and going through the peer review process. But this only works if the student researchers are imbedded within the community of practice.

  1. Using Evolution as a Context for Teaching the Nature of Science to Diverse Student Populations: A High School Unit of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Angela C.

    Teaching evolution provides teachers with the opportunity to educate students on how science aims to understand the natural world. Rooted in research, the purpose of this project was to create NGSS-aligned curriculum focused on teaching the nature of science (NOS) within the context of biological evolution. Field testing and review of the unit resulted in revisions aimed at creating more comprehensive teacher resource materials and explicit inclusion of NOS. Emphasizing NOS in curriculum development and teaching scientific qualities through an evolutionary context has taken the focus off belief or disbelief, keeping the attention on the scientific concept at hand. Designing curriculum around compelling subject matter and embracing student-led learning increased and maintained student interest in the classroom. Implementation of this curriculum not only requires the teacher to be knowledgeable in conventional educational pedagogy, but also the subjects of NGSS and NOS. Additional training and support centered around NGSS is recommended for science educators interested in integrating NOS into their curriculum and instruction.

  2. The Flipped Classroom: Teaching the Basic Science Process Skills to High-Performing 2nd Grade Students of Miriam College Lower School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kenneth Camiling

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Technology has greatly shaped pedagogical practices over time. However scholars posit that the developing technology-aided, -based, and -oriented instructional practices still need scholarly and systematic studies to prove their effectiveness. An emerging teaching strategy that highlights technology tools and programs is Flipped Learning: a strategy where technology redirects learning from large groups to individuals. The research described here hypothesizes that there is a significant difference between the basic science process skills test score means of elementary students in a Flipped classroom and those in a traditional classroom. To test this hypothesis, an experimental design was used as the participants were divided the into two groups: experimental and control. An instructional design was crafted to simultaneously teach both control and experimental groups within a one (1 hour schedule. The experimental group was asked to watch at home researcher-made videos that teach the basic science process skills. In class, these participants deepened understanding of the skills through varied activities. The control group was taught using the traditional method operationalized as 5E Inquiry-Based Model.Both pre- and post-tests were administered to check the relative test scores. A Mann Whitney U test was conducted to evaluate the difference between the basic process skills test mean scores. It is concluded that there is a statistically significant difference (at α=0.05, r = 0.42 with a large effect size between the two variables.

  3. Learning to teach science for social justice in urban schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Purvi

    This study looks at how beginner teachers learn to teach science for social justice in urban schools. The research questions are: (1) what views do beginner teachers hold about teaching science for social justice in urban schools? (2) How do beginner teachers' views about teaching science for social justice develop as part of their learning? In looking at teacher learning, I take a situative perspective that defines learning as increased participation in a community of practice. I use the case study methodology with five teacher participants as the individual units of analysis. In measuring participation, I draw from mathematics education literature that offers three domains of professional practice: Content, pedagogy and professional identity. In addition, I focus on agency as an important component of increased participation from a social justice perspective. My findings reveal two main tensions that arose as teachers considered what it meant to teach science from a social justice perspective: (1) Culturally responsive teaching vs. "real" science and (2) Teaching science as a political act. In negotiating these tensions, teachers drew on a variety of pedagogical and conceptual tools offered in USE that focused on issues of equity, access, place-based pedagogy, student agency, ownership and culture as a toolkit. Further, in looking at how the five participants negotiated these tensions in practice, I describe four variables that either afforded or constrained teacher agency and consequently the development of their own identity and role as socially just educators. These four variables are: (1) Accessing and activating social, human and cultural capital, (2) reconceptualizing culturally responsive pedagogical tools, (3) views of urban youth and (4) context of participation. This study has implications for understanding the dialectical relationship between agency and social justice identity for beginner teachers who are learning how to teach for social justice. Also

  4. Authoritative School Climate and High School Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R.; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high…

  5. Reasons for Choosing the Teaching Profession and Beliefs about Teaching: A Study with Elementary School Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Sahin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine elementary school teacher candidates' motivations for choosing the teaching profession, beliefs about teaching, and satisfaction with the choice. Data were collected from 176 freshman elementary school teacher candidates at two public universities in Turkey. Results showed that the decision to choose…

  6. Teaching the foundations of quantum mechanics in secondary school: a proposed conceptual structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles Fanaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a doctoral thesis that investigates Basic Quantum Mechanics (QM teaching in high school. A Conceptual Structure of Reference (CSR based on the Path Integral Method of Feynman (1965 was rebuilt and a Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST (Otero, 2006, 2007 the basics of Quantum Mechanics at secondary school was designed, analysed and carried out. This PCST does not follow the historical route and it is complementary to the canonical formalism. The concepts: probability distribution, quantum system, x(t alternative, amplitude of probability, sum of probability amplitude, action, Planck's constant, and classic-quantum transition were rebuilt with the students. Mathematical formalism was avoided by using simulation software assistance. The Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST is described and some results from the test carried out by the class group are discussed. This information allows the analysis of the Conceptual Structure Effectively Reconstructed (CSER to be initiated with the students.

  7. Teaching research methodology to student midwives through a socio-constructivist educational model: The experience of the high school for science and health techniques of Tunis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherissi, Atf; Tinsa, Francine; Soussi, Sonia; Benzarti, Anis

    2016-02-01

    Since its independence in 1956, Tunisia's maternal health indicators have steadily improved as the result of the implementation of a national holistic strategy that emancipated women and developed midwifery education and maternal health services provision. The last review of the midwifery education programme, occurred in 2008, and was based on evidence based core competencies. This paper describes the implementation process of the socio-constructivist educational model used by to teach research methodology to student midwives, the changes observed among them, the challenges and the lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress ocupacional no ensino: um estudo com professores dos 3º ciclo e ensino secundário Occupational stress in teaching: a study with high school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rui Gomes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com 689 professores portugueses, a leccionarem nos terceiro ciclo e ensino secundário. Foram avaliados indicadores de stress, "burnout", saúde física e satisfação profissional. Observaram-se valores significativos de stress ocupacional (perto de 40%, e de "burnout" (10% na exaustão emocional, 3% na baixa realização pessoal e 1% na despersonalização, vários problemas de saúde física e valores de insatisfação profissional perto dos 20%. As análises de regressão múltipla apontaram diferentes variáveis preditoras para as três dimensões do "burnout" (62% de variância explicada na exaustão emocional, 16% na realização pessoal e 13% na despersonalização. As análises discriminantes e "t-test" para amostras independentes demonstraram maior stress ocupacional nas mulheres, nos professores mais velhos, nos profissionais com vínculos profissionais mais precários, nos professores com mais horas de trabalho e com mais alunos em sala de aula. No final, apresentam-se as limitações do estudo e as implicações para a investigação futura.This work was done with 689 Portuguese high school teachers. We evaluated the stress, burnout, physical health and professional fulfilment. The results revealed very significant levels of occupational stress (percentages near 40%, a different frequency of burnout in the three appraised dimensions (10% in emotional exhaustion, 3% in reduced personal accomplishment and 1% in depersonalization, various physical health problems and values of professional dissatisfaction close to 20%. Multiple regression analysis pointed different predictors' variables for the three dimensions of burnout (more than 60% of explained variance for emotional exhaustion, 16% for personal accomplishment and 13% for depersonalization. The discriminant analysis and "t-test" for independent samples allowed us to verify more occupational problems (in different variables in the following groups: women

  9. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-05-01

    for You? The end of the school year is approaching quickly. In previous years, several readers have submitted manuscripts soon after the end of the school year, while ideas were fresh in their mind and there was relief from the demands of daily classes. If you have an idea for an article, I encourage you to think about writing as soon as the school term ends. I can probably guess what you are saying, "I don't have anything that readers would be interested in." This is a common reaction, to which we frequently respond by reminding high school teachers that this is "your journal" and the only way to ensure that topics of interest to you are considered or published is by your active participation. In this presidential election year I am reminded of the familiar sentiment, "I voted in the election, so I have earned the right to complain about the politicians." I do not wish to encourage complaining, but there is a relevant correlation. By submitting manuscripts to the Journal, you are ensuring that you will continue to get your money's worth because it will include topics of interest to you. When considering a submission, many prospective authors are overwhelmed at the thought of preparing a complete manuscript. Don't let that stop you. If you have an idea, an outline, or a rough draft, any of the feature editors or I would be happy to discuss it with you. This one-on-one interaction during the development process will help you express your ideas more effectively. Many teachers across the country who are faced with similar situations and problems each day would benefit from an article discussing innovative teaching strategies or a new way to look at principles we teach every year. As you begin to formulate your ideas, I would like to emphasize five features whose editors are fellow teachers: JCE Classroom Activities. An invitation for contributions was issued in the April issue of this column (JCE, 2000, 77, 431). Chemical Principles Revisited, edited by Cary Kilner

  10. "Real Teaching" in the Mathematics Classroom: A Comparison of the Instructional Practices of Elementary Teachers in Urban High-Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Robinson, Jack; Berube, Clair T.

