WorldWideScience

Sample records for high q2 region

  1. Analytic calculation of two-loop QCD corrections to b → sl+l- in the high q2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, C.; Pilipp, V.; Schüpbach, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present our results for the NNLL virtual corrections to the matrix elements of the operators O1 and O2 for the inclusive process b → sl+l- in the kinematical region q2 > 4mc2, where q2 is the invariant mass squared of the lepton-pair. This is the first analytic two-loop calculation of these matrix elements in the high q2 region. We give the matrix elements as an expansion in mc/mb and keep the full analytic dependence on q2. Making extensive use of differential equation techniques, we fully automatize the expanding of the Feynman integrals in mc/mb. In coincidence with an earlier work where the master integrals were obtained numerically [1], we find that in the high q2 region the αs corrections to the matrix elements langlesl+l-|O1,2|brangle calculated in the present paper lead to a decrease of the perturbative part of the q2-spectrum by 10%-15% relative to the NNLL result in which these contributions are put to zero and reduce the renormalization scale uncertainty to ~ 2%.

  2. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagulyan, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Khayari, N El; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovski, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stepanyan, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tahani, A; Tang, L; Tvaskis, V; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zhu, H

    2009-01-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  3. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  4. Exclusive pπ+π- electroproduction in the resonance region at high Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isupov, Evgeny; Burkert, Volker; Mokeev, Victor

    2013-10-01

    We report on the analysis of charged 2-pion electroproduction in the kinematical region of nucleon resonances. The data were taken with a 5 . 75 GeV continuous electron beam at Jefferson Lab impinging on a liquid hydrogen target to measure the process ep --> epπ+π- . Scattered electrons and at least two of the final state hadrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), and the fully exclusive process was determined using kinematical constraints from the over-determined reaction. The data were used to measure nine differential cross sections and the fully integrated cross section in the invariant mass range of the hadronic final state from 1 . 4 to 2 . 0 and at photon virtualities 2 . 0 dressed quark core dominate.

  5. R Measurements at High Q^2

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Previous Measurements of R at high Q^2 are reviewed. Recent R measurement results, including those from the Beijing Spectrometer Experiment, are described. The present status of R measurements and future measurement possiblities are summarized.

  6. N*(1535) electroproduction at high Q2

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G; Tsushima, K

    2011-01-01

    A covariant spectator quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> N*(1535) reaction in the large Q2 region. Starting from the relation between the nucleon and N*(1535) systems, the N*(1535) valence quark wave function is determined without the addition of any parameters. The model is then used to calculate the gamma N -> N*(1535) transition form factors. A very interesting, useful relation between the A12 and S12 helicity amplitudes for Q2 > GeV^2, is also derived.

  7. High Q^2 Measurements from HERA

    CERN Document Server

    South, David M

    2010-01-01

    New measurements of neutral and charged current cross sections at large negative four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 have been performed by H1 and ZEUS, using up to the complete HERA II ep data, which was taken with polarised electron and positron beams. The data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model, based on various parton distribution function parameterisations. The polarisation asymmetry of the neutral current interaction is measured as a function of Q^2, as well as the polarisation dependence of the charged current cross section and both are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. The HERA II cross sections are also combined with previously published HERA I data to obtain the most precise unpolarised measurements.

  8. N*(1535) electroproduction at high Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, M.T. Pena, K. Tsushima

    2012-04-01

    A covariant spectator quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) reaction in the large Q{sup 2} region. Starting from the relation between the nucleon and N*(1535) systems, the N*(1535) valence quark wave function is determined without the addition of any parameters. The model is then used to calculate the {gamma}N {yields} N*(1535) transition form factors. A very interesting, useful relation between the A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} helicity amplitudes for Q{sup 2} > GeV{sup 2}, is also derived.

  9. On The $Q^2$ Dependence of The Spin Structure Function In The Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Li, Zhenping; Li, Zhujun

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin dependent sum rules in the deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry $A_1(x,Q^2)$ approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone can not determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral $\\int_0^1 \\frac {A_1(x,Q^2)F_2(x,Q^2)}{2x(1+R(x,Q^2))}dx$ is estimated from $Q^2=0$ to $2.5$ GeV$^2$. The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important, thus provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin dependent sum rule.

  10. Electromagnetic and Weak Nuclear Structure Functions $F_{1,2}(x,Q^2)$ in the Intermediate Region of $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We have studied nuclear structure functions $F_{1A}(x,Q^2)$ and $F_{2A}(x,Q^2)$ for electromagnetic and weak processes in the region of $1 GeV^2 < Q^2 <8 GeV^2$. The nuclear medium effects arising due to Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions and shadowing effects are taken into account using a many body field theoretical approach. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using a relativistic nucleon spectral function. The results are compared with the available experimental data. Implications of nuclear medium effects on the validity of Callan-Gross relation are also discussed.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  12. Pseudoscalar meson electromagnetic form factor at high Q2 from full lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, J.; Zimermmane-Santos, A. C.; Davies, C. T. H.; Lepage, G. P.; Lytle, A. T.; Hpqcd Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We give an accurate determination of the vector (electromagnetic) form factor, F (Q2) , for a light pseudoscalar meson up to squared momentum transfer Q2 values of 6 GeV2 for the first time from full lattice QCD, including u , d , s and c quarks in the sea at multiple values of the lattice spacing. Our results show good control of lattice discretization and sea quark mass effects. We study a pseudoscalar meson made of valence s quarks but the qualitative picture obtained applies also to the π meson, relevant to upcoming experiments at Jefferson Lab. We find that Q2F (Q2) becomes flat in the region between Q2 of 2 GeV2 and 6 GeV2, with a value well above that of the asymptotic perturbative QCD expectation, but well below that of the vector-meson dominance pole form appropriate to low Q2 values. Our calculations show that we can reach higher Q2 values in future to shed further light on where the perturbative QCD result emerges.

  13. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^+ \\rho^-$ Production in High-$Q^2$ Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive rho^+ rho^- production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly-virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89 GeV rho^+ rho^- is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, W_gg, in the kinematic region: 1.2 GeV^2 rho^0 rho^0, measured in the same kinematic region by L3, and to have similar W_gg and Q^2 dependences.

  14. Charged Particle Production in High Q2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alexa, C; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deák, M; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovskii, E I; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Prideaux, P; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2007-01-01

    The average charged track multiplicity and the normalised distribution of the scaled momentum, $\\xp$, of charged final state hadrons are measured in deep-inelastic $\\ep$ scattering at high $Q^2$ in the Breit frame of reference. The analysis covers the range of photon virtuality $100 < Q^2 < 20 000 \\GeV^{2}$. Compared with previous results presented by HERA experiments this analysis has a significantly higher statistical precision and extends the phase space to higher $Q^{2}$ and to the full range of $\\xp$. The results are compared with $e^+e^-$ annihilation data and with various calculations based on perturbative QCD using different models of the hadronisation process.

  15. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^0 \\rho^0$ Production in Two-Photon Collisions at High $Q^2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    Exclusive rho rho production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89GeV rho rho is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2 and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, Wgg, in the kinematic region: 1.2GeV^2 < Q^2 < 30GeV^2 and 1.1GeV < Wgg < 3GeV.

  16. Neutrino-induced pion production at low energies and in the small $Q^2$ region

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, E A

    2012-01-01

    We analyse neutrino-induced reactions in the small $Q^2$ region and for energies covering the production and decay of the delta resonance. One of our results is the agreement with the MiniBooNE data for $1\\pi^+$ and $1\\pi^0$ final states. In addition we present differential cross sections for charged and neutral currents and for proton and neutron targets. Finally, we present cross sections induced by muon and electron type neutrinos, where effects of the lepton masses are visible.

  17. High $Q^{2}$ Physics at HERA and Searches for New Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, T; Rückl, R

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary results from H1 and ZEUS on Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) at high momentum transfer squared $Q^2$ are presented. Used are all available $e^+ p$ data accumulated by the H1 and ZEUS experiments between 1994 and 1997, corresponding to integrated luminosities of $37 {pb}^{-1}$ and $47 {pb}^{-1}$, respectively. The anomalies observed at high $Q^2$ in the 1994 to 1996 data still remain, though with less significance. Since this high $Q^2$ domain represents a new frontier in DIS, the same data are used to search for new particles possessing direct couplings to lepton-quark pairs. Assuming that the slight excess of events observed in Neutral Current DIS is due to a statistical fluctuation, preliminary limits on the production of leptoquarks and of squarks in R-parity violating MSSM are presented.

  18. New Structure Function Results at Low x and High $Q^{2}$ from HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2000-01-01

    A precise proton structure function F_2 at low x is measured. The data is interpreted in the framework of QCD with an extraction of gluon density xg. The charm contribution to F_2 is determined in an extended kinematic range. Neutral and charged current cross-sections at high Q^2 are also measured and compared with the Standard Model predictions.

  19. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via $\\gamma^* p \\to n\\pi^+$ at high $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kijun; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Anghinolfi, Marco; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Baturin, Vitaly; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Daniel, Aji; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Alaoui, Ahmed El; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fradi, Ahmed; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guo, Lei; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Heddle, David; Hicks, Kenneth; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moutarde, Herve; Espitia, Edwin Munevar; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Paolone, Michael; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Seungkyung; Pereira, Sergio; Phelps, Evan; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Ricco, Giovanni; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seraydaryan, Heghine; Sharabian, Youri; Smith, Elton; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Taylor, Charles; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Trivedi, Arjun; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voutier, Eric; Watts, Daniel; Weygand, Dennis; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Kalantarians, N; Hyde, C E

    2012-01-01

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the $n\\pi^+$ channel at relatively high momentum transfer ($Q^2$ up to 4.2 $\\rm{GeV^2}$). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole ($E_{0+}$), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor $G_1$ within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor $G_A$. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly $4\\pi$ CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754 $\\rm{GeV}$ electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the $\\pi-N$-multipole $E_{0+}/G_D$ were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost $Q^2$ independent.

  20. Measurement of High-$Q^{2}$ Neutral-Current $e^{+}p$ Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross-Sections at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Abramowicz, H; Acosta, D; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; An Shiz Hong; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, M; Bacon, Trevor C; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashindzhagian, G L; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bellagamba, L; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bienlein, J K; Blaikley, H E; Bohnet, I; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Bornheim, A; Borzemski, P; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Breitweg, J; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Burgard, C; Burow, B D; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Cashmore, R J; Castellini, G; Catterall, C D; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottingham, W N; Crittenden, J; Cross, R; D'Agostini, G; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Dardo, M; De Pasquale, S; Deffner, R; Deppe, O; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Dondana, S; Dosselli, U; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Dulinski, Z; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eckert, M; Edmonds, J K; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Fernández, J P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Frisken, W R; Fusayasu, T; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Golubkov, Yu A; Göttlicher, P; Grabosch, H J; Graciani, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanna, D S; Harnew, N; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartmann, J; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heinz, L; Hernández, J M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Homma, K; Hong, S J; Howell, G; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jing, Z; Johnson, K F; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Kasemann, M; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khakzad, M; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, Robert; Klimek, K; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Lamberti, L; Lane, J B; Laurenti, G; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Lindemann, L; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Ma, K J; Maccarrone, G; MacDonald, N; Magill, S; Mallik, U; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; McFall, J D; Mellado, B; Menary, S; Meyer, A; Meyer-Larsen, A; Milewski, J; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Monaco, V; Mönig, K; Monteiro, T; Morandin, M; Moritz, M; Murray, W N; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nam, S W; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Noyes, V A; Nylander, P; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Orr, R S; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Park, I H; Park, S K; Parsons, J A; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, Pier Giovanni; Pellegrino, A; Pelucchi, F; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pfeiffer, M; Piccioni, D; Piotrzkowski, K; Poelz, G; Polenz, S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Prinias, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Puga, J; Quadt, A; Raach, H; Raso, M; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Repond, J; Ritz, S; Riveline, M; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Salehi, H; Sampson, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schechter, A; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Schwarzer, O; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sideris, D; Sievers, M; Simmons, D; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, I O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Saint-Laurent, M G; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Straub, P B; Strickland, E; Stroili, R; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, I; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Velthuis, J J; Verkerke, W; Voci, C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Votano, L; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D S; Waugh, R; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wölfle, S; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zajac, J; Zakrzewski, J A; Zamora Garcia, Y; Zawiejski, L; Zetsche, F; Zeuner, W; Zhu, Q; Zichichi, Antonino; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Van Sighem, A

    1999-01-01

    The e^+p neutral-current deep inelastic scattering differential cross-sections $d\\sigma/dQ^2$, for Q^2 > 400 GeV^2, $d\\sigma/dx$ and $d\\sigma/dy$, for Q^2 > 400, 2500 and 10000 GeV^2, have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The data sample of 47.7 pb^-1 was collected at a center-of-mass energy of 300 GeV. The cross-section, $d\\sigma/dQ^2$, falls by six orders of magnitude between Q^2 = 400 and 40000 GeV^2. The predictions of the Standard Model are in very good agreement with the data. Complementing the observations of time-like Z^0 contributions to fermion-antifermion annihilation, the data provide direct evidence for the presence of Z^0 exchange in the space-like region explored by deep inelastic scattering.

  1. Measurement of the Neutron Electric Form Factor GEN at High Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathy McCormick

    2003-01-01

    Experiment E02-0131 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) will measure the neutron electric form factor GnE at the high four-momentum transfer values of Q^2 ~ 1.3, 2.4 and 3.4 (GeV/c)2 via a measurement of the cross section asymmetry A_T in the reaction 3He(e,e'n)pp. This measurement was approved for 32 days of running by Jefferson Lab PAC 212 in January 2002.

  2. $B \\to K^* \\ell \\ell$ Standard Model contributions -- Zooming in on high $q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Hiller, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    To further precision studies with $B \\to K^{(*)} \\ell \\ell$ decays in the high-$q^2$ window uncertainties related to the operator product expansion (OPE) need to be scrutinized. How well can the OPE describe $B \\to K^* (\\to K \\pi) \\ell \\ell$ angular distributions for a given binning in view of the local charm resonance structure? We present a data-driven method to access this quantitatively. Our analysis suggests that the bins which are near the kinematic endpoint are best described by the OPE and should be pursued for precision studies. At the same time measurements with finer binning help controlling the uncertainties.

  3. Measurement of charged and neutral current e$^{-}$p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q$^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Derrick, Malcolm; Magill, S; Mikunas, D; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Talaga, R L; Zhang, H; Ayad, R; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, P; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Chiarini, M; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Nemoz, C; Palmonari, F; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Timellini, R; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, Antonino; Bargende, A; Crittenden, James Arthur; Desch, Klaus; Diekmann, B; Doeker, T; Eckert, M; Feld, L; Frey, A; Geerts, M; Geitz, G; Grothe, M; Haas, T; Hartmann, H; Haun, D; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Katz, U F; Mari, S M; Mass, A; Mengel, S; Mollen, J; Paul, E; Rembser, C; Schattevoy, R; Schramm, D; Stamm, J; Wedemeyer, R; Campbell-Robson, S; Cassidy, A; Dyce, N; Foster, B; George, S; Gilmore, R; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Llewellyn, T J; Morgado, C J S; Norman, D J P; O'Mara, J A; Tapper, R J; Wilson, S S; Yoshida, R; Rau, R R; Arneodo, M; Iannotti, L; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Bernstein, A M; Caldwell, A; Cartiglia, N; Parsons, J A; Ritz, S; Sciulli, F; Straub, P B; Wai, L; Yang, S; Zhu, Q; Borzemski, P; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Piotrzkowski, K; Zachara, M; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Zajac, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Przybycien, M B; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Beier, H; Bienlein, J K; Coldewey, C; Deppe, O; Desler, K; Drews, G; Flasinski, M; Gilkinson, D J; Glasman, C; Göttlicher, P; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gutjahr, B; Hain, W; Hasell, D; Hessling, H; Hultschig, H; Iga, Y; Joos, P; Kasemann, M; Klanner, Robert; Koch, W; Köpke, L; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labs, J; Ladage, A; Löhr, B; Loewe, M; Lüke, D; Manczak, O; Ng, J S T; Nickel, S; Notz, D; Ohrenberg, K; Roco, M T; Rohde, M; Roldán, J; Schneekloth, U; Schulz, W; Selonke, F; Stiliaris, E; Surrow, B; Voss, T; Westphal, D; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zhou, J F; Grabosch, H J; Kharchilava, A I; Leich, A; Mattingly, M C K; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Wulff, N; Barbagli, G; Pelfer, P G; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Maccarrone, G D; De Pasquale, S; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Eisenhardt, S; Freidhof, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Schröder, J; Trefzger, T M; Brook, N H; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Fleck, I; Saxon, D H; Utley, M L; Wilson, A S; Dannemann, A; Holm, U; Horstmann, D; Neumann, T; Sinkus, R; Wick, K; Badura, E; Burow, B D; Hagge, L; Lohrmann, E; Mainusch, J; Milewski, J; Nakahata, M; Pavel, N; Poelz, G; Schott, W; Zetsche, F; Bacon, Trevor C; Butterworth, Ian; Gallo, E; Harris, V L; Hung, B Y H; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Morawitz, P P O; Prinias, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Whitfield, A F; Mallik, U; McCliment, E; Wang, M Z; Wang, S M; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y; Cloth, P; Filges, D; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S M; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Suh, M H; Yon, S H; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; McNeil, R R; Metcalf, W; Nadendla, V K; Barreiro, F; Cases, G; Graciani, R; Hernández, J M; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Puga, J; Terrón, J; De Trocóniz, J F; Smith, G R; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Hartmann, J; Hung, L W; Lim, J N; Matthews, C G; Patel, P M; Sinclair, L E; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Ullmann, R T; Zacek, G; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Stifutkin, A; Bashindzhagian, G L; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Kobrin, V D; Kuzmin, V A; Proskuryakov, A S; Savin, A A; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Zotov, N P; Botje, M; Chlebana, F S; Dake, A P; Engelen, J; De Kamps, M; Kooijman, P M; Kruse, A; Tiecke, H G; Verkerke, W; Vreeswijk, M; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Van Woudenberg, R; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B G; Durkin, L S; Honscheid, K; Li Chuan; Ling, T Y; McLean, K W; Murray, W N; Park, I H; Romanowsky, T A; Seidlein, R; Bailey, D S; Blair, G A; Byrne, A; Cashmore, Roger J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Daniels, D C; Devenish, R C E; Harnew, N; Lancaster, M; Luffman, P; Lindemann, L; McFall, J D; Nath, C; Noyes, V A; Quadt, A; Uijterwaal, H; Walczak, R; Wilson, F F; Yip, T; Abbiendi, G; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Bulmahn, J; Butterworth, J M; Feild, R G; Oh, B Y; Whitmore, J; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Tassi, E; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Prytz, K; Shah, T P; Short, T L; Barberis, E; Dubbs, T; Heusch, C A; Van Hook, M; Hubbard, B; Lockman, W; Rahn, J T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Biltzinger, J; Seifert, R J; Walenta, Albert H; Zech, G; Abramowicz, H; Briskin, G M; Dagan, S; Levy, A; Hasegawa, T; Hazumi, M; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Mine, S; Nagasawa, Y; Nakao, M; Susuki, I; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Chiba, M; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Homma, K; Kitamura, S; Nakamitsu, Y; Yamauchi, K; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Lamberti, L; Maselli, S; Peroni, C; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Bénard, F; Brkic, M; Crombie, M B; Gingrich, D M; Hartner, G F; Joo, K K; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Sampson, C R; Teuscher, R; Catterall, C D; Jones, T W; Kaziewicz, P B; Lane, J B; Saunders, R L; Shulman, J; Blankenship, K; Kochocki, J A; Lu, B; Mo, L W; Bogusz, W; Charchula, K; Ciborowski, J; Gajewski, J; Grzelak, G; Kasprzak, M; Krzyzanowski, M; Muchorowski, K; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Eisenberg, Y; Karshon, U; Revel, D; Zer-Zion, D; Ali, I; Badgett, W F; Behrens, B H; Dasu, S; Fordham, C; Foudas, C; Goussiou, A; Loveless, R J; Reeder, D D; Silverstein, S; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wodarczyk, M; Tsurugai, T; Bhadra, S; Cardy, M L; Fagerstroem, C P; Frisken, W R; Furutani, K M; Khakzad, M; Schmidke, W B

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e^-p scattering has been studied in both the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q^2, between 400 GeV^2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV^2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, d\\sigma/dQ^2 , are presented. For Q^2 \\simeq M_W^2, where M_W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q^2. The Q^2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M_{W} = 76 \\pm 16 \\pm 13~GeV.

  4. Low Q2, High ν Neutrino Physics (cvc, Pcac, Hadron Dominance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Marage, P.

    A critical review is given of the main theoretical bases and of the experimental results of neutrino physics at low four-momentum transfer (Q2≤1 GeV2) and high energy transfer (ν≥a few GeV). The theoretical predictions for the vector current are first presented, using the CVC hypothesis and the hadron dominance model of Piketty and Stodolsky. The predictions for the axial current at very small Q2 values are discussed on the basis of the PCAC hypothesis (Adler’s theorem), and extended for Q2≲1 GeV2 in the lines of hadron dominance; the structure of the longitudinal component of the axial current is particularly discussed. Experimental data on neutrino and antineutrino interactions on nucleons are reviewed, in particular the total cross sections, which provide good tests of the PCAC hypothesis and of the model of Piketty and Stodolsky; also reviewed are the data on diffractive production of π, ρ and a1 mesons. The observation of shadowing, from the comparison of the total cross sections of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon and deuterium nuclei, is discussed in detail with emphasis on the predictions of the PCAC hypothesis, in the framework of the Glauber-Gribov model. Finally a review is given of the results on coherent neutrino and antineutrino interactions on atomic nuclei: • π meson production, by charged and neutral currents in several experiments, providing a detailed test of the PCAC hypothesis; • ρ meson production, providing a test of the CVC hypothesis in weak interactions; • a1 meson or nonresonant ρπ system production, allowing the study of the weak axial current structure.

  5. Search for QCD Instanton-Induced Processes at HERA in the High-$Q^2$ Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun Avila, Karla~Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krücker, Dirk; Krüger, K.; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Müller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Pokorny, Boris; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Rusakov, Serguei; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schöning, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truöl, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Turnau, Jacek; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wünsch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet; Zomer, Fabian

    2016-07-07

    Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes are searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering at the electron-proton collider HERA in the kinematic region defined by the Bjorken-scaling variable $x > 10^{-3}$, the inelasticity $0.2< y < 0.7$ and the photon virtuality $150 < Q^2 < 15000$ GeV$^2$. The search is performed using H1 data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~$351$ pb$^{-1}$. No evidence for the production of QCD instanton-induced events is observed. Upper limits on the cross section for instanton-induced processes between $1.5$~pb and $6$~pb, at $95\\%$~ confidence level, are obtained depending on the kinematic domain in which instantons could be produced. Compared to earlier publications, the limits are improved by an order of magnitude and for the first time are challenging theory predictions.

  6. Overview of high-Q2 nucleon form factor program with Super BigBite Spectrometer in JLab's Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Andrew; Jefferson Lab Hall A; Super BigBite Spectrometer Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The elastic electromagnetic form factors (EMFFs) of the nucleon describe the impact-parameter-space distributions of electric charge and magnetization in the nucleon in the infinite momentum frame. The form factors are among the simplest and most fundamental measurable dynamical quantities describing the nucleon's structure. Precision measurements of the nucleon form factors provide stringent benchmarks testing the most sophisticated theoretical models of the nucleon, as well as ab initio calculations in lattice QCD and continuum non-perturbative QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations. Measurements at momentum transfers Q in the few-GeV range probe the theoretically challenging region of transition between the non-perturbative and perturbative regimes of QCD. The recent upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to a maximum electron beam energy of 11 GeV will facilitate the measurement of the nucleon helicity-conserving (F1) and helicity-flip (F2) form factors of both proton and neutron to Q2 > 10 GeV2, In this talk, I will present an overview of the Super BigBite Spectrometer, currently under construction in CEBAF's experimental Hall A, and its physics program of high-Q2 nucleon EMFF measurements. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC0014230.

  7. gamma* N --> Delta at JLab: Exploring the High Q2 Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurizio Ungaro; Kyungseon Jo; Paul Stoler

    2007-04-01

    We report a new measurement of the exclusive electroproduction reaction gamma* p --> pi0 p to explore the evolution from soft non-perturbative physics to hard processes via the Q2 dependence of the magnetic (M1+), electric (E1+) and scalar (S1+) multipoles in the N --> Delta transition. 9000 differential cross section data points cover W from threshold to 1.4 GeV/c2, 4pi center-of-mass solid angle, and Q2 from 3 to 6 GeV2/c2, the highest yet achieved. It is found that the magnetic form factor GM* decreases with Q2 more steeply than the proton magnetic form factor, the ratio E1+/M1+ is small and negative, indicating strong helicity non-conservation, and the ratio S1+/M1+ is negative, while its magnitude increases with Q2.

  8. Probing the high momentum component of the deuteron at high Q^2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, Werner; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Aniol, Konrad; Arrington, John; Batigne, Guillaume; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chang, C; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Deur, Alexandre; Epstein, Martin; Finn, John; Frullani, Salvatore; Furget, Christophe; Garibaldi, Franco; Gayou, Olivier; Gilman, Ronald; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hayes, David; Higinbotham, Douglas; Hinton, Wendy; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim, Hassan; De Jager, Cornelis; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Kaufman, Lisa; Klein, Andreas; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Laird; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Laget, Jean; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Margaziotiz, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Milbrath, Brian; Mitchell, Joseph; Monaghan, Peter; Moteabbed, Maryam; Moussiegt, Pierre; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Paschke, Kent; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Punjabi, Vina; Qattan, Issam; Quemener, Gilles; Ransome, Ronald; Raue, Brian; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Reinhold, Joerg; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Rikki; Roedelbronn, Michael; Saha, Arunava; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vincent; Ulmer, Paul; Voutier, Eric; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-12-01

    The {sup 2}H(e,e'p) cross section at a momentum transfer of 3.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} was measured over a kinematical range that made it possible to study this reaction for a set of fixed missing momenta as a function of the neutron recoil angle {theta}{sub nq} and to extract missing momentum distributions for fixed values of {theta}{sub nq} up to 0.55 GeV/c. In the region of 35{sup o} {le} {theta}{sub nq} {le} 45{sup o} recent calculations, which predict that final state interactions are small, agree reasonably well with the experimental data. Therefore these experimental reduced cross sections provide direct access to the high momentum component of the deuteron momentum distribution in exclusive deuteron electro-disintegration.

  9. Jet Production in ep Collisions at High $Q^2$ and Determination of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, FD; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D -J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H -U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic ep scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150<Q^2<15000 GeV^2 using HERA data taken in 1999-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 395 pb^-1. Inclusive jet, 2-jet and 3-jet cross sections, normalised to the neutral current deep-inelastic scattering cross sections, are measured as functions of Q^2, jet transverse momentum and proton momentum fraction. The measurements are well described by perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects. The strong coupling as determined from these measurements is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1168 +/-0.0007 (exp.) +0.0046/-0.0030 (th.) +/-0.0016(pdf).

  10. Jet production in high Q$^{2}$ deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Derrick, Malcolm; Magill, S; Mikunas, D; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Talaga, R L; Zhang, H; Ayad, R; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, P; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Chiarini, M; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Nemoz, C; Palmonari, F; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Timellini, R; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, Antonino; Bargende, A; Crittenden, James Arthur; Desch, Klaus; Diekmann, B; Doeker, T; Eckert, M; Feld, L; Frey, A; Geerts, M; Geitz, G; Grothe, M; Haas, T; Hartmann, H; Haun, D; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Katz, U F; Mari, S M; Mass, A; Mengel, S; Mollen, J; Paul, E; Rembser, C; Schattevoy, R; Schramm, D; Stamm, J; Wedemeyer, R; Campbell-Robson, S; Cassidy, A; Dyce, N; Foster, B; George, S; Gilmore, R; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Llewellyn, T J; Morgado, C J S; Norman, D J P; O'Mara, J A; Tapper, R J; Wilson, S S; Yoshida, R; Rau, R R; Arneodo, M; Iannotti, L; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Bernstein, A M; Caldwell, A; Parsons, J A; Ritz, S; Sciulli, F; Straub, P B; Wai, L; Yang, S; Zhu, Q; Borzemski, P; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Piotrzkowski, K; Zachara, M; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Zajac, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Przybycien, M B; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Beier, H; Bienlein, J K; Coldewey, C; Deppe, O; Desler, K; Drews, G; Flasinski, M; Gilkinson, D J; Glasman, C; Göttlicher, P; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gutjahr, B; Hain, W; Hasell, D; Hessling, H; Hultschig, H; Iga, Y; Joos, P; Kasemann, M; Klanner, Robert; Koch, W; Köpke, L; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labs, J; Ladage, A; Löhr, B; Loewe, M; Lüke, D; Manczak, O; Ng, J S T; Nickel, S; Notz, D; Ohrenberg, K; Roco, M T; Rohde, M; Roldán, J; Schneekloth, U; Schulz, W; Selonke, F; Stiliaris, E; Surrow, B; Voss, T; Westphal, D; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zhou, J F; Grabosch, H J; Kharchilava, A I; Leich, A; Mattingly, M C K; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Wulff, N; Barbagli, G; Pelfer, P G; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Maccarrone, G D; De Pasquale, S; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Eisenhardt, S; Freidhof, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Schröder, J; Trefzger, T M; Brook, N H; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Fleck, I; Saxon, D H; Utley, M L; Wilson, A S; Dannemann, A; Holm, U; Horstmann, D; Neumann, T; Sinkus, R; Wick, K; Badura, E; Burow, B D; Hagge, L; Lohrmann, E; Mainusch, J; Milewski, J; Nakahata, M; Pavel, N; Poelz, G; Schott, W; Zetsche, F; Bacon, Trevor C; Butterworth, Ian; Gallo, E; Harris, V L; Hung, B Y H; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Morawitz, P P O; Prinias, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Whitfield, A F; Mallik, U; McCliment, E; Wang, M Z; Wang, S M; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y; Cloth, P; Filges, D; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S M; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Suh, M H; Yon, S H; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; McNeil, R R; Metcalf, W; Nadendla, V K; Barreiro, F; Cases, G; Graciani, R; Hernández, J M; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Puga, J; Terrón, J; De Trocóniz, J F; Smith, G R; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Hartmann, J; Hung, L W; Lim, J N; Matthews, C G; Patel, P M; Sinclair, L E; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Ullmann, R T; Zacek, G; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Stifutkin, A; Bashindzhagian, G L; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Kobrin, V D; Kuzmin, V A; Proskuryakov, A S; Savin, A A; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Zotov, N P; Botje, M; Chlebana, F S; Dake, A P; Engelen, J; De Kamps, M; Kooijman, P M; Kruse, A; Tiecke, H G; Verkerke, W; Vreeswijk, M; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Van Woudenberg, R; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B G; Durkin, L S; Honscheid, K; Li Chuan; Ling, T Y; McLean, K W; Murray, W N; Park, I H; Romanowsky, T A; Seidlein, R; Bailey, D S; Blair, G A; Byrne, A; Cashmore, Roger J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Daniels, D C; Devenish, R C E; Harnew, N; Lancaster, M; Luffman, P; Lindemann, L; McFall, J D; Nath, C; Noyes, V A; Quadt, A; Uijterwaal, H; Walczak, R; Wilson, F F; Yip, T; Abbiendi, G; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Bulmahn, J; Butterworth, J M; Feild, R G; Oh, B Y; Whitmore, J; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Tassi, E; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Prytz, K; Shah, T P; Short, T L; Barberis, E; Cartiglia, N; Dubbs, T; Heusch, C A; Van Hook, M; Hubbard, B; Lockman, W; Rahn, J T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Biltzinger, J; Seifert, R J; Walenta, Albert H; Zech, G; Abramowicz, H; Briskin, G M; Dagan, S; Levy, A; Hasegawa, T; Hazumi, M; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Mine, S; Nagasawa, Y; Nakao, M; Susuki, I; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Chiba, M; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Homma, K; Kitamura, S; Nakamitsu, Y; Yamauchi, K; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Lamberti, L; Maselli, S; Peroni, C; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Bénard, F; Brkic, M; Crombie, M B; Gingrich, D M; Hartner, G F; Joo, K K; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Sampson, C R; Teuscher, R; Catterall, C D; Jones, T W; Kaziewicz, P B; Lane, J B; Saunders, R L; Shulman, J; Blankenship, K; Kochocki, J A; Lu, B; Mo, L W; Bogusz, W; Charchula, K; Ciborowski, J; Gajewski, J; Grzelak, G; Kasprzak, M; Krzyzanowski, M; Muchorowski, K; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Eisenberg, Y; Karshon, U; Revel, D; Zer-Zion, D; Ali, I; Badgett, W F; Behrens, B H; Dasu, S; Fordham, C; Foudas, C; Goussiou, A; Loveless, R J; Reeder, D D; Silverstein, S; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wodarczyk, M; Tsurugai, T; Bhadra, S; Cardy, M L; Fagerstroem, C P; Frisken, W R; Furutani, K M; Khakzad, M; Schmidke, W B; Levy, Aharon

    1995-01-01

    Two-jet production in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering has been studied for 160<Q^2<1280~GeV^2, 0.01

  11. Nuclear Structure Functions in the Large $X$ Large $Q^{2}$ Kinematic Region in Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Vakili, M; Auchincloss, P S; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Budd, H S; Conrad, J; De Barbaro, L; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koizumi, G; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Lefmann, W C; Marsh, W; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Oreglia, M J; Perera, L P; Quintas, P Z; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schumm, B A; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Steiner, R; Stern, E G; Yang, U K; Yu, J

    2000-01-01

    Data from the CCFR E770 Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiment at Fermilab contain events with large Bjorken x (x>0.7) and high momentum transfer (Q^2>50 (GeV/c)^2). A comparison of the data with a model based on no nuclear effects at large x, shows a significant excess of events in the data. Addition of Fermi gas motion of the nucleons in the nucleus to the model does not explain the excess. Adding a higher momentum tail due to the formation of ``quasi-deuterons'' makes some improvement. An exponentially falling F_2 ``few-nucleon correlations'', can describe the data. A value of s=8.3 \\pm 0.7(stat.)\\pm 0.7(sys.) yields the best agreement with the data.

  12. Electroproduction of $\\phi(1020)$ Mesons at High $Q^2$ with CLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Santoro, J P; Garçon, M; Guidal, M; Laget, J M; Weiss, C; Adams, G; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bookwalter, C; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dhamija, S; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keller, D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji, Li; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacCormick, M; Marchand, C; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabati, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Sapunenko, V; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yurov, M; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2008-01-01

    Electroproduction of exclusive $\\phi$ vector mesons has been studied with the CLAS detector in the kinematical range $1.6\\leq Q^2\\leq 3.8$ GeV$^{2}$, $0.0\\leq t^{\\prime}\\leq 3.6$ GeV$^{2}$, and $2.0\\leq W\\leq 3.0$ GeV. The scaling exponent for the total cross section as $1/(Q^2+M_{\\phi}^2)^n$ was determined to be $n=2.49\\pm 0.33$. The slope of the four-momentum transfer $t'$ distribution is $b_{\\phi}=0.98 \\pm 0.17$ GeV$^{-2}$. The data are consistent with the assumption of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC). Under this assumption, we determine the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross sections to be $R=0.86 \\pm 0.24$. A 2-gluon exchange model is able to reproduce the main features of the data.

  13. Electroproduction of $\\phi(1020)$ Mesons at High $Q^2$ with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Joseph; Smith, Elton; Garcon, Michel; Guidal, Michel; Laget, Jean; Weiss, Christian; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Ficenec, John; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, A

    2008-08-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.025210
    Electroproduction of exclusive $\\phi$ vector mesons has been studied with the CLAS detector in the kinematical range $1.6\\leq Q^2\\leq 3.8$ GeV$^{2}$, $0.0\\leq t^{\\prime}\\leq 3.6$ GeV$^{2}$, and $2.0\\leq W\\leq 3.0$ GeV. The scaling exponent for the total cross section as $1/(Q^2+M_{\\phi}^2)^n$ was determined to be $n=2.49\\pm 0.33$. The slope of the four-momentum transfer $t'$ distribution is $b_{\\phi}=0.98 \\pm 0.17$ GeV$^{-2}$. The data are consistent with the assumption of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC). Under this assumption, we determine the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross sections to be $R=0.86 \\pm 0.24$. A 2-gluon exchange model is able to reproduce the main features of the data.

  14. Dijet Production in Charged and Neutral Current $e^{+}p$ Interactions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Andrieu, B; Arkadov, V; Astvatsaturov, A R; Ayyaz, I; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Bassler, U; Bate, P; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Beier, C; Belousov, A; Benisch, T; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Borras, K; Boudry, V; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P D; Brückner, W; Bruel, P; Bruncko, Dusan; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G W; Campbell, A J; Cao, J; Carli, T; Caron, S; Chabert, E; Clarke, D; Clerbaux, B; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Droutskoi, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Kazarian, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goodwin, C; Grab, C; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Hadig, T; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haynes, W J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Hengstmann, S; Henschel, H; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Hoprich, W; Horisberger, R P; Hurling, S; Ibbotson, M; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Jansen, D M; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kastli, H K; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Kaufmann, O; Kausch, M; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Kroseberg, J; Krücker, D; Krüger, K; Küpper, A; Kuhr, T; Kurca, T; Kutuev, R K; Lachnit, W A; Lahmann, R; Lamb, D; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindstrøm, M; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L K; Magnussen, N; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Merkel, P; Metlica, F; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, P O; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mkrtchyan, T; Mohr, R F; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Nellen, G; Newman, P R; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nix, O; Nowak, G; Nunnemann, T; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pérez, E; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rabbertz, K; Rädel, G; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Reyna, D; Riess, S; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Sievers, P; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Steinhart, J; Stella, B; Stellberger, A; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Swart, M; Tasevsky, M; Chernyshov, V; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tobien, N; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Udluft, S; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vazdik, Ya A; Von Dombrowski, S; Wacker, K; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wengler, T; Werner, M; White, G; Wiesand, S; Wilksen, T; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Wobisch, M; Wollatz, H; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zomer, F; Zsembery, J

    2001-01-01

    Jet production in charged and neutral current events in the kinematic range of Q^2 from 640 to 35000 GeV^2 is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The measured rate of multi-jet events and distributions of jet polar angle, transverse energy, dijet mass, and other dijet variables are presented. Using parton densities derived from inclusive DIS cross sections, perturbative QCD calculations in NLO are found to give a consistent description of both the neutral and charged current dijet production. A direct, model independent comparison of the jet distributions in charged and neutral current events confirms that the QCD dynamics of the hadronic final state is independent of the underlying electroweak scattering process.

  15. Measurement of the Photon Structure Function at High $Q^{2}$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions of real and virtual photons are derivedfrom cross section measurements of the reaction$\\rm e^+e^-\\rightarrow e^+e^- + \\hbox{hadrons}$ at LEP.The reaction is studied at $\\sqrt{\\rm {s}} \\simeq 91$ GeV with the L3detector. One of the final state electrons is detected at a large angle relative to the beam direction, leading to $Q^2$ values between40 GeV$^2$ and 500 GeV$^2$.The other final state electron is either undetected or it is detected ata four-momentum transfer squared $P^2$ between 1 GeV$^2$ and 8 GeV$^2$.These measurements are compared with predictions of the Quark PartonModel and other QCD based models.

  16. Dijet Production in Charged and Neutral Current $e^{+}p$ Interactions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoprich, W.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krucker, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Kutuev, R.; Lachnit, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von Dombrowski, S.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    Jet production in charged and neutral current events in the kinematic range of Q^2 from 640 to 35000 GeV^2 is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The measured rate of multi-jet events and distributions of jet polar angle, transverse energy, dijet mass, and other dijet variables are presented. Using parton densities derived from inclusive DIS cross sections, perturbative QCD calculations in NLO are found to give a consistent description of both the neutral and charged current dijet production. A direct, model independent comparison of the jet distributions in charged and neutral current events confirms that the QCD dynamics of the hadronic final state is independent of the underlying electroweak scattering process.

  17. Observation of the Hadronic Final State Charge Asymmetry in High Q^2 Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A first measurement is presented of the charge asymmetry in the hadronic final state from the hard interaction in deep-inelastic ep neutral current scattering at HERA. The measurement is performed in the range of negative squared four momentum transfer 100<Q^2<8,000 GeV^2. The difference between the event normalised distributions of the scaled momentum, x_p, for positively and negatively charged particles, measured in the current region of the Breit frame, is studied together with its evolution as a function of Q. The results are compared to Monte Carlo models at the hadron and parton level.

  18. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 with Longitudinally Polarised Lepton Beams at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive e\\pmp single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of \\surds = 319GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb-1 shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative fourmomentum transfer squared, Q2, between 60 and 50 000GeV2, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF_3^gammaZ. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F_2^gammaZ is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusi...

  19. Measurement of dijet production in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at high Q**2 and determination of alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, Andreas; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M S; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bienlein, J K; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Bussey, Peter J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, James Arthur; Cross, R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Deppe, O; Derrick, Malcolm; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Graciani, R; Grijpink, S; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K H; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P M; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, Andrzej; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Liu, X; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Longhin, A; López-Duran-Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; MacDonald, N; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martens, J; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Park, S K; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Repond, J; Robins, S A; Rodrigues, E; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Salehi, H; Sampson, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Szuba, D; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Van Sighem, A; Vázquez, M E; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Waugh, R; Weber, A; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Wölfle, S; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yildirim, A; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zakrzewski, J A; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A

    2001-01-01

    Dijet production has been studied in neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering for 470 < Q**2 < 20000 GeV**2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 38.4 pb**{-1}. Dijet differential cross sections are presented in a kinematic region where both theoretical and experimental uncertainties are small. Next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations describe the measured differential cross sections well. A QCD analysis of the measured dijet fraction as a function of Q**2 allows both a precise determination of alpha_s(M_Z) and a test of the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling constant. A detailed analysis provides a realistic estimate of the uncertainties of the NLO QCD cross sections arising from the parton distribution functions of the proton. The value of alpha_s(M_Z), as determined from the QCD fit, is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1166 +- 0.0019 (stat.) {+ 0.0024}_{- 0.0033} (exp.)} {+ 0.0057}_{- 0.0044} (th.).

