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Sample records for high school educational

  1. Job Satisfaction of High School Journalism Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Jack; Phillips, Kay D.

    Four research questions are posed to explore the job satisfaction of high school journalism educators. A national random sample of 669 respondents shows that journalism educators are generally satisfied with their jobs--more so than teachers in other disciplines. Multiple regression analysis using Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory as a…

  2. Transition from high schools to engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Clausen, Nicolaj Riise

    2017-01-01

    Pre-university engineering education has received increasing attention to attract more students to engineering and make them better prepared to enter engineering studies at university level. Denmark is one of the countries that offer established high school curriculum that makes engineering...... the core identity of the school. In a longitudinal research project, the cohort of all Danish engineering students who were enrolled in 2010 has been followed. This study takes a quantitative approach to highlight the differences in preparedness for engineering students who have a background...... themselves as being better prepared in relation to the conduct of experiments, engineering analysis and tolls, as well as in relation to process competences as design, problem solving and teamwork. The students from the profession-oriented high schools also find themselves better prepared in relation...

  3. Analysis of Institutional Competitiveness of Junior High Schools through the Admission Test to High School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Joyzukey; Tarango, Javier; Machin-Mastromatteo, Juan Daniel

    2018-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational research studies 15,658 students from 335 secondary schools in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, through the results of the examination of admission to high school education (National High School Admission Test--EXANI I from the National Assessment Center for Education--CENEVAL) on logical-mathematical and verbal…

  4. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  5. Astronomy Education Project for Guangdong High Schools F. P. Pi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangzhou University, ... an astronomy education project for high school teachers and students was initiated ... ipality, universities and research institutes, professional and amateur astronomical.

  6. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  7. The Relationship between Career Technology Education and High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Patricia Lynn Garnto

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between programs in Career Technology and Agriculture Education (CTAE) utilized by a school district in northern Georgia and the relative effect the programs had on high school graduation. Career technology and agriculture education (CTAE) programs engage students and prepare them for college or career…

  8. Distance Education of Vocational High Schools in Turkey

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    Tuğçe GÜNTER

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of vocational high schools is to teach qualified, high self-sufficient, self-confident, technical staff who have critical and mathematical thinking competence and who can utilize science and technology efficiently. However, because of the limitations of traditional education, students can not take enough education attendance. In this context; along with the advances in science and technology area, “Web- Based Distance Education Programme”, which provides equal education conditions to students, is developed. This programme has got great progresses in abroad, and has also started to practice in Turkish Vocational High Schools. It is determined that some Vocational High Schools have applied Web-Based Distance Education in Medical Documentation and Secretarial (MDS and Medical Laboratory Techniques (MLT Associate Degree Programmes which are also existed in Bülent Ecevit University (BEU Ahmet Erdoğan Health Services Vocational High School. It is observed that the universities, that implemented distance education in these associate degree programmes, have higher technical infrastructure and they design a constructivism-based modules. It is considered that this distance education programme for MDS and MLT Associate Degree Programmes in certain Vocational Schools, can also be implemented for students in Medical Documentation and Secretarial (MDS and Medical Laboratory Techniques (MLT which continues education by computers and overhead projector that is slightly different from traditional education.

  9. Expectations on Track? High School Tracking and Adolescent Educational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of adaptation in expectation formation processes by analyzing how educational tracking in high schools affects adolescents' educational expectations. I argue that adolescents view track placement as a signal about their academic abilities and respond to it in terms...... of modifying their educational expectations. Applying a difference-in-differences approach to the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, I find that being placed in an advanced or honors class in high school positively affects adolescents’ expectations, particularly if placement is consistent across...... subjects and if placement contradicts tracking experiences in middle school. My findings support the hypothesis that adolescents adapt their educational expectations to ability signals sent by schools....

  10. Education of Social Skills among Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.; Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2016-01-01

    Research aim was to reveal peculiarities of the education of social skills among senior high school age students in physical education classes. We hypothesized that after the end of the educational experiment the senior high school age students will have more developed social skills in physical education classes. Participants in the study were 51…

  11. The Danish Folk High School: An Experiment in Humanistic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David Charles

    This historical and comparative study examines the folk high school movement in Denmark from the standpoint of the New Humanism as expressed in the writings of Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, Sidney Jourard, and others. These schools are unique among the many educational forms and institutions western man has developed. Private, nonprofit residential…

  12. Lifelines for High School Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Lifelines project aims to establish a network of practicing high school teachers actively using climate change curricula by creating professional learning communities (PLCs) of teachers who, through remote meetings and workshops, maintain ongoing communication and sharing of best practices among colleagues to strengthen knowledge and promote effective teaching strategies. The project explores techniques to achieve the most effective teleconferencing meetings and workshops. This promotes not only teaching about minimizing environmental impacts of human activity, but minimizes environmental impacts of professional development — practicing what we preach. To date, Lifelines PLCs have set up websites and e-mail lists for sharing information. Teleconferences and webinars have been held using services such as Skype, ReadyTalk, and Wiggio. Many of the meetings have been recorded and archived for the benefit of members who could not attend in real-time.

  13. High School Diversification against Educational Equality: A Critical Analysis of Neoliberal Education Reform in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeongran

    2011-01-01

    Recent reforms of high school education in Korea have focused on transforming the uniform and standardized system into a deregulated and diversified system that has an emphasis on school choice and competition. Situating the high school diversification policy in the context of the recent controversy of the neoliberal educational reform, this study…

  14. The Implementation of Character Education at Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at analyzing the implementation of character education at Senior High School in Sumedang Regency, West Java, Indonesia. A content analysis method was employed to collect the data with interviews with six teachers from six different senior high schools, which represent the rural, transitional, and urban areas. The findings revealed that: (1 not all teachers understand the concept of character education; (2 the character education has not been done systematically or has not had the specific design/model for the teaching and learning process. Most teachers embedded the character values during the teaching and learning process as a form of character education. For example, through Qur’an recitation, learning tasks, group discussion, lecture, socio-drama, observation and admonition, and even through teachers’ model. Meanwhile, outside the class, character education was implemented through competition and extracurricular activities; (3 the evaluation of character education was relatively varied, such as an observation followed by admonition, group guidance, and also focusing on behavior and affective assessment in the classroom learning process. This research implied that it is needed to make a policy on a program development through the Bureau of Education to improve Senior High School teachers’ knowledge and skills in implementing the character education.

  15. Psycho-educational program for high school females

    OpenAIRE

    Perla Caridad López Hernández; Laura López Angulo; Eneida Bravo Polanco; Carmen Benítez Cabrera; Lisbet Cepero Águila; Rafael Luis Pino Pich

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: sex education provides knowledge, values and attitudes that both, men and women need to live with dignity and develop fully and happily. Objective: to determine the usefulness of applying a psycho-educational program on female sexuality in high school. Methods: a quasi-experimental study conducted between September 2007 and June 2008, based on a sample composed of 180 ninth grade females living in Cumanayagua's urban area. Variables analyzed: adolescents knowledge on sex-relate...

  16. Curriculum Orientations and Educational Philosophies of High School Arabic Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalem, Abeer Saleh

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the curriculum orientations of High school Arabic teacher in Riyadh city and to examine the relationship between curriculum orientation and their educational philosophies. The quantitative method (descriptive study) was adopted in this questionnaire survey-based study. Mean and standard deviation for the overall of…

  17. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index, "t"(244)…

  18. High School to Postsecondary Education: Challenges of Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Susan Hudson; Seeley, Cathy L.

    2010-01-01

    How can teachers help prepare their high school students to make the critical transition to what comes after they graduate? Teachers cannot wait until students are seniors to inspire them to consider postsecondary education or training, and at the same time prepare them to succeed when they get there. It is increasingly important for students to…

  19. High-Poverty Urban High School Students' Plans for Higher Education: Weaving Their Own Safety Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem; Drotos, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates high-poverty urban high school students' views of and plans regarding higher education, using Bourdieu's theory of reproduction in education as theoretical framework. Interview data from 76 students from six high-poverty urban schools in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States were analyzed using…

  20. Educational Management Organizations as High Reliability Organizations: A Study of Victory's Philadelphia High School Reform Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David E.

    2013-01-01

    This executive position paper proposes recommendations for designing reform models between public and private sectors dedicated to improving school reform work in low performing urban high schools. It reviews scholarly research about for-profit educational management organizations, high reliability organizations, American high school reform, and…

  1. Dispositions to school education and self concept in Slovenian and British high-school students

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    Darja Kobal

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the relationship between dispositions to school education and self-concept. What is meant by the expression "dispositions of school education" are phenomena like attitudes to school, achievement motivation, believes about personal control over learning, external constrains to learning etc. The definition of self-concept and its brief contemporary understanding is mentioned. The aim of the study is to find out the expression of certain areas of self-concept and dispositions to school education. A group of Slovenian and a group of British high school students participated in the study. The results of ANOVA and discriminant analysis showed significant differences as related to nationality. For example, British participants exceeded Slovenians in many areas of self-concept. They also expressed some significant differences in their dispositions to school. The results are interpreted in the light of personality and national differences.

  2. An Approach to Energy Education for High School, Junior High School and Elementary School Students at Aichi Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukita, Kazuto; Ichiyanagi, Katsuhiro; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Goto, Yasuyuki

    This paper discusses the methods of implementation and improvement adopted in the energy education program of “Marugoto Taiken World” (“Total Experience World”) at Aichi Institute of Technology. The program, which is aimed at high school, junior high school and elementary school students, has been carried on at Aichi Institute of Technology for a number of years now, and the authors have been involved in the energy education project for the past four years. During that time, the following four courses have been held : 1) Let's use wind power to generate electricity, 2) Let's use flowers to build a solar battery, 3) Let's use bottles to build a fuel cell battery, 4) Let's make all sorts of batteries.

  3. School Improvement in High-Capacity Schools: Educational Leadership and Living-Systems Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Coral; Sackney, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Although school improvement continues to present as an unresolved educational problem, the required changes are relatively straightforward. Essentially, schools need to be retooled with students' experiences and high-quality instruction at the center of the design. In this article, we present the findings of research into the leadership of…

  4. IMPLEMENTATIONS OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION AS A SCHOOL CULTURE AT KRIDA NUSANTARA INTEGRATED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

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    Sunani Sunani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of multicultural education at Krida Nusantara integrated high school. The study focuses on four main points; the school policy, the implementation and the dominant factors that influence the policy, and the implementation results. A descriptive qualitative approach is taken in the study and the data is collected through interviews and case studies. The study concludes that the school's multicultural education policy is applied based on the school founding fathers’ philosophy, which emphasizes on merging nationalist and religious values. Those values are then implemented in form of academic and non-academic programs. Apart from that, students' plurality values that are embedded in their school life serve as the most influential factor in implementing the multicultural education policy.

  5. Public Health Education: Teaching Epidemiology in High School Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiology instruction has expanded at the undergraduate level in part because it increases student critical thinking and scientific literacy, promotes students' perception of public health as both practical and relevant, and empowers students as independent, lifelong learners. Why then are more high schools not adopting epidemiology as a course requirement for students? Although prior iterations of high school epidemiology courses are noteworthy for incorporating active and participatory learning, embedding them into existing and continually shifting curricula is challenging and time-consuming, especially for teachers not trained in the field. It also may be argued that currently available epidemiology teaching resources emphasize content rather than thinking skills and therefore do not optimally promote students' personal engagement with, and in-depth understanding of, the mission and goals of public health. I propose a new framework for high school epidemiology that draws from progressive education ideology, including three critical elements: empowerment, authenticity, and transfer. I provide multiple examples to show how this framework has been used across a wide array of settings to hone epidemiology thinking skills in high school students.

  6. High School Computer Science Education Paves the Way for Higher Education: The Israeli Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The gap between enrollments in higher education computing programs and the high-tech industry's demands is widely reported, and is especially prominent for women. Increasing the availability of computer science education in high school is one of the strategies suggested in order to address this gap. We look at the connection between exposure to…

  7. The limitations of mathematical modeling in high school physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forjan, Matej

    The theme of the doctoral dissertation falls within the scope of didactics of physics. Theoretical analysis of the key constraints that occur in the transmission of mathematical modeling of dynamical systems into field of physics education in secondary schools is presented. In an effort to explore the extent to which current physics education promotes understanding of models and modeling, we analyze the curriculum and the three most commonly used textbooks for high school physics. We focus primarily on the representation of the various stages of modeling in the solved tasks in textbooks and on the presentation of certain simplifications and idealizations, which are in high school physics frequently used. We show that one of the textbooks in most cases fairly and reasonably presents the simplifications, while the other two half of the analyzed simplifications do not explain. It also turns out that the vast majority of solved tasks in all the textbooks do not explicitly represent model assumptions based on what we can conclude that in high school physics the students do not develop sufficiently a sense of simplification and idealizations, which is a key part of the conceptual phase of modeling. For the introduction of modeling of dynamical systems the knowledge of students is also important, therefore we performed an empirical study on the extent to which high school students are able to understand the time evolution of some dynamical systems in the field of physics. The research results show the students have a very weak understanding of the dynamics of systems in which the feedbacks are present. This is independent of the year or final grade in physics and mathematics. When modeling dynamical systems in high school physics we also encounter the limitations which result from the lack of mathematical knowledge of students, because they don't know how analytically solve the differential equations. We show that when dealing with one-dimensional dynamical systems

  8. An Extreme Degree of Difficulty: The Educational Demographics of Urban Neighborhood High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neild, Ruth Curran; Balfanz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growth of a variety of alternatives to the neighborhood high school, most students in big-city school systems still attend large comprehensive high schools that serve a particular residential area. The authors contend that the extreme concentration of educational need at these schools is often overlooked by policymakers, school reform…

  9. High School Education in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Hasebe, Io

    2018-01-01

    In this report, I will introduce high school school education in Vietnam in two aspects: time schedule and language instruction. When I had an international exchange with local high school students, I was surprised at how fluently students spoke English and Japanese and thus became interested in language instruction in Vietnam. As I continued my research, I discovered many unique differences between Vietnam and Japan in terms of education. This is why I chose high school education as my repor...

  10. A Collaboration for Health and Physical Education in High-Need Schools and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah; Beale, Angela; DeMarzo, Jenine

    2009-01-01

    Teacher education programs have a long history of producing excellent health and physical education (HPE) teachers for suburban school districts. But graduates who start their career at high-need schools often feel poorly prepared to face the challenges of low-income school districts, schools, and students. This article is directed primarily to…

  11. Science school and culture school: improving the efficiency of high school science teaching in a system of mass science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Educational expansion in western countries has been achieved mainly by adding years to full-time education; however, this process has probably reduced efficiency. Sooner or later, efficiency must improve, with a greater educational attainment per year. Future societies will probably wish more people to study science throughout high school (aged c. 11-19 years) and the first college degree. 'Science' may be defined as any abstract, systematic and research-based discipline: including mathematics, statistics and the natural sciences, economics, music theory, linguistics, and the conceptual or quantitative social sciences. Since formal teaching is usually necessary to learn science, science education should be regarded as the core function of high schools. One standard way to improve efficiency is the 'division of labour', with increased specialization of function. Modern schools are already specialized: teachers are specialized according to age-group taught, subject matter expertise, and administrative responsibilities. School students are stratified by age and academic aptitude. I propose a further institutional division of school function between science education, and cultural education (including education in arts, sports, ethics, social interaction and good citizenship). Existing schools might split into 'science school' and 'culture school', reflected in distinct buildings and zones, separate administrative structures, and the recruitment of differently-specialized teaching personnel. Science school would be distinguished by its focus on education in disciplines which promote abstract systematic cognition. All students would spend some part of each day (how much would depend on their aptitude and motivation) in the 'science school'; experiencing a traditional-style, didactic, disciplined and rigorous academic education. The remainder of the students' time at school would be spent in the cultural division, which would focus on broader aspects, and aim to generate

  12. School motivation and high school dropout: the mediating role of educational expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Wolters, Christopher A

    2014-03-01

    A good deal of evidence indicates that students' motivational beliefs and attitudes play a critical role in their academic success. Research studies on how motivational factors may help determine whether students remain in high school or drop out, however, are relatively few. More specifically, there is a lack of research examining the dynamics of whether students' motivational beliefs from earlier in high school might be used to predict their status as a dropout in their final year. The aim of the present study was to examine the mediating role of students' educational expectations in linking students' school motivation to their dropout status by utilizing a nationally representative dataset. The present study used data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002). The final sample consisted of 16,194 students, with approximately 54% White, 13% Black, 16% Hispanic, and 10% Asian students, and the rest were Native American, Hawaiian, multiracial, or of other races. Structural equation modelling was employed to conduct the mediational analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the relationships between student ability beliefs in math and English and student behaviour of dropping out were fully mediated by students' educational expectations. The results also revealed that student intrinsic value in math and English had significant indirect relations with student behaviour of leaving school through students' educational expectations. The results of this study suggest that explanations for student dropout status that rely solely on students' social background and school behaviours without considering their motivation are incomplete. The study expands the extant research by showing possible pathways that motivate students to persist in high school. These pathways are specifically rooted in students' ability beliefs and intrinsic interest in learning through their relationships with students' expectations for their education. © 2012 The

  13. Parenting Education at Medford and Churchill High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mary Cihak

    1986-01-01

    Nationally, interest in family life and parenting programs has grown amidst concern for "basic education." Parenting education in today's schools may be justified because of increased family stress and deteriorating family support systems. Most parenting and family life courses are offered within home economics departments, have a narrow…

  14. On the High School Education of a Pithecanthropus Erectus

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    Steel, Sean

    2014-01-01

    This article examines our modern ways of schooling youth in light of philosophic and personal narrative accounts of "the Dionysian" aspect--a term the author uses to understand his own experiences and aspirations as a high school English teacher. Having articulated the meaning of this term, he goes on to point out how schools today are…

  15. Multicultural science education in Lesotho high school biology classrooms

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    Nthathakane, Malefu Christina

    2001-12-01

    This study investigated how Basotho high school biology students responded to a multicultural science education (MCSE) approach. Students' home language---Sesotho---and cultural experiences were integrated into the teaching of a unit on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (ATOD) abuse. The focus was on students whose cultural background is African and who are English second language users. The study was conducted in three high school biology classrooms in Lesotho where the ATOD unit was taught using MCSE. A fourth biology classroom was observed for comparison purposes. In this classroom the regular biology teacher taught ATOD using typical instructional strategies. The study was framed by the general question: How does a multicultural science education approach affect Basotho high school biology students? More specifically: How does the use of Sesotho (or code-switching between Sesotho and English) and integration of Basotho students' cultural knowledge and experiences with respect to ATOD affect students' learning? In particular how does the approach affect students' participation and academic performance? A qualitative research method was used in this study. Data were drawn from a number of different sources and analyzed inductively. The data sources included field-notes, transcripts of ATOD lessons, research assistant lesson observation notes and interviews, regular biology teachers' interviews and notes from observing a few of their lessons, students' interviews and pre and posttest scripts, and other school documents that recorded students' performance throughout the year. Using the students' home language---Sesotho---was beneficial in that it enabled them to share ideas, communicate better and understand each other, the teacher and the material that was taught. Integrating students' cultural and everyday experiences was beneficial because it enabled students to anchor the new ATOD ideas in what was familiar and helped them find the relevance of the unit by

  16. Perception of High School Students in Kuwait Regarding Their Knowledge about Physical Education and the Role of Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amari, Hanaa; Ziab, Abdulraheem

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the perceptions of high school students in Kuwait regarding their knowledge about physical education and the role of health education in promotion. The study was conducted using a questionnaire administered to 250 students (103 male and 147 female) from public high schools, during the school year of (2009),…

  17. High School Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebolt, Kevin M.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze high school physical education teachers' beliefs about teaching students with disabilities in inclusive physical education. The participants (3 men, 2 women) were certified physical education teachers at four suburban high schools. The research method was descriptive-qualitative using a case study approach…

  18. Physical activity patterns of college students with and without high school physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Brett; Kernodle, Michael; Ballard, Kesley; McKey, Cathy; Eason, Billy; Weeks, Megan

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in physical activity patterns of high school graduates in Texas who completed physical education class credit during high school and those who did not but who were varsity athletes. A questionnaire was designed and tested for reliability prior to being administered to 201 college students. Analysis indicated that participants who completed high school physical education class credit do not currently participate in regular physical activity as much as those who were not required to complete such credit. Conversely, athletes who did not participate in physical education reported currently engaging in more cardiovascular exercise and team sports than the physical education students during high school.

  19. The Role of School in Educational Decisions during the Transition to High School Public Institutions in Mexico City context

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    Eduardo Rodríguez Rocha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the role of schools in educational choices in the transition to public high schools in Mexico City. Secondary schools have the potential to influence educational choices, through the development of certain educational functions. This influence comes in different ways, and is relatively independent of adscriptive characteristics and previous academic performance of students.  Schools serve i as agents contributing to decision making, facilitating continuity on educational trajectories ii or as instances that do not develop explicit actions aimed to link their students to any of the options offered in the post-secondary educational system. While some schools teaching resources are destined to accompany their students during their decision process, others lack of them, abandoning them in this crucial educational event. The article is based on data provided by an ethnographic study conducted in seven high schools in southern Mexico City between January and July 2012

  20. Roles High School Principals Play in Establishing a Successful Character Education Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francom, Jacob A.

    2016-01-01

    Principal leadership is crucial to the success of a high school character education initiative. The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory research was to identify the roles that high school principals play in developing, implementing, and sustaining a high functioning character education program. Data were collected through interviews and…

  1. SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAL ACCESSIBILITY: DISCUSSING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS WITH HIGH SKILLS/GIFTEDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gomes Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thinking about educational accessibility in academic research constitutes a necessity in view of the reality of education today and investigations unexplored, such as the relation between the high skills/giftedness -AH/SD-, researchin university and educational accessibility. This paper aims to discuss the dialogue between school and university research regarding the accessibility of students with AH/SD, seeking to highlight some actions related to a research project of theUniversidade Federal de Santa Maria/RS. The discussion in this article is guided in a qualitative perspective, is the main theoretical support studies of Manzini (2005 and Freitas and Pérez (2010. Among the main considerations, it follows that: shared responsibility between school and university, through action research projects, contributes significantly to the establishment of educational accessibility for students with AH/SD.

  2. Health Education for High School Students in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jorge, David; Jorge-Estévez, María Dolores; Gutiérrez-Barroso, Josué; de la Rosa-Hormiga, Milagros; Marrero-Morales, María Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Education and training in schools are essential elements in the development and socialization process of children from early childhood. The fact of considering health as a complete physical, mental and social wellbeing (World Health Organization (1848), WHO), and not only as the absence of illness, is closely related to the achievement of optimal…

  3. Critical Success Factors in a High School Healthcare Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thessin, Rebecca A.; Scully-Russ, Ellen; Lieberman, Daina S.

    2017-01-01

    Research has demonstrated career and technical education (CTE) programs have a strong positive influence on secondary students' behavior, attendance, academic achievement, and college persistence. Critical success factors common to career academies, small schools, and CTE programs include socio-emotional support and community, along with a culture…

  4. Publishing the pamphlet of radiation education for junior high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamezawa, Chika; Kamogawa, Masashi; Kanai, Yuko; Nishiura, Shingo; Banda, Kiyomi; Arakawa, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    We made supplementary materials of the radiation education as a pamphlet for junior high school students along the government course guidelines for junior high school pressed by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The pamphlet was published as booklet and calendar. For teachers at junior high schools, a pdf file of the booklet was also appended. The pamphlet focused natural phenomenon and latest researches in the radiation science. Many pictures in the booklet could help students to study the radiation science visually. For 100 days since March 2012 published day, 4119 booklets had been distributed to junior high schools and other schools of applicants, free of charge. (author)

  5. FEATURES OF METHODS OF FUTURE PHYSICAL CULTURE TEACHERS’ TRAINING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Петро Джуринський

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodical approaches and recommendations on implementation of methods of future Physical Culture teachers to physical education of high school students into study process at a higher educational institution. The role of the approbated study discipline “Theory and methods of physical education at high school” has been determined in this research. It has also been defined, that future Physical Culture teacher’s training for physical education of high school students is a system of organizational and educational measures, ensuring the formation of future teacher’s professional knowledge and skills. The article presents the defined tasks, criteria, tools, forms, pedagogical conditions and stages of students’ training for teaching classes of Physical Education to high school students. Approbation of methodical approaches to future Physical Culture teachers’ training for physical education of high school students demonstrated their efficacy

  6. GIS Education in Taiwanese Senior High Schools: A National Survey among Geography Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Hui; Chen, Che-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Following the integration of GIS into the national curriculum standards of senior high school geography, Taiwan has systematically implemented GIS education for over a decade. However, the effectiveness of this implementation is currently unclear. Therefore, this study investigates the status of GIS education in Taiwanese senior high schools. A…

  7. A PROGRAM OF ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE MARSHALL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL SERVICE AREA, LEWISBURG, TENNESSEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARNES, JOHN O., JR.

    THE NEED FOR AN ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM IN THE MARSHALL COUNTY (TENNESSEE) HIGH SCHOOL SERVICE AREA WAS STUDIED THROUGH QUESTIONNAIRES COMPLETED BY 207 ADULTS, EXAMINATION OF SCHOOL AND GOVERNMENT RECORDS, AND PERSONAL INTERVIEWS. IT WAS FOUND THAT OVER HALF OF THE AREA RESIDENTS WERE NOT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES, AND THAT MANY ADULTS DESIRED MORE…

  8. Determinants of Tracking Intentions, and Actual Education Choices among Junior High School Students in Rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingquan; Loyalka, Prashant; Wei, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes rural middle school students' tracking intentions (academic high school, vocational high school, or going to work), actual education choices, and the factors affecting them, using a random sampled baseline survey and follow-up survey of 2,216 second-year students residing outside of county seats in forty-one impoverished…

  9. Critical Science Education in a Suburban High School Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Patrick

    To improve students' scientific literacy and their general perceptions of chemistry, I enacted critical chemistry education (CCE) in two "regular level" chemistry classes with a group of 25 students in a suburban, private high school as part of this study. CCE combined the efforts of critical science educators (Fusco & Calabrese Barton, 2001; Gilbert 2013) with the performance expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (NGSS Lead States, 2013a) to critically transform the traditional chemistry curriculum at this setting. Essentially, CCE engages students in the critical exploration of socially situated chemistry content knowledge and requires them to demonstrate this knowledge through the practices of science. The purpose of this study was to gauge these students development of chemistry content knowledge, chemistry interest, and critical scientific literacy (CSL) as they engaged in CCE. CSL was a construct developed for this study that necessarily combined the National Research Center's (2012) definition of scientific literacy with a critical component. As such, CSL entailed demonstrating content knowledge through the practices of science as well as the ability to critically analyze the intersections between science content and socially relevant issues. A mixed methods, critical ethnographic approach framed the collection of data from open-ended questionnaires, focus group interviews, Likert surveys, pre- and post unit tests, and student artifacts. These data revealed three main findings: (1) students began to develop CSL in specific, significant ways working through the activities of CCE, (2) student participants of CCE developed a comparable level of chemistry content understanding to students who participated in a traditional chemistry curriculum, and (3) CCE developed a group of students' perceptions of interest in chemistry. In addition to being able to teach students discipline specific content knowledge, the implications of this study are

  10. Relationship between the Quality of Educational Facilities, School Climate, and School Safety of High School Tenth Graders in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darnell Brushawn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand the relationships among facility conditions, school climate, and school safety of high school tenth graders in the United States. Previous research on the quality of educational facilities influence on student achievement has varied. Recent research has suggested that the quality of educational facilities…

  11. Status of Instructional Physical Education Programs in Ohio Senior High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraibman, Carl

    High school level instructional physical education programs in the state of Ohio are examined to determine the quality of their organizational structure and curricula offerings. Data collected from a 74.3 percent questionnaire response from 70 Ohio school systems describes the functional arrangement of the school programs based on the sex of the…

  12. Students' Evaluation of Professional Personality Competencies of Physical Education Teachers Working in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between professional personality competencies of physical education teachers working in high schools and gender, school type, and class variables of students. The study was organised according to the screening model. The study was carried out in a total of 17 schools, 16 state and one…

  13. Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science GEMS: Teaching Robotics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    find amusing but that we find of less educational value, like having the robots say comical things. Those who have more teaching time would doubtless...Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science GEMS: Teaching Robotics to High School Students by Edward M. Measure and Edward Creegan...TR-6220 January 2013 Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science (GEMS): Teaching Robotics to High School Students Edward M

  14. CREATING EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL TO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION WITH COMIC BOOKS: THE VACCINA´S HISTORY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Corrêa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Comic book "The Vaccine’s History" is part of a project that creates educational material intended to improve high school education, and is being developed for approximately ten years at the Bioenergetics Laboratory under Prof. Leopoldo de Meis supervision. The project's objective is joining art and science language to create more interesting and playful science education diffusion material for high school students and the general public, working as an entertainment or as an auxiliary tool for teachers in their classrooms. The book’s subject is the history of immunology, from primitive man until present times, using comic book language. An extensive research was necessary in the elaboration of this present work to produce a book that is as true to facts as possible and, at the same time, develop an accessible language to general public. Collaboration of diverse scientists from the Immunology research field made possible an accurate use of academic information, translating this knowledge to students and general pub lic about many topics of discovery and production of vaccines. All products of this project were well received by school teachers all over the country (Brazil, according to data obtained with letters and comments, and the number of requested materials of  the previous works developed by this research group.

  15. Vocational High School Students Entrepreneurship: The Success of Family or School Education..?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Biruli Walidaini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this research is to • determine entrepreneur attitude of SMK students that have entrepreneurship, • determine role of eductaion in family also the role of eduction in school. Approch of that type used is qualitative. Research object was SMK students had been doing entrepreneur while Wadi. Informant in this research were students, the student's parent, teacher of entrepreneur and headmaster. Data collecting using deep interview technique, observation and documentation also attitude test. The research result shows that entreprenuership attitude of students include high category, education of family has important role to build entrepreneurship attitude in terms of involving children in their business, the role of school limited in supporting development of student's knowledge.

  16. Leaving School — learning at SEA: Regular high school education alongside polar research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Against the background of unsatisfactory results from the international OECD study PISA (Program for International Student Assessment), Germany is facing a period of intense school reforms. Looking back at a tradition of school culture with too few changes during the last century, quick and radical renewal of the school system is rather unlikely. Furthermore students are increasingly turning away from natural sciences [1]. The AWI aims at providing impulses for major changes in the schooling system and is offering solid science education not only for university students but also for a larger audience. All efforts towards this goal are interconnected within the project SEA (Science & Education @ the AWI). With the school-term of 2002/03 the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research started HIGHSEA (High school of SEA). The program is the most important component of SEA. Each year 22 high school students (grade 10 or 11) are admitted to HIGHSEA spending their last three years of school not at school but at the institute. Four subjects (biology as a major, chemistry, math and English as accessory subjects) are combined and taught fully integrated. Students leave their school for two days each week to study, work and explore all necessary topics at the AWI. All of the curricular necessities of the four subjects have been rearranged in their temporal sequencing thus enabling a conceptual formulation of four major questions to be dealt with in the course of the three-year program [2]. Students are taught by teachers of the cooperation schools as well as by scientists of the AWI. Close links and intense cooperation between both groups are the basis of fundamental changes in teaching and learning climate. We are organizing expeditions for every group of HIGHSEA-students (e. g. to the Arctic or to mid-Atlantic seamounts). For each student expedition we devise a "real" research question. Usually a single working group at the AWI has a special interest in the

  17. The Educational Benefits of Attending Higher Performing Schools: Evidence from Chicago High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Elaine M.; Moore, Paul T.; Sartain, Lauren; de la Torre, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers are implementing reforms with the assumption that students do better when attending high-achieving schools. In this article, we use longitudinal data from Chicago Public Schools to test that assumption. We find that the effects of attending a higher performing school depend on the school's performance level. At elite public schools…

  18. Incorporating Primary Scientific Literature in Middle and High School Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Fankhauser

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary literature is the most reliable and direct source of scientific information, but most middle school and high school science is taught using secondary and tertiary sources. One reason for this is that primary science articles can be difficult to access and interpret for young students and for their teachers, who may lack exposure to this type of writing. The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI was created to fill this gap and provide primary research articles that can be accessed and read by students and their teachers. JEI is a non-profit, online, open-access, peer-reviewed science journal dedicated to mentoring and publishing the scientific research of middle and high school students. JEI articles provide reliable scientific information that is written by students and therefore at a level that their peers can understand. For student-authors who publish in JEI, the review process and the interaction with scientists provide invaluable insight into the scientific process. Moreover, the resulting repository of free, student-written articles allows teachers to incorporate age-appropriate primary literature into the middle and high school science classroom. JEI articles can be used for teaching specific scientific content or for teaching the process of the scientific method itself. The critical thinking skills that students learn by engaging with the primary literature will be invaluable for the development of a scientifically-literate public.

  19. Incorporating Primary Scientific Literature in Middle and High School Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Sarah C; Lijek, Rebeccah S

    2016-03-01

    Primary literature is the most reliable and direct source of scientific information, but most middle school and high school science is taught using secondary and tertiary sources. One reason for this is that primary science articles can be difficult to access and interpret for young students and for their teachers, who may lack exposure to this type of writing. The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI) was created to fill this gap and provide primary research articles that can be accessed and read by students and their teachers. JEI is a non-profit, online, open-access, peer-reviewed science journal dedicated to mentoring and publishing the scientific research of middle and high school students. JEI articles provide reliable scientific information that is written by students and therefore at a level that their peers can understand. For student-authors who publish in JEI, the review process and the interaction with scientists provide invaluable insight into the scientific process. Moreover, the resulting repository of free, student-written articles allows teachers to incorporate age-appropriate primary literature into the middle and high school science classroom. JEI articles can be used for teaching specific scientific content or for teaching the process of the scientific method itself. The critical thinking skills that students learn by engaging with the primary literature will be invaluable for the development of a scientifically-literate public.

  20. Totally "Online” High School for People at Educational Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo De Agostini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Iberoamerican Virtual Foundation (http://fuvia.org is dedicated to providing e-learning solutions to universities and other institutions that may require it. It is develops a pedagogical, methodological and technological online High School model based on WEB2 tools, which could be easily replicated elsewhere, and is delivered completely through an online ICT technological GNU open source platform, implemented completely online through the “Colegio Virtual Iberoamericano” (http://cvi.edu.ec, which caters to vulnerable students at pedagogical risk who for different reasons were not able to finish their secondary education. The selected students receive scholarships, thus tuition is totally free. The Iberoamerican online High School Project started on October 2004 with UNESCO support, implementing the last six years of High School in four specialties, with student ages being between 16 and 65, located in almost 50 communities both rural and urban-marginal. We are also working in four detention centers of young law violators and with young men and women from street gangs through community centers. Thus far our strategic alliances (over 20 are with central and local governments, and national and international Foundations. In the near future we plan to: extend the online High School coverage to the rest of the Country in order to help decrease the digital divide gap and the student drop out rate from high school (nearly 80 %; replicate the experience in the rest of the region and in other countries in Africa and Asia; and develop a complete professional online digital Library service and a functional online student orientation Department.La Fondation Virtuelle Ibéro-américaine (http://fuvia.org est spécialisée dans la fourniture de solutions d’apprentissage en ligne aux universités et autres institutions. Elle développe un modèle d’enseignement secondaire en ligne à la fois pédagogique, méthodologique et technologique, et bas

  1. Effect of Engineering Education by Science Classroom for High School, Junior High School and Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukita, Kazuto; Goto, Tokimasa; Mizuno, Katsunori; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ichiyanagi, Katsuhiro; Goto, Yasuyuki; Mori, Tsuyoshi

    Recently the importance of Monozukuri (manufacturing) has been watched with keen interest as a social; problem, which has a relation with schoolchildren's decline of their academic standards, pointed out by the reports of PISA of OECD and TIMSS, etc., and their “losing interest in science” and “dislike of science”, some people worry about, which will lead to the decline of technology in the home industry, the top-class personnel shortage, and the decrease of economical power in this country in the future. In order to solve such a problem, science pavilions, universities, and academic societies of science and engineering etc. in various places hold “Monozukuiri Classrooms” or “Science Classrooms”. We can say that various activities which try to hold off “losing interest in science” and “dislike of science.” in the whole society. Under such a situation, Aichi Institute of Technology (AIT) to which we belong, also tries to contribute to the activity of solving the problem, and holds various engineering education lectures which intend for elementary, junior high school and senior high school students. AIT has held “The Whole Experience World” which tries to bring up a talented person who has a dream and hope towards science and technology, grows his/her originality, intellectual curiosity and spirit of inquiry, and supports the nation based on science and technology in the summer vacation since 2001. This paper reports the result of a questionnaire about what kind of the long-term learning effect on the children who participated in “The Whole Experience World” and “Boys and Girls Robot Lectures”. As the conclusion of the study, we can say that the lectures could give the participants who were interested in science and technology more interest. And we could give them the idea of what the study of science and technology is. As a result, we could contribute to the participants' decision of the courses' selection in life.

  2. Using education on irradiated foods to change behavior of Korean elementary, middle, and high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Eunok; Kim, Jaerok; Choi, Yoonseok

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Educational interventions targeted food selection perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Education regarding irradiated food was intended to change food selection behavior specific to it. SUBJECTS AND METHODS There were 43 elementary students (35.0%), 45 middle school students (36.6%), and 35 high school students (28.5%). The first step was research design. Educational targets were selected and informed consent was obtained in step two. An initial survey was cond...

  3. Educational outcomes: Pathways and performance in South African high schools

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Vijay; van der Berg, Servaas; Janse van Rensburg, Dean; Taylor, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We analysed the pathways and performances in mathematics of high (secondary) school students in South Africa using a panel-like data set of Grade 8 students who participated in the 2002 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and who were tracked to Grade 12 examination data sets. We examined the relationship between TIMSS mathematics performance and reaching Grade 12, the selection of and performance in Grade 12 mathematics, and success rates in the matriculation examin...

  4. Emerging Consumerism and the Accelerated "Education Divide": The Case of Specialized High Schools in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyu-Yong

    2007-01-01

    This paper criticizes the neoliberal shift in Korean education toward educational consumerism by analyzing the boom in Specialized High schools (SHs). For its theoretical background, this paper discusses the issues of freedom, equal opportunity, and choice in education, and investigates how neoliberal consumerism has been encouraging the boom in…

  5. Computer Science in High School Graduation Requirements. ECS Education Trends (Updated)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Allowing high school students to fulfill a math or science high school graduation requirement via a computer science credit may encourage more student to pursue computer science coursework. This Education Trends report is an update to the original report released in April 2015 and explores state policies that allow or require districts to apply…

  6. High School Diploma Options That Meet Federal Graduation Rate Calculation Requirements. Education Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Federal requirements stipulate that states and local education agencies annually calculate and report an Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate, disaggregated by student group. The ACGR includes all students who graduate from high school in four years with a regular high school diploma, plus all students with the most significant cognitive disabilities…

  7. Lessons from High-Performing Hispanic Schools: Creating Learning Communities. Critical Issues in Educational Leadership Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Pedro, Ed.; Scribner, Jay D., Ed.; Scribner, Alicia Paredes, Ed.

    The current poor condition of education for Hispanic students need not exist. This book reports on high-performing schools along the Texas-Mexico border that have achieved schoolwide success by creating communities of learners. Three elementary, three middle, and two high schools in the border region were selected for study based on the following…

  8. Earth Science Principles Pertinent to the General Education Programs in Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Kenneth Tyrone

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, and findings of a study designed to identify principles in astronomy, geology, meterology, oceanography and physical geography pertinent to general education programs in junior high schools. (LC)

  9. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kari M H; Vale, Ronald D

    2013-11-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K-12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K-12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K-12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education.

  10. Leadership education in Singapore's high schools: its roles in school-business engagement to develop future leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Yew, Ker Ling

    2017-01-01

    Educators recognise the need to develop Leadership Education Programs (LEPs) that prepare students to deal with the complex and rapid changes in a globalised world. Business organizations, with their emphasis on anticipating and managing multifaceted changes, are a natural partner for high schools to work with to cultivate leadership qualities among students. School practitioners are fully cognizant of the benefits of engaging business organizations to provide greater exposure and authentic...

  11. Critical Chemistry Education in a Private, Suburban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Patrick; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2018-01-01

    This critical ethnography documents how a group of 25 students and their teacher/researcher in a suburban, private school setting, the vast majority from the dominant cultural background, engaged with and enacted a critical chemistry education together. Critical chemistry education contextualizes chemistry in socially relevant issues and problematizes participants' conceptual frameworks for understanding the intersections between chemistry and our capitalist society by identifying the shortcomings of traditional scientific language to sufficiently interrogate privilege and oppression. Qualitative data from teacher/researcher field notes and journal, classroom video transcripts, questionnaires, focus group interviews, and student artifacts document that while it is difficult for the teacher/researcher and the students of this setting to reflect upon their own positions of privilege, together they interpreted and made meaning of their experience by (1) developing the ability to critically analyze the products of science for the potential of oppression, (2) developing an understanding of inequity in science, and (3) evaluating and respecting diverse knowledge bases. Based on the findings, we suggest students should be encouraged to problematize socially situated science issues related to settings close to their own communities, students should participate in structured and purposeful journaling to improve their metacognition and critical reflexivity, and critical pedagogues must be explicit with students in their Marxist-based interpretation of the global capitalist super structure.