    2013-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' "Principles and Standards for School Mathematics" outlines fundamental elements that are crucial for creating a problem-solving and inquiry-driven classroom learning environment that highlights conceptual understandings of mathematics ideas. Even though this document outlines…

  11. Technology integrated teaching in Malaysian schools: GIS, a SWOT analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibah Lateh, vasugiammai muniandy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Geographical Information System (GIS has been introduced and widely used in schools in various countries. The year 1990 onwards, the implementation of GIS in schools showed an increase. This is due to the drastic changes and reforms in the education system. Even though the name GIS suits well to the Geography subject, but it is widely integrated in various subjects such as History, Chemistry, Physics and Science. In Malaysia, GIS is common in fields such as risk management, architecture, town planning and municipal department. Anyhow, it is still unknown in the school education system. Even upper secondary students are not familiar with GIS. The Ministry of Education in Malaysia has been continuously reforming the education towards the aim of creating a society based on economic fundamentals and knowledge. The Master Plan for Educational Development with the aim of developing individual potential with well-integrated and balanced education is already on field. Recently, Malaysia invested 18 % of the annual national budget towards upgrading its education system. The computer in education program started in 1999. Three hundred and twenty two schools were chosen as ‘break a way’ from conventional teaching method towards technology integrated teaching. Projects such as New Primary School Curriculum (KBSR, Integrated Secondary School Curriculum (KBSM, Smart School Project, School Access Centre were introduced constantly. Teacher as the cogwheel of innovations in schools were given courses in aim to develop their ICT knowledge and skill. To this date, the technology integration in subjects is not equal and it disperses through subjects. Geography is one of the ‘dry’ subjects in schools with less technology which is not preferable among students. Geographical Information System (GIS is foremost the best Geographical Information Technology (GIT to be implied in geography subject. In Malaysian Education System, GIS is still exposed just in papers

  12. Preparing perservice teachers to teach elementary school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amy D.

    The development of scientifically literate citizens begins in the elementary school. Yet elementary school teachers are ill prepared to teach science (Trygstad, Smith, Banilower, Nelson, & Horizon Research, Inc., 2013). The research base on teacher preparation finds that programs designed to prepare elementary teachers are inadequate in providing both the content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge necessary to teach science effectively (Baumgartner, 2010; Bodzin & Beerer, 2003; Bulunuz & Jarrett 2009). This mixed methods study examined what happened when a science methods course was interactively co-taught by an expert in elementary teaching methods and a physics expert. This study also aimed to discover what aspects of the curriculum pre-service teachers (PSTs) said helped them in developing their understanding of science content and scientific reasoning, and how to implement inquiry practices to teach science. A nested case study of three PSTs provided descriptive portraits of student experiences in the class. A whole class case analysis was used to examine what PSTs learned in terms of science, scientific reasoning skills, and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) from their experiences in the course. It was found that students often conflated science content with the experiences they had in learning the content. Although PSTs felt the interactive co-teaching model effectively created a balance between theory and practice, it was their experiences doing science--conducting physical experiments, developing and discussing scientific models, and the use of inquiry-based instruction--that they credited for their learning. Even with careful curriculum planning, and a course purposely designed to bridge the theory to practice gap, this study found one semester-long methods course to be insufficient in providing the vast content knowledge and PCK elementary school science teachers need.

  13. Emotions and elementary school science teaching: Postmodernism in practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    This is an ethnographic study about an elementary school teacher's emotions in her science teaching and pedagogy. This study is an interdisciplinary account of emotions in teaching and draws both methodologically and theoretically from a variety of disciplines: philosophy, sociology, psychology, anthropology, cultural studies and feminist studies. The account developed here is based on my understanding of the role of one teacher's (Catherine) emotions in her classroom life for three years. I describe my approach in terms of what I call emotional genealogies of teaching; referring to an account of the events, objects, persons and their relationships that are present or absent in the realization of emotions, and the ways that these emotions are experienced in relation to the self (individual reality), the others (social interactions) and the world in general (sociopolitical context). Applied to my study, an emotional genealogy of Catherine's science teaching seeks not to trace the gradual evolution of her emotions but to record the singularity of various events that make some emotions present and others absent. My study shows how certain emotions are constructed in the science classroom and how they are transformed over the years (as mediated by values, philosophies, beliefs and so on). Catherine's emotions in science teaching is a "history of the present," a history of her emotions' "presences and absences" in her daffy interactions with her students, parents and administrators in the context of the science classroom. This work raises important questions that go beyond the meaning and interpretation of teachers' emotions: How can teachers' emotions become a legitimate topic in (science) education as well as in efforts for science curricular reform? Further, how can educational institutions (universities and schools) and elementary school science teachers themselves support their personal and professional emotional growth?

  14. TEACHING ENTREPENEURSHIP AT ADMINISTRCTIONS SCHOOL IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ZULIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hernandez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation is framed within the research management training developed in the Management Development Research Group at the University of Zulia. The goal was to determine the teaching undertaken in the management training of school administration from the University of Zulia. The methodology was descriptive, by field study the population was comprised of students from the course of administrative systems at the school of administration at East Coast Lake Maracaibo in 2007. The results was obtained that knowledge management systems in the department regarding the organization, is a cornerstone to enhance their learning. We conclude that the learning strategies employed to manage the management tools such as organizational charts, administrative manuals, flowcharts etc.; let you be aware of the importance of procedures and processes in any organization and encouraged the teaching of undertaken as part of management training.

  15. Didactital design of mathematics teaching in primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur’aeni, E.; Muharram, M. R. W.

    2018-05-01

    The fact that the low ability of geometrical understanding of primary school students is what triggers this study to be conducted. Thus, this research aimed to find out how to create a didactical design of students' mathematical understanding, particularly on one of geometry materials that is unit of length. A qualitative approach promoting Didactical Design Research (DDR) was administered in this study. Participants of the study were primary school students in Tasikmalaya, an city in West Java Province, Indonesia. The results show that there was a learning design based on learning obstacles found in the mathematics teaching and learning processes. The learning obstacles comprised students' difficulties in memorizing, relating, and operating the standards of unit of lengths. It has been proven that the most influential factor in the success of mathematics teaching and learning processes is the use of creative media.

  16. Highly qualified does not equal high quality: A study of urban stakeholders' perceptions of quality in science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rommel Joseph

    By employing qualitative methods, this study sought to determine the perceptions that urban stakeholders hold about what characteristics should distinguish a high school science teacher whom they would consider to demonstrate high quality in science teaching. A maximum variation sample of six science teachers, three school administrators, six parents and six students from a large urban public school district were interviewed using semi-structured, in-depth interview techniques. From these data, a list of observable characteristics which urban stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching was generated. Observational techniques were utilized to determine the extent to which six urban high school science teachers, who meet the NCLB Act criteria for being "highly qualified", actually possessed the characteristics which these stakeholders hold as evidence of high quality in science teaching. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data set. The findings suggest that urban stakeholders perceive that a high school science teacher who demonstrates high quality in science teaching should be knowledgeable about their subject matter, their student population, and should be resourceful; should possess an academic background in science and professional experience in science teaching; should exhibit professionalism, a passion for science and teaching, and a dedication to teaching and student learning; should be skillful in planning and preparing science lessons and in organizing the classroom, in presenting the subject matter to students, in conducting a variety of hands-on activities, and in managing a classroom; and should assess whether students complete class goals and objectives, and provide feedback about grades for students promptly. The findings further reveal that some of the urban high school science teachers who were deemed to be "highly qualified", as defined by the NCLB Act, engaged in practices that threatened quality in science

  17. "It's a Lot of Hectic in Middle School": Student-Teaching in an Urban Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Relates the experience of a college professor who spent two months as a student teacher in an eighth-grade language arts classroom in an urban public school. Discusses middle school teaching verses college teaching, coming to know the students, discipline, student testing, accountability, teaching writing, the failure of teacher-training programs,…

  18. Caught in the Balance: An Organizational Analysis of Science Teaching in Schools with Elementary Science Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Bujosa, Lisa M.; Levy, Abigail Jurist

    2016-01-01

    Elementary schools are under increasing pressure to teach science and teach it well; yet, research documents that classroom teachers must overcome numerous personal and school-based challenges to teach science effectively at this level, such as access to materials and inadequate instructional time. The elementary science specialist model…

  19. A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It" (McPhail 2013), the author discusses how McPhail's paper examines human rights teaching principles, the question of why corporations and business schools should respect and teach human rights, and how business…

  20. 發展高中教師教數學所需的知識之問卷:探索性研究 Developing an Instrument for Capturing High School Teachers’ Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    林勇吉 Yung-Chi Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 本研究旨在描述如何發展高中教師「教數學所需的知識」(MKT)問卷。研究結果以一個具代表性的問題為例。呈現這個代表性問題如何發展與不斷精緻,最後報導本問卷的前導測驗結果。本研究發現三個有效的創造問卷的策略:一、使用具有「關鍵」教學知識的數學問題(教導這個數學問題,需要一個基礎、重要且不能忽略的核心知識)。二、使用學生非例行性解法。三、使用教師在實際教學上的錯誤。本研究希望提供相關領域研究者,如何設計MKT問卷的參考依據。 This paper addresses an effort to design and test a set of items for assessing the mathematics knowledge for teaching. The paper begins by describing how a representative item was developed based on three experienced high school teachers’ analyzing classroom instruction. Subsequently, item refinement by two experts is documented. Finally, the initial results of a pilot-test of a focus group of 11 high school mathematics teachers are reported. This study revealed three useful methods for creating items for assessment: (1 using mathematics problems containing certain key mathematical ideas; (2 using nonstandard approaches of students that are unfamiliar to the teachers; and (3 using the errors of teachers.

  1. Physics teaching in the medical schools of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Hsu, Roy

    2012-02-01

    We describe and analyze the statistics of general physics and laboratory courses in the medical schools of Taiwan. We explore the development of the general physics curriculum for medical students of Taiwan. Also, an approach to designing a general physics course in combination with its application to medical sciences is proposed. We hope this preliminary study can provide a useful reference for physics colleagues in the medical schools of Taiwan to revolutionize the dynamics of teaching physics to the medical students of Taiwan. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Participation in Summer School and High School Graduation in the Sun Valley High School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a summer school credit recovery program in the Sun Valley High School District. Using logistic regression I assess the relationship between race, gender, course failure, school of origin and summer school participation for a sample of students that failed one or more classes in their first year of high…

  3. The integrated approach to teaching programming in secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynyuk A.A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available the article considers an integrated approach to teaching programming with the use of technologies of computer modeling and 3D-graphics, allowing to improve the quality of education. It is shown that this method will allow you to systematize knowledge, improve the level of motivation through the inclusion of relevant technologies, to develop skills of project activities, to strengthen interdisciplinary connections, and promotes professional and personal self-determination of students of secondary school.