  20. Measurement of high-Q^2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Abt, I; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Allfrey, P D; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M A; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P M; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bindi, M; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Bonato, A; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brownson, E; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brzozowska, B; Brümmer, N; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; Cui, Y; D'Agostini, G; Dal Corso, F; Danielson, T; De Pasquale, S; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Dossanov, A; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Everett, A; Fazio, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fry, C; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gialas, I; Gil, M; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Goers, S; Gosau, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gregor, I; Grigorescu, G; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heath, G P; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hori, R; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Jakob, H P; Jiménez, M; Jones, T W; Jüngst, M; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kamaluddin, B; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O M; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, Robert; Koffeman, E; Kollar, D; Kooijman, P; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kowalski, H; Kulinski, P; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Lee, A; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Lim, H; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, C; Liu, X; Lobodzinska, E; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukasik, J; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S; Miglioranzi, S; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Morris, J D; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nicholass, D; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Noor, U; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Ota, O; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Rinaldi, L; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Ron, E; Rosin, M; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Samson, U; Santamarta, R; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schonberg, V; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Shimizu, S; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stadie, H; Staiano, A; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Stösslein, U; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Theedt, T; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Uribe-Estrada, C; Vlasov, N N; Vázquez, M; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Wang, M; Watt, G; Whitmore, J J; Whyte, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Wolfe, H; Wrona, K; Yagues-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhou, C; Zichichi, A; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A

    2006-01-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e^+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb^1 at sqrt(s) = 318 GeV, are given for both e^+p charged current and neutral current deep inelastic scattering for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. Single differential cross sections are presented for the kinematic region Q^2 > 200 GeV^2 . The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. A fit to the data yields sigma^CC (P_e = 1) = 7.4 +/- 3.9 (stat.) +/- 1.2 (syst.) pb, which is consistent within two standard deviations with the absence of right-handed charged currents in the Standard Model.

  1. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e-p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, James Arthur; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Engelen, J; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galea, R; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lammers, S; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Löhr, B; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Mastroberardino, A; Mat, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Mc, G J; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mindur, B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pellmann, I A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Renner, R; Repond, J; Rigby, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Saint-Laurent, M G; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Surrow, B; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tap, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Umemori, K; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Vázquez, M; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Weber, A; Wes, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zakrzewski, J A; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A

    2002-01-01

    Cross sections for e-p charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb-1 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross-sections d\\sigma/dQ2, d\\sigma/dx and d\\sigma/dy are presented for Q2>200 GeV2. In addition, d2\\sigma/dxdQ2 was measured in the kinematic range 280 GeV2 < Q2 < 30000 GeV2 and 0.015 < x < 0.42. The predictions of the Standard Model agree well with the measured cross sections. The mass of the W boson, determined from a fit to d\\sigma/dQ2, is MW=80.3 \\pm 2.1 (stat.) \\pm 1.2 (syst.) \\pm 1.0 (PDF) GeV.

  2. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 ${\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the $K^{*0}$ polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.05$ a...

  3. The BigBite Drift Chambers for the Measurement of GE^n at High Q^2 in Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Brandon

    2006-10-01

    A precision measurement of the electric form factor of the neutron G^nE has been carried out in Jefferson Lab's Hall A for Q^2 values of 1.2 to 3.5 GeV^2 using a highly polarized ^3He target and the quasi-elastic semi-exclusive ^3He(e, e^'n ) reaction. The experiment detected the ejected neutron with an array of scintillators and the scattered electron with the newly commissioned BigBite spectrometer. This new spectrometer has a large angular acceptance (80 msr), complementing the existing 6 msr high-resolution spectrometers, and will enable a new generation of low-rate experiments with lower resolution requirements. A package of three multi-wire drift chambers was constructed in order to allow the spectrometer to operate under high rate conditions and achieve a spatial resolution of 2˜00 μm. Novel construction techniques used for the drift chambers will be discussed. Online results showing chamber performance at raw hit rates up to 20 MHz per plane will be presented.

  4. Measurement of cross sections of p(e,e'π+)n for near pion threshold and high-lying resonances at high Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kijun

    2012-04-01

    During the last decade, remarkable experimental data have been collacted in an extensive programs to study the excitation of nucleon resonance (N*) at Jefferson Laboratory through pionelectroproduction using polarized electron beam and unpolarized proton target. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) is well suited for the study of a broad range of kinematics in the invariant mass W and photon virtuality Q2 with nearly complete angular coverage for the hadronic decays. Electron scattering allows us to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states from meson-baryon to dressed quarks in terms of varying the distance scale. The study of nucleon structure allows us to understand these effective degrees of freedom. In this proceeding, I present preliminary cross sections for single pion production in mass range of high-lying resonances as well as near the pion threshold. Analysis of Nπ+ cross sections together with Nπ0 and Nππ exclusive electroproduction data, will allow us for the first time to determine electrocouplings of several high-lying excited proton states (W ≥ 1.6 GeV) at photon virtualities that correspond to the transition toward the dominance of quark degrees of freedom. I also present preliminary result on the E0+ multipole near pion threshold at 2.0 GeV2 ≤ Q2 ≤ 4.5 GeV2 using exclusive Nπ+ electroproduction data.

  5. Measurement of high-Q^2 charged current cross sections in e^+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, A A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav--, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kram, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for e^+p charged current deep inelastic scattering at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV have been determined with an integrated luminosity of 60.9pb^-1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The differential cross sections dsigma/dQ^2, dsigma/dx and dsigma/dy for Q^2>200 GeV^2 are presented. In addition, d^2sigma/dxdQ^2 has been measured in the kinematic range 280 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 17000 GeV^2 and 0.008 < x < 0.42. The predictions of the Standard Model agree well with the measured cross sections. The mass of the W boson propagator is determined to be M_W=78.9 +/- 2.0 (stat.) +/- 1.8 (syst.) +2.0 -1.8 (PDF) GeV from a fit to dsigma/dQ^2. The chiral structure of the Standard Model is also investigated in terms of the (1-y)^2 dependence of the the double-differential cross section. The structure-function F_2^CC has been extracted by combining the measurements presented here with previous ZEUS results from e^-p scattering, extending the measurement obtained in a neutrino-nucleus scatter...

  6. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kijun [ODU, JLAB

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi*_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  7. Measurement of differential cross sections via p(e,e^'&+circ;)n for studying high-lying resonances at high Q^2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kijun; Burkert, Volker

    2012-10-01

    An extensive experimental programs has been carried out at Jefferson Laboratory to study the excitation resonances using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Pion electroproduction on protons is sensitive to the resonance excitation and allows us to explore its internal structure. The CLAS is well suited for the study of a broad range of kinematics in the invariant mass W and photon virtuality Q^2 with nearly complete angular coverage for the hadronic decays. Electron scattering allows us to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states from meson-baryon cloud to dressed quarks in terms of varying distance scale. In this talk, we report the differential cross-sections for exclusive single charged pion electroproduction from proton targets. The kinematic range covers Q^2 from 1.7;GeV^2 to 4.5;GeV^2 and W from 1.6;GeV to 2.0;GeV. Separated structure functions are also presented and compared with the present calculations and previous measurements. This work, along with an upcoming analysis of same kinematics from exclusive p0̂ and p&+circ;&-circ; electroproduction will allow the determination of electro-couplings of several high-lying excited proton states, for the first time, at photon virtualities that correspond to transition toward dominance of quark degrees of freedom.

  8. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at High Q$^{2}$ and Determination of the Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Alexa, C; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deák, M; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovskii, E I; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Prideaux, P; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive jet production is studied in neutral current deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at large four momentum transfer squared Q^2>150 GeV^2 with the H1 detector at HERA. Single and double differential inclusive jet cross sections are measured as a function of Q^2 and of the transverse energy E_T of the jets in the Breit frame. The measurements are found to be well described by calculations at next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. The running of the strong coupling is demonstrated and the value of alpha_s(M_Z) is determined. The ratio of the inclusive jet cross section to the inclusive neutral current cross section is also measured and used to extract a precise value for alpha_s(M_Z)=0.1193+/-0.0014(exp.)^{+0.0047}_{-0.0030}(th.)+/-0.0016(pdf).

  9. Q^2 Evolution of the Neutron Spin Structure Moments using a He-3 Target

    CERN Document Server

    Amarian, M; Averett, T; Berthot, J; Bertin, P; Bertozzi, B; Black, T; Brash, E J; Brown, D; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cates, G D; Chai, Z; Chen, J P; Seonho Choi; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; Deur, A; Di Salvo, R; Dieterich, S; Djawotho, P; Finn, M; Fissum, K; Fonvieille, H; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Goldberg, E; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Hansen, J O; Hersman, B; Holmes, R; Huber, G M; Hughes, E; Humensky, B; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jensen, S; Jiang, X; Jones, C; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jutier, C; Ketikyan, A; Kominis, I; Korsch, W; Krämer, K; Kumar, K; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lakuriqi, E; Laveissière, G; Le Rose, J J; Liang, M; Liyanage, N K; Lolos, G J; Malov, S; Marroncle, J; McCormick, K; McKeown, R; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Mitchell, J; Papandreou, Z; Pavlin, T; Petratos, G G; Pripstein, D; Prout, D L; Ransome, R; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rvachev, M M; Sabatie, F; Saha, A; Slifer, K J; Souder, P A; Saitô, T; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Takahashi, K; Teijiro, S; Todor, L; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Urciuoli, G M; Van der Meer, R L J; Vernin, P; Voskanyan, H; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Xiong, F; Xu, W; Yang, J C; Zhang, B; Zolnierczuk, P A

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spin structure functions $g_1$ and $g_2$ of $^3$He in a double-spin experiment by inclusively scattering polarized electrons at energies ranging from 0.862 to 5.07 GeV off a polarized $^3$He target at a 15.5$^{\\circ}$ scattering angle. Excitation energies covered the resonance and part of the deep inelastic regions. We have determined for the first time the $Q^2$ evolution of $\\Gamma_1(Q^2)=\\int_0^{1} g_1(x,Q^2) dx$, $\\Gamma_2(Q^2)=\\int_0^1 g_2(x,Q^2) dx$ and $d_2 (Q^2) = \\int_0^1 x^2[ 2g_1(x,Q^2) + 3g_2(x,Q^2)] dx$ for the neutron in the range 0.1 GeV$^2$ $\\leq Q^2 \\leq $ 0.9 GeV$^2$ with good precision. $ \\Gamma_1(Q^2)$ displays a smooth variation from high to low $Q^2$. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule holds within uncertainties and $d_2$ is non-zero over the measured range.

  10. Experimental study of exclusive $^2$H$(e,e^\\prime p)n$ reaction mechanisms at high $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Egiyan, K S; Amaryan, M J; Ambrozewicz, P; Anefalos Pereira, S; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Bültmann, S; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dashyan, N B; De Masi, R; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Fersch, R; Feuerbach, R J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gonenc, A; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hakobyan, R S; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kühn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacCormick, M; Marchand, C; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Müller, J; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S I; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2007-01-01

    The reaction $^2$H$(e,e^\\prime p)n$ has been studied with full kinematic coverage for photon virtuality $1.75<Q^2<5.5$ GeV$^2$. Comparisons of experimental data with theory indicate that for very low values of neutron recoil momentum ($p_n<100$ MeV/c) the neutron is primarily a spectator and the reaction can be described by the plane-wave impulse approximation. For $100

  11. Measurement of F_2^ccbar and F_2^bbbar at High Q^2 using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Demirchyan, R; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dingfelder, J; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garutti, E; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Koblitz, B; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kroseberg, J; Krüger, K; Kuckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N A; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Milstead, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morozov, I; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Nankov, K; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C B; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D K; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ossoskov, G; Ozerov, D; Paramonov, A A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pöschl, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Raicevic, N; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Vargas, A; Trevino; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H G; Zomer, F

    2004-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality Q^2 > 150 GeV^2 and of inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.7. The charm and beauty fractions are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. The data are divided into four regions in Q^2 and Bjorken x, and values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  12. Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections in Electron-Proton Collisions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazarian, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyian, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive e^-p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA, in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 150 and 30000 GeV^2, and Bjorken x between 0.002 and 0.65. The data were taken in 1998 and 1999 with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb^(-1). The data are compared with recent measurements of the inclusive neutral and charged current e^+p cross sections. For Q^2>1000 GeV^2 clear evidence is observed for an asymmetry between e^+p and e^-p neutral current scattering and the generalised structure function xF_3 is extracted for the first time at HERA. A fit to the charged current data is used to extract a value for the W boson propagator mass. The data are found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  13. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(-) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H. P.; Juengst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Molina, A. G. Yagues; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(-) p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma/dQ(2), d sigma/dx and d sigma/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q(2

  14. Backward electroproduction of pi0 mesons on protons in the region of nucleon resonances at four momentum transfer squared Q**2 = 1.0 GeV**2

    CERN Document Server

    Laveissière, G; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Todor, L; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; D'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, John J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kamalov, S; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; Le Rose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N K; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E; Papandreou, Z; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quéméner, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saitô, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tiator, L; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Van De Vyver, R; Van, R L J; der Meer; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z L

    2004-01-01

    Backward exclusive electroproduction of pi0 mesons on protons has been measured at Q**2 = 1.0 GeV**2 by detecting protons in the forward direction in coincidence with scattered electrons from the 4 GeV electron beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall A. The data span the range of the total (gamma* p) center-of-mass energy W from the pion production threshold to W = 2.0 GeV. The azimuthally separated differential cross sections sigma_T + epsilon * sigma_L, sigma_TL, and sigma_TT from this experiment are presented together with the MAID2000 and SAID parametrizations.

  15. Angular analysis of the $B^0 \\to K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay in the low-$q^2$ region at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Borsato, Martino

    2015-01-01

    An angular analysis of the $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{*0} e^+ e^-$ decay is performed using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0${\\mbox {fb}^{-1}}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. For the first time several observables are measured in the dielectron mass squared ($q^2$) interval between 0.002 and 1.120${\\mathrm{\\,Ge\\kern -0.1em V^2\\!/}c^4}$. The angular observables $F_{\\mathrm{L}}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}}$ which are related to the \\Kstarz polarisation and to the lepton forward-backward asymmetry, are measured to be $F_{\\mathrm{L}}= 0.16 \\pm 0.06 \\pm0.03$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Re}} = 0.10 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The angular observables $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)}$ and $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{Im}}$ which are sensitive to the photon polarisation in this $q^2$ range, are found to be $A_{\\mathrm{T}}^{(2)} = -0.23 \\pm 0.23 \\pm...

  16. Measurement of Inclusive ep Cross Sections at High Q2 at sqrt(s) = 225 and 252 GeV and of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspereza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive ep double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken with a lepton beam energy of 27.6 GeV and two proton beam energies of Ep = 460 and 575 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energies of 225 and 252 GeV, respectively. The measurements cover the region of 6.5 *10^{-4}<=x<= 0.65 for 35<=Q^2<=800 GeV^2 up to y = 0.85. The measurements are used together with previously published H1 data at Ep = 920 GeV and lower Q2 data at Ep = 460, 575 and 920 GeV to extract the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the region 1.5<=Q^2 <=800 GeV^2.

  17. Measurement of high-Q(2) neutral current deep inelastic e(+) p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e(+)p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d sigma=dQ(2), d sigma=dx and d sigma=dy and the reduced cross section (sigma) over tilde are m

  18. High-$Q^{2}$ neutral current cross sections in $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering at $\\sqrt{s}$=318 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, A A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav--, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Mus, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U Karshon M; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections for e^+p neutral current deep inelastic scattering have been measured at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=318 GeV with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 63.2 pb^-1. The double-differential cross section, d^2sigma/dxdQ^2, is presented for 200 GeV^2 200 GeV^2. The effect of Z-boson exchange is seen in dsigma/dx measured for Q^2 > 10000 GeV^2. The data presented here were combined with ZEUS e^+p neutral current data taken at sqrt{s}=300 GeV and the structure function F_2^{em} was extracted. All results agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  19. Measurement of Target and Double-spin Asymmetries for the $\\vec e\\vec p\\to e\\pi^+ (n)$ Reaction in the Nucleon Resonance Region at Low $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, X; Bosted, P; Deur, A; Drozdov, V; Fassi, L El; Kang, Hyekoo; Kovacs, K; Kuhn, S; Long, E; Phillips, S K; Ripani, M; Slifer, K; Smith, L C; Adikaram, D; Akbar, Z; Amaryan, M J; Pereira, S Anefalos; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Badui, R A; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Briscoe, W J; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Chen, J -P; Chetry, T; Choi, Seonho; Ciullo, G; Clark, L; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fanchini, E; Fedotov, G; Fersch, R; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gleason, C; Golovach, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Lanza, L; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Murdoch, G; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stankovic, I; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of target- and double-spin asymmetries for the exclusive channel $\\vec e\\vec p\\to e\\pi^+ (n)$ in the nucleon resonance region at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These asymmetries were extracted from data obtained using a longitudinally polarized NH$_3$ target and a longitudinally polarized electron beam with energies 1.1, 1.3, 2.0, 2.3 and 3.0 GeV. The new results are consistent with previous CLAS publications but are extended to a low $Q^2$ range from $0.0065$ to $0.35$ (GeV$/c$)$^2$. The $Q^2$ access was made possible by a custom-built Cherenkov detector that allowed the detection of electrons for scattering angles as low as $6^\\circ$. These results are compared with the unitary isobar models JANR and MAID, the partial-wave analysis prediction from SAID and the dynamic model DMT. In many kinematic regions our results, in particular results on the target asymmetry, help to constrain the polarization-dependent components of these models.

  20. Measurement of target and double-spin asymmetries for the e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) reaction in the nucleon resonance region at low Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Drozdov, V.; El Fassi, L.; Kang, Hyekoo; Kovacs, K.; Kuhn, S.; Long, E.; Phillips, S. K.; Ripani, M.; Slifer, K.; Smith, L. C.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chen, J.-P.; Chetry, T.; Choi, Seonho; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovach, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of target- and double-spin asymmetries for the exclusive channel e ⃗p ⃗→e π+(n ) in the nucleon resonance region at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These asymmetries were extracted from data obtained using a longitudinally polarized NH3 target and a longitudinally polarized electron beam with energies 1.1, 1.3, 2.0, 2.3, and 3.0 GeV. The new results are consistent with previous CLAS publications but are extended to a low Q2 range from 0.0065 to 0.35 (GeV/c ) 2 . The Q2 access was made possible by a custom-built Cherenkov detector that allowed the detection of electrons for scattering angles as low as 6∘. These results are compared with the unitary isobar models JANR and MAID, the partial-wave analysis prediction from SAID, and the dynamic model DMT. In many kinematic regions our results, in particular results on the target asymmetry, help to constrain the polarization-dependent components of these models.

  1. Description of the spin structure function g_1 at arbitrary $x$ and arbitrary Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2007-01-01

    The explicit expressions describing the structure function g_1 at arbitrary x and Q^2 are obtained. In the first place, they combine the well-known DGLAP expressions for g_1 with the total resummation of leading logarithms of x, which makes possible to cover the kinematic region of arbitrary x and large Q^2. In order to cover the small-Q^2 region the shift Q^2 -> Q^2 + mu^2 in the large-Q^2 expressions for g_1 is suggested and values of mu are estimated. The expressions obtained do not require singular factors x^{-a} in the fits for initial parton densities.

  2. Single π+ electroproduction on the proton in the first and second resonance regions at 0.25GeV2<Q2<0.65GeV2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiyan, H.; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Griffioen, K. A.; Joo, K.; Minehart, R.; Smith, L. C.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Baltzel, N.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Cetina, C.; Chen, S.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; Desanctis, E.; Devita, R.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Donnely, J.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Eckhause, M.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedotov, G.; Feldman, G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Gai, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Goetz, G. T.; Gordon, C. I.; Gothe, R.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Hleiqawi, I.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Juengst, H. G.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Langheinrich, J.; Lawrence, D.; Li, Ji; Livingston, K.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McKinnon, B.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Sargsyan, M.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Shafi, A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tkabladze, A.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2006-02-01

    The ep→e'π+n reaction was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the 0.25 GeV2<Q2<0.65 GeV2 range by use of the CLAS detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For the first time, to our knowledge, the absolute cross sections were measured, covering nearly the full angular range in the hadronic center-of-mass frame. We extracted the structure functions σTL,σTT, and the linear combination σT+ɛσL by fitting the ϕ dependence of the measured cross sections and compared them with the MAID and Sato-Lee models.

  3. Measurement of the hadronic photon structure function F2(gamma)(x,Q**2) in two-photon collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Johannes; Grupen, C.

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of the hadronic structure function F γ 2 (x, Q2 ) is performed with data taken by the ALEPH Collaboration in the years 1998 to 2000. At LEP centre-of-mass energies between 189 GeV and 207 GeV an integrated luminosity of 548.4 pb−1 is analyzed in two bins of the virtuality Q2 . Single-tag γ ∗γ events are selected in the low Q2 region with hQ2 i = 17.3 GeV2 and at high Q2 with hQ2 i = 67.2 GeV2 . The properties of the selected events are compared to Monte-Carlo calculations. A regularized Tikhonov unfolding technique is applied to correct for the detector acceptance and efficiency. Emphasis is put on a complete treatment of statistical and systematic uncertainties. The final results are compared to theoretical predictions and measurements from other experiments.

  4. Measurement of the D{*}(+/-) meson production cross section and F-2(c(c)over-bar) at high Q(2) in ep scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, S; Rizvi, E; Campbell, A J; Bruncko, D; Li, G; Kiesling, C; Sankey, D P C; Horisberger, R; Trinh, T N; Rostovtsev, A; Pejchal, O; Pascaud, C; Feltesse, J; Buschhorn, G; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Marti, Ll; Shtarkov, L N; Pandurovic, M; Newman, P R; Staykova, Z; Povh, B; Efremenko, V; De Wolf, E A; Nowak, G; Raspiareza, A; Gabathuler, E; Kogler, R; Raicevic, N; Mudrinic, M; Polifka, R; Cvach, J; Habib, S; Morris, J V; Lendermann, V; Landon, M P J; Thompson, P D; Barrelet, E; Sauvan, E; Begzsuren, K; Zacek, J; Henderson, R C W; Sauter, M; von den Driesch, M; Schoeffel, L; Nikiforov, A; Steder, M; Mozer, M U; Naumann, Th; Cantun Avila, K B; Alexa, C; Henschel, H; Cozzika, G; Kleinwort, C; Roland, B; Pahl, P; Wegener, D; Boudry, V; Shaw-West, R N; Turnau, J; Gogitidze, N; Piec, S; Olsson, J E; Martyn, H -U; Niebuhr, C; Kostka, P; Marage, P; Zomer, F; Malinovski, E; Dainton, J B; Brinkmann, M; Fedotov, A; Greenshaw, T; Liptaj, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Mikocki, S; Meyer, A B; Rahmat, A J; Dodonov, V; Hildebrandt, M; Tran, T H; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Glazov, A; Salek, D; Sefkow, F; Zalesak, J; Grab, C; Haidt, D; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Tseepeldorj, B; Toll, T; Van Mechelen, P; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Goerlich, L; Bystritskaya, L; Katzy, J; Picuric, I; Ghazaryan, S; Specka, A; Laycock, P; Spaskov, V; Bizot, J C; Kluge, T; Sloan, T; Fleischer, M; Rotaru, M; Vazdik, Y; Ravdandorj, T; Baghdasaryan, A; Patel, G D; Panagoulias, I; Kutak, K; Deak, M; Felst, R; Lipka, K; Tsakov, I; Delcourt, B; Shushkevich, S; Roosen, R; Hreus, T; Lebedev, A; Tchoulakov, V; Mehta, A; Vallee, C; Andreev, V; Herbst, M; Dubak, A; Schoning, A; Zhokin, A; Stella, B; Hennekemper, E; Ferencei, J; Rusakov, S; Murin, P; Brisson, V; Osman, S; Sunar, D; Sopicki, P; Soloviev, Y; Zohrabyan, H; Smiljanic, I; List, B; Maxfield, S J; Perez, E; Milcewicz-Mika, I; List, J; Bracinik, J; Dossanov, A; Traynor, D; Volchinski, V; Elsen, E; Contreras, J G; Klein, M; Kraemer, M; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Mueller, K; Eckerlin, G; Pitzl, D; Petrukhin, A; Hiller, K H; Gayler, J; Jacquet, M; Delvax, J; Jonsson, L; Grindhammer, G; Bunyatyan, A; Falkiewicz, A; Chekelian, V; Helebrant, C; Cerny, V; Placakyte, R; Urban, K; Cerny, K; Palichik, V; Fomenko, A; Antunovic, B; Nowak, K; Pokorny, B; Kapichine, M; Kretzschmar, J; Backovic, S; Morozov, A; Glushkov, I; Loktionova, N; Thompson, G; Brandt, G; Sykora, T; Diaconu, C; Nikitin, D; Kruger, K; Wissing, Ch; Robmann, P; Vinokurova, S; Tomasz, F; Wuensch, E; Daum, K; Stoicea, G; Cholewa, A; Truoel, P; Alimujiang, K; Meyer, J; Meyer, H; Moreau, F; Krastev, K; Straumann, U; Bartel, W; Reimer, P; Zimmermann, T; Kenyon, I R; Coughlan, J A; South, D; Herrer, G; Eliseev, A; Papadopoulou, Th; Knutsson, A; Belousov, A; Makankine, A; Ozerov, D; Hoffmann, D; Aaron, F D; Grell, B R; Janssen, X; Trevino, A Vargas; Valkarova, A; Zhang, Z; Lange, W; Fischer, D -J; Egli, S; Gouzevitch, M; Levonian, S; Radescu, V; Favart, L; Lubimov, V

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive production of D{*}(+/-)(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic e(+/-)p scattering is measured in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 100 1 5 GeV The data were collected by the H1 experiment during the period from 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb(-1) The charm contribution. F-2(c (c) over bar), to the proton structure function F-2 is determined. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions. (C) 2010 Elsevier B V All rights reserved

  5. Production of a pion in association with a high-Q2 dilepton pair in antiproton-proton annihilation at GSI-FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, J P; Szymanowski, L

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the cross section for anti-p p -> l+ l- pi0 in the forward direction and for large lepton pair invariant mass. In this kinematical region, the leading-twist amplitude factorises into a short-distance matrix element, long-distance dominated antiproton Distribution Amplitudes and proton to pion Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDA). Using a modelling inspired from the chiral limit for these TDAs, we obtain a first estimate of this cross section, thus demonstrating that this process can be measured at GSI-FAIR.

  6. Origin of the Q^2-dependence of the DIS structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2012-01-01

    We consider in detail the Q^2 -dependence of the DIS structure functions, with Q being the virtual photon momentum. Quite often this dependence is claimed to be originated by the Q^2-dependence of the QCD coupling. This leads to the small-x asymptotics of the structure functions with Q^2 -dependent intercepts. We demonstrate that the DGLAP parametrization alpha_s = alpha_s (Q^2) is an approximation valid in the region of large x (where 2pq can be approximated by Q^2) only, providing the factorization scale is also large. Outside this region, the DGLAP parametrization fails, so alpha_s should be replaced by an effective coupling which is independent of Q^2 at small x. As a consequence, intercepts of the structure functions are independent of Q^2. Nevertheless, the small-x asymptotics of the structure functions explicitly depend on Q^2, even when the coupling does not depend on it. We also consider the structure functions at small Q^2 and give a comment on power-Q^2 corrections to the structure functions at lar...

  7. Dipole model analysis of highest precision HERA data, including very low $Q^2$'s

    CERN Document Server

    Luszczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We analyse, within a dipole model, the final, inclusive HERA DIS cross section data in the low $x$ region, using fully correlated errors. We show, that these highest precision data are very well described within the dipole model framework starting from $Q^2$ values of 3.5 GeV$^2$ to the highest values of $Q^2 =$ 250 GeV$^2$.

  8. Nuclear medium effects in structure functions of nucleon at moderate $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments performed on inclusive electron scattering from nuclear targets have measured the nucleon electromagnetic structure functions $F_1(x,Q^2)$, $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_L(x,Q^2)$ in $^{12}C$, $^{27}Al$, $^{56}Fe$ and $^{64}Cu$ nuclei. The measurements have been done in the energy region of $1 GeV^2 < W^2 < 4 GeV^2$ and $Q^2$ region of $0.5 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 4.5 GeV^2$. We have calculated nuclear medium effects in these structure functions arising due to the Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions from pion and rho mesons and shadowing effects. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nucleon spectral function which include nucleon correlations. The numerical results are compared with the recent experimental data from JLab and also with some earlier experiments.

  9. Backward electroproduction of pi{sup 0} mesons on protons in the region of nucleon resonances at four momentum transfer squared Q2 = 1.0 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laveissiere, G; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Todor, L; Salvo, R Di; Hoorebeke, L Van [for the Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2004-04-01

    Exclusive electroproduction of pi{sup 0} mesons on protons in the backward hemisphere has been studied at Q2 = 1.0 GeV2 by detecting protons in the forward direction in coincidence with scattered electrons from the 4 GeV electron beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall A. The data span the range of the total (gamma*p) center-of-mass energy W from the pion production threshold to W = 2.0 GeV. The differential cross sections sigma{sub T} + epsilon sigma{sub L}, sigma{sub TL}, and sigma{sub TT} were separated from the azimuthal distribution and are presented together with the MAID and SAID parameterizations.

  10. Factorization at fixed Q^2(1-x)

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul; Kurki, Samu

    2008-01-01

    We consider QCD factorization between hard and soft subprocesses in inclusive reactions where the momentum fraction x of one parton approaches unity as the hard scale Q^2 -> \\infty, such that Q^2(1-x) is fixed. In this ``BB limit'' the entire (multi-parton) Fock state containing the high x parton is coherent with the hard subprocess. The soft contribution is given by a forward multiparton matrix element. The BB limit corresponds to a fixed (large or small) missing mass and is thus closely connected to exclusive production. We analyze the Drell-Yan process h + N -> \\gamma^* + X in detail, explaining why the virtual photon is longitudinally polarized for h = \\pi and transversely polarized for h = p. The BB limit may be relevant also for other phenomena observed at high x, such as the large single spin asymmetries of p p -> \\Lambda^\\uparrow X and in p p^\\uparrow -> \\pi X.

  11. SVZ + 1/q2 expansion versus some QCD holographic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Jugeau, F; Ratsimbarison, H

    2013-01-01

    Considering the classical two-point correlators built from (axial)-vector, scalar \\bar qq and gluonium currents, we confront results obtained using the SVZ + 1/q2 expansion to the ones from some QCD holographic models in the Euclidian region. We conclude that the presence of the 1/q2-term in the SVZ-expansion due to a tachyonic gluon mass appears naturally in the Minimum Soft Wall (MSW) and the Gauge/String Dual (GSD) models which can also reproduce semi-quantitatively some of the higher dimension condensate contributions appearing in the OPE. The Hard-Wall model shows a large departure from the SVZ + 1/q2 expansion in the vector, scalar and gluonium channels due to the absence of any power corrections. The equivalence of the MSW and GSD models is manifest in the vector channel through the relation of the dilaton parameter with the tachyonic gluon mass. For approximately reproducing the phenomenological values of the dimension d = 4, 6 condensates, the holographic models require a tachyonic gluon mass (alpha_...

  12. Cross sections and beam asymmetries for $\\vev{e}p \\to en\\pi^+$ in the nucleon resonance region for $1.7 \\le Q^2 \\le 4.5 (GeV)^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Park; V.D. Burkert; W. Kim; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction process $\\vec{e}p \\to e^\\prime n \\pi^+$ was measured in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.7 - 4.5 \\rm{GeV^2}$, and the invariant mass range for the $n\\pi^+$ system of $W = 1.15 - 1.7 \\rm{GeV}$ using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive $\\pi^+$ production from protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. The $n\\pi^+$ channel has particular sensitivity to the isospin 1/2 excited nucleon states, and together with the $p\\pi^0$ final state will serve to determine the transition form factors of a large number of resonances. The largest discrepancy between these results and present modes was seen in the $\\sigma_{LT'}$ structure function. In this experiment, 31,295 cross section and 4,184 asymmetry data points were measured. Because of the large volume of data, only a reduced set of structure functions and Legendre polynomial moments can be presented that are obtained in model-independent fits to the differential cross sections.

  13. Cross sections and beam asymmetries for $\\vev{e}p \\to en\\pi^+$ in the nucleon resonance region for $1.7 \\le Q^2 \\le 4.5 (GeV)^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K; Burkert, V D; Kim, W; Aznauryan, I G; Minehart, R C; Smith, L C; Joo, K; Elouadrhiri, L; Adams, G; Amaryan, M J; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bookwalter, C; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dhamija, S; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Gabrielyan, M Y; Garon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, cW; Golovatch, E; Gonenc, A; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hafnaoui, K; Hakobyan, H; Hakobyan, R S; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keller, D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Pereira, S Anefalos; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, e J P; Sapunenko, V; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Takeuchi, T; Tedeschi, D J; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Yurov, M; Zana, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2007-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction process $\\vec{e}p \\to e^\\prime n \\pi^+$ was measured in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.7 - 4.5 \\rm{GeV^2}$, and the invariant mass range for the $n\\pi^+$ system of $W = 1.15 - 1.7 \\rm{GeV}$ using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive $\\pi^+$ production from protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. The $n\\pi^+$ channel has particular sensitivity to the isospin 1/2 excited nucleon states, and together with the $p\\pi^0$ final state will serve to determine the transition form factors of a large number of resonances. The largest discrepancy between these results and present modes was seen in the $\\sigma_{LT'}$ structure function. In this experiment, 31,295 cross section and 4,184 asymmetry data points were measured. Because of the large volume of data, only a reduced set of structure functions and Legendre polynomial moments can be presented ...

  14. Experiment to Measure Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering on Hydrogen and Deuterium with Seperation of Nu(W)(2) and W(1) Nucleon Structure Functions, at the Highest Fermilab Energies and Q(2) Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, G.; Edighoffer, J.; Grigorian, A.; Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Hofstadter, R.; McPharlin, T.P.; Yearian, M.R.; /Stanford U.; Cox, B.C.; Peoples Jr., J.; /Fermilab

    1975-10-15

    The authors propose to measure the inclusive deep inelastic electron-nucleon scattering cross sections on hydrogen and deuterium. Cross sections will be measured in the range of momentum transfers Q{sub min}{sup 2} = 0.160 (GeV/c){sup 2} and Q{sub max}{sup 2} = 160.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, in the range of recoil hadronic mass squared of W{sub min}{sup 2} = 2 GeV{sup 2} and W{sub max}{sup 2} = 450 GeV{sup 2}. The electromagnetic structure functions, {nu}W{sub 2}(Q{sup 2},{nu}) and W{sub 1}(Q{sup 2},{nu}), of both protons and neutrons will be measured and separated by well-known methods, in the highest possible unexplored FERMILAB kinematical regions. The high intensity Proton-West superconducting beam will be used to yield an electron beam of high purity, based on a synchrotron radiation compensated tuning technique. The electron beam will be used at 150 GeV (5 x 10{sup 8} e{sup {+-}}/pulse), at 175 GeV (3.6 x 10{sup 8} e{sup {+-}}/pulse) and at 250 GeV (1 x 10{sup 8} e{sup {+-}}/pulse). The scattered electron will be detected with good acceptance, good resolution and excellent identification. The detector will be the E-192 apparatus with small additions. A simple self-calibration procedure is available, both in experiment and apparatus, removing beam-associated and target-associated background in the entire (Q{sup 2}, W{sup 2}) kinematical regions. Usually, interesting physics occurs where counting rates are small. This experiment will be completely trust-worthy in such regions because their apparatus provides excellent information on the tracking and identification of scattered electrons.

  15. THE ROTATION PERIOD OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Ricart, Miquel; Licandro, Javier, E-mail: mserra@iac.es, E-mail: jlicandr@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-11-20

    C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was observed around perihelion (2015 January 30) on 15 nights between 2015 January 21 and February 11 using the TADer 0.3-m astrograph telescope at Teide Observatory (IAC, Tenerife, Spain). Two large spiral jet structures were observed over several cometary rotations. A new method of searching for periodicities in the PA of spiral jets in the coma region at a fixed distance (20,624 km) from the cometary optocenter is presented and used to determine a nuclear rotation period of 17.89 ± 0.17 hr.

  16. The Rotation Period of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Ricart, Miquel; Licandro, Javier

    2015-11-01

    C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was observed around perihelion (2015 January 30) on 15 nights between 2015 January 21 and February 11 using the TADer 0.3-m astrograph telescope at Teide Observatory (IAC, Tenerife, Spain). Two large spiral jet structures were observed over several cometary rotations. A new method of searching for periodicities in the PA of spiral jets in the coma region at a fixed distance (20,624 km) from the cometary optocenter is presented and used to determine a nuclear rotation period of 17.89 ± 0.17 hr.

  17. Measurement of the $x$- and $Q^2$-Dependence of the Asymmetry $A_1$ on the Nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Dharmawardane, K V; Bosted, P; Prok, Y; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolo, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Bltmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gonenc, A; Gothe, R W; Grioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Haodi, K; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Keith, C; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuleshov, S V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lü, H; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Manak, J J; Markov, N; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S I; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B

    2006-01-01

    We report results for the virtual photon asymmetry $A_1$ on the nucleon from new Jefferson Lab measurements. The experiment, which used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer and longitudinally polarized proton ($^{15}$NH$_3$) and deuteron ($^{15}$ND$_3$) targets, collected data with a longitudinally polarized electron beam at energies between 1.6 GeV and 5.7 GeV. In the present paper, we concentrate on our results for $A_1(x,Q^2)$ and the related ratio $g_1/F_1(x,Q^2)$ in the resonance and the deep inelastic regions for our lowest and highest beam energies, covering a range in momentum transfer $Q^2$ from 0.05 to 5.0 GeV$^2$ and in final-state invariant mass $W$ up to about 3 GeV. Our data show detailed structure in the resonance region, which leads to a strong $Q^2$--dependence of $A_1(x,Q^2)$ for $W$ below 2 GeV. At higher $W$, a smooth approach to the scaling limit, established by earlier experiments, can be seen, but $A_1(x,Q^2)$ is not strictly $Q^2$--independent. We add significantly to the world data...

  18. Insights into $Q^2 \\bar{Q}^2$ states from an effective perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ametller, Ll

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the two photon coupling of the lightest scalar meson on the basis of an extension of $\\chi$PT. Using low energy data on the pion form-factor and the $\\gamma\\gamma\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-(\\pi^0\\pi^0)$ cross-sections as inputs, we find $\\Gamma(\\sigma\\to\\gamma\\gamma) \\cong 0.126~\\rm{keV} $. The smallness of the result and the relative weight between its components, ${\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma\\to S_1}\\over \\Gamma{ \\gamma\\gamma\\to\\pi\\pi\\to S_1}} < 1$, suggests that the scalar $0^{++}$ meson is mainly a $Q^2\\bar{Q}^2$ state.

  19. Nuclear medium effects in $F_{2A}^{EM}(x,Q^2)$ and $F_{2A}^{Weak}(x,Q^2)$ structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Recent phenomenological analysis of experimental data on DIS processes induced by charged leptons and neutrinos/antineutrinos beams on nuclear targets by CTEQ collaboration has confirmed the observation of CCFR and NuTeV collaborations, that weak structure function $F_{2A}^{Weak} (x,Q^2)$ is different from electromagnetic structure function $F_{2A}^{EM} (x,Q^2)$ in a nucleus like iron, specially in the region of low $x$ and $Q^2$. In view of this observation we have made a study of nuclear medium effects on $F_{2A}^{Weak} (x,Q^2)$ and $F_{2A}^{EM} (x,Q^2)$ for a wide range of $x$ and $Q^2$ using a microscopic nuclear model. We have considered Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions from pion and rho mesons and shadowing effects to incorporate nuclear medium effects. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using a relativistic nucleon spectral function which includes nucleon correlations. The numerical results in the case of iron nucleus are compared wi...

  20. A Perturbative QCD Analysis of the Nucleon's Pauli Form Factor F_2(Q^2)

    CERN Document Server

    Belitsky, A V; Yuan, F; Belitsky, Andrei V.; Ji, Xiangdong; Yuan, Feng

    2003-01-01

    We perform a perturbative QCD analysis of the nucleon's Pauli form factor $F_2(Q^2)$ in the asymptotically large $Q^2$ limit. We find that the leading contribution to $F_2(Q^2)$ goes like $1/Q^6$, consistent with the well-known folklore. Its coefficient is expressed in terms of an overlap integral involving the leading and subleading light-cone wave functions of the nucleon, the latter describing the quark state with one unit of orbital angular momentum. We estimate the numerical size of the coefficient and comment on the contribution from the end-point region.

  1. Measurement of the Proton Spin Structure Function $g_1(x,Q^2)$ for $Q^2$ from 0.15 to 1.6 GeV$^2$ with CLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Fatemi, R; Burkert, V D; Crabb, D; De Vita, R; Kuhn, S E; Minehart, R C; Adams, G; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bosted, P E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Ciciani, L; Clark, R; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D C; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Eckhause, M; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Freyberger, A P; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Gai, M; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M R; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Keith, C D; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Koubarovski, V; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kühn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Livingston, K; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Major, W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E A; Peterson, G; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rock, S E; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Seely, M; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sorrel, L; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z

    2003-01-01

    Double-polarization asymmetries for inclusive $ep$ scattering were measured at Jefferson Lab using 2.6 and 4.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on a longitudinally polarized NH$_3$ target in the CLAS detector. The polarized structure function $g_1(x,Q^2)$ was extracted throughout the nucleon resonance region and into the deep inelastic regime, for $Q^2 = 0.15 -1.64 $GeV$^2$. The contributions to the first moment $Gamma_1(Q^2) = int g_1(x,Q^2)dx$ were determined up to $Q^2=1.2$ GeV$^2$. Using a parametrization for $g_1$ in the unmeasured low $x$ regions, the complete first moment was estimated over this $Q^2$ region. A rapid change in $Gamma_1$ is observed for $Q^2 < 1 $GeV$^2$, with a sign change near $Q^2 = 0.3 $GeV$^2$, indicating dominant contributions from the resonance region. At $Q^2=1.2$ GeV$^2$ our data are below the pQCD evolved scaling value.