  12. Bringing Global Climate Change Education to Alabama Middle School and High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Mitra, C.; Percival, E.; Thomas, A.; Lucy, T.; Hickman, E.; Cox, J.; Chaudhury, S. R.; Rodger, C.

    2013-12-01

    A NASA-funded Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Program has been launched in Alabama to improve high school and middle school education in climate change science. The overarching goal is to generate a better informed public that understands the consequences of climate change and can contribute to sound decision making on related issues. Inquiry based NICE modules have been incorporated into the existing course of study for 9-12 grade biology, chemistry, and physics classes. In addition, new modules in three major content areas (earth and space science, physical science, and biological science) have been introduced to selected 6-8 grade science teachers in the summer of 2013. The NICE modules employ five E's of the learning cycle: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend and Evaluate. Modules learning activities include field data collection, laboratory measurements, and data visualization and interpretation. Teachers are trained in the use of these modules for their classroom through unique partnership with Alabama Science in Motion (ASIM) and the Alabama Math Science Technology Initiative (AMSTI). Certified AMSTI teachers attend summer professional development workshops taught by ASIM and AMSTI specialists to learn to use NICE modules. During the school year, the specialists in turn deliver the needed equipment to conduct NICE classroom exercises and serve as an in-classroom resource for teachers and their students. Scientists are partnered with learning and teaching specialists and lead teachers to implement and test efficacy of instructional materials, models, and NASA data used in classroom. The assessment by professional evaluators after the development of the modules and the training of teachers indicates that the modules are complete, clear, and user-friendly. The overall teacher satisfaction from the teacher training was 4.88/5.00. After completing the module teacher training, the teachers reported a strong agreement that the content developed in the NICE

  13. The Changing Role of Vocational Education and the Comprehensive High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, David J.

    As American society has changed from the industrial age to the information age to the knowledge/imagination age, the notion of a comprehensive high school in its originally envisioned form has again become a high priority. If all students are required to obtain a rigorous academic education and an applied education related to a life or work…

  14. Using Immersive Healthcare Simulation for Physiology Education: Initial Experience in High School, College, and Graduate School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Nancy E.; Hayden, Emily M.; Joyal-Mowschenson, Julie; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon; Faux, Russell; Gordon, James A.

    2011-01-01

    In the natural world, learning emerges from the joy of play, experimentation, and inquiry as part of everyday life. However, this kind of informal learning is often difficult to integrate within structured educational curricula. This report describes an educational program that embeds naturalistic learning into formal high school, college, and…

  15. [Survey on junior high school student's attitudes toward rational drug use and the educational effect by school pharmacists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Junichi; Takayanagi, Risa; Yokoyama, Haruko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sinohara, Satomi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The educational intervention could improve knowledge about rational drug use in the junior high school. Improving knowledge about rational drug use at an early age may be a good way to increase the population's awareness of health, medicines and self-medication. To educate the rational drug use, it is desirable that the school pharmacists participate in this educational program in the junior high school. So we conducted an educational lecture by school pharmacists to promote rational drug use and self-medication in junior high school students. The study compared participant responses before and after a lecture. After the first questionnaire, we lectured the mentioned above to them. Afterward, second questionnaire was conducted. In the second questionnaire, more than 95% of the students understood the contents of the lecture to some extent. After a lecture, students who answered that 'I don't have confidence that I can buy medicines rightly by myself' decreased from 42.7% to 11.7%. And students who answered that 'I don't have confidence that I can use medicines rightly by myself' decreased from 25.2% to 12.6%. It was possible to achieve a favorable modification of attitudes to rational use of medicines in junior high school students. Continuous interventions might allow better effects and could help to fill the gap in health education of the general population.

  16. THE ANALYSIS OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS`BEHAVIOUR IN THE SELECTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina SUSANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is to examine the Romanian education system and it focuses on the most important aspects of the education marketing and marketing research. A survey instrument was designed to include the research upon high school student’s behavior in selecting a higher education institution. The results shown that the Romanian education system has some drawbacks, the most important being the weak implementation of marketing in the education institutions. Therefore, the purpose of the marketing researches is to establish a connection between the public which education services are dedicated to and the necessary information used to select a higher education institution.

  17. Implementation of an Education Technology Policy in Namibia's High Schools: Through the Eyes of the Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Perien Joniell

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Namibian high school teachers experienced the ICT policy for education in their schools. This mixed methods sequential explanatory design consists of two distinct phases: quantitative followed by qualitative (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2011). Quantitative data collection involved the distribution and…

  18. Approaching an Extended Role for Meeting Special Educational Needs in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Keith

    1988-01-01

    The paper looks at staffing issues in meeting special educational needs in high schools in Manchester, United Kingdom. The concerns of Heads of Departments (N=26) included improved training and inservice, their extended roles within their schools, the support role of special needs staff, and the need for more planning and evaluation. (Author/DB)

  19. Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of El Paso High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Moises

    The purpose of this study was to make a comprehensive survey of the educational and occupational aspirations and expectations of high school sophomores and seniors in the El Paso and Ysleta school districts (El Paso, Texas). Group-administered questionnaires were used to obtain the information from the 590 randomly sampled students (5% of the…

  20. Financial education level of high school students and its economic reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Pedro da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract This research contributes to the understanding of the level of financial education of high school students from public schools, as well as verifying how their financial knowledge has been generated, providing a view of the gaps in financial education with which these students are able to attend undergraduate courses later. The objective of the research was to determine the level of financial education of high school students from public schools, according to individual, demographic and socializing aspects. The research methodology was characterized as descriptive regarding procedures such as survey and the approach of the quantitative nature of the problem. The research population included 4698 high school students from 14 public schools in the city of Blumenau. In the data processing, the Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests were used. The results indicate that there is an effective financial education among young high school students, which can be noticed in findings such as: some of the young are not obliged to explain to parents where they are spending their financial resources; students have acquired, largely, their financial knowledge with parents and relatives, and in day-to-day practices, but there is little dialog in the family on financial matters. The financial knowledge coming from the school is low, requiring an improvement in the quality of this knowledge at this stage or in the future, including undergraduate courses. Finally, potential workers may cause social problems through their inability to manage their resources and/or the expenses of their families.

  1. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  2. The Benefits of High School Career and Technical Education (CTE) for Youth With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mary M; Newman, Lynn A; Javitz, Harold S

    2016-11-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), this study examines the career and technical education (CTE) course taking of high school students with learning disabilities (LD) in the context of the national movement toward higher standards for determining whether students leave high school "college and career ready." Descriptive analyses document the extent of general education CTE course taking overall by students with LD and their engagement in a concentrated program of occupationally specific general education CTE, a level of course taking early research has linked to improved post-high school employment outcomes. Propensity score modeling was used to determine whether either type of CTE course taking is related to higher odds of full-time employment after high school and whether results differ with the length of time youth were out of high school. Results show no benefits of CTE course taking overall, but demonstrate a significant positive effect for participating in a concentration of occupationally specific CTE in the first 2 post-high school years; effects are nonsignificant for later years. The implications for high school programming and transition planning for students with LD are discussed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2015.

  3. The Status of High School Online Physical Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, David Newman; Buschner, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Online learning is changing the educational landscape despite the limited empirical research and conflicting results about its effectiveness to produce student learning. The purpose of this study was to describe the status of online physical education (OLPE) in the United States. Surveys were sent to forty-five high school online physical…

  4. Understanding Parents, Understanding Parenthood: An Education for Parenthood Course Piloted at Monifeith High School, Angus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Elizabeth; Tammi, Lynne

    This report is the result of an evaluation of the delivery of a pilot parenthood education program at Monifeith High School in Angus, Scotland. The program was developed as part of Save the Children, Scotland's 3-year Positive Parenting Project. The report is targeted at those responsible for the delivery of personal and social education to…

  5. PRACTICAL ASPECTS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Rodionov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach is offered to development of the informational and educational environment of high technical school,based on deep integration of electronic educational content with methods and tools for the engineering problemssolving. The application program interface (API is used asthe main integration instrument, which modern Its have.

  6. Analysis of Self-Esteem Levels of Students in Physical Education and Sports High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    çakoyun, Fahri Ak

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the self-esteem levels of the students at Balikesir University Physical Education and Sports High School according to the variables such; gender, age, body-mass index (BMI), education department, class, sporting situation and sport branch (individual sport-team sport). While the universe of the study has…

  7. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Jersey's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Hampshire's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Mexico's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  10. Education and the Economy: Boosting New York's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  11. The Relationship between Attitude toward Physical Education and Leisure-Time Exercise in High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Min-hau; Phillips, D. Allen

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between U.S. and Taiwanese high school students' attitudes toward physical education and leisure time exercise, noting the influence of nationality and gender. Student surveys indicated significant relationships between attitudes toward physical education and leisure time exercise, regardless of nationality or gender.…

  12. English Educational Policy for High Schools in Japan: Ideals vs. Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Keita; Browne, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology issues a document known as the Course of Study Guidelines on average once every ten years. This document states the overall and specific goals for English education in Japanese junior and senior high schools including specifying the contents of ministry approved textbooks.…

  13. High School General Education English Teachers' Perception of IEP Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, Mary Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative design study was to better understand the experiences of high school general education English teachers who have students with Asperger Syndrome in their classes. More specifically, this researcher wanted to better understand the teacher's perception of the IEP-denoted accommodations the general education teachers…

  14. Philosophical Questions about Teaching Philosophy: What's at Stake in High School Philosophy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    What is at stake in high school philosophy education, and why? Why is it a good idea to teach philosophy at this level? This essay seeks to address some issues that arose in revising the Ontario grade 12 philosophy curriculum documents, significant insights from philosophy teacher education, and some early results of recent research funded by the…

  15. MODELING OF SYSTEM COMPONENTS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Samerkhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principles of System Studies, describes the components of the educational programs of the control system. Educational Program Management is a set of substantive, procedural, resource, subject-activity, efficiently and evaluation components, which ensures the integrity of integration processes at all levels of education. Ensuring stability and development in the management of educational programs is achieved by identifying and securing social norms, the status of the educational institution program managers to ensure the achievement of modern quality of education.Content Management provides the relevant educational content in accordance with the requirements of the educational and professional standards; process control ensures the efficient organization of rational distribution process flows; Resource Management provides optimal distribution of personnel, information and methodological, material and technical equipment of the educational program; contingent management provides subject-activity interaction of participants of the educational process; quality control ensures the quality of educational services.

  16. The optimization of headmaster's role in actualizing character education at vocational private high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyono, Irawan; Widodo, Joko; Sumaryanto, Totok

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays many parties strive for intensity increase and character education implementation quality in formal education institutions. Those demands are based on the developed social phenomena which is the juvenile delinquency, such as mass brawl and other moral decadence cases. Character education can be given in school, but it requires cooperation of all school residents to realize. One of which is headmaster's role for character education in school. The problem of this research is about how headmaster optimizes his role in realizing character education in school. The purpose of this research is to describe and analyze headmaster's optimization role to realize character education in vocational high school (SMK). This research uses qualitative descriptive. Data are collected by interview and documentation then analyzed by using data triangulation. The result of this research shows that headmaster must do his role as an educator, manager, administrator, supervisor, leader, entrepreneur and climate creator. By maximizing his role, character education can be started and will be very useful for students after they graduate and continue to work.

  17. New educational tools to encourage high-school students' activity in stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Vera; Grishko, Dmitriy; Leonov, Victor

    2018-01-01

    Many students have to choose their future profession during their last years in the high school and therefore to choose a university where they will get proper education. That choice may define their professional life for many years ahead or probably for the rest of their lives. Bauman Moscow State Technical University conducts various events to introduce future professions to high-school students. Such activity helps them to pick specialization in line with their interests and motivates them to study key scientific subjects. The paper focuses on newly developed educational tools to encourage high school students' interest in STEM disciplines. These tools include laboratory courses developed in the fields of physics, information technologies and mathematics. More than 2000 high school students already participated in these experimental courses. These activities are aimed at increasing the quality of STEM disciplines learning which will result in higher quality of training of future engineers.

  18. Evaluation of Game-Based Learning in Cybersecurity Education for High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Ge; Tu, Manghui; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Heffron, Justin; White, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The increasing demand for global cybersecurity workforce made it a critical mission for universities and colleges to attract and train next generation of cybersecurity professionals. To address this issue, Purdue University Northwest (PNW) launched high school summer camps to 181 high school students, with 51.3% underrepresented minority ratio. PNW summer camp activities were delivered in the format of game based learning and hands-on labs. Four cybersecurity education games were developed to...

  19. Urban special education policy and the lived experience of stigma in a high school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Chris

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, I provide a window into the lived experience of a group of urban high school science students confronted with the stigma associated with special education, disability, and academic failure and present tools to understanding the ideological forces and institutional structures that undermine the ability of schools to create a culture of care and inclusion of children with disabilities. With the purpose of understanding the context of these students' tainted social status within the school community, I draw connections between the ideological bipolarity and ambiguity of federal and state special education law and the lack of moral commitment at the local level to including and protecting the rights of children with disabilities in New York City schools. An important element of this paper is an exploration of a decade of neoliberal reform in the New York City Department of Education and the meticulously documented failure of New York City's special education system to provide mandated services, adequately include special education students, and generally protect the rights of children with disabilities. I conclude that the ableism embedded in special education law and a lack of meaningful enforcement renders special education regulations intangible to administrators whereas neoliberal performance benchmarks are extremely salient due to the dire consequences for schools of not meeting them.

  20. Creativity Education Model through Dance Creation for Students of Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarsih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to realize dance as a real product of a dance education process. The product is packaged in a form of audio-visual as well as a scientific publication. As the benefit from this study, the product can be used by school and specifically by dance teacher as a guidance in conducting dance lesson at school. The study on the model of creativity education through the creation is being understood as a form of developmental research. As a developmental research, the research plan is initiated by analyzing the teaching material related to dance lesson, and relate it to the creativity education which has to be accomplished through dance lesson, specifically for Junior High School students. The study will be continued with theoretical/ conceptual analysis and observation which is related to creativity education through the dance creation. In the end of this study, model of creativity education through dance creation is produced, particularly for students of Junior High School level. Results of the study show that, in doing creativity activity through dance creation, the value of the dance as an art is not become the primary aim. Moreover, the main aim of this process is towards the creativity process itself. While producing and creating the dance, two major educational points are derived, which are: the creativity and product value in a form of dance. Based on background of the idea, through this pilot project, the creativity of creating dance for public schools students, especially Junior High School, is possible to be done and used as a dance creativity learning model in Junior High School. Two suggestions are formulated in this study: (1 it is suggested for dance teachers in public schools, in this context is Junior High School teachers, to set their teaching and learning process into the creativity education as it is implied in curriculum. (2 In order to achieve the creativity education itself, the dance creation as one of art subject

  1. Evaluation of Game-Based Learning in Cybersecurity Education for High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for global cybersecurity workforce made it a critical mission for universities and colleges to attract and train next generation of cybersecurity professionals. To address this issue, Purdue University Northwest (PNW launched high school summer camps to 181 high school students, with 51.3% underrepresented minority ratio. PNW summer camp activities were delivered in the format of game based learning and hands-on labs. Four cybersecurity education games were developed to teach social engineering, cyber-attack and defense methods, secure online behavior, and cybersecurity principles. Survey result of 154 camp participants indicated that the cybersecurity education games were very effective in cybersecurity awareness training. Further analysis of survey data revealed that the gamification of cybersecurity education to raise students’ interests in computer science and cybersecurity was more effective in male high school students than in female students.

  2. Educational Progression in Ghana: Gender and Spatial Variations in Longitudinal Trajectories of Junior High School Completion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, David; Alhassan, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Completion of junior high school is a critical milestone in every Ghanaian child's educational trajectory and a critical step toward the transition to higher education. However, the rate of children completing junior high school still lags behind most educational indicators in Ghana. Far more attention is paid to ensuring that students enroll in…

  3. Hospitality Education: A Guide for High School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The guide presents key steps in establishing hospitality education curricula, based on recommendations of more than 300 surveyed educators and industry personnel and on information from over 60 proposed or existing curricula. The scope of the hospitality industries is described as including the categories of food service, lodging, tourism, and…

  4. Do they understand the benefits from education? Evidence on Dutch high school students’ earnings expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazza, J.; Hartog, J.

    2011-01-01

    Using an internet collected dataset, we will provide some empirical evidence on the information that Dutch high school students possess before their decision on tertiary education participation. The sample is prone to selective participation and high attrition, but we detect little systematic

  5. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Junior High School Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Lindsey; Barney, David C.; Prusak, Keven A.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Music is an everyday occurrence in a person's life. Music is heard in the workplace, in homes, and in the mall. Music can also be heard as a person exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on junior high students (n = 305) step counts and time in activity in junior high school physical education classes.…

  6. Risk of Concussion During Sports Versus Physical Education Among New Mexico Middle and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard A; Gorman, Stephanie A; Thoma, Robert J; Annett, Robert D; McGrew, Christopher A; Yeo, Ronald A; Mayer, Andrew R; King, John H; Rowland, Andrew S

    2018-01-01

    To measure the risk of concussion among New Mexico middle and high school students during both sports and physical education. Athletic directors or athletic trainers in 147 schools were asked to report the number of concussions occurring during sports and physical education in the 2013 to 2014 school year. We calculated 1-year cumulative incidence rates. Of the 147 schools, 99 responded (67%). During the school year, 598 students were removed from athletics because of a concussion, a 1-year cumulative incidence of 3.5 per 100. The concussion rate during sports was 3.0: 3.5 for boys and 2.4 for girls (relative risk [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 1.7). An additional 335 students experienced concussions during physical education. Concussion rates during physical education were 60% higher than during sports (RR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.4, 1.8). In our data, the risk of concussion was higher in physical education than in sports. This suggests that concussions should be tracked for a wide range of youth athletic activities, not just for sports. Monitoring cumulative incidence, in addition to other measures, may allow comparisons across schools and regions. More prevention efforts are needed.

  7. A Survey of the Problem of Unbalanced High School Educational Resource Allocation within the County Region in Gansu Province--Using Seven High Schools in Three Counties as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Liu; Gaofu, Du

    2015-01-01

    The imbalance in allocating high school educational resources within the county region has expanded the imbalances in local high school educational development. This has caused "diseconomies of scale" in high schools, aggravated the "expansion impulse" in building model high schools, limited the growth of effective demand by…

  8. Educational Interdisciplinarity in the High School through working with Pedagogical Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irinéa de Lourdes Batista

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, an understanding about scholar interdisciplinarity and project working is brought, aiming at showing that the last one is an alternative methodological to promote an interdisciplinary educative practice. Therefore a pedagogical proposal was built to implement interdisciplinarity in Science and Mathematics Education in High School. It is exposed the theoretical syntheses, analysis and discussions concerning the pertinence and possibility to implement the proposal studied by the teachers and pedagogical staff in a public High School in the State of Paraná, Brazil.

  9. Evaluation of a School-Based Sex Education Program for Low Income Male High School Students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Monica; Ross, Ines

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated a 1-year sex education program for low income male high school students in Chile. Findings for 92 students in the baseline year, 1993, and 196 students in the 1998 cohort show a reduction in the percentage of students reporting having had sexual intercourse, changes attitudes toward abstinence, and differences in communication about…

  10. Theoretical perspectives for the Environmental Education in high school. Theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Haydé Gutiérrez Sabogal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article exposes the background and conclusions of an Environmental Education purpose —EE— supported by theoretical models able to frame processes of teaching and learning applied to EE in the high school. All of this come from strict revision and analysis of complemented educational didactics, through the professional teaching experience. To reveal this conceptual framework, the activities are posed and developed within the Environmental School Project —ESP— of the District Education Institute —DEI— Ignacio Pescador as a mode to put into practice the analyzed theory. Thus, the results obtained validate the referential framework proposed to produce knowledge about the instructive theory — which is aimed to professional teachers who will be added to the teaching process of EE into the high school institutes— and the process of knowledge creation in the student body.

  11. Citizenship Education: Instructional Materials/Resources for High School Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Jane

    This resource guide contains six units of study on citizenship education for use at the secondary level. The purpose of the units is to help students examine the political and legal processes of American society and the rights, responsibilities, and roles of its citizens. The units can be used as the basis for a one-semester elective course in…

  12. Impacts of Flipped Classroom in High School Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ling

    2016-01-01

    As advanced technology increasingly infiltrated into classroom, the flipped classroom has come to light in secondary educational settings. The flipped classroom is a new instructional approach that intends to flip the traditional teacher-centered classroom into student centered. The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of the…

  13. Promoting nuclear education and technology in Thai high schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, W.

    1998-01-01

    The public acceptance project which Thailand is undertaking through the Chulalongkorn University project is based on the awareness that increased public support of nuclear power is an essential precondition to the consideration of a nuclear power program for the country. By approaching public education on this matter via an independent and recognized authority such as Chulalongkorn University, the issue has remained as an education and information process rather than becoming a political issue and falling victim to all of the pitfalls of that process. The model of selecting independent partners and organizations to conduct public education and public acceptance activities appears to be more effective than for the utility itself to more directly address such issues. It is of course recognized that at some time there will be a public discussion and debate of the issue of nuclear power in Thailand. However the work done by such public education projects in advance of any public announcements on any project plans should help to ensure that the ensuing public discussion will take place amongst a better informed public

  14. Inspiring careers in STEM and healthcare fields through medical simulation embedded in high school science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Louis J; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L; Goyal, Riya; Joyal, Julie A; Gordon, James A; Faux, Russell; Oriol, Nancy E

    2014-09-01

    The most effective ways to promote learning and inspire careers related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain elusive. To address this gap, we reviewed the literature and designed and implemented a high-fidelity, medical simulation-based Harvard Medical School MEDscience course, which was integrated into high school science classes through collaboration between medical school and K-12 faculty. The design was based largely on the literature on concepts and mechanisms of self-efficacy. A structured telephone survey was conducted with 30 program alumni from the inaugural school who were no longer in high school. Near-term effects, enduring effects, contextual considerations, and diffusion and dissemination were queried. Students reported high incoming attitudes toward STEM education and careers, and these attitudes showed before versus after gains (P science or healthcare-related career to the program. Additionally, 63% subsequently took additional science or health courses, 73% participated in a job or educational experience that was science related during high school, and 97% went on to college. Four of every five program graduates cited a health-related college major, and 83% offered their strongest recommendation of the program to others. Further study and evaluation of simulation-based experiences that capitalize on informal, naturalistic learning and promote self-efficacy are warranted. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  15. [Eating Disorders in Female High School Students: Educational and Migration Background, School-Related Stress and Performance-Orientated Classes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüttner, M

    2018-02-01

    Many adolescents and young adults, especially young females, suffer from eating disorders or problematic nutrition behavior. Children and adolescents with migration background as well as from a lower social class are more likely to have eating disorders 1. Although schools are an important context in these age groups, there is a lack of scientific inquiry concerning the relationship between schooling and eating disorders. The present study investigates the relationship between performance-related stress at school and eating disorders while controlling for personnel and familial resources. Interview data on the 7 th grade high school students from the National Educational Panel Study (NEPS)* starting cohort 3 are used. The dependent variable is based on the SCOFF questionnaire. Logistic regressions are calculated using information from students and parents. Performance-related stress at school is operationalized by the negative deviation of realistic from idealistic educational aspirations (EA) and unfulfilled social expectations (SE), performance-oriented class climate is operationalized by students' perception of the performance-orientation of the teacher (PT) and the expectations of classmates (EC). The results point towards an increased risk of suffering from an eating disorder due to performance-related school stress (EA: AME: 0.18; p<0.001; SE: AME: 0.12; p<0.05) and performance-oriented class climate (PT: AME: 0.05; p<0.1; EC: AME: 0.15, p<0.01). They partly explain the relation between both migration background and educational background and eating disorders. In order to prevent eating disorders in female high school students, attention should be paid to performance-orientation experienced at school and in the social background, and improved individual support for disadvantaged students should be made available. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. College students' experiences and attitudes regarding middle and high school-based breastfeeding education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the attitudes and experiences of male and female college students relative to breastfeeding education within middle and high school programs of study. Findings revealed that 36.7% of the participants were taught about breastfeeding while enrolled in a specific course in high school; 11.3% received information about breastfeeding in middle school. Overall, participants expressed positive attitudes toward breastfeeding and were supportive of the promotion of breastfeeding within a formal educational setting. However, 54% disagreed with offering information about breastfeeding to middle school students. Furthermore, most (67.8%) participants found public breastfeeding to be unacceptable; 77.7% indicated that breastfeeding is an intimate behavior that should be kept private. School nurses are in a unique position to influence school health and science-related curricula designed to promote the health benefits of breastfeeding. More education is needed to teach young people about the advantages of breastfeeding and to make breastfeeding a socially and culturally acceptable lifestyle behavior.

  17. School Motivation and High School Dropout: The Mediating Role of Educational Expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Wolters, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A good deal of evidence indicates that students' motivational beliefs and attitudes play a critical role in their academic success. Research studies on how motivational factors may help determine whether students remain in high school or drop out, however, are relatively few. More specifically, there is a lack of research…

  18. Racial/Ethnic and Gender Equity Patterns in Illinois High School Career and Technical Education Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Asia Fuller; Malin, Joel; Hackmann, Donald

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed high school Career and Technical Education (CTE) enrollments in Illinois, with comparisons to national data when possible, by career cluster and pathway and with respect to gender and racial/ethnic makeup of students. Enrollment patterns in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) CTE programming were emphasized.…

  19. Methodological Lessons Learned from Conducting Civic Education Research in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Elizabeth C.; Vercellotti, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    With the growing size of the "Millennial Generation" and its potential impact on American democracy, the civic education of this cohort deserves study. Using news media and discussion of politics at home and in the classroom at four public high schools in New Jersey, we conducted an experiment to measure changes in media use, political…

  20. Do they understand the benefits from education? Evidence on Dutch high school students' earnings expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazza, J.; Hartog, J.

    2008-01-01

    Using an internet collected dataset, we will provide some empirical evidence on the level of knowledge that Dutch high school students possess before their decision on tertiary education participation. We will assess the awareness of the risky nature of such an investment and if a compensation for

  1. Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Members' Engagement with Sex Education in Canadian High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an examination of gay-straight alliance (GSA) members' engagement with sex education, sexual health, and prejudice and discrimination in Canadian public high schools. It explores how five students' (four straight and one gay-identifying) participation in GSAs served as a springboard for learning about and challenging stereotypes;…

  2. Association of a Behaviorally Based High School Health Education Curriculum with Increased Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J.; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M[subscript age] = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating…

  3. Native Plant Naming by High-School Students of Different Socioeconomic Status: Implications for Botany Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M. A.; Díaz, Sandra; De Longhi, Ana L.

    2018-01-01

    People's diminished awareness of plants, affected by anthropogenic environmental deterioration, has challenged science education to overcome the obstacles impeding a better understanding of their meaning and value. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the socioeconomic status of high-school students, as indicated by their…

  4. Approaches of High School Instrumental Music Educators in Response to Student Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple instrumental case study was to explore approaches of four high school instrumental music educators assuming the role of facilitative teacher in responding to challenges affecting the social and emotional well-being of their students. This study utilized the framework of social emotional learning as a lens to view the…

  5. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  6. Using Focus Groups to Develop a Nutrition Education Video for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delores C. S.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Frazee, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Study used focus group interviews with ninth graders to help develop a nutrition education video and teacher's guide for Florida high schools. Students believed a video would be successful, expressed interest in 10 nutrition topics, recommended using teen actors with varying body types, and suggested no more than three or four topics per video.…

  7. An Examination of Embedding Character Education into the Daily Functions of High School Instrumental Music Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sours, James P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of embedding character education into the daily functions of instrumental music ensembles at Franklin High School in Portland Oregon. The participants in the study were the students of the researcher which may have been a delimitation. Their ages were from 14 to 19 years. Students from…

  8. Soil 4 Youth: Charting New Territory in Canadian High School Soil Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzic, Maja; Wilson, Julie; Basiliko, Nathan; Bedard-Haughn, Angela; Humphreys, Elyn; Dyanatkar, Saeed; Hazlett, Paul; Strivelli, Rachel; Crowley, Chris; Dampier, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    As global issues continue to place increasing demands on soil resources, the need to provide soil science education to the next generation of soil scientists and the general public is becoming more imminent. In many countries around the world, including Canada, soil is either not included in the high school curriculum or it is not covered in…

  9. STEM Education and Sexual Minority Youth: Examining Math and Science Coursetaking Patterns among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael; Estrada, Fernando; Sublett, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Sexual minority students such as those identifying as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as well as those identifying with emerging self-labels (e.g., queer) face a host of risk factors in high school that can potentially compromise educational excellence, particularly in rigorous academic disciplines. The current study advances the area of diversity…

  10. Special Education Services Received by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders from Preschool through High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wagner, Mary; Christiano, Elizabeth R A; Shattuck, Paul; Yu, Jennifer W

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about how special education services received by students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) differ by age, disability severity, and demographic characteristics. Using three national datasets, the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), the Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study (SEELS), and the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), this study examined the age trends in special education services received by students with ASDs from preschool through high school. Elementary-school students with ASDs had higher odds of receiving adaptive physical education, specialized computer software or hardware, and special transportation, but lower odds of receiving learning strategies/study skills support than their preschool peers. Secondary-school students had lower odds of receiving speech/language or occupational therapy and of having a behavior management program, but higher odds of receiving mental health or social work services than their elementary-school peers. Both disability severity and demographic characteristics were associated with differences in special education service receipt rates.

  11. Barriers to health education in adolescents: health care providers' perspectives compared to high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Kobra; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2015-11-01

    Although adolescence is marked by profound and dynamic changes, it is virtually neglected by health care providers, by society, and even by most parents, teachers, and health professionals. The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to health education in adolescents from health care providers' views compared to teens. The study population consisted of 72 health care providers and 402 high school female students in Northern Iran in 2012. They completed a self-administered questionnaire about their views on barriers to adolescents' health education. It is revealed that the major barrier to adolescents' health education from a health care providers' perspective is "Lack of private room for adolescents' health education", while "Lack of adolescents' interest to content of educational programs" is a significantly greater barrier to health education among adolescents. The results suggest that for adolescent health education, specific strategies should be used in adolescent health promotion programs.

  12. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kari M. H.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K–12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K–12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K–12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education. PMID:24174464

  13. Hospitality Major Vocational High School Students' Expectations on University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ya-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hospitality is not a new industry in Asia, but high quality hospitality industry has become more and more important in the trend of questing service-based economy and the increasing number of tourists in Asia. Thus there are more universities opened hospitality degree programs in Asia, Taiwan is no exception. In this context, why high school…

  14. Parenting styles, adolescents' attributions, and educational outcomes in nine heterogeneous high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, K L; Dornbusch, S M; Troyer, L; Steinberg, L; Ritter, P L

    1997-06-01

    This article examined the contemporaneous and predictive relations between parenting styles, adolescents' attributions, and 4 educational outcomes. Data were collected from adolescents attending 6 high schools in California and 3 high schools in Wisconsin during the 1987-1988 and 1988-1989 school years. The results of path analyses partially confirmed the central hypotheses. Adolescents who perceived their parents as being nonauthoritative were more likely than their peers to attribute achievement outcomes to external causes or to low ability. Furthermore, the higher the proportion of dysfunctional attributions made for academic successes and failures, the lower the levels of classroom engagement and homework 1 year later. Although adolescents' attributional style provided a bridge between parenting style and 2 educational outcomes, it did not fully explain the impact of parenting on those outcomes. Additional analyses within gender and ethnic subgroups reinforced the overall pattern of findings observed within the entire sample.

  15. Mathematical Knowledge and Skills Expected by Higher Education in Engineering and the Social Sciences: Implications for High School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Mehmet; Özalp, Gülümser; Kalender, Ilker; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    One important function of school mathematics curriculum is to prepare high school students with the knowledge and skills needed for university education. Identifying them empirically will help making sound decisions about the contents of high school mathematics curriculum. It will also help students to make informed choices in course selection at…

  16. Physical activity in physiotherapy and physical education high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailova A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A term of health-related physical fitness became topical with four its components: aerobic and/or cardiovascular fitness, body composition, abdominal muscle strength and endurance, and lower back and hamstring flexibility. Complex evaluation of health-related physical fitness and physical activity (PA may show a wider insight in health promotion and disease prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate physical activity relation to health-related physical fitness in Physiotherapy (PT and Physical Education (PE students. Final study sample consisted of 67 students (46 women and 21 men (aged 21.61 ± 0.71. All participants filled in International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Health-related physical testing included: 1 body composition evaluation, 2 abdominal muscles strength tests, 3 dynamometry, 4 hamstring muscles and m. quadratus lumborum elasticity evaluation tests, 5 bicycle ergometer test (anaerobic threshold, maximal oxygen consumption. Results showed that most students had normal body composition parameters (BMI, body fat, muscle mass, body water in both genders and study programs. Women were less physically active that men, and PA duration was higher in PE students. PT students had higher body composition values, lower cardiorespiratory fitness parameters and lower handgrip strength in both hands than PE students. Greater PA generally implies a higher level of health-related physical fitness. PA significantly positively affects body composition, upper m. rectus abdominisstrength, grip strength and aerobic capacity.

  17. Evaluation outcomes of a sex education strategy in high schools of Pavia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benni, Emanuela; Sacco, Sara; Bianchi, Leonardo; Carrara, Roberto; Zanini, Chiara; Comelli, Mario; Tenconi, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to provide process and effectiveness evaluations of a sex education intervention realized with interactive techniques in high schools of Pavia (Italy). Six public high schools, divided into 'treated' and 'control' units, voluntarily joined this mixed-methods study. Only second-year classes were enrolled: treated adolescents followed a sex education course, performed by trained 'near-peer educators' (undergraduate medical students) with interactive techniques. All adolescents compiled an anonymous effectiveness evaluation questionnaire at baseline (pre-test) and 3 months later (post-test). Sexual knowledge and reported behavioural changes were compared between the two groups through linear mixed-effects models. The process was assessed through a satisfaction questionnaire for treated students, monitoring cards for working group members and cards/diaries for educators. The final sample consisted of 547 treated and 355 control adolescents (mean age = 15.28 ± 0.61 years). Highly significant changes (p educators generally provided positive evaluations, although difficult communication was perceived. The intervention was effective in improving adolescents' sexual knowledge. The present work highlighted that in Italy sex education in adolescence is still neglected: this could encourage misinformation and health-risk behaviour. Young people perceive the need for a serious health-promoting action in which they could play an active role, spreading educational messages with organized interactive methods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Inequalities in Educational Access in Mexico: A Study with Graduates Students of a High Performance Technical High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pérez-Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Access to the higher education system in Mexico has been characterized by educational inequalities explained by social and reproductionist currents. The phenomenon occurs in graduate students with a high school diploma and coming from different contexts (social, cultural, economic, institutional and academic ones that create a process of transition far away from equal opportunities. Therefore, the differences due to cultural diversity do not generate equitable access to higher education institutions. The aim of this study was to identify the social, cultural and academic factors affecting the access to or the abandonment of the academic education of students with expectations of entering the higher education system. The research was based on the results obtained from forty technicians who studied at a vocational high school with high academic performance in Mexico, and were supposed to enter the higher level. It was an exploratory descriptive investigation with qualitative approach, using two multiple-choice item questionnaires whose results were analyzed interpretively. The sampling was non-probability, with the technique of “snowball” and “convenience”. The results showed that the level of parents’ schooling, social relations, and academic career of graduates were decisive to enter the higher education; so it can be concluded that the students’ origin generate inequality in educational achievement.

  19. The effect of biotechnology education on Australian high school students' understandings and attitudes about biotechnology processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille; Soames, Christina

    2006-11-01

    Our education system aims to equip young people with the knowledge, problem-solving skills and values to cope with an increasingly technological society. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of biotechnology education on adolescents’ understanding and attitudes about processes associated with biotechnology. Data were drawn from teacher and student interviews and surveys in the context of innovative Year 10 biotechnology courses conducted in three Western Australian high schools. The results indicate that after completing a biotechnology course students’ understanding increased but their attitudes remained constant with the exception of their views about human uses of gene technology. The findings of this study have ramifications for the design and implementation of biotechnology education courses in high schools.

  20. In high school and pregnant: the importance of educational and fertility expectations for subsequent outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakusheva, Olga

    2011-01-01

    This study uses the High School and Beyond data (1980–1992) to examine the importance of educational and fertility expectations in explaining the achievement gap of adolescent mothers for over 5,500 young women from different socioeconomic backgrounds. Using a non-parametric local propensity score regression, the study finds that the economic disadvantage associated with having a child in high school is particularly large in poor socioeconomic environments; however, this disadvantage is a result of preexisting differences in the educational and fertility expectations and is not because of a diminished capacity of the socioeconomic environment to mediate the effect of an unplanned childbirth. The findings suggest that childcare assistance and other policies designed to alleviate the burden of child rearing for young mothers of low means may not produce the desired improvement in their subsequent educational and labor market outcomes. A much earlier policy intervention with a focus on fostering young women's outlook for the future is needed.

  1. The status of environmental education in Illinois public high school science and social studies classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jill F.

    Examines relationships among the levels of pre-service and inservice teacher preparation in various topic areas within environmental education (EE) and the levels of implementation of those topic areas in public high school science and social studies classrooms in Illinois. Measures teacher attitudes toward EE. Findings indicate that teachers who had received pre-service/inservice teacher education in EE implemented significantly more EE topics into the curriculum than did teachers who reported receiving no pre-service/inservice teacher education in EE. Findings also indicate that beginning teachers do not implement the EE topics nearly as much as veteran teachers.

  2. Computer-Based Junior High/Intermediate School Program of Transitional Bilingual Education, Community School District 3, Manhattan. Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Diana L.

    The Computer-Based Junior High/Intermediate School Program of Transitional Bilingual Education was a federally funded program in its third year of operation in one intermediate school and two junior high schools in Manhattan (New York) in 1992-93. During this period, it served 244 native Spanish-speaking, limited-English-proficient (LEP) students…

  3. A case study of a vocabulary strategy in a high school class of special education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Jill K.

    In the United States, almost 7000 students drop out of high school every day and the most common reason is academic failure. The economic, social, and emotional cost of dropping out of high school are enormous. Vocabulary knowledge is essential for students to grasp the concepts of a content area and there has been little research reported for scaffolding vocabulary learning in content classes. The purpose of this study was to investigate a vocabulary instructional strategy in a high school biology class. The research questions focused on understanding the vocabulary instructional strategy and student perception of the strategy. This was an evaluative case study using a convenience sample of a college preparatory biology class of special education students. Participants included eight males and two females who were identified as having learning, emotional or health disabilities with average to low average intelligence. Informal interviews, observations, school records, student and teacher artifacts and rich description were used for data triangulation. Analysis involved coding and grouping data by category, and identification of relationships between categories. Three themes emerged from this study: Students believed the strategy helped them to learn vocabulary, the strategy gave direction to instruction, and the strategy can be difficult to implement. The skill level of our future work force and the health of our society is linked to our nation's high school graduation rate. Development of instructional strategies that result in student academic success will improve our high school graduation rate which will result in positive social change.

  4. Education-Related Parameters in High Myopia: Adults versus School Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available Since high myopia in the younger generation may differ etiologically from high myopia in older generations, we examined whether education-related parameters differ between high myopia in today´s school children and high pathological myopia in today´s elderly generation.The investigation included the adult populations of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (BES (3468 adults;mean age:64.6±9.8years;range:50-93years and Central India Eye and Medical Study (CIEMS (4711 adults;age:49.±13.2years;range:30-100years, and the children and teenager populations of the Shandong Children Eye Study (SCES (6026 children;age:9.7±3.3years;range:4-18years;cycloplegic refractometry, Gobi Desert Children Eye Study (1565;age:11.9±3.5years;range:6-21 years;cycloplegic refractometry, Beijing Pediatric Eye Study (681 children;age:7.7±1.6years;range:5-13 years;non-cycloplegic refractometry,calculation of axial length to corneal curvature radius ratio, Beijing Children Eye Study (15066 children;age:13.2±3.4years;range:7-18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry, Beijing High School Teenager Eye Study (4677 children;age:16.9±0.7years;range:16-18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry.In the BES and CIEMS, educational level did not differ significantly between, or was significantly lower in the highly myopic group (myopic refractive error ≥6 diopters than in the non-highly myopic group. In all non-adult study populations, higher prevalence of high myopia was significantly associated with higher degree of education related parameters such as attendance of high-level schools, and more time spent for indoors near work versus time spent outdoors.Comparing associations of old or genetic high myopia in adults with new or acquired high myopia in school children revealed that education-related parameters did not show a clear association with old or genetic high myopia, while in contrast, new high myopia showed strong associations with education. It confirms previous studies

  5. Using immersive healthcare simulation for physiology education: initial experience in high school, college, and graduate school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Nancy E; Hayden, Emily M; Joyal-Mowschenson, Julie; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon; Faux, Russell; Gordon, James A

    2011-09-01

    In the natural world, learning emerges from the joy of play, experimentation, and inquiry as part of everyday life. However, this kind of informal learning is often difficult to integrate within structured educational curricula. This report describes an educational program that embeds naturalistic learning into formal high school, college, and graduate school science class work. Our experience is based on work with hundreds of high school, college, and graduate students enrolled in traditional science classes in which mannequin simulators were used to teach physiological principles. Specific case scenarios were integrated into the curriculum as problem-solving exercises chosen to accentuate the basic science objectives of the course. This report also highlights the historic and theoretical basis for the use of mannequin simulators as an important physiology education tool and outlines how the authors' experience in healthcare education has been effectively translated to nonclinical student populations. Particular areas of focus include critical-thinking and problem-solving behaviors and student reflections on the impact of the teaching approach.