  4. Carpet Aids Learning in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy and High Performance Schools Act of 2002 has set specific federal guidelines for school design, and developed a federal/state partnership program to assist local districts in their school planning. According to the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), high-performance schools are, among other things, healthy, comfortable,…

  5. Burnout in Prospective Elementary School Teachers: Is It Related to Reasons for Choosing the Elementary School Teaching Major, Beliefs about the Teaching Career and Satisfaction with the Choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Sahin

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the relationships between elementary school teacher candidates' motivations for choosing the teaching profession, beliefs about the teaching profession, satisfaction with the choice, and burnout. The study was carried out with 171 senior elementary school teacher candidates at one public university in…

  6. Transitions from high school to college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezia, Andrea; Jaeger, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of high school students aspire to some kind of postsecondary education, yet far too many of them enter college without the basic content knowledge, skills, or habits of mind they need to succeed. Andrea Venezia and Laura Jaeger look at the state of college readiness among high school students, the effectiveness of programs in place to help them transition to college, and efforts to improve those transitions. Students are unprepared for postsecondary coursework for many reasons, the authors write, including differences between what high schools teach and what colleges expect, as well as large disparities between the instruction offered by high schools with high concentrations of students in poverty and that offered by high schools with more advantaged students. The authors also note the importance of noncurricular variables, such as peer influences, parental expectations, and conditions that encourage academic study. Interventions to improve college readiness offer a variety of services, from academic preparation and information about college and financial aid, to psychosocial and behavioral supports, to the development of habits of mind including organizational skills, anticipation, persistence, and resiliency. The authors also discuss more systemic programs, such as Middle College High Schools, and review efforts to allow high school students to take college classes (known as dual enrollment). Evaluations of the effectiveness of these efforts are limited, but the authors report that studies of precollege support programs generally show small impacts, while the more systemic programs show mixed results. Dual-enrollment programs show promise, but the evaluation designs may overstate the results. The Common Core State Standards, a voluntary set of goals and expectations in English and math adopted by most states, offer the potential to improve college and career readiness, the authors write. But that potential will be realized, they add, only if the

  7. Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu TC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tzu-Chieh Yu¹, Nichola C Wilson², Primal P Singh¹, Daniel P Lemanu¹, Susan J Hawken³, Andrew G Hill¹¹South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ²Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; ³Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandIntroduction: International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice.Objective: To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students.Method: A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes.Results: From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective

  8. Textbook Forum: The Nernst Equation in High School Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Daniel M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a problem on nonstandard concentrations at nonstandard temperature modeled after an example problem on the Nernst equation found in a high school chemistry textbook. Discusses why the problem is incorrect, offering a second problem which is correctly solved. Implications for teaching the Nernst equation are considered. (JN)

  9. The Estuary Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Glen; And Others

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what estuaries are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects estuaries; and encourage students to…

  10. High Stakes Testing and Its Impact on Rural Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, V. Pauline

    2002-01-01

    The movement to standardization and high-stakes testing has been driven by ideological and political concerns and has adversely affected teaching/learning, democratic discourse, and educational equity. Rural schools are hit harder because of geographic isolation and insufficient staff and resources. Testing used for purposes other than measuring…

  11. Implementing Concepts of Pharmaceutical Engineering into High School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Howard; Hirsch, Linda S.; Simon, Laurent; Burr-Alexander, Levelle; Dave, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    The Research Experience for Teachers was designed to help high school science teachers develop skills and knowledge in research, science and engineering with a focus on the area of pharmaceutical particulate and composite systems. The experience included time for the development of instructional modules for classroom teaching. Results of the…

  12. Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Christiana J.

    Over the last several decades, forensic science---the application of science to civil and criminal legal matters---has become of increasing popularity with the public. The range of disciplines within the field is immense, offering individuals the potential for a unique career, regardless of their specific interests or expertise. In response to this growth, many organizations, both public and private, have recognized the need to create forensic science programs that strive to maintain and enhance the quality of forensic science education. Unfortunately, most of the emphasis placed on developing these materials relates to post-secondary education, and creates a significant lack of forensic science educational materials available in the U.S., especially in Oklahoma. The purpose of this project was to create a high school curriculum that provides the foundation for building a broad, yet comprehensive, overview of the field of forensic science and its associated disciplines. The overall goal was to create and provide course materials to high school teachers in order to increase their knowledge of forensic science such that they are able to teach its disciplines effectively and with accuracy. The Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students includes sample lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, and lab activities with step-by-step instructions.

  13. Introducing the USAYPT--Do Research in Your High School then Debate Your Results with Other Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldaker, Bruce G.; Jacobs, Greg; Bibilashvili, Tengiz

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the USAYPT--the United States Association for Young Physicists Tournaments, Inc. Our motto is "Better teaching and learning by doing research in your high school." We believe that all high school teachers can improve their knowledge of physics by forming small groups that perform non-trivial--but not cutting edge--research. In order…

  14. Impact of Texas high school science teacher credentials on student performance in high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anna Ray Bayless

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between the credentials held by science teachers who taught at a school that administered the Science Texas Assessment on Knowledge and Skills (Science TAKS), the state standardized exam in science, at grade 11 and student performance on a state standardized exam in science administered in grade 11. Years of teaching experience, teacher certification type(s), highest degree level held, teacher and school demographic information, and the percentage of students who met the passing standard on the Science TAKS were obtained through a public records request to the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). Analysis was performed through the use of canonical correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The results of the multiple linear regression analysis indicate that a larger percentage of students met the passing standard on the Science TAKS state attended schools in which a large portion of the high school science teachers held post baccalaureate degrees, elementary and physical science certifications, and had 11-20 years of teaching experience.

  15. Challenges for Teachers in Developing their Teaching Professionalism: A Case Study of Secondary School in Makassar, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Tanang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying challenges for teachers in developing their professionalism in teaching to improve students’ learning outcomes. The focus was addressed on the development of teaching professionalism in improving knowledge and skills of Junior High School teachers in Makassar Indonesia. This study employed qualitative methods through a case study to identify the barriers of professionalism in teaching. 36 samples for open-ended questionnaire and nine of them are selected purposively to be interviewed. The data was analyzed by coding based on themes related to constraints in teaching management. The results showed four obstacles experienced by teachers in developing their professionalism, namely constraints on textbooks and student worksheets, school laboratory usage, ICT-based media, and the students themselves. The identification could encourage the community and parents support to finance the development of professionalism in teaching and to help the teachers work effectively

  16. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  17. How New Technologies Have (and Have Not) Changed Teaching and Learning in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Richard; Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Information technologies have reshaped teaching and learning in schools, but often not in ways anticipated by technology proponents. This paper proposes a contrast between technologies for learning and technologies for learners to explain how technologies influence teaching and learning in and out of schools. Schools have made significant use of…

  18. Teaching Science in the Primary School: Surveying Teacher Wellbeing and Planning for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    A teacher-researcher in a primary school setting surveyed the middle years' teachers of her school and those in the local science hub group, to determine their confidence and satisfaction levels in relation to teaching science. Her results confirm feelings of inadequacy and reluctance to teach Science, but also indicate ways that schools can…

  19. Professional Development and the Teaching Schools Experiment in England: Leadership Challenges in an Alliance's First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from the first year of a longitudinal, mixed-methods case study of a large teaching school alliance in England. This national initiative is intended to drive improvement at system level by grouping schools around formally designated teaching schools. These "alliances" work collaboratively to share learning,…

  20. [Status of health psychology teaching in Chilean schools of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Jaime T; Pinedo, José P; Repetto, Paula L

    2012-07-01

    Physicians should be exposed, during their training to basic concepts in psychology. To describe the current status of the formal teaching of health psychology or medical psychology in Chilean medical schools. We reviewed the programs of the courses including topics of Medical Psychology, Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine at 18 medical schools in Chile, using a focused coding method. The contents and the time spent on these courses were considered and analyzed. Eighty three percent of medical schools have a Medical Psychology or related program, 56.3% are carried out during the first year of medical School teaching and the weekly load has an average of 4 hours. The contents are mixed and predominantly concerning general and developmental psychology, but also address specific issues of Medical Psychology in most cases. There is little clarity about the training issues to be addressed in medical psychology for medical students in Chile. It is necessary to define the minimum content that all medical graduates should learn.

  1. Powerlifting: A Suitable High School Elective and After-School Intramural Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, Francis M.; Brusseau, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Although weightlifting is part of most high school physical education curricula, the sport of powerlifting is a relatively overlooked activity that men and women of all ages can practice as a lifetime sport. This activity consists of three lifts: squat, bench press, and deadlift. This article describes the benefits of teaching powerlifting as a…

  2. Voice Range Profiles of Middle School and High School Choral Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are significant, and this challenge is compounded for choral directors who depend on the voice for communicating information or demonstrating music concepts. The purpose of this study is to examine the frequency and intensity of middle and high school choral directors' voices and to compare choral directors' voices with…

  3. Towards a High Quality High School Workforce: A Longitudinal, Demographic Analysis of U.S. Public School Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Rosengrant, David; Dewar, Andrew; Shah, Lisa; Ray, Herman E.; Sheppard, Keith; Watanabe, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to improve the number and quality of the high school physics teaching workforce have taken several forms, including those sponsored by professional organizations. Using a series of large-scale teacher demographic data sets from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this study sought to investigate trends in teacher quality…

  4. Catholic High Schools and Rural Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, William

    1997-01-01

    A study of national longitudinal data examined effects of rural Catholic high schools on mathematics achievement, high school graduation rates, and the likelihood that high school graduates attend college. Findings indicate that rural Catholic high schools had a positive effect on mathematics test scores and no effect on graduation rates or rates…

  5. High-Performance Schools: Affordable Green Design for K-12 Schools; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plympton, P.; Brown, J.; Stevens, K.

    2004-08-01

    Schools in the United States spend $7.8 billion on energy each year-more than the cost of computers and textbooks combined, according to a 2003 report from the National Center for Education Statistics. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that these high utility bills could be reduced as much as 25% if schools adopt readily available high performance design principles and technologies. Accordingly, hundreds of K-12 schools across the country have made a commitment to improve the learning and teaching environment of schools while saving money and energy and protecting the environment. DOE and its public- and private-sector partners have developed Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools, customized for nine climate zones in U.S. states and territories. These design guidelines provide information for school decision makers and design professionals on the advantages of energy efficiency and renewable energy designs and technologies. With such features as natural day lighting, efficient electric lights, water conservation, and renewable energy, schools in all types of climates are proving that school buildings, and the students and teachers who occupy them, are indeed high performers. This paper describes high performance schools from each of the nine climate zones associated with the Energy Design Guidelines. The nine case studies focus on the high performance design strategies implemented in each school, as well as the cost savings and benefits realized by students, faculty, the community, and the environment.