  2. Measurement of the Proton Spin Structure Function g1(x,Q2) for Q2 from 0.15 to 1.6 GeV2 with CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, R.; Skabelin, A. V.; Burkert, V. D.; Crabb, D.; Vita, R. De; Kuhn, S. E.; Minehart, R.; Adams, G.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Bertozzi, W.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bosted, P. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Cetina, C.; Ciciani, L.; Clark, R.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Connelly, J.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Eckhause, M.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Farhi, L.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Freyberger, A.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Gordon, C. I.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hancock, D.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Keith, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Koubarovski, V.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Lawrence, D.; Li, Ji; Livingston, K.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Major, W.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J. T.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rock, S. E.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Sargsyan, M.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seely, M.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, T.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Sorrel, L.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zhang, B.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2003-11-01

    Double-polarization asymmetries for inclusive ep scattering were measured at Jefferson Lab using 2.6 and 4.3GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on a longitudinally polarized NH3 target in the CLAS detector. The polarized structure function g1(x,Q2) was extracted throughout the nucleon resonance region and into the deep inelastic regime, for Q2=0.15 1.64 GeV2. The contributions to the first moment Γ1(Q2)=∫g1(x,Q2) dx were determined up to Q2=1.2 GeV2. Using a parametrization for g1 in the unmeasured low x regions, the complete first moment was estimated over this Q2 region. A rapid change in Γ1 is observed for Q2<1 GeV2, with a sign change near Q2=0.3 GeV2, indicating dominant contributions from the resonance region. At Q2=1.2 GeV2 our data are below the perturbative QCD evolved scaling value.

  3. Measurement of the proton spin structure function g1(x,Q2) for Q2 from 0.15 to 1.6 GeV2 with CLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, R; Skabelin, A V; Burkert, V D; Crabb, D; De Vita, R; Kuhn, S E; Minehart, R; Adams, G; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bosted, P E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Ciciani, L; Clark, R; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Eckhause, M; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Freyberger, A; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Keith, C; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Koubarovski, V; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Major, W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rock, S E; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Seely, M; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sorrel, L; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z

    2003-11-28

    Double-polarization asymmetries for inclusive ep scattering were measured at Jefferson Lab using 2.6 and 4.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on a longitudinally polarized NH3 target in the CLAS detector. The polarized structure function g(1)(x,Q2) was extracted throughout the nucleon resonance region and into the deep inelastic regime, for Q(2)=0.15-1.64 GeV2. The contributions to the first moment Gamma(1)(Q2)= integral g(1)(x,Q2) dx were determined up to Q(2)=1.2 GeV2. Using a parametrization for g(1) in the unmeasured low x regions, the complete first moment was estimated over this Q2 region. A rapid change in Gamma(1) is observed for Q2<1 GeV2, with a sign change near Q(2)=0.3 GeV2, indicating dominant contributions from the resonance region. At Q(2)=1.2 GeV2 our data are below the perturbative QCD evolved scaling value.

  4. Prediction of Stereochemistry using Q2MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric; Rosales, Anthony R; Tutkowski, Brandon; Norrby, Per-Ola; Wiest, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    The standard method of screening ligands for selectivity in asymmetric, transition metal-catalyzed reactions requires experimental testing of hundreds of ligands from ligand libraries. This "trial and error" process is costly in terms of time as well as resources and, in general, is scientifically and intellectually unsatisfying as it reveals little about the underlying mechanism behind the selectivity. The accurate computational prediction of stereoselectivity in enantioselective catalysis requires adequate conformational sampling of the selectivity-determining transition state but has to be fast enough to compete with experimental screening techniques to be useful for the synthetic chemist. Although electronic structure calculations are accurate and general, they are too slow to allow for sampling or fast screening of ligand libraries. The combined requirements can be fulfilled by using appropriately fitted transition state force fields (TSFFs) that represent the transition state as a minimum and allow fast conformational sampling using Monte Carlo. Quantum-guided molecular mechanics (Q2MM) is an automated force field parametrization method that generates accurate, reaction-specific TSFFs by fitting the functional form of an arbitrary force field using only electronic structure calculations by minimization of an objective function. A key feature that distinguishes the Q2MM method from many other automated parametrization procedures is the use of the Hessian matrix in addition to geometric parameters and relative energies. This alleviates the known problems of overfitting of TSFFs. After validation of the TSFF by comparison to electronic structure results for a test set and available experimental data, the stereoselectivity of a reaction can be calculated by summation over the Boltzman-averaged relative energies of the conformations leading to the different stereoisomers. The Q2MM method has been applied successfully to perform virtual ligand screens on a range of

  5. A First Measurement of Low x Low $Q^{2}$ Structure Functions in Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, B T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Suwonjandee, N; Vaitaitis, A G; Vakili, M; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2001-01-01

    A new structure function analysis of CCFR deep inelastic nu-N and nubar-N scattering data is presented for previously unexplored kinematic regions down to Bjorken x=0.0045 and Q^2=0.3 GeV^2. Comparisons to charged lepton scattering data from NMC and E665 experiments are made and the behavior of the structure function F2_nu is studied in the limit Q^2 -> 0.

  6. Numerical solution of $Q^2$ evolution equations for fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M

    2011-01-01

    Semi-inclusive hadron-production processes are becoming important in high-energy hadron reactions. They are used for investigating properties of quark-hadron matters in heavy-ion collisions, for finding the origin of nucleon spin in polarized lepton-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon reactions, and possibly for finding exotic hadrons. In describing the hadron-production cross sections in high-energy reactions, fragmentation functions are essential quantities. A fragmentation function indicates the probability of producing a hadron from a parton. Its $Q^2$ dependence is described by the standard DGLAP (Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi) evolution equations, which are often used in theoretical and experimental analyses of the fragmentation functions and in calculating semi-inclusive cross sections. The DGLAP equations are complicated integro-differential equations, which cannot be solved in an analytical method. In this work, a simple method is employed for solving the evolution equations by using Gauss-Legen...

  7. The Q$^{2}$ dependence of the hard diffractive photoproduction of vector meson or photon and the range of pQCD validity

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, I F

    1996-01-01

    We consider two coupled problems. We study the dependence on photon virtuality Q^2 for the semihard quasi--elastic photoproduction of neutral vector mesons on a quark, gluon or real photon (at s\\gg p_{\\bot}^2,\\;Q^2; \\; p_{\\bot}^2\\gg \\mu^2 \\approx (0.3 GeV)^2). To this end we calculate the corresponding amplitudes (in an analytical form) in the lowest nontrivial approximation of perturbative QCD. It is shown that the amplitude for the production of light meson varies very rapidly with the photon virtuality near Q^2=0. We estimate the bound of the pQCD validity region for such processes. For the real incident photon the obtained bound for the \\rho meson production is very high. This bound decreases fast with the increase of Q^2, and we expect that the virtual photoproduction at HERA gives opportunity to test the pQCD results. The signature of this region is discussed. For the hard Compton effect the pQCD should work good at not too high p_{\\bot}, and this effect seems measurable at HERA.

  8. The Asymptotic 3-Loop Heavy Flavor Corrections to the Charged Current Structure Functions $F_L^{W^+-W^-}(x,Q^2)$ and $F_2^{W^+-W^-}(x,Q^2)$

    CERN Document Server

    Behring, A; Falcioni, G; De Freitas, A; von Manteuffel, A; Schneider, C

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the massive Wilson coefficients for the heavy flavor contributions to the non-singlet charged current deep-inelastic scattering structure functions $F_L^{W^+}(x,Q^2)-F_L^{W^-}(x,Q^2)$ and $F_2^{W^+}(x,Q^2)-F_2^{W^-}(x,Q^2)$ in the asymptotic region $Q^2 \\gg m^2$ to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at general values of the Mellin variable $N$ and the momentum fraction $x$. Besides the heavy quark pair production, also the single heavy flavor excitation $s \\rightarrow c$ contributes. Numerical results are presented for the charm quark contributions and consequences on the unpolarized Bjorken sum rule and Adler sum rule are discussed.

  9. Target and Beam-Target Spin Asymmetries in Exclusive $\\pi^+$ Electroproduction for $Q^2>1$ GeV$^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Bosted, P E; Pereira, S Anefalos; Avakian, H; Badui, R A; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Briscoe, W J; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Clark, L; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Deur, A; De Sanctis, E; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fanchini, E; Fedotov, G; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Forest, T; Fradi, A; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Gleason, C; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Hakobyan, H; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lanza, L; Net, L A; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; McCracken, M E; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V I; Montgomery, R A; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Murdoch, G; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Schumacher, R A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stankovic, I; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Torayev, B; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zhang, J; Zonta, I

    2016-01-01

    Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive $\\pi^+$ electroproduction ($\\gamma^* p \\to n \\pi^+$) were obtained from scattering of 6~GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is $1.1Q^2<6$ GeV$^2$. Results were obtained for about 6000 bins in $W$, $Q^2$, \\cthcm, and $\\phi^*$. Except at forward angles, very large target-spin asymmetries are observed over the entire $W$ region. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for $W<1.6$ GeV, but very large differences are seen at higher $W$. A GPD-based model is in poor agreement with the data. When combined with cross section measurements, the present results will provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of $Q^2$, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  10. Singlet structure function g_1 at small x and small Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2006-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the singlet g_1 at small x and small Q^2 are obtained with the total resummation of the leading logarithmic contributions. It is shown that g_1 practically does not depend on Q^2 in this kinematic region. In contrast, it would be interesting to investigate its dependence on the invariant energy 2pq because, being g_1 positive at small 2pq, it can turn negative at greater values of this variable. The position of the turning point is sensitive to the ratio between the initial quark and gluon densities, so its experimental detection would enable to estimate this ratio

  11. Overview of the spin structure function g_1 at arbitrary x and Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper we summarize our results on the structure function g_1 and present explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet components of g_1 which can be used at arbitrary x and Q^2. These expressions combine the well-known DGLAP-results for the anomalous dimensions and coefficient functions with the total resummation of the leading logarithmic contributions and the shift of Q^2 -> Q^2 + \\mu^2, with \\mu/\\Lambda_{QCD} approx 10 (approx 55) for the non-singlet (singlet) components of g_1 respectively. In contrast to DGLAP, these expressions do not require the introduction of singular parameterizations for the initial parton densities. We also apply our results to describe the experimental data in the kinematic regions beyond the reach of DGLAP.

  12. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  13. Moments of the neutron $g_2$ structure function at intermediate $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Solvignon, P; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Slifer, K; Aniol, K; Averett, T; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Cates, G D; Chang, C C; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Deur, A; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Feuerbach, R; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Gorbenko, V; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Ibrahim, H; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Kelleher, A; Kelly, J; Keppel, C; Kim, W; Korsch, W; Kramer, K; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Ma, B; Margazioti, D J; Markowitz, P; McCormick, K; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Camacho, C Munoz; Paschke, K; Reitz, B; Saha, A; Shneor, R; Singh, J; Sulkosky, V; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, K; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Woo, S; Yang, J -C; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2013-01-01

    We present new experimental results of the $^3$He spin structure function $g_2$ in the resonance region at $Q^2$ values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c)$^2$. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were then extracted. The resonance contribution to the neutron $d_2$ matrix element was found to be small at $\\ $=2.4 (GeV/c)$^2$ and in agreement with the Lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low $x$ unmeasured region. A small deviation was observed at $Q^2$ values between 0.5 and 1.2 (GeV/c)$^2$ for the neutron.

  14. Q2/Q3 2016 Solar Industry Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David; Boff, Daniel; Margolis, Robert

    2016-10-11

    This technical presentation provides an update on the major trends that occurred in the solar industry in the Q2 and Q3 of 2016. Major topics of focus include global and U.S. supply and demand, module and system price, investment trends and business models, and updates on U.S. government programs supporting the solar industry.

  15. The spin structure of the proton at low $x$ and low $Q^2$ in two-dimensional bins from COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal double spin asymmetries $A_1^p$ and the spin dependent structure function of the proton $g_1^p$ were extracted from COMPASS data in the region of low Bjorken scaling variable $x$ and low photon virtuality $Q^2$. The data were taken in 2007 and 2011 from scattering of polarised muons off polarised protons, resulting in a sample that is 150 times larger than the one from the previous experiment SMC that pioneered studies in this kinematic region. For the first time, $A_1^p$ and $g_1^p$ were evaluated in this region in two-dimensional bins of kinematic variables: $(x,Q^2)$, $(\

  16. Low $Q^{2}$ low $\\times$ structure function analysis of CCFR data for $F_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Tamminga, B H; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; Barbaro, L; Barbaro, P D; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D A; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of structure functions (SFs) from neutrino and muon deep inelastic scattering data have shown discrepancies in F2 for x < 0.1. A new SF analysis of the CCFR collaboration data examining regions in x down to x=.0015 and 0.4 < Q^2 < 1.0 is presented. Comparison to corrected charged lepton scattering results for F2 from the NMC and E665 experiments are made. Differences between muon and neutrino scattering allow that the behavior of F2 from muon scattering could be different from F2 from neutrino scattering as Q^2 approaches zero. Comparisons between F2 muon and F2 neutrino are made in this limit.

  17. The Physical Squeezed Limit: Consistency Relations at Order q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Creminelli, Paolo; Senatore, Leonardo; Simonović, Marko; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    In single-field models of inflation the effect of a long mode with momentum q reduces to a diffeomorphism at zeroth and first order in q. This gives the well-known consistency relations for the n-point functions. At order q^2 the long mode has a physical effect on the short ones, since it induces curvature, and we expect that this effect is the same as being in a curved FRW universe. In this paper we verify this intuition in various examples of the three-point function, whose behaviour at order q^2 can be written in terms of the power spectrum in a curved universe. This gives a simple alternative understanding of the level of non-Gaussianity in single-field models. Non-Gaussianity is always parametrically enhanced when modes freeze at a physical scale k_{ph, f} shorter than H: f_{NL} \\sim (k_{ph, f}/H)^2.

  18. The physical squeezed limit: consistency relations at order q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Perko, Ashley; Senatore, Leonardo; Simonović, Marko; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2013-11-01

    In single-field models of inflation the effect of a long mode with momentum q reduces to a diffeomorphism at zeroth and first order in q. This gives the well-known consistency relations for the n-point functions. At order q2 the long mode has a physical effect on the short ones, since it induces curvature, and we expect that this effect is the same as being in a curved FRW universe. In this paper we verify this intuition in various examples of the three-point function, whose behaviour at order q2 can be written in terms of the power spectrum in a curved universe. This gives a simple alternative understanding of the level of non-Gaussianity in single-field models. Non-Gaussianity is always parametrically enhanced when modes freeze at a physical scale kph, f shorter than H: fNL ~ (kph, f/H)2.

  19. Three layer $Q_2$-free families in the Boolean lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Manske, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We prove that the largest $Q_2$-free family of subsets of $[n]$ which contains sets of at most three different sizes has at most $(3 + 2\\sqrt {3})N/3 + o(N) \\approx 2.1547N + o(N)$ members, where $N = {n \\choose {\\lfloor n/2 \\rfloor}}$. This improves an earlier bound of $2.207N + o(N)$ by Axenovich, Manske, and Martin.

  20. Quadrature two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (Q-2DCOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Isao

    2016-11-01

    Quadrature 2D correlation spectroscopy (Q-2DCOS) is introduced. The technique incorporates the effect of the perturbation into the traditional 2DCOS analysis by building a multivariate model, merging the information of the perturbation variable and spectral responses. By employing factors which are 90° out of phase with each other, pertinent coincidental and sequential spectral intensity variations are adequately captured for the subsequent 2D correlation analysis. Almost complete replication of the original 2DCOS results based on such a simple rank 2 model of experimental spectra suggests that only the dominant spectral intensity variation patterns in combination with its quadrature counterpart seems to be utilized in 2DCOS analysis. Using the linear perturbation variable itself as the basis for generating the primary score vector is equivalent to the least squares fitting of a quadratic polynomial with spectral intensity variations. Q-2DCOS analysis may be displayed in terms of a graphical plot on a phase plane in the vector space, so that coincidental and sequential matching of the patterns of spectral intensity variations is represented simply by the phase angle difference between two vectors. Q-2DCOS analysis is closely related to other established ideas and practices in the 2D correlation spectroscopy field, such as dynamic 2D IR dichroism, PCA 2D, quadrature orthogonal signal correction (Q-OSC), and perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) analyses.

  1. Pursuing interpretations of the HERA large-$Q^{2}$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Lola, S; Giudice, Gian Francesco; Mangano, Michelangelo L

    1997-01-01

    We explore interpretations of the anomaly observed by H1 and ZEUS at HERA in deep-inelastic e^+ p scattering at very large Q^2. We discuss the possibilities of new effective interactions and the production of a narrow state of mass 200 GeV with leptoquark couplings. We compare these models with the measured Q^2 distributions: for the contact terms, constraints from LEP2 and the Tevatron allow only a few choices of helicity and flavour structure that could roughly fit the HERA data. The data are instead quite consistent with the Q^2 distribution expected from a leptoquark state. We study the production cross sections of such a particle at the Tevatron and at HERA. The absence of a signal at the Tevatron disfavours the likelihood that any such leptoquark decays only into e^+ q. We then focus on the possibility that the leptoquark is a squark with R-violating couplings. In view of the present experimental limits on such couplings, the most likely production channels are e^+d -> scharm_L or perhaps e^+d->stop, wi...

  2. Moments of the neutron g2 structure function at intermediate Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvignon, P.; Liyanage, N.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Slifer, K.; Aniol, K.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Cates, G. D.; Chang, C. C.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Deur, A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Feuerbach, R.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Gorbenko, V.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Ibrahim, H.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kelleher, A.; Kelly, J.; Keppel, C.; Kim, W.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Ma, B.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; McCormick, K.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Paschke, K.; Reitz, B.; Saha, A.; Shneor, R.; Singh, J.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, K.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Woo, S.; Yang, J.-C.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab E01-012 Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results for the 3He spin structure function g2 in the resonance region at Q2 values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c )2. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were extracted. Our main result, the inelastic contribution to the neutron d2 matrix element, was found to be small at =2.4 (GeV/c ) 2 and in agreement with the lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for 3He and the neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low x unmeasured region.

  3. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  4. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 at low Q2 in QED Compton scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Anthonis, T. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium)] (and others)

    2004-09-30

    The proton structure function F2(x,Q2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q2, down to 0.5 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x up to {approx}0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  5. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 at low Q2 in QED Compton scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kückens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pöschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2004-09-01

    The proton structure function F2 (x,Q2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q2, down to 0.5 GeV2, and Bjorken x up to ∼0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  6. Extraction of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor from Quasi-Elastic 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') at Q^2 = 0.1 - 0.6 (GeV/c)^2

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, B; Averett, T; Bertozzi, W; Black, T; Calarco, J; Cardman, L; Cates, G D; Chai, Z W; Chen, J P; Seonho Choi; Chudakov, E; Churchwell, S; Corrado, G S; Crawford, C; Dale, D; Deur, A; Djawotho, P; Dutta, D; Finn, J M; Gao, H; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A V; Glashausser, C; Glöckle, W; Golak, J; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V G; Hansen, J O; Hersman, F W; Higinbotham, D W; Holmes, R; Howell, C R; Hughes, E; Humensky, B; Incerti, S; De Jager, C W; Jensen, J S; Jiang, X; Jones, C E; Jones, M; Kahl, R; Kamada, H; Kievsky, fA; Kominis, I; Korsch, W; Krämer, K; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lakuriqi, E; Liang, M; Liyanage, N; Le Rose, J; Malov, S; Margaziotis, D J; Martin, J W; McCormick, K; McKeown, R D; McIlhany, K; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mitchell, J; Nanda, S; Pace, E; Pavlin, T; Petratos, G G; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Pripstein, D; Prout, D; Ransome, R D; Roblin, Y; Rvachev, M; Saha, A; Salmè, G; Schnee, M; Seely, J; Shin, T; Slifer, K J; Souder, P A; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Sutter, M; Tipton, B; Todor, L; Viviani, M; Vlahovic, B; Watson, J; Williamson, C F; Witala, H; Wojtsekhowski, B; Xiong, F; Xu, W; Yeh, J

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent transverse asymmetry, A_T', in quasi-elastic inclusive electron scattering from polarized 3He with high precision at Q^2 = 0.1 to 0.6 (GeV/c)^2. The neutron magnetic form factor, GMn, was extracted at Q^2 = 0.1 and 0.2 (GeV/c)^2 using a non-relativistic Faddeev calculation that includes both final-state interactions (FSI) and meson-exchange currents (MEC). In addition, GMn was extracted at Q^2 = 0.3 to 0.6 (GeV/c)^2 using a Plane Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. The accuracy of the modeling of FSI and MEC effects was tested and confirmed with a precision measurement of the spin-dependent asymmetry in the breakup threshold region of the 3He(pol)(e(pol),e') reaction. The total relative uncertainty of the extracted GMn data is approximately 3%. Close agreement was found with other recent high-precision GMn data in this Q^2 range.

  7. The Q$^2$ evolution of the Hadronic Photon Structure Function $F^\\gamma_2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Gong, Z F; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C

    1999-01-01

    New measurements at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV of the hadronic photon structure function F2(x) in the Q2 interval, 9 GeV2 < Q2 < 30 GeV2, are presented. The data, collected in 1997, with the L3 detector, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51.9 pb-1. Combining with the data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 91 GeV, the evolution of F2 with Q2 is measured in the Q2 range from 1.2 GeV2 to 30 GeV2. F2 shows a linear growth with ln(Q2); the value of the slope (alpha-1)dF2(Q2)/dln(Q2) is measured in two x bins from 0.01 to 0.2 and is higher than predictions.

  8. Measurement of the $E_{T}^{2},jet/Q^{2}$ dependence of forward-jet production at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Abramowicz, H; Acosta, D; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; An Shiz Hong; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, M; Bacon, Trevor C; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashindzhagian, G L; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bellagamba, L; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bienlein, J K; Blaikley, H E; Bohnet, I; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Bornheim, A; Borzemski, P; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Breitweg, J; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Burgard, C; Burow, B D; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Cashmore, R J; Castellini, G; Catterall, C D; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cor, M; Cormack, C; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottingham, W N; Crittenden, J; Cross, R; D'Agostini, G; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Dardo, M; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Deffner, R; Del Peso, J; Deppe, O; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Dondana, S; Dosselli, U; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Dulinski, Z; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eckert, M; Edmonds, J K; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Fernández, J P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Frisken, W R; Fusayasu, T; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Golubkov, Yu A; Grabosch, H J; Graciani, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hanna, D S; Harnew, N; Hart, H; Hart, J C; Hartmann, J; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heinz, L; Hernández, J M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Homma, K; Hong, S J; Howell, G; Hughes, V W; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jing, Z; Johnson, K F; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Kasemann, M; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khakzad, M; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, Robert; Klimek, K; Ko, I A; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Kotanski, A; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Lamberti, L; Lane, J B; Laurenti, G; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Lindemann, L; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Lopez-Duran Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; MacDonald, N; Maccarrone, G; Magill, S; Mallik, U; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; McFall, J D; Mellado, B; Menary, S R; Meyer, A; Meyer-Larsen, A; Milewski, J; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Monaco, V; Monteiro, T; Morandin, M; Moritz, M; Murray, W N; Musgrave, B; Mönig, K; Nagano, K; Nam, S W; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Noyes, V A; Nylander, P; Ochs, A; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Orr, R S; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Park, I H; Park, S K; Parsons, J A; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, Pier Giovanni; Pellegrino, A; Pelucchi, F; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pfeiffer, M; Pic, D; Piotrzkowski, K; Poelz, G; Polenz, S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Prinias, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Puga, J; Quadt, A; Raach, H; Raso, M; Rautenberg, J; Re, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Ritz, S; Riveline, M; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Saint-Laurent, M; Salehi, H; Samp, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schechter, A; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Schwarzer, O; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sideris, D; Sievers, M; Simmons, D; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, I O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Straub, P B; Strickland, E; Stroili, R; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, I; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Van Sighem, A; Velthuis, J J; Verkerke, W; Voci, C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Votano, L; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D S; Waugh, R; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Wölfle, S; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zajac, J; Zakrzewski, J A; Zamora Garcia, Y; Zawiejski, L; Zetsche, F; Zeuner, W; Zhu, Q; Zichichi, A; Zotkin, S A

    2000-01-01

    The forward-jet cross section in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 6.36 pb^-1. The jet cross section is presented as a function of jet transverse energy squared, E(T,jet)^2, and Q^2 in the kinematic ranges 10^-2Q^2<10^2 and 2.5 10^-4Q)^2 terms, this measurement provides an important test. The measured cross section is compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading order pQCD calculation as well as to various leading-order Monte Carlo models. Whereas the predictions of all models agree with the measured cross section in the region of small E(T,Jet)^2/Q^2, only one model, which includes a resolved photon component, describes the data over the whole kinematic range.

  9. Mellin moments of heavy flavor contributions to F_2(x,Q^2) at NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the calculation of fixed moments of the O(a_s^3) heavy flavor contributions to the Wilson coefficients of the structure function F_2(x,Q^2) in the limit Q^2 >> m^2, neglecting power corrections. The massive Wilson coefficients in the asymptotic region are given as convolutions of massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) and the known light flavor Wilson coefficients. The former derive from the twist--2 operators emerging in the light--cone--expansion and are calculated at the 3--loop level for fixed moments. We also compute the massive OMEs which are needed to evaluate heavy flavor parton distributions in the variable flavor number scheme to the same order. All contributions to the Wilson coefficients and OMEs but the genuine constant terms at O(a_s^3) of the OMEs are derived in terms of quantities, which are known for general values in the Mellin variable N. For the OMEs A_{Qg}^(3), A_{qg,Q}^(3) and A_{gg,Q}^(3) the moments N = 2 to 10, for A_{Qq}^{(3), PS} to N = 12, and for A_{...

  10. Nuclear Effects in Structure Functions xF3(x, Q2) from Charge Current Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-Gui; SHEN Peng-Nian; LI Guang-Lie

    2006-01-01

    By taking advantage of the model-independent nuclear parton distributions, the structure functions xF3(x, Q2)are calculated, in comparison with the experimental data from CCFR neutrino-nuclei charge current deep inelastic scattering. It is shown that shadowing and anti-shadowing effects occur in valence quark distributions for small and medium x regions, respectively. It is suggested that the neutrino experimental data should be employed in the future for pinning down the nuclear parton distributions.

  11. Spin structure function g_1 at small x and arbitrary $Q^2: Total resummaion of leading logarithms vs Standard Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2007-01-01

    The Standard Approach (SA) for description of the structure function g_1 combines the DGLAP evolution equations and Standard Fits for the initial parton densities. The DGLAP equations describe the region of large Q^2 and large x, so there are not theoretical grounds to exploit them at small x. In practice, extrapolation of DGLAP into the region of large Q^2 and small x is done with complementing DGLAP with special, singular (~x^{-a}) phenomenological fits for the initial parton densities. The factors x^{-a} are wrongly believed to be of the non-perturbative origin. Actually, they mimic the resummation of logs of x and should be expelled from the fits when the resummation is accounted for. Contrary to SA, the resummaton of logarithms of x is a straightforward and natural way to describe g_1 in the small-x region. This approach can be used at both large and small Q^2 where DGLAP cannot be used by definition. Confronting this approach and SA demonstrates that the singular initial parton densities and the power Q...

  12. The rotation and coma profiles of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    CERN Document Server

    Reyniers, Maarten; Bodewits, Dennis; Cuypers, Jan; Waelkens, Christoffel

    2008-01-01

    Aims. Rotation periods of cometary nuclei are scarce, though important when studying the nature and origin of these objects. Our aim is to derive a rotation period for the nucleus of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz). Methods. C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) was monitored using the Merope CCD camera on the Mercator telescope at La Palma, Spain, in January 2005, during its closest approach to Earth, implying a high spatial resolution (50km per pixel). One hundred seventy images were recorded in three different photometric broadband filters, two blue ones (Geneva U and B) and one red (Cousins I). Magnitudes for the comet's optocentre were derived with very small apertures to isolate the contribution of the nucleus to the bright coma, including correction for the seeing. Our CCD photometry also permitted us to study the coma profile of the inner coma in the different bands. Results. A rotation period for the nucleus of P = 9.1 +/- 0.2 h was derived. The period is on the short side compared to published periods of other comets, bu...

  13. Strangeness Production at low $Q^2$ in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, Paul R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2009-01-01

    The production of neutral strange hadrons is investigated using deep-inelastic scattering events measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The measurements are made in the phase space defined by the negative four-momentum transfer squared of the photon 2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and the inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.6. The K_s and Lambda production cross sections and their ratios are determined. K_s production is compared to the production of charged particles in the same region of phase space. The Lambda - anti-Lambda asymmetry is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. Predictions of leading order Monte Carlo programs are compared to the data.

  14. Measurement of $D*{+-}$ meson production in ep scattering at low $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Abt, I; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Allfrey, P D; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M A; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bindi, M; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bold, T; Bonato, A; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Boutle, S K; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brownson, E; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brzozowska, B; Brümmer, N; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; Cui, Y; D'Agostini, G; Dal Corso, F; Danielson, T; De Favereau, J; De Pasquale, S; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Dossanov, A; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, A; Estrada; Everett, A; Fazio, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fry, C; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gialas, I; Gil, M; Giller, I; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Goers, S; Gosau, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gregor, I; Grigorescu, G; Grzelak, G; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heath, G P; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Hori, R; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ingbir, R; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jechow, M; Jiménez, M; Jones, T W; Jüngst, M; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kamaluddin, B; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O M; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Koffeman, E; Kollar, D; Kooijman, P; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kowalski, H; Kulinski, P; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Lee, A; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, C; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukasik, J; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; Magill, S; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsumoto, T; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S; Miglioranzi, S; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Morris, J D; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nicholass, D; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Noor, U; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Okazaki, N; Olkiewicz, K; Ota, O; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Rinaldi, L; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Ron, E; Rosin, M; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Samson, U; Santamarta, R; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schonberg, V; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Shehzadi, R; Shimizu, S; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Theedt, T; Tiecke, H; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Uribe-, C; Vlasov, N N; Vázquez, M; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Whitmore, J J; Whyte, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Wolfe, H; Wrona, K; Yagues-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhou, C; Zichichi, A; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A

    2007-01-01

    The production of D*+-(2010) mesons in ep scattering in the range of exchanged photon virtuality 0.05 D0 pi+ with D0 -> K- pi+ and corresponding antiparticle decay were used to identify D* mesons and the ZEUS beampipe calorimeter was used to identify the scattered electron. Differential D* cross sections as functions of Q^2, inelasticity, y, transverse momentum of the D* meson, p_T(D*), and pseudorapidity of the D* meson, eta(D*), have been measured in the kinematic region 0.02 < y < 0.85, 1.5 < p_T(D*) < 9.0 GeV and |eta(D*)| < 1.5. The measured differential cross sections are in agreement with two different NLO QCD calculations. The cross sections are also compared to previous ZEUS measurements in the photoproduction and DIS regimes.

  15. $O(\\alpha_s^3 T_F^2 N_F)$ Contributions to the Heavy Flavor Wilson Coefficients of the Structure Function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ at $Q^2 \\gg m^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Wissbrock, Fabian

    2010-01-01

    The massive 3-loop fermion-loop corrections $\\propto C_A N_f T_F^2$ and $C_F N_f T_F^2$ to the massive operator matrix elements $A_{Qg}$, $A_{Qq}^{\\rm{PS}}$, $A_{qq,Q}^{\\rm{PS}}$, $A_{qq,Q}^{\\rm{NS}}$ and $A_{qq,Q}^{\\rm{NS,TR}} have been obtained for general values of $N$. Thereby the corresponding contributions to the asymptotic heavy flavor Wilson coefficients of the structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and of transversity in the region $Q^2 \\geq 10 \\cdot m^2$ are known. Our method is based on direct integration, avoiding the integration-by-parts technique, which is advantageous due to the compactness of the intermediate and final results. We also obtain the corresponding contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions and confirm results in the literature.

  16. The $Q^{2}$-dependence of the Generalised Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Integral for the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akushevich, I V; Amarian, M; Arrington, J; Aschenauer, E C; Avakian, H; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Bains, B; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brauksiepe, S; Brauniu, B; Brückner, W; Brüll, A; Budz, P; Bulten, H J; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Chumney, P; Cisbani, E; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Devitsin, E G; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Di Nezza, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Düren, M; Dvoredsky, A P; Elbakian, G M; Ely, J; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Ferro-Luzziwad, M; Fiedler, K; Filippone, B W; Fischer, H; Fox, B; Franzl, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Golendukhin, A; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Green, P W; Greeniaus, L G; Gute, A; Haeberli, W; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Heinsius, F H; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hoffmann-Rothe, P; Hofman, G J; Holler, Y; Holto, R J; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Iodice, M; Izotov, A A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesakaac, J; Kinney, E R; Kiselev, A; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, H; Koch, N; Königsmann, K C; Kolster, H; Korotkov, V A; Kotik, E; Kozlov, V; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kyle, G S; Lagamba, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Martin, J W; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; McAndrew, M; McIlhany, K; McKeown, R D; Menden, F; Metzu, A; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Milner, R; Mitsyn, V; Muccifora, V; Mussa, R; Nagaitsev, A P; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Neill, T G; Openshaw, R; Ouyang, J; Owen, B R; Pate, S F; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Rakness, G; Rappoport, V; Redwine, R P; Reggiani, D; Reolon, A R; Ristinen, R; Rith, K; Robinson, D; Ruh, M; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Savin, I A; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schmidt, F; Schnell, G; Schulerf, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shibata, T A; Shin, T; Shutov, V B; Simani, C; Simon, A; Sinram, K; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Suetsugu, K; Sutter, M F; Tallini, H A; Taroian, S P; Terkulov, A R; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tipton, B; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van den Brand, J F J; van der Steenhoven, G; Van de Vyver, R; Van Hunen, J J; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Volk, E; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wiseq, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G

    2000-01-01

    The dependence on Q^2 (the negative square of the 4-momentum of the exchanged virtual photon) of the generalised Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral for the proton has been measured in the range 1.2 GeV^2 3 GeV^2, while both contributions are important at low Q^2. The total integral shows no significant deviation from a 1/Q^2 behaviour in the measured Q^2 range, and thus no sign of large effects due to either nucleon-resonance excitations or non-leading twist.

  17. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  18. Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance for 1.7 < Q**2 < 4.5 -GeV2 in vec-ep ---> en pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznauryan, Inna; Burkert, Volker; Kim, Wooyoung; Park, Kil; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gonenc, Atilla; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, L.; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hafnaoui, Khadija; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Andreas; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lee, T.; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, S.; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Jerome; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045209
    The helicity amplitudes of the electroexcitation of the Roper resonance are extracted for 1.7 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2 from recent high precision JLab-CLAS cross section and longitudinally polarized beam asymmetry data for pi+ electroproduction on protons at W=1.15-1.69 GeV. The analysis is made using two approaches, dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. It is found that the transverse helicity amplitude A_{1/2} for the gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 transition, which is large and negative at Q2=0, becomes large and positive at Q2 ~ 2 GeV2, and then drops slowly with Q2. The longitudinal helicity amplitude S_{1/2}, which was previously found from CLAS ep -> eppi0,enpi+ data to be large and positive at Q2=0.4,0.65 GeV2, drops with Q2. Available model predictions for gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 allow us to conclude that these results provide strong evidence in favor of N(1440)P11 as a first radial excitation of

  19. The rotation and coma profiles of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyniers, M.; Degroote, P.; Bodewits, D.; Cuypers, J.; Waelkens, C.

    Aims. Rotation periods of cometary nuclei are scarce, though important when studying the nature and origin of these objects. Our aim is to derive a rotation period for the nucleus of comet C/2004 Q2 ( Machholz). Methods. C/2004 Q2 ( Machholz) was monitored using the Merope CCD camera on the Mercator

  20. 31 CFR 30.2 - Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? 30.2 Section 30.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.2 Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? This...

  1. Roles of two-component system AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating biosynthesis of the yellow-pigmented coelimycin P2 in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Guosong; Zhu, Hong; He, Huiqi; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that in Streptomyces coelicolor two-component system AfsQ1/Q2 activates the production of the yellow-colored coelimycin P2 (also named as yCPK) on glutamate-supplemented minimal medium, and the response regulator AfsQ1 could specifically bind to the intergenic region between two structural genes, cpkA and cpkD Here, a more in-depth investigation was performed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the role of AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating coelimycin P2 biosynthesis. Deletion of afsQ1/Q2 resulted in markedly decreased expression of the whole coelimycin P2 biosynthetic gene cluster. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that AfsQ1 bound only to the target site identified previously, but not to any other promoters in the gene cluster. Mutations of AfsQ1-binding motif only resulted in drastically reduced transcription of the cpkA/B/C operon (encoding three type I polyketide synthases) and intriguingly, led to enhanced expression of some coelimcyin P2 genes, particularly accA1 and scF These results suggested the direct role of AfsQ1/Q2 in regulating coelimycin production, which is directly mediated by the structural genes, but not the cluster-situated regulatory genes, and also implied that other unknown mechanisms may be involved in AfsQ1/Q2-mediated regulation of coelimycin P2 biosynthesis.

  2. Expression Status of UBE2Q2 in Colorectal Primary Tumors and Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Shafiee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in various malignancies, including colorectal cancer, is established. This pathway mediates the degradation of damaged proteins and regulates growth and stress response. The novel human gene, UBE2Q2, with a putative ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme activity, is reported to be overexpressed in some malignancies. We sought to investigate the expression levels of the UBE2Q2 gene in colorectal cell lines as well as in cancerous and normal tissues from patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Levels of UBE2Q2 mRNA in cell lines were assessed by Real-Time PCR. Western blotting was employed to investigate the levels of the UBE2Q2 protein in 8 colorectal cell lines and 43 colorectal tumor samples. Results: Expression of UBE2Q2 was observed at the level of both mRNA and protein in colorectal cell lines, HT29/219, LS180, SW742, Caco2, HTC116, SW48, SW480, and SW1116. Increased levels of UBE2Q2 immunoreactivity was observed in the 65.11% (28 out of 43 of the colorectal carcinoma tissues when compared with their corresponding normal tissues. Difference between the mean intensities of UBE2Q2 bands from cancerous and normal tissues was statistically significant at P<0.001 (paired t test. Conclusion: We showed the expression pattern of the novel human gene, UBE2Q2, in 8 colorectal cell lines. Overexpression of UBE2Q2 in the majority of the colorectal carcinoma samples denotes that it may have implications for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

  3. Fundamental fermion masses from deformed SU{sub q}(2) triplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladino, B.E.; Ferreira, P.L. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-10-01

    A spectrum generating q-algebra, within the framework of SU{sub q}(2), is studied in order to describe the mass spectrum of three generations of quarks and leptons. The SU{sub q}(2) quantum group is a q-deformed extension of SU(2), where q=exp{alpha} (with {alpha} real) is the deformation parameter. In this letter, the essential use of inequivalent representations of SU{sub q}(2) is introduced. A formula for the fermion masses is derived. As an example, a possible scheme which corresponds to two triplets associated to up and down quarks is presented here in some detail. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. A highly amyloidogenic region of hen lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frare, Erica; Polverino De Laureto, Patrizia; Zurdo, Jesús; Dobson, Christopher M; Fontana, Angelo

    2004-07-23

    Amyloid fibrils obtained after incubating hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) at pH 2.0 and 65 degrees C for extended periods of time have been found to consist predominantly of fragments of the protein corresponding to residues 49-100, 49-101, 53-100 and 53-101, derived largely from the partial acid hydrolysis of Asp-X peptide bonds. These internal fragments of HEWL encompass part of the beta-domain and all the residues forming the C-helix in the native protein, and contain two internal disulfide bridges Cys64-Cys80 and Cys76-Cys94. The complementary protein fragments, including helices A, B and D of the native protein, are not significantly incorporated into the network of fibrils, but remain largely soluble, in agreement with their predicted lower propensities to aggregate. Further analysis of the properties of different regions of HEWL to form amyloid fibrils was carried out by studying fragments produced by limited proteolysis of the protein by pepsin. Here, we show that only fragment 57-107, but not fragment 1-38/108-129, is able to generate well-defined amyloid fibrils under the conditions used. This finding is of particular importance, as the beta-domain and C-helix of the highly homologous human lysozyme have been shown to unfold locally in the amyloidogenic variant D67H, which is associated with the familial cases of systemic amyloidosis linked to lysozyme deposition. The identification of the highly amyloidogenic character of this region of the polypeptide chain provides strong support for the involvement of partially unfolded species in the initiation of the aggregation events that lead to amyloid deposition in clinical disease.

  5. Q-bosonization of the quantum group GL$_{q}$(2) based on the Gauss decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Damaskinsky, E V; Damaskinsky, E V; Sokolov, M A

    1995-01-01

    The new method of q-bosonization for quantum groups based on the Gauss decomposition of a transfer matrix of generators is suggested. The simplest example of the quantum group GL_q(2) is considered in some details.