  6. The Effects of Toilet and Genital Hygiene Education on High School, Students’ Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Sezgin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to identify the effects of toilet and genital hygiene education on high school student behavior.Methodology: In total, 145 students participated in this study, which took place in January-September 2006. The researchdesign was a single-group pre-test/post-test pre-experiment. The post-test data were obtained by administering the samequestion form to the participants six months later to determine the effects of the education administered. The samplecomprised 145 students, 39 of whom were girls and 106 of whom were boys, studying at Kılıçkaya Boarding SecondarySchool (Turkey, city of Artvin, Yusufeli town.Results: The rate of hand washing before toilet use rose from 66.9% to 79.3%. The rate of failing to keep the genital organsdry decreased from 27.6% to 3.8%. The health education that was delivered led to a noticeable change in the behavior,awareness, and toilet-menstruation hygiene practices of the high school students living in rural areas.Conclusions: Behavioral changes in high school students’ toilet and menstruation hygiene may be established through healtheducation without negatively impacting the co-operation of health trainers, teachers and family members.

  7. How would we deal with radiation related issues in high school educational programs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Kuniko

    1999-01-01

    Current educational curriculum will be more improved and the materials in schools will be somewhat different by the year of 2002 when students have two days off in a week. It is a well known fact that recent Japanese people's level of understanding about Science and Technology is the second from the bottom among OECD nations and, as a matter of fact, few schools are dealing with scientific issues such as atomic energy or radiation. High school teachers need to survey what students know about atomic power and radiation, how deep they studied in previous schools and what kind of interest they have in conservation of world energy sources or environmental issues discussed today. Through questionnaires to 328 students, it became clear that they were most interesting to the effect of radiation or radioactivity on any kind of things in the environment, and that they want to know solutions for those problems such as greenhouse effect, ozone layers and Garbage disposal. (M. Suetake)

  8. "Cancer--Educate to Prevent"--high-school teachers, the new promoters of cancer prevention education campaigns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Barros

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and thus represents a priority for national public health programs. Prevention has been assumed as the best strategy to reduce cancer burden, however most cancer prevention programs are implemented by healthcare professionals, which constrain range and educational impacts. We developed an innovative approach for cancer prevention education focused on high-school biology teachers, considered privileged mediators in the socialization processes. A training program, "Cancer, Educate to Prevent" was applied, so that the teachers were able to independently develop and implement prevention campaigns focused on students and school-related communities. The program encompassed different educational modules, ranging from cancer biology to prevention campaigns design. Fifty-four teachers were empowered to develop and implement their own cancer prevention campaigns in a population up to five thousands students. The success of the training program was assessed through quantitative evaluation--questionnaires focused on teachers' cancer knowledge and perceptions, before the intervention (pre-test and immediately after (post-test. The projects developed and implemented by teachers were also evaluated regarding the intervention design, educational contents and impact on the students' knowledge about cancer. This study presents and discusses the results concerning the training program "Cancer, Educate to Prevent" and clearly shows a significant increase in teacher's cancer literacy (knowledge and perceptions and teachers' acquired proficiency to develop and deliver cancer prevention campaigns with direct impact on students' knowledge about cancer. This pilot study reinforces the potential of high-school teachers and schools as cancer prevention promoters and opens a new perspective for the development and validation of cancer prevention education strategies, based upon focused interventions in restricted

  9. [Impact of an intervention improving the food supply (excluding school meals) with educational support in middle and high schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, C; Lorrain, S; Langevin, C; Barberger Gateau, P; Maurice, S; Thibault, H

    2015-12-01

    Within the Nutrition, Prevention, and Health Program for children and teenagers in Aquitaine, an experimental intervention was implemented in 2007-2008 in the middle and high schools in Aquitaine (southwest France). This intervention aimed to improve the eating habits of adolescents, combining actions to improve the food supply sold during recreational times (remove/limit fat and sugar products sold and promote the sale of fruits and bread) and health education actions to make adolescents aware of the concept of nutritional balance and steer their choice towards recommended products. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the impact of the intervention on the eating behavior of adolescents and the food supply sold during recreational times in middle and high schools in Aquitaine. A survey was conducted before and after the implementation of the intervention in seven middle and high schools that have implemented actions (intervention group) and eight middle and high schools that have not implemented actions (control group). In these schools, 1602 adolescents answered the survey before and 1050 after the intervention (samples were independent because of the anonymity of responses). The impact of the intervention on the dietary behavior of teenagers was modeled using logistic regression adjusted on potential confounding variables (sex, age, and educational status). In multivariate analyses, the intervention was associated with more frequent daily intake of breakfast (OR=2.63; 95% CI [1.89; 3.66]) and lower intake of morning snacks (OR=0.66; 95% CI [0.48; 0.90]), higher consumption of starchy foods (OR=1.77; 95% CI [1.30; 2.42]), bread at breakfast, morning snacks, and a light afternoon meal (OR=1.43; 95% CI [1.07; 1.90]), and the food supply sold at recreational times (OR=1.34 95% CI [1.01; 1.78]). These results show that the "Improving food supply in middle and high schools associated with educational support actions" project led to the sales of recommended foods

  10. Investigation of high school male and female students‘ attitudes towards Physical Education and Sports course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir PEPE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The investigation has been made in order to define high school male and female students’ attitudes towards physical education and sports course. Material and Methods: The Research is in research screening model. The population of the study is consisted of Burdur province and high schools located in the selected district and the sample group consists of students studying at the 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th grade in these schools. The data have been obtained from the written sources and by using survey methods. The attitude scale of physical education and sports classes for secondary school students developed by Güllü and Güçlü (2007 has been used. Questionnaires have been applied to the sample group by being consulted with one to one by sampling method. 950 individuals in total, 522 women and 428 men, have answered to the questionnaire. The data obtained have been transferred to a computer for statistical process and as statistical procedures, frequency (% and Independent samples t- test, to determine the difference between variables, have been applied. In the detection of differences, reviews have been made by being adopting the significance level of 0.05 in compliance with the answer distributions given to each question and the averages. Results: According to the obtained data; according to the responses of the surveyed high school students studying in average, their attitudes are positive to physical education and sports lessons; it is seen that there is a significant relationship in the significance level of 0,05 in comparative statistical procedures (p <0.05 . Conclusion: As a result; we can say that students' attitudes towards physical education and sports classes participated in the survey are positive, but male students have more positive attitudes than female students.

  11. ELWIRA "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials": University meets school - science meets high school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss-Sieberth, Alexandra; Strauss, Alfred; Kalny, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter; Loiskandl, Willibald

    2016-04-01

    The research project "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials" (ELWIRA) is in the framework of the Sparkling Science programme performed by the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences together with the Billroth Gymnasium in Vienna. The targets of a Sparkling Science project are twofold (a) research and scientific activities should already be transferred in the education methods of schools in order to fascinate high school students for scientific methods and to spark young people's interest in research, and (b) exciting research questions not solved and innovative findings should be addressed. The high school students work together with the scientists on their existing research questions improve the school's profile and the high school student knowledge in the investigated Sparkling Science topic and can lead to a more diverse viewing by the involvement of the high school students. In the project ELWIRA scientists collaborate with the school to quantify and evaluate the properties of classical building materials like concrete and natural materials like plants and woodlogs in terms of their life cycle through the use of different laboratory and field methods. The collaboration with the high school students is structured in workshops, laboratory work and fieldworks. For an efficient coordination/communication, learning and research progress new advanced electronic media like "Moodle classes/courses" have been used and utilized by the high school students with great interest. The Moodle classes are of high importance in the knowledge transfer in the dialogue with the high school students. The research project is structured into four main areas associated with the efficiencies of building materials: (a) the aesthetic feeling of people in terms of the appearance of materials and associated structures will be evaluated by means of jointly developed and collected questionnaires. The analysis, interpretation and evaluation are carried

  12. Academic performance: A case study of mathematics and science educators from rural Washington high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Tira K.

    A qualitative descriptive case study explored courses of action for educators and leaders of math and science educators to implement to help students achieve state assessment standard and postsecondary success. The problem focused on two demographically similar rural high schools in Southwest Washington that demonstrated inadequate rates of student achievement in mathematics and science. The research question investigated courses of action that may assist educators and leaders of secondary math and science educators to help students achieve WASL standards and postsecondary success in compliance with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. Senge's learning organization theory (1990, 2006) and Fullan's (2001) contributions to leading and learning in times of change provided the theoretical framework for the study. Twenty study participant responses analyzed with qualitative analysis software QSR NVivo 7 revealed six themes. Triangulation of responses with secondary data from WASL assessment scores and case study school assessment data identified 14 courses of action and three recommendations for educators and leaders of math and science educators to help students meet state standards and postsecondary success. Critical factors identified in the study as needed to assist educators to help students succeed included professional development, collaboration, teaching practices, funding, student accountability, and parental involvement.

  13. Benefits and Challenges of Technology in High Schools: A Voice from Educational Leaders with a Freire Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jane P.; Wiebe, Sean; Gabriel, Martha; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; MacDonald, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the perceptions of school leaders pertaining to the benefits and challenges of technology in high schools located on Prince Edward Island (PEI) (Canada). For this qualitative study, we interviewed 11 educational leaders representing the PEI Department of Education, principals, vice-principals, and…

  14. Does a Nutrition Education Programme Change the Knowledge and Practice of Healthy Diets among High School Adolescents in Chennai, India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M. Anitha; Shriraam, Vanishree; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony D.; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Tetali, Shailaja; Anchala, Raghupathy; Muthukumar, Diviya; Sathiyasekaran, B. W. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education is used as a way of promoting lifelong healthy eating practices among school adolescents. There is limited published information on the impact of nutrition education programmes in India. Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practices of high school students with respect to healthy diets before and after a…

  15. Fixing High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Reports from national education organizations in the US indicate the sorry state of high schools in the country that are accused of failing to adequately prepare their graduates for college or for the workforce, highlighting what is a serious problem in light of the troubled state of the US economy. The need to improve high schools is urgent and…

  16. Yoga Improves Academic Performance in Urban High School Students Compared to Physical Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Yoga programs within schools have become more widespread but research regarding the potential effect on academic achievement remains limited. This study cluster-randomized 112 students within a single New York City public high school to participate in either school-based yoga or physical education (PE) for an entire academic year. The primary…

  17. Ability, Parental Valuation of Education and the High School Dropout Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Kelly; Gallipoli, Giovanni; Green, David

    of the factor model set out in Carneiro, Hansen, and Heckman (2003). Specically, we consider the impact of cognitive and non-cognitive ability and the value that parents place on education. Our results support three main conclusions. First, cognitive ability at age 15 has a substantial impact on dropping out....... Second, parental valuation of education has an impact of approximately the same size as cognitive ability e ects for medium and low ability teenagers. A low ability teenager has a probability of dropping out of approximately .03 if his parents place a high value on education but .36 if their education......We use a large, rich Canadian micro-level dataset to examine the channels through which family socio-economic status and unobservable characteristics a ect children's decisions to drop out of high school. First, we document the strength of observable socio-economic factors: our data suggest...

  18. Exploring high school science students' perceptions of parental involvement in their education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mji, Andile; Mbinda, Zoleka

    2005-08-01

    This exploratory study describes high school students' perceptions of their parents' involvement in their education and in relation to school achievement. A new 12-item Parental Involvement Scale was used to measure parents' involvement in curricular and extracurricular activities and using exploratory analyses to estimate the scale's properties. Exploratory analysis resulted in the reduction of the 12 items to 8, with an internal consistency (Cronbach alpha) .82. Grade 12 science students indicated that their less educated parents were involved in activities pertaining to their learning; however, high perceived parental involvement in curricular activities was related to low achievement. It is recommended that further exploratory analyses be undertaken to examine the reported two-dimensional model of the Parental Involvement Scale.

  19. Association of a behaviorally based high school health education curriculum with increased exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M

    2015-06-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M(age) = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating cognitive-behavioral methods to increase exercise over 6 weeks. Significant within-group improvements in exercise, mood, and body satisfaction were found, with slightly larger effect sizes identified for the boys. Increase in exercise was significantly associated with reduced mood distress (β = -.17, p goal setting and self-regulation within high school health education classes may foster increased exercise and associated improvements in mood and body satisfaction. For girls, the positive effects may reinforce one another. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Toward improvements of the education concerning radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in high schools in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tatsuo

    1996-01-01

    Despite the high scientific and technical level of research and practical applications of radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear energy in Japan, the level of education concerning these matters at primary school and junior and high schools seems to be considerably behind the world, according to a recent comparative survey among six European countries and Japan. It has also been found that the description of these matters in current textbooks of science and social studies in senior high schools in Japan is generally not satisfactory, both in scope and in correctness. There are many reasons for this observation. One is the fact that many Japanese people including writers of textbooks have an excessive fear for radiation and radioactivity, and consequently are critical of the use of nuclear energy. Another is that Japanese teachers also have similar feeling and tend to avoid teaching about such controversial subject. This comes from the educational policy of Monbusho, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture; the nuclear-related matters are not being given an appropriate educational position, despite their importance in the national energy policy determined by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. In addition, there are several unfortunate educational circumstances. These include, limitations of hours of teaching allotted to the subject of science, the system of choosing curricula among several menus in the subject, the shortage of experimental instruments available in classroom, the severe safety regulation in handling even a very small amount of radioactivity, extraordinary fear for radiation and radioactivity by students, teachers, and their supervisors, the rare appearance of these topics in the problems at the entrance examination of universities. This paper discusses various ways to correct the situation and reports on our recent activities for improving means of education such as textbooks and the official guidelines. (J.P.N.)

  1. Role of the educational and non-educational factors on the mental health in girl high school students in Bushehr city on 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Shakib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available : The mental health has a prominent role in psychosocial development in different periods of life, especially during adolescence. Mental disorders in adolescents can be related to different educational and non-educational factors. Therefore the aim of this study was to identify the educational and non-educational factors affecting the mental health of femal high school students in Bushehr. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 500 high school femal students evaluated with using multi-stage cluster random sampling. Information was collected by questionnaire with three-part including educational factors (suchas anxiety academic and educational motivation, non educational factors (suchas demographic characteristics and quality of life (SF-36 part. The data were analyzed with SPSS software by using appropriate statistical tests. In this study the mental health level was moderate (50.99±11, and mental health was associated with educational motivation, facilitator anxiety, the school years, educational branch, interest to educational branch, mother education, evaluation of educational counseling, and evaluation of non educational counseling. Maternal education, interest to educational branch, the evaluation of non-educational counseling, facilitating stress, the school year, and educational branch were predictors of mental health (R2= 0.107. According to the results, providing educational consulting for increasing interest to educational branch, also non educational consulting for reducing problems and designing stress management workshop are necessary to improve students' mental health.

  2. Influencing College and Higher Education Choices in Disadvantaged Hispanic High School Students Through a School-Based Health Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Matza, Maria; Latham, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Statistics representing professional health care providers do not adequately reflect the shift in the nation's diverse population. Latinos are significantly underrepresented at all levels of appropriate academic programs critical for entry to health profession careers. This project describes the implementation of a student-run, faculty-facilitated Future Nurse and Health Club at a school (with majority Latino students) to emphasize the importance of higher education in health care. Demographic and psychosocial profiles of club members were also developed to understand community needs. The Future Nurse and Health Club was established in partnership with faculty and researchers representing a university-based nursing program, school officials, and community leaders. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from club members and their parents using a variety of techniques including questionnaires and focus groups. The findings of the study highlighted a variety of student- and parent-related factors including poor lifestyle habits and perceptions of support that could potentially influence Latino high school students' interest and progress in health care-related higher education. A school-based health career club involving active participation of parents and students with support from health care professionals such as academic nursing faculty has the potential to simultaneously raise student interest in health-related careers and health needs of their community.

  3. Later school start times for supporting the education, health, and well-being of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Robert; Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Davison, Colleen M; Ufholz, Lee-Anne; Freeman, John; Shankar, Ravi; Newton, Lisa; Brown, Robert S; Parpia, Alyssa S; Cozma, Ioana; Hendrikx, Shawn

    2017-07-03

    A number of school systems worldwide have proposed and implemented later school start times as a means of avoiding the potentially negative impacts that early morning schedules can have on adolescent students. Even mild sleep deprivation has been associated with significant health and educational concerns: increased risk for accidents and injuries, impaired learning, aggression, memory loss, poor self-esteem, and changes in metabolism. Although researchers have begun to explore the effects of delayed school start time, no one has conducted a rigorous review of evidence to determine whether later school start times support adolescent health, education, and well-being. We aimed to assess the effects of a later school start time for supporting health, education, and well-being in high school students.Secondary objectives were to explore possible differential effects of later school start times in student subgroups and in different types of schools; to identify implementation practices, contextual factors, and delivery modes associated with positive and negative effects of later start times; and to assess the effects of later school start times on the broader community (high school faculty and staff, neighborhood, and families). We conducted the main search for this review on 28 October 2014 and updated it on 8 February 2016. We searched CENTRAL as well as 17 key electronic databases (including MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts), current editions of relevant journals and organizational websites, trial registries, and Google Scholar. We included any randomized controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies with sufficient data points that pertained to students aged 13 to 19 years and that compared different school start times. Studies that reported either primary outcomes of interest (academic outcomes, amount or quality of sleep, mental health indicators, attendance, or alertness) or secondary

  4. Comparative Study of Mental Health of High School Teachers and Educational Counselors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Shakiba

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teachers have an important effect on mental health and development of students. Teaching and counseling may be stressful jobs. The objective of this study was to compare psychological status of high school teachers and educational counselors measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI.Materials and Method: In a cross-sectional study 60 teachers (20 male and 40 female and 60 educational counselors (20 male and 40 female from high schools of Zahedan city were recruited randomly and asked to complete Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Iranian short form of MMPI. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t test.Results: The results showed significant differences between teachers and educational counselors in 6 clinical scales of MMPI so that the teachers had higher scores than educational counselors in D (depression, Pd (psychopathy, Pa (paranoid, Pt (Psychastenia, Sc (schizophrenia and Ma (hypomania scales of MMPI. Mean scores of Male counselors in hysteria and psychopathy were higher than female's scores and also female teachers had higher mean scores in hypochondria, hysteria, paranoid, psychastenia and schizophrenia than male teachers.Conclusion: Although the profiles of both teachers and educational counselors were normal but teachers had higher mean scores than counselors, thus, efforts need to be made to explore possible factors associated to those differences

  5. High School Geography Project. Legacy for the Seventies. An Analysis of the High School Geography Project in Relation to New Developments in Geographic Education Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Angus M., Ed.

    Nine articles by geographers and educators analyze the High School Geography Project (HSGP). A project overview by Angus Gunn presents essential ideas and content of six units and several preliminary reactions. The question of "HSGP exportability" to France and Germany is examined in articles by Maurice Saint-Yves and Robert Geipel…

  6. Evaluation of the Alliance for Climate Education's national high school edutainment program (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, M.; Flora, J.; Saphir, M.; Roser-Renouf, C.; Maibach, E.; Leiserowitz, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Alliance for Climate Education educates high school students on the science of climate change and inspires them to create effective solutions. Since 2009, ACE has reached over 1.6 million students nationwide with its multi media assembly presentation. In this paper, we evaluate the climate science knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, behavior and communication impact of the ACE Assembly program in a random sample of 49 schools (from population of 779) and a panel of 1,241 high school students. Pre and post assembly surveys composed of questions from the Global Warming Six Americas segmentation and intervention specific questions were administered in classrooms. We demonstrate that exposure to climate science in an engaging edutainment format changes youths' beliefs, involvement, and behavior positively and moves them to more climate science literate audience segments. The net impact of scaled and engaging programs for youth could be a population shift in climate science literacy and positive engagement in the issue of climate change. In addition, such programs can empower youth for deeper engagement in school programs, personal action, political and consumer advocacy.

  7. Teacher and Student Perceptions on High School Science Flipped Classrooms: Educational Breakthrough or Media Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Rebecca C.

    For years educators have struggled to ensure students meet the rigors of state mandated tests. Challenges that often impede student success are student absences, school closings due to weather, and remediation for students who need additional help while advanced students can move ahead. Many educators, especially secondary math and science teachers, have responded to these issues by implementing a teaching strategy called the flipped classroom where students view lectures, power points, or podcasts outside of school and class time shifts to allow opportunities for collaborative learning. The purpose of this research was to evaluate teacher and student perceptions of high school flipped science classrooms. A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to observe 3 high school science teachers from Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee selected through purposeful sampling who have used the flipped classroom method for a minimum of 2 years. Analysis of data from an online survey, direct observation, teacher interviews, and student focus groups helped to identify challenges and benefits of this teaching and learning strategy. Findings indicated that teachers find the flipped classroom beneficial to build student relationships but requires a significant amount of time to develop. Mixed student reactions revealed benefits of a flipped classroom as a successful learning tool for current and future endeavors for college or career preparation.

  8. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Eating Disorders Attitude in Girls High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahiminia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Adolescence is one of the important period in growth and evolution process, Also, eating disorders in adolescences, especially girls is one of the major problems in communities. Therefore, an effective education is of special priority for prevention of eating disorders. The current study was performed with the goal of assessment of the effect of nutrition education on eating disorders attitude in girls high school students. Methods: This non-experimental study with a single group pre- and post-test design, was performed using purposive sampling method on 97 students of the first year of high school, in 2015. Data collection tool was EAT-26 standardized questionnaire, which was completed by the participants using self-report method before and 3 months after the education. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. The significance level was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean score of abnormal eating attitude decreased from 1.7±0.04 (before education to 1.4±0.06 (after education. Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the results of before and after education (p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that nutrition education has brought about desired changes in the attitude. However, the increase of nutrition awareness and attitude change can gradually lead to behavior change. Therefore, the current study can help the authorities to include a wider range of nutritional education in the curriculum of students in dorder to prevent eating disorder.

  9. Subjective Happiness Optimizes Educational Outcomes: Evidence from Filipino High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datu, Jesus Alfonso D; Valdez, Jana Patricia; Cabrera, Ian Kenneth; Salanga, Maria Guadalupe

    2017-10-30

    Subjective happiness has been found to be associated with key psychological outcomes. However, there is paucity of research that assessed how subjective happiness is related to a number of positive student outcomes in the educational setting. The objective of the study was to assess the associations of subjective happiness with academic engagement, flourishing, and school resilience among 606 Filipino high school students (m age = 13.87; n boys = 300, n girls = 305, n missing = 1) in the Philippine context. Results of path analysis demonstrated that subjective happiness positively predicted behavioral engagement (β = .08, p < .01), emotional engagement (β = .08, p < .01), flourishing (β = .17, p < .01), and school resilience (β = .18, p < .01) even after controlling for gender. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. High school students educational usage of Internet and their learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Betül Yılmaz, Feza Orhan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Internet usage of high school students for educational needs in respect to their learning approaches. The “learning approach” categorizes individuals as ‘surface learners’ and ‘deep learners’. Surface learners mainly choose to rehearse and memorize the course material they work on and they acquire the information they need to learn in a disconnected way, by memorization. On the other hand, deep learners want to grasp the meaning of the course material. In the study, adapted Turkish version of Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ was used to determine high school students’ learning approaches. 921 secondary school students were subjected and the Cronbach alpha values were 0.73 for a deep approach and 0.66 for a surface approach. According to the data obtained, surface learners use the Internet more when compared to deep learners, though they use it for non-instructional purposes. The ratios of the Internet use of deep learners for educational needs are higher when compared to those of surface learners. Ratios of the Internet use for educational needs by the students who are given assignments requiring the use of the Internet are higher.

  11. Electronic doors to education: study of high school website accessibility in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, David; Myhill, William; Hansen, Linda; Asby, Gary; Michaelson, Susan; Blanck, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities in all aspects of daily life, including education, work, and access to places of public accommodations. Increasingly, these antidiscrimination laws are used by persons with disabilities to ensure equal access to e-commerce, and to private and public Internet websites. To help assess the impact of the anti-discrimination mandate for educational communities, this study examined 157 website home pages of Iowa public high schools (52% of high schools in Iowa) in terms of their electronic accessibility for persons with disabilities. We predicted that accessibility problems would limit students and others in obtaining information from the web pages as well as limiting ability to navigate to other web pages. Findings show that although many web pages examined included information in accessible formats, none of the home pages met World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards for accessibility. The most frequent accessibility problem was lack of alternative text (ALT tags) for graphics. Technical sophistication built into pages was found to reduce accessibility. Implications are discussed for schools and educational institutions, and for laws, policies, and procedures on website accessibility. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Lack of implementation of eating disorder education and prevention programs in high schools: Data from incoming college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emalee T; Venta, Amanda

    2018-03-22

    The purpose of this study was to examine the implementation of eating disorder education and prevention programs in high schools retrospectively, as reported by incoming college freshmen, exploring whether characteristics of the school influenced implementation. The sample, 169 first-year students from a public university, participated in an online survey inquiring about exposure to programs and high school characteristics. Results demonstrated few students exposed to any eating disorder programming (29.0%), with no students reporting exposure to prevention programming. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the implementation based on school characteristics, suggesting that this is a universal issue across high schools.

  13. Integration of Engineering Education by High School Teachers to Meet Standards in the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Jennifer Anna

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in engineering education at the K-12 level, which has resulted in states adopting engineering standards as a part of their academic science standards. From a national perspective, the basis for research into engineering education at the K-12 level is the belief that it is of benefit to student learning, including to "improve student learning and achievement in science and mathematics; increase awareness of engineering and the work of engineers; boost youth interest in pursuing engineering as a career; and increase the technological literacy of all students" (National Research Council, 2009a, p. 1). The above has led to a need to understand how teachers are currently implementing engineering education in their classrooms. High school physics teachers have a history of implementing engineering design projects in their classrooms, thus providing an appropriate setting to look for evidence of quality engineering education at the high school level. Understanding the characteristics of quality engineering integration can inform curricular and professional development efforts for teachers asked to implement engineering in their classrooms. Thus, the question that guided this study is: How, and to what extent, do physics teachers represent quality engineering in a physics unit focused on engineering? A case study research design was implemented for this project. Three high school physics teachers were participants in this study focused on the integration of engineering education into the physics classroom. The data collected included observations, interviews, and classroom documents that were analyzed using the Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education (Moore, Glancy et al., 2013). The results provided information about the areas of the K-12 engineering framework addressed during these engineering design projects, and detailed the quality of these lesson components. The results indicate that all of the design

  14. High School Teachers' Perspectives on Supporting Students with Visual Impairments toward Higher Education: Access, Barriers, and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Maureen; Curtis, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study presented here was to understand the experiences of teachers in assisting students with visual impairments in making the transition to higher education. The teachers reported barriers in high school that affect students' access to and success in higher education. Furthermore, institutions of higher education provided…

  15. The Influence of Peer Victimization on Educational Outcomes for LGBTQ and Non-LGBTQ High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Steven R.; Poteat, V. Paul; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Koenig, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 11,447 high school students were surveyed to test the relation between victimization and the educational outcomes of truancy, post-high school intentions, and grades for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) and non-LGBTQ students. LGBTQ students reported statistically higher truancy, lower grades, greater…

  16. The Effects of the Great Recession on Educational Attainment: Evidence from a Large Urban High School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordechay, Kfir

    2017-01-01

    Economic crises are a recurrent phenomenon in American society, yet there is little knowledge of the impacts on educational opportunity. Using data from a large high school district as a case study, this research explores the impact of the Great Recession (2007-2009) on high school senior graduation rates in an area at the epicenter of the…

  17. The Effect of Socioeconomic Status and Gender on High School Student Perceptions about Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Briael Marie

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study examines the perceptions of career and technical education (CTE) among high school students based on their socioeconomic status and gender, and the interaction between the two. The study used a convenience sample of 207 students from four coastal South Carolina high schools. The data was collected using the Image of…

  18. A Comparison of the Fitness, Obesity, and Physical Activity Levels of High School Physical Education Students across Race and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn L.; Wojcik, Janet R.; DeWaele, Christi S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the physical fitness, obesity, and physical activity (PA) levels of high school students in physical education classes when comparing racial and gender groups. Purpose: To compare the fitness, obesity, and PA levels of female and male students of different racial groups in 6 high schools in the southeastern…

  19. Impact of the Educational Use of Facebook Group on the High School Students' Proper Usage of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan; Kokoc, Mehmet; Cakir, Ozlem

    2017-01-01

    This study examines impact of the educational use of Facebook group on the high school students' proper usage of language. The study included thirty students who attend 11th grade in a high school in Trabzon, Turkey. Firstly, preliminary data about Facebook usage of students were obtained to understand the factors that motivate students to use…

  20. The Effect of Recycling Education on High School Students' Conceptual Understanding about Ecology: A Study on Matter Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugulu, Ilker; Yorek, Nurettin; Baslar, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze and determine whether a developed recycling education program would lead to a positive change in the conceptual understanding of ecological concepts associated with matter cycles by high school students. The research was conducted on 68 high school 10th grade students (47 female and 21 male students). The…

  1. Leaving School — learning at SEA: Regular high school education alongside polar research, not only during IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, S.

    2006-12-01

    Against the background of unsatisfactory results from the international OECD study PISA (Program for International Student Assessment), Germany is facing a period of intense school reforms. Looking back at a tradition of school culture with too few changes during the last century, quick and radical renewal of the school system is rather unlikely. Furthermore students are increasingly turning away from natural sciences. The AWI aims at providing impulses for major changes in the schooling system and is offering solid science education not only for university students but also for a much younger audience. All efforts towards this goal are interconnected within the project SEA (Science & Education @ the AWI). Fife years ago the AWI started HIGHSEA (High school of SEA). Each year 22 high school students (grade 11) are admitted to HIGHSEA spending their last three years of school not at school but at the institute. Four subjects (biology as a major, chemistry, math and English as accessory subjects) are combined and taught fully integrated. Students leave their schools for two days each week to study, work and explore all necessary topics at the AWI. All of the curricular necessities of the four subjects are being met. After rearrangement of the temporal sequencing conceptual formulation of four major questions around AWI-topics was possible. Students are taught by teachers of the cooperating schools as well as by scientists of the AWI. Close links and intense cooperation between all three groups are the basis of fundamental changes in teaching and learning climate. For each group of students we organize a short research expedition: in August 2005 we worked in the high Arctic, in January and February 2006 we performed measurements at two eastern Atlantic seamounts. Even if the amount of data coming from these expeditions is comparatively small they still contribute to ongoing research projects of the oceanographic department. The first two groups of students finished

  2. Physical education Teachers' and public health Nurses' perception of Norwegian high school Students' participation in physical education - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Stea, Tonje H; Berntsen, Sveinung; Omfjord, Christina S; Rohde, Gudrun

    2015-12-24

    High quality physical education programs in high schools may facilitate adoption of sustainable healthy living among adolescents. Public health nurses often meet students who avoid taking part in physical education programs. We aimed to explore physical education teachers' and public health nurses' perceptions of high school students' attitudes towards physical education, and to explore physical education teachers' thoughts about how to facilitate and promote students' participation in class. Prior to an initiative from physical education teachers, introducing a new physical education model in two high schools in the South of Norway, we conducted focus groups with 6 physical education teachers and 8 public health nurses. After implementation of the new model, we conducted two additional focus group interviews with 10 physical education teachers. In analyses we used Systematic Text Condensation and an editing analysis style. In general, the students were experienced as engaged and appreciating physical education lessons. Those who seldom attended often strived with other subjects in school as well, had mental health problems, or were characterized as outsiders in several arenas. Some students were reported to be reluctant to expose their bodies in showers after class, and students who seldom attended physical education class frequently visited the school health services. Although the majority of students were engaged in class, several of the students lacked knowledge about physical fitness and motoric skills to be able to master daily activities. The participants related the students' competence and attitude towards participation in physical education class to previous experiences in junior high school, to the competence of physical education teachers, and to possibility for students to influence the content of physical education programs. The participants suggested that high school students' attitudes towards participation in physical education is heterogeneous

  3. Present status of Radiation and Nuclear Education at High School in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    A special committee for 'Radiation and Nuclear Education' made an investigation into textbooks for social and science courses at high school in 1996. The committee concluded that descriptions of subjects related to energy, radiation and nuclear power in textbooks should be more substantial . In textbooks for social course, nuclear power was described from the point of view of resource, energy and environment. Some of the textbooks described that Chernobyl power plant's accident and nuclear weapons testing contaminated and destructed the earth environment. Descriptions about nuclear power were perceptional and one-sided . In textbooks for science course, subjects related to radiation, nucleus, nuclear reactor and nuclear power plant were described in detail to a certain extent . Descriptions about radiation hazard and radiation utilization were objective and balanced. In order that high school students can understand objectively nuclear power as a energy resource and conservation of the earth environment, the committee recommended the government course guidelines to be revised. (M. Suetake)

  4. African American Educators' Ideas and Practices for Increasing High School Graduation Rates, 1920-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergensen, Miyoshi B.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores African American educators' ideas about school completion in the 1920s and 1930s as a way to begin to understand their contributions to the historical discourse on school completion. Using publications from African American professional teaching organizations, the author elevates and examines how African American educators both…

  5. "We Don't Recruit, We Educate": High School Program Marketing and International Baccalaureate Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Martha K.; Lakes, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Public education reformers have created a widespread expectation of school choice among school consumers. School leaders adopt rigorous academic programs, like the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) and Career Programme (CP), to improve their market position in the competitive landscape. While ample research has investigated…

  6. Multicultural and multilingual approach: Mathematics, science, and engineering education for junior high school minority students and high school administrators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crumbly, I.J.; Hodges, J.

    1994-09-01

    During the 1993 school year, LLNL and the US Department of Energy`s San Francisco Field Office provided funds through grant {number_sign}DE-FG03-93SF20045/A000 to assist Cooperative Developmental Energy Program (CDEP) with its network coalition of high school counselors from 19 states and with its outreach and early intervention program in mathematics, science and engineering for minority junior high school students. The program for high school counselors is called the National Educators Orientation Program (NEOP) and the outreach program for minority junior high school students is called the Mathematics, Science and Engineering Academy (MSEA). A total of 35 minority and female rising eighth grade students participated in the Second Annual Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Academy sponsored by the Cooperative Developmental Energy Program of Fort Valley State College (FVSC). There were 24 students from the middle Georgia area, 4 students from Oakland, California, and 7 students from Portland, Oregon. Each student was selected by counselor in his or her respective school. The selection criteria were based on the students` academic performance in science and mathematics courses.

  7. Participation in High School Career and Technical Education and Postsecondary Enrollment. Data Point. NCES 2018-043

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Among the public high school graduating class of 2004, 89 percent of graduates enrolled in postsecondary education at some point in the 8 years after graduation. This Data Point uses data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) and its 2012 follow-up. This Data Point examines ELS students who were 2004 public high school…

  8. Heart Rate Responses of High School Students Participating in Surfing Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Michelle M; Cummins, Kevin M; Nessler, Jeff A; Newcomer, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    Despite the nation's rising epidemic of childhood obesity and diabetes, schools struggle to promote physical activities that help reduce risks for cardiovascular disease. Emerging data suggest that adopting novel activities into physical education (PE) curriculum may serve as an effective strategy for increasing physical activity in children. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize activity in the water and heart rates (HRs) of high school students participating in surf PE courses. Twenty-four male (n = 20) and female (n = 4) high school students (mean age = 16.7 ± 1.0 years) who were enrolled in surf PE courses at 2 high schools participated in this investigation. Daily measurements of surfing durations, average HR, and maximum HR were made on the students with HR monitors (PolarFT1) over an 8-week period. In addition, HR and activity in the water was evaluated during a single session in a subset of students (n = 11) using a HR monitor (PolarRCX5) and a video camera (Canon HD). Activity and HR were synchronized and evaluated in 5-second intervals during data analyses. The average duration that PE students participated in surfing during class was 61.7 ± 1.0 minutes. Stationary, paddling, wave riding, and miscellaneous activities comprised 42.7 ± 9.5, 36.7 ± 7.9, 2.9 ± 1.4, and 17.8 ± 11.4 percent of the surf session, respectively. The average and maximum HRs during these activities were 131.1 ± 0.9 and 177.2 ± 1.0 b·min, respectively. These data suggest that high school students participating in surf PE attained HRs and durations that are consistent with recommendations with cardiovascular fitness and health. In the future, PE programs should consider incorporating other action sports into their curriculum to enhance cardiovascular health.