  6. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-12-01

    Chemistry and the Environment This issue contains more than 20 articles relating to the environment. Several articles of potential interest are indicated in the Table of Contents with the SSC mark (). Others are not so indicated because they depict use of expensive instrumentation or costly procedures, but if you have an interest in environmental chemistry you may wish to examine all the environmentally related articles. While many of the articles, both marked and unmarked, are targeted to college-level environmental chemistry curricula or to introductory courses for non-major, the methods described in several could be readily adapted to high school chemistry courses. One article likely to be of interest to teachers is found in News from Online, pp 1608-1609. The author explains how to use the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's EnviroMapper Web site to view and query environmental information. She mentioned finding a hazardous waste handler located near her home, so I decided to check the area near my home. I quickly located a natural gas salt dome storage facility marked on the map and, with a few more mouse clicks, I found information that included status of compliance with regulations, amounts of each compound released to the air in tons per year, and how to contact the corporation owning the site. Email and Web site addresses were included for the convenience of anyone wishing to contact the corporation. Students could learn a great deal about where they live that is relevant to chemistry by using the EPA site. Additional Web sites dealing with environmental issues and chemistry are cited in the sidebar at the bottom of p 1609. Among the articles that could be adapted to an advanced high school chemistry class or possibly even to an introductory class is one titled Bridge of Mandolin County (pp 1671-1672). It describes a case-study strategy similar to the scenarios used in ChemStudy. Students analyze information from various sources, including laboratory

  7. Playful Teaching Work of School Science Teachers Fundamental in a Municipal School in Pernambuco, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros Silva, Suzana Cinthia Gomes; de Oliveira, Maria Marly; de Oliveira, Gilvaneide Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    This study is part of a dissertation which aims to explore and understand the role of play in the teaching-learning process at elementary level in a public school at Pernambuco, Brazil. We opted for a qualitative approach, using the interactive methodology, interviews by the technique of hermeneutic-dialectical circle, observations of science…

  8. School System (Re)design: Developing Educational Infrastructures to Support School Leadership and Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Megan; Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for local education agencies (i.e., school districts in the United States) undergoing reform is to design systems that facilitate instructional improvement. At the core of these systems are educational infrastructures that bolster capacity building efforts and support teaching and leadership practices. Our goal for this special…

  9. Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Wilson, Nichola C; Singh, Primal P; Lemanu, Daniel P; Hawken, Susan J; Hill, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Introduction International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL) during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice. Objective To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students. Method A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes. Results From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective contexts, achieves short-term learner outcomes that are comparable with those produced by faculty-based teaching. Furthermore, peer-teaching has beneficial effects on student-teacher learning outcomes. Conclusions Peer-teaching in undergraduate medical programs is comparable to conventional teaching when utilized in selected contexts. There is evidence to suggest

  10. Chaos at High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Meszéna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We are faced with chaotic processes in many segments of our life: meteorology, environmental pollution, financial and economic processes, sociology, mechanics, electronics, biology, chemistry. The spreading of high-performance computers and the development of simulation methods made the examination of these processes easily available. Regular, periodic motions (pendulum, harmonic oscillatory motion, bouncing ball, as taught at secondary level, become chaotic even due minor changes. If it is true that the most considerable achievements of twentieth century physics were the theory of relativity, quantum mechanics and chaos theory, then it is presumably time to think about, examine and test how and to what extent chaos can be presented to the students. Here I would like to introduce a 12 lesson long facultative curriculum framework on chaos designed for students aged seventeen. The investigation of chaos phenomenon in this work is based on a freeware, “Dynamics Solver”. This software, with some assistance from the teacher, is suitable for classroom use at secondary level.

  11. Braille Goes to High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    This brief report describes the development and implementation of a unique, full-year, credit-bearing, technology course in literary Braille transcription offered at a Long Island (New York) high school. It describes the program's goals, development, implementation, students, ongoing activities, outreach efforts, and student attitudes. Suggestions…

  12. INSPIRED High School Computing Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerschuk, Peggy; Liu, Jiangjiang; Mann, Judith

    2011-01-01

    If we are to attract more women and minorities to computing we must engage students at an early age. As part of its mission to increase participation of women and underrepresented minorities in computing, the Increasing Student Participation in Research Development Program (INSPIRED) conducts computing academies for high school students. The…

  13. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  14. Improving Mathematical Communication Ability and Self Regulation Learning of Junior High Students by Using Reciprocal Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qohar, Abdul; Sumarmo, Utari

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a posttest experiment control group design by using reciprocal teaching, conducted in Indonesia University of Education to investigate students' ability in mathematical communication and self regulated learning. Subject of the study were 254 of 9th grade students from three junior high schools of high, medium,…

  15. School-Within-A-School (Hawaii Nui High) Hilo High School Report 1969-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Social Welfare Development and Research Center.

    The second year of operation of Hilo High School's "School-Within-A-School" [SWS] program is evaluated in this paper. Planning, training, and program implementation are described in the document. The following are the results of the program: There was an improvement in attendance among project students when compared to their record in…

  16. Middle School Concept Helps High-Poverty Schools Become High-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picucci, Ali Callicoatte; Brownson, Amanda; Kahlert, Rahel; Sobel, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The results of a study conducted by the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin for the U.S. Department of Education during the 2001-02 school year showed that elements of the middle school concept can lead to improved student performance, even in high-poverty schools. This article describes common elements of the middle school…

  17. 閱讀策略教學對高二學生數學學習表現的影響 Effects of Teaching Reading Strategies on Senior High School Student’s Mathematics Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    蘇慧珍 Hui-Chen Su

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究參考交互教學法之閱讀策略設計運用閱讀來學習數學的課程,透過實驗研究檢驗此課程是否有助於提升高中二年級學生的數學學習成就、數學閱讀理解以及策略使用的表現。教學實驗共歷時6 週,研究採前後測準實驗設計,以臺北市立一所公立高中二年級兩個班級學生為研究對象;其中一班為實驗組,實施閱讀策略教學,另一班對照組則未實施閱讀策略教學,兩班皆由同一位數學教師教學,有效樣本共計74人。研究者共設計四份評量工具檢驗教學實驗的成效,內容包含數學成就測驗、數學閱讀理解測驗以及閱讀策略使用情形自我評估,分別用於實驗前的前測、6週實驗後的第一次後測、經過1 週的第二次後測,以及6週實驗後2 個月的延後測,再以廣義估計方程式分析測驗資料。研究發現運用閱讀來學習數學課程的成效包含:一、有利於提升學生讀課本時使用各項閱讀策略的頻率;二、有利於提升學生當下的數學成就與數學閱讀理解;三、有利於提升學生使用提問與澄清策略來閱讀未學過的數學文本。但是,隨著教學實驗後所經過的時間愈久,對數學成就與數學閱讀理解的效果會逐漸消失,最後只有利於提升學生使用提問策略來閱讀未學過的數學文本。本研究將針對未如預期的延後測實驗結果提出可能的原因,作為未來進一步改善數學閱讀教學與研究 的建議。 The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of teaching reading strategies involving textbooks for senior high school students. Two classes of 11th-grade students participated in this study; one was the experimental class and the other was the control class. The experiment was designed to teach cognitive reading strategies through reciprocal teaching using a mathematics textbook to improve mathematics

  18. Physics teaching in a public school: an ethnographic case study with an epistemological bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa T. Massoni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a classroom ethnography. Ethnography in a research strategy that attempts to comprehensively describe a culture, in this case the culture of a physics classroom in the 12th grade of a public high school in Porto Alegre, Brazil. This study is part of a larger scope study designed to investigate the contributions of contemporary views of the nature of science to the improvement of physics teaching. It is in sense that this paper assumes an epistemological perspective. The physics teacher that was observed had conceptions partially aligned to those epistemological views, however, although our initial intention was to search for relationships between her conceptions an her teaching practices we ended up with a detailed interpretative description of the classroom reality that revealed relevant aspects to the comprehension of such a culture and to the teaching and learning process in physics. This interpretative description is what we present here.

  19. Teaching High School Physical Education According to National Standards: The 6 Verbs of Success--Demonstrate, Understand, Participate, Achieve, Exhibit and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The six national content standards from NASPE define what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a high quality physical education program. The "NASPE SIX" serve as a North Star to guide teachers as they prepare and implement programs. Simply stated, the NASPE Standards for Physical Education are all about six simple…

  20. Australian Lesbian Teachers--A Reflection of Homophobic Harassment of High School Teachers in New South Wales Government Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfolja, Tania

    1998-01-01

    Examines the homophobic harassment of lesbian teachers working in government high schools in Sydney (Australia). The experiences of six lesbian teachers show that harassment based on sexual orientation is often an invisible issue in schools, as is homosexuality in general. Recommendations are made for teaching about homosexual tolerance. (SLD)

  1. O problema da linguagem e o ensino da mecânica quântica no nível médio The language problem in the teaching of quantum mechanics at high school level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iramaia Jorge Cabral de Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, é discutida a questão básica da linguagem e da captação de significados da Mecânica Quântica (MQ como uma questão relevante para a inserção dos seus conceitos fundamentais no Ensino Médio. Sabe-se que a linguagem é fundamental para a compreensão da ciência e a construção de conceitos científicos que, ao mesmo tempo em que são específicos, podem se generalizar no contexto da vida cotidiana. A preocupação com a linguagem configurada e utilizada pela MQ foi evidenciada pelos seus próprios autores. Diante do problema da relação entre a linguagem clássica e a quântica, este trabalho mostra a opção da manutenção da linguagem clássica modificando-se a lógica para tratar os fenômenos quânticos, buscando-se localizar essa opção do ponto de vista epistemológico e suas implicações para o ensino.In this paper the problem of language and the grasping of meanings in quantum mechanics is discussed as a relevant subject for the teaching of basic concepts at high school level. It is well known that language is fundamental for the comprehension of science and for the construction of scientific concepts which are specific but at the same time might be generalized in the context of everyday life. The concern with the language shaped and used by quantum mechanics was externalized by their own creators. Given the problem of the relationship between the classical and the quantum languages, in this paper we argue that a way to deal with quantum phenomena is to keep the classical language but a different logic must be used, and so we are trying to locate this option from an epistemological point of view and show its implications for teaching.