  6. The $Q^{2}$ Dependence of Dijet Cross Sections in $\\gamma p$ Interactions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Derrick, Malcolm; Krakauer, D A; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Abbiendi, G; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, A; Amelung, C; Bornheim, A; Brock, I; Coboken, K; Crittenden, James Arthur; Deffner, R; Hartmann, H; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Paul, E; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Wieber, H; Bailey, D S; Barret, O; Brook, N H; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; McFall, J D; Piccioni, D; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Jeoung, H Y; Kim, J Y; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Liu, W; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Sacchi, R; Sampson, S; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Klimek, K H; Olkiewicz, K; Piotrzkowski, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Kotanski, Andrzej; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bienlein, J K; Burgard, C; Desler, K; Drews, G; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Göbel, F; Göttlicher, P; Graciani, R; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hebbel, K; Johnson, K F; Kasemann, M; Koch, W; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lindemann, L; Löhr, B; Martínez, M; Milite, M; Monteiro, T; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Pelucchi, F; Petrucci, M C; Rohde, M; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Sievers, M; Stonjek, S; Tassi, E; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Coldewey, C; Grabosch, H J; López-Duran-Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Straub, P B; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Maccarrone, G D; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Benen, A; Eisenhardt, S; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Lee, S W; MacDonald, N; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Waugh, R; Bohnet, I; Gendner, N; Holm, U; Meyer-Larsen, A; Salehi, H; Wick, K; Dannheim, D; Garfagnini, A; Gialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Kcira, D; Klanner, Robert; Lohrmann, E; Poelz, G; Zetsche, F; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Mallik, U; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Ahn, S H; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S J; Lee, S B; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Lim, H; Park, I H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; García, G; Glasman, C; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Barbi, M S; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Riveline, M; Stairs, D G; Wing, M; Tsurugai, T; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Dementev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Botje, M; Brümmer, N; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P M; Schagen, S; Van Sighem, A; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Nylander, P; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Matsushita, T; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dosselli, U; Dusini, S; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Iannotti, L; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Toothacker, W S; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Shah, T P; Epperson, D E; Heusch, C A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Wichmann, R; Williams, D C; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Fagerstroem, C P; Galea, R; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Polenz, S; Sabetfakhri, A; Simmons, D; Butterworth, J M; Catterall, C D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Grzelak, G; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Smalska, B; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Adamus, M; Gadaj, T; Deppe, O; Eisenberg, Y; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Badgett, W F; Chapin, D; Cross, R; Foudas, C; Mattingly, S E K; Reeder, D D; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wildschek, T; Wodarczyk, M; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Hughes, V W; Bhadra, S; Cole, J E; Frisken, W R; Hall-Wilton, R; Khakzad, M; Menary, S R; Schmidke, W B

    2000-01-01

    The dependence of the photon structure on the photon virtuality, Q^2, isstudied by measuring the reaction e^+p\\to e^+ + {\\rm jet} + {\\rm jet} + {\\rm X}at photon-proton centre-of-mass energies 134 5.5 GeV in the final state.The dijet cross section has been measured as a function of the fractionalmomentum of the photon participating in the hard process, x_gamma. The ratio ofthe dijet cross section with x_gamma 0.75decreases as Q^2 increases. The data are compared with the predictions of NLOpQCD and leading-order Monte Carlo programs using various parton distributionfunctions of the photon. The measurements can be interpreted in terms of aresolved photon component that falls with Q^2 but remains present at values ofQ^2 up to 4.5 GeV^2. However, none of the models considered gives a gooddescription of the data.

  7. Is it possible to unify the QCD evolution of structure functions in X and $Q^{2}$?

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1995-01-01

    We start from the two existing QCD evolution equations for structure functions, the BFKL and DGLAP equations, and discuss the theoretical hints for a unifying picture of the evolution in x and Q^2. The main difficulty is due to the property of angular ordering of the gluon radiation driving the evolution and the cancellation of the related collinear singularities. At the leading \\log\\ 1/x and leading \\log \\ Q^2 accuracy, we find a unified set of equations satisfying the constraints.

  8. Measurement of the Proton Structure Function $F_{2}$ at Very Low $Q^{2}$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Derrick, Malcolm; Krakauer, D A; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Abbiendi, G; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, A; Amelung, C; Bornheim, A; Brock, I; Coboken, K; Crittenden, James Arthur; Deffner, R; Hartmann, H; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Paul, E; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Wieber, H; Bailey, D S; Barret, O; Brook, N H; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; McFall, J D; Piccioni, D; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Jeoung, H Y; Kim, J Y; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Liu, W; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Sampson, S; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Klimek, K H; Olkiewicz, K; Piotrzkowski, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Kotanski, Andrzej; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bienlein, J K; Burgard, C; Dannheim, D; Desler, K; Drews, G; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Göbel, F; Göttlicher, P; Graciani, R; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hebbel, K; Johnson, K F; Kasemann, M; Koch, W; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lindemann, L; Löhr, B; Martínez, M; Milite, M; Monteiro, T; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Pelucchi, F; Petrucci, M C; Rohde, M; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Sievers, M; Stonjek, S; Tassi, E; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Coldewey, C; López-Duran-Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Straub, P B; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Maccarrone, G D; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Benen, A; Eisenhardt, S; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bussey, Peter J; Bell, M; Doyle, A T; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; MacDonald, N; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Waugh, R; Bohnet, I; Gendner, N; Holm, U; Meyer-Larsen, A; Salehi, H; Wick, K; Garfagnini, A; Gialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Kcira, D; Klanner, Robert; Lohrmann, E; Poelz, G; Zetsche, F; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Mallik, U; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Ahn, S H; Lee, S B; Park, S K; Lim, H; Park, I H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; García, G; Glasman, C; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Barbi, M S; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Riveline, M; Stairs, D G; Wing, M; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Bashkirov, V; Danilov, M V; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Botje, M; Brümmer, N; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P M; Schagen, S; Van Sighem, A; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Matsushita, T; Quadt, A; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dosselli, U; Dusini, S; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Turcato, M; Voci, C; Adamczyk, L; Iannotti, L; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Toothacker, W S; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Shah, T P; Epperson, D E; Heusch, C A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Wichmann, R; Williams, D C; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Fagerstroem, C P; Galea, R; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Polenz, S; Sabetfakhri, A; Simmons, D; Butterworth, J M; Catterall, C D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Grzelak, G; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Smalska, B; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Gadaj, T; Deppe, O; Eisenberg, Y; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Badgett, W F; Chapin, D; Cross, R; Foudas, C; Mattingly, S E K; Reeder, D D; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wildschek, T; Wodarczyk, M; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Hughes, V W; Bhadra, S; Cole, J E; Frisken, W R; Hall-Wilton, R; Khakzad, M; Menary, S R

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the proton structure function F_2(x,Q^2) is presented in the kinematic range 0.045 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 0.65 GeV^2 and 6*10^{-7} < x < 1*10^{-3}. The results were obtained using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.9pb^-1 in e^+p reactions recorded with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Information from a silicon-strip tracking detector, installed in front of the small electromagnetic calorimeter used to measure the energy of the final-state positron at small scattering angles, together with an enhanced simulation of the hadronic final state, has permitted the extension of the kinematic range beyond that of previous measurements. The uncertainties in F_2 are typically less than 4%. At the low Q^2 values of the present measurement, the rise of F_2 at low x is slower than observed in HERA data at higher Q^2 and can be described by Regge theory with a constant logarithmic slope. The dependence of F_2 on Q^2 is stronger than at higher Q^2 values, approaching, at the lowest Q...

  9. Corotating Interaction Regions at High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunow, H.; Lee, M. A.; Fisk, L. A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Heber, B.; Horbury, T. S.; Keppler, E.; Kóta, J.; Lou, Y.-Q.; McKibben, R. B.; Paizis, C.; Potgieter, M. S.; Roelof, E. C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Simnett, G. M.; von Steiger, R.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1999-07-01

    Ulysses observed a stable strong CIR from early 1992 through 1994 during its first journey into the southern hemisphere. After the rapid latitude scan in early 1995, Ulysses observed a weaker CIR from early 1996 to mid-1997 in the northern hemisphere as it traveled back to the ecliptic at the orbit of Jupiter. These two CIRs are the observational basis of the investigation into the latitudinal structure of CIRs. The first CIR was caused by an extension of the northern coronal hole into the southern hemisphere during declining solar activity, whereas the second CIR near solar minimum activity was caused by small warps in the streamer belt. The latitudinal structure is described through the presentation of three 26-day periods during the southern CIR. The first at ˜24°S shows the full plasma interaction region including fast and slow wind streams, the compressed shocked flows with embedded stream interface and heliospheric current sheet (HCS), and the forward and reverse shocks with associated accelerated ions and electrons. The second at 40°S exhibits only the reverse shock, accelerated particles, and the 26-day modulation of cosmic rays. The third at 60°S shows only the accelerated particles and modulated cosmic rays. The possible mechanisms for the access of the accelerated particles and the CIR-modulated cosmic rays to high latitudes above the plasma interaction region are presented. They include direct magnetic field connection across latitude due to stochastic field line weaving or to systematic weaving caused by solar differential rotation combined with non-radial expansion of the fast wind. Another possible mechanism is particle diffusion across the average magnetic field, which includes stochastic field line weaving. A constraint on connection to a distant portion of the CIR is energy loss in the solar wind, which is substantial for the relatively slow-moving accelerated ions. Finally, the weaker northern CIR is compared with the southern CIR. It is weak

  10. Q2 dependence of the S11(1535) photocoupling and evidence for a P-wave resonance in η electroproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizli, H.; Mueller, J.; Dytman, S.; Leber, M. L.; Levine, R. D.; Miles, J.; Kim, K. Y.; Adams, G.; Amaryan, M. J.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, N.; Ball, J. P.; Baltzell, N. A.; Barrow, S.; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cetina, C.; Chen, S.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Collins, P.; Coltharp, P.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; Cummings, J. P.; Dashyan, N.; Vita, R. De; Sanctis, E. De; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Dennis, L.; Deur, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Farhi, L.; Fatemi, R.; Fedotov, G.; Feldman, G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Forest, T. A.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gonenc, A.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hleiqawi, I.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Langheinrich, J.; Lawrence, D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, M.; Manak, J. J.; Markov, N.; McAleer, S.; McKinnon, B.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mibe, T.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Morrow, S. A.; Moteabbed, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Paterson, C.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Shafi, A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stokes, B. E.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tkabladze, A.; Tkachenko, S.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction ep→e'ηp are reported for total center-of-mass energy W=1.5-2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer Q2=0.13-3.3 GeV2. This large kinematic range allows the extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and ηN coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at W~1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a P-wave resonance that persists to high Q2. Improved values are derived for the photocoupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expand the Q2 range covered, and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parametrization is provided.

  11. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  12. Submillimetric spectroscopic observations of volatiles in comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    CERN Document Server

    de Val-Borro, M; Jarchow, C; Rengel, M; Villanueva, G L; Küppers, M; Biver, N; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J

    2012-01-01

    We aim to determine the production rates of several parent and product volatiles and the 12C/13C isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H13CN, HNC, H2CO, CO and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH (7-6) series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 \\pm 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/H13CN/HCN = 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.5...

  13. Study of HERA data at Low Q^2 and Low x

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Foster, B; Wing, M; Myronenko, V; Wichmann, K

    2016-01-01

    In the HERAPDF2.0 PDF analysis it was noted that the fit $\\chi^2$ worsens significantly at low $Q^2$ for both NLO and NNLO fits. The turn over of the reduced cross section at low-$x$ and low $Q^2$ due to the contribution of the longitudinal cross section $F_L$ is also not very well described. In this paper the prediction for $F_L$ is highlighted and the corresponding extraction of $F_2$ from the data is further investigated, showing discrepancies with description of HERAPDF2.0 at low $x$ and $Q^2$. The effect of adding a simple higher twist term of the form ~$F_L*A/Q^2$ to the description of $F_L$ is investigated. This results in a significantly better description of the reduced cross-sections, $F_2$ and $F_L$ at low $x$, $Q^2$ and a significantly lower $\\chi^2$ for the NNLO fit as compared to the NLO fit. This is not the case if the higher twist term is added to $F_2$

  14. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

    2009-10-19

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

  15. Non-Commutative Integration, Zeta Functions and the Haar State for SU{sub q}(2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matassa, Marco, E-mail: marco.matassa@gmail.com [SISSA (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We study a notion of non-commutative integration, in the spirit of modular spectral triples, for the quantum group SU{sub q}(2). In particular we define the non-commutative integral as the residue at the spectral dimension of a zeta function, which is constructed using a Dirac operator and a weight. We consider the Dirac operator introduced by Kaad and Senior and a family of weights depending on two parameters, which are related to the diagonal automorphisms of SU{sub q}(2). We show that, after fixing one of the parameters, the non-commutative integral coincides with the Haar state of SU{sub q}(2). Moreover we can impose an additional condition on the zeta function, which also fixes the second parameter. For this unique choice the spectral dimension coincides with the classical dimension.

  16. Non-Commutative Integration, Zeta Functions and the Haar State for SU q (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, Marco

    2015-12-01

    We study a notion of non-commutative integration, in the spirit of modular spectral triples, for the quantum group SU q (2). In particular we define the non-commutative integral as the residue at the spectral dimension of a zeta function, which is constructed using a Dirac operator and a weight. We consider the Dirac operator introduced by Kaad and Senior and a family of weights depending on two parameters, which are related to the diagonal automorphisms of SU q (2). We show that, after fixing one of the parameters, the non-commutative integral coincides with the Haar state of SU q (2). Moreover we can impose an additional condition on the zeta function, which also fixes the second parameter. For this unique choice the spectral dimension coincides with the classical dimension.

  17. A measurement of the proton structure function F$_{2}$(x,Q$^{2}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, T; Andreev, V; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Arpagaus, M; Aïd, S; Babaev, A; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bergstein, H; Bernardi, G; Bernet, R; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Brasse, F W; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Buschhorn, G W; Bán, J; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charles, F; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Colombo, M G; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Coutures, C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Danilov, M V; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; De Wolf, E A; Deffur, E; Del Buono, L; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duboc, J; Duhm, H; Düllmann, D; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichenberger, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Erlichmann, H; Evrard, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Forbush, M; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Gamerdinger, K; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Gellrich, A; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Goritchev, P A; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hamon, O; Hampel, M; Hanlon, E M; Hapke, M; Haynes, W J; Heatherington, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hildesheim, W; Hill, P; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Huet, Patrick; Hufnagel, H; Höppner, M; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jabiol, M A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johannsen, K; Johnson, D P; Johnson, L; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kasselmann, P; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Ko, W; Kolanoski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Krüger, U P; Krüner-Marquis, U; Kubenka, J P; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhöfer, J; Kuznik, B; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Lamarche, F; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lanius, P; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Leverenz, C; Levonian, S; Ley, C; Lindner, A; Lindström, G; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Loch, P; Lohmander, H; Lubimov, V; López, G C; Lüke, D; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Masson, S; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Mercer, D; Merz, T; Meyer, C A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Obrock, U; Olsson, J E; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pichler, C; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Prosi, R; Pérez, E; Raupach, F; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Ribarics, P; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riess, S; Rietz, M; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rylko, R; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sahlmann, N; Sankey, D P C; Savitsky, M M; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schwind, A; Schöning, A; Seehausen, U; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shooshtari, H; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Soloviev, Yu V; Spiekermann, J; Spitzer, H; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Stella, B; Stephens, K; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Strachota, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Sánchez, E; Tapprogge, Stefan; Taylor, R E; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Vartapetian, A H; Vazdik, Ya A; Vecko, M; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walker, I W; Walther, A; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wellisch, H P; West, L R; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wright, A E; Wulff, N; Wünsch, E; Yiou, T P; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zimmer, M; Zimmermann, W; Zomer, F; Zuber, K; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W; Niebergall, Friedrich

    1995-01-01

    A measurement of the proton structure function F_{\\!2}(x,Q^2) is reported for momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 4.5 GeV^2 and 1600 GeV^2 and for Bjorken x between 1.8\\cdot10^{-4} and 0.13 using data collected by the HERA experiment H1 in 1993. It is observed that F_{\\!2} increases significantly with decreasing x, confirming our previous measurement made with one tenth of the data available in this analysis. The Q^2 dependence is approximately logarithmic over the full kinematic range covered. The subsample of deep inelastic events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap in the hadronic energy flow close to the proton remnant is used to measure the "diffractive" contribution to F_{\\!2}.

  18. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEn/GMn via the ^2H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{n})^1H reaction to Q^2 = 1.45 (GeV/c)^2

    CERN Document Server

    Plaster, B; Aghalaryan, A; Crouse, E; MacLachlan, G; Tajima, S; Tireman, W; Ahmidouch, A; Anderson, B D; Arenhövel, H; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Baldwin, A R; Barkhuff, D; Breuer, H; Carlini, R; Christy, E; Churchwell, S; Cole, L; Danagulyan, S; Day, D; Eden, T; Elaasar, M; Ent, R; Farkhondeh, M; Fenker, H; Finn, J M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Garrow, K; Gueye, P; Howell, C R; Hu, B; Jones, M K; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kim, W Y; Kowalski, S; Lung, A; Mack, D; Madey, R; Manley, D M; Markowitz, P; Mitchell, J; Mkrtchyan, H; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Punjabi, V; Raue, B A; Reichelt, T; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Sato, Y; Savvinov, N; Semenova, I A; Seo, W; Simicevic, N; Smith, G; Stepanyan, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Taylor, S; Ulmer, P E; Vulcan, W; Watson, J W; Wells, S; Wesselmann, F; Wood, S; Yan, C; Yang, S; Yuan, L; Zhang, W M; Zhu, H; Zhu, X

    2003-01-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GEn/GMn, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic 2H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{n})1H reaction, at three Q^2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)^2. The data at Q^2 = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c)^2 are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q^2 > 1 (GeV/c)^2 region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q^2.

  19. Gluon contribution to the structure function $g_{2}(x,Q^{2})$

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the one-loop twist-3 gluon contribution to the flavor-singlet structure function g_2(x,Q^2) in polarized deep-inelastic scattering and find that it is dominated by the contribution of the three-gluon operator with the lowest anomalous dimension (for each moment N). The similar property was observed earlier for the nonsinglet distributions, although the reason is in our case different. The result is encouraging and suggests a simple evolution pattern of g_2(x,Q^2) in analogy with the conventional description of twist-2 parton distributions.

  20. First measurement of proton's charge form factor at very low Q2 with initial state radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Weber, A. B.; Achenbach, P.; Beranek, T.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Cardinali, M.; Correa, L.; Debenjak, L.; Denig, A.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Ferretti Bondy, M. I.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J. M.; Friščić, I.; Griffioen, K.; Hoek, M.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Merkel, H.; Middleton, D. G.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rohrbeck, M.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Thiel, M.; Tyukin, A.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Weinriefer, M.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a new experimental method based on initial-state radiation (ISR) in e-p scattering, which exploits the radiative tail of the elastic peak to study the properties of electromagnetic processes and to extract the proton charge form factor (GEp) at extremely small Q2. The ISR technique was implemented in an experiment at the three-spectrometer facility of the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). This led to a precise validation of radiative corrections far away from elastic line and provided first measurements of GEp for 0.001 ≤Q2 ≤ 0.004(GeV / c) 2.

  1. Scalar Mesons as qbar^2 q^2? Insight from the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, M

    2003-01-01

    I describe some insight obtained from a lattice calculation on the possibility that the light scalar mesons are qbar^2 q^2 states rather than qbar q. First I review some general features of qbar^2 q^2 states in QCD inspired quark models. Then I describe a lattice QCD calculation of pseudoscalar meson scattering amplitudes, ignoring quark loops and quark annihilation, which finds indications that for sufficiently heavy quarks there is a stable four-quark bound state with JPC=0{++} and non-exotic flavor quantum numbers.

  2. An Efficient Q2P1 Finite Element Discretisation and Preconditioner for Variable Viscosity Stokes Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dave; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Brown, Jed

    2014-05-01

    Here I describe a numerical method suitable for studying 3D non-linear, large deformation processes associated with crustal and lithopspheric deformation. The method employs a combination of mixed finite elements for the flow problem, coupled to the Material-Point-Method for representing material state and history variables. This computational methodology is intended to simultaneously satisfy all of the geodynamic modelling requirements. Particular emphasis is given to the development of non-linear solvers and preconditioners which are performant, practical and highly scalable - thereby enabling high resolution 3D simulations to be performed using massively parallel computational hardware. We have made a number of fundamental design choices which result in a fast, highly scalable and robust Q2P1 finite element implementation which is suitable for solving a wide range of geodynamic applications. Specifically these choices include: (i) utilizing an inf-sup stable mixed finite element (with a mapped pressure space) which provides a reliable velocity and pressure solution; (ii) expressing the problem in defect correction form so that Newton-like methods can be exploited; (iii) making extensive use of matrix-free operators which both drastically reduces the memory requirements and improves the parallel scalability of the sparse matrix-vector product; (iv) deferring a wide range of choices associated with the solver configuration to run-time. The performance characteristics of our hybrid geometric multi-grid preconditioning strategy is presented. The robustness of the preconditioner with respect to the viscosity contrast and the topology of the viscosity field, together with the parallel scalability is demonstrated. We will highlight the benefits of using hybrid coarse grid hierarchies consisting of a combination of Galerkin, assembled and matrix-free operators. The merits of using aggressive coarsening strategies will also be discussed. Examples from 3D continental

  3. Homeownership in a high-cost region

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Schlorholtz

    2006-01-01

    A perfect storm is brewing in eastern Massachusetts: high home prices, rising interest rates, and a proliferation of high-cost mortgage products. More buyer education and better state regulation of lenders not covered by the Community Reinvestment Act are needed.

  4. Two-parameter deformed supersymmetric oscillators with SUq1/q2(n|m)-covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Algin, A; Arikan, A S; Algin, Abdullah; Arik, Metin; Arikan, Ali Serdar

    2003-01-01

    A two-parameter deformed superoscillator system with SUq1/q2(n|m)-covariance is presented and used to construct a two-parameter deformed N=2 SUSY algebra. The Fock space representation of the algebra is discussed and the deformed Hamiltonian for such generalized superoscillators is obtained.

  5. A characterization of the desarguesian planes of order q2 by SL(2,q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Foulser

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The main result is that if the translation complement of a translation plane of order q2 contains a group isomorphic to SL(2,q and if the subgroups of order q are elations (shears, then the plane is Desarguesian. This generalizes earlier work of Walker, who assumed that the kernel of the plane contained GF(q.

  6. Photon Electroproduction from Hydrogen at Backward Angles and Momentum Transfer Squared of Q**2=1.0 GeV**2

    CERN Document Server

    Laveissière, G; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Todor, L; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; D'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, John J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kamalov, S; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; Le Rose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N K; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E; Papandreou, Z; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quéméner, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saitô, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tiator, L; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Van De Vyver, R; Van, R L J; der Meer; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z L

    2004-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the e p -> e p gamma exclusive reaction at Q**2 = 1 GeV**2 in the nucleon resonance region by detecting scattered protons and electrons in coincidence in the two spectrometers of Jefferson Lab Hall A. Evaluated cross sections correspond to the backward electroproduction of real photons in the range of total (gamma* p) center-of-mass energy W from the proton mass up to W = 1.95 GeV.

  7. Asymptotically Honest Confidence Regions for High Dimensional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caner, Mehmet; Kock, Anders Bredahl

    While variable selection and oracle inequalities for the estimation and prediction error have received considerable attention in the literature on high-dimensional models, very little work has been done in the area of testing and construction of confidence bands in high-dimensional models. However...... develop an oracle inequality for the conservative Lasso only assuming the existence of a certain number of moments. This is done by means of the Marcinkiewicz-Zygmund inequality which in our context provides sharper bounds than Nemirovski's inequality. As opposed to van de Geer et al. (2014) we allow...

  8. 原状Q2黄土CT-三轴浸水试验研究%Triaxial wetting tests of intact Q2 loess by computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方祥位; 申春妮; 陈正汉; 张伟

    2011-01-01

    利用后勤工程学院研制的CT-多功能土工三轴仪,研究非饱和原状Q2黄土三轴浸水变形特性,并在浸水过程中利用CT技术对内部结构的变化进行无损的量测,得到内部结构演化的CT图像和相应的CT数据,从细观上解释了三轴浸水过程。基于CT数据定义结构性参数和结构演化变量;分析浸水过程中结构演化变量与净围压、偏应力和吸力的关系,浸水前的固结净围压、偏应力和吸力越大,浸水过程中结构演化越快。建立非饱和原状Q2黄土三轴浸水过程的结构演化方程,该方程为结构演化变量与偏应变、体应变和饱和度增量的关系,能同时反映净围压、偏应力和吸力等对结构演化的影响。利用提出的结构演化方程对试验数据进行拟合,拟合结果较理想。CT技术使土的细观结构研究达到定量阶段,为建立土的结构演化方程和结构性本构模型提供了试验基础。%A series of CT triaxial wetting tests of an intact unsaturated Q2 loess were conducted using a CT multi-function triaxial apparatus developed at the Logistical Engineering University. Behavior of deformation of intact Q2 loess upon wetting was studied. The distinctive CT images and detailed CT data were obtained during nondestructive wetting of the loess. The CT data were employed to define a parameter and an evolution variable to characterize evolution of the meso- structure. Relationships among the evolution variable of structure, net cell stress, deviatoric stress and suction were formulated. It was found that the evolution of meso-structure accelerated with increases in net cell stress, deviatoric stress and suction before wetting. An equation was developed to describe the evolution of meso-structure of intact unsaturated Q2 loess during wetting, with volumetric strain, deviatoric strain and incremental degree of saturation included, to reflect the influences of net cell stress

  9. Transverse Electrodisintegration of the Deuteron in the Threshold Region at High Momentum Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodyma, Marc B.

    1990-01-01

    Deuteron electrodisintegration cross sections near 180^circ have been measured in the break-up threshold region for the squared four-momentum transfer Q^2 range 1.21 to 2.77 (GeV/c)^2. These measurements constitute part of Experiment NE4, performed at the Standford Linear Accelerator Center during the years 1985 and 1986. The data have relatively coarse energy resolution, 12 to 20 MeV in relative neutron-proton energy E _{np}, and predictions are examined using two methods: Various non-relativistic predictions are folded with Monte-Carlo determined resolution functions, and a model-dependent resolution-unfolding procedure was employed, yielding results averaged over E_ {np} from 0 to 10 MeV. Systematic errors arose predominantly from a +/-0.25% uncertainty in the scattered electron energy E ^1. These results are compared with theoretical predictions averaged over similar ranges of E_ {np}. The comparisons indicate that meson exchange currents (MEC) have a strong influence on the measured cross section up to E_{np} = 20 MeV. However, the calculations have great sensitivity to the choice of form factor for the meson-nucleon coupling. Evidence for a possible change in slope of the cross section has been obtained for the first time. This feature is predicted to arise from interference effects between the IA, pi and rho exchange, Delta resonance interactions, and, perhaps, a quark exchange effect. No existing model lies in complete agreement with the data over the entire measured range of Q^2. The inelastic structure functions W_1 (E_{np}, Q ^2), and W_2(E _{np}, Q^2) are obtained from the present results and previous forward angle data. The deduced ratios, W_1/ W_2 ~ 1 for E_{np} > 50 MeV, but decrease as E_{np } to 0, in accord with earlier results at lower Q^2. All non-relativistic predictions are in agreement above E _{np} = 50 MeV, indicating that the IA interaction dominates in this region. In contrast, no prediction is in good agreement at small E_ {np}. The

  10. AML-M2 with der(18t(1;18(q2?;p11.3 in addition to t(8;21 and del(9q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi Sonal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia with clinical features suggestive of AML-M3 and 46,XX,t(8;21,del(9q,der(18t(1;18 karyotype leading to the final diagnosis AML-M2 in light of t(8;21. The Deletion (9q is a frequent secondary anomaly to the t(8;21(q22;q22 in AML-M2. In addition to these two AML-M2 related rearrangements we also observed der(18t(1;18(q2?;p11.3 which may be an unusual rearrangement. This rearrangement resulted into partial trisomy of chromosome #1(q2? without the loss of any part of chromosome 18, morphologically. Rearrangements of long arm of chromosome 1 that result in complete or partial trisomy for 1q mostly involved the region q25-q32, which may confer a proliferation advantage.

  11. Reanalysis of Proton Form Factor Ratio Data at $\\mathbf{Q^2 =}$ 4.0, 4.8, and 5.6 GeV$\\mathbf{^2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Puckett, A J R; Gayou, O; Jones, M K; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Aniol, K A; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Calarco, J R; Cavata, C; Chai, Z; Chang, C -C; Chang, T; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; De Leo, R; Dieterich, S; Endres, R; Epstein, M B; Escoffier, S; Fonvieille, K G Fissum H; Frullani, S; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gomez, J; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D; Huber, G M; Iodice, M; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Khandaker, M; Kozlov, S; Kramer, K M; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lhuillier, D; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Margaziotis, D J; Marie, F; Markowitz, P; McCormick, K; Michaels, R; Milbrath, B D; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Piskunov, N M; Ransome, R D; Raue, B A; Roché, R; Rvachev, M; Saha, A; Salgado, C; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Strauch, S; Todor, L; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Urciuoli, G M; Voskanyan, H; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-01-01

    Recently published measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio $R = \\mu_p G_{Ep}/G_{Mp}$ at momentum transfers $Q^2$ up to 8.5 GeV$^2$ in Jefferson Lab Hall C deviate from the linear trend of previous measurements in Jefferson Lab Hall A, favoring a slower rate of decrease of $R$ with $Q^2$. While statistically compatible in the region of overlap with Hall A, the Hall C data hint at a systematic difference between the two experiments. This possibility was investigated in a reanalysis of the Hall A data. We find that the original analysis underestimated the background in the selection of elastic events. The application of an additional cut to further suppress the background increases the results for $R$, improving the consistency between Halls A and C.

  12. Evolution equation for the structure function g_2(x,Q^2)

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2001-01-01

    We perform an extensive study of the scale dependence of flavor-singlet contributions to the structure function g_2(x,Q^2) in polarized deep-inelastic scattering. We find that the mixing between quark-antiquark-gluon and three-gluon twist-3 operators only involves the three-gluon operator with the lowest anomalous dimension and is weak in other cases. This means, effectively, that only those three-gluon operators with the lowest anomalous dimension for each moment are important, and allows to formulate a simple two-component parton-like description of g_2(x,Q^2) in analogy with the conventional description of twist-2 parton distributions. The similar simplification was observed earlier for the nonsinglet distributions, although the reason is in our case different.

  13. Jet Production in ep Collisions at Low Q^2 and Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kosior, E.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e+p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5<Q^2<100 GeV^2 and at inelasticity 0.2Q^2 and jet transverse momentum. The 2-jet cross section is also measured as a function of the proton momentum fraction xi. The measurements are well described by perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order corrected for hadronisation effects and are subsequently used to extract the strong coupling alpha_s.

  14. Q2 dependence of nuclear transparency for exclusive rho0 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, N; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotski, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, H; Borissov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Brunn, I; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Court, G R; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Fechtchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Graw, G; Grebeniouk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Haeberli, W; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Königsmann, K; Kolster, H; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lorenzon, W; Makins, N C R; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Menden, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Mikloukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, W-D; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Podiatchev, S; Potashov, S; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Ryckbosch, D; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seibert, J; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shibata, T-A; Shutov, V; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Tessarin, S; Thomas, E; Tkabladze, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van Der Nat, P; Van Der Steenhoven, G; Van De Vyver, R; Vetterli, M C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Wise, T; Yen, S; Yoneyama, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabian, H; Zupranski, P

    2003-02-07

    Exclusive coherent and incoherent electroproduction of the rho(0) meson from 1H and 14N targets has been studied at the HERMES experiment as a function of coherence length (l(c)), corresponding to the lifetime of hadronic fluctuations of the virtual photon, and squared four-momentum of the virtual photon (-Q2). The ratio of 14N to 1H cross sections per nucleon, called nuclear transparency, was found to increase (decrease) with increasing l(c) for coherent (incoherent) rho(0) electroproduction. For fixed l(c), a rise of nuclear transparency with Q2 is observed for both coherent and incoherent rho(0) production, which is in agreement with theoretical calculations of color transparency.

  15. Measurement of the proton structure function $F_L(x,Q^2)$ at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Del Degan, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; Deák, M; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jöhnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Jnsson, L; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Murín, P; Müller, K; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schöning, A; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wünsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zácek, J; Zálesák, J; De Boer, Y

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F_L(x,Q^2) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e^+p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F_L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12 < Q^2 < 90 GeV^2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024 < x < 0.0036. The F_L values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA.

  16. Pion distribution amplitude from holographic QCD and the electromagnetic form factor F_pi(Q2)

    CERN Document Server

    Agaev, S S

    2008-01-01

    The holographic QCD prediction for the pion distribution amplitude (DA) $\\phi_{hol}(u)$ is used to compute the pion spacelike electromagnetic form factor $F_{\\pi}(Q^2)$ within the QCD light-cone sum rule method. In calculations the pion's renormalon-based model twist-4 DA, as well as the asymptotic twist-4 DA are employed. Obtained theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data and with results of the holographic QCD.

  17. Perturbative power Q^2-corrections to the structure function g(1)

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2006-01-01

    We show that regulating infrared divergencies generates power (\\sim 1/(Q^2)^k) corrections to the spin structure function g_1 at small x. We present the explicit series of such terms as well as the formulae for their resummation. These contributions are not included in the standard analysis of the experimental data. We argue that accounting for such terms can sizably change the impact of the other power corrections conventionally attributed to the higher twists.

  18. The low Q$^2$ chicane and Compton polarimeter at the JLab EIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camsonne, Alexandre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The JLAB EIC (JLEIC) design includes a chicane after the interaction point to detect electron associated with production of quasi-real photon at the interaction. This chicane layout can also be used for Compton polarimetry to measure the electron beam polarization. This proceeding will present the layout of the low Q^2 chicane and the implementation and current R&D; of a Compton polarimeter which would be located in the middle of this chicane.

  19. Heavy quark effective field theory at $O(1/m_{Q}^{2})$; 1, QCD corrections to the Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Balzereit, C; Balzereit, Christopher; Ohl, Thorsten

    1996-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the renormalized HQET Lagrangian at order O(1/m_Q^2) and discuss the consequences of the BRST invariance of QCD and the reparameterization invariance of HQET. Our result corrects earlier, conflicting calculations and sets the stage for the calculation of the renormalized currents at order O(1/m_Q^2).

  20. Improving Magnet Designs With High and Low Field Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2011-01-01

    to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example, these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material......A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays have to deliver high field regions in close proximity...

  1. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Hasselhuhn, A.; von Manteuffel, A.; Round, M.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2) in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 and the associated operator matrix element Aqq,Q(3),NS(N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(NF) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F2(x,Q2).

  2. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F2(x,Q2 and transversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 in the asymptotic region Q2≫m2 and the associated operator matrix element Aqq,Q(3,NS(N to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(NF and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F2(x,Q2.

  3. The 3-Loop Non-Singlet Heavy Flavor Contributions and Anomalous Dimensions for the Structure Function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and Transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Ablinger, J; Blümlein, J; De Freitas, A; Hasselhuhn, A; von Manteuffel, A; Round, M; Schneider, C; Wißbrock, F

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the asymptotic region $Q^2 \\gg m^2$ and the associated operator matrix element $A_{qq,Q}^{(3), \\rm NS}(N)$ to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable $N$. This matrix element is associated to the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments $N$, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to $O(N_F)$ and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in $N$ space and harmonic polylogarithms in $x$-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to $F_2(x,Q^2)$.

  4. Improving magnet designs with high and low field regions

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R; Smith, A; Pryds, N

    2014-01-01

    A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays has to deliver high field regions in close proximity to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material used by 42% while increasing the difference in flux density between a high and a low field region by 45%.

  5. Bit Optimizing Experimental Study on Q2-24 Well%Q2-24井钻头优选试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波; 于文华; 文平; 陈志学

    2004-01-01

    玉门油田青西地区地层可钻性变化较大,钻头选型困难,导致机械钻速较低.在Q2-24井钻井过程中试验应用了BEST公司的PDC钻头和HUGHES公司的三牙轮钻头,结果表明:该地区弓形山组地层开始直到中沟组泥岩段(2200~3500m)夹杂砂岩、砾岩的地层,使用小尺寸、大倒角的PDC钻头是适宜的,但需认真分析岩性及井下情况,并参阅邻井PDC钻头使用资料,确定合理的钻井参数和钻具组合,以提高机械钻速,缩短钻井周期;与国产钻头相比,HUGHES钻头的的机械钻速较高,钻头的轴承和胎体材质较好,与国产钻头相比,能承受更大钻压.

  6. Comparing High-speed Transition Region Jets in Coronal Holes and Quiet Sun Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate Arbacher, Rebecca; Tian, Hui; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The complicated energy transfer and plasma motion in the transition region, between the photosphere and the corona, may play a significant role in the formation and acceleration of the solar wind. New observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have revealed unprecedented levels of detail in this less-studied region. Coronal holes in particular are a likely source of solar wind material, though the formation and acceleration mechanisms of the fast solar wind are still largely unknown. In our previous work, we have reported the prevalence of small-scale high-speed (~80-250 km/s) jets with transition region temperatures from the network structures of coronal holes. Here we undertake a comparative study of these short-lived episodic network jets in a coronal hole region and a quiet sun region using IRIS sit-and-stare slit-jaw imaging in the 1330 Angstrom (C II) passband. The pointing coordinates, exposure time, observing cadence, and field of view of both observations are all identical. Our preliminary study suggests that the speeds and lengths of the network jets may differ between quiet sun and coronal hole regions. The quiet sun region exhibits many compact bright regions with sizes of 5-10 arcseconds which produce very few jets. The jets that do exist tend to propagate at much slower speeds over smaller distances than their coronal hole counterparts. Comparatively, in the coronal hole, such compact regions are almost absent and all network patches are permeated by the intermittent high-reaching jets. Such a difference suggests that magnetic loops are much smaller in the coronal hole and the network jets are produced at low heights. The recurrence frequency seems to be higher in the coronal hole region, with many of the isolated quiet sun region jets demonstrating curved trajectories.This work is supported under contract 8100002705 from Lockheed-Martin to SAO and by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241.

  7. Grassmannians and form factors with $q^2=0$ in N=4 sym theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bork, L V

    2016-01-01

    We consider tree level form factors of operators from stress tensor operator supermultiplet with light-like operator momentum $q^2=0$. We present a conjecture for the Grassmannian integral representation both for these tree level form factors as well as for leading singularities of their loop counterparts. The presented conjecture was successfully checked by reproducing several known answers in $\\mbox{MHV}$ and $\\mbox{N}^{k-2}\\mbox{MHV}$, $k\\geq3$ sectors together with appropriate soft limits. We also discuss the cancellation of spurious poles and relations between different BCFW representations for such form factors on simple examples.

  8. The pi0, eta, eta' -> gamma gamma*(Q^2) Decay Rates and Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, A M

    2015-01-01

    The low $Q^2$ slopes of the the transition form factors provide a unique method to measure the sizes of the neutral pseudo-scalar mesons, since they do not have electromagnetic form factors. From the slope one obtains the "axial transition RMS radius" $ R_{PS,A} = \\sqrt{}$ for each PS meson. The present status of theory and experiment for these quantities are presented. A comparison of the $ R_{PS,A}$ is presented along with the electromagnetic and scalar radii of the $\\pi^{\\pm}$ mesons and the proton

  9. Bound Nucleon Properties through 3He(e,e'p) at High Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Penel-Nottaris

    2002-12-01

    Electron scattering cross-sections for the reaction {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}p)d have been measured in parallel kinematics for three values of the recoil momentum (0 and {+-} 300 MeV/c) and for different values of the virtual photon squared mass Q{sup 2} up to 4.1 GeV{sup 2}. The goal is to probe the electromagnetic properties of the proton when embedded in a nucleus, by studying the Q{sup 2} dependence of the longitudinal and transverse response functions.

  10. High Threshold for Lead Accumulators Helps the Battery Industry to Recover in Q2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Along with release of relevant access conditions of the lead acid accumulator industry and increasing popularity of new-type batteries including lithium battery and lead-carbon battery, etc., the battery industry recovered in the first

  11. The High Latitude D Region During Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, J. K.; Collis, P. N.; Korth, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  12. High latitude D region during electron precipitation events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, J.K.; Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1984-05-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  13. HCN observations of comets C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    CERN Document Server

    Wirström, E S; Källström, P; Levinsson, A; Olivefors, A; Tegehall, E

    2016-01-01

    HCN J=1-0 emission from the long-period comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was observed from the Onsala Space Observatory on multiple occasions during the month before its perihelion passage on December 22, 2013. We report detections for seven different dates, spanning heliocentric distances (R_h) decreasing from 0.94 to 0.82 au. Estimated HCN production rates are generally higher than previously reported for the same time period, but the implied increase in production rate with heliocentric distance, Q_{HCN} proportionate to R_h^{-3.2}, represent well the overall documented increase since it was first observed at R_h=1.35. The implied mean HCN abundance relative to water in R1 Lovejoy is 0.2%. We also report on a detection of HCN with the new 3 mm receiver system at Onsala Space Observatory in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on January 14, 2015, when its heliocentric distance was 1.3 au. Relative to comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), the HCN production rate of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was more than 5 times higher at similar heliocentri...

  14. High Power VCSEL Device with Periodic Gain Active Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High power vertical cavity surface emitting lasers(VCSEKLs) with large aperture have been fabricated through improving passivation, lateral oxidation and heat dissipation techniques. Different from conventional three quantum well structures, a periodic gain active region with nine quantum wells was incorporated into the VCSEL structure, with which high efficiency and high power operation were expected. The nine quantum wells were divided into three groups with each of them located at the antinodes of the ca...

  15. Measurement of the Neutron (3He) Spin Structure at Low Q2 and the Extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominis, Ioannis

    2001-01-31

    This thesis presents the results of E-94010, an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) designed to study the spin structure of the neutron at low momentum transfer, and to test the “extended” Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule. The first experiment of its kind, it was performed in experimental Hall-A of TJNAF using a new polarized 3He facility. It has recently been shown that the GDH sum rule and the Bjorken sum rule are both special examples of a more general sum rule that applies to polarized electron scattering off nucleons. This generalized sum rule, due to Ji and Osborne, reduces to the GDH sum rule at Q2 = 0 and to the Bjorken sum rule at Q2 >> 1 GeV2. By studying the Q2 evolution of the extended GDH sum, one learns about the transition from quark-like behavior to hadronic-like behavior. We measured inclusive polarized cross sections by scattering high energy polarized electrons off the new TJNAF polarized 3He target with both longitudinal and transverse target orientations. The high density 3He target, based on optical pumping and spin exchange, was used as an effective neutron target. The target maintained a polarization of about 35% at beam currents as high as 151tA. We describe the precision 3He polarimetry leading to a systematic uncertainty of the target polarization of 4% (relative). A strained GaAs photocathode was utilized in the polarized electron gun, which provided an electron beam with a polarization of about 70%, known to 3% (relative). By using six different beam energies (between 0.86 and 5.06 GeV) and a fixed scattering angle of 15.5°, a wide kinematic coverage was achieved, with 0.02 GeV2< Q2 <1 GcV2 and 0.5 GeV< W < 2.5 GeV for the squared momentum transfer and invariant mass, respectively. From the measured cross sections we extract the 3He spin structure functions He and g1e Finally, we determine the extended GDH sum for the range 0.1 GeV2< Q2 <1 GeV2 for 3He and the neutron.