  9. The Impact of Educational Intervention on Aggression Level among High School Students in Ilam-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Bahari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundManagement and control of adolescence aggression improves constructive relationships, quality of life, and academic achievement. This research aimed to study the impact of educational intervention on reduction of aggression among male high school students in Ilam city, Iran.Materials and MethodsThis quasi-experimental intervention study using the pretest-posttest method was conducted on 70 aggressive male high school students in Ilam who were selected using the convenience sampling method. First, students were asked to fill out the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQand 70 of them with the highest score of aggression were selected as the sample. They received educational intervention for eight 90-minute sessions  during one month. Then post-test data were collected and follow-up at three months after the intervention and statistically analyzed using SPSS-20.ResultsThe mean age of subjects was 15.81±1.24 years old. 83% belonged to the urban community and 12.5% belonged to the rural community. The results showed that the educational intervention was effective in reduction of aggression levels and its four subscales (P

  10. Effective Education Materials to Advance Stroke Awareness Without Teacher Participation in Junior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Satoshi; Yokota, Chiaki; Miyashita, Fumio; Amano, Tatsuo; Inoue, Yasuteru; Shigehatake, Yuya; Sakamoto, Yuki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2015-11-01

    Youth stroke education is promising for the spread of stroke awareness. The aim of this study was to examine whether our stroke awareness teaching materials without teacher's participation can increase student awareness to act fast on suspected stroke signs. We used the face, arm, speech, and time (FAST) mnemonic derived from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale. Seventy-three students of the second grade and 72 students of the third grade (age range, 13-15 years) in a junior high school were enrolled in the study. The students were divided into 2 groups: students who received a teacher's lesson (group I) and those who did not receive a teacher's lesson (group II). Students in group II watched an animated cartoon and read a Manga comic in class. All students took the educational aids home, including the Manga comic and magnetic posters printed with the FAST message. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were examined at baseline and immediately and 3 months after receiving the intervention. At 3 months after the intervention, a significant improvement in understanding the FAST message was confirmed in both the groups (group I, 85%; group II, 94%). Significant increases in the knowledge of risk factors were not observed in each group. Our education materials include a Manga comic, an animated cartoon, and a magnetic poster, without an accompanying teacher's lesson can increase stroke awareness, including the FAST message, in junior high school students. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  12. Students' Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinussa, Anderson L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students' critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME) culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in…

  13. High School Principal Transformational Leadership Behaviors and Teacher Extra Effort during Educational Reform: The Mediating Role of Teacher Agency Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, John Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transformational leadership has been shown to affect organizational commitment, capacity development, and performance. However, these relationships have received very little attention in schools, especially high schools in the United States that are experiencing educational reform initiatives under No Child Left Behind. Using a sample of 1403 high…

  14. Educational Web-Based Intervention for High School Students to Increase Knowledge and Promote Positive Attitudes toward Organ Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Amiram D.; Merion, Robert M.; Couper, Mick P.; Jones, Eleanor G.; Dong, Yihui

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 490 high school students from 81 schools in Michigan participated in an experiment in which they were randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental Web site. The experimental Web site provided exposure to educational material about the process of organ donation and organ transplantation. The control Web site provided…

  15. How would we deal with radiation related issues in high school educational programs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Kuniko [Attached High School of Akita Keizai Houka Univ., Akita (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Current educational curriculum will be more improved and the materials in schools will be somewhat different by the year of 2002 when students have two days off in a week. It is a well known fact that recent Japanese people's level of understanding about Science and Technology is the second from the bottom among OECD nations and, as a matter of fact, few schools are dealing with scientific issues such as atomic energy or radiation. High school teachers need to survey what students know about atomic power and radiation, how deep they studied in previous schools and what kind of interest they have in conservation of world energy sources or environmental issues discussed today. Through questionnaires to 328 students, it became clear that they were most interesting to the effect of radiation or radioactivity on any kind of things in the environment, and that they want to know solutions for those problems such as greenhouse effect, ozone layers and Garbage disposal. (M. Suetake)

  16. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  17. Trajectories of Math Achievement and Perceived Math Competence over High School and Postsecondary Education: Effects of an All-Girl Curriculum in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapka, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the benefits of all-girls' classroom instruction in math and/or science during Grades 9 and/or 10, within the context of a public co-educational high school. There were 118 participants in this longitudinal investigation: 26 girls in the all-girl classes, as well as 42 girls and 50 boys in the regular co-educational…

  18. Effectiveness of Health Education Teachers and School Nurses Teaching Sexually Transmitted Infections/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Knowledge and Skills in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A.; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S.; Hayman, Laura L.; Yoder, Laura D.; Lovegreen, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Methods: Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and…

  19. PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT THREE-FACTOR MODEL OF EDUCATING HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Lopatukhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented publication is to discuss the changes in the practice of professional higher education which consist in strengthening and emphasis of an educational component in educational process.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of a condition of higher education and the provisions of the Federal Law on Education regulating its functioning in the Russian Federation; text-centered approach to education of the person of culture – the professional specialist, responsible for the activities.Results and scientific novelty. It states that some drawbacks of the existing present-day education organization are being constantly discussed by a pedagogical community of the Russian Federation: the absence of development stability; the absence of effective strategies and technologies of their implementation; the triumph of national nihilism confirmed by high schools and individual scientists participation in different foreign educational projects, usually having world notorious reputation; penetration of commercial principals in to an education system, the latter having been turned in to an education service, etc. As a result the personality quality itself has greatly deteriorated as well as Russia society intellect, on the whole, according to some law, psychological, philosophical and pedagogical analysis. The article stresses that the way out maybe found in restoring Russian national traditions and lost values and returning them to Russian education via adequate upbringing process. The authors describe their innovative model comprising three directions: 1 the integral three-factor spiritual, moral and intellectual upbringing of the students; 2 specially selected text content professional information using text-centered approach and 3 peculiar interaction of two education subjects: a student and a teacher. Their cooperation envisages the following stages: first, teacher’s strict guidance of a student; then

  20. The NARCONON™ drug education curriculum for high school students: A non-randomized, controlled prevention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecchini Marie A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 13 million youths aged 12 to 17 become involved with alcohol, tobacco and other drugs annually. The number of 12- to 17-year olds abusing controlled prescription drugs increased an alarming 212 percent between 1992 and 2003. For many youths, substance abuse precedes academic and health problems including lower grades, higher truancy, drop out decisions, delayed or damaged physical, cognitive, and emotional development, or a variety of other costly consequences. For thirty years the Narconon program has worked with schools and community groups providing single educational modules aimed at supplementing existing classroom-based prevention activities. In 2004, Narconon International developed a multi-module, universal prevention curriculum for high school ages based on drug abuse etiology, program quality management data, prevention theory and best practices. We review the curriculum and its rationale and test its ability to change drug use behavior, perceptions of risk/benefits, and general knowledge. Methods After informed parental consent, approximately 1000 Oklahoma and Hawai'i high school students completed a modified Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP Participant Outcome Measures for Discretionary Programs survey at three testing points: baseline, one month later, and six month follow-up. Schools assigned to experimental conditions scheduled the Narconon curriculum between the baseline and one-month follow-up test; schools in control conditions received drug education after the six-month follow-up. Student responses were analyzed controlling for baseline differences using analysis of covariance. Results At six month follow-up, youths who received the Narconon drug education curriculum showed reduced drug use compared with controls across all drug categories tested. The strongest effects were seen in all tobacco products and cigarette frequency followed by marijuana. There were also significant

  1. Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Candice

    This report presents an evaluation of the Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx and George Washington High School in Manhattan. The project served…

  2. Does Vocational Education Help the "Forgotten Half'?: Short-term Economic Consequences of High School Vocational Education for Non-College Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasinski, Kenneth

    1998-01-01

    .... Given the changing nature of employer's demands, one important question is whether those young men and women who take vocational education courses in high school and go to work rather than to college...

  3. Vocational High School Students Entrepreneurship: The Success of Family or School Education..?

    OpenAIRE

    Arum Biruli Walidaini; Agung Wirnarno

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of this research is to • determine entrepreneur attitude of SMK students that have entrepreneurship, • determine role of eductaion in family also the role of eduction in school. Approch of that type used is qualitative. Research object was SMK students had been doing entrepreneur while Wadi. Informant in this research were students, the student's parent, teacher of entrepreneur and headmaster. Data collecting using deep interview technique, observation and documentation also attitude ...

  4. Stroke education using an animated cartoon and a manga for junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehatake, Yuya; Yokota, Chiaki; Amano, Tatsuo; Tomii, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Yasuteru; Hagihara, Takaaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    We investigated whether junior high school students could be educated regarding stroke with an animated cartoon and a Manga that we produced for the purpose of dissemination of this knowledge. We produced a 10-minute animated cartoon and a Manga that provided information regarding stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and awareness to immediately contact emergent medical service (EMS) on identification of stroke signs and symptoms. From December 2011 to March 2012, 493 students in 15 classes of the first grade (age 12-13 years) of 3 junior high schools were enrolled in the study. Each subject watched the animated cartoon and read the Manga; this was referred to as "training." Lessons about stroke were not given. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the training, and 3 months after the training. The proportion of correct answers given immediately after the training was higher for all questions, except those related to arrhythmia, compared with baseline. Percentage of correct answers given at 3 months was higher than that at baseline in questions related to facial palsy (75% versus 33%), speech disturbance (91% versus 60%), hemiplegia (79% versus 52%), numbness of 1 side (58% versus 51%), calling for EMS (90% versus 85%), alcohol intake (96% versus 72%), and smoking (69% versus 54%). At 3 months after the training, 56% of students answered the FAST (facial droop, arm weakness, speech disturbance, time to call for EMS) mnemonic correctly. Stroke education using these teaching aids of the animated cartoon and the Manga improved stroke knowledge in junior high school students. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluid dynamics practices as a scientific divulgation tool in high school education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Tavares da Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-0221.2016v13n24p94 This extension project was designed to bring together students from high schools in Nova Friburgo-RJ region with the Instituto Politécnico IPRJ / UERJ, providing an experience within the university with scientific incentive practices to the area of sciences and earth. Introducing the universe and diversity in the mathematics and science area with a short course aimed to studies of particles analysis, viscosity and permeability, this initiative encompasses more than knowledge of these activities, but also restore the link between school and university, inserting the high school students in the university environment and scientific activities. The importance of providing a "north" for teens, due to the great difficulty of choosing their profession, makes this Extension Project a potential tool that will certainly contribute to the professional future of these young citizens. Therefore, the students had a laboratory experience and also it was possible to motivate them to go further in the superior education through the awareness that university is accessible to all of people.

  6. Gifted Education in Korea: Three Korean High Schools for the Mathematically Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong Mi; Hon, Dae Sik

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of three Korean high schools for mathematically gifted students. It describes how these schools operate, how their mathematics curricula differ compared to those of regular high schools, the admissions criteria, curriculum offered, and the student and teacher population. This review of specialized, science,…

  7. The Effects of a Rational-Emotive Affective Education Program for High-Risk Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaConte, Michael A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of participation in developmentally appropriate affective education program. Middle school students (n=23), identified as high risk for dropping out and also as learning disabled or emotionally disturbed, were assigned to experimental and control conditions. Participants in affective education group met for 15 weeks.…

  8. Teacher Perception on Educational Informatics Network: A Qualitative Study of a Turkish Anatolian High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalar, Halit; Dogan, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    FATIH Project carried out by the Turkish government is one of the comprehensive technology integration project in the World. With this project, interactive boards, tablets and multifunctional printers have been distributed to schools and Internet infrastructure of schools improved. EIN (Educational Informatics Network) platform, known as EBA…

  9. A Web Based Educational Programming Logic Controller Training Set Based on Vocational High School Students' Demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alper Efe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to design and develop aProgramming Logic Controller Training Set according to vocational high school students’ educational needs. In this regard, by using the properties of distance education the proposed system supported “hands-on” PLC programming laboratory exercises in industrial automation area. The system allowed students to access and control the PLC training set remotely. For this purpose, researcher designed a web site to facilitate students’ interactivity and support PLC programming. In the training set, Induction Motor, Frequency Converter and Encoder tripart controlled by Siemens Simatic S7-200 PLC controller by the help of SIMATIC Step 7 Programming Software were used to make the system more effective and efficient. Moreover, training set included an IP camera system allowing to monitor devices and pilot application. By working with this novel remote accessible training set, students and researchers recieved a chance to inhere self paced learning experiences. Also, The PLC training set offered an effective learning enviroenment for distance education, which is based on presenting the content on the web and opening it to the online users and provided a safe and economical solution for multiple users in a workplace to enhance the quality of education with less overall cost.

  10. Innovative Educational Aerospace Research at the Northeast High School Space Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyet, Audra; Matarazzo, Anthony; Folta, David

    1997-01-01

    Northeast High Magnet School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a proud sponsor of the Space Research Center (SPARC). SPARC, a model program of the Medical, Engineering, and Aerospace Magnet school, provides talented students the capability to successfully exercise full simulations of NASA manned missions. These simulations included low-Earth Shuttle missions and Apollo lunar missions in the past, and will focus on a planetary mission to Mars this year. At the end of each scholastic year, a simulated mission, lasting between one and eight days, is performed involving 75 students as specialists in seven teams The groups are comprised of Flight Management, Spacecraft Communications (SatCom), Computer Networking, Spacecraft Design and Engineering, Electronics, Rocketry, Robotics, and Medical teams in either the mission operations center or onboard the spacecraft. Software development activities are also required in support of these simulations The objective of this paper is to present the accomplishments, technology innovations, interactions, and an overview of SPARC with an emphasis on how the program's educational activities parallel NASA mission support and how this education is preparing student for the space frontier.

  11. Evaluation Policy and Integral Education Program in the High School of Pernambuco State Education System: the limits of the centrality of evaluation in education policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ninive Pinto Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed at evaluating the results of the relationship between 1. The Educational Responsibility Policy; 2. The Evaluation Policy defined by the Pernambuco State Education System; and 3. The process of implementation of the Integral Education Program (PEI, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation in High School Reference Institutions (EREMs, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation and in the State Technical Schools (ETEs, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation. Based on document and content analyses, a qualitative study was carried out whose data collection instruments were interviews with managers, teachers, students and technicians, along with questionnaires applied to the students. The theoretical background included Freitas (2012, Ravitch (2011, Algebaile (2009, among others. The results revealed that in the PEI implementation process, the evaluation through results is related to command-and-control strategies which broaden and intensify teachers‟ and students‟ school hours, working as a neoliberal and managerial laboratory in education. From this research perspective, the conclusion was that strategies such as increasing the years of study and the school hours disguise problems such as the crisis of structural unemployment and the reduction in investments provided for in social policies as a whole.

  12. About a theoretical Background of Outdoor Education in High School : A practical approach to the Integrated Classes

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 豊; 佐野, 裕

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to consider the educational values and prospects of outdoor education at the Integrated Classes for high school in Japan. As it should be recognized that "the cultivation of the vitality for children to live" is the most important educational target of the New Japanese Government Curriculum Guidelines. The vitality for children to live is explained as the abilities to feel nature, to collaborate with others, to take initiative, and to take own risk, for example. It should be s...

  13. The teach-learning process of high school students: a case of Educational Biology for teachers formation

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Laporta Chudo; Maria Cecília Sonzogno

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the teach-learning process of high school students, in the scope of Educational Biology. To plan and to develop a methodology with lesson strategies that facilitate the learning. To analyze, in the students vision, the positive and negative points in the process. Method. A research was developed -- of which had participated students of the first semester of the Pedagogy of a high school private institution in São Paulo city -- of the type action-research, with increased ...

  14. Effectiveness of health education teachers and school nurses teaching sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus prevention knowledge and skills in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S; Hayman, Laura L; Yoder, Laura D; Lovegreen, Loren D

    2015-03-01

    We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and tenth grade students in 10 schools. Twenty-seven facilitators (6 nurses, 21 teachers) provided programming; nurse-led classrooms were randomly assigned. Students taught by teachers were more likely to report their instructor to be prepared, comfortable with the material, and challenged them to think about their health than students taught by a school nurse. Both groups reported significant improvements in HIV/STI/condom knowledge immediately following the intervention, compared to controls. Yet, those taught by school nurses reported significant and sustained changes (up to 12 months after intervention) in attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy, whereas those taught by health education teachers reported far fewer changes, with sustained improvement in condom knowledge only. Both classroom teachers and school nurses are effective in conveying reproductive health information to high school students; however, teaching the technical (eg, condom use) and interpersonal (eg, negotiation) skills needed to reduce high-risk sexual behavior may require a unique set of skills and experiences that health education teachers may not typically have. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  15. Going against the Grain: Gender-Specific Media Education in Catholic High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapayese, Yvette V.

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church has addressed the power of media, as well as the critical importance of understanding and educating Catholic youth on the media's role and place in modern culture. In this article, the narratives of female Catholic teachers are prioritized to illustrate how gender-specific media education influences the schooling experiences of…

  16. Internal and External Factors Shaping Educational Beliefs of High School Teachers of "Sacred" Subjects to Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iluz, Shira; Rich, Yisrael

    2009-01-01

    This research investigated pedagogical beliefs of teachers of "sacred" school subjects, curricular topics that the school community deems culturally valued, unassailable and inviolate. Two hundred and fifty-five teachers of girls only who taught sacred or secular subjects in Jewish modern religious high schools responded to questionnaires focusing…

  17. Time Series in Education: The Analysis of Daily Attendance in Two High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of a time series approach to the analysis of daily attendance in two urban high schools over the course of one school year (2009-10). After establishing that the series for both schools were stationary, they were examined for moving average processes, autoregression, seasonal dependencies (weekly cycles),…

  18. The Shopping Mall High School. Winners and Losers in the Educational Marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Arthur G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    High schools seek to maximize student holding power providing something for everybody. This shopping mall concept produces schools in which variety, choice, and neutrality are counterproductive for some individuals. To counteract this effect schools need to take risks through greater commitment to individual student development and to higher…

  19. "Bauchman v. West High School" Revisited: Religious Text and Context in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, William Michael

    2017-01-01

    In 1997 the Tenth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that school officials at West High School did not violate Rachel Bauchman's constitutional rights by including Christian religious music as part of its curriculum, or by staging school performances at religious sites. Three philosophical questions are investigated in this paper: whether the…

  20. Collaboration with a local organization on the subjects of energy/radiation field in high school science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Mori, Chizuo

    2005-01-01

    We, high school teachers, collaborated with a local organization, Chubu Atomic Power Conference (partly in co-operation with The Radiation Education Forum), in the education on the subjects of energy and radiation fields. In addition to the subjects concerned with radiations, cloud chamber and personal radiation-monitor, we developed a few new subjects, which are not directly connected themselves with radiations, for the purpose to widen the fields and to bring the high acceptability of the subjects in high school side. (author)

  1. Native plant naming by high-school students of different socioeconomic status: implications for botany education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M. A.; Díaz, Sandra; De Longhi, Ana L.

    2018-01-01

    People's diminished awareness of plants, affected by anthropogenic environmental deterioration, has challenged science education to overcome the obstacles impeding a better understanding of their meaning and value. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the socioeconomic status of high-school students, as indicated by their attendance at private or state schools, on their knowledge of native plants. In total, 321 students aged 15-18 were asked to write down 10 plants native to Córdoba, Argentina, in a freelist questionnaire. Students listed a mean of 6.8 species of a total of 165 different categories of plant names. The majority of the species named were exotic to Córdoba (63%) or Argentina (50.6%, of which 33.8% were adventitious), indicating an 'adventitious-to-native' effect by which all spontaneously reproducing plants were presumed to be native species. However, the 20 most frequently named plants were mainly native, with 'Algarrobo' (Prosopis spp.) and 'Espinillo' (Vachellia caven) being the most mentioned. Students' socioeconomic status had a significant effect on the number of species named, with the students of state schools (where the less well-off sectors of the society attend) mentioning more species and, among these, more native ones than the students from private schools. Furthermore, we defined size, colour and scent as being conspicuous traits of plant flowers that are relevant for human perception, and found that the most frequently named adventitious species, unlike the native ones, were those exhibiting big brightly-coloured flowers which ranged from being inodorous to having medium intensity scents.

  2. Astronomy Education in Morocco - New Project for Implementing Astronomy in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darhmaoui, H.; Loudiyi, K.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy education in Morocco, like in many developing countries, is not well developed and lacks the very basics in terms of resources, facilities and research. In 2004, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) signed an agreement of collaboration with Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to support the continued, long-term development of astronomy and astrophysics in Morocco. This is within the IAU program "Teaching for Astronomy Development" (TAD). The initial focus of the program concentrated exclusively on the University's Bachelor of Science degree program. Within this program, and during two years, we were successful in providing adequate astronomy training to our physics faculty and few of our engineering students. We also offered our students and community general astronomy background through courses, invited talks and extra curricular activities. The project is now evolving towards a wider scope and seeks promoting astronomy education at the high school level. It is based on modules from the Hands on Universe (HOU) interactive astronomy program. Moroccan students will engage in doing observational astronomy from their PCs. They will have access to a world wide network of telescopes and will interact with their peers abroad. Through implementing astronomy education at this lower age, we foresee an increasing interest among our youth not only in astronomy but also in physics, mathematics, and technology. The limited astronomy resources, the lack of teachers experience in the field and the language barrier are amongst the difficulties that we'll be facing in achieving the objectives of this new program.

  3. Big Data Meets Physics Education Research: From MOOCs to University-Led High School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) movement has catalyzed discussions of digital learning on campuses around the world and highlighted the increasingly large, complex datasets related to learning. Physics Education Research can and should play a key role in measuring outcomes of this most recent wave of digital education. In this talk, I will discuss big data and learning analytics through multiple modes of teaching and learning enabled by the open-source edX platform: open-online, flipped, and blended. Open-Online learning will be described through analysis of MOOC offerings from Harvard and MIT, where 2.5 million unique users have led to 9 million enrollments across nearly 300 courses. Flipped instruction will be discussed through an Advanced Placement program at Davidson College that empowers high school teachers to use AP aligned, MOOC content directly in their classrooms with only their students. Analysis of this program will be highlighted, including results from a pilot study showing a positive correlation between content usage and externally validated AP exam scores. Lastly, blended learning will be discussed through specific residential use cases at Davidson College and MIT, highlighting unique course models that blend open-online and residential experiences. My hope for this talk is that listeners will better understand the current wave of digital education and the opportunities it provides for data-driven teaching and learning.

  4. Aspects of Teacher Education that Affect Student Success in Arizona Public High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Elizabeth Andreasen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate what aspects of teacher education (if any affect student success. Questionnaires were mailed to a random sample of high- and low-performing urban and rural public high schools across Arizona. Quantitative variables that were researched include the level of degree a teacher attains, the route a teacher chooses to achieve certification, teachers’ attendance at core-subject related workshops, teacher mentoring, and teacher collaboration using data based information to drive decision-making. Qualitative research enabled teachers to state a valuable skill learned in college that promotes student success and to reveal what they felt their current school does to promote student success. A mixed methodology approach was used to analyze the data; quantitatively through regression analysis and qualitatively through coded themes.A detailed explanation was presented with accompanying data to support the statements. The results of this research support teacher mentoring and attendance at core subject related workshops as vehicles to promote student success. This dissertation provides information for policy makers, administrators, and teachers who are invested in promoting student success.

  5. Virtual Lab Experiment: Physics Educational Technology (PhETPhoto Electric Effect for Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supurwoko Supurwoko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduced these Physics Educational Technology (PhET Simulation and demonstrated their utility for Senior High School Students. The PhET simulations are very involved, interactive animated environments that create a unique opportunity for students. In each case, we demonstrate that discussion simulations are more productive, for developing student conceptual understanding  for photo electric effect than traditional discussion without simulations. During the discussion with PhET simulation, students can construct their  understanding about concepts photo electric effect within this framework. Students learn by building on their prior understanding through a series of constrained and supportives exploration. The simulations support an interactive approach and constrain students productively.

  6. Linking the Timing of Career and Technical Education Coursetaking with High School Dropout and College-Going Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Plasman, Jay Stratte

    2018-01-01

    While prior studies have examined the efficacy of career and technical education (CTE) courses on high school students' outcomes, there is little knowledge on timing of these courses and a potential link to student outcomes. We asked if the timing of these courses predicted differences in the likelihood of dropout and on-time high school…

  7. Measuring Spatiality in Infrastructure and Development of High School Education in Hooghly District of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shovan Ghosh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing access and enrolment do not necessarily ensure school effectiveness or educational progress. They are, of course, other parameters of development of education, rather than being measures of standards of quality education. The present paper opts to scrutinize whether infrastructural development in schools at all ensures good educational development or not. To accomplish this, Education Infrastructural Index has been prepared through Access, Facility and Teacher Index whereas a combination of Enrollment Index and Literacy Index gave rise Educational Development Index. The study reveals that accessibility factor begets a division within rural spaces in the form of backward rural, rural and prosperous rural that manifests through the availability of the teachers and facilities. In the urban areas, wherein accessibility is not a matter of concern, facilities and teachers matter in making difference between the less developed and developed urban areas. The higher Educational Development Index at the non-rural areas indicates town- centric nature of the development of our educational system. Superimposition of the infrastructural and developmental parameters revealed that good infrastructure does not always ensure good educational achievement. In the light of these backdrops, the key purpose of this article is to measuring spatiality in infrastructure and development of high school education in Hooghly District of West Bengal, India.

  8. Analysis of motivational profiles of satisfaction and importance of physical education in high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Pérez-Quero, Francisco J; Ortiz-Camacho, Maria M; Bracho-Amador, Clara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the motivational profiles of satisfaction with and importance of physical education in high school students and its relation with gender and the practice of sport. The sample comprised 2002 students aged from 12 to 19 who completed the Sport Motivation Scale (Núñez et al., 2006), the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (Baena-Extremera et al., 2012) and the Importance of Physical Education Scale (Moreno et al., 2009). Descriptive analyzes, correlations between the scales, a cluster analysis for profiles, and a MANOVA were conducted to examine differences by gender. Three clusters (profiles) were identified. The first profile identified was "moderate" motivation (n = 463) and was associated with boys who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. The second profile identified was "low" motivation (n = 545) and was associated mainly with girls who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. And lastly the third profile identified was "high" motivation (n = 910), which was found to be greater in boys who practiced physical exercise for more than 3 hours a week.

  9. ANALYSIS OF MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES OF SATISFACTION AND IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN HIGH SCHOOL ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Granero-Gallegos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available he purpose of this study was to analyze the motivational profiles of satisfaction with and importance of physical education in high school students and its relation with gender and the practice of sport. The sample comprised 2002 students aged from 12 to 19 who completed the Sport Motivation Scale (Núñez et al., 2006, the Perception of Success Scale (Martínez et al., 2006, the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (Baena-Extremera et al., 2012 and the Importance of Physical Education Scale (Moreno et al., 2009. Descriptive analyzes, correlations between the scales, a cluster analysis for profiles, and a MANOVA were conducted to examine differences by gender. Three clusters (profiles were identified. The first profile identified was "moderate" motivation (n = 463 and was associated with boys who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. The second profile identified was "low" motivation (n = 545 and was associated mainly with girls who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. And lastly the third profile identified was "high" motivation (n = 910, which was found to be greater in boys who practiced physical exercise for more than 3 hours a week

  10. Participation in School Physical Education and Selected Dietary Patterns among High School Students--United States, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Examines the prevalence of self-reported enrollment, attendance, and participation in school physical education, noting dietary patterns among students in grades 9-12 from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Percentages of students participating varied significantly. Males participated and exercised more than females. Very few students…

  11. Predicting High School Outcomes in the Baltimore City Public Schools. The Senior Urban Education Research Fellowship Series. Volume VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Messel, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study of high school outcomes in the Baltimore City Public Schools builds on substantial prior research on the early warning indicators of dropping out. It sought to investigate whether the same variables that predicted a non-graduation outcome in other urban districts--attendance, behavior problems, and course failure--were also significant…

  12. Is Sex Education Failing Our Youth? A Program Evaluation of One East Bay High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Allison B.

    2011-01-01

    The reality is that many adolescents are engaging in sexual activity. It is also a reality that the rate of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is high and continues to be a major problem. What are schools doing about this continued problem and the rise in STDs? More specifically, what are Northern California high schools doing to address this…

  13. Supplementary Reading Instruction in Alternative High Schools: A Statewide Survey of Educator Reported Practices and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Kimber L.; Yan, Min-Chi; Perzigian, Aaron B.; Cakiroglu, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a majority of secondary students read below the level considered proficient on state standardized tests of reading. Alternative high schools, in particular, serve a high proportion of struggling readers. This survey study investigated reading instruction provided to struggling readers in alternative schools in one state by…

  14. Advancing Multicultural Education: New Historicism in the High School English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sidney C.

    2015-01-01

    High schools across the country are restructuring their curricular frameworks to meet the new Common Core State Standards (CCSS), which emphasize an understanding of cultural diversity in addition to critical thinking and literacy. Despite curricular variance among high schools, the significant roles non-white races have played in constructing a…

  15. Geological field study for science education on Elementary and Junior high school student, in Shimane prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of learning at field has been increasing in the elementary and the junior high school in Japan. And, an environmental education is one of the important subjects even in the school education, too. It was important, as for science education, understanding with actual feeling and learning were specified as for the Teaching outlines (the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) of the new science textbook of the elementary and the junior high school as well. However, It is a little actual situation that there is in an opportunity for the field learning enforced in the school lesson by the investigation of JST (Japan Science and Tecnology Agency). This tendency is strong as much as school of the city and that circumference. I have this cause think that there are a few suitable places for learning to observe geological and biological field near school. In addition, below two is pointed out as a big problem to obstruct the execution of field learning. 1) A natural experience isn't being done sufficient as much as a teacher can teach to the student. 2) It doesn't have the confidence that a teacher teaches a student geology and biology at the field. I introduce the practical example of geological field learning at the public elementary school of the Shimane prefecture by this research. Though it is the place where nature is comparatively rich even in Japan, it can't be said that field learning is popular in Shimane prefecture. A school teacher has to learning experience at field, and he must settle confidence to guide a student at the field. A specialist in the university and the museum must support continuous learning for that to the school teacher.

  16. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  17. Usability Testing Analysis on The Bana Game as Education Game Design References on Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adnan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning media is one of the important elements in the learning process. Technological development support makes learning media more varied. The approach of using digital technology as a learning media has a better and more effective impact than other approaches. In order to increase the students’ learning interest, it requires the support of an interesting learning media. The use of gaming applications as learning media can improve learning outcomes. The benefits of using the maximum application cannot be separated from the determination of application design. The Bana game aims to increase the ability of critical thinking of the junior high school students. The usability-testing analysis on the Bana game application is used in order to get the design reference as an educational game development. The game is used as an object of the analysis because it has the same characteristics and goals with the game application to be developed. Usability Testing is a method used to measure the ease of use of an application by users. The Usability Testing consists of learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors, and satisfaction. The results of the analysis obtained will be used as a reference for educational game applications that will be developed.

  18. Preventing the link between SES and high-risk behaviors: "value-added" education, drug use and delinquency in high-risk, urban schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Amy L; Komro, Kelli A; Dabroski, Alexis; Aveyard, Paul; Markham, Wolfgang A

    2011-06-01

    We examined whether schools achieving better than expected educational outcomes for their students influence the risk of drug use and delinquency among urban, racial/ethnic minority youth. Adolescents (n = 2,621), who were primarily African American and Hispanic and enrolled in Chicago public schools (n = 61), completed surveys in 6th (aged 12) and 8th (aged 14) grades. Value-added education was derived from standardized residuals of regression equations predicting school-level academic achievement and attendance from students' sociodemographic profiles and defined as having higher academic achievement and attendance than that expected given the sociodemographic profile of the schools' student composition. Multilevel logistic regression estimated the effects of value-added education on students' drug use and delinquency. After considering initial risk behavior, value-added education was associated with lower incidence of alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use; stealing; and participating in a group-against-group fight. Significant beneficial effects of value-added education remained for cigarette and marijuana use, stealing and participating in a group-against-group fight after adjustment for individual- and school-level covariates. Alcohol use (past month and heavy episodic) showed marginally significant trends in the hypothesized direction after these adjustments. Inner-city schools may break the links between social disadvantage, drug use and delinquency. Identifying the processes related to value-added education in order to improve school environments is warranted given the high costs associated with individual-level interventions.

  19. High School Social Studies Teachers' Beliefs and Education for Democratic Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Stuart Beall

    2010-01-01

    This study explores secondary social studies teachers' beliefs about the concept of citizenship. The development of citizenship in young people is an often-stated goal for schooling in the USA. The most prominent social studies professional organization, the National Council for the Social Studies, describes education for citizenship as the…

  20. Impact of an Intuitive Eating Education Program on High School Students' Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nicole; Joram, Elana; Matvienko, Oksana; Woolf, Suzanne; Knesting, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need for school-based nutritional educational programs that promote healthy eating attitudes without increasing an unhealthy focus on restrictive eating or promoting a poor body image. Research suggests that "intuitive eating" ("IE") approaches, which encourage individuals to focus on internal body…

  1. Comprehensive Reform for Urban High Schools: A Talent Development Approach. Sociology of Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Nettie E.; Balfanz, Robert; Jordan, Will J.; McPartland, James M.

    This book offers an alternative to current reform efforts, the talent development approach, detailing organizational, curricular, and instructional strategies that provide practitioners with a blueprint for whole school reform. The book presents the story of what happened in urban high schools when this approach was implemented. There are eight…

  2. Texas High School Principals' First Year Experiences and Perceptions Relating to the Leadership of Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Toby Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of three Texas high school principals regarding their first-year of leadership involving Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs. A narrative non-fiction methodology was used to present the participants' stories and perceptions of their lived experiences. The three…

  3. Protein Structure and Function: An Interdisciplinary Multimedia-Based Guided-Inquiry Education Module for the High School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethel, Casey M.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a multidisciplinary educational unit intended for general, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate-level high school science, focused on the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their connection to function and disease. The lessons are designed within the framework of the Next Generation Science Standards to make…

  4. Promoting Self-Determination for Transition-Age Youth: Views of High School General and Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen L.; Pierson, Melinda R.; Stang, Kristin K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in policy and practice have emphasized the importance of promoting self-determination and supporting access to the general curriculum for youth with disabilities. To understand how these trends align, we examined the efforts of 340 general and special educators to promote student self-determination in high school classrooms.…

  5. A Systematic Literature Review of Alcohol Education Programmes in Middle and High School Settings (2000-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Timo; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Schuster, Lisa; Connor, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Social marketing benchmark criteria were used to understand the extent to which single-substance alcohol education programmes targeting adolescents in middle and high school settings sought to change behaviour, utilised theory, included audience research and applied the market segmentation process. The paper aims to discuss these issues.…

  6. A Phenomenological Study of How High School Advanced Placement Classes Prepared First-Generation College Students for Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the lived experiences of first-generation college students and the perceived influence of taking high school Advanced Placement (AP) courses on their college education. The following research questions were addressed: (a) what motivated students to consider going to college, (b) what was their experience in taking AP…

  7. Prioritization of K-12 World Language Education in the United States: State Requirements for High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Polly; Zhou, Qian; Rottman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    In view of the importance of increasing multilingualism in the United States, the current study examined state policy for high school graduation requirements in the 50 states and the District of Columbia as an index of the way in which the study of world language is positioned and prioritized in K--12 education. Only seven states require the study…

  8. The High School Students' Views on the Necessity of Private Courses for Accessing Higher Education (Siirt Sample)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevdet, Epcacan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine high school students' opinions regarding the necessity of private courses in the transition to higher education. For this purpose, the descriptive research method has been applied. As a data collection tool, an interview which has both quantitative and qualitative structure in other words a hybrid structure…

  9. Conventional Gymnasium vs. Geodesic Field House. A Comparative Study of High School Physical Education and Assembly Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    A description is presented of the design features of a high school's geodesic dome field house. Following consideration of various design features and criteria for the physical education facility, a comprehensive analysis is given of comparative costs of a geodesic dome field house and conventional gymnasium. On the basis of the study it would…

  10. Low Vitamin D Status and Inadequate Nutrient Intakes of Elementary School Children in a Highly Educated Pacific Northwest Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Simone; Frei, Balz; Bobe, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Are Extension healthy youth programs needed in highly educated U.S. communities? To answer this question, 175 children from four public elementary schools in Corvallis, Oregon, self-reported in a cross-sectional study their dietary intake, and 71 children provided a blood sample for measuring vitamin D concentrations. Most children had…

  11. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morguí, Josep-Anton; Font, Anna; Cañas, Lidia; Vázquez-García, Eusebi; Gini, Andrea; Corominas, Ariadna; Àgueda, Alba; Lobo, Agustin; Ferraz, Carlos; Nofuentes, Manel; Ulldemolins, Delmir; Roca, Alex; Kamnang, Armand; Grossi, Claudia; Curcoll, Roger; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Silvia; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the "Obra Social 'La Caixa'", who funds this research. The starting point for the development of the Air Enquirers was the experience at IC3 (www.ic3.cat) in the CarboSchools+ FP7 project (www.carboschools.cat, www.carboschools.eu). The Air Enquirer's multi-sensor box is based in Arduino's architecture and contains sensors for CO2, temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and both infrared and visible luminance. The Air Enquirer is designed for taking continuous measurements. Every Air Enquirer ensemble of measurements is used to convert values to standard units (water content in ppmv, and CO2 in ppmv_dry). These values are referred to a calibration made with Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry (Picarro®) under different temperature, pressure, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Multiple sets of Air Enquirers are intercalibrated for its use in parallel during the experiments. The different experiments proposed to the students will be outdoor (observational) or indoor (experimental, in the lab) focusing on understanding the biogeochemistry of GHGs in the ecosystems (mainly CO2), the exchange (flux) of gases, the organic matter production, respiration and decomposition processes, the influence of the anthropogenic activities on the gases (and particles) exchanges, and their interaction with the structure and composition of the atmosphere (temperature, water content, cooling and warming processes, radiative forcing, vertical gradients and horizontal patterns). In order to ensure Air Enquirers a high-profile research performance the experimental designs

  12. High school cigarette smoking and post-secondary education enrollment: Longitudinal findings from the NEXT Generation Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabado, Melanie D; Haynie, Denise; Gilman, Stephen E; Simons-Morton, Bruce; Choi, Kelvin

    2017-12-01

    The inverse association between smoking and educational attainment has been reported in cross-sectional studies. Temporality between smoking and education remains unclear. Our study examines the prospective association between high school cigarette and smoking post-secondary education enrollment. Data were collected from a nationally representative cohort of 10th graders who participated in the Next Generation Health Study (2010-2013). Ethnicity/race, urbanicity, parental education, depression symptoms, and family affluence were assessed at baseline. Self-reported 30-day smoking was assessed annually from 2010 to 2012. Post-secondary education enrollment was measured in 2013 and categorized as either not enrolled or enrolled in technical school, community college, or 4-year college/university. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking duration and post-secondary education enrollment (N=1681). Participants who smoked 1, 2, or 3years during high school had lower odds of attending a 4-year college (relative to a no enrollment) than non-smokers (adjusted OR: smoking 1year=0.30, 2years=0.28, 3years=0.14). Similarly, participants who smoked for 2 or 3years were less likely than non-smokers to enroll in community college (adjusted OR: 2years=0.31, 3years=0.40). These associations were independent of demographic and socioeconomic factors. There was a prospective association between high school smoking and the unlikelihood of enrollment in post-secondary education. If this represents a causal association, strategies to prevent/delay smoking onset and promote early cessation in adolescents may provide further health benefits by promoting higher educational attainment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. HIV prevention through drugs and sex education in junior high schools in Bandung West Java: the teachers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduan, Zahrotur R; Riyanti, Eka; Tasya, Irma A; Pohan, Mawar N; Sumintardja, Elmira N; Astuti, Sri R; Jabar, Bambang A; Pinxten, Lucas Wj; Hospers, Harm J

    2009-07-01

    to explore the teacher perspective on needs (in terms of knowledge, skills and curriculum content), attitudes, beliefs and self-efficacy related to teaching and implementation of a reproductive health (RH)/drug education (DE) program at their own junior high school. one hundred and thirty-three teachers participated in a survey, from February to April 2009, measuring: socio demographic, behavioral intention, perceived behavior control, content knowledge, school climate, reproductive health knowledge and school drug education. all teachers had a high intention to teach RH and DE, especially the younger RH teachers had a high intention to teach about teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. DE teachers had a high intention facts/effects of drugs, first-time drug use dealing with peer pressure. Perceived beliefs of teachers, parents, school management and perceived self-efficacy were strong predictors for the intention of RH teaching and DE. the high intention of the RH and DE teacher offers a great opportunity to build and implement a DE and RH curriculum in junior high school. Before a curriculum is developed and implemented there is a need to assess and strengthen the teacher's skills and effectiveness in teaching RH and DE.

  14. Radiation education to the elementary and junior high school students in Aomori prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Susumu; Okamura, Yasuharu; Sakata, Misaki; Miyakawa, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) began 'the delivery lesson on radiation' in order to promote understanding of radiation for the elementary and junior high schools students. Currently, 'the delivery lesson on radiation' is aimed mainly for the junior high school students. About 1800 students per year take the lesson. We will report the effects and tasks of 'the delivery lesson on radiation' based on the results of the questionnaire filled out before and after the lesson. (author)

  15. education in the school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Leiva Olivencia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses its gaze on the participation of immigrant families in the school context, analyzing this participation as a key initiative in the generation and development of intercultural educational coexistence within the framework of educational institutions seeking to be inclusive. In this sense, we argue that multiculturalism requires active and democratic practices as the school community participation in educational settings of cultural diversity, and enabling more young people to learn models of relationships and positive social values. Indeed, a recent research study conducted in public schools Primary and Secondary Education in the province of Malaga, confirms the growing tendency to consider the importance of promoting intercultural and the involvement of immigrant families to improve the construction of a school life intercultural and inclusive.

  16. Between Scylla and Charybdis: How Catholic High School Leaders Negotiate the Polarities of Contemporary U.S. Culture within the Catholic Educational Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandt, Kevin William

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, comparative case study involves a multi-faceted approach to how lay leaders in four different Catholic high schools brand their schools within a broader Catholic educational marketplace. As compared with the parochial era (1884-1965), the approach of Catholic high school administrators, campus ministers, department chairs, and…

  17. Bioinformatics education in high school: implications for promoting science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Dina N; Patterson, Davis G; Cohen, Carolyn; Sanders, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Karen A; Porter, Sandra G; Chowning, Jeanne Ting

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of our Bio-ITEST teacher professional development model and bioinformatics curricula on cognitive traits (awareness, engagement, self-efficacy, and relevance) in high school teachers and students that are known to accompany a developing interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. The program included best practices in adult education and diverse resources to empower teachers to integrate STEM career information into their classrooms. The introductory unit, Using Bioinformatics: Genetic Testing, uses bioinformatics to teach basic concepts in genetics and molecular biology, and the advanced unit, Using Bioinformatics: Genetic Research, utilizes bioinformatics to study evolution and support student research with DNA barcoding. Pre-post surveys demonstrated significant growth (n = 24) among teachers in their preparation to teach the curricula and infuse career awareness into their classes, and these gains were sustained through the end of the academic year. Introductory unit students (n = 289) showed significant gains in awareness, relevance, and self-efficacy. While these students did not show significant gains in engagement, advanced unit students (n = 41) showed gains in all four cognitive areas. Lessons learned during Bio-ITEST are explored in the context of recommendations for other programs that wish to increase student interest in STEM careers.