  2. The Use of Computer Competencies of Students in the Departments of Physical Education and Sport Teaching, and School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okan, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal the levels of the use of computer, which is nowadays one of the most important technologies, of teacher candidate studying in the departments of Physical Education and Sport Teaching, and School teaching; also aims to research whether there is differences according to various criteria or not. In research, data were…

  3. A Portrait of a Teacher's Life: Learning to Teach, Curriculum-Making, and Teaching about Islam in a Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aown, Najwa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance and the inclusion of teaching about religion in most national and state curriculum standards, especially in social studies curriculum, many public school teachers are not adequately prepared to how, and what, to teach about religion, in particular Islam. As a result, many teachers are left alone to sink and swim in their…

  4. Authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-06-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high school dropout rates. Analyses controlled for school demographics of school enrollment size, percentage of low-income students, percentage of minority students, and urbanicity. Consistent with authoritative school climate theory, moderation analyses found that when students perceive their teachers as supportive, high academic expectations are associated with lower dropout rates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Teaching Vacancies and Difficult-to-Staff Teaching Positions in Public Schools. Stats in Brief. NCES 2015-065

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Nat; Hoyer, Kathleen Mulvaney; Sparks, Dinah

    2015-01-01

    This brief investigates teaching vacancies and difficult-to-staff teaching positions (i.e., positions for which the principals reported that it was very difficult to fill a vacancy or that they could not fill a vacancy in a specific subject area) in public schools in four school years (1999-2000, 2003-04, 2007-08, and 2011-12). This Statistics in…

  6. The climate change: A teaching unit to Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarita González

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the planning of "Climate change" Secondary School the experience gained in its application Ninth Grade ESBU Tania the Guerilla of Pinar del Río.The subjects are presented in proposal for the simultaneous work of the subjectare:Geography, Chemistry Physicsand Biology with the support of Computing. Work on these subjects taxed at fulfillment of the objectiveof the unit.instruments are also presented for measuring development of knowledge, assessment and materials Discussesthe results of the application thereof.TeachingClimate Change Unit is one of the ways in which they can be realized in the classroom addressing issues of global interest

  7. THE TEACHING OF GEOMETRY SUPPORTED BY COMPUTERS: A NEW REALITY IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL / LA ENSEÑANZA DE LA GEOMETRÍA ASISTIDA POR COMPUTADORAS: UNA NUEVA REALIDAD EN LA SECUNDARIA BÁSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Fonseca Pérez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the third revolution in the educational system in Cuba, schools are provided with new technologies, among them: computers, constituting a challenge for its usage in the teaching-learning process. Being aware that the learning of Geometry presents difficulties proved in different moments and by different people, this work offers methodological words of advice for teachers and it shows some activities designed where it is used a computer´ program of application as it is Geometry, which eases to reveal its potentialities and transform the teaching-learning process of Geometry and takes into account the levels of development of the geometric thought, the formation of stages in the mental actions and the didactic for a developing process. In its implementation, in the referential provincial center, are shown significant changes in the learners.

  8. Teaching Chronobiology and Sleep Habits in School and University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Carolina V. M.; Sousa, Ivanise; Paul, Ketema; MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Mondejar, Ma Teresa; Sarabia, Juan Antonio; Rol, M. Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Early morning school schedules are in the opposite direction to the sleep-wake cycle in adolescence and early adulthood. This conflict leads to sleep deprivation and irregular patterns whose consequences are scarcely explored. This article discusses the effects of three educational experiences with high school students, parents, teachers, and…

  9. Integrating International Business Law Concepts into a High School Business Law Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Cathleen J.; McDonald, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines international business content for a high school business law curriculum: history of international business law, World Trade Organization, international disputes, contracts and sales, financing/banking, currency, taxation, intellectual property, transportation, and multinational corporations. Considers whether to teach international…

  10. Factors influence the digital media teaching of primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EAOSA

    Keywords: digital media; flipped classroom; learning achievement; teaching ... Despite the negative high start-up cost, Touchton (2015) has argued that ... results in the cognition, affection and skills and so on”. ... teachers have ignored the importance of establish- .... Guided by engagement researches and theories, this.

  11. Effects of Post-School Options Instruction on Knowledge of Options and Ability to Orally Present Post-School Goals for High School Students with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the effects of teaching presentation skills and post-school options to three high school students with developmental disabilities. While previous research has indicated students with learning disabilities can learn both academic and life skills within the same activity (Collins, Hager, & Galloway, 2011; Falkenstine, Collins,…

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-07-01

    Secondary School Feature Articles * Super Science Connections, by Patricia B. McKean, p 916 * A pHorseshoe, by Roger Plumsky, p 935 National Conferences in Your Part of the Country For the past several months, considerable space in this column has been devoted to forthcoming national conferences and conventions and to highlights of conferences past. For some of us, location is fairly unimportant; but for most of us travel costs and time are both factors to consider when choosing a conference. The community of high school chemistry teachers is favored by the number of national conventions and conferences that are held each year in different locations. In 1999, for example, the spring National Meeting of the American Chemical Society was in Anaheim and the National Science Teachers Association National Convention was in Boston. This summer CHEMED '99 will be held in Fairfield, CT, August 1-5, and the fall National ACS Meeting will be in New Orleans. Teachers from the mid-South especially should consider attending the High School Program at New Orleans, described below by Lillie Tucker Akin, Chairperson of the Division's High School Program Committee. The event will be held on Sunday to minimize conflicts with the beginning of the school year. JCE at CHEMED '99 Stop by the JCE booth at CHEMED '99 in the exhibits area to learn more about the wide array of print and nonprint resources you can use in your classroom and laboratory. Members of the editorial staff will be on hand to talk with you. You are invited to participate in a workshop, "Promoting Active Learning through JCE Activity Sheets and Software", on Monday, August 1, 8:30-10:30. The free hands-on workshop is number WT11 and we encourage you to include it among your choices in the blanks provided on the third page of the registration form. We will also conduct an interactive session to listen to ideas for making the Journal more useful to you. Check the final program for location and time or inquire at the JCE

  13. Vocational Education with a Twist: This School Teaches Community Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara

    1983-01-01

    At Davis Vocational Technical High School in Lincoln (Rhode Island) students in such areas as carpentry, culinary arts, and cosmetology provide free services to the community and gain valuable experience. (Author/JM)

  14. Sexting by High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; Cann, Deanna; Velarde, Valerie

    2017-08-01

    In the last 8 years, several studies have documented that many adolescents acknowledge having exchanged sexually explicit cell phone pictures of themselves, a behavior termed sexting. Differences across studies in how sexting was defined, recruitment strategies, and cohort have resulted in sometimes significant differences in as basic a metric as what percentage of adolescents have sent, received, or forwarded such sexts. The psychosocial and even legal risks associated with sexting by minors are significantly serious that accurate estimates of its prevalence, including over time, are important to ascertain. In the present study, students (N = 656) from a single private high school were surveyed regarding their participation in sexting. Students at this same school were similarly surveyed four years earlier. In this second survey, reported rates of sending (males 15.8%; females 13.6%) and receiving (males 40.5%; females 30.6%) sexually explicit cell phone pictures (revealing genitals or buttocks of either sex or female breasts) were generally similar to those reported at the same school 4 years earlier. Rates of forwarding sexts (males 12.2%; females 7.6%) were much lower than those previously acknowledged at this school. Correlates of sexting in this study were similar to those reported previously. Overall, our findings suggest that sexting by adolescents (with the exception of forwarding) remains a fairly common behavior, despite its risks.

  15. From Government to Governance: Teach for India and New Networks of Reform in School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vidya K.

    2018-01-01

    The Teach for India (TFI) programme, an important offshoot of the Teach for All/Teach for America global education network, began as a public-private partnership in 2009 in poorly functioning municipal schools in Pune and Mumbai. Like its American counterpart, the programme in India has similar ideas of reform and recruits college graduates and…

  16. An Analysis of Three Curriculum Approaches to Teaching English in Public-Sector Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kathleen; Garton, Sue

    2017-01-01

    This article explores three current, influential English language teaching (ELT) curriculum approaches to the teaching of English in public-sector schools at the primary and secondary level and how the theory of each approach translates into curriculum practice. These approaches are communicative language teaching (CLT), genre-based pedagogy, and…

  17. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  18. Influencing Science Teaching Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Primary School Teachers: A Longitudinal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Merryn; Lamberts, Rod

    2014-01-01

    The science teaching self-efficacy beliefs of primary school teachers influence teaching practice. The purpose of this research was to determine if informal education institutions, such as science centres, could provide professional development that influences the science teaching self-efficacy beliefs of pre-service and in-service primary school…

  19. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes in Secondary Schools in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, T. O.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools in the State. This population was made up of 147 rural schools and 110 urban schools. It was also made up of 12 single sex…

  20. Syllabus Development Studies in Turkey and in the World for Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language - Some Suggestion for Teaching Arabic in Primary Schools in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat ÖZCAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Arabic in Turkey and in the world is rising in the last years because of some developments in Middle East. Beside this, Arabic is the language o f Holy Quran and hadiths. As it is known the non - Arab, Muslims need to learn this language in order to understand their religion. After all, of these needs, some countries opened some courses for teaching Arabic. In addition , people started to write some new materials for teaching Arabic in these courses as a foreign language. In Turkey, there are Arabic lessons in intermediate, middle and high school periods. The Education Ministry is publishing syllabus for these lessons. A s Turkey, some countries are teaching Arabic as a foreign language in their schools. In this paper, we tried to analyze the similarities and differences between the syllabuses of these countries and Turkey for teaching Arabic as a foreign language. At the end of the analyze we suggested some suggestions for teaching Arabic in primary schools in Turkey.