  16. Spin asymmetry $A^d_1$ and the spin-dependent structure function $g^d_1$ of the deuteron at low values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, E S; Alexandrov, Y; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Berglund, P; Bernet, C; Bertini, R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Bytchkov, V N; Cerini, L; Chapiro, A; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M L; Colavita, A A; Costa, S; Crespo, M L; D'Hose, N; Dalla Torre, S; Das-Gupta, S S; De Masi, R; Dedek, N; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diáz-Kavka, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Dolgopolov, A V; Donskov, S V; Dorofeev, V A; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Ehlers, J; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Fabro, M; Faessler, M; Falaleev, V; Fauland, P; Ferrero, A; Ferrero, L; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchs, U; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S G; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Görtz, S; Gorin, A M; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Grünemaier, A; Hannappel, J; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hedicke, S; Heinsius, F H; Hermann, R; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Von Hodenberg, M; Horikawa, N; Horikawa, S; Ijaduola, R B; Ilgner, C; Ioukaev, A I; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Janata, A; Joosten, R; Jouravlev, N I; Kabu, E; Kalinnikov, V; Kang, D; Karstens, F; Kastaun, W; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomutov, N V; Kisselev, Yu V; Klein, F; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K C; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korentchenko, A S; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Koutchinski, N A; Kowalik, K L; Kravchuk, N P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Krumshtein, Z; Kühn, R; Kunne, Fabienne; Kurek, K; Ladygin, M E; Lamanna, M; Le Goff, J M; Leberig, M; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Ludwig, I; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Manuilov, I V; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matsuda, T; Maximov, A N; Medved, K S; Meyer, W; Mielech, A; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Nahle, O; Nassalski, J P; Neliba, S; Neyret, D P; Nikolaenko, V I; Nozdrin, A A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pereira, H D; Peshekhonov, V D; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Platzer, K; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Popov, A A; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Rebourgeard, P C; Reicherz, G; Reymann, J; Rith, K; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Rondio, E; Sadovski, A B; Saller, E; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sans, M; Sapozhnikov, M G; Savin, I A; Schiavon, Paolo; Schill, C; Schmidt, T; Schmitt, H; Schmitt, L; Shevchenko, O Yu; Shishkin, A A; Siebert, H W; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Skachkova, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sozzi, F; Sugonyaev, V P; Srnka, A; Stinzing, F; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takabayashi, N; Tchalishev, V V; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Thers, D; Tkatchev, L G; Toeda, T; Tretyak, V I; Trousov, S; Varanda, M; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Wagner, M; Webb, R; Weise, E; Weitzel, Q; Wiedner, U; Wiesmann, M; Windmolders, R; Wirth, S; Wilicki, W; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J; Ziegler, R; Zvyagin, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of the deuteron longitudinal spin asymmetry $A_1^d$ and of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function $g_1^d$ at $Q^2 < $ 1~(GeV/$c$)$^2$ and $4\\cdot$10$^{-5} < x < $~2.5$\\cdot$10$^{-2}$ based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002 and 2003. The statistical precision is tenfold better than that of the previous measurement in this region. The measured $A_1^d$ and $g_1^d$ are found to be consistent with zero in the whole range of $x$.

  17. Measurement of the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton in Virtual Compton Scattering at Q2=0.92 and 1.76 Gev2: II. Dispersion Relation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laveissière, G; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Di Salvo, R; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; D'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, John J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fonvieille, H; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; Le Rose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; Martoff, C J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E A J M; Papandreou, Z; Pasquini, B; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quéméner, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saitô, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Van De Vyver, R; Van der Meer, R L J; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z L

    2003-01-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering is studied at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in the energy domain below pion threshold and in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The data analysis is based on the Dispersion Relation (DR) approach. The electric and magnetic Generalized Polarizabilities (GPs) of the proton and the structure functions Pll-Ptt/epsilon and Plt are determined at four-momentum transfer squared Q2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV2. The DR analysis is consistent with the low-energy expansion analysis. The world data set indicates that neither the electric nor magnetic GP follows a simple dipole form.

  18. General formulae for the su{sub q}(2) 6-j symbols simply obtained thanks to trivial q-identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehamet, L. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-04-01

    The analytical formulae for the su{sub q}(2) 6-j symbols are easily obtained, without the use of any su{sub q}(2)3-j symbol formula. With respect to the checking up on two compatible sets of trivial identities, already successful in the su(2) case , the process becomes still simpler because each set reduces into a single q-numbers identity.

  19. Seismicity analysis in Indonesia region from high precision hypocenter location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri; Shiddiqi, Hasbi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Wandono

    2015-04-01

    As a complex tectonic region, Indonesia has a high seismicity rate which is related to subduction and collision as well as strike-slip fault. High-precision earthquake locations with adequate relocation method and proper velocity model are necessary for seismicity analysis. We used nearly 25,000 earthquakes that were relocated using double-difference method. In our relocation process, we employed teleseismic, regional, and local P-wave arrival times. Furthermore, we employed regional-global nested velocity models that take into account the subduction slab in the study region by using a 3D model for area inside and a 1D model for area outside Indonesia. Relocation results show shifted hypocenters that are generally perpendicular to the trench. Beneath western Sunda arc, the Wadati-Benioff Zone (WBZ) extents to a depth of about 300 km and depicts a gently dipping slab. The WBZ beneath eastern Sunda arc extends deeper to about 500 km and depicts a steep slab geometry. In the Sunda-Banda transition zone, we found anomalously low seismicity beneath the oceanic-continental transition region. The WBZ of the severely curved Banda arc extends to a depth of about 600 km and depicts a two-slab model. In the Molucca collision zone, seismicity clearly depicts two opposing slabs of the Molucca sea plate, i.e. to the east and to the west. Around Sulawesi region, most earthquakes are related to the north Sulawesi trench and depict subducted slab beneath the northern part of the island. In Sumatra region, we identified a seismic gap in the WBZ between 70 km and 150 km. Seismicity gaps are also detected beneath particular regions, e.g. Mentawai region, and several parts along the subducted slab. Similar to the Sumatra region, beneath eastern Sunda arc, seismic gap in WBZ is also detected but deeper, i.e. at depths of 150 km to 250 km. Furthermore, we used global centroid moment tensor catalog data available for earthquakes with magnitude 5.0 or greater. In general, focal mechanism

  20. On the Size of HII Regions around High Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, A; Ferrara, A; Choudhury, T R

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of constraining the ionization state of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) close to the end of reionization (z ~ 6) by measuring the size of the HII regions in high-z quasars spectra. We perform a combination of multiphase SPH and 3D radiative transfer (RT) simulations to reliably predict the properties of typical high-z quasar HII regions, embedded in a partly neutral IGM. From the analysis of mock spectra along lines of sight through the simulated QSO environment we find that the HII region size derived from quasar spectra is on average 30 % smaller than the physical one. Additional maximum likelihood analysis shows that this offset induces an overestimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction, x_HI, by a factor ~ 3. By applying the same statistical method to a sample of observed QSOs our study favors a mostly ionized (x_HI < 0.06) universe at z=6.1.

  1. Molecular line tracers of high-mass star forming regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, Zsofia; Van der Tak, Floris; Ossenkopf, Volker; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Faure, Alexandre; Fuller, Gary; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier; Joblin, Christine; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Makai, Zoltan; Plume, Rene; Roellig, Markus; Spaans, Marco; Tolls, Volker

    2013-01-01

    High-mass stars influence their environment in different ways including feedback via their FUV radiation. The penetration of FUV photons into molecular clouds creates Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) with different chemical layers where the mainly ionized medium changes into mainly molecular. Differe

  2. Optical Spectroscopy of Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) from MIRO

    CERN Document Server

    Venkataramani, Kumar; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Joshi, U C; Agnihotri, Vikrant K; Baliyan, K S

    2016-01-01

    Spectra of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) were taken with a low resolution spectrograph mounted on the 0.5 m telescope at the Mount Abu Infrared Observatory (MIRO), India during January to May 2015 covering the perihelion and post-perihelion periods. The spectra showed strong molecular emission bands (C2, C3 and CN) in January, close to perihelion. We have obtained the scale lengths for these molecules by fitting the Haser model to the observed column densities. The variation of gas production rates and production rate ratios with heliocentric distance were studied. The extent of the dust continuum using the Af-rho parameter and its variation with the heliocentric distance were also investigated. The comet is seen to become more active in the post-perihelion phase, thereby showing an asymmetric behaviour about the perihelion.

  3. High Resolution CO Observations of Massive Star Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Keto, E R; Zhang, Q; Galván-Madrid, R; Liu, H-Y B

    2011-01-01

    Context. To further understand the processes involved in the formation of massive stars, we have undertaken a study of the gas dynamics surrounding three massive star forming regions. By observing the large scale structures at high resolution, we are able to determine properties such as driving source, and spatially resolve the bulk dynamical properties of the gas such as infall and outflow. Aims. With high resolution observations, we are able to determine which of the cores in a cluster forming massive stars is responsible for the large scale structures. Methods. We present CO observations of three massive star forming regions with known HII regions and show how the CO traces both infall and outflow. By combining data taken in two SMA configurations with JCMT observations, we are able to see large scale structures at high resolution. Results. We find large (0.26-0.40 pc), massive (2-3 M_sun) and energetic (13-17 \\times 10^44 erg) outflows emanating from the edges of two HII regions suggesting they are being ...

  4. Folding ion rays in comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) and the connection with the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Degroote, P; Reyniers, M

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of folding ion rays in cometary comae is still not very well understood, so our aim is to gain more insight into the role of the local solar wind in the formation of these structures. Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) was intensively monitored during its closest approach to Earth (January 2005) with the CCD camera Merope mounted on the Flemish 1.2m Mercator telescope, in three different bands (Geneva U and B and Cousins I). Spectacular ion rays, thin ionic structures rapidly folding tailward, were recorded in the U band during one night, January 12th. Data from the SOHO satellite that was extrapolated corotationally to the position of the comet showed that the ion rays were formed during a sudden change in the in-situ solar wind state. We were able to succesfully correlate a high-speed solar wind stream with the appearance of folding ion rays. To our knowledge, this is the first clear observational evidence that folding ion rays in cometary comae are produced by a sudden change in the local solar wind...

  5. Evaluating an impact origin for Mercury's high-magnesium region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Elizabeth A.; Potter, Ross W. K.; Abramov, Oleg; James, Peter B.; Klima, Rachel L.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2017-03-01

    During its four years in orbit around Mercury, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft's X-ray Spectrometer revealed a large geochemical terrane in the northern hemisphere that hosts the highest Mg/Si, S/Si, Ca/Si, and Fe/Si and lowest Al/Si ratios on the planet. Correlations with low topography, thin crust, and a sharp northern topographic boundary led to the proposal that this high-Mg region is the remnant of an ancient, highly degraded impact basin. Here we use a numerical modeling approach to explore the feasibility of this hypothesis and evaluate the results against multiple mission-wide data sets and resulting maps from MESSENGER. We find that an 3000 km diameter impact basin easily exhumes Mg-rich mantle material but that the amount of subsequent modification required to hide basin structure is incompatible with the strength of the geochemical anomaly, which is also present in maps of Gamma Ray and Neutron Spectrometer data. Consequently, the high-Mg region is more likely to be the product of high-temperature volcanism sourced from a chemically heterogeneous mantle than the remains of a large impact event.abstract type="synopsis">Plain Language SummaryDuring its four years in orbit around Mercury, chemical measurements from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft revealed a large region of unusual composition relative to the rest of the planet. Its elevated magnesium abundance, in particular, led to the name of the "high-magnesium region" (HMR). High magnesium abundance in rock can be an indicator of its origin, such as high-temperature volcanism. Although the HMR covers approximately 15% of Mercury's surface, its origin is not obvious. It does roughly correspond to a depression with thin crust, which previously led to the hypothesis that it is an ancient impact crater that was large enough to excavate mantle material, which, in rocky planets, is rich in

  6. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function $g_{1}^{d(x)}$ for $1(GeV/c)^{2} < Q^{2} < 40 (GeV/c)^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Averett, T; Band, H R; Berisso, M C; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Bultmann, S L; Buénerd, M; Chupp, T E; Churchwell, S; Court, G R; Crabb, D; Day, D; Decowski, P; De Pietro, P; Erbacher, R; Erickson, R; Feltham, A; Fonvieille, H; Frlez, E; Gearhart, R A; Ghazikhanian, V; Gómez, J; Griffioen, K A; Harris, C; Houlden, M A; Hughes, E W; Hyde-Wright, C E; Igo, G; Incerti, S; Jensen, J; Johnson, J R; King, P M; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kuhn, S E; Lindgren, R; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; McCarthy, J; McKee, P; Meyer, Werner T; Mitchell, G; Mitchell, J; Olson, M; Penttila, S; Peterson, G; Petratos, G G; Pitthan, R; Pocanic, D; Prepost, R; Prescott, C; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reyna, D; Rochester, L S; Rock, S E; Rondon-Aramayo, O A; Sabatie, F; Sick, I; Smith, T; Sorrell, L; Staley, F; Lorant, S St; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Tobias, A; Todor, L; Toole, T; Trentalange, S; Walz, D; Welsh, R C; Wesselmann, F R; Wright, T R; Young, C C; Zeier, M; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Sigma.

  7. Measurement of GEp/GMp in ep -> ep to Q2 = 5.6 GeV2

    CERN Document Server

    Gayou, O; Jones, M K; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V

    2002-01-01

    The ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, GEp/GMp, was measured at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) using the recoil polarization technique. The ratio of the form factors is directly proportional to the ratio of the transverse to longitudinal components of the polarization of the recoil proton in the elastic $\\vec ep \\to e\\vec p$ reaction. The new data presented in this article span the range 3.5 < Q2 < 5.6 GeV2 and are well described by a linear Q2 fit. Also, the ratio QF2p/F1p reaches a constant value above Q2=2 GeV2.

  8. Ethyl alcohol and sugar in comet C/2014Q2 (Lovejoy)

    CERN Document Server

    Biver, Nicolas; Moreno, Raphaël; Crovisier, Jacques; Colom, Pierre; Lis, Dariusz C; Sandqvist, Aage; Boissier, Jérémie; Despois, Didier; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    The presence of numerous complex organic molecules (COMs; defined as those containing six or more atoms) around protostars shows that star formation is accompanied by an increase of molecular complexity. These COMs may be part of the material from which planetesimals and, ultimately, planets formed. Comets represent some of the oldest and most primitive material in the solar system, including ices, and are thus our best window into the volatile composition of the solar protoplanetary disk. Molecules identified to be present in cometary ices include water, simple hydrocarbons, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen-bearing species, as well as a few COMs, such as ethylene glycol and glycine. We report the detection of 21 molecules in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), including the first identification of ethyl alcohol (ethanol, C2H5OH) and the simplest monosaccharide sugar glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) in a comet. The abundances of ethanol and glycolaldehyde, respectively 5 and 0.8% relative to methanol (0.12 and 0.02% relative to ...

  9. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X

    2010-06-01

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon’s quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5  GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  10. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Puckett, A J R; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-01-01

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon's quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the non-perturbative regime.

  11. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation at Very High Turbulence Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    A database for stagnation region heat transfer has been extended to include heat transfer measurements acquired downstream from a new high intensity turbulence generator. This work was motivated by gas turbine industry heat transfer designers who deal with heat transfer environments with increasing Reynolds numbers and very high turbulence levels. The new mock aero-combustor turbulence generator produces turbulence levels which average 17.4%, which is 37% higher than the older turbulence generator. The increased level of turbulence is caused by the reduced contraction ratio from the liner to the exit. Heat transfer measurements were acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter (40.64 cm and 10.16 cm). Gandvarapu and Ames [1] previously acquired heat transfer measurements for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two lower turbulence aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data are documented and tabulated for an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 136% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. This heat transfer rate is an increase over the previous aero-combustor turbulence generator which had augmentation levels up to 110%. Note, the rate of increase in heat transfer augmentation decreases for the large cylindrical leading edge inferring only a limited level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL (Turbulence, Reynolds number, Length scale) parameter. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs

  12. A high-resolution regional reanalysis for the European CORDEX region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmeyer, Christoph; Keller, Jan; Ohlwein, Christian; Wahl, Sabrina

    2015-04-01

    Within the Hans-Ertel-Centre for Weather Research (HErZ), the climate monitoring branch concentrates efforts on the assessment and analysis of regional climate in Germany and Europe. In joint cooperation with DWD (German Weather Service), a high-resolution reanalysis system based on the COSMO model has been developed. Reanalyses gain more and more importance as a source of meteorological information for many purposes and applications. Several global reanalyses projects (e.g., ERA, MERRA, CSFR, JMA9) produce and verify these data sets to provide time series as long as possible combined with a high data quality. Due to a spatial resolution down to 50-70km and 3-hourly temporal output, they are not suitable for small scale problems (e.g., regional climate assessment, meso-scale NWP verification, input for subsequent models such as river runoff simulations, renewable energy applications). The implementation of regional reanalyses based on a limited area model along with a data assimilation scheme is able to generate reanalysis data sets with high spatio-temporal resolution. The work presented here focuses on two regional reanalyses for Europe and Germany. The European reanalysis COSMO-REA6 matches the CORDEX EURO-11 specifications, albeit at a higher spatial resolution, i.e., 0.055° (6km) instead of 0.11° (12km). Nested into COSMO-REA6 is COSMO-REA2, a convective-scale reanalysis with 2km resolution for Germany. COSMO-REA6 comprises the assimilation of observational data using the existing nudging scheme of COSMO and is complemented by a special soil moisture analysis and boundary conditions given by ERA-Interim data. COSMO-REA2 also uses the nudging scheme complemented by a latent heat nudging of radar information. The reanalysis data set currently covers 17 years (1997-2013) for COSMO-REA6 and 4 years (2010-2013) for COSMO-REA2 with a very large set of output variables and a high temporal output step of hourly 3D-fields and quarter-hourly 2D-fields. The evaluation

  13. 德国职业学校全面质量管理的 Q2 E模式%Q2E Model for Total Quality Management of Vocational Schools in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文静; 周志刚

    2015-01-01

    Q2E model, based on total quality management and feedback culture idea , is an effective tool to evaluate and devolop the quality of vocational schools in Germany .Q2E model practices “bottom-up” quality management , and is built on a foundation of six parts including school quality statement , individual feedback and individual quality development , quality process controlled by school leadership , self-evaluation and quality development , external evaluation , and certifica-tion.Q2E model has the function of development-oriented and performing duties from individuals and institutions , and over-views the overall quality action framework of total quality management systems in vocational schools .%德国职业学校教育质量保障的Q2 E模式基于全面质量管理思想和反馈文化理念,是评价和发展学校教育质量的有效工具。 Q2 E模式是自下而上的教育质量管理模式,以学校质量宗旨、个别反馈与个体质量发展、学校领导控制质量过程、学校自我评价与质量发展、学校外部评价和认证等6个模块要素为基石,从个人、机构层面发挥导向和履行职责的功能,阐述职业学校全面质量管理的总体质量行为框架。

  14. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laveissiere, Geraud; Degrande, Natalie; Jaminion, Stephanie; Jutier, Christophe; Todor, Luminita; Di Salvo, Rachele; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Alexa, L.C.; Anderson, Brian; Aniol, Konrad; Arundell, Kathleen; Audit, Gerard; Auerbach, Leonard; Baker, F.; Baylac, Maud; Berthot, J.; Bertin, Pierre; Bertozzi, William; Bimbot, Louis; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breton, Vincent; Breuer, Herbert; Burtin, Etienne; Calarco, John; Cardman, Lawrence; Cavata, Christian; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dale, Daniel; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; D' Hose, Nicole; Dodge, Gail; Domingo, John; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Epstein, Martin; Ewell, Lars; Finn, John; Fissum, Kevin; Fonvieille, Helene; Fournier, Guy; Frois, Bernard; Frullani, Salvatore; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasparian, Ashot; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Glashausser, Charles; Gomez, Javier; Gorbenko, Viktor; Grenier, Philippe; Guichon, Pierre; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Holmes, Richard; Holtrop, Maurik; Howell, Calvin; Huber, Garth; Hyde, Charles; Incerti, Sebastien; Iodice, Mauro; Jardillier, Johann; Jones, Mark; Kahl, William; Kamalov, Sabit; Kato, Seigo; Katramatou, A.T.; Kelly, James; Kerhoas, Sophie; Ketikyan, Armen; Khayat, Mohammad; Kino, Kouichi; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Laird; Kumar, Krishna; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Kuss, Michael; Leone, Antonio; LeRose, John; Liang, Meihua; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lolos, George; Lourie, Robert; Madey, Richard; Maeda, Kazushige; Malov, Sergey; Manley, D.; Marchand, Claude; Marchand, Dominique; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marroncle, Jacques; Martino, Jacques; McCormick, Kathy; McIntyre, Justin; Mehrabyan, Surik; Merchez, Fernand; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Miller, Gerald; Mougey, Jean; Nanda, Sirish; Neyret, Damien; Offermann, Edmond; Papandreou, Zisis; Perdrisat, Charles; Perrino, R.; Petratos, Gerassimos; Platchkov, Stephane; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Prout, David; Punjabi, Vina; Pussieux, Thierry; Quemener, Gilles; Ransome, Ronald; Ravel, Oliver; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Renard, F.; Roblin, Yves; Rowntree, David; Rutledge, Gary; Rutt, Paul; Saha, Arunava; Saito, Teijiro; Sarty, Adam; Serdarevic, A.; Smith, T.; Smirnov, G.; Soldi, K.; Sorokin, Pavel; Souder, Paul; Suleiman, Riad; Templon, Jeffrey; Terasawa, Tatsuo; Tiator, Lothar; Tieulent, Raphael; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E.; Tsubota, Hiroaki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Urciuoli, Guido; Van De Vyver, R.; van der Meer, Rob; Vernin, Pascal; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Watson, J.W.; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zainea, Dan; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e,e'p)? exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q2=1 GeV2, and for the Q2-dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q2-dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e,e'p)? to H(e,e'p)?0 cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to Real Compton Scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q2-independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  15. The High Density Region of QCD from an Effective Model

    CERN Document Server

    De Pietri, R; Seiler, E; Stamatescu, I O

    2007-01-01

    We study the high density region of QCD within an effective model obtained in the frame of the hopping parameter expansion and choosing Polyakov-type loops as the main dynamical variables representing the fermionic matter. This model still shows the so-called sign problem, a difficulty peculiar to non-zero chemical potential, but it permits the development of algorithms which ensure a good overlap of the simulated Monte Carlo ensemble with the true one. We review the main features of the model and present results concerning the dependence of various observables on the chemical potential and on the temperature, in particular of the charge density and the Polykov loop susceptibility, which may be used to characterize the various phases expected at high baryonic density. In this way, we obtain information about the phase structure of the model and the corresponding phase transitions and cross over regions, which can be considered as hints about the behaviour of non-zero density QCD.

  16. Convection Fingerprints on the Vertical Profiles of Q1 and Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Lin, H.; Chou, C.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of tropical convection left their fingerprints on vertical structures of apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Profile of deep convection on condensation heating and drying has been well-documented, yet direct assessment of shallow convection remains to be explored. Shallow convection prevails over subtropical ocean, where large-scale subsidence is primarily balanced by radiative cooling and moistening due to surface evaporation instead of moist convection. In this study a united framework is designed to investigate the vertical structures of tropical marine convections in three reanalysis data, including ERA-Interim, MERRA, and CFSR. It starts by sorting and binning data from the lightest to the heaviest rain. Then the differences between two neighboring bins are used to examine the direct effects for precipitation change, in light of the fact that non-convective processes would change slowly from bin to bin. It is shown that all three reanalyses reveal the shallow convective processes in light rain bins, featured by re-evaporating and detraining at the top of boundary layer and lower free troposphere. For heavy rain bins, three reanalyses mainly differ in their numbers and altitudes of heating and drying peaks, implying no universal agreement has been reached on partitioning of cloud populations. Coherent variations in temperature, moisture, and vertical motion are also discussed. This approach permits a systematical survey and comparison of tropical convection in GCM-type models, and preliminary studies of three reanalyses suggest certain degree of inconsistency in simulated convective feedback to large-scale heat and moisture budgets.

  17. How to map soil carbon stocks in highly urbanized regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, V. I.; Stoorvogel, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon stock in terrestrial ecosystems and the capacity for carbon sequestration is a widely accepted soil function. For land-use planning and decision making the regional analysis of SOC stocks and their spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention. Quite a few studies focus on mapping the carbon stocks in natural and agricultural areas using digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. Although urban areas remain almost neglected. The urban environment provides a number of specific features and processes that influence soil formation and functioning: soil sealing, functional zoning and settlement history. This not only results in a considerable urban SOC (especially in the subsoil), but also results in a unique spatial variability of SOC stocks at short distance. In contrast to the often gradual changes in natural areas, urban soils may exhibit abrupt changes due to the anthropogenic influence. Thus implementation of standard DSM methodology will result in extremely high nuggets and correspondingly low prediction accuracy. Besides, traditional regression kriging, widely-used for the case when legacy data is lacking, is often based on the correlation between SOC and dominating soil forming factors (climate, relief, parent material and vegetation). Although in urban conditions, anthropogenic influence itself turns out to be a predominant soil-forming factor. The spatial heterogeneity of urban soil carbon stocks is further complicated by a specific profile distribution with possible second SOC maximum, referred to cultural layer. Importance of urban SOC as well as specifics of urban environment requires for a specific approach to map urban SOC as part of regional analysis. Moscow region with its variability of bioclimatic conditions and high urbanization level (10 % from the total area) was chosen as an interesting case study. Random soil sampling in different soil zones (4) and land

  18. Developing a high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher; Fox-Hughes, Paul; Su, Chun-Hsu; Jakob, Dörte; Kociuba, Greg; Eisenberg, Nathan; Steinle, Peter; Harris, Rebecca; Corney, Stuart; Love, Peter; Remenyi, Tomas; Chladil, Mark; Bally, John; Bindoff, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    A dynamically consistent, long-term atmospheric reanalysis can be used to support high-quality assessments of environmental risk and likelihood of extreme events. Most reanalyses are presently based on coarse-scale global systems that are not suitable for regional assessments in fire risk, water and natural resources, amongst others. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology is currently working to close this gap by producing a high-resolution reanalysis over the Australian and New Zealand region to construct a sequence of atmospheric conditions at sub-hourly intervals over the past 25 years from 1990. The Australia reanalysis consists of a convective-scale analysis nested within a 12 km regional-scale reanalysis, which is bounded by a coarse-scale ERA-Interim reanalysis that provides the required boundary and initial conditions. We use an unchanging atmospheric modelling suite based on the UERRA system used at the UK Met Office and the more recent version of the Bureau of Meteorology's operational numerical prediction model used in ACCESS-R (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator-Regional system). An advanced (4-dimensional variational) data assimilation scheme is used to optimally combine model physics with multiple observations from aircrafts, sondes, surface observations and satellites to create a best estimate of state of the atmosphere over a 6-hour moving window. This analysis is in turn used to drive a higher-resolution (1.5 km) downscaling model over selected subdomains within Australia, currently eastern New South Wales and Tasmania, with the capability to support this anywhere in the Australia-New Zealand domain. The temporal resolution of the gridded analysis fields for both the regional and higher-resolution subdomains are generally one hour, with many fields such as 10 m winds and 2 m temperatures available every 10 minutes. The reanalysis also produces many other variables that include wind, temperature, moisture, pressure, cloud cover

  19. Comet C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ): Parent Volatiles, a Search for Deuterated Methane, and Constraint on the CH4 Spin Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bonev, Boncho P; Gibb, Erika L; Disanti, Michael A; Villanueva, Geronimo L; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Ellis, Richard S

    2009-01-01

    High-dispersion (l/dl ~ 25,000) infrared spectra of Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) were acquired on Nov. 28-29, 2004, and Jan. 19, 2005 (UT dates) with NIRSPEC at the Keck-2 telescope on Mauna Kea. We detected H2O, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, CO, H2CO, CH3OH, HCN, and NH3 and we conducted a sensitive search for CH3D. We report rotational temperatures, production rates, and mixing ratios (with respect to H2O) at heliocentric distances of 1.49 AU (Nov. 2004) and 1.21 AU (Jan. 2005). We highlight three principal results: (1) The mixing ratios of parent volatiles measured at 1.49 AU and 1.21 AU agree within confidence limits, consistent with homogeneous composition in the mean volatile release from the nucleus of C/2004 Q2. Notably, the relative abundance of C2H6/C2H2 is substantially higher than those measured in other comets, while the mixing ratios C2H6/H2O, CH3OH/H2O, and HCN/H2O are similar to those observed in comets, referred to as "organics-normal". (2) The spin temperature of CH4 is > 35-38 K, an estimate consistent wi...

  20. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for $Q^2>1$ GeV$^2$. II. $e p \\rightarrow e \\pi^0 p$

    CERN Document Server

    Bosted, P E; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Akbar, Z; Amaryan, M J; Pereira, S Anefalos; Avakian, H; Badui, R A; Ball, J; Balossino, I; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Chetry, T; Ciullo, G; Clark, L; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fanchini, E; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fersch, R; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Glazier, D I; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Hakobyan, H; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Hollis, G; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klei, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lanza, L; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McCracken, M E; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V I; Montgomery, R A; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Murdoch, G; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stankovic, I; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2016-01-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive $\\pi^0$ electroproduction reaction $\\gamma^* p \\to p \\pi^0$, expanding an analysis of the $\\gamma^* p \\to n \\pi^+$ reaction from the same experiment. The results were obtained from scattering of 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is $1.1Q^2<6$ GeV$^2$. Results were obtained for about 5700 bins in $W$, $Q^2$, \\cthcm, and $\\phi^*$. The beam-target asymmetries were found to generally be greater than zero, with relatively modest \\phicmsp dependence. The target asymmetries exhibit very strong \\phicmsp dependence, with a change in sign occurring between results at low $W$ and high $W$, in contrast to $\\pi^+$ electroproduction. Reasonable agreement is found with phenomenological fits to previous data for $W<1.6$ GeV, but significant differences are se...

  1. High-velocity gas associated ultracompact HII regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Ye(徐烨); JIANG; Dongrong(蒋栋荣); YANG; Chuanyi(杨传义); ZHENG; Xingwu(郑兴武); GU; Minfeng(顾敏峰); PEI; Chunchuan(裴春传)

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for high-velocity 12CO (1-0) emission associated H2O masers and ultracompact (UC) HII regions. The aim is to investigate the relationship between H2O masers, CO high-velocity gas (HVG) and their associated infrared sources. Our sample satisfies Wood & Churchwell criterion. Almost 70 % of the sources have full widths (FWs) greater than 15 km@ s?1 at T*a = 100 mK and 15 % have FWs greater than 30 km@ s?1. In most of our objects there is excess high velocity emission in the beam. There is a clear correlation between CO line FWs and far-infrared luminosities: the FW increases with the FIR luminosity. The relation suggests that more luminous sources are likely to be more energetic and able to inject more energy into their surroundings. As a result, larger FW of the CO line could be produced. In most of our sources, the velocities of peak of the H2O emission are in agreement with those of the CO cloud, but a number of them have a large blueshift with respect to the CO peak. These masers might stem from the amplifications of a background source, which may amplify some unobservable weak masers to an observable level.

  2. A molecular survey of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at radio wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, N.; Moreno, R.; Boissier, J.; Lis, D.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Colom, P.; Paubert, G.; Milam, S.; Sandqvist, Aa; Hjalmarson, A.; Lundin, S.; Karlsson, T.; Battelino, M.; Frisk, U.; Murtagh, D.; Nordh, L.

    2015-10-01

    Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is a long period Oort Cloud comet (original orbital period = 11030 years, inclination = 80.3°) which passed perihelion at 1.290 AU from the Sun on 30 January 2015. It brightened very quickly as it approached the Sun and the Earth (perigee at 0.469 AU on 7 January 2015) to reach naked eye visibility (m1 = 4) and a total production rate approaching QH2O = 1030 molec.s-1. This comet was intrinsically the most active comet since C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and we triggered targetof- opportunity observations with the IRAM-30m, NOEMA, ALMA, CSO, Nançay and Odin radiotelescopes. The water outgassing was monitored via observations of the OH radical at 18-cm with the Nançay radiotelescope from December to March 2015. Observations of H2O and H18 2 O with the Odin submillimeter space telescope were carried out between 30 January and 03 February. The comet was observed with the IRAM-30m radiotelescope in Spain on January 13.8, 15.8 and 16.8, with some complementary observations on January 23.7, 24.7, 25.7 and 26.7 under good weather. One objective was to support the ALMA program 2013.1.00686.T (PI S. Milam). It was also observed with NOEMA (25.8 and 28.8 January, PI J. Boissier) and shortly with CSO on February 13.3 and 16.3 UT. We will present here the analysis of the IRAM data set, which is the most sensitive survey of the molecular content of a comet ever obtained since comet Hale- Bopp. We covered #48 GHz of the 1mm band (Fig.1) enabling the detection of over 20 molecules plus radicals and isotopologues. We will present themeasuredmolecular abundances and sensitive upper limits obtained on a number of complex molecules and of particular (prebiotic) interest. The comet seems relatively depleted in organic molecules compared to our sample of comets investigated at submillimeter wavelengths ([6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]).

  3. Impact of High Resolution SST Data on Regional Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Case, Jonathon; LaFontaine, Frank; Vazquez, Jorge; Mattocks, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the use of coarse resolution SST products such as from the real-time global (RTG) SST analysis[1] or other coarse resolution once-a-day products do not properly portray the diurnal variability of fluxes of heat and moisture from the ocean that drive the formation of low level clouds and precipitation over the ocean. For example, the use of high resolution MODIS SST composite [2] to initialize the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) (ARW) [3] has been shown to improve the prediction of sensible weather parameters in coastal regions [4][5}. In an extend study, [6] compared the MODIS SST composite product to the RTG SST analysis and evaluated forecast differences for a 6 month period from March through August 2007 over the Florida coastal regions. In a comparison to buoy data, they found that that the MODIS SST composites reduced the bias and standard deviation over that of the RTG data. These improvements led to significant changes in the initial and forecasted heat fluxes and the resulting surface temperature fields, wind patterns, and cloud distributions. They also showed that the MODIS composite SST product, produced for the Terra and Aqua satellite overpass times, captured a component of the diurnal cycle in SSTs not represented in the RTG or other one-a-day SST analyses. Failure to properly incorporate these effects in the WRF initialization cycle led to temperature biases in the resulting short term forecasts. The forecast impact was limited in some situations however, due to composite product inaccuracies brought about by data latency during periods of long-term cloud cover. This paper focuses on the forecast impact of an enhanced MODIS/AMSR-E composite SST product designed to reduce inaccuracies due data latency in the MODIS only composite product.

  4. Q2 Evolution of the Neutron Spin Structure Moments using a 3He Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Amarian; L. Auerbach; T. Averett; J. Berthot; P. Bertin; B. Bertozzi; T. Black; E. Brash; D. Brown; E. Burtin; J. Calarco; G. Cates; Z. Chai; J.P. Chen; Seon-ho Choi; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. DiSalvo; S. Dieterich; P. Djawotho; M. Finn; K. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; E. Goldberg; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.O. Hansen; B. Hersman; R. Holmes; G.M. Huber; E. Hughes; B. Humensky; S. Incerti; M. Iodice; S. Jensen; X. Jiang; C. Jones; G. Jones; M. Jones; C. Jutier; A. Ketikyan; I. Kominis; W. Korsch; K. Kramer; K. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; E. Lakuriqi; G. Laveissiere; J. Lerose; M. Liang; N. Liyanage; G. Lolos; S. Malov; J. Marroncle; K. McCormick; R. Mckeown; Z.E. Meziani; R. Michaels; J. Mitchell; Z. Papandreou; T. Pavlin; G.G. Petratos; D. Pripstein; D. Prout; R. Ransome; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; M. Rvachev; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; K. Slifer; P. Souder; T. Saito; S. Strauch; R. Suleiman; K. Takahashi; S. Teijiro; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; G. Urciuoli; R. Van der Meer; P. Vernin; H. Voskanian; B. Wojtsekhowski; F. Xiong; W. Xu; J.C. Yang; B. Zhang; P. Zolnierczuk

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of {sup 3}He in a double-spin experiment by inclusively scattering polarized electrons at energies ranging from 0.862 to 5.07 GeV off a polarized {sup 3}He target at a 15.5{sup o} scattering angle. Excitation energies covered the resonance and the onset of the deep inelastic regions. We have determined for the first time the Q{sup 2} evolution of {Gamma}{sub 1}(Q{sup 2})=/int{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) dx, {Gamma}{sub 2}(Q{sup 2})=/int{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) dx and d{sub 2} (Q{sup 2}) = /int{sub 0}{sup 1} x {sup 2}[2g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) + 3g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2})] dx for the neutron in the range 0.1 GeV{sup 2} /leq Q{sup 2} /leq 0.9 GeV{sup 2} with good precision. {Gamma}{sub 1}(Q{sup 2}) displays a smooth variation from high to low Q{sup 2}. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule holds within uncertainties and d{sub 2} is non-zero over the measured range.

  5. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  6. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  7. Measurements of the Separated Longitudinal Structure Function F_L from Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets at Low Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Tvaskis, V; Niculescu, I; Abbott, D; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Brash, E; Breuer, H; Chang, G; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Khayari, N El; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gaskell, D; Garrow, K; Gilman, R; Gueye, P; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Jackson, H; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Joo, K; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, J; Kinney, E; Klein, A; Kubarovsky, V; Liang, M; Liang, Y; Lolos, G; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; Mbianda, G; McGrath, E; Mckee, D; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Nozar, M; Ostapenko, T; Papandreou, Z; Potterveld, D; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Telfeyan, J; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B; Zhu, H

    2016-01-01

    Structure functions, as measured in lepton-nucleon scattering, have proven to be very useful in studying the quark dynamics within the nucleon. However, it is experimentally difficult to separately determine the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and consequently there are substantially less data available for the longitudinal structure function in particular. Here we present separated structure functions for hydrogen and deuterium at low four--momentum transfer squared, Q^2< 1 GeV^2, and compare these with parton distribution parameterizations and a k_T factorization approach. While differences are found, the parameterizations generally agree with the data even at the very low Q^2 scale of the data. The deuterium data show a smaller longitudinal structure function, and smaller ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross section R, than the proton. This suggests either an unexpected difference in R for the proton and neutron or a suppression of the gluonic distribution in nuclei.

  8. Q2 Dependence of quadrupole strength in the gamma*p --> Delta(+)(1232) --> p pi(0) transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, K; Smith, L C; Burkert, V D; Minehart, R; Aznauryan, I G; Elouadrhiri, L; Stepanyan, S; Adams, G S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Armstrong, D S; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Barrow, S; Bagdasaryan, H; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Brooks, W K; Calarco, J R; Capitani, G P; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Demirchyan, R A; Denizli, H; Dennis, L C; Deppman, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Eckhause, M; Efremenko, Y V; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Fissum, K; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavrilov, V B; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heisenberg, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Kelley, J H; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kuang, Y; Kuhn, S E; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Longhi, A; Loukachine, K; Lucas, M; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; Matthews, S K; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niczyporuk, B; Niyazov, R A; Ohandjanyan, M S; Opper, A; Patois, Y; Peterson, G A; Philips, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reolon, A R; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Salgado, C W; Sanzone, M; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Shuvalov, S M; Skabelin, A; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stoler, P; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tung, T Y; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A; Weller, H; Weinstein, L B; Welsh, R; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, S; Witkowski, M; Wolin, E; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhou, Z; Zhao, J

    2002-03-25

    Models of baryon structure predict a small quadrupole deformation of the nucleon due to residual tensor forces between quarks or distortions from the pion cloud. Sensitivity to quark versus pion degrees of freedom occurs through the Q2 dependence of the magnetic (M1+), electric (E1+), and scalar (S1+) multipoles in the gamma*p-->Delta(+)-->p pi(0) transition. We report new experimental values for the ratios E(1+)/M(1+) and S(1+)/M(1+) over the range Q2 = 0.4-1.8 GeV2, extracted from precision p(e,e(')p)pi(0) data using a truncated multipole expansion. Results are best described by recent unitary models in which the pion cloud plays a dominant role.

  9. On the dual code of points and generators on the Hermitian variety $\\mathcal{H}(2n+1,q^2)$

    OpenAIRE

    De Boeck, Maarten; Vandendriessche, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study the dual linear code of points and generators on a non-singular Hermitian variety $\\mathcal{H}(2n+1,q^2)$. We improve the earlier results for $n=2$, we solve the minimum distance problem for general $n$, we classify the $n$ smallest types of code words and we characterize the small weight code words as being a linear combination of these $n$ types.