  18. Content Analysis of the Science Textbooks of Iranian Junior High School Course in terms of the Components of Health Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProviding healthcare for students is one of the primary duties of the states. This study aimed to analyze the contents of the science textbooks of Junior High School course in terms of the components of health education in Iran.Materials and MethodsThis descriptive study was conducted through content analysis. To collect data, a researcher-made check list including: physical health, nutritional health, the environment, environmental health, family health, accidents and safety, mobility, physical education, mental health, prevention of risky behavior, control and prevention of diseases, disabilities, public health and school health, was used. The samples were the science textbooks of Junior High School course (7th, 8th and 9th grades. Analysis unit was all pages of the textbooks (texts, pictures and exercises. Descriptive method (frequency table, percentage, mean and standard deviation [SD] was used to analyze the data and non-parametric Chi-square test was used to investigate the probable significant differences between the components.ResultsThe results showed that the authors of sciences textbooks of Junior High School course have paid most attention to the component of control and prevention of diseases (21.10% and have paid no attention to the component of "mental health". Also, there were significant differences among the components of physical health, family health, the environment and environmental health in terms of to be addressed in the science textbooks of Junior High School (P

  19. Relationship Between the Parenting Styles and Students' Educational Performance Among Iranian Girl High School Students, A Cross- Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Parivash; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh; Hashemian, Ataollah

    2015-12-01

    Parenting styles are effective in the educational performance of their child. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the parenting styles and students' educational performance among Iranian girl high school students. In a cross-sectional survey, female students in high schools of Ilam (Iran) evaluated during the academic year 2014-15. Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select the participants. Data were collected by two demographic and Baumrind's parenting styles questionnaire. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was measured as an index of internal identicalness of the questionnaire to verify its reliability. A total 400 students were studied. The Mean±SD of the students' age were 14±1.08. The students' school grades were the first year of high school to pre-university course. The Mean±SD of parenting styles were 35.37±5.8, 34.69±6.34 and 19.17±6.64 for permissive parenting style, authoritarian parenting style and authoritative parenting styles, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the score of permissive parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.151), authoritarian parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.343) and authoritative parenting style (p=0. 001, r= 0.261) with the students' average score for studying. The results of this study demonstrate that parental influence plays an important role in students' educational performance.

  20. Relationship Between the Parenting Styles and Students’ Educational Performance Among Iranian Girl High School Students, A Cross- Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Parivash; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parenting styles are effective in the educational performance of their child. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the parenting styles and students’ educational performance among Iranian girl high school students. Materials and Methods In a cross–sectional survey, female students in high schools of Ilam (Iran) evaluated during the academic year 2014-15. Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select the participants. Data were collected by two demographic and Baumrind’s parenting styles questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was measured as an index of internal identicalness of the questionnaire to verify its reliability. Results: A total 400 students were studied. The Mean±SD of the students’ age were 14±1.08. The students’ school grades were the first year of high school to pre-university course. The Mean±SD of parenting styles were 35.37±5.8, 34.69±6.34 and 19.17±6.64 for permissive parenting style, authoritarian parenting style and authoritative parenting styles, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the score of permissive parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.151), authoritarian parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.343) and authoritative parenting style (p=0. 001, r= 0.261) with the students’ average score for studying. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that parental influence plays an important role in students’ educational performance. PMID:26813692

  1. The inadequacy of Individual Educational Program (IEP) goals for high school students with word-level reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catone, William V; Brady, Susan A

    2005-06-01

    This investigation analyzed goals from the Individual Educational Programs (IEPs) of 54 high school students with diagnosed reading disabilities in basic skills (decoding and/or word identification). Results showed that for 73% of the students, the IEPs written when they were in high school failed to specify any objectives regarding their acute difficulties with basic skills. IEPs from earlier points in the students' educations were also reviewed, as available. For 23 of the students, IEPs were present in the students' files for three time points: elementary school (ES), middle school (MS), and high school (HS). Another 20 students from the sample of 54 had IEPs available for two time points (HS and either MS or ES). Comparisons with the IEPs from younger years showed a pattern of decline from ES to MS to HS in the percentage of IEPs that commented on or set goals pertaining to weaknesses in decoding. These findings suggest that basic skills deficits that persist into the upper grade levels are not being sufficiently targeted for remediation, and help explain why older students frequently fail to resolve their reading problems.

  2. Increasing High School Students' Interest in STEM Education through Collaborative Brainstorming with Yo-Yos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Brainstorming is a creativity technique in which a group of people (or an individual person) spontaneously generates a set of ideas to find the solution to a particular problem. This paper describes an innovative approach called "brainstorming with yo-yos," which was implemented in an outreach to high school event to increase high school…

  3. Inspiring Careers in STEM and Healthcare Fields through Medical Simulation Embedded in High School Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Louis J.; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L.; Goyal, Riya; Joyal, Julie A.; Gordon, James A.; Faux, Russell; Oriol, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    The most effective ways to promote learning and inspire careers related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain elusive. To address this gap, we reviewed the literature and designed and implemented a high-fidelity, medical simulation-based Harvard Medical School MEDscience course, which was integrated into high school…

  4. Science Achievement and Occupational Career/Technical Education Coursetaking in High School: The Class of 2005. Statistics in Brief. NCES 2010-021

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Karen; Wun, Jolene; Green, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    The definition of CTE (career/technical education) used by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) includes, at the high school level, family and consumer sciences education, general labor market preparation, and occupational education (Bradby and Hoachlander 1999; Bradby and Hudson 2007). Most researchers focus on occupational…

  5. A Project-Centric Course on Cyberinfrastructure to Support High School STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Rainey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent rapid advances in information technology pose new challenges for teachers in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM fields to incorporate the latest knowledge and technical expertise into courses in a way that will be applicable to students as future scientists. A demonstration project was designed, developed, and deployed by university faculty and high school teachers for their students to explore the use of the components of cyberinfrastructure. The project explored the introduction of cyberinfrastructure through the use of bioinformatics and the use of team science. This paper describes the high school course that was deployed at Galileo Magnet High School (GMHS in collaboration with the scientists at Virginia Tech University, and details its overall assessment. Implementation of a project-centric teaching paradigm to engage students in applying the concepts of cyberinfrastructure by integrating the disciplines of biology, computer science, mathematics, and statistics through bioinformatics was an integral part of this study.

  6. The impact of truant and alcohol-related behavior on educational aspirations: a study of US high school seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, J Don

    2011-08-01

    Truancy and alcohol use are quality indicators of academic achievement and success. However, there remains a paucity of substantive research articulating the impact these deviant behaviors have on an adolescent's educational aspirations. The purpose of this study is to assess whether recent alcohol use and truancy impact students' educational aspirations among a nationally representative sample of US high school seniors. This study conducted a secondary data analysis of the Monitoring the Future project data, 2006. Logistic regression was conducted to assess how alcohol use and truancy affected educational aspirations. Subsequent interaction effects were assessed in the final multivariable model. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, and father and mother's educational level were included as covariates in the regression model. Results indicate that as students engage in increased alcohol use and/or truancy, educational aspirations decrease. Thus, students who indicated a desire to attend a 4-year college/university were less likely to engage in high-risk drinking behavior and/or truancy. Moreover, in testing the interaction between truancy and alcohol use, as it relates to educational aspirations, the logistic regression model found both of these independent variables to be statistically significant predictors of the likelihood students would attend a 4-year college/university. To ensure that adolescents further their education and maximize their potential life opportunities, school and public health officials should initiate efforts to reduce alcohol consumption and truancy among students. Furthermore, future research should examine the risk and protective factors that may influence one's educational aspirations. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  7. Does school physical education really contribute to accelerometer-measured daily physical activity and non sedentary behaviour in high school students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Martínez-Baena, Alejandro; Viciana, Jesús

    2018-01-11

    Physical education has been highlighted as an important environment for physical activity promotion, however, to our knowledge there are no previous studies examining the contribution of physical education to daily accelerometer-measured physical activity and non sedentary behaviour. The purpose was to compare the accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour between physical education, non-physical education and weekend days in adolescents. Of the 394 students from a Spanish high school that were invited to participate, 158 students (83 boys and 75 girls) aged 13-16 years were analyzed (wear time ≥ 600 min). Participants' physical activity and sedentary behaviour were objectively-measured by GT3X+ accelerometers during physical education (one session), non-physical education and weekend days. Results indicated that overall adolescents had statistically significant greater physical activity levels and lower values of sedentary behaviour on physical education days than on non-physical education and weekend days (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity = 71, 54 and 57 min; sedentary = 710, 740 and 723 min) (p education contributes significantly to reducing students' daily physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. Increasing the number of physical education classes seems to be an effective strategy to reduce the high current prevalence of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour in adolescence.

  8. The intersectionality of postsecondary pathways: the case of high school students with special education needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Karen L; Anisef, Paul; Brown, Robert S; Parekh, Gillian

    2014-08-01

    Using data from the Toronto District School Board, we examine the postsecondary pathways of students with special education needs (SEN). We consider both university and college pathways, employing multilevel multinomial logistic regressions, conceptualizing our findings within a life course and intersectionality framework. Our findings reveal that having SEN reduces the likelihood of confirming university, but increases the likelihood of college confirmation. We examine a set of known determinants of postsecondary education (PSE) pathways that were derived from the literature and employ exploratory statistical interactions to examine if the intersection of various traits differentially impacts upon the PSE trajectories of students with SEN. Our findings reveal that parental education, neighborhood wealth, race, and streaming impact on the postsecondary pathways of students with SEN in Toronto.

  9. Associations between delayed completion of high school and educational attainment and symptom levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melkevik, Ole; Hauge, Lars Johan; Bendtsen, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression among adults with lower educational attainment. Delayed completion of high school (HS) is common and represents a potentially complicating factor in the relationship between educational attainment and anxiety and depression....... This study aims to investigate whether delayed HS completion is associated with symptom levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood and whether it interacts with later educational attainment in predicting symptom-levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood. METHODS: The sample consisted of 10 149...... participants from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT 3) between 30 and 46 years of age in 2006. The outcome variables were symptoms of anxiety and depression as measured by the HADS scale. Variables measuring educational attainment were obtained from the National Educational Database in Norway. We used...

  10. Educational Approach to Seismic Risk Mitigation in Indian Himalayas -Hazard Map Making Workshops at High Schools-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, K.; Oki, S.; Kimura, M.; Chadha, R. K.; Davuluri, S.

    2014-12-01

    How can we encourage people to take preventive measures against damage risks and empower them to take the right actions in emergencies to save their lives? The conventional approach taken by scientists had been disseminating intelligible information on up-to-date seismological knowledge. However, it has been proven that knowledge alone does not have enough impact to modify people's behaviors in emergencies (Oki and Nakayachi, 2012). On the other hand, the conventional approach taken by practitioners had been to conduct emergency drills at schools or workplaces. The loss of many lives from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake has proven that these emergency drills were not enough to save people's lives, unless they were empowered to assess the given situation on their own and react flexibly. Our challenge is to bridge the gap between knowledge and practice. With reference to best practices observed in Tohoku, such as The Miracles of Kamaishi, our endeavor is to design an effective Disaster Preparedness Education Program that is applicable to other disaster-prone regions in the world, even with different geological, socio-economical and cultural backgrounds. The key concepts for this new approach are 1) empowering individuals to take preventive actions to save their lives, 2) granting community-based understanding of disaster risks and 3) building a sense of reality and relevancy to disasters. With these in mind, we held workshops at some high schools in the Lesser Himalayan Region, combining lectures with an activity called "Hazard Map Making" where students proactively identify and assess the hazards around their living areas and learn practical strategies on how to manage risks. We observed the change of awareness of the students by conducting a preliminary questionnaire survey and interviews after each session. Results strongly implied that the significant change of students' attitudes towards disaster preparedness occurred not by the lectures of scientific knowledge, but

  11. Teacher Use of Brain-Based Research, Response to Intervention, and Teacher Efficacy in Elementary Schools with High and Low Individual Education Plan Growth for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possible causes that might contribute to the disproportionate percentage of English language learners ELLs with special education individual education plans (IEPs). Elementary school classroom teachers from school districts that exhibited high growth in the percentage of ELLs with IEPs during 2007-2010…

  12. Project on Social Architecture in Education. Final Report. Part III: Case Studies. Chapter 9: Arts Co-op: An Experimental High School Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ellen Wahl

    This document contains chapter 9 of the final report of the Project on Social Architecture in Education. Chapter 9 is about a regional experimental high school program for the arts. Several features distinguished Arts Co-op from the other schools in the study. For one, it was a special purpose school, focused on the arts, and not offering a…

  13. Ethnographic case study of a high school science classroom: Strategies in stem education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Lucinda N.

    Historically, science education research has promoted that learning science occurs through direct physical experiences. In recent years, the need for best practices and student motivation have been highlighted in STEM research findings. In response to the instructional challenges in STEM education, the National Research Council has provided guidelines for improving STEM literacy through best practices in science and mathematics instruction. A baseline qualitative ethnographic case study of the effect of instructional practices on a science classroom was an opportunity to understand how a teacher and students work together to learn in an International Baccalaureate life science course. This study was approached through an interpretivist lens with the assumption that learning science is socially constructed. The following were the research questions: 1.) How does the teacher implement science instruction strategies in the classroom? 2.) In what ways are students engaged in the classroom? 3.) How are science concepts communicated in the classroom? The total 35 participants included a high school science teacher and two classes of 11th grade students in the International Baccalaureate program. Using exploratory qualitative methods of research, data was collected from field notes and transcripts from a series of classroom observations, a single one-on-one interview with the teacher and two focus groups with students from each of the two classes. Three themes emerged from text coded using initial and process coding with the computer assisted qualitative data analysis software, MAXQDA. The themes were: 1.) Physical Forms of Communication Play Key Role in Instructional Strategy, 2.) Science Learning Occurs in Casual Environment Full of Distractions, and 3.) Teacher Persona Plays Vital Role in Classroom Culture. The findings provided insight into the teacher's role on students' motivation to learn science. The recommendation for STEM programs and new curriculum is a

  14. Quality of Life, Mental Health and Educational Stress of High School Students in the Northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assana, Supat; Laohasiriwong, Wongsa; Rangseekajee, Poonsri

    2017-08-01

    Majority of high school students in Thailand aim to study at universities. Therefore, they spend a lot of time studying in both classrooms and tutorial classes, that could cause stress, health problems and deteriorate their Quality Of Life (QOL). However, there has been no study on these issues in Thai context. To describe the status of QOL, mental health, educational stress, well-being and determine factors associated with QOL among high school students in the Northeast of Thailand. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Northeast of Thailand among 1,112 students of grade 10 th , 11 th and 12 th . Multistage random sampling was used to select high schools in 5 provinces. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess QOL, educational stress, anxiety, depression and well-being. The association between the covariates was observed by using Generalized Linear Mixed (logistic regression) Model (GLMM). The prevalence of high level of QOL was 36% (95%CI: 32.30 to 41.69); whereas, 26.18% (95% CI: 16.72 to 35.63) had high level of educational stress and 16.41% (95% CI: 2.20 to 30.71) had severe anxiety. Prevalence of depression was 18.55% (95%CI: 9.86 to 27.23) and low level of well-being was 13.41% (95% CI: 0.18 to 27.14). The factors significantly associated with high QOL were; not having depression (Adj. OR= 3.07; 95%CI: (2.23 to 4.22); peducational stress and anxiety. Depression, anxiety and general well-being had influences on QOL of high school students.

  15. An Empirical Investigation on Chinese High School Students' Choice of Pursuing Undergraduate Education Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiankun

    2014-01-01

    Globalization has greatly promoted student mobility around the world. Being a developing economy, China witnessed significant growth of students studying internationally, especially with the number of students study at undergraduate programs. However, empirical research on high school students' choice and the decision-making process of pursuing…

  16. Multiple Teaching Approaches, Teaching Sequence and Concept Retention in High School Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David

    2013-01-01

    Students in 4 Canadian high school physics classes completed instructional sequences in two key physics topics related to motion--Straight Line Motion and Newton's First Law. Different sequences of laboratory investigation, teacher explanation (lecture) and the use of computer-based scientific visualizations (animations and simulations) were…

  17. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  18. Education of Non-European Ancestry Immigrant Students in Suburban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shodavaram, Mary P.; Jones, Lisa A.; Weaver, Laurie R.; Marquez, Judith A.; Ensle, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine suburban high school teachers' beliefs about non-European ancestry immigrant students; more specifically, suburban teachers' beliefs regarding the impact of students' cultural backgrounds on academic performance were examined. Non-European ancestry immigrant students are those students whose ancestral…

  19. Discussing spent nuclear fuel in high school classrooms: addressing public fears through early education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, S.; Sullivan, J.; Jones, S.; Sullivan, K.; Hyland, B.; Pencer, J.; Colton, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Inreach program combines the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) 'learning through research' approach with state of the art communication technology to bring scientific research to high school classrooms. The Inreach program follows the DRSA teaching model where a university student tutor works on a research project with scientific staff at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Participating high school classes are located across Canada. The high school students learn about the ongoing research activities via weekly web conferences. In order to engage the students and encourage participation in the conferences, themed exercises linked to the research project are provided to the students. The DRSA's Inreach program uses a cost-effective internet technology to reach a wide audience, in an interactive setting, without anyone leaving their desks or offices. An example Inreach research project is presented here: an investigation of the potential of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) concept to burn transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) to reduce the impact of used nuclear fuel. During this project a university student worked with AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) researchers on technical aspects of the project, and high school students followed their progress and learned about the composition, hazards, and disposition options for used nuclear fuel. Previous projects included the effects of tritium on cellular viability and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses in automobile engines

  20. Bioinformatics Education in High School: Implications for Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Dina N.; Patterson, Davis G.; Cohen, Carolyn; Sanders, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Karen A.; Porter, Sandra G.; Chowning, Jeanne Ting

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of our Bio-ITEST teacher professional development model and bioinformatics curricula on cognitive traits (awareness, engagement, self-efficacy, and relevance) in high school teachers and students that are known to accompany a developing interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. The…

  1. Computers, Education and the Library at The Bronx High School of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, Sondra; Sussman, Valerie

    1988-01-01

    Describes the services and programs offered by the library at The Bronx High School of Science. Topics discussed include the library collection; a basic library skills mini-course for freshmen and incoming sophomores; current uses of the library's computer system; and plans to automate the library's card catalog and circulation records.…

  2. High School Health-Education Teachers' Perceptions and Practices Related to Teaching HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Scott W.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Stone, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: HIV/AIDS is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States with individuals between the ages of 13 and 19 years being especially vulnerable for infection. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, perceptions, and instructional practices of high school health teachers toward teaching HIV prevention.…

  3. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

  4. Skylab experiments. Volume 6: Mechanics. [Skylab program accomplishments for high school level education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab program activities are presented in a form adapted to instruction of high school students. The overall goals of the program are discussed. The specific accomplishments of the mechanics investigations are described. The subjects involved are as follows: (1) evaluation of mobility aids, (2) mass measurement devices, and (3) space guidance crew/vehicle disturbances.

  5. High School Physical Education Teachers' Attitudes and Use of Fitness Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Phillips, Sharon; Silverman, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for using and implementing fitness tests have been extensively researched and teachers' attitudes toward fitness tests are beginning to be studied. Less understood is how high school teachers use fitness tests and the role their attitudes toward fitness tests affect students' attitudes toward physical activity. The purpose of this…

  6. Discussing spent nuclear fuel in high school classrooms: addressing public fears through early education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, S. [Deep River Science Academy, 20 Forest Ave. P.O. Box 600, Deep River, Ontario K0J 1P0 (Canada); Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Sullivan, J.; Jones, S.; Sullivan, K. [Deep River Science Academy, 20 Forest Ave. P.O. Box 600, Deep River, Ontario K0J 1P0 (Canada); Hyland, B.; Pencer, J.; Colton, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Inreach program combines the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) 'learning through research' approach with state of the art communication technology to bring scientific research to high school classrooms. The Inreach program follows the DRSA teaching model where a university student tutor works on a research project with scientific staff at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Participating high school classes are located across Canada. The high school students learn about the ongoing research activities via weekly web conferences. In order to engage the students and encourage participation in the conferences, themed exercises linked to the research project are provided to the students. The DRSA's Inreach program uses a cost-effective internet technology to reach a wide audience, in an interactive setting, without anyone leaving their desks or offices. An example Inreach research project is presented here: an investigation of the potential of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) concept to burn transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) to reduce the impact of used nuclear fuel. During this project a university student worked with AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) researchers on technical aspects of the project, and high school students followed their progress and learned about the composition, hazards, and disposition options for used nuclear fuel. Previous projects included the effects of tritium on cellular viability and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses in automobile engines.

  7. Using Mobile Communication Technology in High School Education: Motivation, Pressure, and Learning Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Gao, Qin; Wu, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Motivation and pressure are considered two factors impacting vocational senior high school student learning. New communication technology, especially mobile communication technology, is supposed to be effective in encouraging interaction between the student and the instructor and improving learning efficiency. Social presence and information…

  8. Fear and Trembling in the American High School: Educational Reform and Teacher Alienation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Roxanne M.; Brooks, Melanie C.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports findings from a two-year case study of teachers in a single public high school. Data were gathered and analyzed using a conceptual framework that conceived of alienation as a set of five sub-constructs: powerlessness, meaninglessness, normlessness, isolation, and estrangement. Findings suggested that teachers experienced each…

  9. Classroom Goal Structures and HIV and Pregnancy Prevention Education in Rural High School Health Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek R.; Zimmerman, Rick; Gray, DeLeon L.; O'Connell, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Over 5,000 adolescents enrolled in required rural high school health courses reported their perceptions of mastery and extrinsic goal structures in their health classrooms. Data were collected from all students at three time points (prior to HIV and pregnancy instruction, 3 months after instruction, and 1 year after instruction). Results indicated…

  10. Investigating stakeholders' perceptions of the link between high STD rates and the current Baltimore City Public Schools' sex education curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Shenell L. T.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine key stakeholders' perceptions of the current Baltimore City Public Schools' (BCPS) sex education curriculum and to gain insight into how they believe the curriculum could be modified to be more effective. A mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection consisting of a survey, focus group interview, and individual interviews was conducted to gather information on stakeholders' perceptions. The stakeholders included: (1) former students who received their sex education courses in the Baltimore City Public School system (BCPS); (2) teachers in BCPS who were affiliated with the sex education curriculum; (3) health care professionals who screened and/or treated East Baltimore City residents for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and; (4) one policy maker who was responsible for creating sex education curriculum at the national level. Analysis of the quantitative data from former Baltimore City Public School students revealed a general satisfaction with the current sex education curriculum. However, qualitative data from the same group of stakeholders revealed several changes they thought should be implemented into the program in an effort to improve the current curriculum. Findings from the other groups after qualitative analysis of the interviews suggest three major themes in support of curriculum change: (1) a blended curriculum that integrates both the cognitive and affective learning domains; (2) knowledge of prevention of STD's and pregnancy; and (3) authentic teaching and learning. Results from this study strongly suggest that the Baltimore City Public School system is apathetic to the sexual health needs of students and, therefore, is inadvertently contributing to the high rate of sexually transmitted diseases among young people. Keywords: Abstinence, Affective domain, Indoctrination, Behavior Modification, Cognitive domain, Sex education curriculum, Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

  11. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2001-05-01

    Literature Cited National Science Education Standards; National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1996; http://www. nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/. Principles and Standards for School Mathematics; National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Washington, DC, 2000; http://standards.nctm.org/. Visit CLIC, an Online Resource for High School Teachers at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/HS/

  12. Principles for School Drug Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lois

    2004-01-01

    This document presents a revised set of principles for school drug education. The principles for drug education in schools comprise an evolving framework that has proved useful over a number of decades in guiding the development of effective drug education. The first edition of "Principles for Drug Education in Schools" (Ballard et al.…

  13. Digital media promoting new approaches to subject specific didactics in visual arts education in primary school, high school, teacher education and university education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Örtegren, Hans; Haïkö, Tarja

    The symposium discusses eventual paradigmatic shift within Art Education at different levels when new tools for creation are applied in educational settings. The symposium addresses current developments in visual arts education based on empirical projects from different levels of the educational ...

  14. Comparison of breast-feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs before and after educational intervention for rural Appalachian high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Allison K; Schetzina, Karen E; Freeman, Sherry C; Coulter, Meredith M; Colgrove, Nicole J

    2013-03-01

    Breast-feeding rates in rural and southeastern regions of the United States are lower than national rates and Healthy People 2020 targets. The objectives of this study were to understand current breast-feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among rural southern Appalachian adolescents and to explore whether a high school educational intervention designed to address the five tenets (knowledge, attitudes, intentions, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms) of the theory of planned behavior may be effective in increasing future rates of breast-feeding in this population. An educational session including an interactive game was developed and administered to occupational health science students during a single class period in two county high schools. A presurvey and a postsurvey administered 2 weeks after the intervention were completed by students. Pre- and postsurveys were analyzed using paired t tests and Cohen d and potential differences based on sex and grade were explored. Both pre- and postsurveys were completed by 107 students (78%). Knowledge, attitudes about breast-feeding benefits, subjective norms, and intentions significantly improved following the intervention. Baseline knowledge and attitudes about breast-feeding benefits for mothers were low and demonstrated the greatest improvement. Offering breast-feeding education based on the theory of planned behavior in a single high school class session was effective in improving student knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about breast-feeding and intention to breast-feed.

  15. Distance education program for a master´s degree on teachers education at the high school level organized by UNAM (National University Of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Sierra Vázquez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The general characteristics of the Master’s degree program MADEMS and the strategic actions required to organize the distance education program are described. The possibilities for generalization and collaboration with high schools and colleges in Mexico and in other countries are examined. Furthermore, the implications of this program in the context of educational spaces in which our institution is involved are also considered. This is done by taking into account that this program provides a multidisciplinary model with a multiplicative effect and that it is also a project which contributes to education, training, innovation, cooperation and development.

  16. STEM Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education pathway in Georgia: Perceptions of Georgia engineering and technology education high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Mark VanBuren

    This study examined the perceptions held by Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education (ETE) high school pathway teachers and Georgia's Career, Technical and Agriculture Education (CTAE) administrators regarding the ETE pathway and its effect on implementation within their district and schools. It provides strategies for ETE teaching methods, curriculum content, STEM integration, and how to improve the ETE pathway program of study. Current teaching and curricular trends were examined in ETE as well as the role ETE should play as related to STEM education. The study, using the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey, was conducted to answer the following research questions: (a) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE teaching methodology between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (b) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE curriculum content between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (c) Is there a significant difference in the perception of STEM integration in the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? and (d) Is there a significant difference in the perception of how to improve the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? Suggestions for further research also were offered.

  17. Integration of educational methods and physical settings: design guidelines for High/Scope methodology in pre-schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Izadpanah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality design and appropriate space organization in preschool settings can support preschool children's educational activities. Although the relationship between the well-being and development of children and physical settings has been emphasized by many early childhood researchers, there is still a need for theoretical design guidelines that are geared towards the improvement of this issue. This research focuses on High/Scope education and aims to shape a theoretical guideline that raises teachers' awareness about the potential of learning spaces and guides them to improve the quality of the physical spaces. To create a theoretical framework, reliable sources are investigated in the light of High/Scope education and the requirements of pre-school children educational spaces. Physical space characteristics, the preschool child's requirements and High/Scope methodology identified design inputs, design considerations and recommendations that shape the final guideline for spatial arrangement in a High/Scope setting are integrated. Discussions and suggestions in this research benefit both designers and High/ Scope teaching staff. Results help High/Scope teaching staff increase the quality of a space in an educational setting without having an architectural background. The theoretical framework of the research allows designers to consider key features and users' possible activities in High/ Scope settings and shape their designs accordingly.

  18. Recruiting and Retaining Highly Qualified Special Education Teachers for High-Poverty Districts and Schools: Recommendations for Educational Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Teacher turnover disproportionately impacts high poverty districts, where teachers hold fewer professional credentials and working conditions are more challenging. The disparities in teacher quality and working conditions likely contribute to teacher turnover and workplace instability as well as limit students' opportunities to learn.…

  19. Twenty-first Century Space Science in The Urban High School Setting: The NASA/John Dewey High School Educational Outreach Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B.; Levy, M.; Reyes, C.; Austin, S.

    2003-05-01

    A unique and innovative partnership has recently developed between NASA and John Dewey High School, infusing Space Science into the curriculum. This partnership builds on an existing relationship with MUSPIN/NASA and their regional center at the City University of New York based at Medgar Evers College. As an outgrowth of the success and popularity of our Remote Sensing Research Program, sponsored by the New York State Committee for the Advancement of Technology Education (NYSCATE), and the National Science Foundation and stimulated by MUSPIN-based faculty development workshops, our science department has branched out in a new direction - the establishment of a Space Science Academy. John Dewey High School, located in Brooklyn, New York, is an innovative inner city public school with students of a diverse multi-ethnic population and a variety of economic backgrounds. Students were recruited from this broad spectrum, which covers the range of learning styles and academic achievement. This collaboration includes students of high, average, and below average academic levels, emphasizing participation of students with learning disabilities. In this classroom without walls, students apply the strategies and methodologies of problem-based learning in solving complicated tasks. The cooperative learning approach simulates the NASA method of problem solving, as students work in teams, share research and results. Students learn to recognize the complexity of certain tasks as they apply Earth Science, Mathematics, Physics, Technology and Engineering to design solutions. Their path very much follows the NASA model as they design and build various devices. Our Space Science curriculum presently consists of a one-year sequence of elective classes taken in conjunction with Regents-level science classes. This sequence consists of Remote Sensing, Planetology, Mission to Mars (NASA sponsored research program), and Microbiology, where future projects will be astronomy related. This

  20. Tle Triangulation Campaign by Japanese High School Students as a Space Educational Project of the Ssh Consortium Kochi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Okamoto, Sumito; Miyoshi, Terunori; Takamura, Yuzaburo; Aoshima, Akira; Hinokuchi, Jin

    As one of the space educational projects in Japan, a triangulation observation project of TLE (Transient Luminous Events: sprites, elves, blue-jets, etc.) has been carried out since 2006 in collaboration between 29 Super Science High-schools (SSH) and Kochi University of Technol-ogy (KUT). Following with previous success of sprite observations by "Astro High-school" since 2004, the SSH consortium Kochi was established as a national space educational project sup-ported by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). High-sensitivity CCD camera (Watec, Neptune-100) with 6 mm F/1.4 C-mount lens (Fujinon) and motion-detective software (UFO-Capture, SonotaCo) were given to each participating team in order to monitor Northern night sky of Japan with almost full-coverage. During each school year (from April to March in Japan) since 2006, thousands of TLE images were taken by many student teams, with considerably large numbers of successful triangulations, i.e., (School year, Numbers of TLE observations, Numbers of triangulations) are (2006, 43, 3), (2007, 441, 95), (2008, 734, 115), and (2009, 337, 78). Note that, school year in Japan begins on April 1 and ends on March 31. The observation campaign began in December 2006, numbers are as of Feb. 28, 2010. Recently, some high schools started wide field observations using multiple cameras, and others started VLF observations using handmade loop antennae and amplifiers. Infomation exchange among the SSH consortium Kochi is frequently communicated with scientific discussion via KUT's mailing lists. Also, interactions with amateur observers in Japan are made through an internet forum of "SonotaCo Network Japan" (http://sonotaco.jp). Not only as an educational project but also as a scientific one, the project is also in success. In February 2008, simultaneous observations of Elves were obtained, in November 2009 a Giant "Graft-shaped" Sprites driven by Jets was clearly imaged with VLF signals. Most recently, ob-servations of Elves

  1. ICTs and School Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Aris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there exist lots of ICTs that teachers use as teaching tools. In this work, we introduce the theoretical context of the study of using ICTs in school education, then we present the method that will be used in order to achieve our goals. This work constitutes the groundwork to continue the study of ICT and its use in teaching.

  2. Geophysical Exploration Technologies for the Deep Lithosphere Research: An Education Materials for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Xu, C.; Luo, S.; Chen, H.; Qin, R.

    2012-12-01

    The science of Geophysics applies the principles of physics to study of the earth. Geophysical exploration technologies include the earthquake seismology, the seismic reflection and refraction methods, the gravity method, the magnetic method and the magnetotelluric method, which are used to measure the interior material distribution, their structure and the tectonics in the lithosphere of the earth. Part of the research project in SinoProbe-02-06 is to develop suitable education materials for carton movies targeting the high school students and public. The carton movies include five parts. The first part includes the structures of the earth's interior and variation in their physical properties that include density, p-wave, s-wave and so on, which are the fundamentals of the geophysical exploration technologies. The second part includes the seismology that uses the propagation of elastic waves through the earth to study the structure and the material distribution of the earth interior. It can be divided into earthquake seismology and artifice seismics commonly using reflection and refraction. The third part includes the magnetic method. Earth's magnetic field (also known as the geomagnetic field)extends from the Earth's inner core to where it meets the solar wind, a stream of energetic particles emanating from the Sun. The aim of magnetic survey is to investigate subsurface geology on the basis of anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field resulting from the magnetic properties of the underlying rocks. The magnetic method in the lithosphere attempts to use magnetic disturbance to analyse the regional geological structure and the magnetic boundaries of the crust. The fourth part includes the gravity method. A gravity anomaly results from the inhomogeneous distribution of density of the Earth. Usually gravity anomalies contain superposed anomalies from several sources. The long wave length anomalies due to deep density contrasts are called regional anomalies. They are

  3. TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS FOR THE USE OF THE EDUCATIONAL TABLET: AN ACTION-RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elivelton Henrique Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at understanding the importance of continuing development of CESEC’s (State Center of Continuing Education Augusta Raquel da Silveira High School teachers in Lagamar, in the state of Minas Gerais, as a form of enabling the adoption of new technologies, especially the Educational Tablet, to their pedagogical purposes. The action-research was chosen as the method of work. Thus, through the implementation of three actions – technical training, pedagogical training, and elaboration and development of a lesson plan using the Educational Tablet –, it was possible to present to the school teachers technical and pedagogical knowledge about the tablet, promoting its practical use with the necessary guidance and support for their educational routine. From the development of the actions, a body of knowledge concerning the Educational Tablet was constructed and systematized, which contributed for the teachers to get to know it and understand how relevant it is to employ it so as to explore its possibilities and resources that significantly subsidize the teaching work and the teaching-learning process.

  4. The High Cost of Failing to Reform Public Education in Texas. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Research has documented a crisis in Texas high school graduation rates. Only 67 percent of Texas students graduate from high school, and some large urban districts have graduation rates of 50 percent or lower. This study documents the public costs of high school dropouts in Texas and examines how school choice could provide large public benefits…

  5. Journalism Beyond High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the shift from high school journalism to college journalism for students. Describes the role of the high school journalism advisor in that process. Offers checklists for getting to know a college publication. Outlines ways high school journalism teachers can take advantage of journalism resources available at local colleges and…

  6. Evaluating High School IT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Since its inception in 1997, Cisco's curriculum has entered thousands of high schools across the U.S. and around the world for two reasons: (1) Cisco has a large portion of the computer networking market, and thus has the resources for and interest in developing high school academies; and (2) high school curriculum development teams recognize the…

  7. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  8. Antecedents of Teachers' Educational Beliefs about Mathematics and Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching among In-Service Teachers in High Poverty Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkin, Danya M.; Ekmekci, Adem; Papakonstantinou, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the antecedents of three types of educational beliefs about mathematics among 151 teachers predominantly working in high poverty schools. Studies across various countries have found that teachers in high poverty schools are less likely to enact instructional approaches that align with mathematics reform standards set by…

  9. Change in Knowledge of Korean Elementary, Middle, and High School Students in the Fundamental Education on the Nuclear Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaerok; Lee, Seungkoo; Choi, Yoonseok; Han, Eunok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear power facilities and policies are based upon their acceptability to local residents and citizens. In Korea, where nuclear power should be consistently used for national energy security and economic growth, it is important to enhance the social acceptability of nuclear power. To do so, it is necessary to relieve the minds of the Korean people and global nuclear power communities regarding safety. However, there is sharp division on the perception of nuclear power safety between the expert group of operators, philosophers, and regulators, and ordinary citizens, local residents, media, and anti-nuclear groups. This study designed an experiment on knowledge change as part of an educational strategy to enhance public understanding and develop extensive bonds of sympathy for nuclear power generation adequate for Korean society. In order to provide fundamental evidence for planning an educational intervention strategy, this study analyzed the knowledge change of elementary, middle, and high school students, who are then expected to impact education of the general population. As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long education on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of objective knowledge (p<0.000) was significantly higher. This indicates that if education for enhancing social acceptance in Korea argued nuclear power should be constantly used, an education effect could be anticipated. Although objective knowledge does not have any direct influence on behavior change, it is an important variable for attitude change, and thus information on objective knowledge should be offered as well. Here, the contents preferred by the education subjects should also be considered.

  10. Change in Knowledge of Korean Elementary, Middle, and High School Students in the Fundamental Education on the Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaerok; Lee, Seungkoo; Choi, Yoonseok; Han, Eunok

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power facilities and policies are based upon their acceptability to local residents and citizens. In Korea, where nuclear power should be consistently used for national energy security and economic growth, it is important to enhance the social acceptability of nuclear power. To do so, it is necessary to relieve the minds of the Korean people and global nuclear power communities regarding safety. However, there is sharp division on the perception of nuclear power safety between the expert group of operators, philosophers, and regulators, and ordinary citizens, local residents, media, and anti-nuclear groups. This study designed an experiment on knowledge change as part of an educational strategy to enhance public understanding and develop extensive bonds of sympathy for nuclear power generation adequate for Korean society. In order to provide fundamental evidence for planning an educational intervention strategy, this study analyzed the knowledge change of elementary, middle, and high school students, who are then expected to impact education of the general population. As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long education on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of objective knowledge (p<0.000) was significantly higher. This indicates that if education for enhancing social acceptance in Korea argued nuclear power should be constantly used, an education effect could be anticipated. Although objective knowledge does not have any direct influence on behavior change, it is an important variable for attitude change, and thus information on objective knowledge should be offered as well. Here, the contents preferred by the education subjects should also be considered

  11. On School Educational Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    This analysis of the literatures on school educational technology leadership addresses definitions of school technology leaders and leadership, their role in educational change, and why schools are now changing as a result of 21st century advancements in technology. The literatures disagree over the definition of educational technology leadership.…

  12. The Survey of the Knowledge and Skills Required for Transition Teachers in High School Divisions of Special Needs Education with Intellectual Disabilities : Based on the opinions of transition teachers in high school divisions of special needs education with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Asuka; Ochiai, Toshiro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the opinions that transition teachers in upper second education division of special school which are requested to themselves on the knowledge and skills needed for transition from school to work. The questionnaires were sent to 574 upper second education divisions of special schools. As the result of statistic analyze, the four domains about the knowledge and skills needed for transition. They were "Needs Assessment", "Coordination" "Job-Coaching" a...

  13. An air-filled GM counter as an educational tool and its use at senior high school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikado, Shogo

    1999-01-01

    A Yano-Yonemura type air-filled Geiger-Meuller tube which operates at about 4 kV, having poor resolution but rather high sensitivity, and which is capable of detecting alpha-particles was fabricated. It was found suitable as an educational material for use for one of the 2-hours group experiments in Physics IB' course at senior high school of Japan. Detailed instruction for the fabrication is given, together with some results of the measurement of beta-rays from potassium and also alpha-rays from thorium. (S. Ohno)

  14. 75 FR 34716 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Overview Information; High School Graduation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ..., sustainable, and coordinated dropout prevention and reentry programs in schools that serve students in grades...) schools that-- (A) serve students in grades 6 through 12; and (B) have annual school dropout rates that are above the State average annual school dropout rate; or (ii) middle schools that feed students into...

  15. Delaware GK-12: Improvement of Science Education in Vocational Technical High Schools Through Collaborative Learning and Coteaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J.; Skalak, K.; Watson, G.; Scantlebury, K.; Allen, D.; Quillen, A.

    2006-12-01

    With funding from the National Science Foundation, the University of Delaware (UD) in partnership with the New Castle County Vocational Technical School District (NCCoVoTech) in Delaware has initiated a GK-12 Program. In each of year this program, nine full time UD graduate students in the sciences, who have completed all or most of their coursework, will be selected to serve as fellows. Participation in the GK-12 program benefits the graduate fellows in many ways. In addition to gaining general insight into current issues of science education, the fellows enhance their experience as scientific researchers by directly improving their ability to effectively communicate complex quantitative and technical knowledge to an audience with multiple and diverse learning needs. In the first year of this project, fellows have been paired with high school science teachers from NCCoVoTech. These pairs, along with the principal investigators (PIs) of this program have formed a learning community that is taking this opportunity to examine and to reflect on current issues in science education while specifically addressing critical needs in teaching science in vocational technical high schools. By participating in summer workshops and follow-up meetings facilitated by the PIs, the fellows have been introduced to a number of innovative teaching strategies including problem-based learning (PBL). Fellow/teacher pairs have begun to develop and teach PBL activities that are in agreement with State of Delaware science standards and that support student learning through inquiry. Fellows also have the opportunity to engage in coteaching with their teacher partner. In this "teaching at the elbow of another", fellows will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the complexities and nuances of teaching science in vocational technical high schools. While not taught as a stand-alone course in NCCoVoTech high schools, earth science topics are integrated into the science curriculum at

  16. The influence of ethnic segregation and school mobility in primary education on high school dropout : evidence from regression discontinuity at a contextual tipping point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, C.; de Witte, K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of ethnic composition and school mobility at the primary school-level on the propensity to drop out of high school. Using rich school and neighbourhood administrative data, we observe that (i) frequent school movers have a 2.6 times higher likelihood of early

  17. High School Mathematics Curriculum Development Integrated with Character Education Within Project Assessment as Spiral System Leveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Badriatul Munawaroh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are: (1 description of characteristics and (2 validate thesenior hight school of mathematics syllabus integrated character education with the project assessment, (3 test the effectiveness of the learning material of function in class X. Testing procedure of syllabus and learning used research development of Borg & Gall (1987. The data were processed with descriptive analysis, statistical test t test and regression. The results obtained by the integration of the 10 characters on the senior hight school of mathematics syllabus show a valid syllabus by experts with an average score of 4 (both categories, the maximum score of 5. Test implementation on learning reach effective: (1 the percentage of learners achieve mastery learning by 89, 5%; (2 an increase of characters curiosity of learners of meeting 1 to 2, up to 3, up to 4 each score gain of 0.17; 0.30; 0.31; (3 the influence of the curiosity of students to the learning outcomes of 48.9%, (4 the average learning outcomes of students experimental class (77.2 is better than the control class (76.2. Thus, each character can bring a change in behavior according to the character programmed and observed in the learning process in focus. Coordination learning at every level stated in the syllabus.