  1. From Attitudes to Practice: Utilising Inclusive Teaching Strategies in Kenyan Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Brent C.; Damiani, Michelle L.; Oswago, Benson O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of Kenyan primary school teachers using inclusive teaching strategies in a rural setting with many known barriers to the development of a sustainable inclusive education system. This qualitative study examines teachers' uses of inclusive teaching strategies in primary schools following a series of…

  2. Science That Matters: Exploring Science Learning and Teaching in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Angela; Smith, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To help support primary school students to better understand why science matters, teachers must first be supported to teach science in ways that matter. In moving to this point, this paper identifies the dilemmas and tensions primary school teachers face in the teaching of science. The balance is then readdressed through a research-based…

  3. Primary School Teacher Perceived Self-Efficacy to Teach Fundamental Motor Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, Micarle B.; Spittle, Michael; O'Meara, James; Casey, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) are a part of the school curricula, yet many Australian primary-age children are not mastering FMS. One reason may be a lack of perceived self-efficacy of primary teachers to teach FMS. This study investigated the level of perceived self-efficacy of primary school teachers to teach FMS in Victoria, Australia. A…

  4. Peer Observation of Teaching: Perceptions and Experiences of Teachers in a Primary School in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgi, Yiasemina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines teachers' perceptions of, and experiences with, professional development opportunities involving a school-based project on peer observation of teaching. The study aims to reveal the ways in which seven teachers in one primary school in Cyprus see themselves as agents improving their own and peers' teaching through informal…

  5. Theoretical Perspectives on Critical Thinking Teaching: Reflections from Field Experiences from a Norwegian Lower Secondary School in Comparison to Tanzanian Secondary School Teaching Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leatitia Gabriel Mashaza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theoretical perspectives relevant to critical thinking as my topic of research during my teaching practice period which was conducted from 12th -28th October 2015 at Eidsvag secondary school in Bergen, Norway. As a requirement for Masters’ degree in social science education, all master students were required to engage in teaching practice in different Norwegian primary and secondary schools. Importantly, every student teacher was given a topic of concentration as a mini-research for the whole teaching practice period. My topic of research focused at exploring and gaining the theoretical and practical perspectives on critical thinking teaching by drawing some experiences from a Norwegian lower secondary school (Eidsvag skole in reflection to secondary school teaching practice experiences in Tanzania. Therefore, in this paper, my reflections with regard to the conditions favoring the possibility for critical thinking teaching and how it was enhanced by teachers at my practice school will be discussed. Further to that, I will also present the observed challenges of which, in my view, in way or another intervened the possibility for effective critical thinking teaching to take place.

  6. Mathematics training for the teaching of basic knowledge in times of teaching school reform of Parana (Year 1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara da Silva França

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The article discusses the mathematical training of primary teachers in Paraná and aims to understand how elementary mathematical knowledge was included in the reform carried out by Lysimaco Ferreira da Costa, in the 1920’s and directed by Prieto Martinez for the modernization of the state’s primary education. Supported by theoretical and methodological framework of cultural history, this study is guided by the question: Considering the Reform of teaching school and thinking about the mathematics education of Paraná teachers, what has changed, why has it changed and what for? With the reform subjects more focused on practical teaching in primary school were introduced, and that favored the renewal of teaching methods and teaching resources, curriculum reorganization which reflected in the quality of Math education of future teachers in the state’s primary education. Keywords: Mathematics Teaching. Primary Education Teacher. History of Education.

  7. School Effectiveness at Primary Level of Education in Relation to Classroom Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Ranjan Panigrahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate the relationship of School Effectiveness with regard to classroom teaching at primary level of education. The objectives of the study were to identify the more-effective and less-effective schools; to find out the differences between more-effective and less-effective schools in relation to physical facilities, Head Master and Teachers’ performance and Students’ performance; to find out the relationship between the school effectiveness and classroom teaching. The descriptive survey method was used to carry out this study. A Total number of 27 more-effective and 35 less-effective primary schools were included in the sample of the present study. And also all principals of selected schools and from each school 2 teachers were selected to know their classroom teaching in the classroom situation. The selection of teachers was based on their teaching the classes (III, IV and V, to investigate their participation in school activities. The findings of the present study on school effectiveness and classroom teaching find adequate support from similar or related studies. Thus, the above discussion reflects that there is no simple combination of factors, which can produce effective school. The study has, however, revealed that school effectiveness has emerged as related to classroom teaching.

  8. An Investigation of Three Methods of Teaching Vocabulary at the Junior High Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Evangeline Drury

    This study of methods of teaching vocabulary in the junior high school investigated three approaches: use of a programed text in vocabulary development that emphasized context clues, use of the programed text augmented by listening assistance, and use of the programed text augmented by a word-analysis supplement. Over 300 students with I.Q.'s…

  9. contextualization and interdisciplinarity in chemistry teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    National Curricular Parameters for High School Teaching in Brazil, ... the policy and bases of national education (law 9.394/1996) and specially ... formation of the new generations of elementary and high school teachers) teaching in Brazil:.

  10. Teaching of reading to school beginners : a study of reading programmes in primary one in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kemizano, Rosert

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The study examines reading programmes with the reference to the teaching/learning of reading to school beginners. The teaching of reading at the early stages is important because it is the quality of the experiences that children get that affect or lay the foundation for reading development (Chall, 1996).Therefore, the phenomenon, “teaching of reading to school beginners” studied is of great importance. The theoretical background used includes reading and its importance, Languag...

  11. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  12. Why Teach Theater in the High School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    Theater participation aids students in several areas, including self-expression, self-development, self-understanding, self-esteem, self-discipline, analytical skills, empathy, human understanding, and competition. Balance between academics and the arts is essential if students are to be prepared to live well-rounded, meaningful lives in the…

  13. Predoctoral Teaching of Geriatric Dentistry in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current teaching of geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools and compare the findings to previous reports. Academic deans at all 67 U.S. dental schools were contacted in November 2015 via email, asking them to complete a questionnaire about the teaching of geriatric dentistry or gerodontology at their institution. Questionnaires were received from 56 of the 67 schools (84% response rate). The results showed that geriatric dentistry was taught in all responding schools; for 92.8% of the respondents, the instruction was compulsory. Among the responding schools, 62.5% were teaching it as an independent course, 25% as an organized series of lectures, and 8.9% as occasional lectures in parts of other courses. In addition, 57.1% had some form of compulsory clinical education in geriatric dentistry. Public schools, as opposed to private schools, were marginally associated with an increased interest in expanding geriatric dentistry teaching (p=0.078). No differences were found between any teaching variables and school location. This study found that the form of education in geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools differed in many ways, but the teaching of geriatric dentistry had increased among all respondents and had been increasing for over 30 years. Future research is needed to determine the impact of this teaching on services to the geriatric community.

  14. A BLUEPRINT FOR RESEARCH-LED TEACHING ENGINEERING AT SCHOOLS: A CASE STUDY FOR TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although it is expected that research conducted at universities and institutions of higher learning will have some positive impact on the teaching quality, the literature seem to point in another direction. Available literature reports zero correlation between teaching and research. However, this need not be the case and a number of recommendations to create a positive correlation between teaching and research are proposed. This paper outlines a framework that utilises the Grand Challenges for Engineering and CDIO to create a clear link between teaching and research in Taylor’s School of Engineering. Aligning the academic staff research objectives to the Grand Challenges, creates a sense of purpose that extends beyond the academic staff to their students. Ensuring that students’ projects and other CDIO activities are derived from the academic staff research interests help creates a learning environment in which research and teaching are integrated. This integration is highly desirable as it benefits both the students and the academic staff.

  15. PROGRAMMING IS GOOD FOR CHILDREN? A CRITICAL VIEW ABOUT TEACHING PROGRAMMING IN SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell Bento Geraldes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reflections on teaching programming in schools and the positive and negative impact of this new methodology today. The study also discusses the initiatives relating to teaching programming in schools, considering also the opinion of experts on the subject. The following questions are addressed: Is it good for children to learn to program computers in schools? Can all people learn to program computers? What is the importance of learning for today's society? The pros and cons regarding teaching programming in schools will be discussed in search of answers to these questions.

  16. Studies in Mathematics, Volume X. Applied Mathematics in the High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Max M.

    This publication contains a sequence of lectures given to high school mathematics teachers by the author. Applications of mathematics emphasized are elementary algebra, geometry, and matrix algebra. Included are: (1) an introduction concerning teaching applications of mathematics; (2) Chapter 1: Mechanics for the High School Student; (3) Chapter…

  17. High School Physics: An Interactive Instructional Approach That Meets the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaobo; Mejia, Joel Alejandro; Becker, Kurt; Neilson, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Improving high school physics teaching and learning is important to the long-term success of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Efforts are currently in place to develop an understanding of science among high school students through formal and informal educational experiences in engineering design activities…

  18. English Cooperative Learning Mode in a Rural Junior High School in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Peng, Wen; Sun, Liuhua

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative learning is one of the most recognized and fruitful research areas in modern education practice. It has been widely used in many countries as an effective teaching strategy to improve class efficiency and students' comprehensive language ability since the 1990's. This paper takes JA Junior High School, a rural junior high school in…

  19. Leading a Quiet Revolution: Women High School Principals in Traditional Arab Society in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid; Shapira, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates why very few Arab women persevere to become principals in Arab high schools in Israel. It identifies these trailblazers' distinguishing characteristics through the narratives of two Arab women, high school principals, tracing their transition from teaching to management, describing the intertwining of their personal and…

  20. How High School Students Select a College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joseph E., Jr.; And Others

    The college selection process used by high school students was studied and a paradigm that describes the process was developed, based on marketing theory concerning consumer behavior. Primarily college freshmen and high school seniors were interviewed, and a few high school juniors and upper-level college students were surveyed to determine…

  1. A framework for high-school teacher support in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, B.; Mair, A.; Schaller, G.; Koeberl, C.

    2012-04-01

    To attract future geoscientists in the classroom and share the passion for science, successful geoscience education needs to combine modern educational tools with applied science. Previous outreach efforts suggest that classroom-geoscience teaching tremendously benefits from structured, prepared lesson plans in combination with hands-on material. Building on our past experience, we have developed a classroom-teaching kit that implements interdisciplinary exercises and modern geoscientific application to attract high-school students. This "Mobile Phone Teaching Kit" analyzes the components of mobile phones, emphasizing the mineral compositions and geologic background of raw materials. Also, as geoscience is not an obligatory classroom topic in Austria, and university training for upcoming science teachers barely covers geoscience, teacher training is necessary to enhance understanding of the interdisciplinary geosciences in the classroom. During the past year, we have held teacher workshops to help implementing the topic in the classroom, and to provide professional training for non-geoscientists and demonstrate proper usage of the teaching kit. The material kit is designed for classroom teaching and comes with a lesson plan that covers background knowledge and provides worksheets and can easily be adapted to school curricula. The project was funded by kulturkontakt Austria; expenses covered 540 material kits, and we reached out to approximately 90 schools throughout Austria and held a workshop in each of the nine federal states in Austria. Teachers received the training, a set of the material kit, and the lesson plan free of charge. Feedback from teachers was highly appreciative. The request for further material kits is high and we plan to expand the project. Ultimately, we hope to enlighten teachers and students for the highly interdisciplinary variety of geosciences and a link to everyday life.