  10. Querying quantitative logic models (Q2LM) to study intracellular signaling networks and cell-cytokine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melody K; Shriver, Zachary; Sasisekharan, Ram; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models have substantially improved our ability to predict the response of a complex biological system to perturbation, but their use is typically limited by difficulties in specifying model topology and parameter values. Additionally, incorporating entities across different biological scales ranging from molecular to organismal in the same model is not trivial. Here, we present a framework called “querying quantitative logic models” (Q2LM) for building and asking questions of constrained fuzzy logic (cFL) models. cFL is a recently developed modeling formalism that uses logic gates to describe influences among entities, with transfer functions to describe quantitative dependencies. Q2LM does not rely on dedicated data to train the parameters of the transfer functions, and it permits straight-forward incorporation of entities at multiple biological scales. The Q2LM framework can be employed to ask questions such as: Which therapeutic perturbations accomplish a designated goal, and under what environmental conditions will these perturbations be effective? We demonstrate the utility of this framework for generating testable hypotheses in two examples: (i) a intracellular signaling network model; and (ii) a model for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cell-cytokine interactions; in the latter, we validate hypotheses concerning molecular design of granulocyte colony stimulating factor. PMID:22125256

  11. Constraints on the Nucleon Strange Form Factors at Q^2 ~ 0.1 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Baturin, V; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Gregor, I M; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, M C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P; Aniol, K A; Armstrong, D S; Averett, T; Benaoum, H; Bertin, P Y; Burtin, E; Cahoon, J; Cates, G D; Chang, C C; Chao Yu Chiu; Chen, J P; Seonho Choi; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Decowski, P; Deepa, D; Ferdi, C; Feuerbach, R J; Finn, J M; Fuoti, K; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Gorbenko, V; Grames, J M; Hansknecht, J; Higinbotham, D W; Holmes, R; Holmstrom, T; Humensky, T B; Ibrahim, H; De Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kowalski, S; Kumar, K S; Lambert, D; La Violette, P; Le Rose, J; Lhuillier, D; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Mazouz, M; McCormick, K; Meekins, D G; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Munoz-Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V V; Neyret, D; Paschke, K D; Poelker, M; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Qiang, Y; Reitz, B; Roche, J; Saha, A; Singh, J; Snyder, R; Souder, P A; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Sulkosky, V; Tobias, W A; Urciuoli, G M; Vacheret, A; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X

    2006-01-01

    We report the most precise measurement to date of a parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering. The measurement was carried out with a beam energy of 3.03 GeV and a scattering angle = 6.0 degrees, with the result A_PV = -1.14 +/- 0.24 (stat) +/- 0.06 (syst) parts per million. From this we extract, at Q^2 = 0.099 GeV^2, the strange form factor combination G_E^s + 0.080 G_M^s = 0.030 +/- 0.025 (stat) +/- 0.006 (syst) +/- 0.012 (FF) where the first two errors are experimental and the last error is due to the uncertainty in the neutron electromagnetic form factor. The measurement significantly improves existing constraints on G_E^s and G_M^s at Q^2 ~0.1 GeV^2. A consistent picture emerges from all measurements at this Q^2. A combined fit shows that G_E^s is consistent with zero while G_M^s prefers positive values though G_E^s=G_M^s=0 is compatible with the data at 95% C.L.

  12. High-Resolution Regional Phase Attenuation Models of the Iranian Plateau and Surrounding Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Mayeda, W. R. Walter, L. Malagnini, and W. S. Phillips, Regional Attenuation in Northern California: A Comparison of Five 1D Q Methods, Bull. Seism ...regional phase amplitude tomography, Seism . Res. Lett., 80, p. 360, 2009. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 49 Priestley, K

  13. Spatial economy: high-tech glossary or new regional economics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Machado Ruiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available "The Spatial Economy Cities, Regions and International Trade", by Masahisa Fujita, Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables, has been seen as the best synthesis of the so-called new economic geography. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to review the book; and second, to place it in the current debate on regional economics. The first part of the paper is a brief introduction that situates the book in the history of regional economics. In the second part, a description and analysis of the basic models, their variations and applications are presented. The debate on regional economics concerning the theory proposed in the book is in the third part. Two aspects are stressed: the criticisms on the core-periphery model and how it incorporates regional diversity The fourth topic is a critical assessment of the achievements and originality of the new economic geography analysis.

  14. Spatial economy: high-tech glossary or new regional economics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Machado Ruiz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Spatial Economy – Cities, Regions and International Trade, by Masahisa Fujita, Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables, has been seen as the best synthesis of the so-called new economic geography. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to review the book; and second, to place it in the current debate on regional economics. The first part of the paper is a brief introduction that situates the book in the history of regional economics. In the second part, a description and analysis of the basic models, their variations and applications are presented. The debate on regional economics concerning the theory proposed in the book is in the third part. Two aspects are stressed: the criticisms on the core-periphery model and how it incorporates regional diversity The fourth topic is a critical assessment of the achievements and originality of the new economic geography analysis...

  15. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kang, T I; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1 kHz/cm**2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high- radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50 Hz/cm**2, compared to only 5 Hz/cm**2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100 V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve.

  16. Measurements of the \\gamma * p --> \\Delta(1232) reaction at low Q2

    CERN Document Server

    Sparveris, N; Achenbach, P; Gayoso, C Ayerbe; Baumann, D; Bernauer, J; Bernstein, A M; Bohm, R; Bosnar, D; Botto, T; Christopoulou, A; Dale, D; Ding, M; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Friedrich, J; Karabarbounis, A; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Muller, U; Nakagawa, I; Neuhausen, R; Nungesser, L; Papanicolas, C N; Piegsa, A; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Seimetz, M; Sirca, S; Stiliaris, S; Walcher, Th; Weis, M

    2013-01-01

    We report new p$(\\vec{e},e^\\prime p)\\pi^\\circ$ measurements in the $\\Delta^{+}(1232)$ resonance at the low momentum transfer region utilizing the magnetic spectrometers of the A1 Collaboration at MAMI. The mesonic cloud dynamics are predicted to be dominant and appreciably changing in this region while the momentum transfer is sufficiently low to be able to test chiral effective calculations. The results disagree with predictions of constituent quark models and are in reasonable agreement with dynamical calculations with pion cloud effects, chiral effective field theory and lattice calculations. The reported measurements suggest that improvement is required to the theoretical calculations and provide valuable input that will allow their refinements.

  17. Determination of the pion charge form factor for Q^2 = 0.60-1.60 (GeV/c)^2

    CERN Document Server

    Tadevosyan, V; Huber, G M; Abbott, D; Anklin, H; Armstrong, C; Arrington, J; Assamagan, K A; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Bochna, C; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chant, N; Dunne, J; Eden, T; Ent, R; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Gustafsson, K; Hinton, W; Jackson, H; Jones, M K; Keppel, C; Kim, P H; Kim, W; Klein, A; Koltenuk, D; Liang, M; Lolos, G J; Lung, A; Mack, D J; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Mitchell, J; Mkrtchyan, H; Müller, B; Niculescu, G N I; Pitz, D; Potterveld, D; Qin, L M; Reinhold, J; Shin, I K; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L G; Van der Meer, R L J; Vansyoc, K; Van Westrum, D; Volmer, J; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Zhao, W X; Zihlmann, B

    2006-01-01

    The data analysis for the reaction H(e,e' pi^+)n, which was used to determine values for the charged pion form factor Fpi for values of Q2 = 0.6-1.6 (gEv/C)^2, has been repeated with careful inspection of all steps and special attention to systematic uncertainties. Also the method used to extract Fpi from the measured longitudinal cross section was critically reconsidered. Final values for the separated longitudinal and transverse cross sections and the extracted values of Fpi are presented.

  18. Strange magnetic form factor of the proton at $Q^2 = 0.23$ GeV$^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Leinweber, Derek; Thomas, Anthony; Young, Ross

    2009-06-01

    We determine the $u$ and $d$ quark contributions to the proton magnetic form factor at finite momentum transfer by applying chiral corrections to quenched lattice data. Heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is applied at next to leading order in the quenched, and full QCD cases for the valence sector using finite range regularization. Under the assumption of charge symmetry these values can be combined with the experimental values of the proton and neutron magnetic form factors to deduce a relatively accurate value for the strange magnetic form factor at $Q^2=0.23$ GeV$^2$, namely $G_M^s=-0.034 \\pm 0.021$ $\\mu_N$.

  19. Measurement of the q2 dependence of the Hadronic Form Factor in D0 --> K- e+ nu_e decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the q2 dependence of the D0 --> K- e+ nu_e decay rate. This rate is proportional to the hadronic form factor squared, specified by a single parameter. This is either the mass in the simple pole ansatz m_pole = (1.854 +- 0.016 +- 0.020) GeV/c2 or the scale in the modified pole ansatz alpha_pole = 0.43 +- 0.03 +- 0.04. The first error refers to the statistical, the second to the systematic uncertainty.

  20. Minimum uncertainty states for the quantum group SU{sub q}(2) and quantum Wigner d-functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, A.; Parthasarathy, R. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Madras (India)

    1996-01-21

    Minimum uncertainty angular momentum states for the quantum group SU{sub q}(2) are constructed. They involve the eigenvalues of J{sub 1} which are q-numbers and the quantum group analogue of the Wigner d-functions for {theta}={pi}/2. The result is generalized for all values of {theta} and a formula for the quantum Wigner d-function is derived. The case of q=1 is discussed and compared with the well known results for the Wigner d-functions. (author)

  1. Two new ternary lanthanide antimony chalcogenides: Yb4Sb2S11.25 and Tm4Sb2Se11.68 containing chalcogenide Q2- and dichalcogenide (Q2)2- anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-03-01

    Dark red and dark brown crystals of Yb4Sb2S11.25 and Tm8Sb4Se11.68, respectively, were obtained from the reaction of the elements in Sb2Q3 (Q=S, Se) fluxes. Both non-stoichiometric compounds are orthorhombic and crystallize in the same space group Pnnm, with two formula units per unit cell (a=12.446(2), b=5.341(1), c=12.058(2) for sulfide and a=13.126(2), b=5.623(1), c=12.499(2) for the selenide). Their crystal structures are dominated by lanthanide-chalcogenide polyhedra (CN=7 and 8), which share corners, edges, triangular- and square-faces to form a three-dimensional framework embedding antinomy cations. The latter are coordinated by three sulfide anions with 5(1+2+2) secondary contacts forming basically infinite chains running along [0 1 0]. The chalcogens in both compounds form chalcogenide Q2- and dichalcogenide (Q2)2- anionic units. The optical analysis made on those compounds shows that both are semiconductors with band gap of 1.71 and 1.22 eV for Yb4Sb2S11.25 and Tm4Sb2Se11.75, respectively.

  2. Highly ionized region surrounding SN Refsdal revealed by MUSE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karman, W.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Caputi, K. I.; Di Teodoro, E.; Fraternali, F.; Gavazzi, R.; Mercurio, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rodney, S.; Treu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) Refsdal is the first multiply imaged, highly magnified, and spatially resolved SN ever observed. The SN exploded in a highly magnified spiral galaxy at z = 1.49 behind the Frontier Fields cluster MACS1149, and provides a unique opportunity to study the environment of SNe at high z. We

  3. Measurement of the hadronic photon structure function $F_2^{\\gamma}(x,Q^2)$ in two-photon collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Armstrong, S R; Awunor, O; Azzurri, P; Badaud, F; Bagliesi, G; Barate, R; Barklow, Timothy L; Bencivenni, G; Berkelman, K; Beuselinck, R; Blair, G A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Blondel, A; Blumenschein, U; Boccali, T; Bonissent, A; Booth, C N; Borean, C; Bossi, F; Boucrot, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Boumediene, D E; Bowdery, C K; Brandt, S; Bravo, S; Brient, J C; Brunelière, R; Buchmüller, O L; Böhrer, A; Callot, O; Cameron, W; Capon, G; Cartwright, S; Casado, M P; Cattaneo, M; Cavanaugh, R J; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Chmeissani, M; Ciulli, V; Clarke, D P; Clerbaux, B; Clifft, R W; Colaleo, A; Colas, P; Combley, F; Cowan, G; Coyle, P; Cranmer, K; Creanza, D; Crespo, J M; Curtil, C; David, A; Davier, M; Davies, G; De Bonis, I; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Delaere, C; Dessagne, S; Dhamotharan, S; Dietl, H; Dissertori, G; Dornan, P J; Drevermann, H; Duflot, L; Décamp, D; Ealet, A; Edgecock, T R; Ellis, G; Fabbro, B; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Ferguson, D P S; Fernández-Bosman, M; Fernández, E; Finch, A J; Focardi, E; Forty, R W; Foster, F; Fouchez, D; Foà, L; Frank, M; Ganis, G; Gao, Y; García-Bellido, A; Garrido, L; Gay, P; Geweniger, C; Ghete, V M; Giammanco, A; Giannini, G; Gianotti, F; Giassi, A; Girone, M; Girtler, P; González, S; Goy, C; Green, M G; Grivaz, J F; Grupen, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Harvey, J; Hayes, O J; He, H; Hepp, V; Hess, J; Heusse, P; Hill, R D; Hodgson, P N; Hu, H; Huang, X; Hughes, G; Hutchcroft, D E; Hölldorfer, F; Hüttmann, K; Iaselli, G; Jacholkowska, A; Jakobs, K; Janot, P; Jin, S; Jones, L T; Jones, R W L; Jost, B; Jousset, J; Jézéquel, S; Kado, M; Kayser, F; Kennedy, J; Kile, J; Kleinknecht, K; Kluge, E E; Kneringer, E; Kraan, A C; Kuhn, D; Kyriakis, A; Lançon, E; Laurelli, P; Lees, J P; Lehto, M H; Leibenguth, G; Lemaire, M C; Lemaître, V; Ligabue, F; Lin, J; Litke, A M; Locci, E; Lynch, J G; Lütjens, G; Machefert, F P; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Mannocchi, G; Marinelli, N; Markou, C; Martin, F; Martínez, M; Mato, P; McNamara, P A; Medcalf, T; Merle, E; Messineo, A; Michel, B; Minard, M N; Misiejuk, A; Monteil, S; Moser, H G; Moutoussi, A; Murtas, G P; Männer, W; Müller, A S; Negus, P; Ngac, A; Nielsen, J; Nilsson, B S; Norton, P R; Nowell, J; Nuzzo, S; O'Shea, V; Ouyang, Q; Pacheco, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Pallin, D; Pan, Y B; Parrini, G; Pascolo, J M; Passalacqua, L; Payre, P; Pearson, M R; Perret, P; Pietrzyk, B; Prange, G; Putzer, A; Pérez, P; Pütz, J; Ragusa, F; Rander, J; Ranieri, A; Ranjard, F; Raso, G; Renk, B; Robertson, N A; Rolandi, Luigi; Rothberg, J E; Rougé, A; Rudolph, G; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz, H; Rutherford, S A; Sander, H G; Sanguinetti, G; Schael, S; Schlatter, W D; Schmeling, S; Sciabà, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Selvaggi, G; Serin, L; Settles, Ronald; Sguazzoni, G; Silvestris, L; Simopoulou, Errietta; Smizanska, M; Spagnolo, P; Stenzel, H; Strong, J A; Taylor, G; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tempesta, P; Tenchini, R; Teubert, F; Thompson, A S; Thompson, J C; Thompson, L F; Tilquin, A; Tittel, K; Tomalin, I R; Tricomi, A; Trocmé, B; Tuchming, B; Valassi, Andrea; Vallage, B; Vayaki, Anna; Veillet, J J; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Videau, H L; Videau, I; Villegas, M; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wachsmuth, H W; Wang, T; Ward, J J; Wasserbaech, S R; White, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Wunsch, M; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zachariadou, K; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Ziegler, T; Zito, G; Zobernig, G; van der Aa, O

    2003-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function $F_2^gamma(x,Q^2)$ is measured from data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP. At centre-of-mass energies between $sqrt{s}=189,{ m GeV}$ and $207,{ m GeV}$ an integrated luminosity of $548.4,{ m pb}^{-1}$ is analyzed in two ranges of $Q^2$ with $langle Q^2 angle =17.3GeV^2$ and $67.2GeV^2$. Detector effects and acceptance are corrected for with a Tikhonov unfolding procedure. The results are compared to theoretical predictions and measurements from other experiments.

  4. High fertility regions in Bangladesh: a marriage cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sabina; Islam, Mohammad Amirul; Padmadas, Sabu S

    2010-11-01

    Bangladesh represents one of the few countries in south Asia where the pace of fertility decline has been unprecedented over the last three decades. Although there has been significant reduction in fertility levels at the national level, regional variations continue to persist, especially in Sylhet and Chittagong where the total fertility rates are well above the country average. Using data from three consecutive Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHSs) this paper assesses how fertility patterns in Sylhet and Chittagong differ from the rest of Bangladesh through a marriage cohort analysis of the parity progression ratios, and examines the factors determining the transition rates to higher parity in these two regions. Three cohorts of women are identified: those married during 1965-1974, 1975-84 and 1985-94. The results show that the probability that a woman from the recent cohort in Sylhet or Chittagong who had a third birth will have a fourth birth is nearly twice that of her counterpart in other regions. Social characteristics such as education, occupation, religion and residence have no effect on fertility in Sylhet and Chittagong. Additional period-specific analyses using the 2007 BDHS data show that women in Sylhet are considerably more likely to have a third or fourth birth sooner than those in other divisions, especially Khulna. The findings call for specific family planning policy interventions in Sylhet and Chittagong ensuring gender equity, promoting female education and delaying entry into marriage and childbearing.

  5. Precision Rosenbluth Measurement of the Proton Elastic Electromagnetic Form Factors and Their Ratio at Q^2 = 2.64, 3.20, and 4.10 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Qattan, I A

    2006-01-01

    Due to the inconsistency in the results of the GEp/Gmp ratio of the proton, as extracted from the Rosenbluth and recoil polarization techniques, high precision measurements of the e-p elastic scattering cross sections were made at Q^2 = 2.64, 3.20, and 4.10 GeV^2. Protons were detected, in contrast to previous measurements where the scattered electrons were detected, which dramatically decreased epsilon-dependent systematic uncertainties and corrections. A single spectrometer measured the scattered protons of interest while simultaneous measurements at Q^2 = 0.5 GeV^2 were carried out using another spectrometer which served as a luminosity monitor in order to remove any uncertainties due to beam charge and target density fluctuations. The absolute uncertainty in the measured cross sections is \\approx 3% for both spectrometers and with relative uncertainties, random and slope, below 1% for the higher Q^2 protons, and below 1% random and 6% slope for the monitor spectrometer. The extracted electric and magnetic...

  6. LANL Q2 2016 Quarterly Progress Report. Science Campaign and ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, Melissa Rae [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-07

    This progress report includes highlights for the Science Campaign and ICF about Advanced Certification and Assessment Methodologies, Implosion Hydrodynamics (C-1, SCE), Materials and Nuclear Science (C-1, C-2), Capabilities for Nuclear Intelligence, and High Energy Density Science (C-1, C-4, C-10). Upcoming meetings, briefings, and experiments are then listed for April and May.

  7. High resolution oh maser survey in star forming regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ruiz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos los resultados de un rastreo de alta resoluci on de m aseres de OH en Regiones de Formaci on Estelar Gal actica con el prop osito de estudiar la emisi on m aser y establecer una lista de candidatos adecuados para realizar un seguimiento con instrumentos de mayor resoluci on. Se utiliz o el Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA para observar las transiciones del m aser de OH en 1665, 1667, 1612 y 1720 MHz dentro de 41 regiones. Estas son las primeras observaciones de alta resoluci on que se realizan en la mayor parte de las fuentes. Se detectaron 30 sitios de emisi on m aser en alguna o varias transiciones, con nuevas detecciones en 4 fuentes, y donde aproximadamente 40% de la muestra exhibe estructura muy compacta. Finalmente consideramos que el espectro observado en W75N muestra el estado inicial de una r afaga del m aser de OH en la l nea de 1665 MHz, la cual es la primera que se conoce

  8. Virtual Compton Scattering and the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton at Q^2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Fonvieille, H; Degrande, N; Jaminion, S; Jutier, C; Di Salvo, L TodorR; Van Hoorebeke, L; Alexa, L C; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Arundell, K; Audit, G; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Baylac, M; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Boeglin, W U; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, L S; Cavata, C; Chang, C -C; Chen, J -P; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; deJager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; d'Hose, N; Dodge, G E; Domingo, J J; Elouadrhiri, L; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fissum, K G; Fournier, G; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Furget, C; Gao, H; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gomez, J; Gorbenko, V; Grenier, P; Guichon, P A M; Hansen, J O; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde, C E; Incerti, S; Iodice, M; Jardillier, J; Jones, M K; Kahl, W; Kato, S; Katramatou, A T; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Ketikyan, A; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Kox, S; Kramer, L H; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Leone, A; LeRose, J J; Liang, M; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Mehrabyan, S; Merchez, F; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Miller, G W; Mougey, J Y; Nanda, S K; Neyret, D; Offermann, E A J M; Papandreou, Z; Pasquini, B; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quemener, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Real, J S; Renard, F; Roblin, Y; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G; Rutt, P M; Saha, A; Saito, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic, A; Smith, T; Smirnov, G; Soldi, K; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Tieulent, R; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Van der Meer, R L J; Van De Vyver, R; Vernin, P; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zhang, W-M; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z -L

    2012-01-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at Jefferson Lab using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction (e p --> e p gamma). This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led to the determination of the structure functions P_LL-P_TT/epsilon and P_LT, and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha_E(Q^2) and beta_M(Q^2) at values of the four-momentum transfer squared Q^2= 0.92 and 1.76 GeV^2. These data, together with the results of VCS experiments at lower momenta, help building a coherent picture of the electric and magnetic GPs of the proton over the full measured Q^2-range, and point to their non-trivial behavior.

  9. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g_1^p and g_1^d for 0.05 < Q^2 < 3.0 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Prok, Y; Burkert, V D; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dodge, G E; Griffioen, K A; Kuhn, S E; Minehart, R; Adams, G; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Fersh, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Marchand, C; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, e J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Seely, M L; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2008-01-01

    The spin structure functions g_1 for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in x and Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH_3 and ND_3 targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for 0.05 < Q^2 < 5 GeV^2 and W < 3 GeV. The first moments of g_1 for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton gamma_0^p is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above Q^2 = 1.5 GeV^2. Although the first moments of g_1 are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) calculations up to approximately Q^2 = 0.06 GeV^2, a significant discrepancy is observed between the \\gamma_0^p data and ChPT for gamma_0^p,even at the lowest Q2.

  10. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  11. Precise Determination of the Deuteron Spin Structure at Low to Moderate $Q^2$ with CLAS and Extraction of the Neutron Contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Guler, N; Kuhn, S E; Bosted, P; Griffioen, K A; Keith, C; Minehart, R; Prok, Y; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Pereira, S Anefalos; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bultmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crabb, D; Crede, V; Angelo, A D; Dashyan, N; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Dupre, R; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; McKinnon, B; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-01-01

    We present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron ($^{15}$ND$_3$) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry $A_1^d$ and the polarized structure function $g_1^d$ were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 5 GeV$^2$ and 0.9 GeV $< W <$ 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure and a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions $A_1^n$ and $g_1^n$ of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, $W < 2$ GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as para...

  12. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Lis, D. C.; Neufeld, D.; Phillips, T. G.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass

  13. High resolution physical map of porcine chromosome 7 QTL region and comparative mapping of this region among vertebrate genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeure Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On porcine chromosome 7, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC contains several Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL influencing many traits including growth, back fat thickness and carcass composition. Previous studies highlighted that a fragment of ~3.7 Mb is located within the Swine Leucocyte Antigen (SLA complex. Internal rearrangements of this fragment were suggested, and partial contigs had been built, but further characterization of this region and identification of all human chromosomal fragments orthologous to this porcine fragment had to be carried out. Results A whole physical map of the region was constructed by integrating Radiation Hybrid (RH mapping, BAC fingerprinting data of the INRA BAC library and anchoring BAC end sequences on the human genome. 17 genes and 2 reference microsatellites were ordered on the high resolution IMNpRH212000rad Radiation Hybrid panel. A 1000:1 framework map covering 550 cR12000 was established and a complete contig of the region was developed. New micro rearrangements were highlighted between the porcine and human genomes. A bovine RH map was also developed in this region by mapping 16 genes. Comparison of the organization of this region in pig, cattle, human, mouse, dog and chicken genomes revealed that 1 the translocation of the fragment described previously is observed only on the bovine and porcine genomes and 2 the new internal micro rearrangements are specific of the porcine genome. Conclusion We estimate that the region contains several rearrangements and covers 5.2 Mb of the porcine genome. The study of this complete BAC contig showed that human chromosomal fragments homologs of this heavily rearranged QTL region are all located in the region of HSA6 that surrounds the centromere. This work allows us to define a list of all candidate genes that could explain these QTL effects.

  14. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF HIGHLY TOURISTIC REGION OF ISTRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina GRZINIC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As the scale of tourism grows, the resource use threatens to become unsustainable. Withought environmental responsibility the levels of cheaper mass tourism will increase, forcing more “nature-based” tourism to move on to new destinations. This scenario is opposite to the “Croatian Tourism Development by 2010” strategy. With a favourable geographic position, almost at the heart of Europe, Istria has always represented a bridge connecting the Middle European continental area with the Mediterranean. This area is the most visited Croatian tourist region with 27% of all visitors and 35% of time spent in all of Croatia. The Croatian National Bank’s preliminary figures for 2007 show that international tourism generated 18.4% of Croatian GDP. For these reasons the Istrian tourism industry can not ignore environmental issues in its management and requires the informed participation of all relevant stakeholders (according to the Agenda 21 for tourism industry. Properly planned tourism development, combined with environmental protection, produces the concept of sustainable tourism. Environmentally sustainable form of tourism represents a step forward from "sea and sun" mass tourism developed at the coastal part of Istria. There are a myriad of definitions for Sustainable Tourism, including eco-tourism, green travel, environmentally and culturally responsible tourism, fair trade and ethical travel. Mentioned selective tourism forms are adopted as the concept of the present and future Istrian destination development.

  15. Copepod assemblages in a highly complex hydrographic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berasategui, A. D.; Menu Marque, S.; Gómez-Erache, M.; Ramírez, F. C.; Mianzan, H. W.; Acha, E. M.

    2006-02-01

    Community structure and diversity patterns of planktonic copepods were investigated for the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean between 34 and 41°S. Our objectives were (1) to define copepod assemblages, (2) to accurately identify their association to different water masses/hydrodynamic regimes, (3) to characterize the assemblages in terms of their community structure, and (4) to test if frontal boundaries between water masses separate copepod assemblages. Biogeographic patterns were investigated using multivariate analysis (cluster and ANOSIM analyses). Biodiversity patterns were examined using different univariate indexes (point species richness and taxonomic distinctness). Five regions of similar copepod assemblages were defined for our study area each one corresponding to different environments (freshwater, estuarine, continental shelf, Malvinas and Brazil current assemblages). These assemblages have major community structure differences. In spite of the complex oceanographic scenario of our study area, that can lead us to expect a pattern of copepod communities with diffuse boundaries, we found a strong spatial correspondence between these limits and the presence of permanent frontal structures.

  16. The Excess of HERA High$-Q^2$ Events and Leptoquarks in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiguchi, M; Ishida, S; Sekiguchi, Motoo; Wada, Hiroaki; Ishida, Shin

    1998-01-01

    An interpretation that the HERA excess events are due to intermediate production and decay of composite leptoquarks in the left-right symmetric preon model is given. Because of the preon-line rule, expected to be valid well, the event-ratio of neutral to charged current interactions is predicted to be one.

  17. The Excess of HERA High-Q2 Events and Leptoquarks in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, M.; Wada, H.; Ishida, S.

    1998-04-01

    An interpretation that the HERA excess events are due to intermediate production and decay of composite leptoquarks in the left-right symmetric preon model is given. Because of the preon-line rule, expected to be valid, the event-ratio of neutral to charged current interactions is predicted to be 1.

  18. Experimental study of exclusive $^2$H$(e,e^\\prime p)n$ reaction mechanisms at high $Q^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Egiyan; Gegham Asryan; Nerses Gevorgyan; Keith Griffioen; Jean Laget; Sebastian Kuhn; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Gerard Audit; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; Vitaly Baturin; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Lukasz Blaszczyk; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Antoine Cazes; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Rita De Masi; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Haluk Denizli; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Steven Dytman; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Robert Fersch; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Hayko Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; Charles Hanretty; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Ji Li; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Claude Marchand; Nikolai Markov; Paul Mattione; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Surik Mehrabyan; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; James Mueller; Edwin Munevar Espitia; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Sergio Pereira; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-06-01

    The reaction {sup 2}H(e,e{prime} p)n has been studied with full kinematic coverage for photon virtuality 1.75 < 5.5 {approx} GeV{sup 2}. Comparisons of experimental data with theory indicate that for very low values of neutron recoil momentum (p{sub n} < 100 MeV/c) the neutron is primarily a spectator and the reaction can be described by the plane-wave impulse approximation. For 100 < 750 MeV/c proton-neutron rescattering dominates the cross section, while {Delta} production followed by the N{Delta} {yields} NN transition is the primary contribution at higher momenta.

  19. Multi-mode q-oscillator algebras with q2(k+1)= 1 and related thermo field dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高亚军

    2002-01-01

    A type of multi-mode q-oscillator algebra with q2(k+1) = 1 is set up and the associated qk-thermo field dynamics is constructed for all k = 1, 2, …, ∞ in a unified form. It is demonstrated that these qk-thermo field dynamics can all be nicely fitted into the algebraic formulation of statistical mechanics (axiomatized form for statistical physics). This means that we obtain infinitely many realizations of the algebraic scheme, which extend the consideration of Ojima[1981 Ann. Phys. 137 1] and contain the usual thermo field dynamics for the fermionic (k = 1) and bosonic (k = ∞)systems as special cases. As simple applications, the qk-statistical average of some operators are given.

  20. Measurement of the $p(e,e'\\pi^+)n$ reaction close to threshold and at low $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Friščić, I; Gayoso, C Ayerbe; Baumann, D; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Debenjak, L; Denig, A; Ding, M; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Merkel, H; Middleton, D G; Mihovilovič, M; Müller, U; Pochodzalla, J; Schlimme, B S; Schoth, M; Schulz, F; Sfienti, C; Širca, S; Thiel, M; Walcher, Th

    2016-01-01

    The cross section of the $p(e,e'\\pi^+)n$ reaction has been measured for five kinematic settings at an invariant mass of $W = 1094$ MeV and for a four-momentum transfer of $Q^2 = 0.078$ (GeV/$c$)$^2$. The measurement has been performed at MAMI using a new short-orbit spectrometer (SOS) of the A1 collaboration, intended for detection of low-energy pions. The transverse and longitudinal cross section terms were separated using the Rosenbluth method and the transverse-longitudinal interference term has been determined from the left-right asymmetry. The experimental cross section terms are compared with the calculations of three models: DMT2001, MAID2007 and $\\chi$MAID. The results show that we do not yet understand the dynamics of the fundamental pion.

  1. 敬鹏泰国厂全面复工Q2运营向上

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    国内汽车板大厂敬鹏主管表示,展望近期市况,敬鹏订单表现不错,再加上Q2起进入传统旺季,泰国厂子公司Draco在泰水灾重建后设备陆续到位,估4月初全面复工,下季营运展望乐观。敬鹏甫公告2011年财报。敬鹏2011年合并营收为158.7亿元新台币,年衰退4.3%,合并毛利率13.2%。

  2. Measurement of the p(e,e‧π+)n reaction close to threshold and at low Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friščić, I.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Debenjak, L.; Denig, A.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Merkel, H.; Middleton, D. G.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Thiel, M.; Walcher, Th.

    2017-03-01

    The cross section of the p (e ,e‧π+) n reaction has been measured for five kinematic settings at an invariant mass of W = 1094 MeV and for a four-momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.078 (GeV / c) 2. The measurement has been performed at MAMI using a new short-orbit spectrometer (SOS) of the A1 collaboration, intended for detection of low-energy pions. The transverse and longitudinal cross section terms were separated using the Rosenbluth method and the transverse-longitudinal interference term has been determined from the left-right asymmetry. The experimental cross section terms are compared with the calculations of three models: DMT2001, MAID2007 and χMAID. The results show that we do not yet understand the dynamics of the fundamental pion.

  3. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelli Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2. Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5. A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease. Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer.

  4. Morphology and phenomenology of the high-latitude E and F regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained at high latitude observatories on the behavior of E and F region ionization are presented including a bibliography. Behavior of E and F region ionization during day and night for quiet and disturbed conditions in the auroral and polar regions is described. Daily, seasonal and sunspot variations are also outlined.

  5. A Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering at Low Q^2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-01-28

    The electroweak theory has been probed to a high level of precision at the mass scale of the Z{sup 0} through the joint contributions of LEP at CERN and the SLC at SLAC. The E158 experiment at SLAC complements these results by measuring the weak mixing angle at a Q{sup 2} of 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2}, far below the weak scale. The experiment utilizes a 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized atomic electrons in a target of liquid hydrogen to measure the parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} in Moeller scattering. The tree-level prediction for A{sup PV} is proportional to 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. Since sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} {approx} 0.25, the effect of radiative corrections is enhanced, allowing the E158 experiment to probe for physics effects beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. This work presents the results from the first two physics runs of the experiment, covering data collected in the year 2002. The parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} was measured to be A{sup PV} = -158 ppb {+-} 21 ppb (stat) {+-} 17 ppb (sys). The result represents the first demonstration of parity violation in Moeller scattering. The observed value of A{sup PV} corresponds to a measurement of the weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2380 {+-} 0.0016(stat) {+-} 0.0013(sys), which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory).

  6. APEX survey of southern high mass star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Hieret, C; Menten, K M; Schilke, P; Thorwirth, S; Wyrowski, F

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study of a large sample of sources, covering a wide range in galactocentric distances, masses and luminosities, is a fast and efficient way of obtaining a good overview of the different stages of high-mass star formation. With these goals in mind, we have started a survey of 40 color selected IRAS sources south of -20 degrees declination with the APEX telescope on Chajnantor, Chile. Our first APEX results already demonstrate that the selection criteria were successful, since some of the sources are very rich in molecular lines.

  7. Efficacy of a new fluoroquinolone, JNJ-Q2, in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae skin, respiratory, and systemic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey; Hilliard, Jamese J; Morrow, Brian J; Melton, John L; Flamm, Robert K; Barron, Alfred M; Lynch, A Simon

    2011-12-01

    The in vivo efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone (FQ), was evaluated in a murine septicemia model with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and in a Streptococcus pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model. JNJ-Q2 and comparators were also evaluated in an acute murine skin infection model using a community-acquired MRSA strain and in an established skin infection (ESI) model using a hospital-acquired strain, for which the selection of resistant mutants was also determined. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity in the MSSA septicemia model that was comparable to that moxifloxacin (JNJ-Q2 50% effective dose [ED(50)], 0.2 mg/kg of body weight administered subcutaneously [s.c.] and 2 mg/kg administered orally [p.o.]) and activity in the MRSA septicemia model that was superior to that of vancomycin (JNJ-Q2 ED(50), 1.6 mg/kg administered s.c.). In an S. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model, JNJ-Q2 displayed activity (ED(50), 1.9 mg/kg administered s.c. and 7.4 mg/kg administered p.o.) that was comparable to that of gemifloxacin and superior to that of moxifloxacin. In both MRSA skin infection models, treatment with JNJ-Q2 resulted in dose-dependent reductions in bacterial titers in the skin, with the response to JNJ-Q2 at each dose exceeding the responses of the comparators ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin. Additionally, in the ESI model, JNJ-Q2 showed a low or nondetectable propensity for ciprofloxacin resistance selection, in contrast to the selection of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants observed for both ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity that was comparable or superior to the activity of fluoroquinolone or antistaphylococcal comparators in several local and systemic skin infection models performed with both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae and is currently being evaluated in phase II human clinical trials.

  8. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NL-9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: emprecht@caltech.edu [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

  9. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Emprechtinger, Martin; van der Tak, Floris F S; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Lis, Dariusz C; Neufeld, David; Phillips, Thomas G; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J=1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H2 of 1.5e-8 in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC6334 I, we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5e-10. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freeze out of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant 3.6e-8) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of...

  10. Charged pion form factor between Q^2=0.60 and 2.45 GeV^2. II. Determination of, and results for, the pion form factor

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, G M; Horn, T; Beise, E J; Gaskell, D; Mack, D J; Tadevosyan, V; Volmer, J; Abbott, D; Aniol, K; Anklin, H; Armstrong, C; Arrington, J; Assamagan, K; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Barrett, B; Bochna, C; Boeglin, W; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Dunne, J; Eden, T; Ent, R; Gibson, E; Gilman, R; Gustafsson, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Jackson, H; Jin, S; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Kim, P H; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Koltenuk, D; Kovaltchouk, V; Kiang, M; Liu, J; Lolos, G J; Lung, A; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Matsumura, A; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Müller, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Okayasu, Y; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C; Pitz, D; Potterveld, D; Punjabi, V; Qin, L M; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Roos, P G; Sarty, A; Shin, I K; Smith, G R; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L G; Tvaskis, V; Van der Meer, R L J; Vansyoc, K; Van Westrum, D; Vidakovic, S; Vulcan, W; Warren, G; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Zhao, W -X; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B

    2008-01-01

    The charged pion form factor, Fpi(Q^2), is an important quantity which can be used to advance our knowledge of hadronic structure. However, the extraction of Fpi from data requires a model of the 1H(e,e'pi+)n reaction, and thus is inherently model dependent. Therefore, a detailed description of the extraction of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data obtained recently at Jefferson Lab is presented, with particular focus given to the dominant uncertainties in this procedure. Results for Fpi are presented for Q^2=0.60-2.45 GeV^2. Above Q^2=1.5 GeV^2, the Fpi values are systematically below the monopole parameterization that describes the low Q^2 data used to determine the pion charge radius. The pion form factor can be calculated in a wide variety of theoretical approaches, and the experimental results are compared to a number of calculations. This comparison is helpful in understanding the role of soft versus hard contributions to hadronic structure in the intermediate Q^2 regime.

  11. Russian version of CU-Q2oL questionnaire for estimation of quality of life of patients with chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekrasova Е.Е.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to work out the creation of Russian-language questionnaire for assessing quality of life of patients with chronic urticaria by adapting the questionnaire «Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire» (CU-Q2oL to Russian conditions. The study involved 150 patients aged 18 to 50 years (32,41±6,02 with chronic urticaria. Cultural and linguistic adaptation of the questionnaire was conducted according to international methodology. Evaluation of reliability was conducted by calculating Cronbach's б-coefficient, constructive validity -the method of «known groups» and the identification of mutual correlations with the scales of the SF-36 questionnaire, sensitivity-by comparing the quality of life before and after the treatment. High values of Cronbach's б-coefficient (>0.72 were obtained, the dependence of quality of life on the severity of chronic urticaria was proved to be significant, as well as the sensitivity of the questionnaire to clinical changes. The research findings confirmed good psychometric properties of Russian version of the questionnaire. The developed version of the questionnaire is a reliable, valid and sensitive device for assessing the quality of life in patients with chronic urticaria, and may be used in scientific and clinical research.

  12. Recoil Polarization Measurements for Neutral Pion Electroproduction at Q^2=1 (GeV/c)^2 Near the Delta Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, J J

    2005-01-01

    We measured angular distributions of differential cross section, beam analyzing power, and recoil polarization for neutral pion electroproduction at Q^2 = 1.0 (GeV/c)^2 in 10 bins of W across the Delta resonance. A total of 16 independent response functions were extracted, of which 12 were observed for the first time. Comparisons with recent model calculations show that response functions governed by real parts of interference products are determined relatively well near 1.232 GeV, but variations among models is large for response functions governed by imaginary parts and for both increases rapidly with W. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis that adjusts complex multipoles with high partial waves constrained by baseline models. Parabolic fits to the W dependence of the multipole analysis around the Delta mass gives values for SMR = (-6.61 +/- 0.18)% and EMR = (-2.87 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly larger than those from Legendre analysis of the same data. Similarly, the multipole analysi...

  13. Exome sequencing generates high quality data in non-target regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing technologies is a cost efficient approach to selectively sequencing coding regions of human genome for detection of disease variants. A significant amount of DNA fragments from the capture process fall outside target regions, and sequence data for positions outside target regions have been mostly ignored after alignment. Result We performed whole exome sequencing on 22 subjects using Agilent SureSelect capture reagent and 6 subjects using Illumina TrueSeq capture reagent. We also downloaded sequencing data for 6 subjects from the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 study. Using these data, we examined the quality of SNPs detected outside target regions by computing consistency rate with genotypes obtained from SNP chips or the Hapmap database, transition-transversion (Ti/Tv ratio, and percentage of SNPs inside dbSNP. For all three platforms, we obtained high-quality SNPs outside target regions, and some far from target regions. In our Agilent SureSelect data, we obtained 84,049 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 65,231 SNPs inside target regions (a 129% increase. For our Illumina TrueSeq data, we obtained 222,171 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 95,818 SNPs inside target regions (a 232% increase. For the data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we obtained 7,139 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 1,548 SNPs inside target regions (a 461% increase. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a significant amount of high quality genotypes outside target regions can be obtained from exome sequencing data. These data should not be ignored in genetic epidemiology studies.

  14. The Spin and Flavour Dependence of High-Energy Photoabsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, S D

    1999-01-01

    We review the present data on high-energy, spin-dependent photoabsorption. We find a strong isotriplet term in $(\\sigma_A - \\sigma_P)$ which persists from $Q^2 \\sim 0.25$GeV$^2$ to high $Q^2$ polarised deep inelastic scattering. For $Q^2 \\sim 4$GeV$^2$ and $x$ between 0.01 and 0.12 the isotriplet part of $g_1$ behaves as $g_1^{(p-n)} \\sim x^{-{1 \\over 2}}$, in contrast to soft Regge theory which predicts that $g_1^{(p-n)}$ should converge as $x \\to 0$. The isotriplet, polarised structure function $2x g_1^{(p-n)}$ is significantly greater than the isotriplet, unpolarised structure function $F_2^{(p-n)}$ in this kinematic region. We analyse the low $Q^2$ photoabsorption data from E-143 and SMC and use this data to estimate the high-energy Regge contribution to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum-rule.

  15. Living in a High Mountain Border Region: the Case of the 'Bhotiyas' of the Indo-Chinese Border Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Bergmann; Martin Gerwin; Marcus Nüsse; William S. Sax

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces one of South Asia's most important border regions into academic discourse, namely, the Central Himalayan mountain rim separating India and the Tibetan Autonomous Region (People's Republic of China). What makes this border region so interesting is a tangled interplay of changing environmental, cultural, and political forms to which the local populations constantly have to adapt in order to make a living there. We focused on the so-called 'Bhotiyas' of Uttarakhand, former trans-Himalayan traders whose ethnicity and livelihood was traditionally associated with the Indo-Chinese border that was sealed as a result of the India-China war in 1962. Drawing on the work of borderland scholarship, we identified the key processes and developments that changed the perspective of this area. Competing political aspirations as well as the 'Bhotiyas' countervailing strategies were considered equally important for understanding local livelihoods and identities within the dynamics of a 'high mountain border region'. Through an exemplary analysis of historical differences of power in one 'Bhotiya' valley, we further explored the ways in which shifting socio-spatial constellations are creatively re-interpreted by the borderlanders.