  18. Educational Challenges and Diminishing Family Safety Net Faced by High-School Girls in a Slum Residence, Nairobi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Benta A.; Onsomu, Elijah O.; Moore, Dakysha

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, there was a slight decrease in the number of out-of school adolescents from 75 million in 2009 (UNESCO, 2009) to 71 million in 2010, of which 55% are girls (UNESCO, 2010). In Kenya, only 17% of girls have secondary education (CBS, 2004). This paper analyzes the role of families in girls' secondary education in two schools within Nairobi…

  19. Federal Contributions to High-Income School Districts: The Use of Tax Deductions for Funding K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Susannna; Socias, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    The federal role in education finance is commonly seen as compensatory. The federal government gives large sums of money to low-income schools and school districts through programs such as Title 1. Yet, this view of federal aid is based solely on direct educational expenditures. The federal government and state governments also support schools…

  20. The High Cost of Failing to Reform Public Education in Missouri. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    As a large body of high-quality research has emerged in the past few years showing that school choice benefits the students who use it, much of the debate has shifted to the "public" or "social" effects of school choice. This study examines how school choice in Missouri would raise high school graduation rates, and measures the…

  1. The High Cost of Failing to Reform Public Education in Indiana. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the public costs of high school dropouts in Indiana, and examines how school choice would provide large public benefits by increasing the graduation rate in Indiana public schools. It calculates the annual cost of high school dropouts in Indiana due to lower state income tax payments, increased reliance on Medicaid, and…

  2. Evaluating a Health Belief Model-Based Educational Program for School Injury Prevention among Hard-of-Hearing/Deaf High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Vejdani-Aram

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: While all students are vulnerable to injuries, such vulnerability may even be higher in the deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Therefore, this study evaluated a health belief model-based educational program to prevent school injuries among deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on all deaf and hard-of-hearing students who attended two special schools in Hamadan (Iran during 2014. They were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 23 or the control group (n = 27. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire containing items on demographic characteristics, constructs of the health belief model, and knowledge and preventive behaviors. In both groups, the questionnaires were filled out through interviews before and two months after the intervention. The intervention included distributing booklets and holding five educational sessions. Data were analyzed with paired t, independent t, chi square, and Fisher’s exact tests in SPSS16. Results: After the educational intervention, the mean scores of knowledge (P=0.002, preventive behaviors (P=0.001, and constructs of the health belief model, i.e. perceived severity (P=0.001, perceived benefits (P=0.001, self-efficacy (P=0.001, and cues to action (P=0.001, were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Conclusion: According to our findings, an educational intervention based on the health belief model can promote behaviors to prevent school injuries among deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

  3. Effects of same-sex versus coeducational physical education on the self-perceptions of middle and high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirgg, C D

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this field experiment was to investigate the effects of attending either a coeducational or a same-sex physical education class on several self-perception variables. Middle and high school youth who had previously been in coeducational classes were assigned to either a same-sex or a new coeducational physical education class for a 10-lesson unit of basketball. Analyses were conducted at both the group and the individual levels. Self-perception variables examined included perceived self-confidence of learning basketball, perceived usefulness of basketball, and perceived gender-appropriateness of basketball. Results of hierarchical linear model group level analyses indicated that the variability in groups for self-confidence could be explained by grade, class type, and the interaction between gender and class type. At the individual level, multivariate results showed that, after the unit, males in coeducational classes were significantly more confident in their ability to learn basketball than males in same-sex classes. Also, males in same-sex classes decreased in confidence from pretreatment to posttreatment. Perceived usefulness of basketball emerged as the strongest predictor of self-confidence for learning basketball for both genders. In general, middle school students preferred same-sex classes, whereas high school students preferred coeducational classes.

  4. Validating Common Measures of Self-Efficacy and Career Attitudes within Informal Health Education for Middle and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Karen; Withy, Kelley; Boulay, Rachel

    2018-06-01

    A common challenge in the evaluation of K-12 science education is identifying valid scales that are an appropriate fit for both a student's age and the educational outcomes of interest. Though many new scales have been validated in recent years, there is much to learn about the appropriate educational contexts and audiences for these measures. This study investigated two such scales, the DEVISE Self-Efficacy for Science scale and the Career Interest Questionnaire (CIQ), within the context of two related health sciences projects. Consistent patterns were found in the reliability of each scale across three age groups (middle school, high school, early college) and within the context of each project. As expected, self-efficacy and career interest, as measured through these scales, were found to be correlated. The pattern of results for CIQ scores was also similar to that reported in other literature. This study provides examples of how practitioners can validate established measures for new and specific contexts and provides some evidence to support the use of the scales studied in health science education contexts.

  5. Middle School Concept Helps High-Poverty Schools Become High-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picucci, Ali Callicoatte; Brownson, Amanda; Kahlert, Rahel; Sobel, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The results of a study conducted by the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin for the U.S. Department of Education during the 2001-02 school year showed that elements of the middle school concept can lead to improved student performance, even in high-poverty schools. This article describes common elements of the middle school…

  6. Study on the Role of Video Educational Games with a Linguistic Approach in English Language Education of the 2nd Grade High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Jalalian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The inability of English language learners to recall English concepts is a major challenge faced by teachers. This paper aims to determine the effectiveness of video educational games with a linguistic approach in English language education of the 2nd grade high school students. This is an applied and quasi-experimental study conducted in 2016. For the purpose of this study, we divided the participants into test and control groups and omitted the impacts of covariate (pretest scores measured before execution of any test on the learners. The statistical population consists of 90 students, divided into three groups each consisting of 30 students. Due to the long process of the research, we used availability sampling method in order to minimize the drop in the number of participants. The data was analyzed by SPSS and ANCOVA. The results of this study confirmed that a significant difference exists between English language recalling ability of 2nd grade high school students in test and control groups who are provided with video educational games with and without English language concepts respectively. We concluded that video educational games play an effective role in English language recalling ability of the students. Therefore, it is recommended that video educational games be used for enriching the leisure times of English learners.

  7. Role of professional motivation in the system of education of students in physical culture high schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N.I.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main approaches to the professional motivation formation in the system of education in the physical culture шт. high educational institutions have been determined in the article. Content of programs, textbooks and training manuals of professionally orientated disciplines aiming to determine their topic orientation on the sport pedagogue profession have been analyzed. It has been shown that didactical provision of the "Theory and Methods of the Chosen Type of Sports" and psychological-pedagogical disciplines, generally, does reflect a setting towards forming of theoretical competence in students. The main conditions of the students motivation development have been noted, such as renewing of the content and technology of the educational activity in the high educational institutions with including such components like didactical provision (of content, methods of realization, means of cooperation in the system "lecturer-student", which is based on the integration of pedagogical and sport components of context approach based training; professionally oriented tasks, which are actualizing students life experience in connection with the specialty; taking part in the pedagogical activity; psychological-pedagogical interaction in motivation development.

  8. The Experience of a Highly Skilled Student during Handball Lessons in Physical Education: A Relevant Pointer to the Gap between School and Sports Contexts of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crance, Marie-Cecile; Trohel, Jean; Saury, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the experience of a highly skilled student during a handball physical education unit in a French high school. More specifically, the analysis describes the nature of his involvement during two lessons that follow a pedagogical model close to the principles of Sport Education. The present case study of a…

  9. Fluid dynamics practices as a scientific divulgation tool in high school education

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano Tavares da Silva; Lamon Benevides de Souza; Leôncio Diógenes Tavares Câmara

    2016-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-0221.2016v13n24p94 This extension project was designed to bring together students from high schools in Nova Friburgo-RJ region with the Instituto Politécnico IPRJ / UERJ, providing an experience within the university with scientific incentive practices to the area of sciences and earth. Introducing the universe and diversity in the mathematics and science area with a short course aimed to studies of particles analysis, viscosity and permeability, this initia...

  10. Effects of stroke education of junior high school students on stroke knowledge of their parents: Tochigi project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yokota, Chiaki; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Okamura, Tomonori; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Satoshi; Ishigami, Akiko; Okumura, Kosuke; Toyoda, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    Educating the youth about stroke is a promising approach for spreading stroke knowledge. The aim of this study was to verify communication of stroke knowledge to parents by educating junior high school students about stroke. We enrolled 1127 junior high school students (age, 13-15 years) and their parents in the Tochigi prefecture, Japan. All students received a stroke lesson, watched an animated cartoon, and read the related Manga comic as educational aids. The students took back home the Manga and discussed what they learned with their parents. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were given to all at baseline and immediately after the lesson. A total of 1125 students and 915 parents answered the questionnaires. In the students, the frequency of correct answers increased significantly for all questions on stroke symptoms except for headache, and for all questions on risk factors after the lesson. In the parents, the correct answer rates increased for stroke symptoms except for headache and numbness in one side of the body, and for all questions on risk factors except for hypertension. Ninety-one percent of students and 92.7% of parents correctly understood the Face, Arm, Speech, and Time (FAST) mnemonic after the lesson. Improvement of stroke knowledge immediately after the stroke lesson was observed in parents as well as their children, which indicated that our teaching materials using the Manga was effective in delivering the stroke knowledge to parents through their children. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. The effect of coach education on reporting of concussions among high school athletes after passage of a concussion law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Frederick P; Schiff, Melissa A; Chrisman, Sara P; Chung, Shana K; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Herring, Stanley A

    2014-05-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to concussions and especially sports-related concussions in youth. To prevent an inappropriate return to play while symptomatic, nearly all states have now passed legislation on youth sports-related concussions. To determine (1) the incidence of sports-related concussions in high school athletes using a unique system to collect reports on concussions, (2) the proportion of athletes with concussions who play with concussive symptoms, and (3) the effect of the type and modality of coach education on the likelihood of athletes reporting symptoms to the coach or playing with concussive symptoms. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. This study was conducted with high school football and girls' soccer athletes playing in fall 2012 and their coaches and parents in 20 urban or rural high schools in Washington State. The main outcome was the incidence of concussions per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), the proportion of concussed athletes who played with concussive symptoms, and the association of coach concussion education with coach awareness of athletes with concussive symptoms. Among the 778 athletes, the rate of concussions was 3.6 per 1000 AEs and was identical for the 2 sports studied. The cumulative concussion incidence over the course of the season was similar in girls' soccer (11.1%) and football (10.4%). Sixty-nine percent of concussed athletes reported playing with symptoms, and 40% reported that their coach was not aware of their concussion. Most measures of coach concussion education were not associated with coach awareness of concussions in their athletes, although the modalities of a video and quiz were associated with a lower likelihood of coach awareness. More objective and accurate methods are needed to identify concussions. Changes in athlete attitudes on reporting concussive symptoms will likely not be accomplished through legislation alone.

  12. STEM Education-An Exploration of Its Impact on Female Academic Success in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michael E.

    The 21st century presents many new career opportunities and choices for women today. However, over the past decade, there has been a growing concern that there will not be enough students trained in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to fill jobs in the United States. Current research reveals that there will be a need for highly skilled workers in the STEM industries, along with the opportunities to earn higher wages. With these opportunities ahead, it is paramount that secondary schools prepare not only their male students, but also their female students for these lucrative STEM careers. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what degree female high school students enrolled in a STEM academy, and who may play sports, experience academic differences in college preparatory math and science courses, and in the math and science portions of the California Standards Test. Academic differences shall be defined as differences in grade point averages. A comparison will be made of female students who take similar classes and play sports, but who are not enrolled in a STEM academy program. This comparison will then incorporate a quantitative non-experimental research design, along with a chi-square test.

  13. WORKING-CLASS HIGH SCHOOL LEARNERS’ CHALLENGE TO CHANGE: INSIGHTS FROM THE EQUAL EDUCATION MOVEMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lance Robins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hargreaves (2002 suggested that vigorous social movements have the potential to improve the quality of (and increase the equity in public education. This paper explores the role of Equal Education, an education social movement in South Africa led by university students and secondary school learners, in the process of educational change. Drawing on interviews with the organisation’s founding members, organisers and secondary school learners, the paper examines how the organisation/social movement embodies what Oakes and Rogers (2007 describe as ‘learning power’ and in the process contribute to improvement in public education.

  14. Influence of a Non-formal Environmental Education Programme on Junior High-School Students' Environmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daphne; Ben Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Shaharabani, Dina

    2013-02-01

    One of the solutions implemented by schools for conducting value-based environmental education (EE) is outsourcing: allocating external environmental organizations that develop and conduct EE programmes. This study addressed such a programme-the Green Council Programme (GCP)-developed and implemented in schools by the Israeli Society for Protection of Nature. A pre-test/post-test design was used to investigate the influence of participation in the GCP on components of junior high-school students' environmental literacy. Conceptualizations of 'environment', environmental attitudes and sense of ability to act on environmental issues were studied employing quantitative and qualitative tools. Contribution of the programme to the cognitive domain, in developing a systemic understanding of the environment, was limited. On the other hand, participating in this programme heightened students' sensitivity to human-environment interrelationships and developed a more ecological worldview. After the programme, students demonstrated greater perception of humans as part of the environment, an increased sensitivity to human impact on the environment and their value for non-human nature moved from an anthropocentric to a more ecocentric orientation. While students' internal locus-of-control increased, when environmental protection entailed personal economic trade-offs, their support was limited and remained unchanged. The article concludes with recommendations, based on the findings, regarding supplementing the school (science) curriculum with external EE enrichment programmes.

  15. Expanding the classroom with educational technology: A case study of a Cuban polytechnic high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Leftwich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polytechnic instruction has a common place in the Cuban education system (Gasperini, 2000. In polytechnic institutions, teachers leverage technological tools to prepare students for labor market competences. This case study examined a polytechnic institution in Cuba to consider how teachers defined educational technology. Based on teacher questionnaire responses, site-based teacher interviews, and field observations, technology was primarily viewed as a method for student preparation. In other words, teachers used technology to prepare students for their future careers and the technology they will need to be successful in that career. The study found that teachers highly valued their technical pedagogical training, believed that the growing spaces were an integral part of their technology based instruction, and claimed that the limited resources was their greatest barrier to integrating ICT in the classroom.

  16. Effects of classroom education on knowledge and attitudes regarding organ donation in ethnically diverse urban high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Vicky; Thornton, John Daryl; Wong, Kristine A.; Spigner, Clarence; Allen, Margaret D.

    2010-01-01

    School-based health education is a promising approach for improving organ donation rates, but little is known about its efficacy among ethnically diverse youth. The impact of a classroom intervention was examined in a multicultural high school population where students’ ethnicities were 45% African American, 30% Asian American, and 33% Caucasian (allowing for multiracial choices). A baseline survey was administered to all health classes within 2 weeks prior to intervention. On the intervention day, classes randomly assigned to the intervention group received an educational session, followed by a second survey; in control classes, the second survey was taken before the educational session. At baseline, non-Caucasian ethnicity and male gender were each associated with lower levels of willingness to donate. Following the intervention, students in the intervention group demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge scores (p<0.001), as well as positive movement of opinion regarding willingness to donate (p<0.0001). Most importantly, the positive changes in opinion occurred independently of ethnicity and gender, in spite of these both being negative predictors of opinion at baseline. These results demonstrate that even a single classroom exposure can impact knowledge levels, correct misinformation, and effect opinion change on organ donation among an ethnically diverse adolescent population. PMID:20088915

  17. Differences in High School and College Students' Basic Knowledge and Perceived Education of Internet Safety: Do High School Students Really Benefit from the Children's Internet Protection Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA; 2000) requires an Internet filtering and public awareness strategy to protect children under 17 from harmful visual Internet depictions. This study compared high school students who went online with the CIPA restriction and college students who went online without the restriction in order to…

  18. Sports and Physical Education in American High Schools: Some Historical Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Timothy P.

    Public schooling was restructured and reoriented in fundamental ways during the decades immediately preceding the First World War. Schools were engaged in the process of preparing people for specialized work roles, but reformers were also concerned that the schools inculcate common social values. A wide range of extracurricular activities was…

  19. The Effect of Education Based on the Health Belief Model on Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors in Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousaviasl

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Osteoporosis is one of the most common metabolic bone diseases and is the silent epidemic of this era. Objectives This study evaluates the effect of education that is based on the health belief model on promoting osteoporosis prevention behaviors among female high school students. Methods In this two-group interventional study, 172 students age 11 to 14 years (experimental group = 86 subjects; control group = 86 subjects were randomly selected from Khorramshahr high schools using multistage sampling. Data were collected before the intervention and two months after its completion using a researcher-made questionnaire with four parts: demographic questions, knowledge questions, questions related to the health belief model constructs, and questions regarding preventive behaviors. Data was analyzed using SPSS 22 software and by applying the Mann-Whitney test, the analysis of covariance procedure, and the Wilcoxon statistical test. Results After the intervention, significant statistical differences were seen between the experimental and control groups in mean scores of knowledge, health belief model constructs, and preventive behaviors. Conclusions The education based on health belief model plays an important role in increasing knowledge and improving osteoporosis prevention behaviors in students.

  20. A sociocultural analysis of Latino high school students' funds of knowledge and implications for culturally responsive engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Joel Alejandro

    Previous studies have suggested that, when funds of knowledge are incorporated into science and mathematics curricula, students are more engaged and often develop richer understandings of scientific concepts. While there has been a growing body of research addressing how teachers may integrate students' linguistic, social, and cultural practices with science and mathematics instruction, very little research has been conducted on how the same can be accomplished with Latino and Latina students in engineering. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by investigating how fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents used their funds of knowledge to address engineering design challenges. This project was intended to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented minorities whose social and cultural practices have been traditionally undervalued in schools. This ethnographic study investigated the funds of knowledge of fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents and how they used these funds of knowledge in engineering design. Participant observation, bi-monthly group discussion, retrospective and concurrent protocols, and monthly one-on-one interviews were conducted during the study. A constant comparative analysis suggested that Latino and Latina adolescents, although profoundly underrepresented in engineering, bring a wealth of knowledge and experiences that are relevant to engineering design thinking and practice.

  1. A Neglected Opportunity: Entrepreneurship Education in the Lower High School Curricula for Technology in South Africa and Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Adri; Gaotlhobogwe, Mike

    2018-01-01

    Technology is a school subject that forms part of the compulsory curriculum for high school learners in South Africa, and is a core theme in the subject Design and Technology in Botswana high schools. Knowledge and production skills acquired in the subject are applied to solve real-life problems consistent with the steps of the design process. The…

  2. Expectations and Anticipations of Middle and High School Special Education Teachers in Preparing Their Students with Intellectual Disability for Future Adult Roles Including Those as Partner and Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of individual ethnographic interviews and focus groups, I explored the expectations and anticipations of middle and high school special education teachers as they carry out their professional charge of educating their students with intellectual disability for lives in the least restrictive environment, including possible adult…

  3. A Case of Fragmented High School Earth and Space Science Education in the Great Plains: Tracing Teacher Certification Policy to Students' Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Lu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Although U.S. high school students' access to Earth and space science (ESS) varies widely from state to state, nationally, ESS content is the most neglected area of science education and scientific literacy. States have been considering whether they will formally adopt, or less formally adapt, the new national science education standards, the Next…

  4. Esthetic Education in Soviet Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soviet Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This issue of Soviet Education examines esthetic education in Soviet schools, including ways of raising the level of esthetic education, the factor of labor, research on the relationship between the atheistic and esthetic education, ways of amplifying interrelationship between theory and practice in teacher education and psychological principles…

  5. Students' perspective on sexual and coexistence education in Primary School : A retrospective survey among high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Santaoja, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Public health is a concern of many important areas of society and it is therefore of great importance to examine and expand the goals of public health work within different sectors, e.g., school. Sexually transmitted diseases, sexual violence and mental health problems related to sexual orientation are some of the public health problems in society today. Throughout childhood and teenage years, norms and attitudes regarding sexuality and coexistence are formed, which means that school is an im...

  6. Multimedia Open Educational Resources in Mathematics for High School Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghoon; McLeod, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    Open Educational Resources (OER) can offer educators the necessary flexibility for tailoring educational resources to better fit their educational goals. Although the number of OER repositories is growing fast, few studies have been conducted to empirically test the effectiveness of OER integration in the classroom. Furthermore, very little is…

  7. The Impact of E-Education on At Risk High School Students' Science Achievement and Experiences during Summer School Credit Recovery Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Pamela Prevette

    Nationally, at risk students make up to 30% of U.S. students in public schools. Many at risk students have poor attendance, are disengaged from the learning environment and have low academic achievement. Educational failure occurs when students do not complete the required courses and as a result do not receive a high school diploma or a certificate of attendance. Many at risk students will not graduate; nearly one-third of all United States high school students have left the public school system before graduating, which has been referred to as a national crisis. Many at risk students fail science courses that are required for graduation, such as biology. Clearly, many students are not responding positively to the conditions in many public school classrooms, suggesting the need for different methods of educating at risk students, such as e-education. Three research questions guided the study: 1) Who are the students in an e-education, online summer school credit recovery course? 2) Do students' beliefs about their learning environment or other personal factors influence their academic achievement?, and 3) How do students describe their experiences of an e-education science course? This mixed methods study investigates thirty-two at risk students who were enrolled in one of three e-education science education courses (biology, earth science, and physical science) during a summer session in a rural county in a southeastern US state. These students failed their most recent science course taken in a traditional classroom setting. Artino's (2010) social-cognitive model of academic motivation and emotion was used as a theoretical framework to highlight the salient motivational factors toward learning science (e.g., task characteristics, task value beliefs, positive emotions). Student data included pre and post tests for all e-education lessons, a final exam, survey data (Students Motivation towards Science Learning (SMTSL), time (on task and idle), field notes, and

  8. From Little Rock Central High School to Laerskool Potgitersrus: Education and Racial Change in the United States and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Catsam, Derek

    2007-01-01

    In both South Africa and the United States South, education stands and has stood historically as a vital cultural and economic center for its people. In both cases school integration has proved to be profoundly contentious. Certainly much of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. was centered on integrating schools from the elementary school playground to the university campus. An interesting and important parallel between South Africa's segregationists and those in America also emerged in the...

  9. Influence of a Non-Formal Environmental Education Programme on Junior High-School Students; Environmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daphne; Assaraf, Orit Ben Zvi; Shaharabani, Dina

    2013-01-01

    One of the solutions implemented by schools for conducting value-based environmental education (EE) is outsourcing: allocating external environmental organizations that develop and conduct EE programmes. This study addressed such a programme--the Green Council Programme (GCP)--developed and implemented in schools by the Israeli Society for…

  10. High School Principals and the High School Journalism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study asked selected high school principals to respond to statements about the value of high school journalism to the high school student and about the rights and responsibilities of the high school journalist. These responses were then checked against such information as whether or not the high school principal had worked on a high school…

  11. Validation of an observation tool to assess physical activity-promoting physical education lessons in high schools: SOFIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Stuart J; Weaver, R Glenn; Johnson, Siobhan; Rawlinson, Jack

    2018-05-01

    SOFIT+ is an observation tool to measure teacher practices related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) promotion during physical education (PE). The objective of the study was to examine the validity of SOFIT+ during high school PE lessons. This cross-sectional, observational study tested the construct validity of SOFIT+ in boys' and girls' high school PE lessons. Twenty-one PE lessons were video-recorded and retrospectively coded using SOFIT+. Students wore hip-mounted accelerometers during lessons as an objective measure of MVPA. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of students engaging in MVPA during different teacher practices represented by observed individual codes and a combined SOFIT+ index-score. Fourteen individual SOFIT+ variables demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with girls' and boys' MVPA. Observed lesson segments identified as high MVPA-promoting were related to an increased likelihood of girls engaging in 5-10 (OR=2.86 [95% CI 2.41-3.40]), 15-25 (OR=7.41 [95% CI 6.05-9.06]), and 30-40 (OR=22.70 [95% CI 16.97-30.37])s of MVPA. For boys, observed high-MVPA promoting segments were related to an increased likelihood of engaging in 5-10 (OR=1.71 [95% CI 1.45-2.01]), 15-25 (OR=2.69 [95% CI 2.31-3.13]) and 30-40 (OR=4.26 [95% CI 3.44-5.29])s of MVPA. Teacher practices during high school PE lessons are significantly related to students' participation in MVPA. SOFIT+ is a valid and reliable tool to examine relationships between PE teacher practices and student MVPA during PE. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. School Segregation, Charter Schools, and Access to Quality Education*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R.; Burdick-Will, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Race, class, neighborhood, and school quality are all highly inter-related in the American educational system. In the last decade a new factor has come into play, the option of attending a charter school. We offer a comprehensive analysis of the disparities among public schools attended by white, black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American children in 2010–2011, including all districts in which charter schools existed. We compare schools in terms of poverty concentration, racial composition, and standardized test scores, and we also examine how attending a charter or non-charter school affects these differences. Black and Hispanic (and to a lesser extent Native American and Asian) students attend elementary and high schools with higher rates of poverty than white students. Especially for whites and Asians, attending a charter school means lower exposure to poverty. Children’s own race and the poverty and charter status of their schools affect the test scores and racial isolation of schools that children attend in complex combinations. Most intriguing, attending a charter school means attending a better performing school in high-poverty areas but a lower performing school in low-poverty areas. Yet even in the best case the positive effect of attending a charter school only slightly offsets the disadvantages of black and Hispanic students. PMID:27616813

  13. School Librarian, Teacher Collaborator, and Independent Learner: A Symbiosis for Equitable Education in an Alternative High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaskelainen, Kristal; Deneen, Musetta

    2018-01-01

    As the future arrives faster and faster one must ask continually, what do kids actually need from their formal education today and tomorrow? Continuous innovation of method and strategy must be integral to the practice of all teaching professionals. Equitable educators must take a look at the learners in front of them, when and where they stand,…

  14. Multilevel modeling and panel data analysis in educational research (Case study: National examination data senior high school in West Java)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulvia, Pepi; Kurnia, Anang; Soleh, Agus M.

    2017-03-01

    Individual and environment are a hierarchical structure consist of units grouped at different levels. Hierarchical data structures are analyzed based on several levels, with the lowest level nested in the highest level. This modeling is commonly call multilevel modeling. Multilevel modeling is widely used in education research, for example, the average score of National Examination (UN). While in Indonesia UN for high school student is divided into natural science and social science. The purpose of this research is to develop multilevel and panel data modeling using linear mixed model on educational data. The first step is data exploration and identification relationships between independent and dependent variable by checking correlation coefficient and variance inflation factor (VIF). Furthermore, we use a simple model approach with highest level of the hierarchy (level-2) is regency/city while school is the lowest of hierarchy (level-1). The best model was determined by comparing goodness-of-fit and checking assumption from residual plots and predictions for each model. Our finding that for natural science and social science, the regression with random effects of regency/city and fixed effects of the time i.e multilevel model has better performance than the linear mixed model in explaining the variability of the dependent variable, which is the average scores of UN.

  15. Brief report: Exploring the benefits of a peer-tutored physical education programme among high school students with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Erica; Greguol, Márcia; Carraro, Attilio

    2018-01-29

    The purpose of this study was to explore possible benefits of a peer-tutored physical education programme (PTPE) in comparison with school physical education (SPE) in high school students with intellectual disability. Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (15 boys, mean age 17.4 ± 1.7 years) were monitored during three PTPE and three SPE classes. A factorial RM-ANOVA was used to test differences on objective measured physical activity (PA), enjoyment and exertion during the two conditions, considering participants' weight condition as independent factor. During PTPE, participants reported higher light intensity PA, enjoyment and exertion than during SPE. Participants with overweight showed less inactive time and higher light intensity PA during PTPE than during SPE. The peer-tutored programme was beneficial for adolescents with intellectual disability, particularly for those in overweight condition. The higher enjoyment found during PTPE may encourage exercise participation of students with intellectual disability. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Characteristics of health education among secondary schools--School Health Education Profiles, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunbaum, J A; Kann, L; Williams, B I; Kinchen, S A; Collins, J L; Kolbe, L J

    1998-09-11

    School health education (e.g., classroom training) is an essential component of school health programs; such education promotes the health of youth and improves overall public health. February-May 1996. The School Health Education Profiles monitor characteristics of health education in middle or junior high schools and senior high schools. The Profiles are school-based surveys conducted by state and local education agencies. This report summarizes results from 35 state surveys and 13 local surveys conducted among representative samples of school principals and lead health education teachers. The lead health education teacher is the person who coordinates health education policies and programs within a middle or junior high school and senior high school. During the study period, almost all schools in states and cities required health education in grades 6-12; of these, a median of 87.6% of states and 75.8% of cities taught a separate health education course. The median percentage of schools that tried to increase student knowledge on certain topics (i.e., prevention of tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection, other sexually transmitted diseases, violence, or suicide; dietary behaviors and nutrition; and physical activity and fitness) was > 72% for each of these topics. The median percentage of schools that tried to improve certain student skills (i.e., communication, decision making, goal setting, resisting social pressures, nonviolent conflict resolution, stress management, and analysis of media messages) was > 69% for each of these skills. The median percentage of schools that had a health education teacher coordinate health education was 33.0% across states and 26.8% across cities. Almost all schools taught HIV education as part of a required health education course (state median: 94.3%; local median: 98.1%), and more than half (state median: 69.5%; local median: 82.5%) had a written policy on HIV infection

  17. Meeting the Needs of Career and Technical Education: Observations from Graduates of a High School Health Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avey, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Career and Technical education has been around for some time, and has often been shaped by the current economic landscape of the country. While current evolving trends focus on relevance for students in the school setting, a coexistence with college preparation curriculum is now the new trend in modern technical education. New programs have…

  18. Education and Health in Late-Life among High School Graduates: Cognitive versus Psychological Aspects of Human Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Just as postsecondary schooling serves as a dividing line between the advantaged and disadvantaged on outcomes like income and marital status, it also serves as a dividing line between the healthy and unhealthy. Why are the better educated healthier? Human capital theory posits that education makes one healthier via cognitive (skill improvements)…

  19. Educator Mental Health Literacy: A Programme Evaluation of the Teacher Training Education on the Mental Health & High School Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, S.; Wei, Y.; McLuckie, A.; Bullock, L.

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders make up close to one-third of the global burden of disease experienced during adolescence. Schools can play an important role in the promotion of positive mental health as well as an integral role in the pathways into mental health care for adolescents. In order for schools to effectively address the mental health problems of…

  20. Facilitating Transition from High School and Special Education to Adult Life: Focus on Youth with Learning Disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Speech/Language Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherman, Lee I; Shaftel, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Youth with learning disorders, speech/language disorders, and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may experience significant struggles during the transition from high school to postsecondary education and employment. These disorders often occur in combination or concurrently with behavioral and emotional difficulties. Incomplete evaluation may not fully identify the factors underlying academic and personal challenges. This article reviews these disorders, the role of special education law for transitional age youth in public schools, and the Americans with Disabilities Act in postsecondary educational and employment settings. The role of the child and adolescent psychiatrist and the importance of advocacy for these youth are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The teach-learning process of high school students: a case of Educational Biology for teachers formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Laporta Chudo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the teach-learning process of high school students, in the scope of Educational Biology. To plan and to develop a methodology with lesson strategies that facilitate the learning. To analyze, in the students vision, the positive and negative points in the process. Method. A research was developed -- of which had participated students of the first semester of the Pedagogy of a high school private institution in São Paulo city -- of the type action-research, with increased qualitative character of quantitative instruments; as a way of data collect, had been used questionnaires and field diary; the results had been converted in charts; after that, the data collected by the questionnaires had been analyzed according to the technique of the collective subject analysis. Results. The results had supplied important information to high school teachers reflection about teach-learning process, showing that the used strategies allowed student envolvement and participation, proximity with personal and professional reality, bigger interaction in the interpersonal relations and critical reflection. Conclusions. The theoretical referencial about adult learning, the active methodologies and the interpersonal relationship between professor and pupils, with the analysis of the students vision about the positive and negative points in the teach-learning process, had provided subsidies to believe a methodology and specific didactic strategies for adults and that must contemplate the teachers motivation and the pedagogical communication, including elements like creativity, up to date technician content and formative content to the future profession, experiences exchange, that allow an affective relationship teacher-student, with interaction and dialogue.

  2. Evaluation of Personality Traits of Physical Education Teachers Working in Secondary Schools and High Schools in Çanakkale According to Their Sports Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The sampling of the present study consists of 92 volunteer physical education teachers (59 male and 33 female) who work at state and private primary schools (of the Ministry of Education) in Canakkale in the academic year 2013-2014. To identify the personality traits of the participants, Personality Inventory (PERI) was utilized. PERI consists of…

  3. Home Education, School, Travellers and Educational Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The difficulties Traveller pupils experience in school are well documented. Yet those in home educating go unreported. Monk suggests this is because some groups are overlooked; that gypsies and Travellers are often not perceived as home educators. This article highlights how the move to home education is seldom a free choice for Traveller…

  4. Ideological Homogeneity, School Leadership, and Political Intolerance in Secondary Education: A Study of Three High Schools during the 2008 Presidential Election

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journell, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This study reports findings from a qualitative case study of three high schools during the 2008 presidential election. The schools appeared to promote the political ideologies of their corresponding populations, and in the two predominately ideologically homogenous schools, political intolerance often appeared to affect teachers' instruction and…

  5. High School Book Fairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Many secondary students have given up the joy of reading. When asked why they don't read for pleasure, students came up with many different reasons, the first being lack of time. High school students are busy with after school jobs, sports, homework, etc. With the growing number of students enrolled in AP classes, not only is there not much time…

  6. Investing in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Strapped for cash, a Massachusetts high school creates its own venture capital fund to incentivize teachers to create programs that improve student learning. The result has been higher test scores and higher job satisfaction. One important program is credited with helping close the achievement gap at the school, while others have helped ambitious…

  7. Mathematics Instructional Model Based on Realistic Mathematics Education to Promote Problem Solving Ability at Junior High School Padang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Musdi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop a mathematics instructional model based realistic mathematics education (RME to promote students' problem-solving abilities. The design research used Plomp models, which consists of preliminary phase, development or proto-typing phase and assessment phase.  At this study, only the first two phases conducted. The first phase, a preliminary investigation, carried out with a literature study to examine the theory-based instructional learning RME model, characteristics of learners, learning management descriptions by junior high school mathematics teacher and relevant research. The development phase is done by developing a draft model (an early prototype model that consists of the syntax, the social system, the principle of reaction, support systems, and the impact and effects of instructional support. Early prototype model contain a draft model, lesson plans, worksheets, and assessments. Tesssmer formative evaluation model used to revise the model. In this study only phase of one to one evaluation conducted. In the ppreliminary phase has produced a theory-based learning RME model, a description of the characteristics of learners in grade VIII Junior High School Padang and the description of teacher teaching in the classroom. The result showed that most students were still not be able to solve the non-routine problem. Teachers did not optimally facilitate students to develop problem-solving skills of students. It was recommended that the model can be applied in the classroom.

  8. Religious Education for the Disenfranchised: Fusing Multicultural Strategies into Catholic High School Religion Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Mary

    Although multicultural education is misunderstood by many and feared by some, it has been embraced by educators throughout the world as a necessary approach to preparing the next generation for the complexities of the 21st century. A study explored the work of three Catholic secondary religion teachers, who use multicultural strategies in their…

  9. Playing educational micro-games at high schools: Individually or collectively?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brom, C.; Levčík, David; Buchtová, M.; Klement, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, Jul (2015), s. 682-694 ISSN 0747-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13386 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : educational games * collective play * learning effects * secondary education * classrooms Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.880, year: 2015

  10. Planning Wetland Ecology-Based Outdoor Education Courses in Taiwanese Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Education does more than give students facts; it develops their potential and trains them to adapt to and improve their living environment. Through education, students formulate informed ideas about the interactions between people, things, and the environment. In an era of global environmental change, students must understand environmental…

  11. Development and Testing of a Junior High School Oral Hygiene Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffa, Joseph; Kugler, John F., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Described is a program to be woven into the curriculum in such a way that it becomes part of the the total education plan. It should be taught in the classroom by the teacher and would thus necessitate inservice education. (Author)

  12. Native American High School Seniors' Perceptions of Higher Education: Motivating and Demotivating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogman, Calvin

    2013-01-01

    For many Native American students, particularly those from reservations, the pursuit of higher education is a formidable concept to grasp. Poverty, rural isolation, and a myriad of social ills all take a role as demotivational factors that act as barriers between Native American students and a college education. On the other hand, family,…

  13. Integration of Engineering Education by High School Teachers to Meet Standards in the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Jennifer Anna

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in engineering education at the K-12 level, which has resulted in states adopting engineering standards as a part of their academic science standards. From a national perspective, the basis for research into engineering education at the K-12 level is the belief that it is of benefit to student…

  14. Experiences of Teacher Evaluation Systems on High School Physical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon R.; Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Primary objective: Teacher evaluation is being revamped by policy-makers. The marginalized status of physical education has protected this subject area from reform for many decades, but in our current era of system-wide, data-based decision-making, physical education is no longer immune. Standardized and local testing, together with structured…

  15. The Changing Roles of Vocational and Academic Education in Future High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, David J.

    Both the rapid movement to the knowledge/imagination age and a more thorough understanding of how problem-solving skills are developed challenge traditional education to change and adopt a new set of goals. Academic and vocational education are modifying their goals and instructional procedures, and they are blending together. As technology has…

  16. National Identity in Moral Education Textbooks for High School Students in the Philippines: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Sherlyne A.

    2003-01-01

    The past two consecutive administrations in the Philippines saw the need for developing a greater sense of national identity among Filipinos. In response, the Education Sector strengthened the teaching of values on national ideals and Filipino heritage. One reform was the offering of Moral Education as an independent subject in the secondary…

  17. The Effect of Biotechnology Education on Australian High School Students' Understandings and Attitudes about Biotechnology Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Vaille; Soames, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Our education system aims to equip young people with the knowledge, problem-solving skills and values to cope with an increasingly technological society. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of biotechnology education on adolescents' understanding and attitudes about processes associated with biotechnology. Data were drawn from…

  18. Effect of Drug and Alcohol Education on Attitudes of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignell, Constance; Davidhizar, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Examined effects of 3-week alcohol and drug education course on attitudes about alcohol and drugs in ninth grade students (n=180). Results showed mean attitude score changed in desired direction after education indicating negative feelings toward drugs and alcohol use and abuse, polydrug use, dependency, social pressure, and media pressure and…

  19. Relationship between Different Types of Educational, Emotional and Spiritual Intelligence and Second Grade High School Female Students’ Religious Orientation, in Sari, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Doustdar Toosi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, we investigated how significantly the second grade high school female students’ educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence were associated with their religious orientation. This research is descriptive (non- experimental with a correlation design. The research population includes all of the second grade high school girl students, during the 2015-16 educational year in Sari, a city in the north of Iran.  In this research, 260 samples were selected randomly. Research results showed that educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence (independent variables had positive and significant relationship with internal and external religious orientation (dependent variable. As the levels of educational, emotional, and spiritual intelligence increased, so did the level of religious orientation. Also the results of multiple regression analysis showed that educational, emotional, spiritual intelligence were anticipants of religious orientation and its dimensions (internal and external religious orientation.