  2. Attractor States in Teaching and Learning Processes: A Study of Out-of-School Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geveke, Carla H; Steenbeek, Henderien W; Doornenbal, Jeannette M; Van Geert, Paul L C

    2017-01-01

    In order for out-of-school science activities that take place during school hours but outside the school context to be successful, instructors must have sufficient pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) to guarantee high-quality teaching and learning. We argue that PCK is a quality of the instructor-pupil system that is constructed in real-time interaction. When PCK is evident in real-time interaction, we define it as Expressed Pedagogical Content Knowledge (EPCK). The aim of this study is to empirically explore whether EPCK shows a systematic pattern of variation, and if so whether the pattern occurs in recurrent and temporary stable attractor states as predicted in the complex dynamic systems theory. This study concerned nine out-of-school activities in which pupils of upper primary school classes participated. A multivariate coding scheme was used to capture EPCK in real time. A principal component analysis of the time series of all the variables reduced the number of components. A cluster revealed general descriptions of the components across all cases. Cluster analyses of individual cases divided the time series into sequences, revealing High-, Low-, and Non-EPCK states. High-EPCK attractor states emerged at particular moments during activities, rather than being present all the time. Such High-EPCK attractor states were only found in a few cases, namely those where the pupils were prepared for the visit and the instructors were trained.

  3. High School Astronomical Research at the Army and Navy Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2016-06-01

    Establishment of a high school astronomy and research program is a difficult task to accomplish in an environment of state mandated high school educational curricula and the task saturation for many teachers today created by their class room and administrative requirements. This environment is most challenging for public schools. The astronomy program we will describe seems to be better suited at least at the present time for private or specialized schools. We will outline how a broad astronomy program was developed over two years at the Army and Navy Academy (ANA), a private boarding school in Carlsbad, California. Starting with no astronomy program in 2013, the Academy now has an astronomy club, a University of California a-g certified two semester high school course, and a college accredited astronomy research seminar with over 20 published high school authors.At ANA the development followed this path: finding a strong proponent at the school who can make actionable decisions; building interest and perceived value to other staff and faculty members; establishing an astronomy club to generate student interest and future student leaders; and designing the a-g certified high school course including the course length, structure and balance of teaching elements. Building on these foundations, the college level astronomy research seminar was then added to provide an avenue for inspired students to undertake actual research and publication of their work in scientific journals in their free time for college credit.Creating a sustainable program with supporting infrastructure comes next. Success with the three foundation steps builds confidence in the program with faculty and staff. Published, tangible successes highlight the value and enable advanced placement and scholarship opportunities for graduates. These successes build enthusiasm. The further keys to sustainability include addressing course credit, instructor compensation and rewards, and integration into the

  4. Analysing the physics learning environment of visually impaired students in high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toenders, Frank G. C.; de Putter-Smits, Lesley G. A.; Sanders, Wendy T. M.; den Brok, Perry

    2017-07-01

    Although visually impaired students attend regular high school, their enrolment in advanced science classes is dramatically low. In our research we evaluated the physics learning environment of a blind high school student in a regular Dutch high school. For visually impaired students to grasp physics concepts, time and additional materials to support the learning process are key. Time for teachers to develop teaching methods for such students is scarce. Suggestions for changes to the learning environment and of materials used are given.

  5. Relationships between school support, school facilities, ICT culture and mathematics teachers' attitudes towards ICT in teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Ismail, Rohayati

    2012-05-01

    Information communication Technology (ICT) has been a major influence in the Malaysian Education System, especially in the teaching of mathematics. Since 2003, the Malaysian Ministry of Education has provided incentives to mathematics teacher to motivate them to use ICT using English as the medium of instruction, during the teaching and learning process. However, there are barriers that prevented mathematics teachers from using ICT in the classrooms. This study is to determine factors that influenced the attitudes of Malaysian Mathematic Teachers in integrating ICT in their teaching and learning. One hundred ninety one mathematics teachers were randomly selected for the purpose of this study. The three factors investigated were school support, school facilities and school culture which had been selected to be correlated with teachers' attitudes towards integrating ICT in the teaching and learning of mathematics. Findings showed that significant positive relationships existed between teachers' attitudes toward integrating ICT in the teaching and learning and school support, school facilities and ICT culture and This finding indicated that, in order to develop teachers' attitudes in using ICT during their teaching and learning process, they needed support from the school principals and also their colleagues. Apart from that, school facilities and also ICT culture were also found to be essential.

  6. Improving Mathematical Communication Ability and Self Regulation Learning Of Yunior High Students by Using Reciprocal Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qohar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings from a posttest experiment control group design  by  using reciprocal teaching, conducted  in Indonesia University of Education to investigate students’ ability in mathematical communication and self regulated learning.  Subject of the study were 254 of 9th grade students from three junior high schools of high, medium, and low level in Bojonegoro, East Java.  The instruments of the study were an essay mathematical communication test, and a self regulated learning scale. The study found that reciprocal teaching took the best role among school  cluster  and students’ prior mathematics ability on students’ mathematical communication ability and self regulated learning as well.  The other finding were there was interaction between school cluster and teaching approaches, but was no interaction between students’ prior mathematics ability and teaching approaches on mathematical communication ability and  self regulated learning. Moreover, there was association between mathematical communication and self regulated learningKeywords: Reciprocal Teaching, Mathematical Communication, Self Regulated Learning DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.562.59-74

  7. Analyses of Common Grammar Mistakes in High-school English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liou

    2017-01-01

    English has an important position in the basic education stage as a language subject. English teaching requires students to have the abilities of listening, speaking, reading and writing in high school. If students want to learn these skills well, they should not only memorize vocabularies, but also master grammar knowledge. This paper illustrates the importance of English grammar for learning English and lists the common grammar mistakes. It also introduces some skills of learning English grammar.

  8. Solar ultraviolet and the occupational radiant exposure of Queensland school teachers: A comparative study between teaching classifications and behavior patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan J; Harrison, Simone L; Chavez, Daniel R Garzon; Parisi, Alfio V

    2016-05-01

    Classroom teachers located in Queensland, Australia are exposed to high levels of ambient solar ultraviolet as part of the occupational requirement to provide supervision of children during lunch and break times. We investigated the relationship between periods of outdoor occupational radiant exposure and available ambient solar radiation across different teaching classifications and schools relative to the daily occupational solar ultraviolet radiation (HICNIRP) protection standard of 30J/m(2). Self-reported daily sun exposure habits (n=480) and personal radiant exposures were monitored using calibrated polysulphone dosimeters (n=474) in 57 teaching staff from 6 different schools located in tropical north and southern Queensland. Daily radiant exposure patterns among teaching groups were compared to the ambient UV-Index. Personal sun exposures were stratified among teaching classifications, school location, school ownership (government vs non-government), and type (primary vs secondary). Median daily radiant exposures were 15J/m(2) and 5J/m(2)HICNIRP for schools located in northern and southern Queensland respectively. Of the 474 analyzed dosimeter-days, 23.0% were found to exceed the solar radiation protection standard, with the highest prevalence found among physical education teachers (57.4% dosimeter-days), followed by teacher aides (22.6% dosimeter-days) and classroom teachers (18.1% dosimeter-days). In Queensland, peak outdoor exposure times of teaching staff correspond with periods of extreme UV-Index. The daily occupational HICNIRP radiant exposure standard was exceeded in all schools and in all teaching classifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The identification of teaching interactions used in one-to-one teaching of number in the early years of schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Ewing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research paper reports on phase one of an investigation of video recorded intensive one-to-one teaching interactions with 6–7-year-old students who were in their second year of schooling in Australia and identified by the their teacher as low attaining in early number. The two-phased study from which this paper emerges was originally conducted in 1998 as part of my Bachelor of Teaching Honours (Research program at Southern Cross University Lismore, New South Wales. That study identified teaching interactions particularly suited to one-to-one teaching in the Maths Recovery Program, a program designed for these students who were at risk of failure in early number. Since that time a great deal has not changed with limited literature available that comprehensively reports on teaching interactions in intensive one-to-one settings. Revisiting the original study is considered timely given the increasing number of withdrawal and intensive programs now funded and adopted by schools and yet, rarely reported on in terms of the effectiveness of the teaching interactions that occur in such settings. This paper then presents a discussion of a preliminary series of teaching interactions that either positively and or negatively influence an intensive one-to-one teaching and learning setting.