  16. Measurements of the $Q^{2}$-Dependence of the Proton and Neutron Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1n

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Averett, T; Band, H R; Berisso, M C; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Bültmann, S; Buénerd, M; Chupp, T E; Churchwell, S; Court, G R; Crabb, D; Day, D; Decowski, P; De Pietro, P; Erbacher, R D; Erickson, R; Feltham, A; Fonvieille, H; Frlez, E; Gearhart, R A; Ghazikhanian, V; Gómez, J; Griffioen, K A; Harris, C; Houlden, M A; Hughes, E W; Hyde-Wright, C E; Igo, G; Incerti, S; Jensen, J; Johnson, J R; King, P M; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kuhn, S E; Lindgren, R; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; McCarthy, J; McKee, P M; Meyer, Werner T; Mitchell, G S; Mitchell, J; Olson, M N; Penttilä, S; Peterson, G A; Petratos, G G; Pitthan, R; Pocanic, D; Prepost, R; Prescott, C; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reyna, D; Rochester, L S; Rock, S E; Rondon-Aramayo, O A; Sabatié, F; Sick, I; Smith, T; Sorrell, L; Staley, F; Saint-Lorant, S; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Tobias, A; Todor, L; Toole, T; Trentalange, S; Walz, D; Welsh, R C; Wesselmann, F R; Wright, T R; Young, C C; Zeier, M; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions g1p and g1n have been measured over the range 0.014 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q2 < 40 GeV2 using deep-inelastic scattering of 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons. We find that the Q2 dependence of g1p (g1n) at fixed x is very similar to that of the spin-averaged structure function F1p (F1n). From a NLO QCD fit to all available data we find $\\Gamma_1^p - \\Gamma_1^n =0.176 \\pm 0.003 \\pm 0.007$ at Q2=5 GeV2, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule prediction of 0.182 \\pm 0.005.

  17. Electroproduction of Eta Mesons in the S11(1535) Resonance Region at High Momentum Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, M M; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Bertoncini, C; Böglin, W; Bosted, P E; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Cui, Y; Danagulyan, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Khayari, N El; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kubarovski, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Ostapenko, T; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Tvaskis, V; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zhu, H

    2008-01-01

    The differential cross-section for the process p(e,e'p)eta has been measured at Q2 ~ 5.7 and 7.0 (GeV/c)2 for centre-of-mass energies from threshold to 1.8 GeV, encompassing the S11(1535) resonance, which dominates the channel. This is the highest momentum transfer measurement of this exclusive process to date. The helicity-conserving transition amplitude A_1/2, for the production of the S11(1535) resonance, is extracted from the data. This quantity appears to begin scaling as 1/Q3, a predicted signal of the dominance of perturbative QCD, at Q2 ~ 5 (GeV/c)2.

  18. Simulations of the C-2/C-2U Field Reversed Configurations with the Q2D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, Marco; Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2U was built to sustain advanced beam-driven FRCs for 5 + ms. The Q2D transport code is used to simulate the evolution of C-2U discharges and to study sustainment via fast ion current and pressure, with the latter comparable to the thermal plasma pressure. The code solves the MHD equations together with source terms due to neutral beams, which are calculated by a Monte Carlo method. We compare simulations with experimental results obtained in the HPF14 regime of C-2 (6 neutral beams with energy of 20 keV and total power of 4.2 MW). All simulations start from an initial equilibrium and transport coefficients are chosen to match experimental data. The best agreement is obtained when utilizing an enhanced energy transfer between fast ions and the plasma, which may be an indication of anomalous heating due to beneficial beam-plasma instabilities. Similar simulations of C-2U (neutral beam power increased to 10 + MW and angled beam injection) are compared with experimental results, where a steady state has been obtained for 5 + ms, correlated with the neutral beam pulse and limited by engineering constraints.

  19. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Gibb, E. L.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H2O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H2O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 1029 and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 1026 molecules s‑1, respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10‑4, i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H2O.

  20. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammami, H. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Yazidi, O. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar, Le Belvédère, 1060 Tunis (Tunisia); Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M. [EMIR, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs, Monastir (Tunisia); Al Mogren, M. M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  1. Deep Inelastic Structure Functions from Electron Scattering on Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Iron at 0.6 GEV(2) <= Q('2) <= 30.0 GEV(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Larry W.

    1990-01-01

    We report the final results from experiment E140, a recent deep inelastic electron-deuterium and electron -iron scattering experiment at SLAC. In addition, we present the results of a combined global analysis of all SLAC deep inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium cross section measurements between 1970 and 1983. Data from seven earlier experiments are re-radiatively corrected and normalized to experiment E140. We report extractions of R(x,Q^2) and F_2(x,Q ^2) for hydrogen and deuterium over the entire SLAC kinematic range:.06 .7 , in excellent agreement with predictions based on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms.

  2. The 3-Loop Pure Singlet Heavy Flavor Contributions to the Structure Function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and the Anomalous Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Ablinger, J; Blümlein, J; De Freitas, A; von Manteuffel, A; Schneider, C

    2014-01-01

    The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and the corresponding transition matrix element $A_{Qq}^{(3), \\sf PS}$ in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-$N$ space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ are presented.

  3. Measurements of electron-proton elastic cross sections for $0.4 < Q^2 < 5.5 (GeV/c)^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Christy, M E; Armstrong, C S; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Beck, D H; Blok, H P; Bochna, C W; Böglin, W; Bosted, P; Bouwhuis, M; Breuer, H; Brown, D S; Brüll, A; Carlini, R D; Chant, N S; Cochran, A; Cole, L; Danagulyan, S; Day, D B; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Fox, B; Gan, L; Gao, H; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Geesaman, D F; Gueye, P L J; Harvey, M; Holt, R J; Jiang, X; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E; Liang, Y; Lorenzon, W; Lung, A; Markowitz, P; Martin, J W; McIlhany, K; McKee, D; Meekins, D G; Miller, M A; Milner, R G; Mitchell, J H; Mkrtchyan, H G; Müller, B A; Nathan, A; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; O'Neill, T G; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Piercey, R B; Potterveld, D; Ransome, R D; Reinhold, J; Rollinde, E; Roos, P; Sarty, A J; Sawafta, R; Schulte, E C; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Tieulent, R; Uzzle, A; Vulcan, W F; Wood, S A; Xiong, F; Yuan, L; Zeier, M; Zihlmann, B; Ziskin, V

    2004-01-01

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 unique kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 $<$ $Q^2$ $<$ 5.5 $(\\rm GeV/c)^2$. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the $Q^2$ range where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab.

  4. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio to Q2 = 8.5  GeV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, A J R; Brash, E J; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-06-18

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon's quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5  GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which G(E)(p) is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  5. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F2(x,Q2 and the anomalous dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F2(x,Q2 and the corresponding transition matrix element AQq(3,PS in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F2(x,Q2 are presented.

  6. Common and specific brain regions in high- versus low-confidence recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongkeun; Cabeza, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate whether and to what extent brain regions involved in high-confidence recognition (HCR) versus low-confidence recognition (LCR) overlap or separate from each other. To this end, we performed conjunction analyses involving activations elicited during high-confidence hit, low-confidence hit, and high-confidence correct-rejection responses. The analyses yielded 3 main findings. First, sensory/perceptual and associated posterior regions were common to HCR and LCR, indicating contribution of these regions to both HCR and LCR activity. This finding may help explain why these regions are among the most common in functional neuroimaging studies of episodic retrieval. Second, medial temporal lobe (MTL) and associated midline regions were associated with HCR, possibly reflecting recollection-related processes, whereas specific prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions were associated with LCR, possibly reflecting executive control processes. This finding is consistent with the notion that the MTL and PFC networks play complementary roles during episodic retrieval. Finally, within posterior parietal cortex, a dorsal region was associated with LCR, possibly reflecting top-down attentional processes, whereas a ventral region was associated with HCR, possibly reflecting bottom-up attentional processes. This finding may help explain why functional neuroimaging studies have found diverse parietal effects during episodic retrieval. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that HCR versus LCR, and by implication, recollection versus familiarity processes, are represented in common as well as specific brain regions. PMID:19501072

  7. Research on the Characteristic and Genesis of Q2 Vermicular Red Clay in Ningxiang of Changsha -Yiyang Railway%长益城际宁乡 Q2网纹黏土特征及成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪莹鹤

    2015-01-01

    研究目的:长益城际沿线广泛分布 Q2棕红色网纹黏土,土层厚度达5~30 m。城际铁路对路基的沉降变形控制十分严格,针对此种路基如何进行合理处理是一个关键问题。由于土体的成分、结构、成因对工程性能有着很大的影响,本文结合现场调查、颗粒分析、化学成分分析、X 射线分析及微观图像,对网纹土体的成分、结构、成因进行系统研究,为地基处理方案选择提供参考。研究结论:(1)宁乡红白网纹土均以黏粒为第一优势粒级,含量在65%以上,红网纹黏粒含量大于白网纹土;(2)网纹土中 SiO2含量占总含量的60%左右,其次为 Al2 O3和 TFe2 O3,这三种物质的总含量超过85%;(3)红土中铁的含量差不多是白土的三倍,SiO2含量相对减少;(4)白土的颗粒形状多为片状,排列较为规则,颗粒之间的接触主要为面-面、面-边接触;(5)红土颗粒结构单元体排列较白土紊乱,无明显定向排列且结构比白土小;(6)网纹土不是在单一气候条件下形成的,而是经历了多阶段的气候波动,因而是一种复合型的古土壤;(7)本研究成果可供网纹土成因研究提供参考。%Research purposes:The Q2 vermicular red clay was widely distributed along the Changsha -Yiyang railway where soil thickness is 5 ~30 m.It is the key problem to choose proper method to treat this type of soil because the settlement of intercity railway subgrade must be controlled strictly.Based on the site survey,particle -size analysis, chemical component analysis,X -ray spectrometry analysis and microstructure,the material composition,structure and genesis of the Q2 vermicular red clay were studied systematically,which can provide a reference to choose the foundation treatment method. Research conclusions:(1 )The clay was the preponderant particle in which the content was about 65% in the soil of

  8. Preliminary results of an oilspill risk analysis for the Bombay High Region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Gouveia, A.D.; Sitaraman, R.

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the Bombay High, Maharashtra, India. The likely paths of oilslicks, and locations of resources vulnerable to spilled...

  9. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$. I. Measurements of the cross section for the ${^1}$H($e,e'\\pi^+$)$n$ reaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blok, Henk; Horn, Tanja; Huber, Garth; Beise, Elizabeth; Gaskell, David; Mack, David; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Volmer, Jochen; Abbott, David; Aniol, Konrad; Anklin, Heinz; Armstrong, Christopher; Arrington, John; Assamagan, Ketevi; Avery, Steven; Baker, O; Barrett, Robert; Bochna, Christopher; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breuer, Herbert; Chang, C; Chang, C C; Chant, Nicholas; Christy, Michael; Dunne, James; Eden, Thomas; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gibson, Edward; Gilman, Ronald; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Jackson, Harold; uk Jin, Seong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, pyunghun; Kim, Wooyoung; King, Paul; Klein, Andreas; Koltenuk, Douglas; Kovaltchouk, Vitali; Liang, Meihua; Liu, Jinghua; Lolos, George; Lung, Allison; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Matsumura, Akihiko; McKee, David; Meekins, David; Mitchell, Joseph; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Mueller, Robert; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Pitz, David; Potterveld, David; Punjabi, Vina; Qin, Liming; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Roos, Philip; Sarty, Adam; Shin, Ilkyoung; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tang, Liguang; Tvaskis, Vladas; van der Meer, Rob; Vansyoc, Kelley; Van Westrum, Derek; Vidakovic, Sandra; Vulcan, William; Warren, Glen; Wood, Stephen; Xu, C; Yan, Chen; Zhao, Wenxia; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045202
    Cross sections for the reaction 1H(e,e'pi+)n were measured in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) using the high-intensity Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to determine the charged pion form factor. Data were taken for central four-momentum transfers ranging from Q2=0.60 to 2.45 GeV2 at an invariant mass of the virtual photon-nucleon system of W=1.95 and 2.22 GeV. The measured cross sections were separated into the four structure functions sigmaL,sigmaT,sigmaLT, and sigmaTT. The various parts of the experimental setup and the analysis steps are described in detail, including the calibrations and systematic studies, which were needed to obtain high-precision results. The different types of systematic uncertainties are also discussed. The results for the separated cross sections as a function of the Mandelstam variable t at the different values of Q2 are presented. Some global featu

  10. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$. I. Measurements of the cross section for the ${^1}$H($e,e'\\pi^+$)$n$ reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Blok, H P; Huber, G M; Beise, E J; Gaskell, D; Mack, D J; Tadevosyan, V; Volmer, J; Abbott, D; Aniol, K; Anklin, H; Armstrong, C; Arrington, J; Assamagan, K; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Barrett, B; Bochna, C; Boeglin, W; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Dunne, J; Eden, T; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gibson, E; Gilman, R; Gustafsson, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Jackson, H; Jin, S; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Kim, P H; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Koltenuk, D; Kovaltchouk, V; Liang, M; Liu, J; Lolos, G J; Lung, A; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Matsumura, A; McKee, D; Meekins, D; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Müller, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Okayasu, Y; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C; Pitz, D; Potterveld, D; Punjabi, V; Qin, L M; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Roos, P G; Sarty, A; Shin, I K; Smith, G R; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L G; Tvaskis, V; Van der Meer, R L J; Vansyoc, K; Van Westrum, D; Vidakovic, S; Vulcan, W; Warren, G; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Zhao, W -X; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B

    2008-01-01

    Cross sections for the reaction ${^1}$H($e,e'\\pi^+$)$n$ were measured in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) using the CEBAF high-intensity, continous electron beam in order to determine the charged pion form factor. Data were taken for central four-momentum transfers ranging from $Q^2$=0.60 to 2.45 GeV$^2$ at an invariant mass of the virtual photon-nucleon system of $W$=1.95 and 2.22 GeV. The measured cross sections were separated into the four structure functions $\\sigma_L$, $\\sigma_T$, $\\sigma_{LT}$, and $\\sigma_{TT}$. The various parts of the experimental setup and the analysis steps are described in detail, including the calibrations and systematic studies, which were needed to obtain high precision results. The different types of systematic uncertainties are also discussed. The results for the separated cross sections as a function of the Mandelstam variable $t$ at the different values of $Q^2$ are presented. Some global features of the data are discussed, and the data are co...

  11. Solutions of the Quantum Yang-Baxter Equations Associated with (1-3/2)-D Representations of SU(sub q) (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yijun, Huang; Guochen, Yu; Hong, Sun

    1996-01-01

    The solutions of the spectral independent QYBE associated with (1-3/2)-D representations of SU(sub q) (2) are derived, based on the weight conservation and extended Kauffman diagrammatic technique. It is found that there are nonstandard solutions.

  12. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$. II. Determination of, and results for, the pion form factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Garth; Blok, Henk; Horn, Tanja; Beise, Elizabeth; Gaskell, David; Mack, David; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Volmer, Jochen; Abbott, David; Aniol, Konrad; Anklin, Heinz; Armstrong, Christopher; Arrington, John; Assamagan, Ketevi; Avery, Steven; Baker, O.; Barrett, Robert; Bochna, Christopher; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breuer, Herbert; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chant, Nicholas; Christy, Michael; Dunne, James; Eden, Thomas; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Benjamin; Gibson, Edward; Gilman, Ronald; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Jackson, Harold; uk Jin, Seong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, pyunghun; Kim, Wooyoung; King, Paul; Klein, Andreas; Koltenuk, Douglas; Kovaltchouk, Vitali; Liang, Meihua; Liu, Jinghua; Lolos, George; Lung, Allison; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Matsumura, Akihiko; McKee, David; Meekins, David; Mitchell, Joseph; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Mueller, Robert; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Pitz, David; Potterveld, David; Punjabi, Vina; Qin, Liming; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Roos, Philip; Sarty, Adam; Shin, Ilkyoung; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tang, Liguang; Tvaskis, Vladas; van der Meer, Rob; Vansyoc, Kelley; Van Westrum, Derek; Vidakovic, Sandra; Vulcan, William; Warren, Glen; Wood, Stephen; Xu, Chen; Yan, Chen; Zhao, Wenxia; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045203
    The charged pion form factor, Fpi(Q2), is an important quantity that can be used to advance our knowledge of hadronic structure. However, the extraction of Fpi from data requires a model of the 1H(e,e'pi+)n reaction and thus is inherently model dependent. Therefore, a detailed description of the extraction of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data obtained recently at Jefferson Lab is presented, with particular focus given to the dominant uncertainties in this procedure. Results for Fpi are presented for Q2=0.60-2.45 GeV2. Above Q2=1.5 GeV2, the Fpi values are systematically below the monopole parametrization that describes the low Q2 data used to determine the pion charge radius. The pion form factor can be calculated in a wide variety of theoretical approaches, and the experimental results are compared to a number of calculations. This comparison is helpful in understanding the role of soft versus hard c

  13. Identification of mammalian species using the short and highly variable regions of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianhui; Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Yueqin; Liu, Zhiping; Chen, Yang; Zhao, Ziqin

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing is useful for the species determination of degraded samples and the nucleotide diversity of target fragments across species is crucial for the discrimination. In this study, the short and highly polymorphic regions flanked by two conserved termini were sought by the sequence alignment of mtDNA across species and two target regions located at 12S rRNA gene were characterized. Two universal primer sets were developed that appear to be effective for a wide variety of mammalian species, even for domestic birds. The two target regions could be efficiently amplified using their universal primer sets on degraded samples and provide sufficient information for species determination. Therefore, the two short and highly variable target regions might provide a high discriminative capacity and should be suitable for the species determination of degraded samples.

  14. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of Eastern Tibet and Adjacent Regions (Post Print)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    mantle in this region. Similarly, a high velocity and high Q block in southeastern Tibet around eastern Bangong-Nujiang Suture and Eastern Himalaya ...Similarly, a high velocity and high Q block in southeastern Tibet around eastern Bangong-Nujiang Suture and Eastern Himalaya Syntaxis correlates well...underthrusting Indian plate. Azimuthal fast directions are consistent at all depths up to approximately 200 km, which suggests a vertical coherent

  15. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  16. Highlighting High Performance: Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School; Upton, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-10-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Blackstone Valley High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, and water conservation. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  17. High-Velocity H2O Masers Associated Massive Star Formation Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐烨; 蒋栋荣; 郑兴武; 顾敏峰; 俞志尧; 裴春传

    2001-01-01

    We report on the results of 12 CO (1-0) emission associated with H2O masers and massive star formation regions to identify high-velocity H2O masers. Several masers have a large blueshift, even up to 120 km.s-1, with respect to the CO peak, but no large redshifted maser appears. This result suggests that high-velocity H2O masers can most probably occur in high mass star-forming regions and quite a number of masers stem from the amplifications of a background source, which may enable those undetectable weak masers to come to an observable level.

  18. High variability of the gvpA-gvpC region in Microcystis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gas vesicles provide buoyancy to Microcystis and other common cyanobacterial bloom-forming species. gvpA and gvpC are structural genes encoding gas vesicle proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of 10 Microcystis strains/uncultured samples showed that gvpC and each intergenic segment of the gvpA-gvpC region can be divided into two types. The combination of different types of gvpC and intergenic segments is an important factor that diversifies this genomic region. Some Microcystis strains isolated in China possess a 172 to 176 bp sequence tag in the intergenic segment between gvpA and gvpC. The gvpA-gvpC region in Microcystis can be divided into at least 4 classes and more numbers of subclasses. Compared to rbcLX and other regions, the high variability of the gvpA-gvpC region should be more useful in identifying geographical isolates or ecotypes of Microcystis.

  19. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and spin dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the proton at small values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aghasyan, M; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anfimov, N V; Anosov, V; Antoshkin, A; Augsten, K; Augustyniak, W; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C D R; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, M; Barth, J; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bodlak, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Buechele, M; Burtsev, V E; Chang, W -C; Chatterjee, C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chumakov, A G; Chung, S -U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Dreisbach, Ch; Duennweber, W; Dusaev, R R; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger jr, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchey, E; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Giarra, J; Giordano, F; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grasso, A; Gridin, A; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Hahne, D; Hamar, G; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Heitz, R; Herrmann, F; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Hsieh, C -Y; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jary, V; Joosten, R; Joerg, P; Kabuss, E; Kerbizi, A; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Koenigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O M; Kral, Z; Kraemer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kulinich, Y; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Kuznetsov, I I; Kveton, A; Lednev, A A; Levchenko, E A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lian, Y -S; Lichtenstadt, J; Longo, R; Lyubovitskij, V E; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mamon, S A; Marianski, B; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G V; Meyer, M; Meyer, W; Mikhailov, Yu V; Mikhasenko, M; Mitrofavov, E; Mitrofanov, N; Miyachi, Y; Moretti, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Novy, J; Nowak, W -D; Nukazuka, G; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J -C; Pereira, F; Pesek, M; Peskova, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Pierre, N; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rogacheva, N; Ryabchikov, D I; Rybnikov, A; Rychter, A; Salac, R; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sawada, T; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schoenning, K; Seder, E; Selyunin, A; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Smolik, J; Srnka, A; Steffen, D; Stolarski, M; Subrt, O; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Tasevsky, M; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thiel, A; Tomsa, J; Tosello, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Vasilishin, B I; Vauth, A; Veloso, J; Vidon, A; Virius, M; Wallner, S; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; ter Wolbeek, J; Zaremba, K; Zavada, P; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Zhuravlev, N; Ziembicki, M

    2017-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of the proton longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and the proton spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ at photon virtualities $0.006~({\\rm GeV}/c)^2< Q^2< 1~ ({\\rm GeV}/c)^2$ in the Bjorken $x$ range of $4 \\times 10^{-5} < x < 4 \\times 10^{-2}$. The results are based on data collected by the COMPASS Collaboration at CERN using muon beam energies of $160~{\\rm GeV}$ and $200~ {\\rm GeV}$. The statistical precision is more than tenfold better than that of the previous measurement in this region. In the whole range of $x$, the measured values of $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and $g_1^{\\rm p}$ are found to be positive. It is for the first time that spin effects are found at such low values of $x$.

  20. A novel high voltage LIGBT with an n-region in p-substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jianbing; Zhang Bo; Li Zhaoji

    2011-01-01

    A novel 4 μm thickness drift region lateral insulated gate bipolar transistor with a floating n-region (NRLIGBT) in p-substrate is proposed.Due to the field modulation from the n-region,the vertical blocking capability is enhanced and the breakdown voltage is improved significantly.Low area cost,high current capability and short turn-off time are achieved because of the high average electric field per micron.Simulation results show that the blocking capability of the new LIGBT increases by about 58% when compared with the conventional LIGBT (C-LIGBT) for the same 100μm drift region length.Furthermore,the turn-off time is shorter than that of the conventional LIGBT for nearly same blocking capability.

  1. An Unusual Time-Variable High Radiation Region Seen by HETE-2 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y. E.; Tamagawa, Toru; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Yamazaki, Tohru; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Torii, Ken'ichi; Shiraski, Yugi; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Sakamoto, Takanori; Suzuki, Motoko; Urata, Yuji; Sato, Rie; Ricker, George; Hurley, Kevin; Crew, Geoff

    2003-07-01

    We studied the unusual high radiation region above Ecuador seen by the X-ray and gamma-ray satellite HETE-2. The WXM instrument on-board HETE2 is position-sensitive proportional counter which has also sensitivity to charged particles. Detailed analysis of this region shows that 1) the fraction of the veto counts in total counts was concentrated on around 10% and 2) the ratio of particles which deposit energy below 100 keV in the main cell is 25˜70%. We evaluated these results quantitatively by Monte Carlo method, then found the unusual high radiation region mainly consist of electrons rather than protons. If assumed a power law distribution, the energy distribution of electrons should have a very steep index of ≥ 0.9, which is completely different from the SAA region.

  2. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-20

    bottom). complicated tectonics . Lg appears to propagate well in the Arabian plate but is dramatically attenuated in the Lesser Caucasus. This may be...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1022 High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region Robert J. Mellors...Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0007 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  3. New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, N; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M H S; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D B; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fassi, L El; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Seely, J; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Zheng, X

    2011-01-01

    We present new, high-Q^2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  4. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  5. Looking for outflow and infall signatures in high mass star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Beuther, H

    2011-01-01

    (Context) Many physical parameters change with time in star forming regions. Here we attempt to correlate changes in infall and outflow motions in high mass star forming regions with evolutionary stage using JCMT observations. (Aims) From a sample of 45 high mass star forming regions in three phases of evolution, we investigate the presence of established infall and outflow tracers to determine whether there are any trends attributable to the age of the source. (Methods) We obtained JCMT observations of HCO+/H13CO+ J=4-3 to trace large scale infall, and SiO J=8-7 to trace recent outflow activity. We compare the infall and outflow detections to the evolutionary stage of the host source (high mass protostellar objects, hypercompact HII regions and ultracompact HII regions). We also note that the integrated intensity of SiO varies with the full width at half maximum of the H13CO+. (Results) We find a surprising lack of SiO detections in the middle stage (Hypercompact HII regions), which may be due to an observat...

  6. Augmenting Chinese hamster genome assembly by identifying regions of high confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Nandita; Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Sharma, Mohit; Johnson, Kathryn C; Mudge, Joann; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Onsongo, Getiria; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Jacob, Nitya M; Le, Huong; Karypis, George; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines are the dominant industrial workhorses for therapeutic recombinant protein production. The availability of genome sequence of Chinese hamster and CHO cells will spur further genome and RNA sequencing of producing cell lines. However, the mammalian genomes assembled using shot-gun sequencing data still contain regions of uncertain quality due to assembly errors. Identifying high confidence regions in the assembled genome will facilitate its use for cell engineering and genome engineering. We assembled two independent drafts of Chinese hamster genome by de novo assembly from shotgun sequencing reads and by re-scaffolding and gap-filling the draft genome from NCBI for improved scaffold lengths and gap fractions. We then used the two independent assemblies to identify high confidence regions using two different approaches. First, the two independent assemblies were compared at the sequence level to identify their consensus regions as "high confidence regions" which accounts for at least 78 % of the assembled genome. Further, a genome wide comparison of the Chinese hamster scaffolds with mouse chromosomes revealed scaffolds with large blocks of collinearity, which were also compiled as high-quality scaffolds. Genome scale collinearity was complemented with EST based synteny which also revealed conserved gene order compared to mouse. As cell line sequencing becomes more commonly practiced, the approaches reported here are useful for assessing the quality of assembly and potentially facilitate the engineering of cell lines.

  7. High Prevalence of Nontraumatic Shoulder Pain in a Regional Sample of Female High School Volleyball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Kayt E.; Clark, Jacob; Hanson, Chad; Fagerness, Chris; Conway, Adam; Hoogendoorn, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is becoming increasingly problematic in young players as volleyball gains popularity. Associations between repetitive motion and pain and overuse injury have been observed in other overhand sports (most notably baseball). Studies of adult athletes suggest that there is a shoulder pain and overuse problem present in volleyball players, but minimal research has been done to establish rates and causes in juvenile participants. Purpose: To establish rates of shoulder pain, regardless of whether it resulted in a loss of playing time, in female high school volleyball players. A secondary goal was to determine whether high repetition volumes correlated with an increased likelihood of experiencing pain. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A self-report survey focusing on the prevalence of pain not associated with a traumatic event in female high school youth volleyball players was developed. Survey questions were formulated by certified athletic trainers, experienced volleyball coaches, and biomechanics experts. Surveys were received from 175 healthy, active high school volleyball players in Iowa, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Results: Forty percent (70/175) of active high school volleyball players remembered experiencing shoulder pain not related to traumatic injury, but only 33% (23/70) reported taking time off to recover from the pain. Based on these self-reported data, activities associated with significantly increased risk of nontraumatic shoulder pain included number of years playing competitive volleyball (P = .01) and lifting weights out of season (P = .001). Players who reported multiple risk factors were more likely to experience nontraumatic shoulder pain. Conclusion: When using time off for recovery as the primary injury criterion, we found that the incidence of shoulder pain is more than twice as high as the incidence of injury reported by previous studies. Findings also indicated that the incidence of shoulder pain

  8. The Identification of Technology Platforms and Innovation Areas with High Regional Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Urbančíková

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the process of identification of the technological platforms and innovation areas with high regional impact. The aim is to discover future fields of technological innovation which are having a high qualitative and quantitative demand of high potentials. The research has been undertaken within project Innovative Development of European Areas by fostering transnational Knowledge Development – IDEA/ 2CE1175P1 funded by Central Europe Programme. The aim of IDEA project is the development of an adequate strategy which enables the small and medium sized enterprises in the regions of Central Europe to face the increasing demand of high potentials with tested methods and instruments. The target group of IDEA project are so called “high potentials” in the engineering and scientific sector where future-oriented technologies are one of the main sources of innovation.

  9. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the WHO European Region 2003-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerup, Annemarie R; Donoghoe, Martin C; Lazarus, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    To assess changes in access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between the end of 2002 and the end of 2005, and to review the capacity for further HAART scale-up in the then 52 Member States of the WHO European Region.......To assess changes in access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between the end of 2002 and the end of 2005, and to review the capacity for further HAART scale-up in the then 52 Member States of the WHO European Region....

  10. Waveguide-mode interference lithography technique for high contrast subwavelength structures in the visible region

    CERN Document Server

    Kusaka, Kanta; Ohno, Seigo; Sakaki, Yozaburo; Nakayama, Kazuyuki; Moritake, Yuto; Ishihara, Teruya

    2014-01-01

    We explore possibilities of waveguide-mode interference lithography (WMIL) technique for high contrast subwavelength structures in the visible region. Selecting an appropriate waveguide-mode, we demonstrate high contrast resist mask patterns for the first time. TM1 mode in the waveguide is shown to be useful for providing a three-dimensional structure whose cross section is checkerboard pattern. Applying our WMIL technique, we demonstrate 1D, 2D and 3D subwavelength resist patterns that are widely used for the fabrication of metamteterials in the visible region. In addition to the resist patterns, we demonstrate a resonance at 1.9 eV for a split tube structure experimentally.

  11. Very-High-Energy Astrophysical Processes in the Cygnus Region of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkow, Alexis G.

    2017-05-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy can provide insight in to the origin of cosmic rays. The Cygnus arm of the Galaxy is a well studied region and has been shown to have active sources of particle acceleration. VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four 12 meter diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona. From 2007 through 2012 VERITAS observed the Cygnus region for nearly 300 hours from 67° to 82° in Galactic longitude and from -1° to 4° in Galactic latitude. The survey and followup observations detected four sources: VER J2031+415, VER J2019+407, VER J2016+317, and VER J2019+368. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) is a satellite gamma-ray telescope operating in the high-energy gamma-ray regime. The emission detected by the Fermi-LAT can provide insight into the nature of these sources and guide targeted followup observations in the region. We have reanalyzed the VERITAS data with updated VERITAS analysis and completed an analysis of over seven years of Fermi-LAT data in the region. We have discovered Fermi-LAT emission associated with VER J2031+415 strengthening its interpretation as a pulsar wind nebula, the SNR nature of VER J2019+407 has been confirmed by this study, and VER J2016+317 has been confirmed to be associated with the pulsar wind nebula CTB 87 rather than with a blazar source located at the same position. The Cygnus region is observed to be a particularly bright region of the Galaxy with both very-high-energy and high-energy gamma-ray experiments. These results motivate continued study of the region with VERITAS, as well as with current and future experiments such as HAWC and CTA.

  12. Modelling the regional variability of the probability of high trihalomethane occurrence in municipal drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Geneviève; Lebel, Alexandre; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2015-12-01

    The regional variability of the probability of occurrence of high total trihalomethane (TTHM) levels was assessed using multilevel logistic regression models that incorporate environmental and infrastructure characteristics. The models were structured in a three-level hierarchical configuration: samples (first level), drinking water utilities (DWUs, second level) and natural regions, an ecological hierarchical division from the Quebec ecological framework of reference (third level). They considered six independent variables: precipitation, temperature, source type, seasons, treatment type and pH. The average probability of TTHM concentrations exceeding the targeted threshold was 18.1%. The probability was influenced by seasons, treatment type, precipitations and temperature. The variance at all levels was significant, showing that the probability of TTHM concentrations exceeding the threshold is most likely to be similar if located within the same DWU and within the same natural region. However, most of the variance initially attributed to natural regions was explained by treatment types and clarified by spatial aggregation on treatment types. Nevertheless, even after controlling for treatment type, there was still significant regional variability of the probability of TTHM concentrations exceeding the threshold. Regional variability was particularly important for DWUs using chlorination alone since they lack the appropriate treatment required to reduce the amount of natural organic matter (NOM) in source water prior to disinfection. Results presented herein could be of interest to authorities in identifying regions with specific needs regarding drinking water quality and for epidemiological studies identifying geographical variations in population exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs).

  13. Measurement of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio at Q2 = 1.58 GeV2 using the reaction 3He(e,e'n)pp

    CERN Document Server

    Schlimme, B S; Gayoso, C A Ayerbe; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Challand, Th; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Fellenberger, F; Fonvieille, H; Rodríguez, M Gómez; Grabmayr, P; Hehl, T; Heil, W; Kiselev, D; Krimmer, J; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Middleton, D G; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Ott, B A; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Majos, S Sánchez; Sargsian, M M; Sick, I; Širca, S; Weinriefer, M; Wendel, M; Yoon, C J

    2013-01-01

    A measurement of beam helicity asymmetries in the reaction 3He(e,e'n)pp has been performed at the Mainz Microtron in quasielastic kinematics in order to determine the electric to magnetic form factor ratio of the neutron, GEn/GMn, at a four momentum transfer Q2 = 1.58 GeV2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered on a highly polarized 3He gas target. The scattered electrons were detected with a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer, and the ejected neutrons with a dedicated neutron detector composed of scintillator bars. To reduce systematic errors data were taken for four different target polarization orientations allowing the determination of GEn/GMn from a double ratio. We find mu_n GEn/GMn = 0.250 +/- 0.058(stat.) +/- 0.017 (sys.).

  14. High spatial resolution FeXII observations of solar active region

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal FeXII 1349.4A emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (~0.33"). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), FeXII emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops, and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (moss) FeXII emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts (v_Dop ~3 km/s), as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average ~24 km/s, and the peak of the distribution at ~15 km/s). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced 3D radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the transition region footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of FeXII 1349.4A peaks at similar values as lower resolut...

  15. High time resolution observations of HF cross-modulation within the D region ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, J.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    High-frequency cross-modulation is employed to probe the D region ionosphere during HF heating experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory. We have adapted Fejer's well-known cross-modulation probing method to determine the extent of ionospheric conductivity modification in the D region ionosphere with high (5 μsec) time resolution. We demonstrate that the method can be used to analyze D region conductivity changes produced by HF heating both during the initial stages of heating and under steady state conditions. The sequence of CW probe pulses used allow the separation of cross-modulation effects that occur as the probe pulse propagates upward and downward through the heated region. We discuss how this probing technique can be applied to benefit ELF/VLF wave generation experiments and ionospheric irregularities experiments at higher altitudes. We demonstrate that large phase changes equivalent to Doppler shift velocities >60 km/s can be imposed on HF waves propagating through the heated D region ionosphere.

  16. The Incidence of Highly-Obscured Star-Forming Regions in SINGS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Prescott, Moire K M; Bendo, George J; Buckalew, Brent A; Calzetti, Daniela; Engelbracht, Charles W; Gordon, Karl D; Hollenbach, David J; Lee, Janice C; Moustakas, John; Dale, Daniel A; Helou, George; Jarrett, Thomas H; Murphy, Eric J; Smith, John David T; Akiyama, Sanae; Sosey, Megan L; George J. Bendo Astrophysics Group, Imperial College

    2007-01-01

    Using the new capabilities of the Spitzer Space Telescope and extensive multiwavelength data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), it is now possible to study the infrared properties of star formation in nearby galaxies down to scales equivalent to large HII regions. We are therefore able to determine what fraction of large, infrared-selected star-forming regions in normal galaxies are highly obscured and address how much of the star formation we miss by relying solely on the optical portion of the spectrum. Employing a new empirical method for deriving attenuations of infrared-selected star-forming regions we investigate the statistics of obscured star formation on 500pc scales in a sample of 38 nearby galaxies. We find that the median attenuation is 1.4 magnitudes in H-alpha and that there is no evidence for a substantial sub-population of uniformly highly-obscured star-forming regions. The regions in the highly-obscured tail of the attenuation distribution (A_H-alpha > 3) make up only ~...

  17. Determination of the Charged Pion Form Factor at Q2=1.60 and 2.45 (GeV/c)2

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, T; Arrington, J; Barrett, B; Beise, E J; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Chang, C C; Christy, M E; Ent, R; Gaskell, D; Gibson, E; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Jin, S; Jones, M K; Keppel, C E; Kim, W; King, P M; Kovaltchouk, V; Liu, J; Lolos, G J; Mack, D J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Matsumura, A; Meekins, D; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Niculescu, I; Okayasu, Y; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D; Punjabi, V; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Roos, P G; Sarty, A; Smith, G R; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L G; Tvaskis, V; Vidakovic, S; Volmer, J; Vulcan, W; Warren, G; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Zheng, X

    2006-01-01

    The H(e,e'pi+)n cross section was measured at four-momentum transfers of Q2=1.60 and 2.45 GeV2 at an invariant mass of the photon nucleon system of W=2.22 GeV. The charged pion form factor (F_pi) was extracted from the data by comparing the separated longitudinal pion electroproduction cross section to a Regge model prediction in which F_pi is a free parameter. The results indicate that the pion form factor deviates from the charge-radius constrained monopole form at these values of Q2 by one sigma, but is still far from its perturbative Quantum Chromo-Dynamics prediction.

  18. Measurement of the RLT response function for π0 electroproduction at Q2=0.070 (GeV/c)2 in the N→Δ transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparveris, N. F.; Alarcon, R.; Barkhuff, D.; Bernstein, A.; Bertozzi, W.; Calarco, J.; Casagrande, F.; Chen, J.; Comfort, J.; Distler, M. O.; Dodson, G.; Dolfini, S.; Dooley, A.; Dow, K.; Farkondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Hicks, R.; Holtrop, M.; Hotta, A.; Jiang, X.; Kaloskamis, N.; Karabarbounis, A.; Kowalski, S.; Kunz, C.; Margaziotis, D.; Mertz, C.; Milner, R.; Miskimen, R.; Nakagawa, I.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Pavan, M. M.; Peterson, G.; Ramirez, A.; Rowntree, D.; Sarty, A. J.; Shaw, J.; Six, E.; Soong, S.; Stiliaris, E.; Tieger, D.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Vellidis, C.; Warren, G. A.; Young, A.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.-L.; Zwart, T.

    2003-05-01

    Quadrupole amplitudes in the γ*N→Δ transition are associated with the issue of nucleon deformation. A search for these small amplitudes has been the focus of a series of measurements undertaken at Bates/MIT by the OOPS Collaboration. We report on results from H(e,e'p)π0 data obtained at Q2=0.070 (GeV/c)2 and invariant mass of W=1155 MeV using the out-of-plane detection technique with the OOPS spectrometers. The σLT and σT+ɛσL response functions were isolated. These results, along with those of previous measurements at W=1172 MeV and Q2=0.127 (GeV/c)2, aim in elucidating the interplay between resonant and nonresonant amplitudes.

  19. AmphiFoxQ2, a novel winged helix/forkhead gene, exclusively marks the anterior end of the amphioxus embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.

    2003-01-01

    A full-length FoxQ-related gene (AmphiFoxQ2) was isolated from amphioxus. Expression is first detectable in the animal/anterior hemisphere at the mid blastula stage. The midpoint of this expression domain coincides with the anterior pole of the embryo and is offset dorsally by about 20 degrees from the animal pole. During the gastrula stage, expression is limited to the anterior ectoderm. By the early neurula stage, expression remains in the anterior ectoderm and also appears in the adjacent anterior mesendoderm. By the early larval stages, expression is detectable in the anteriormost ectoderm and in the rostral tip of the notochord. AmphiFoxQ2 is never expressed anywhere except at the anterior tip of amphioxus embryos and larvae. This is the first gene known that exclusively marks the anterior pole of chordate embryos. It may, therefore, play an important role in establishing and/or maintaining the anterior/posterior axis.

  20. High resolution telescope and spectrograph observations of solar fine structure in the 1600 A region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution spectroheliograms of the 1600 A region obtained during the HRTS rocket flight of 1978 February 13 are presented. The morphology, fine structure, and temporal behavior of emission bright points (BPs) in active and quiet regions are illustrated. In quiet regions, network elements persist as morphological units, although individual BPs may vary in intensity while usually lasting the flight duration. In cell centers, the BPs are highly variable on a 1 minute time scale. BPs in plages remain more constant in brightness over the observing sequence. BPs cover less than 4 percent of the quiet surface. The lifetime and degree of packing of BPs vary with the local strength of the magnetic field.

  1. Charged Pion Form Factor Determination in the Range of Q2 = 0.6 ~ 1.6 (GeV/c)2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nader Ghahramany; Kamran Rostami; Mohammad Ghanatian

    2004-01-01

    Using the most recent differential cross section data for ep quasi-elastic scattering, the charged pion formation and its form factor Fπ is calculated in the energy range of 2.4 ~ 4 GeV at Q2 = 0.6 ~ 1.6 (GeV/c)2. The functional dependence of the charged pion form factor to the separated cross section σL is investigated and compared to the previously determined result.

  2. Isotopic ratios of H, C, N, O, and S in comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    OpenAIRE

    Biver, N; Moreno, R.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Sandqvist, Aa.; Colom, P.; Crovisier, J.; Lis, D.C.; Boissier, J.; Debout, V; Paubert, G.; Milam, S.; Hjalmarson, A.; Lundin, S; T. Karlsson; Battelino, M.

    2016-01-01

    The apparition of bright comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) in March-April 2013 and January 2015, combined with the improved observational capabilities of submillimeter facilities, offered an opportunity to carry out sensitive compositional and isotopic studies of the volatiles in their coma. We observed comet Lovejoy with the IRAM 30m telescope between 13 and 26 January 2015, and with the Odin submillimeter space observatory on 29 January - 3 February 2015. We detected 22 mole...