  20. A study of the professional development needs of Shiraz high schools' principals in the area of educational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Aliasghar; Abdollahi, Bijan; Zainabadi, Hasan Reza; Arasteh, Hamid Reza

    2015-07-01

    The increased emphasis on standards-based school accountability since the passage of the no child left behind act of 2001 is focusing critical attention on the professional development of school principals and their ability to meet the challenges of improving the student outcomes. Due to this subject, the current study examined professional development needs of Shiraz high schools principals. The statistical population consisted of 343 principals of Shiraz high schools, of whom 250 subjects were selected using Krejcie and Morgan (1978) sample size determination table. To collect the data, a questionnaire developed by Salazar (2007) was administered. This questionnaire was designed for professional development in the leadership skills/competencies and consisted of 25 items in each leadership performance domain using five-point Likert-type scales. The content validity of the questionnaire was confirmed and the Cronbach's Alpha coefficient was (a=0.78). To analyze the data, descriptive statistics and Paired-Samples t-test were used. Also, the data was analyzed through SPSS14 software. The findings showed that principals' "Importance" ratings were always higher than their "Actual proficiency" ratings. The mean score of the difference between "Importance" and "Actual proficiency" pair on "Organizing resources" was 2.11, making it the highest "need" area. The lowest need area was "Managing the organization and operational procedures" at 0.81. Also, the results showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the means of the "Importance" and the corresponding means on the "Actual proficiency" (Difference of means=1.48, t=49.38, pprofessional development needs of the principals included organizing resources, resolving complex problems, understanding student development and learning, developing the vision and the mission, building team commitment, understanding measurements, evaluation and assessment strategies, facilitating the change process, solving

  1. SOCIAL PERCEPTION OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM REFORM. SURVEY CONDUCTED IN UPPER HIGH SCHOOLS OF BIHOR COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabau Remus Mircea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Between the elements which mark the global processes, we can include educational issues, the management of processes in pre-university education. Therefore, the synthetic approach to educational problems in Romania, studied in terms of the processes and the phenomena of social development, but also due to the need for submiting the pre-university Romanian educational process to the European Union requirements, appears to be current and important. This analysis focuses on the decentralization of education. This theme is a true significant of the stage and of the the changing potential of the management practice in the public area. Its actuality is also hard to contest under the conditions in which changes in this area have been slow compared to those of the other countries that joined the European Union (Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, contradictory and inconsistent (Herczynski and Levitas, 2001: 1-2. The legislative changes, training facilities, as well as the constant institutional reorganization of pre-university education show the presence of an active interest in this matter. However, the real reform of university education still requires essential improvements. This study analyzes the social perception of performers in pre-university system, establishes positive and negative aspects of the reform in pre-university education, all from the perspective of teachers. The research was conducted between March 1st, 2011 and April 1st, 2011. During this time the questionnaire was applied and the data interpreted. The data obtained from the questionnaire interpretation were introduced into the SPSS program. For the analysis and interpretation of data we used SPSS 15.0. under Windows license. My investigation efforts were directed towards the impact of decentralization on the performers in pre-university education system and on their perception. The main purpose of the experimental study was to determine the essential perceptions of the performers

  2. Deterministic Chaos: Proposal of an Informal Educational Activity Aimed at High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Valeria; Spagnolo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Chaos theory is not present in the Italian school curricula and textbooks in spite of being present in many topics of classical physics and in everyday life. Chaotic dynamics, in fact, are involved in phenomena easily accessible to everyone or in events experienced by most people in their lives (the dripping of a faucet which keeps people awoken…

  3. Career/Education Plans and Student Engagement in Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasman, Jay Stratte

    2018-01-01

    Student engagement in education is key to ensuring successful learning. Engagement becomes crucial as students progress through high school and transition into young adulthood; however, engaging them in high school can be an arduous task. A career/education plan can help students make strong connections between their work in high school and their…

  4. INFLUENCE OF MOTIVATOR ON EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH PLANNING ON PHYSICS IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra M. Sokolyuk

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author considers the problem of the determination the role of instruction in the organization of educational research activity in the senior classes according to their profile area in view of motivator.

  5. INFLUENCE OF MOTIVATOR ON EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH PLANNING ON PHYSICS IN HIGH SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandra M. Sokolyuk

    2010-01-01

    In the article the author considers the problem of the determination the role of instruction in the organization of educational research activity in the senior classes according to their profile area in view of motivator.

  6. The Analysis of High School 'Home Economics' Textbooks from a Career Education Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    松田, 典子; マツダ, ノリコ; Noriko, Matsuda

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the system of employment has changed; it is said that career education is important. In this paper, I explore and clearly describe career education on `Home economics' textbooks. My findings suggest (1) the characteristics and cases of `housework' and `occupational work'were found in many textbooks. (2) `the diversity of employment' and `how to work' is frequently described in recent years. (3) one textbook specifically pick up `what vocational skills are needed'. (4) `life time' or...

  7. Promoting Science in Secondary School Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovitti, Anthony; Duncan, Jacinta C; Jabbar, Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Engaging secondary school students with science education is crucial for a society that demands a high level of scientific literacy in order to deal with the economic and social challenges of the 21st century. Here we present how parasitology could be used to engage and promote science in secondary school students under the auspice of a 'Specialist Centre' model for science education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Timetabling at High Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias

    on the publicly available XHSTT format for modeling instances and solutions of the HSTP) and the Danish High School Timetabling Problem (DHSTP). For both problems a complex Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model is developed, and in both cases are empirical tests performed on a large number of real-life datasets......High school institutions face a number of important planning problems during each schoolyear. This Ph.D. thesis considers two of these planning problems: The High School Timetabling Problem (HSTP) and the Consultation Timetabling Problem (CTP). Furthermore a framework for handling various planning....... The second part contains the main scienti_c papers composed during the Ph.D. study. The third part of the thesis also contains scienti_c papers, but these are included as an appendix. In the HSTP, the goal is to obtain a timetable for the forthcoming school-year. A timetable consists of lectures scheduled...

  9. Education effect of solar car for technical high school student; Kogyo kokosei ni taisuru solar car no kyoiku koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, T.

    1998-09-30

    The solar car race which technical high school students can join in was determined to be held at Ogata village, Akita prefecture. To join in the solar bicycle race, the author working in Ofuna technical high school called on 3 schools of Yokosuka, Fujisawa and Kanagawa technical high schools which joined in World Solar-Car Rally in Akita (WSR) in 1997, before fabrication of a racing bicycle. This paper describes the survey results at the above technical high schools, and the spirit as the teacher of Ofuna technical high school on joining in the race and fabrication of the solar bicycle, and the past, current and future situations. Club activities of high school students incline too toward sports such as soccer, baseball, volleyball and rugby, and are apt to keep honest cultural events and technical events at a distance. The author says that the challenge spirit to the solar car race using environment-friendly solar energy by both dedicated teachers and students of technical high schools summoned up the author`s courage. 15 figs.

  10. Observation of High School Students' Food Handling Behaviors: Do They Improve following a Food Safety Education Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplock, Kenneth J; Dubin, Joel A; Leatherdale, Scott T; Hammond, David; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Majowicz, Shannon E

    2018-06-01

    Youth are a key audience for food safety education. They often engage in risky food handling behaviors, prepare food for others, and have limited experience and knowledge of safe food handling practices. Our goal was to investigate the effectiveness of an existing food handler training program for improving safe food handling behaviors among high school students in Ontario, Canada. However, because no schools agreed to provide control groups, we evaluated whether behaviors changed following delivery of the intervention program and whether changes were sustained over the school term. We measured 32 food safety behaviors, before the intervention and at 2-week and 3-month follow-up evaluations by in-person observations of students ( n = 119) enrolled in grade 10 and 12 Food and Nutrition classes ( n = 8) and who individually prepared recipes. We examined within-student changes in behaviors across the three time points, using mixed effects regression models to model trends in the total food handling score (of a possible 32 behaviors) and subscores for "clean" (17 behaviors), "separate" (14 behaviors), and "cook" (1 behavior), adjusting for student characteristics. At baseline, students ( n = 108) averaged 49.1% (15.7 of 32 behaviors; standard deviation = 5.8) correct food handling behaviors, and only 5.5% (6) of the 108 students used a food thermometer to check the doneness of the chicken (the "cook" behavior). All four behavior score types increased significantly ∼2 weeks postintervention and remained unchanged ∼3 months later. Student characteristics (e.g., having taken a prior food handling course) were not significant predictors of the total number of correctly performed food handling behaviors or of the "clean" or "separate" behaviors, working or volunteering in a food service establishment was the only characteristic significantly associated with food thermometer use (i.e., "cook"). Despite the significant increase in correct behaviors, students continued to

  11. High school and college introductory science education experiences: A study regarding perceptions of university students persisting in science as a major area of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, L. Denise

    The focus of this study was to investigate college students' perception of high school and college introductory science learning experiences related to persistence in science as a major area of study in college. The study included students' perceptions of the following areas of science education: (1) teacher interpersonal relationship with students, (2) teacher personality styles, (3) teacher knowledge of the content, (4) instructional methods, and (5) science course content. A survey research design was employed in the investigative study to collect and analyze data. One hundred ninety two students participated in the research study. A survey instrument entitled Science Education Perception Survey was used to collect data. The researcher sought to reject or support three null hypotheses as related to participants' perceptions of high school and college introductory science education experiences. Using binomial regression analysis, this study analyzed differences between students persisting in science and students not persisting in science as a major. The quantitative research indicated that significant differences exist between persistence in science as a major and high school science teacher traits and college introductory science instructional methods. Although these variables were found to be significant predictors, the percent variance was low and should be considered closely before concluded these as strong predictors of persistence. Major findings of the qualitative component indicated that students perceived that: (a) interest in high school science course content and high school science teacher personality and interpersonal relationships had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (b) interest in college introductory science course content had the greatest effect on students' choice of major area of study; (c) students recalled laboratory activities and overall good teaching as most meaningful to their high school science

  12. The Educational Effects of basic Nuclear Power and Radiation Education on Elementary-, Middle-, and High-School Students in 2012-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok; Hahm, Young Kyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Eun Ok

    2014-01-01

    Due to the cognitive anchoring of both powerful and negative images, such as those concerning the Chernobyl accident and the Fukushima nuclear accident, as well as insufficient post-accident management following such events, the general population's perception of risk regarding technology or institutions related to nuclear energy is heavily affected by the occurrence of these nuclear accidents. Because the acceptability of local and general residents serves as a prerequisite to nuclear power institutions and policies, increasing the social acceptability of nuclear power is important in South Korea, where the continuous use of nuclear power is necessary for the security of its nationwide energy supply and economic growth. By focusing education regarding nuclear power generation and radiation use on elementary-, middle-, and high-school students, who will, out of the general population, likely experience some of the greatest ripple effects from this focused education, the relationship between perception, knowledge, and attitude regarding nuclear power generation and radiation were then analyzed. The goals of this analysis were to help form an extensive and national social consensus regarding nuclear power generation and radiation use that is appropriate to South Korea, and improve the understanding and public perceptions of the aforementioned technology of the people of South Korea. In order for radiation technology to power national developments through the next generation, understanding and acceptance of for radiation technology by the general population must come first. In order to effectively provide data about this understanding and acceptance, elementary-, middle-, and high-school students all of whom will constitute the majority of public opinion in the near future were provided basic education regarding radiation use and nuclear power. Their perceptions before and after the intervention, as well as their knowledge and attitude as based on traditional

  13. The Educational Effects of basic Nuclear Power and Radiation Education on Elementary-, Middle-, and High-School Students in 2012-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok; Hahm, Young Kyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Eun Ok [Department of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Due to the cognitive anchoring of both powerful and negative images, such as those concerning the Chernobyl accident and the Fukushima nuclear accident, as well as insufficient post-accident management following such events, the general population's perception of risk regarding technology or institutions related to nuclear energy is heavily affected by the occurrence of these nuclear accidents. Because the acceptability of local and general residents serves as a prerequisite to nuclear power institutions and policies, increasing the social acceptability of nuclear power is important in South Korea, where the continuous use of nuclear power is necessary for the security of its nationwide energy supply and economic growth. By focusing education regarding nuclear power generation and radiation use on elementary-, middle-, and high-school students, who will, out of the general population, likely experience some of the greatest ripple effects from this focused education, the relationship between perception, knowledge, and attitude regarding nuclear power generation and radiation were then analyzed. The goals of this analysis were to help form an extensive and national social consensus regarding nuclear power generation and radiation use that is appropriate to South Korea, and improve the understanding and public perceptions of the aforementioned technology of the people of South Korea. In order for radiation technology to power national developments through the next generation, understanding and acceptance of for radiation technology by the general population must come first. In order to effectively provide data about this understanding and acceptance, elementary-, middle-, and high-school students all of whom will constitute the majority of public opinion in the near future were provided basic education regarding radiation use and nuclear power. Their perceptions before and after the intervention, as well as their knowledge and attitude as based on traditional

  14. Evaluating Changes in Climate Literacy among Middle and High School Students who Participate in Climate Change Education Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWaters, J.; Powers, S.; Dhaniyala, S.; Small, M.

    2012-12-01

    Middle school (MS) and high school (HS) teachers have developed and taught instructional modules that were created through their participation in Clarkson University's NASA-funded Project-Based Global Climate Change Education project. A quantitative survey was developed to help evaluate the project's impact on students' climate literacy, which includes content knowledge as well as affective and behavioral attributes. Content objectives were guided primarily by the 2009 document, Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The survey was developed according to established psychometric principles and methodologies in the sociological and educational sciences which involved developing and evaluating a pool of survey items, adapted primarily from existing climate surveys and questionnaires; preparing, administering, and evaluating two rounds of pilot tests; and preparing a final instrument with revisions informed by both pilot assessments. The resulting survey contains three separate subscales: cognitive, affective, and behavioral, with five self-efficacy items embedded within the affective subscale. Cognitive items use a multiple choice format with one correct response; non-cognitive items use a 5-point Likert-type scale with options generally ranging from "strongly agree" to "strongly disagree" (affective), or "almost always" to "hardly ever" (behavioral). Three versions of the survey were developed and administered using an on-line Zoomerang™ platform to college students/adults; HS students; and MS students, respectively. Instrument validity was supported by using items drawn from existing surveys, by reviewing/applying prior research in climate literacy, and through comparative age-group analysis. The internal consistency reliability of each subscale, as measured by Cronbach's alpha, ranges from 0.78-0.86 (cognitive), 0.87-0.89 (affective) and 0.84-0.85 (behavioral), all satisfying generally accepted criteria for internal reliability of

  15. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 8. High Tech High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  16. Approaches for Improving Earth System Science Education in Middle Schools and High Schools in the United States (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. E.

    2009-12-01

    Earth system science is an often neglected subject in the US science curriculum. The state of Kansas State Department of Education, for example, has provided teachers with a curriculum guide for incorporating earth system science as an ancillary topic within the subjects of physics, chemistry, and the biological sciences. While this does provide a means to have earth system science within the curriculum, it relegates earth system science topics to a secondary status. In practice, earth system science topics are considered optional or only taught if there is time within an already an overly crowded curriculum. Given the importance of developing an educated citizenry that is capable of understanding, coping, and deciding how to live in a world where climate change is a reality requires a deeper understanding of earth system science. The de-emphasis of earth system science in favor of other science disciplines makes it imperative to seek opportunities to provide teachers, whose primary subject is not earth system science, with professional development opportunities to develop content knowledge understanding of earth system science, and pedagogical content knowledge (i.e. effective strategies for teaching earth system science). This is a noble goal, but there is no single method. At Fort Hays State University we have developed multiple strategies from face-to-face workshops, on-line coursework, and academic year virtual and face-to-face consultations with in-service and pre-service teachers. A review of the techniques and measures of effectiveness (based on teacher and student performance), and strengths and limitations of each method will be presented as an aid to other institutions and programs seeking to improve the teaching and learning of earth system science in their region.

  17. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Outbreak Among a High School Football Team at an Outdoor Education Camping Trip, Arizona, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jefferson M; Hranac, Carter R; Schumacher, Mare; Horn, Kim; Lee, Darlene M; Terriquez, Joel; Engelthaler, David M; Peoples, Marie; Corrigan, Jennifer; Replogle, Adam; Souders, Nina; Komatsu, Kenneth K; Nieto, Nathan C

    2016-09-07

    During August 2014, five high school students who had attended an outdoor education camp were hospitalized with a febrile illness, prompting further investigation. Ten total cases of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) were identified-six cases confirmed by culture or visualization of spirochetes on blood smear and four probable cases with compatible symptoms (attack rate: 23%). All patients had slept in the campsite's only cabin. Before the camp, a professional pest control company had rodent proofed the cabin, but no acaricides had been applied. Cabin inspection after the camp found rodents and Ornithodoros ticks, the vector of TBRF. Blood samples from a chipmunk trapped near the cabin and from patients contained Borrelia hermsii with identical gene sequences (100% over 630 base pairs). Health departments in TBRF endemic areas should consider educating cabin owners and pest control companies to apply acaricides during or following rodent proofing, because ticks that lack rodents for a blood meal might feed on humans. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Internationalization of Higher Education in China: Chinese-Foreign Cooperation in Running Schools and the Introduction of High-Quality Foreign Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    With the acceleration of the internationalization process of higher education in China, the Chinese-foreign cooperation in running schools (CFCRS) has been developing at an expeditious pace nowadays. It positively enhances the internationalization process of Chinese higher education and greatly contributes to providing the society with talents.…

  19. Investigating Multicultural Education Phenomena in Minority and Public High Schools in Turkey: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlar, Aylin; Dogan, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Upon inspection of Turkish national programs, it is seen that today they incorporate more universal values and principles such as democracy and pluralism. In order to design systems and curricula for multicultural societies, it is of great importance to thoroughly understand the phenomenon of multicultural education in minority and public…

  20. Impact of a High School Career and Technical Education Program on Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, Bradley E.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder rates are climbing in the United States. Because this population is growing, research is needed to understand how to assist these individuals in pursuit of postsecondary educational and employment opportunities. The purpose of this qualitative study, as reflected in the central research question, was to investigate how a…

  1. Parenting Styles, Adolescents' Attributions, and Educational Outcomes in Nine Heterogeneous High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Kristan L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined contemporaneous and predictive relations between parenting styles, adolescents' attributions, and educational outcomes. Found that adolescents who perceived their parents as nonauthoritative were more likely than peers to attribute achievement outcomes to external causes or low ability. The higher the proportion of dysfunctional…

  2. Effects of Educational Productivity on Career Aspiration among United States High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Xin

    2001-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling and data on 10th-grade students from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth, a model was developed to show the relationship to career aspiration of eight indicators of "educational productivity": mathematics achievement; motivation; instructional quantity and quality; home, class, and peer environment; and mass…

  3. Interrelation of satisfaction educational activity and sense of justice of students of pedagogical high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Szinkovskaya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Formation of sense of justice of students is caused not only objective factors, but also subjective among which essential value has satisfaction study. In article the analysis of satisfaction of students is given by educational activity and its interrelation with levels of sense of justice of students is shown.

  4. Curriculum Guide for General Education Development or High School Equivalency Examination in Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shobha; Escalona, Margaret Boyter

    This curriculum guide was developed as part of the Worker Education Program for workers in the garment industry. The program was jointly developed by the workers, their employer, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. It contains the materials required to teach a course to help Spanish-speaking individuals pass the General Educational…

  5. How to develop sex education among adolescents in high school, from the Spanish-Literature lessons ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanicet Rodríguez Marrero

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the treatment of sexual education for adolescents from the Spanish-Literature lessons in pr euniversity. It is based on contents that have become of paramount importance at the time of having a responsible sexuality, and in preventing risky behaviour on the STD (Sexual Transmitted Diseases. In its modelling various up-to-date concepts and appro aches that deal with this theme for its contextualization and enrichment of the educative models existing in Cuba were taken into consideration. It is considered that the formation of adolescents should be dealt with in the pedagogical context where the role of the teachers is of great significance from the point of view of the lesson.

  6. Between Rights and Realities: Human Rights Education for Immigrant and Refugee Youth in an Urban Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha; Canlas, Melissa; Argenal, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This article presents data from a two-year ethnographic case study to explore how immigrant and refugee youth in the United States made sense of participation in a weekly human rights club after school. Three types of student responses to human rights education are exemplified through the profiles of students. The article offers new insights on…

  7. Targeted Funding for Educationally Disadvantaged Students: A Regression Discontinuity Estimate of the Impact on High School Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gary T.; Fortner, C. Kevin; Thompson, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the impacts of public school funding on student achievement has been an important objective for informing education policymaking but fraught with data and methodological limitations. Findings from prior research have been mixed at best, leaving policymakers with little advice about the benefits of allocating public resources to schools…

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Curriculum to Improve Educational and Career Outcomes for High School Girls with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doren, Bonnie; Lombardi, Allison; Lindstrom, Lauren; Gau, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Despite the national focus on improving transition services and post-school outcomes, many young women with disabilities still face significant barriers in obtaining meaningful employment and pursuing postsecondary education or training. Although recent reports indicate that the gender gap in employment rates may be diminishing, in this same…

  9. Educating Amid Uncertainty: The Organizational Supports Teachers Need to Serve Students in High-Poverty, Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Matthew A.; Papay, John P.; Johnson, Susan Moore; Charner-Laird, Megin; Ng, Monica; Reinhorn, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We examine how uncertainty, both about students and the context in which they are taught, remains a persistent condition of teachers' work in high-poverty, urban schools. We describe six schools' organizational responses to these uncertainties, analyze how these responses reflect open- versus closed-system approaches, and examine how this…

  10. Linking Foreign Language to Occupational Education in a Rural High School: Foreign Language with Criminal Justice and Travel & Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, William R.

    Ticonderoga High School (New York) has succeeded in increasing enrollments in foreign language courses beyond the college bound, Regents-level students who usually choose such courses. The school is located in the Adirondack Mountains, a region that, in the past decade, has seen increases both in prison construction and in tourism by…

  11. ASPECTS OF THE COMMUNICATION IN THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM. CASE STUDY, HIGH SCHOOL SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Radu IOVA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pupil-teacher communication and the teacher communication skills seem to be key concepts to reach the objectives of the educational act. Recent studies highlight the link between the teacher communication skills, their efficiency, and the fact that these skills could play a more important role for the education that the teaching staff training, his intelligence level and teaching methods. The research goal was the investigation of the aspects specific to the educational communication, that constitute facilitator factors and barriers in the learning process and in the relation teacher-pupil. The quantitative analysis was based on a questionnaire for pupils and teachers, that aimed the investigation of the respondents perception on what it is a good teacher in order to identify those skills that make the difference, from the pupils point of view, and also from the teachers point of view, between a competent teacher and an ineffective one. The research used a double approach, quantitative and qualitative one. The quantitative study allowed the inclusion of a number of 151 subjects and the survey of some dimensions of teacherpupil communication. The qualitative research used a number of 47 subjects, but it allowed the consolidation of the approached topics. The results obtained were interpreted based on the differences that appear in the pupils and teaching staff opinions, but also through the investigation of those dimensions that make the difference, in the case of a model teaching staff, between the pupils and teachers perceptions.

  12. Gendered Motivational Processes Affecting High School Mathematics Participation, Educational Aspirations, and Career Plans: A Comparison of Samples from Australia, Canada, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Helen M. G.; Shapka, Jennifer D.; Morris, Zoe A.; Durik, Amanda M.; Keating, Daniel P.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2012-01-01

    In this international, longitudinal study, we explored gender differences in, and gendered relationships among, math-related motivations emphasized in the Eccles (Parsons) et al. (1983) expectancy-value framework, high school math participation, educational aspirations, and career plans. Participants were from Australia, Canada, and the United…

  13. Effect of Feedback Strategy and Motivation of Achievement to Improving Learning Results Concept in Learning Civic Education in Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarno; Setyosari, Punaji; Haryono

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of feedback strategies on understanding and applying the concept of National ideology to students who have different achievement motivation, on learning Citizenship Education in vocational high schools. This research uses quasi experiment research design (Quasi Experiment). The subjects of this study were 133…

  14. The Female Predominance of a Vocational and Scientific Education Programme for High School Students in Rio de Janeiro and Recife, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Isabela Cabral Felix; Braga, Cristiane Nogueira; Frutuoso, Telma de Mello; Ferreira, Cristina Araripe; Vargas, Diego da Silva

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how students view their volunteer choices to take part in a specific scientific education programme while they attend high school. This programme is called (Provoc) located at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Brazil. Historically, this programme has been characterised by a significant predominance of…

  15. Students' Perceptions about the Use of Educational Games as a Tool for Teaching the Periodic Table of Elements at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, Jose´ María; Gil, M. L. Almoraima

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here was conducted to investigate the perceptions of high school students on the use of educational games as a tool for teaching the periodic table of elements in a chemistry class in Spain. The 127 students who participated in this study came from six different classes in grade 10 (15-16 years old). The students' perceptions of…

  16. Perceived Factors Influencing High School Student Participation in an Integrated Statewide Dual Credit Program: An Examination of Program Success and Student Higher Education Selection Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchstone, Allison J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Dual credit programs have become increasingly popular with 71% U.S. public high schools offering dual credit courses in 2002-2003. As this popularity has grown, so have concerns regarding academic rigor, course quality, parity with college courses, and effects on higher education. Determining actual dual credit course equivalent in higher…

  17. The Role of Senior High School Experiences in Shaping a Life Project Linked to Higher Education for Students With Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Cruz-Vadillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the school experiences of 13 students with disabilities. It corresponds to a cross, synchronous and non experimental study, whose scope is mainly descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a semi-structured interview and transcribed from audio recordings to make a category analysis. The main results showed that in the case of students who were born with disabilities, the fact that an institution was inclusive turned out essential for them to have adequate transit through the educational system and thus become apt for higher education. The combination disability-inclusion-right to education-higher education is what this paper aimed to weave, trying to follow as thread or anchor, the previous school experiences of students with disabilities. We recognize that an adequate, inclusive, positive experience besides a subjective construction of the body and disability by family members, become important conditions to access schooling. Education is a right, therefore it can not be seen as an act of charity; it should be required as a quality practice.

  18. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School...

  19. The Classification of Romanian High-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Ion; Milodin, Daniel; Naie, Lucian

    2006-01-01

    The article tries to tackle the issue of high-schools classification from one city, district or from Romania. The classification criteria are presented. The National Database of Education is also presented and the application of criteria is illustrated. An algorithm for high-school multi-rang classification is proposed in order to build classes of…

  20. Switching Schools: Reconsidering the Relationship Between School Mobility and High School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasper, Joseph; DeLuca, Stefanie; Estacion, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Youth who switch schools are more likely to demonstrate a wide array of negative behavioral and educational outcomes, including dropping out of high school. However, whether switching schools actually puts youth at risk for dropout is uncertain, since youth who switch schools are similar to dropouts in their levels of prior school achievement and engagement, which suggests that switching schools may be part of the same long-term developmental process of disengagement that leads to dropping out. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study uses propensity score matching to pair youth who switched high schools with similar youth who stayed in the same school. We find that while over half the association between switching schools and dropout is explained by observed characteristics prior to 9th grade, switching schools is still associated with dropout. Moreover, the relationship between switching schools and dropout varies depending on a youth's propensity for switching schools. PMID:25554706

  1. The Impact of E-Education on At Risk High School Students' Science Achievement and Experiences during Summer School Credit Recovery Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Pamela Prevette

    2015-01-01

    Nationally, "at risk" students make up to 30% of U.S. students in public schools. Many "at risk" students have poor attendance, are disengaged from the learning environment and have low academic achievement. Educational failure occurs when students do not complete the required courses and as a result do not receive a high…

  2. Present status and problems of radiation education in Japanese high school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Tadashi; Muraishi, Yukimasa; Mikado, Shogo; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    1999-01-01

    Radiations always exist in nature and are necessary in various fields of our daily life. Radiations are utilized for nondestructive inspection in industrial uses, diagnosis and medical treatment, tracers in agricultural research, and so on. Researchers make good use of radioactivity. However, the fears of radioactivity remain in the public due to reports by mass media, accidents of nuclear power station, treatment of nuclear waste, and atomic bomb. Therefore the public tend to see the negative images of the radiation. Radioactivity can be dangerous. But it is hard to say that radiations are always elevated appropriately. To solve the problems of misunderstanding, we focused the study on the radiation education curriculum. In this research, we studied the radiation education from the following four points: 'physics field', 'physical experiment', 'chemistry field', and 'comprehensive study time'. Two themes of the former were performed in the actual lessons. Two themes of the latter were the investigation of the current state and the tentative plan. The research have to be continued in the future. (author)

  3. School directors and management in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdić Vesna M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of school management and organization comprise planning, decision making, management, leadership and communication. Research suggests that successful school management requires not only advanced managerial but also leadership skills, with highly developed social skills as the main competence. In a complex social system, good leadership becomes a fundamental component of a successful organization or institution. Although leadership has for a long time been of interest for theoreticians and practitioners alike, there are still numerous questions waiting to be answered in the area of management and leadership in education. According to the Law on the Basis of Educational System, the person who can be named a school director must posses appropriate education, competences, license and experience in education. Legal requirements allow the provision of effective training, but the fact that personal disposition can be both an advantage and an obstacle for acquiring necessary items of knowledge and skills, points to the necessity of including selection into the standard procedure for the election of a director. Democratization and decentralization of the educational system presupposes a series of structural, systemic and functional changes which reflect on school management and the role played by the director. This paper considers responsibilities and competences of directors, both in legislation and in school practice and addresses the question whether a school director is a manager or a leader, and what are the possibilities for the provision of professional resources for school management.

  4. The use of images in physics textbooks for high school and college education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Otero

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes how images are used in (N=41 Physics textbooks of three different educational levels. It is discussed to what extent the use of external images could contribute to the comprehension of the physical phenomena and the building of proper mental representations. It is considered how certain conceptions on the internal images would seem to influence on the way the external images are used. A classification is carried out to get a typology, using multivaried analysis techniques. The results indicate that the level decides the image use, being scarce the interaction with the text. In textbooks for EGB 3 in particular, it is identified a use very linked to the ideas derived from the "picture metaphor". An image use that considers its further internal representation is not identified. These results allow to establish some interesting questions for Teaching and Research in Science Teaching.

  5. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  6. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-09-01

    strategies. With all the publicity given to the occasion in the popular press, it seems trite to mention that this school year will end in the 21st century. Nevertheless it is an inescapable fact that this year's senior class will be the first to live out all their post-high-school years in a new century and a new millennium in a world where technological change occurs at breathtaking speed. When they become adults, this school year's students will face the host of problems that plague our planetproblems that will not be left behind with the mere turn of a calendar page: poverty, hunger, political upheaval, disease, natural disasters, environmental degradation. The new school year provides us with an opportunity to help these students equip themselves with the intellectual skills and working knowledge necessary to tackle global problems and local problems. It is a daunting task, one that can only be understood fully by those who teach high school students year after year, often with limited resources and inadequate reward. So why devote this space to something that every experienced teacher knows? Precisely to wish you well, to encourage, to say hurrah, and especially to thank you for what you have done and what you are going to do to educate youth for a productive and chemically literate life in the new millennium.

  7. Looking at sexual education in pre-school education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella García Quintero

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides the framework supporting the training of educative agents to influence upon sexual education of boys and girls in pre-school age as a way to attain high quality standard in the education. These rationale starts from the assumption that it is possible to favor the training process of educative agents on the topic by means of integrating actions with a gender centered approach. The proposal is the result of a thorough study based on the socio-historical cultural approach resulting from the doctoral dissertation already presented by the first authoress. At the same time, these results contribute to the research project “Training the family for the intellectual stimulus of pre-school children. Additionally it offers the stages of sexual education at pre-school age.

  8. Reshaping High School English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, Bruce

    This book takes up the question of what shape high school English studies should take in the coming years. It describes an English program that blends philosophical depth with classroom practicality. Drawing examples from commonly taught texts such as "Macbeth,""To Kill a Mockingbird," and "Lord of the Flies," the…

  9. High-school students' reasoning while constructing plant growth models in a computer-supported educational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergazaki, Marida; Komis, Vassilis; Zogza, Vassiliki

    2005-08-01

    This paper highlights specific aspects of high-school students’ reasoning while coping with a modeling task of plant growth in a computer-supported educational environment. It is particularly concerned with the modeling levels (‘macro-phenomenological’ and ‘micro-conceptual’ level) activated by peers while exploring plant growth and with their ability to shift between or within these levels. The focus is on the types of reasoning developed in the modeling process, as well as on the reasoning coherence around the central concept of plant growth. The findings of the study show that a significant proportion of the 18 participating dyads perform modeling on both levels, while their ability to shift between them as well as between the various elements of the ‘micro-conceptual’ level is rather constrained. Furthermore, the reasoning types identified in peers’ modeling process are ‘convergent’, ‘serial’, ‘linked’ and ‘convergent attached’, with the first type being the most frequent. Finally, a significant part of the participating dyads display a satisfactory degree of reasoning ‘coherence’, performing their task committed to the main objective of exploring plant growth. Teaching implications of the findings are also discussed.

  10. The implementation of skill assessment by the educators on the mathematics learning process in senior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestariani, I.; Sujadi, I.; Pramudya, I.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of research to describe and know the implementation of skill assessment on the mathematics learning process with the high school mathematics teacher as the subject because it is less fully implemented. This research is the type of the descriptive qualitative method. The data was collecting observation method, interview and documentation. The result showed that on the planning stage of the implementation of skill assessment, there were many teachers who had not prepared all the completeness with various assessment techniques through performance, project and portfolio. The teacher was prepared the list of questions. On the implementation stage, there were many teachers who had not understand the stage of completing the assessment with the appropriate instrument method and development. On the reporting stage, discovered that teachers faced the difficulty on preparing scoring report with the range value. Aside from that, the teachers had not prepared the assessment instrument very well on the planning stage. It can be concluded that the implementation of skill assessment has been implemented but not maximally because educators don’t understand about the skill assessment and the number of instrument that must be prepared before the assessment.

  11. Educational effects of radiation work-study activities for elementary, middle, and high schools students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kim, Jae Rok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The results of this study, suggest public communication to promote the use of radiation as follows: first, suitable information for the recipient's perception patterns should be provided, as there is a difference in risk perception and acceptance between the experts and the public. Thus, information on the necessity of nuclear power should be provided to the public, while information based on technical risks is provided by the experts. Second, since the levels of perception, knowledge, and attitudes increased highly for sectors which use radiation after the class, classes should be provided continuously to increase students' perception, knowledge, and attitude, which are all preemptive variables which induce positive behavioral changes. Third, since the seven sectors which use radiation are highly correlated, arguments for the necessity of other sectors should be based on the necessity of the medical sector.

  12. Choice of Professional and Educational Route in High School Students with Disabilities: University Education in the Context of Motivation and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantor V.Z.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a questionnaire survey in the context of the idea of continuity of school and university education of persons with disabilities. 90 senior students with visual, hearing and motor impairments were the respondents of the survey. The purpose of the survey was to study the motives, preferences and needs of school graduates among disabled people, which determine the choice of their vocational and educational route. The survey reveals features of motivation for professional choice of various categories of enrollees with disabilities and its informational support; assesses the level of these enrollees needs in helping by career counselors; identifies the preferred forms of higher education by persons with disabilities; characterizes the needs of people with disabilities in special equipment and services in obtaining higher education, as well as in adaptation of educational programs in the university. The resulting practical-oriented conclusions concern both purpose and content of the work with disabled enrollees from among school graduates as well as approaches to the organization of higher education for persons with disabilities.

  13. Political Education in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Nilgun; Sozer, Mehmet Akif; Sel, Burcu

    2015-01-01

    Political education is a term with negative associations and triggering prejudiced approaches and discourses--maybe some paranoid thoughts--like "keep politics away from education!" in the minds of several people. This article deals with "political education" phenomenon almost never discussed and made subject to scientific…

  14. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory Howell, J.

    1999-11-01

    many of our readers. The High School/College Interface Luncheon was part of the very rich day-long High School Program at the New Orleans ACS Meeting. Shown here (from left) are Glenn Crosby, the luncheon speaker; Lillie Tucker-Akin, the High School Day program chair; and Fred Johnson, Assistant Superintendent of Shelby County (TN) schools and Immediate Past President of NSTA. The recipient of the James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching is Frank G. Cardulla, who taught for many years at Niles North High School, Skokie, Illinois. His extensive record of service to fellow teachers includes editing the JCE "View from My Classroom" feature for several years and writing several articles, as well as his recent appointment to the JCE Board of Publication. The recipient of the George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education is Jerry A. Bell of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. An author of numerous articles appearing in JCE and a member of the JCE Board of Publication for several years, he currently serves as Board Chair. The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education Readers who attended the 15th BCCE in Waterloo, Ontario, know that much of the programming at these conferences is of interest to high school teachers. Many work shops, papers, and demonstrations are presented by high school teachers. There are many other outstanding papers and posters, plenary speakers, and exciting demonstrations. The 16th BCCE will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, July 30-August 3, 2000. Among the high school teachers already scheduled to present workshops at the 16th BCCE are George Hague, Lynn Hershey, and Jack Randall, and there will be many more before the program is completed. The High School Chemistry Program Chair is Tim Graham, Roosevelt High School (MI). The Organizing Committee is seeking the assistance of local sections of the American Chemical Society within a 300-mile radius of Ann Arbor in providing support for high school

  15. Technology Leadership in Malaysia's High Performance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yieng, Wong Ai; Daud, Khadijah Binti

    2017-01-01

    Headmaster as leader of the school also plays a role as a technology leader. This applies to the high performance schools (HPS) headmaster as well. The HPS excel in all aspects of education. In this study, researcher is interested in examining the role of the headmaster as a technology leader through interviews with three headmasters of high…

  16. High School Teachers' Identities: Constructing Civic Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Balkute, Asta; Vaughn, Erin; White, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that teachers play a role in the type of citizenship education implemented in schools. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how two high school teachers understood and enacted their civic identities as a dimension of their teacher identities. Findings suggest that factors contributing to an individual's civic…

  17. Craftsmanship and Technology: Level I, Unit 5, Lesson 1; Government Separation of Powers: Lesson 2; Comparisons in Literature: Lesson 3. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    An advanced General Education Program has been designed to prepare an individual with the information, concepts, and general knowledge required to successfully pass the American Council on Education's High School General Education Development (GED) Test. The Advanced General Education Program provides comprehensive self-instruction in each of the…

  18. Intended and Unintended Effects of State-Mandated High School Science and Mathematics Course Graduation Requirements on Educational Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, Andrew D; Tate, William F; Bierut, Laura J; Grucza, Richard A

    2014-06-01

    Mathematics and science course graduation requirement (CGR) increases in the 1980s and 1990s might have had both intended and unintended consequences. Using logistic regression with Census and American Community Survey (ACS) data ( n = 2,892,444), we modeled CGR exposure on (a) high school dropout, (b) beginning college, and (c) obtaining any college degree. Possible between-groups differences were also assessed. We found that higher CGRs were associated with higher odds to drop out of high school, but results for the college-level outcomes varied by group. Some were less likely to enroll, whereas others who began college were more likely to obtain a degree. Increased high school dropout was consistent across the population, but some potential benefit was also observed, primarily for those reporting Hispanic ethnicity.

  19. Concussion Knowledge and Reporting Behavior Differences Between High School Athletes at Urban and Suburban High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica; Covassin, Tracey; Nogle, Sally; Gould, Daniel; Kovan, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    We determined differences in knowledge of concussion and reporting behaviors of high school athletes attending urban and suburban high schools, and whether a relationship exists between underreporting and access to an athletic trainer in urban schools. High school athletes (N = 715) from 14 high schools completed a validated knowledge of concussion survey consisting of 83 questions. The independent variable was school type (urban/suburban). We examined the proportion of athletes who correctly identified signs and symptoms of concussion, knowledge of concussion and reasons why high school athletes would not disclose a potential concussive injury across school classification. Data were analyzed using descriptive, non-parametric, and inferential statistics. Athletes attending urban schools have less concussion knowledge than athletes attending suburban schools (p urban schools without an athletic trainer have less knowledge than urban athletes at schools with an athletic trainer (p urban schools and 10 reasons for not reporting. Concussion education efforts cannot be homogeneous in all communities. Education interventions must reflect the needs of each community. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  20. School connectedness and high school graduation among maltreated youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkin, Allison; Kistin, Caroline J; Cabral, Howard J; Aschengrau, Ann; Bair-Merritt, Megan

    2018-01-01

    Maltreated youth have higher rates of school dropout than their non-maltreated peers. School connectedness is a modifiable predictor of school success. We hypothesized maltreated youth's school connectedness (supportive relationships with adults at school and participation in school clubs) would be positively associated with high school graduation. We included youth with at least one Child Protective Services (CPS) report by age twelve from Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect, a prospective cohort study. Participation in extracurricular activities and adult relationships reported at age 16, high school graduation/General Education Development (GED) status reported at age 18, and demographics were provided by youth and caregivers. Maltreatment data were coded from CPS records. The outcome was graduation/receipt of GED. Multivariable logistic regressions examined the association between school connectedness and graduation/receipt of GED, controlling for confounders. In our sample of 318 maltreated youth, 73.3% graduated. School club was the only activity with a statistically significant association with graduation in bivariate analysis. Having supportive relationships with an adult at school was not significantly associated with graduation, though only 10.7% of youth reported this relationship. Maltreated youth who participated in school clubs had 2.54 times the odds of graduating, adjusted for study site, gender, poverty status, caregiver high school graduation status, and age at first CPS report (95% CI: [1.02, 6.33]). Few maltreated youth reported relationships with adults at school, and additional efforts may be needed to support these vulnerable youth. School club participation may represent an opportunity to modify maltreated youth's risk for school dropout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differences of adaptation to school and self-resilience before and after sleep education for adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, So-Mi; Kim, Jong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effectiveness of sleep education by identifying the differences of adaption to school and self-resilience of the high school students before and after sleep education for a certain period of time. The conclusion of this study is presented below: First, there were differences in adaptation to school and self-resilience of the high school students before and after sleep education for the high school students. After sleep education, adaptation to school environment ...