  10. 透過現職教師建構國中健康與體育學習領域之自尊教學指標 Promoting Self-Esteem in Junior High School Students by Building Teaching Indicators: A Survey of Health and Physical Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    賴香如 Hsiang-Ru Lai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available 國中是自尊發展的重要階段,學校可建構合宜教學指標以利提升學生的自尊。本研究採德懷術(Delphi technique)進行健康與體育領域的自尊教學指標建構。由一項全臺抽樣調查的620 名對象中,徵詢到128 名願意參與後續研究者,再以信件和電話邀請,最後有38 名現職教師參加和完成三回合問卷填寫。主要研究結果如下:一、自尊教學指標包括學生、教師和學校三層面一百零六項。二、學生層面教學指標有四十二項,依安全感、自我感、歸屬感、使命感和能力感等自尊五要素來建構。三、教師層面教學指標包括課室經營四十四項、教學方法十一項和教學評量三項;其中課室經營也依自尊五要素建構。四、學校層面六項教學指標乃針對學校行政措施來發展。本研究建議國中教師可參照教學指標來設計自尊教材與活動。 The middle school years are an important stage in the development of students’ self-esteem. Schools can help students to develop their self-esteem by setting appropriate teaching indicators. This study aims to construct teaching indicators for self-esteem in the disciplines of Health Education and Physical Education. The Delphi technique was used. A total of 620 teachers were randomly selected from a national survey, and 128 agreed to participate. However, only 38 teachers agreed to serve as the expert panel after fully understanding the procedures associated with the Delphi technique. After completing the three-round questionnaire, the major results of this study were as follows. 1. A total of 106 teaching indicators for self-esteem, including student, teacher, and institution in the Health and Physical Education curriculum in junior high school were constructed. 2. Based on the five components of self-esteem, 42 teaching indicators were constructed for the student dimension. 3. The teacher dimension included

  11. School connectedness and high school graduation among maltreated youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkin, Allison; Kistin, Caroline J; Cabral, Howard J; Aschengrau, Ann; Bair-Merritt, Megan

    2018-01-01

    Maltreated youth have higher rates of school dropout than their non-maltreated peers. School connectedness is a modifiable predictor of school success. We hypothesized maltreated youth's school connectedness (supportive relationships with adults at school and participation in school clubs) would be positively associated with high school graduation. We included youth with at least one Child Protective Services (CPS) report by age twelve from Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect, a prospective cohort study. Participation in extracurricular activities and adult relationships reported at age 16, high school graduation/General Education Development (GED) status reported at age 18, and demographics were provided by youth and caregivers. Maltreatment data were coded from CPS records. The outcome was graduation/receipt of GED. Multivariable logistic regressions examined the association between school connectedness and graduation/receipt of GED, controlling for confounders. In our sample of 318 maltreated youth, 73.3% graduated. School club was the only activity with a statistically significant association with graduation in bivariate analysis. Having supportive relationships with an adult at school was not significantly associated with graduation, though only 10.7% of youth reported this relationship. Maltreated youth who participated in school clubs had 2.54 times the odds of graduating, adjusted for study site, gender, poverty status, caregiver high school graduation status, and age at first CPS report (95% CI: [1.02, 6.33]). Few maltreated youth reported relationships with adults at school, and additional efforts may be needed to support these vulnerable youth. School club participation may represent an opportunity to modify maltreated youth's risk for school dropout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Teaching of ophthalmology in undergraduate curricula: a survey of Australasian and Asian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jennifer C; Sherwin, Trevor; McGhee, Charles N J

    2007-01-01

    Despite established international guidelines on preferred teaching components for ophthalmology in undergraduate curricula, with increasingly less specialty-based undergraduate teaching within curricula, teaching of core ophthalmology knowledge and skills may become marginalized. This survey aims to evaluate the current state of undergraduate ophthalmology teaching in Australasia and proximate Asian medical schools. A questionnaire was developed to determine the content and extent of ophthalmology teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum. The questionnaire was sent to 25 medical schools throughout Australasia and Asia. Nineteen of the 25 questionnaires were returned (76% response rate). Ophthalmology teaching programmes ranged from 2 to 20 days: five (26%) medical schools having one ophthalmology attachment; six schools (32%) two attachments; and the remainder three or more. Only seven of the schools taught all 13 ophthalmology topics recommended in current curriculum guidelines. Ocular examination (100%), lens and cataract (95%) and ocular manifestations of systemic disease (95%) were the most commonly taught topics, with intraocular tumours only covered by 10 schools (53%). Students in 14 schools (74%) attended ophthalmology operating theatre, but only two schools (11%) offered attendance at optometry clinics. Ten schools (53%) required a pass in ophthalmology to complete the academic year. Ophthalmology may increasingly be a small, or even absent, component of undergraduate medical curricula. Despite established international ophthalmology curriculum guidelines, this survey highlights significant lack of uniformity in their implementation.

  13. Child-centered versus teacher-directed teaching practices: Associations with the development of academic skills in the first grade at school

    OpenAIRE

    Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kiuru, Noona; Pakarinen, Eija; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which child-centered versus teacher-directed teaching practices predicted the development of children’s reading and math skills in the first year of elementary school. In addition, we investigated whether associations between teaching practices and children’s academic skills development in Grade 1 differed among children who had low, average, or high initial academic skills at the beginning of school. The reading and math skills of 1,132 Finnish c...

  14. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR THE SUBJECT TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Elizabeth Barrera-del Castillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work is described the proposal of a model of semi-presence educational intervention for the subject, "Teaching of Mathematics in basic education", corresponding to the fourth semester of Special Education Bachelor's Degree, Plan 2004, of the Specializing Teaching School of the State of Sinaloa (ENEES, that attend the desirable characteristics of the graduates in the effective and efficient use of the technological tools, disciplinary competences, collaborative work and digital competences which are developed through the adaptation and the use of the model proposed. In this task, it is attended the digital literacy too, that the society of knowledge demands; firstly in function of the personal development needs, and then to respond to the actual educational context. The model of educational intervention defined in this task contributes to the interaction of teachers and students with technological background, collaborative work, groups of study, material and activities for each topic to develop. It was used the e-Collaborative Learning Sistema Integral Colaborativo para la Educación sin Barreras (SICEB implemented by the Secretary of Public Education and Culture (SEPyC, in which various types of learning objects are integrated among synchronized and unsynchronized activities. The proposed model is given through the defined criteria by the e-pedagogy which involves concepts such as quality, values and efficiency with support of the Learning Technologies and Knowledge (TAC.

  15. Teaching and Learning Physics in a 1:1 Laptop School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Andrew A.; Hug, Sarah T.

    2008-12-01

    1:1 laptop programs, in which every student is provided with a personal computer to use during the school year, permit increased and routine use of powerful, user-friendly computer-based tools. Growing numbers of 1:1 programs are reshaping the roles of teachers and learners in science classrooms. At the Denver School of Science and Technology, a public charter high school where a large percentage of students come from low-income families, 1:1 laptops are used often by teachers and students. This article describes the school's use of laptops, the Internet, and related digital tools, especially for teaching and learning physics. The data are from teacher and student surveys, interviews, classroom observations, and document analyses. Physics students and teachers use an interactive digital textbook; Internet-based simulations (some developed by a Nobel Prize winner); word processors; digital drop boxes; email; formative electronic assessments; computer-based and stand-alone graphing calculators; probes and associated software; and digital video cameras to explore hypotheses, collaborate, engage in scientific inquiry, and to identify strengths and weaknesses of students' understanding of physics. Technology provides students at DSST with high-quality tools to explore scientific concepts and the experiences of teachers and students illustrate effective uses of digital technology for high school physics.

  16. 教師背景與初職位置:中學教師背景特質對取得各類型教職位置的影響 Teacher’s Background and the First Teaching Job: The Effects of the Background Characteristics of High School Teachers on Their First Teaching Job-Getting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    紀金山 Chin-Shan Chi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available 目前中學教師供過於求的情形,已使得其教職位置的取得愈來愈市場化。本研究藉由各類型中學新制教師特質的分布情形,說明師資培育制度改革後教師背景特質對取得初職位置的影響。本文先以邏輯迴歸分析探討影響私立高職教職取得的背景變項作用,其次以私立高職教職為參照組的多元邏輯迴歸分析,探討影響其他類型教職取得的背景變項作用,結果發現教師背景特質對取得公立學校教職與私立高職教職的影響效果有明顯差異。比較各類背景特質的作用,人力資本變項的影響最為重要,它對於取得私立高職教職位置,有相對性的負向顯著影響;另一方面,它則是影響公立學校教職位置取得的有利變項,其中教師甄試表現、學歷種類和學歷高低的影響最顯著。 Since the new Teacher Education Act in 1994, the oversupply of teacher candidates brings to change the first-teaching-job-getting (FTJG from traditional embedded approach to a new quasi-market one. This article tries to delineate the effects of the background characteristics of high school teachers on their FTJG. I took the private vocation-high school as a basic group and analyzed the effects of related factors on it with logistic regression. Then I explored the effects of related factors on the others categories through multinomial logit model with private vocation-high school as the reference group. In summary, the entrants’ human capital is not beneficial to the FTJG of the private vocation-high schools. However the effect of human capital is the most important to the FTJG of the public schools, especially according to the performance of the job-seeking test, and the objective variables of education background.

  17. Multicultural Teaching in Flemish Secondary Schools: The Role of Ethnic School Composition, Track, and Teachers' Ethnic Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaet, Roselien; Van Houtte, Mieke; Stevens, Peter A. J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the association between a school's ethnic composition, the track in which teachers teach, and their level of involvement with multicultural teaching (MCT) in the Flemish context, taking into account the ethnic prejudice of teachers. Multilevel analyses of data from 590 Flemish teachers in 40 Belgian secondary schools…

  18. Teacher Accountability at High Performing Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Moises G.

    2016-01-01

    This study will examine the teacher accountability and evaluation policies and practices at three high performing charter schools located in San Diego County, California. Charter schools are exempted from many laws, rules, and regulations that apply to traditional school systems. By examining the teacher accountability systems at high performing…

  19. Towards a high quality high school workforce: A longitudinal, demographic analysis of U.S. public school physics teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory T. Rushton; David Rosengrant; Andrew Dewar; Lisa Shah; Herman E. Ray; Keith Sheppard; Lynn Watanabe

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to improve the number and quality of the high school physics teaching workforce have taken several forms, including those sponsored by professional organizations. Using a series of large-scale teacher demographic data sets from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this study sought to investigate trends in teacher quality at the national level in the two and a half decades between 1987 and 2012. Specifically, we investigated (i) details about the degree backgrounds, ma...

  20. Industrial Internship and Entrepreneurship Competencies on Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendi, H. F.; Kusumah, I. H.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the research is to explore the influence of internship and vocational skill to student’s entrepreneurship competencies. The research used ex post facto approach. Population in this research is all students of Vocational High School in Bandung, Indonesia. The sample of 40 respondents was determined by proportional random sampling technique. The data were collected by instrument questionnaire and test. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression. The results show that almost half students have a low the competencies of an entrepreneur. The hypothesis testing shows many the influence of factory teaching has a positive and significant effect on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Similarly, vocational skills have positive influence and significant on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Respectively, the influence of factory teaching and vocational skills expertise collectively have the effect on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Therefore, the influence of factory teaching and vocational skills are effective to student’s entrepreneurship cap competencies.