  2. Classroom implementation of the practices learned in the Master of Chemistry Education program by the School District of Philadelphia's high school chemistry teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Uma Devi

    This dissertation reports the results of an exploratory case study utilizing quantitative and qualitative methodologies intended to ascertain the extent and differences of implementation of research-based instructional practices, learned in an intensive 26-month professional development, in their urban classrooms. Both the extent and differences in the implementation of practices were investigated in relation to the lesson design and implementation, content, and classroom culture aspects of research-based practices. Additionally, this research includes the concerns of the teachers regarding the factors that helped or hindered the implementation of research-based practices in their classrooms. Six graduates of the Master of Chemistry Education Program who were teaching a chemistry course in a high school in the School District of Philadelphia at the time of the study (2006-8), were the case. The teachers completed a concerns questionnaire with closed and open-ended items, and rated their perceptions of the extent of implementation of the practices in their urban classrooms. Additionally, the teachers were observed and rated by the researcher using a reform-teaching observation protocol and were interviewed individually. Also, the teachers submitted their lesson plans for the days they were observed. Data from these sources were analyzed to arrive at the findings for this study. The research findings suggest that the group of teachers in the study implemented the research-based practices in their classrooms to a low extent when compared to the recommended practices inherent to the MCE Program. The extents of implementation of the practices differed widely among the teachers, from being absent to being implemented at a high level, with inconsistent levels of implementation from various data sources. Further, the teachers expressed the depth of knowledge (gained in the MCE Program), formal laboratory exercises and reports, administrative support, self

  3. Population education in the schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherris, J D; Quillin, W F

    1982-01-01

    Formal population education is designed to teach children in school about basic population issues and, in many cases, to encourage them eventually to have smaller families. Some programs include specific units on human reproduction and family planning, while others do not. National population education programs began during the 1970s in about a dozen countries, mainly in Asia. These include Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, South Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Thailand, Egypt, Tunisia, and El Salvador. A strong case can be made for including an important contemporary issue like population in the school curriculum. Nevertheless, educational innovation is a difficult and long-term process. As a rule, it takes 5 to 10 years before new material can be fully incorporated in a school curriculum. Curriculum changes must be carefully planned, thousands of teachers trained, and appropriate materials prepared for classroom use. Moreover, differences of opinion over the need, acceptability, goals, content, methods, and other aspects of population education have held back programs in some countries. Where population education programs have been implemented, student knowledge of population issues increases, but it is not yet clear whether in-school education has a measurable impact on fertility-related attitudes or behavior.

  4. Disaster Risk Education of Final Year High School Students Requires a Partnership with Families and Charity Organizations: An International Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Tudor A; Celenza, Antonio; Ngo, Hanh

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The aim of disaster reduction education (DRE) is to achieve behavioral change. Over the past two decades, many efforts have been directed towards this goal, but educational activities have been developed based on unverified assumptions. Further, the literature has not identified any significant change towards disaster preparedness at the individual level. In addition, previous research suggests that change is dependent on multiple independent predictors. It is difficult to determine what specific actions DRE might result in; therefore, the preamble of such an action, which is to have discussions about it, has been chosen as the surrogate outcome measure for DRE success. This study describes the relationship of the perceived entity responsible for disaster education, disaster education per se, sex, and country-specific characteristics, with students discussing disasters with friends and family as a measure of proactive behavioral change in disaster preparedness. A total of 3,829 final year high school students participated in an international, multi-center prospective, cross-sectional study using a validated questionnaire. Nine countries with different levels of disaster exposure risk and economic development were surveyed. Regression analyses examined the relationship between the likelihood of discussing disasters with friends and family (dependent variable) and a series of independent variables. There was no statistically significant relationship between a single entity responsible for disaster education and discussions about potential hazards and risks with friends and/or family. While several independent predictors showed a significant main effect, DRE through school lessons in interaction with Family & Charity Organizations had the highest predictive value. Disaster reduction education might require different delivery channels and methods and should engage with the entities with which the teenagers are more likely to collaborate. Codreanu TA

  5. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-12-01

    experiments if desired, discuss their findings, and make a recommendation regarding which of two road deicers should be used on the bridge. The article Pesticides in Drinking Water: Project-Based Learning within the Introductory Chemistry Curriculum (pp 1673-1667) describes class involvement in field data collection and analysis. Since more sophisticated instrumentation than is possessed by many schools is required, 6th grade science and high school chemistry classes work with a college class to obtain and analyze data. Everyone involved in this approach wins. The 6th graders, high school students, and college students all gain experience in sampling, preparing samples for analysis, determining pollutant levels, and drawing conclusions, each at an appropriate level of understanding. Plus, the high school students are exposed to instrumentation that otherwise would not be accessible, such as gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although the project described was started by the college faculty members who wrote the article, such an approach to many interesting environmental chemistry problems could be initiated by a high school teacher by seeking out a nearby college or university with whom to partner. An article that probably would not have received the SSC mark had I not noticed that two of the coauthors are high school students, is titled Remediation of Water Contaminated with an Azo Dye (pp 1680-1683). In addition to being interesting, the article is a good reminder that research opportunities for high school students exist. Still another article that received the SSC mark because of a high school connection is Chemical Analysis of Soils (pp 1693-1694). The authors mention that with modification their techniques could be used in high school chemistry. They cite a reference to an article published several years ago, titled Soil Analysis for High School Chemistry Students (J. Chem. Educ. 1980, 57, 897-899). It was published in a feature titled the 50

  6. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-08-01

    Ocean-Stating the Case for Chemistry, by Paul J. Scheuer, p 1075 * Distillation Apparatuses Using Household Items, by Danielle R. D. Campanizzi, Brenda Mason, Christine K. F. Hermann, p 1079 New Orleans Concurrent Workshops, High School Program 8:30 a.m.-9:20 a.m. A. A Teaching Resource for You: The Journal of Chemical Education, J. E. Howell, J. W. Moore, and A. M. Sarquis B. Electrical Conductivity, J. M. Manion and P. F. Krause, and The Properties of Gases, J.-M. Whitfield and K. A. Woodling C. Chemistry with Calculators for Beginners, P. Sconzo (3 hours) D. Spectrum of Activities for Chemistry Teachers, Carolina Biological Supply, S. Mitchell, F. Cherry, and L. Akin (3 hours) 9:30 a.m.-10:20 a.m. A. Applying Chemical Education Research to the Classroom, L. Akin and J. Valasek B. Another Look at the Deflection of Falling Liquids, H. H. Harris and J. Newstrum, and Encouraging Students to Investigate Acids and Bases Using Plant Indicators, P. K. Kerrigan C. Chemistry with Calculators (continued) D. Spectrum of Activities (continued) E. Science Education for Public Understanding (SEPUP) and Chemistry, Health, Environment, and Me, M. Koker and L. Akin (2 hours) 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. A. Increasing Aptitude and Interest of High School Students through Summer Camp, C. E. Fulton, and Energy Teaching Introduction to High School Chemistry, L.-M. Trejo B. Chemistry in Science Museum Exhibits: Opportunities and Challenges and Cooking with Chemistry, D. Katz C. Chemistry with Calculators (continued) D. Spectrum of Activities (continued) E. SEPUP (continued) 12:00 noon-1:15 p.m., High School Luncheon Educating High School Teachers for the 21st Century, Glenn Crosby 1:30 p.m.-2:20 p.m. A. Customized Mastery Learning in First-Year Chemistry and Computer Software for Chemistry Teachers Who Require Mastery Learning of Their Students, J. Bedenbaugh and A. Bedenbaugh B. Can One Teach Chemistry with Everyday Substances? A. Sae, and SourceBook Activities Using Everyday Substances, C

  7. Bending Back To Move Forward: Using Reflective Practice To Develop a High School Civic Education/Aikido Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Lane, Jonathan

    This paper describes the development of a high school social studies course, Citizenship and World Affairs. Course development involved two forms of reflection: deliberative and personalistic. The author's deliberative reflection, reported in part one of the paper, began as he reviewed research regarding how teachers should foster citizenship…

  8. The concepts of nanotechnology as a part of physics education in high school and in interactive science museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Lucie; Rálišová, Ema

    2017-01-01

    The advancements in nanotechnology especially in medicine and in developing new materials offer interesting possibilities for our society. It is not only scientists and engineers who need a better understanding of these new technologies but it is also important to prepare the young people and the general public on impact of nanotechnology on their life. Knowledge from this field likewise provides the opportunities to engage and motivate high school students for the study of science. Although, the concepts of nanoscience and nanotechnology are not a part of Czech high school physics curriculum they can be successfully integrated into regular curriculum in appropriate places. Because it is an interdisciplinary field, it also provides an opportunity for the interdisciplinary connections of physics, chemistry and biology. Many concepts for understanding the nanoworld can be shown by the simple activities and experiments and it is not a problem to demonstrate these experiments in each classroom. This paper presents the proposal for integration of the concepts of nanoscience and nanotechnologies into the high school physics curriculum, and the involvement of some of these concepts into the instructional program for middle and high school students which was realized in interactive science museum Fort Science in Olomouc. As a part of the program there was a quantitative questionnaire and its goal was to determine the effectiveness of the program and how students are satisfied with it.

  9. "In It for the Long Haul": How Teacher Education Can Contribute to Teacher Retention in High-Poverty, Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Sarah Warshauer; Appleman, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This study explores a constellation of factors that contribute to the retention of teachers in high-poverty, urban schools. It focuses on one cohort of the University of California at Berkeley's Multicultural Urban Secondary English Credential and MA Program, analyzing qualitative and quantitative data to track the careers of 26 novice teachers…

  10. Chinese High School Students' Perceptions of Freedom of Expression: Implications for Researching Emerging Civil Liberties in Global Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mario S.; Qin, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    This study explored attitudes and perceptions of Chinese high school students regarding freedom of expression in their country. A survey capturing perceptions over various forms of free speech (e.g., student publication, dress code) was administered to a sample of 838, which included students from both urban and rural areas within Shaanxi Province…

  11. Visual Arts as a Lever for Social Justice Education: Labor Studies in the High School Art Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosin, Adrienne Andi; Bekkala, Elsa; Pepper-Sanello, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative action research study of pedagogy examines an introductory high school visual arts curriculum that includes artworks pertinent to labor studies, and their impact on students' understanding of the power of art for social commentary. Urban students with multicultural backgrounds study social realism as an historical artistic…

  12. Strengthening High School Chemistry Education through Teacher Outreach Programs: A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A strong chemical workforce in the United States will be essential to the ability to address many issues of societal concern in the future, including demand for renewable energy, more advanced materials, and more sophisticated pharmaceuticals. High school chemistry teachers have a critical role to play in engaging and supporting the chemical…

  13. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thais Cyrino de Mello; Martins, Roberto de Andrade; Pietrocola, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the…

  14. School health education and promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahy, Deana; Simovska, Venka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose - This Special Issue is the second in a series that aims to place the spotlight on educational research and its contribution to the field of school-based health and wellbeing promotion. The purpose of both special issues is to bring together scholars from across the world to consider...... current developments in research on curricula, interventions, policies and practices concerning health education and promotion and related professional development of teachers. Design/methodology/approach – As in the first Special Issue published in 2017 (School health education and promotion: Health...... and wellbeing promotion. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education website and on the EERA website. There was considerable interest from those such as researchers, scholars and practitioners, and as a result, we have been able to publish a second Special Issue. Findings...

  15. Outline of High School Credit Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia.

    An outline is presented of the objectives and content of courses offered for credit in high schools in South Carolina. Courses in the following subjects are described: (1) art; (2) drama; (3) driver education; (4) environmental education; (5) foreign language: French, German, Russian, Spanish; (6) health; (7) language arts; (8) mathematics; (9)…

  16. School inclusion in youth and adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglaucimara Oliveira Rodriguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates teachers’ perceptions about the assistance provided to students with special educational needs, developmental disorders and high skills or giftedness at a state educational institution in Londrina (Brazil which offers exclusively Youth and Adult Education modality. For this, we applied an instrument to collect data with 24 participants whose questions were about school inclusion in Youth and Adult Education. The results showed that most teachers did not receive specific training to support pupils with special educational needs. These professionals reported that they are dissatisfied with the developed work, highlighting the lack of training and capacitating programs as the main cause. Data also showed that, in seeking help and support for professional practice, teachers usually rely on colleagues with specific training and the school teaching staff. Several points highlighted as barriers for effective school inclusion are related to questions present in any heterogeneous class and not specifically with students with special educational needs. Thus, it is believed that the inclusion in the school environment can be a reality and the teacher is a key element in the consolidation of this process.

  17. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-07-01

    experts; a series of nine oral presentations on "hot" topics in chemistry today; Carolina Biological's showcasing of Chemistry Set to Music and demonstrations where you can watch the periodic table come to life in front of your eyes; an afternoon of safety by Kauffman and Associates; and Penny Sconzo's entire day on calculator literacy in chemistry and biology with sessions for beginners and advanced users. In addition to five concurrent sessions specifically for high school teachers, the Division of Chemical Education will offer a variety of programs throughout the conference. A high school-college interface luncheon will feature chemical educator Glenn Crosby as keynote speaker. An array of door prizes will be given away, including a crisp 100 bill. Tickets for the luncheon are limited and will only be sold through preregistration. Registration information can be obtained through the ACS Internet home page, http://www.acs.org, in Chemical and Engineering News, or in the summer issue of the Division of Chemical Education Newsletter. Eisenhower funds can be used as support funds (check with your school coordinator for title programs). There will be a membership registration desk for teachers interested in joining the ACS Division of Chemical Education. Membership dues are 15 per year. We have a lot planned for you and we need all our high school chemistry teachers to attend and make this event a huge success! I look forward to seeing each of you in 'Nawlins! Lillie Tucker Akin

  18. The Prevalence of Postgraduate Education in Youth Health Among High School Clinicians and Associated Student Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Simon; Farrant, Bridget; Utter, Jennifer; Fleming, Theresa; Bullen, Pat; Peiris-John, Roshini; Clark, Terryann

    2016-11-01

    Despite numerous calls to improve training in adolescent health, there is little known about the prevalence or effectiveness of specialized training in adolescent health. A two-stage random sampling cluster design was used to collect nationally representative data from 8,500 students from 91 high schools. Student data were linked to data from a survey of school health clinicians from participating schools on their level of training in youth health. Multilevel models accounting for demographic characteristics of students were used to estimate the association between nurses and physicians training in youth health and health outcomes among students. Almost all nurses and physicians reported some training in youth health, either having attended lectures or study days in youth health (n = 60, 80%) or completed postgraduate papers in youth health (n = 13, 17.3%). Students in schools where the nurses and physicians had received postgraduate training in youth health were less likely than students from schools with clinicians having attended lectures or study days in youth health to report emotional and behavior difficulties (11.8 vs. 12.7, p = .002) and binge drinking (19.6% vs. 24.9%, p = .03). There were no significant associations between depressive symptoms, suicide risk, cigarette, marijuana, contraception use, or motor vehicle risk behaviors among students and level of training among clinicians in their schools' health service. Postgraduate training in youth health among nurses and physicians in school health services is associated with fewer students reporting mental health difficulties and binge alcohol use. These findings support specialized training in youth health for clinicians working predominantly with young people. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Students’ Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character:Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson L. Palinussa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students’ critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in Ambon. The instruments of the study are: students’ early math skills test, critical thinking skills mathematical test and perception scale of students’character. Data was analyzed by using t-test and Anova. The study found that: 1 Achievements and enhancement of students’ critical mathematical thinking skills who were treated with by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ skills were treated by conventional mathematics education. The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level; 2 Quality of students’ character who were treated by realistic mathematics education is better then students’ character who were treated by conventional mathematics education The differences are considered to: a overall students, b the level of early math skills, and c schools’ level  Keywords: Critical Thinking, Students’ Character, Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.566.75-94

  20. The Association between Motivation in School Physical Education and Self-Reported Physical Activity during Finnish Junior High School: A Self-Determination Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Timo; Washington, Tracy; Yli-Piipari, Sami

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the role of motivational climates, perceived competence and motivational regulations as antecedents of self-reported physical activity during junior high school years. The participants included 237 Finnish students (101 girls, 136 boys) that were 13 years old at the first stage of the…

  1. School Uniforms in Urban Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draa, Virginia Ann Bendel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the implementation of a mandatory uniform policy in urban public high schools improved school performance measures at the building level for rates of attendance, graduation, academic proficiency, and student conduct as measured by rates of suspensions and expulsions. Sixty-four secondary…

  2. Success Despite Socioeconomics: A Case Study of a High-Achieving, High-Poverty School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Thomas Brent; Smith, Samuel J.; Claxton, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty school describes the school's leadership, culture, and programs that contributed to its success. Data were collected from two surveys (the School Culture Survey and the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education), observations at the school site, and interviews with school personnel. The…

  3. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  4. Perception of Sexuality Education amongst Secondary School

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    school students attending a series of Schools debates in Port. Harcourt Metropolis. ... 31(2): 109–113. Keywords:Perceptions, sexuality education, secondary school, students. ..... implications for counseling practices. European Journal of ...

  5. Rational emotive behaviour therapy in high schools to educate in mental health and empower youth health. A randomized controlled study of a brief intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sælid, Gry Anette; Nordahl, Hans M

    2017-04-01

    Rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT) is effective in reducing distress in several target groups. No other study has tested the mental health effects on adolescents in a high school setting while expanding a Cognitive Behaviour-based therapy, REBT, into the concept of mental health literacy. The format of the ABC model, which is an important element of REBT, functioned as a working manual in and between three sessions. This study tested whether knowledge and practical use of the ABC model increased self-esteem and hope, and reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression, and dysfunctional thinking. Sixty-two high school students with subclinical levels of anxiety and depression were randomly allocated into three groups; three individual REBT sessions, or three individual attentional placebo (ATP) sessions or no sessions (control). However, dysfunctional thinking, self-esteem and hope were not measured in the control group. Repeated measures with ANOVA and t-tests were conducted. Both REBT and ATP significantly reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression, but only REBT was significantly different from the control group at the six-month follow-up. Only REBT significantly reduced dysfunctional thinking, and both REBT and ATP significantly increased self-esteem and hope. REBT had both an immediate and a long-term effect. The findings show the potential positive effects of educating well-documented psychological techniques as ordinary education in school. Further research might contribute to decide whether or not to change the school system by enclosing mental health literacy classes for all students.

  6. Anthropological analysis of differences in psychomotor skills area high school students and their linkages with the formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bešović Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine differences in anthropological space psychomotor skills and their connection with the formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum of secondary school students, conducted the study in part on a simple random sample of 200 female high school population of entities, which are described with 7 sets of primary psychomotor indicators. According to the criterion of formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum, the sample was stratified on the subsample with two or four hours a week. To determine the difference discriminant analysis was applied. According to the actual parameters, confirmed the initial assumption that the system of psychomotor variables and criterion variables no statistically significant association, then it was concluded that the results do not contradict current scientific knowledge indicated the need and transition model curriculum in favor of the treated population biopsihosocijalnog integrity of its entities.

  7. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 6. Perspectives Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  8. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Personalization Strategic Designs: 9. MetWest High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  9. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  10. Quality of School Education in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utha, Karma; Giri, Krishna; Gurung, Bhupen

    This book is a product of a collaborative Bhutanese-Danish research project concerning the quality of school education in Bhutanese secondary schools. The empirical investigations that were at the center of the project took part in 2012-2014 and consisted in case study of seven selected schools...... findings and interpretations to global debate and development of school educational quality....

  11. Do Rural Schools Need Character Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Janice Carner

    Studies suggest that the challenge of violence in public schools can be met through character education, whether by providing a school culture in which core values are practiced or some form of moral training (indoctrination). To assess the need for character education in rural schools, small-school superintendents and board members in central…

  12. High school science teacher perceptions of the science proficiency testing as mandated by the State of Ohio Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Samuel Shird

    There is a correlation between the socioeconomic status of secondary schools and scores on the State of Ohio's mandated secondary science proficiency tests. In low scoring schools many reasons effectively explain the low test scores as a result of the low socioeconomics. For example, one reason may be that many students are working late hours after school to help with family finances; parents may simply be too busy providing family income to realize the consequences of the testing program. There are many other personal issues students face that may cause them to score poorly an the test. The perceptions of their teachers regarding the science proficiency test program may be one significant factor. These teacher perceptions are the topic of this study. Two sample groups ware established for this study. One group was science teachers from secondary schools scoring 85% or higher on the 12th grade proficiency test in the academic year 1998--1999. The other group consisted of science teachers from secondary schools scoring 35% or less in the same academic year. Each group of teachers responded to a survey instrument that listed several items used to determine teachers' perceptions of the secondary science proficiency test. A significant difference in the teacher' perceptions existed between the two groups. Some of the ranked items on the form include teachers' opinions of: (1) Teaching to the tests; (2) School administrators' priority placed on improving average test scores; (3) Teacher incentive for improving average test scores; (4) Teacher teaching style change as a result of the testing mandate; (5) Teacher knowledge of State curriculum model; (6) Student stress as a result of the high-stakes test; (7) Test cultural bias; (8) The tests in general.

  13. Effects of two educational method of lecturing and role playing on knowledge and performance of high school students in first aid at emergency scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Vasili, Arezu; Zare, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two educational methods on students' knowledge and performance regarding first aid at emergency scenes. In this semi-experimental study, the sample was selected randomly among male and female public high school students of Isfahan. Each group included 60 students. At first the knowledge and performance of students in first aid at emergency scene was assessed using a researcher-made questionnaire. Then necessary education was provided to the students within 10 sessions of two hours by lecturing and role playing. The students' knowledge and performance was as-sessed again and the results were compared. It was no significant relationship between the frequency distribution of students' age, major and knowledge and performance before the educational course in the two groups. The score of knowledge in performing CPR, using proper way to bandage, immobilizing the injured area, and proper ways of carrying injured person after the education was significantly increased in both groups. Moreover, the performance in proper way to bandage, immobilizing injured area and proper ways of carrying injured person after educational course was significantly higher in playing role group compared to lecturing group after education. Iran is a developing country with a young generation and it is a country with high risk of natural disasters; so, providing necessary education with more effective methods can be effective in reducing mortality and morbidity due to lack of first aid care in crucial moments. Training with playing role is suggested for this purpose.

  14. School education on energy and environment problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imakita, Manami

    2005-01-01

    In Japanese school, elementary and junior- and senior-high, it is widely agreed that teaching of energy and environment is desirable, as has been adopted in a course of study of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. This paper reports the present state of affairs on these problems from elementary schools to high schools, describing of each school year or grade and each lessons separately. It contains the results of the author's investigation on curriculum and syllabus including some classroom practices and measurement of natural radioactivity and radiation with the help of adequate measuring instruments and visits to some related facilities. Methods of learning and teaching are also studied together with some future prospect. (S. Ohno)

  15. Radiation education in school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Teruko; Higashijima, Emiko; Hisajima, Michihiro

    2005-01-01

    Part of goals of general education of physics is to provide students for basic knowledge on radiation. This includes understanding of both its risks and benefits. Students should know how to protect and defence from radiation but they should not overwhelm the risk of radiation. Sometimes, students think that atomic power is so terrible and frightening that they keep away from use of atomic power. Basic knowledge about risks of radiation will reduce the excessive reaction or anxiety coming from radiation. It also makes people understand other possible risks and benefits of radiation accompanied by modern scientific technologies such as nuclear technologies. We believe that the radiation education is an essential requisite for the peaceful usage of nuclear energy and radiation technology for the future. (author)

  16. Fun, influence and competence—a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students’ participation in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Abildsnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA, and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1 to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance (“Sports enjoyment” or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons (“Motion enjoyment”, and 2 to explore the students’ experiences with PE programs. Methods In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82% comprising 141 (78% girls and 40 (22% boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%, Design, Arts and Crafts (27% or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49% were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Results Students attending “Motion enjoyment” accrued less steps/day compared to the “Sports enjoyment” group (6661 (5514, 7808 vs.9167 (7945, 10390 steps/day and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5 vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9 hours/day. Compared to those attending “Sports enjoyment”, a higher number of students attending “Motion enjoyment” reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.28, 12.78, and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95. The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the

  17. Fun, influence and competence-a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students' participation in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Rohde, Gudrun; Berntsen, Sveinung; Stea, Tonje H

    2017-03-10

    Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA), and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE) than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance ("Sports enjoyment") or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons ("Motion enjoyment"), and 2) to explore the students' experiences with PE programs. In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82%) comprising 141 (78%) girls and 40 (22%) boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%), Design, Arts and Crafts (27%) or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49%) were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys) were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Students attending "Motion enjoyment" accrued less steps/day compared to the "Sports enjoyment" group (6661 (5514, 7808) vs.9167 (7945, 10390) steps/day) and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5) vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9) hours/day). Compared to those attending "Sports enjoyment", a higher number of students attending "Motion enjoyment" reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.28, 12.78), and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95)). The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the importance of having competent and engaging teachers

  18. High School Students’ Social Media Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz, Levent; Gürültü, Ercan

    2018-01-01

    Theaim of this study is to investigate high school students’ social mediaaddiction. The study was conducted with 473 students who were educated in2014-2015 academic year at 6 different schools in İstanbul, Eyüp disctrict.‘Social Media Addiction Scale’ developed by Tutgun, Ünal and Deniz (2015) wasused to determine the students’ social media addiction. The results in general showedthat high school students have a medium level social media addiction. Besides,it was also concluded that high scho...

  19. High school science fair and research integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, Simon; Shepherd, Karen; Reisch, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Research misconduct has become an important matter of concern in the scientific community. The extent to which such behavior occurs early in science education has received little attention. In the current study, using the web-based data collection program REDCap, we obtained responses to an anonymous and voluntary survey about science fair from 65 high school students who recently competed in the Dallas Regional Science and Engineering Fair and from 237 STEM-track, post-high school students (undergraduates, 1st year medical students, and 1st year biomedical graduate students) doing research at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Of the post-high school students, 24% had competed in science fair during their high school education. Science fair experience was similar overall for the local cohort of Dallas regional students and the more diverse state/national cohort of post-high school students. Only one student out of 122 reported research misconduct, in his case making up the data. Unexpectedly, post-high school students who did not participate in science fair anticipated that carrying out science fair would be much more difficult than actually was the case, and 22% of the post-high school students anticipated that science fair participants would resort to research misconduct to overcome obstacles. No gender-based differences between students’ science fair experiences or expectations were evident. PMID:28328976

  20. Visual Arts as a Lever for Social Justice Education: Labor Studies in the High School Art Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Sosin, Adrienne Andi; Bekkala, Elsa; Pepper-Sanello, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative action research study of pedagogy examines an introductory high school visual arts curriculum that includes artworks pertinent to labor studies, and their impact on students’ understanding of the power of art for social commentary. Urban students with multicultural backgrounds study social realism as an historical artistic movement, consider the value of collective activism for social justice, and learn modes of artistic expression that meet state standards in visual arts....

  1. The Kennedy Report: Commission Evaluates High School Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Ann

    1974-01-01

    Presents excerpts from the report of the Kennedy Commission of Inquiry into High School Journalism, concentrating on censorship, minority participation, journalism education, established media, and censorship issues.

  2. High School Harvest: Combining Food Service Training and Institutional Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David; Estrin, Hans; Becot, Florence

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses High School Harvest (HSH), an Extension educator-led project in five Vermont schools to provide students with job training and food system education and to provide lightly processed produce to school lunch programs. One hundred and twenty-one students participated, logging 8,752 hours growing, harvesting, and processing…

  3. College Bound: Americans' Attitudes about Paying for College. A Survey of Families with College-Bound High School Students on the Value of a College Education and Its Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallup & Robinson, Inc. Princeton, NJ.

    This study examined several aspects of family viewpoints regarding the financing of higher education. Data were collected via a telephone survey of 800 parents of college bound high school students and 300 college bound high school juniors and seniors. The survey examined attitudes in such areas as: the relative importance of financing college…

  4. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness When Comparing Alternatively and Traditionally Licensed High School Technology Education Teachers in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    According to No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the definition of a highly qualified teacher includes three components: obtaining a bachelor's degree; having full licensure as defined by the state; and demonstrating competency, as defined by the state, in each subject taught (U.S. Department of Education, 2004). However, NCLB does not specifically…

  5. High-­Stakes Schooling: What We Can Learn from Japan's Experiences with Testing, Accountability, and Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    If there is one thing that describes the trajectory of American education, it is this: more high-stakes testing. In the United States, the debates surrounding this trajectory can be so fierce that it feels like we are in uncharted waters. As Christopher Bjork reminds us in this study, however, we are not the first to make testing so central to…

  6. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Recommendations for Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxia; Gu, Xiangli; Zhang, Tao; Keller, Jean; Chen, Senlin

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs) aim to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles among school-age children and adolescents. Physical educators are highly qualified individuals taking on the role of certified physical activity leaders. Physical education teacher education (PETE) programs should consider preparing…

  7. Global Ethics in a High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappir, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Raphi Amram, the late director of Israel's Society for Excellence Through Education, founded the Ethics in Science and Humanities Program operating in Israel and five other countries. Though the ethics program currently operates only in high schools serving high-achieving or gifted students, founders emphasize the universality of its appeal.…

  8. TOCUSO: Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Physics educators around the world often need reliable diagnostic materials to measure students' understanding of physics concept in high school. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new diagnostic tool on High School Optics concept. Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics (TOCUSO) consists of 25 conceptual items that measures…

  9. Teacher-Led Change in Secondary School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jay; Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    How and why meaningful curriculum or program changes happen in physical education is important, but not well understood, especially at the secondary school level. In this longitudinal case study, we examined teacher-initiated changes in a high school physical education program. Data were collected through prolonged engagement over 5 years and…

  10. Complexities in the Evaluation of Distance Education and Virtual Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Zembylas, Michalinos; Chamberlain, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the issues related to evaluation of distance education and virtual schooling. The evaluation design of a virtual high school project is presented, and goals, stakeholder analysis, evaluator role, data collection, and data analysis are described. The need for evaluation of distance education and the ethical responsibility of the…

  11. Psychodrama and Moviemaking in a Death Education Course to Work Through a Case of Suicide Among High School Students in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Testoni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the psychological effects of an experience of death education (DE used to explore a case of suicide in an Italian high school. DE activities included philosophical and religious perspectives of the relationships between death and the meaning of life, a visit to a local hospice, and psychodrama activities, which culminated in the production of short movies. The intervention involved 268 high school students (138 in the experimental group. Pre-test and post-test measures assessed ontological representations of death, death anxiety, alexithymia, and meaning in life. Results confirmed that, in the experimental group, death anxiety was significantly reduced as much as the representation of death as annihilation and alexithymia, while a sense of spirituality and the meaning of life were more enhanced, compared to the No DE group. These improvements in the positive meaning of life and the reduction of anxiety confirmed that it is possible to manage trauma and grief at school with death education interventions that include religious discussion, psychodrama and movie making activities.

  12. Psychodrama and Moviemaking in a Death Education Course to Work Through a Case of Suicide Among High School Students in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Ines; Ronconi, Lucia; Palazzo, Lorenza; Galgani, Michele; Stizzi, Antonio; Kirk, Kate

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the psychological effects of an experience of death education (DE) used to explore a case of suicide in an Italian high school. DE activities included philosophical and religious perspectives of the relationships between death and the meaning of life, a visit to a local hospice, and psychodrama activities, which culminated in the production of short movies. The intervention involved 268 high school students (138 in the experimental group). Pre-test and post-test measures assessed ontological representations of death, death anxiety, alexithymia, and meaning in life. Results confirmed that, in the experimental group, death anxiety was significantly reduced as much as the representation of death as annihilation and alexithymia, while a sense of spirituality and the meaning of life were more enhanced, compared to the No DE group. These improvements in the positive meaning of life and the reduction of anxiety confirmed that it is possible to manage trauma and grief at school with death education interventions that include religious discussion, psychodrama and movie making activities.

  13. Psychodrama and Moviemaking in a Death Education Course to Work Through a Case of Suicide Among High School Students in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Ines; Ronconi, Lucia; Palazzo, Lorenza; Galgani, Michele; Stizzi, Antonio; Kirk, Kate

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the psychological effects of an experience of death education (DE) used to explore a case of suicide in an Italian high school. DE activities included philosophical and religious perspectives of the relationships between death and the meaning of life, a visit to a local hospice, and psychodrama activities, which culminated in the production of short movies. The intervention involved 268 high school students (138 in the experimental group). Pre-test and post-test measures assessed ontological representations of death, death anxiety, alexithymia, and meaning in life. Results confirmed that, in the experimental group, death anxiety was significantly reduced as much as the representation of death as annihilation and alexithymia, while a sense of spirituality and the meaning of life were more enhanced, compared to the No DE group. These improvements in the positive meaning of life and the reduction of anxiety confirmed that it is possible to manage trauma and grief at school with death education interventions that include religious discussion, psychodrama and movie making activities. PMID:29692745

  14. The Effects of High - Risk - Behavior Prevetion Educational Program on the Knowledge and Atittude of School Health Trainers in Khoramabad in 1384

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    faride Malekshahi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Malekshahi F1, Momen-nasab M1 1. Instructor, Department of nursing, Faculty of nursing and midwifery, Lorestan University of medical sciences Abstract Background: High risk behaviors are the most prevalent factors that endanger the health of a community. Nowadays the prevalence of high risk behaviors, especially among adolescents and young adults has created a lot of worries for human societies and despite the preventive measures of the last three decades, high risk behaviors have grown tremendousely in the world and have imposed heavy medical bills.Since prevention has been recognized to be the only way of controlling such behaviors, medical professionals should change people’s health behaviors by promoting the knowledge of the society. Among these professionals, health trainers can have an important role in increasing community knowledge for the prevention and control of high risk behaviors. Therefore, the level of their knowledge is important. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of high - risk - behavior prevetion educational program on the knowledge and atittude of school health trainers in Khoramabad in 1384. Materials and methods: The study was a quasi-experimental one. The sample of the study was all school health trainers (n=50 in Khoramabad. The data collection tool was a three-section questionnaire including questions on demographic data, knowledge, and atittude toward high risk behaviors which was prepared based on reliable information, books and papers and was used after confirming its reliability and validity. In this study the intervening variable was the high - risk - behavior prevetion educational program. The educational method in this study was a two-session workshop. The educational content emphasized on the promotion of knowledge, positive attitude toward prevetion to implement healthy behaviors which was performed by university instructors in the field. After two months of education, the post test was

  15. Network for Astronomy School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Ros, R. M.; Garcia, B.

    2014-01-01

    The Network for Astronomy School Education Project (NASE) was developed in response to the IAU's most recent 10 Years Strategic Plan to increase the efforts of the IAU in schools. NASE's mission is to stimulate teaching astronomy in schools, through professional development of primary and secondary school science teachers in developing and emerging countries. NASE's organizational principle is to build capacity by providing courses for three years in cooperation with a Local Organizing Committee (Local NASE Group). The Local NASE Group consists of 6-8 local university professors and education professional who will promote astronomy activities and organize future courses in subsequent years in their region of their country. NASE philosophy is to introduce low-tech astronomy, and has thus developed an a suite of activities that can be carried out with inexpensive, quotidian materials. Supporting these activities is a text for teachers, plus a complete set of instructional materials for each topic. These materials are available in English and Spanish, with future editions available in Chinese and Portuguese. We describe and discuss NASE activities in Central and South America from 2009 to the present.

  16. Organ ic Agroedu - Tourism Attractions t oward a n Interesting O utdoor Environmental Education t o Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Raisa Khairun Nisa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate two organic agroedu-tourism attractions developed to 42 students of eight graders of three junior high schools in the village and one school in the city. Organic agroedu-tourism offers two tour programs namely Organic Garden Tour and Organic Farming Technology. Appreciations of the participants were determined by pre and post test after joining the organic agroedu-tourism. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics. This study shows that 78.6 % of the participants prefer the Organic Garden Tour and 21.4% find that the Organic Farming Technology is better. Organic agroedu-tourism can develop cognitive aspect of participants from score 1 turned into 3. Most participants had a high interest in joining the organic egroedu-tourism. Organic agroedu-tourism is also able to meet the expectations of participants that are indicated by an increase in the skills and experience of participants from score 2 to 5. Satisfaction of the participants can also be assessed from the high appreciation average before and after joining Organic agroedu-tourism, which are score 4. The appreciation of the participant is shown by their willingness to invite other people to join. Factors affecting participants’ satisfaction were family background, socio-economy background, personal perception and knowledge. Based on the result, organic agroedu-tourism shows strength to develop the participants’ understanding, knowledge and skills in integrated organic farming system, even though not all participants are interested to join all programs provided. Farmer groups need to improve the quality of organic agroedu-tourism, for example, completing the facilities and agreed on tourism attractions, enhancing farmers’ skills as tour guide, providing organic agroedu-tourism program relevant to the school curriculum, and promoting it to public.

  17. Variables Affecting a Level of Practice and Quality of Educational Quality Assurance in Basic Education Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakkapong Prongprommarat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to study the Level of Practice and Quality of Educational Quality Assurance in Basic Education Schools of the Office of the Basic Education Commission. The sample consisted of 60 secondnary schools in Office of the basic Education Commission in the provinces of Chaiyaphum, Nakhon Ratchasima, Burirum, Surin and Khon Kaen were drawn by using proportionally with the number of teachers in each school. The data were collected by using (1 the questionnaire on the acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools. (2 the record form the external assessment of the office for National Education Standards and Quality Assessment, (3 the questionnaire on the director leadership, (2 test of the directors and teachers attitudes towards educational quality assurance, (5 test of the directors and teachers inquirying motive, (6 test of the directors and teachers working responsibility, and (7 the questionnaire on the directors and teachers cooperative. The statistical methods used to analysis the data were mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation and path analysis. The findings revealed that: 1. The level of acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools was at a high level. There was just a fairly difference in acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools. 2. The level of external quality assessment in basic education schools was at a good level. There was just a little difference in external quality assessment in basic education schools. 3. The variables affecting level of acting of educational quality assurance in basic education schools were the level of the school directors attitudes towards educational quality assurance (β = 0.10, the level of the school directors working responsibility (β = 0.13, the level of the teacher attitudes towards educational quality assurance (β = 0.23 and the level of the teachers inquirying motive (β = 0.49 These four

  18. Effects of Part-Time Work on School Achievement During High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kusum; Chang, Mido; Dika, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The authors explored the effects of part-time work on school achievement during high school. To estimate the true effects of part-time work on school grades, the authors included family background, students' educational aspirations, and school engagement as controls. Although a substantial literature exists on the relationship of part-time work…

  19. The Development of Cooperative Learning Model Based on Local Wisdom of Bali for Physical Education, Sport and Health Subject in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, I. K.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a cooperative learning model based on local wisdom (PKBKL) of Bali (Tri Pramana’s concept), for physical education, sport, and health learning in VII grade of Junior High School in Singaraja-Buleleng Bali. This research is the development research of the development design chosen refers to the development proposed by Dick and Carey. The development of model and learning devices was conducted through four stages, namely: (1) identification and needs analysis stage (2) the development of design and draft of PKBKL and RPP models, (3) testing stage (expert review, try out, and implementation). Small group try out was conducted on VII-3 grade of Undiksha Laboratory Junior High School in the academic year 2013/2014, large group try out was conducted on VIIb of Santo Paulus Junior High School Singaraja in the academic year 2014/2015, and the implementation of the model was conducted on three (3) schools namely SMPN 2 Singaraja, SMPN 3 Singaraja, and Undiksha laboratory Junior High School in the academic year 2014/2015. Data were collected using documentation, testing, non-testing, questionnaire, and observation. The data were analyzed descriptively. The findings of this research indicate that: (1) PKBKL model has met the criteria of the operation of a learning model namely: syntax, social system, principles of reaction, support system, as well as instructional and nurturing effects, (2) PKBKL model is a valid, practical, and effective model, (3) the practicality of the learning devices (RPP), is at the high category. Based on the research results, there are two things recommended: (1) in order that learning stages (syntax) of PKBKL model can be performed well, then teachers need to have an understanding of the cooperative learning model of Student Team Achievement Division (STAD) type and the concepts of scientifically approach well, (2) PKBKL model can be performed well on physical education, sport and health learning, if the

  20. About to Graduate from High School? Consider Career Education Opportunities. EdSource Student/Parent Guide = Estas por graduarte de la escuela preparatoria? Considera oportunidades para seguir tu educacion de carrera. EdSource guia de estudiantes y padres

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Getting a sound education is important to a student's ability to make a good living in a field they will enjoy. For many students graduating from high school, that includes high quality career technical (or vocational) education tailored to a specific job. In California, such programs are available in a wide range of fields, from healthcare to the…