  3. Generation of High Speed Particles in Herbig-Haro Flow Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hui-Rong; MAO Xin-Jie

    2001-01-01

    A mechanism is presented for generating high speed particles in Herbig-Haro flow coming from accretion disks associated with protostars. The disks are threaded with weak magnetic field lines, in which the magnetorotational instability results in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Then the turbulent waves accelerate the thermal particles out of the accretion disks to a few hundred kilometres per second, forming the high speed particles of optical jets in star-forming regions.

  4. Parsec-scale X-ray Flows in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P

    2005-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing remarkable new views of massive star-forming regions, revealing all stages in the life cycle of high-mass stars and their effects on their surroundings. We present a Chandra tour of several high-mass star-forming regions, highlighting physical processes that characterize the life of a cluster of high-mass stars, from deeply-embedded cores too young to have established an HII region to superbubbles so large that they shape our views of galaxies. Along the way we see that X-ray observations reveal hundreds of stellar sources powering great HII region complexes, suffused by both hard and soft diffuse X-ray structures caused by fast O-star winds thermalized in wind-wind collisions or by termination shocks against the surrounding media. Finally, we examine the effects of the deaths of high-mass stars that remained close to their birthplaces, exploding as supernovae within the superbubbles that these clusters created. We present new X-ray results on W51 IRS2E and 30 Doradu...

  5. Control of high power IGBT modules in the active region for fast pulsed power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Cravero, J M; Garcia Retegui, R; Maestri, S; Uicich, G

    2014-01-01

    At CERN, fast pulsed power converters are used to supply trapezoidal current in different magnet loads. These converters perform output current regulation by using a high power IGBT module in its ohmic region. This paper presents a new strategy for pulsed current control applications using a specifically designed IGBT driver.

  6. Spontaneous breathing during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation improves regional lung characteristics in experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, M.; Roubik, K.; Kopelent, V.; Kneyber, M. C. J.; Markhorst, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Maintenance of spontaneous breathing is advocated in mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates the effect of spontaneous breathing on regional lung characteristics during high-frequency oscillatory (HFO) ventilation in an animal model of mild lung injury. Methods Lung injury was

  7. Spontaneous breathing during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation improves regional lung characteristics in experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, M.; Roubik, K.; Kopelent, V.; Kneyber, M. C. J.; Markhorst, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Maintenance of spontaneous breathing is advocated in mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates the effect of spontaneous breathing on regional lung characteristics during high-frequency oscillatory (HFO) ventilation in an animal model of mild lung injury. Methods Lung injury was induce

  8. Enhancing Extension Program Effectiveness by Examining Regional Differences in High Water Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-wen Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for water sources in urban areas of Florida has increased due to increased population and human activities. High water users have been identified as a specific group on which Extension should focus water conservation education due to their low awareness of water issues and active landscape water use. In order to ensure the effectiveness of Extension programs targeting high water users statewide, this study sought to explore regional differences in water conservation behavior engagement within Florida high water users. An online survey was conducted to capture responses of high water users (N = 932 in three distinct regions for this comparative study. Respondents were asked to indicate their current engagement in water use behavior, application of water conservation strategies, and likelihood of engaging in water conservation and related societal behaviors. Regional differences were found in all four examined constructs. The findings imply Extension educators should tailor educational programs to regional audiences’ behavior patterns instead of designing statewide programs to ensure program effectiveness

  9. xF 3(x,Q 2) Structure Function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule with Nuclear Effect and Higher Twist Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, N. M.; Mukharjee, A.; Das, M. K.; Sarma, J. K.

    2016-12-01

    We present an analysis of the xF3(x,Q2) structure function and Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) sum rule taking into account the nuclear effects and higher twist correction. This analysis is based on the results presented in [N.M. Nath, et al, Indian J. Phys. 90 (2016) 117]. The corrections due to nuclear effects predicted in several earlier analysis are incorporated to our results of xF3(x,Q2) structure function and GLS sum rule for free nucleon, corrected upto next-next-to-leading order (NNLO) perturbative order and calculate the nuclear structure function as well as sum rule for nuclei. In addition, by means of a simple model we have extracted the higher twist contributions to the non-singlet structure function xF3(x,Q2) and GLS sum rule in NNLO perturbative orders and then incorporated them to our results. Our NNLO results along with nuclear effect and higher twist corrections are observed to be compatible with corresponding experimental data and other phenomenological analysis. Support from DAE-BRNS, India, as Major Research Project under Sanction No. 2012/37P/36/BRNS/2018 dated 24 Nov. 2012

  10. Evidence for Strange Quark Contributions to the Nucleon's Form Factors at $Q^2$ = 0.108 (GeV/c)$^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, F E; Baunack, S; Capozza, L; Diefenbach, J; Gl"aser, B; Hammel, T; Von Harrach, D; Imai, Y; Kabuss, E M; Kothe, R; Lee, J H; Lorente, A; Schilling, E P; Schwaab, D; Sikora, M; Stephan, G; Weber, G; Weinrich, C; Altarev, I S; Arvieux, J; El-Yakoubi, M; Frascaria, R; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Morlet, M; Ong, S; Van de Wiele, J; Kowalski, S; Plaster, B; Suleiman, R; Taylor, S

    2004-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons off unpolarized protons with the A4 apparatus at MAMI in Mainz at a four momentum transfer value of $Q^2$ = \\Qsquare (GeV/c)$^2$ and at a forward electron scattering angle of 30$^\\circ < \\theta_e < 40^\\circ$. The measured asymmetry is $A_{LR}(\\vec{e}p)$ = (\\Aphys $\\pm$ \\Deltastat$_{stat}$ $\\pm$ \\Deltasyst$_{syst}$) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$. The expectation from the Standard Model assuming no strangeness contribution to the vector current is A$_0$ = (\\Azero $\\pm$ \\DeltaAzero) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$. We have improved the statistical accuracy by a factor of 3 as compared to our previous measurements at a higher $Q^2$. We have extracted the strangeness contribution to the electromagnetic form factors from our data to be $G_E^s$ + \\FakGMs $G_M^s$ = \\GEsGMs $\\pm $ \\DeltaGEsGMs at $Q^2$ = \\Qsquare (GeV/c)$^2$. As in our previous measurement at higher momentum transfer for $G_E^s$ + 0.230 $G_M^s$, we again find t...

  11. Ubiquitous High Speed Transition Region and Coronal Upflows in the Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Mcintosh, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    We study the line profiles of a range of transition region (TR) emission lines observed in typical quiet Sun regions. In magnetic network regions, the Si IV 1402\\AA{}, C IV 1548\\AA{}, N V 1238\\AA{}, O VI 1031\\AA{}, and Ne VIII 770\\AA{} spectral lines show significant asymmetry in the blue wing of the emission line profiles. We interpret these high-velocity upflows in the lower and upper TR as the quiet Sun equivalent of the recently discovered upflows in the low corona above plage regions (Hara et al., 2008). The latter have been shown to be directly associated with high-velocity chromospheric spicules that are (partially) heated to coronal temperatures and play a significant role in supplying the active region corona with hot plasma (DePontieu et al., 2009}. We show that a similar process likely dominates the quiet Sun network. We provide a new interpretation of the observed quiet Sun TR emission in terms of the relentless mass transport between the chromosphere and corona - a mixture of emission from dynami...

  12. Detection of genomic variation by selection of a 9 mb DNA region and high throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Detection of the rare polymorphisms and causative mutations of genetic diseases in a targeted genomic area has become a major goal in order to understand genomic and phenotypic variability. We have interrogated repeat-masked regions of 8.9 Mb on human chromosomes 21 (7.8 Mb and 7 (1.1 Mb from an individual from the International HapMap Project (NA12872. We have optimized a method of genomic selection for high throughput sequencing. Microarray-based selection and sequencing resulted in 260-fold enrichment, with 41% of reads mapping to the target region. 83% of SNPs in the targeted region had at least 4-fold sequence coverage and 54% at least 15-fold. When assaying HapMap SNPs in NA12872, our sequence genotypes are 91.3% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 4-fold, and 97.9% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 15-fold. About 81% of the SNPs recovered with both thresholds are listed in dbSNP. We observed that regions with low sequence coverage occur in close proximity to low-complexity DNA. Validation experiments using Sanger sequencing were performed for 46 SNPs with 15-20 fold coverage, with a confirmation rate of 96%, suggesting that DNA selection provides an accurate and cost-effective method for identifying rare genomic variants.

  13. High resolution radio observations of nuclear and circumnuclear regions of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A; Perez-Torres, M A [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA, CSIC), PO Box 3004, 18080-Granada (Spain); Colina, L [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia - IEM, CSIC, C, Serrano 115, 28005 Madrid (Spain); Torrelles, J M [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC) and IEEC, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: antxon@iaa.es, E-mail: torres@iaa.es, E-mail: colina@damir.iem.csic.es, E-mail: torrelle@ieec.fcr.es

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution radio observations of the nuclear region of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) have shown that its radio structure consists of a compact high surface-brightness central radio source immersed in a diffuse low brightness circumnuclear halo. While the central component could be associated with an AGN or compact star-forming regions where radio supernovae are exploding, it is well known that the circumnuclear regions host bursts of star-formation. The studies of radio supernovae can provide essential information about stellar evolution and CSM/ISM properties in regions hidden by dust at optical and IR wavelengths. In this contribution, we show results from radio interferometric observations from NGC 7469, IRAS 18293-3413 and IRAS 17138-1017 where three extremely bright radio supernovae have been found. High-resolution radio observations of these and other LIRGs would allow us to determine the core-collapse supernova rate in them as well as their star-formation rate.

  14. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukrinov Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-voltage (IV characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  15. A high-resolution interval map of the q21 region of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, C.; Monaco, A.P. [ICRF Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others; Arnould, C. [Laboratoire de Genetique Humaine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    In a previous study, we have developed a panel of chromosomal rearrangements for the physical mapping of the q13-q21 region of the human X chromosome. Here, we report the physical localization of 36 additional polymorphic markers by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The high density of chromosomal breakpoints in Xq21 allows us to map 58 DNA loci in 22 intervals. As a result, this segment of the X chromosome is saturated with approximately three sequence tagged sites per megabase of DNA, which will facilitate the construction of a YAC contig of this region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  17. Innovation, regional development and relations between high- and low-tech industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis; Winther, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The current European policy agenda strongly accentuates the importance of research and development (R&D) as a driver of economic growth. The basic assumption is that high European wage levels make it unlikely that less research-intensive parts of the economy can withstand competition from low...... of such policies. EU growth has caught up with that of the USA during recent years and low-tech industries continue to have considerable economic importance in Europe in terms of jobs and value added, especially outside the main growth regions, but also in the major urban regions. Empirical evidence from Denmark...

  18. Evaluation of a High-Sensitivity GPS Receiver for Kinematics Application in Regions with High Shading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandri, H. F.; Becker, D.; Kleusberg, A.

    2009-04-01

    GPS positioning has been very much improved with high-sensitivity GPS (HSGPS) receivers. This kind of receiver can track the signal until 20-25dB below the level of conventional receivers. Obviously, no problem occurs when GPS technology is used for air and ocean vehicles navigation; sufficient and/or redundant signals can be easily acquired due to good hemispherical signal reception. A problem arises whenever signals cannot be traced anymore, if not enough satellites are available or if there is very weak signal reception in forest areas or between buildings. Those situations cannot be avoided or eliminated in land vehicle navigation. The HSGPS technology tries to solve those problems by tracking signals below the normal signal threshold of non-HSGPS receivers. This paper discusses the two factors of availability and accuracy in the context of navigation with HSGPS receivers. In order to investigate these issues some scenarios of receivers-placing will be examined which represent various receiver environments: good hemispherical signal reception, strong signal shading environment and indoor environment. The signal availability and accuracy are investigated during observation sessions of several hours by comparing the measurements of the HSGPS receiver with the measurements of a conventional, non-HSGPS receiver. As expected, the non-HSGPS receiver yields the same level of availability as the HSGPS receiver in an environment with good hemispherical signal reception. When both receivers are located in an environment with significant signal shading, the percentage of availability will significantly decay for the non-HSGPS receiver whereas the availability of the HSGPS receiver is much less reduced. However the results from the HSGPS receiver in this case are at a significantly reduced accuracy level. The accuracy level is assessed by using three parameters: i) the difference between the C/A code and the carrier phase in order to investigate how big the multipath and

  19. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28$\\le$$A$$\\le$52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in $^{56}$Ni with $I$=114$\\hbar$ and 140$\\hbar$, which follow the same (multi-particle)--(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on $^{20}$Ne or $^{28}$Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TCP) experiments.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON DIFFUSION CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH CONCENTRATION JET FLOW IN NEAR REGION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion characteristics of the high concentration jet flowissued from a round nozzle above the free surface into moving waterbody were experimentally investigated. By means of flow visualization technique, the diffusion behavior of the high concentration jet was observed and analysed, Concentration distribution in the near region was obtained by sampling and quantitative measurements. Experimental results indicate that the diffusion mechanics of the high concentration jet flow are greatly influenced by initial momentum, buoyancy, turbulent structure, ambient current and boundary conditions, showing complicated flow patterns and concentration distribution characteristics that are different from previous results for submerged jets.

  1. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2. II. e p →e π0p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Kim, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hakobyan, H.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Hollis, G.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klei, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π0 electroproduction reaction γ*p →p π0 , expanding an analysis of the γ*p →n π+ reaction from the same experiment. The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic ranges covered are 1.1 measurements, as well as π+ observables, the present results will provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  2. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive pion electroproduction for Q2>1 GeV2 . I. e p →e π+n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosted, P. E.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lanza, L.; Net, L. A.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries were measured for the exclusive π+ electroproduction reaction γ*p →n π+ . The results were obtained from scattering of 6-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 values of W . A generalized parton distributions (GPD)-based model is in poor agreement with the data. When combined with cross-sectional measurements, the present results provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.4 GeV.

  3. CGHScan: finding variable regions using high-density microarray comparative genomic hybridization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashekara Gireesh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic hybridization can rapidly identify chromosomal regions that vary between organisms and tissues. This technique has been applied to detecting differences between normal and cancerous tissues in eukaryotes as well as genomic variability in microbial strains and species. The density of oligonucleotide probes available on current microarray platforms is particularly well-suited for comparisons of organisms with smaller genomes like bacteria and yeast where an entire genome can be assayed on a single microarray with high resolution. Available methods for analyzing these experiments typically confine analyses to data from pre-defined annotated genome features, such as entire genes. Many of these methods are ill suited for datasets with the number of measurements typical of high-density microarrays. Results We present an algorithm for analyzing microarray hybridization data to aid identification of regions that vary between an unsequenced genome and a sequenced reference genome. The program, CGHScan, uses an iterative random walk approach integrating multi-layered significance testing to detect these regions from comparative genomic hybridization data. The algorithm tolerates a high level of noise in measurements of individual probe intensities and is relatively insensitive to the choice of method for normalizing probe intensity values and identifying probes that differ between samples. When applied to comparative genomic hybridization data from a published experiment, CGHScan identified eight of nine known deletions in a Brucella ovis strain as compared to Brucella melitensis. The same result was obtained using two different normalization methods and two different scores to classify data for individual probes as representing conserved or variable genomic regions. The undetected region is a small (58 base pair deletion that is below the resolution of CGHScan given the array design employed in the study

  4. Activated region fitting: a robust high-power method for fMRI analysis using parameterized regions of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeda, Wouter D; Waldorp, Lourens J; Christoffels, Ingrid; Huizenga, Hilde M

    2009-08-01

    An important issue in the analysis of fMRI is how to account for the spatial smoothness of activated regions. In this article a method is proposed to accomplish this by modeling activated regions with Gaussian shapes. Hypothesis tests on the location, spatial extent, and amplitude of these regions are performed instead of hypothesis tests of individual voxels. This increases power and eases interpretation. Simulation studies show robust hypothesis tests under misspecification of the shape model, and increased power over standard techniques especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. An application to real single-subject data also indicates that the method has increased power over standard methods.

  5. Scalability of regional climate change in Europe for high-end scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, O. B.; Yang, S.; Boberg, F.

    2015-01-01

    With the help of a simulation using the global circulation model (GCM) EC-Earth, downscaled over Europe with the regional model DMI-HIRHAM5 at a 25 km grid point distance, we investigated regional climate change corresponding to 6°C of global warming to investigate whether regional climate change...... are close to the RCP8.5 emission scenario. We investigated the extent to which pattern scaling holds, i.e. the approximation that the amplitude of any climate change will be approximately proportional to the amount of global warming. We address this question through a comparison of climate change results...... generally scales with global temperature even for very high levels of global warming. Through a complementary analysis of CMIP5 GCM results, we estimated the time at which this temperature may be reached; this warming could be reached in the first half of the 22nd century provided that future emissions...

  6. Retention of Highly Skilled Workers in Science and Technology: Distant Regional Employers’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Beaudry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research focuses on the retention of highly skilled workers in science and technology (HSWST in the distant regions of Canada.  Indeed, the human resource shortage forces them to seek more stability in their employment relationships. Our first objective is to analyze the point of view of distant regional employers regarding their retention capacity of HSWST and the reasons behind voluntary turnover in this group of workers. Our second objective is to analyze the retention strategies and practices implemented by these employers. This study uses a qualitative approach, which is to say the case study of businesses hiring HSWST in the Lower St. Lawrence Region of Canada. Results show that employers generally think they have good retention capacity. Employers believe that departures are chiefly due to personal reasons or working conditions. In addition, employers generally have no formal or planned strategies or practices with respect to retention.

  7. [Comparative rate of regional metastasis of high differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, N N; Evmenova, T D; Drozdova, D É

    2014-01-01

    The rate of metastasis of high differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid glands to the neck lymph nodes was studied in people of Kemerovo Region. The metastatic lesions of pretracheal lymph nodes (VI group) were detected in 49.5% patients with papillary carcinoma and 21.0% of patients with follicular cancer. Metastases in jungular lymph nodes were revealed in 37.3% patients with papillary carcinoma. It was noted that an extension of metastatic lesions of regional lymph nodes was observed in the case of primary tumour foci spread beyond borders of the capsula glandularis in patients with papillary carcinoma. There wasn't such a relation in a case of follicular cancer. Metastases in regional lymph nodes were detected more often (67.6%) in the case of papillary carcinoma in uncontaminated zone of the thyroid gland compared with other thyroid pathology (31.7%).

  8. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  9. The Effect of High Ambient Temperature on the Elderly Population in Three Regions of Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacim Rocklöv

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The short-term effects of high temperatures are a serious concern in the context of climate change. In areas that today have mild climates the research activity has been rather limited, despite the fact that differences in temperature susceptibility will play a fundamental role in understanding the exposure, acclimatization, adaptation and health risks of a changing climate. In addition, many studies employ biometeorological indexes without careful investigation of the regional heterogeneity in the impact of relative humidity. We aimed to investigate the effects of summer temperature and relative humidity and regional differences in three regions of Sweden allowing for heterogeneity of the effect over the scale of summer temperature. To do so, we collected mortality data for ages 65+ from Stockholm, Göteborg and Skåne from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute for the years 1998 through 2005. In Stockholm and Skåne on average 22 deaths per day occurred, while in Göteborg the mean frequency of daily deaths was 10. We fitted time-series regression models to estimate relative risks of high ambient temperatures on daily mortality using smooth functions to control for confounders, and estimated non-linear effects of exposure while allowing for auto-regressive correlation of observations within summers. The effect of temperature on mortality was found distributed over the same or following day, with statistically significant cumulative combined relative risk of about 5.1% (CI = 0.3, 10.1 per °C above the 90th percentile of summer temperature. The effect of high relative humidity was statistically significant in only one of the regions, as was the effect of relative humidity (above 80th percentile and temperature (above 90th percentile. In the southernmost region studied there appeared to be a significant increase in mortality with decreasing low summer temperatures that was not

  10. Partonic structure of proton in the resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Jianhong; Chen, Xurong; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We separate the contributions of parton distributions from higher twist corrections to the deeply inelastic lepton-proton scattering in the resonance region using the Jefferson Lab data at low $Q^2$. The study indicates that the concept of the valence quarks and their distributions are indispensable even at $Q^2<1GeV^2$. The quark-hadron duality is also discussed.

  11. Variability of sunspot cycle QBO and total ozone over high altitude western Himalayan regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar Singh

    2011-10-01

    Long-term trend of total column ozone at high altitude region in Ladakh is studied, using a total ozone mapping spectrometer and an ozone monitoring instrument during 1979-2008. In the region, total ozone exhibits seasonality with maximum in spring and minimum in autumn. The decreasing trend of total ozone was found as -2.51±0.45% per decade with 95% confidence level in the region. Ozone deficiency in the Ladakh region is strongest (-33.9 DU at Hanle) in May and weakest (-11.5 DU at Hanle) in January-February. In the study, the solar maximum in 1990 is in phase with ozone maximum, while ozone variation lags in phase with the 1980 and 2000 solar maxima. However, a significant correlation between total ozone and sunspot number is achieved in the westerly phase of quasi-biennial oscillation during spring season. Decreasing trend of ozone in the region is correlating well with the cooling rate in the lower stratosphere.

  12. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    CERN Document Server

    Santander-García, M; Alcolea, J; Castro-Carrizo, A; Sánchez-Contreras, C; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Corradi, R L M; Neri, R

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich equatorial regions of post-AGB stars can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms at work. We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. The high spatial resolution of the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO J=3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the SHAPEMOL plug-in. We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much grea...

  13. Scatter reduction for high resolution image detectors with a region of interest attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Compton scatter is the main interaction of x-rays with objects undergoing radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging procedures. Such scatter is responsible for reducing image signal to noise ratio which can negatively impact object detection especially for low contrast objects. To reduce scatter, possible methods are smaller fields-of-view, larger air gaps and the use of an anti-scatter grid. Smaller fields of view may not be acceptable and scanned-beam radiography is not practical for real-time imaging. Air gaps can increase geometric unsharpness and thus degrade image resolution. Deployment of an anti-scatter grid is not well suited for high resolution imagers due to the unavailability of high line density grids needed to prevent grid-line artifacts. However, region of interest (ROI) imaging can be used not only for dose reduction but also for scatter reduction in the ROI. The ROI region receives unattenuated x-rays while the peripheral region receives x-rays reduced in intensity by an ROI attenuator. The scatter within the ROI part of the image originates from both the unattenuated ROI and the attenuated peripheral region. The scatter contribution from the periphery is reduced in intensity because of the reduced primary x-rays in that region and the scatter fraction in the ROI is thus reduced. In this study, the scatter fraction for various kVp's, air-gaps and field sizes was measured for a uniform head equivalent phantom. The scatter fraction in the ROI was calculated using a derived scatter fraction formula, which was validated with experimental measurements. It is shown that use of a ROI attenuator can be an effective way to reduce both scatter and patient dose while maintaining the superior image quality of high resolution detectors.

  14. Head-Tail Galaxies: Beacons of High-Density Regions in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie Y; Stevens, Jamie B; Wotherspoon, Simon J

    2008-01-01

    Using radio data at 1.4 GHz from the ATCA we identify five head-tail (HT) galaxies in the central region of the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Physical parameters of the HT galaxies were determined along with substructure in the HRS to probe the relationship between environment and radio properties. Using a density enhancement technique applied to 582 spectroscopic measurements in the 2 degree x 2 degree region about A3125/A3128, we find all five HT galaxies reside in regions of extremely high density (>100 galaxies/Mpc^3). In fact, the environments surrounding HT galaxies are statistically denser than those environments surrounding non-HT galaxies and among the densest environments in a cluster. Additionally, the HT galaxies are found in regions of enhanced X-ray emission and we show that the enhanced density continues out to substructure groups of 10 members. We propose that it is the high densities that allow ram pressure to bend the HT galaxies as opposed to previously proposed mechanisms relyin...

  15. Regional development strategy of high-tech industry: The case of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Sofija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial thesis in the present work is that the solution of the problem of improving the competiveness of the economy of Vojvodina indispensably should open the room for the development of high-tech industries, in the first line on the basis of dynamic entrepreneurship and development of small and medium enterprises (SMEs. Emphasis in the research is on the analysis of the problem of inappropriate institutional order as a factor blocking innovative entrepreneurial conduct, technological development and economic valorization of high technologies, efficient socio-economic coordination of individual development initiatives and larger orientation of financial capital to risky investments in new industries. In this context, the most important limiting factors of development and economic valorization of high technologies in Vojvodina are defined as: (1 absence of socio-economic motivation for innovative behavior and manufacturing entrepreneurship, (2 low availability of skilled and internationally competent labour, (3 poor quality of regional, subregional and local STIEOT infrastructure, (4 orientation of regional financial infrastructure to credit imports and population and (5 low efficiency of regional, sub regional and local administrative and public services in eliminating above problems. In the light of those observations the operationalization of the concrete contents of development strategy for high-tech industries in Vojvodina is defined as a measure of ability to include regional, subregional and local institutions and public services to find how to solve the following problems: 1. providing conditions for internationally competent training of entrepreneurs, managers and expert teams in the function of acquiring necessary knowledge for the implementation of modern technological, managerial and organizational solutions needed for the foundation and dynamic development of high-tech enterprises, 2. provision of technical and economic support

  16. High beta and second region stability analysis and ICRF edge modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the tasks accomplished under Department of Energy contract [number sign]DE-FG02-86ER53236 in modeling the edge plasma-antenna interaction that occurs during Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating. This work has resulted in the development of several codes which determine kinetic and fluid modifications to the edge plasma. When used in combination, these code predict the level of impurity generation observed in experiments on the experiments on the Princeton Large Torus. In addition, these models suggest improvements to the design of ICRF antennas. Also described is progress made on high beta and second region analysis. Code development for a comprehensive infernal mode analysis code is nearing completion. A method has been developed for parameterizing the second region of stability and is applied to circular cross section tokamas. Various studies for high beta experimental devices such as PBX-M and DIII-D have been carried out and are reported on.

  17. An accretion disks in the high-mass star forming region IRA 23151+5912

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migenes, Victor; Rodríguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of radio continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.6 cm and H2O masers toward the high-mass star-forming regions IRA 23151+5912 carried out with the VLA-EVLA. We detected one continuum source at 1.3 cm and 13 water maser spots which are distributed in three groups aligned along the northeast-southwest direction. Our results suggest that the 1.3 cm emission is consistent with an HC HII region, probably with an embedded zero-age main sequence star of type B2. In particular, we find that this radio continuum source is probably associated with a circumstellar disk of about 68 AU, as traced by water masers. Furthermore, the masers of the second group are probably describing another circumstellar disk of about 86 AU, whose central protostar is still undetected. We discuss this results in the light of more recent high-resolution observations.

  18. Childhood diarrhea in high and low hotspot districts of Amhara Region, northwest Ethiopia: a multilevel modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Azage, Muluken; Kumie, Abera; Worku, Alemayehu; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood diarrhea is one of the major public health problems in Ethiopia. Multiple factors at different levels contribute to the occurrence of childhood diarrhea. The objective of the study was to identify the factors affecting childhood diarrhea at individual and community level. Methods A cross-sectional study design was employed from February to March 2015 in high and low hotspot districts of Awi and West and East Gojjam zones in Amhara Region, northwest Ethiopia. Districts wit...

  19. Calculations for nuclear data evaluation for Nb, Zr and W in the high energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Maruyama, Shin-ichi; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron total cross sections on Nb, Zr and W were calculated in the high energy region. In this calculation, we used the neutron optical-model potentials derived from those for proton incidence with introducing the symmetry term. Proton-induced activation yields for Nb and Zr was calculated by means of HETC/KFA2 and QMD plus SDM at incident energies up to 5 GeV. (author)

  20. Current Sharing inside a High Power IGBT Module at the Negative Temperature Coefficient Operating Region

    CERN Document Server

    Asimakopoulos, Panagiotis; Bongiorno, M; Thiringer, T

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the current sharing effect of a high power Soft Punch Through IGBT module in the Negative Temperature Coefficient region. The unbalanced current sharing between two of the substrates is demonstrated for different current and temperature levels and its impact on the thermal stressing of the device is evaluated. The results indicate that the current asymmetry does not lead to a significant thermal stressing unbalance between the substrates.

  1. High Risk Flash Flood Rainstorm Mapping Based on Regional L-moments Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Liao, Yifan; Lin, Bingzhang

    2017-04-01

    Difficulties and complexities in elaborating flash flood early-warning and forecasting system prompt hydrologists to develop some techniques to substantially reduce the disastrous outcome of a flash flood in advance. An ideal to specify those areas that are subject at high risk to flash flood in terms of rainfall intensity in a relatively large region is proposed in this paper. It is accomplished through design of the High Risk Flash Flood Rainstorm Area (HRFFRA) based on statistical analysis of historical rainfall data, synoptic analysis of prevailing storm rainfalls as well as the field survey of historical flash flood events in the region. A HRFFRA is defined as the area potentially under hitting by higher intense-precipitation for a given duration with certain return period that may cause a flash flood disaster in the area. This paper has presented in detail the development of the HRFFRA through the application of the end-to-end Regional L-moments Approach (RLMA) to precipitation frequency analysis in combination with the technique of spatial interpolation in Jiangxi Province, South China Mainland. Among others, the concept of hydrometeorologically homogenous region, the precision of frequency analysis in terms of parameter estimation, the accuracy of quantiles in terms of uncertainties and the consistency adjustments of quantiles over durations and space, etc., have been addressed. At the end of this paper, the mapping of the HRFFRA and an internet-based visualized user-friendly data-server of the HRFFRA are also introduced. Key words: HRFFRA; Flash Flood; RLMA; rainfall intensity; Hydrometeorological homogenous region.

  2. Thorium distributions in high- and low-dust regions and the significance for iron supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Christopher T.; Rosen, Jeffrey; McGee, David; Boyle, Edward A.

    2017-02-01

    Thorium and uranium isotopes (232Th, 230Th, 238U, and 234U) were investigated to refine their use for estimating mineral dust deposition and Fe delivery to the ocean. U concentrations and isotope ratios were consistent with conservative behavior and can safely be described using published U-salinity relationships and global average seawater isotopic composition. Near Barbados, waters affected by the Amazon outflow contained elevated 232Th. This signals one region where the thorium-dust method is inaccurate because of a confounding continental input. Dissolved 232Th fluxes in this region suggest that Amazonian Fe supply to the adjacent open ocean is much larger than local atmospheric deposition. The colloidal content of dissolved Th south of Bermuda was found to be quite small (2-6%), similar to that found north of Hawaii, despite the order of magnitude higher dust deposition in the Atlantic. This finding supports the assumption that dissolved 232Th and 230Th are scavenged at the same rate despite their different sources and also sheds light on the increase of dissolved 232Th fluxes with integrated depth. Outside the region influenced by Amazon River waters, dissolved 232Th fluxes are compared with Bermudan aerosol Fe deposition to estimate that fractional Th solubility is around 20% in this region. Finally, new dissolved and soluble Fe, Mn, and Cr data from the subtropical North Pacific support the idea that Fe concentrations in the remote ocean are highly buffered, whereas 232Th has a larger dynamic range between high- and low-dust regions.

  3. The Galactic Starburst Region NGC 3603 : exciting new insights on the formation of high mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberger, D. E. A.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most fundamental, yet still unsolved problems in star formation research is addressed by the question "How do high mass stars form?". While most details related to the formation and early evolution of low mass stars are quite well understood today, the basic processes leading to the formation of high mass stars still remain a mystery. There is no doubt that low mass stars like our Sun form via accretion of gas and dust from their natal environment. With respect to the formation of high mass stars theorists currently discuss two possible scenarios controversely: First, similar to stars of lower masses, high mass stars form by continuous (time variable) accretion of large amounts of gas and dust through their circumstellar envelopes and/or disks. Second, high mass stars form by repeated collisions (coalescence) of protostars of lower masses. Both scenarios bear difficulties which impose strong constrains on the final mass of the young star. To find evidences for or against one of these two theoretical models is a challenging task for observers. First, sites of high mass star formation are much more distant than the nearby sites of low mass star formation. Second, high mass stars form and evolve much faster than low mass star. In particular, they contract to main sequence, hydrogen burning temperatures and densities on time scales which are much shorter than typical accretion time scales. Third, as a consequence of the previous point, young high mass stars are usually deeply embedded in their natal environment throughout their (short) pre-main sequence phase. Therefore, high mass protostars are rare, difficult to find and difficult to study. In my thesis I undertake a novel approach to search for and to characterize high mass protostars, by looking into a region where young high mass stars form in the violent neighbourhood of a cluster of early type main sequence stars. The presence of already evolved O type stars provides a wealth of energetic photons and

  4. Region Templates: Data Representation and Management for High-Throughput Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, George; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Klasky, Scott; Saltz, Joel

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a region template abstraction and framework for the efficient storage, management and processing of common data types in analysis of large datasets of high resolution images on clusters of hybrid computing nodes. The region template abstraction provides a generic container template for common data structures, such as points, arrays, regions, and object sets, within a spatial and temporal bounding box. It allows for different data management strategies and I/O implementations, while providing a homogeneous, unified interface to applications for data storage and retrieval. A region template application is represented as a hierarchical dataflow in which each computing stage may be represented as another dataflow of finer-grain tasks. The execution of the application is coordinated by a runtime system that implements optimizations for hybrid machines, including performance-aware scheduling for maximizing the utilization of computing devices and techniques to reduce the impact of data transfers between CPUs and GPUs. An experimental evaluation on a state-of-the-art hybrid cluster using a microscopy imaging application shows that the abstraction adds negligible overhead (about 3%) and achieves good scalability and high data transfer rates. Optimizations in a high speed disk based storage implementation of the abstraction to support asynchronous data transfers and computation result in an application performance gain of about 1.13×. Finally, a processing rate of 11,730 4K×4K tiles per minute was achieved for the microscopy imaging application on a cluster with 100 nodes (300 GPUs and 1,200 CPU cores). This computation rate enables studies with very large datasets.

  5. Projected changes to high temperature events for Canada based on a regional climate model ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dae Il; Sushama, Laxmi; Diro, Gulilat Tefera; Khaliq, M. Naveed; Beltrami, Hugo; Caya, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Extreme hot spells can have significant impacts on human society and ecosystems, and therefore it is important to assess how these extreme events will evolve in a changing climate. In this study, the impact of climate change on hot days, hot spells, and heat waves, over 10 climatic regions covering Canada, based on 11 regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for the June to August summer period is presented. These simulations were produced with six RCMs driven by four Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCM), for the A2 emission scenario, for the current 1970-1999 and future 2040-2069 periods. Two types of hot days, namely HD-1 and HD-2, defined respectively as days with only daily maximum temperature (Tmax) and both Tmax and daily minimum temperature (Tmin) exceeding their respective thresholds (i.e., period-of-record 90th percentile of Tmax and Tmin values), are considered in the study. Analogous to these hot days, two types of hot spells, namely HS-1 and HS-2, are identified as spells of consecutive HD-1 and HD-2 type hot days. In the study, heat waves are defined as periods of three or more consecutive days, with Tmax above 32 °C threshold. Results suggest future increases in the number of both types of hot days and hot spell events for the 10 climatic regions considered. However, the projected changes show high spatial variability and are highly dependent on the RCM and driving AOGCM combination. Extreme hot spell events such as HS-2 type hot spells of longer duration are expected to experience relatively larger increases compared to hot spells of moderate duration, implying considerable heat related environmental and health risks. Regionally, the Great Lakes, West Coast, Northern Plains, and Maritimes regions are found to be more affected due to increases in the frequency and severity of hot spells and/or heat wave characteristics, requiring more in depth studies for these regions

  6. Populations of High-Luminosity Density-Bounded HII Regions in Spiral Galaxies? Evidence and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, J. E.; Rozas, M.; Zurita, A.; Watson, R. A.; Knapen, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that the H II regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the Ha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of H iI regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity Lstr), LH(sub alpha) = Lstr = 10(sup 38.6) (+/- 10(sup 0.1)) erg/ s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at LH(sub alpha) = Lstr marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is also presented: measurements of the central surface brightnesses of H II regions for LH(sub alpha) less than Lstr are proportional to L(sup 1/3, sub H(sub alpha)), expected for ionization bounding, but show a sharp trend to a steeper dependence for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr, and the observed relation between the internal turbulence velocity parameter, sigma, and the luminosity, L, at high luminosities, can be well explained if these regions are density bounded. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would have a number of interesting implications. It would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. Our estimates, based on the hypothesis, indicate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to

  7. HIV Prevalence Correlates with High-Risk Sexual Behavior in Ethiopia's Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris R.; Tsoumanis, Achilleas; Schwartz, Ilan Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV prevalence varies between 0.9 and 6.5% in Ethiopia’s eleven regions. Little has been published examining the reasons for this variation. Methods We evaluated the relationship between HIV prevalence by region and a range of risk factors in the 2005 and 2011 Ethiopian Demographic Health Surveys. Pearson’s correlation was used to assess the relationship between HIV prevalence and each variable. Results There was a strong association between HIV prevalence and three markers of sexual risk: mean lifetime number of partners (men: r = 0.87; P cohabiting partner (men: r = 0.92; P premarital sex. Condom usage and HIV testing were positively associated with HIV prevalence, while the prevalence of circumcision, polygamy, age at sexual debut and male migration were not associated with HIV prevalence. Conclusion Variation in sexual behavior may contribute to the large variations in HIV prevalence by region in Ethiopia. Population-level interventions to reduce risky sexual behavior in high HIV incidence regions should be considered. PMID:26496073

  8. HIV Prevalence Correlates with High-Risk Sexual Behavior in Ethiopia's Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R Kenyon

    Full Text Available HIV prevalence varies between 0.9 and 6.5% in Ethiopia's eleven regions. Little has been published examining the reasons for this variation.We evaluated the relationship between HIV prevalence by region and a range of risk factors in the 2005 and 2011 Ethiopian Demographic Health Surveys. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between HIV prevalence and each variable.There was a strong association between HIV prevalence and three markers of sexual risk: mean lifetime number of partners (men: r = 0.87; P < 0.001; women: r = 0.60; P = 0.05; reporting sex with a non-married, non-cohabiting partner (men: r = 0.92; P < 0.001, women r = 0.93; P < 0.001; and premarital sex. Condom usage and HIV testing were positively associated with HIV prevalence, while the prevalence of circumcision, polygamy, age at sexual debut and male migration were not associated with HIV prevalence.Variation in sexual behavior may contribute to the large variations in HIV prevalence by region in Ethiopia. Population-level interventions to reduce risky sexual behavior in high HIV incidence regions should be considered.

  9. High resolution regional soil carbon mapping in Madagascar : towards easy to update maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinand, Clovis; Dessay, Nadine; Razafimbelo, Tantely; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitoaina; Albrecht, Alain; Vaudry, Romuald; Tiberghien, Matthieu; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Bernoux, Martial

    2013-04-01

    The soil organic carbon plays an important role in climate change regulation through carbon emissions and sequestration due to land use changes, notably tropical deforestation. Monitoring soil carbon emissions from shifting-cultivation requires to evaluate the amount of carbon stored at plot scale with a sufficient level of accuracy to be able to detect changes. The objective of this work was to map soil carbon stocks (30 cm and 100 cm depths) for different land use at regional scale using high resolution satellite dataset. The Andohahela National Parc and its surroundings (South-Est Madagascar) - a region with the largest deforestation rate in the country - was selected as a pilot area for the development of the methodology. A three steps approach was set up: (i) carbon inventory using mid infra-red spectroscopy and stock calculation, (ii) spatial data processing and (iii) modeling and mapping. Soil spectroscopy was successfully used for measuring organic carbon in this region. The results show that Random Forest was the inference model that produced the best estimates on calibration and validation datasets. By using a simple and robust method, we estimated uncertainty levels of of 35% and 43% for 30-cm and 100-cm carbon maps respectively. The approach developed in this study was based on open data and open source software that can be easily replicated to other regions and for other time periods using updated satellite images.

  10. Combined effects of deterministic and statistical structure on high-frequency regional seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Christopher J.; Cormier, Vernon F.; Fitzpatrick, Michele

    2017-08-01

    Radiative transport modelling can combine the effects of both large-scale (deterministic) and the small-scale (statistical) structure on the coda envelopes of high-frequency regional seismograms. We describe a computer code to implement radiative transport modelling that propagates packets of seismic body wave energy along ray paths through large-scale deterministic 3-D structure, including the effects of velocity gradients, intrinsic attenuation, source radiation pattern and multiple scattering by layer boundaries and small-scale heterogeneities specified by a heterogeneity spectrum. The spatial distribution of these energy packets can be displayed as time snapshots to aid in the understanding of regional phase propagation or displayed as a coda envelope by summing at receiver bins. These techniques are applied to earthquakes and explosions recorded in the Lop Nor, China region to model observed narrow band passed seismic codas in the 1-4 Hz band. We predict that source discriminants in this region based on P/Lg amplitude ratios will best separate earthquake and explosion populations at frequencies 2 Hz and higher.

  11. Parsec-scale X-ray Flows in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K; Montmerle, T; Broos, P; Chu, Y H; Garmire, G; Getman, K

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra/ACIS images of several high-mass star-forming regions. The massive stellar clusters powering these HII regions are resolved at the arcsecond level into hundreds of stellar sources, similar to those seen in closer young stellar clusters. However, we also detect diffuse X-ray emission on parsec scales that is spatially and spectrally distinct from the point source population. For nearby regions (e.g. M17 and Rosette) the emission is soft, with plasma temperatures less than 10 million degrees, in contrast to what is seen in more distant complexes (e.g. RCW49, W51). This extended emission most likely arises from the fast O-star winds thermalized either by wind-wind collisions or by a termination shock against the surrounding media. We have established that only a small portion of the wind energy and mass appears in the observed diffuse X-ray plasma; in the blister HII regions, we suspect that most of it flows without cooling into the low-density interstellar medium through blow-outs or fissures...

  12. Segmenting high-frequency intracardiac ultrasound images of myocardium into infarcted, ischemic, and normal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, X; Bruce, C J; Pislaru, C; Greenleaf, J F

    2001-12-01

    Segmenting abnormal from normal myocardium using high-frequency intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) images presents new challenges for image processing. Gray-level intensity and texture features of ICE images of myocardium with the same structural/perfusion properties differ. This significant limitation conflicts with the fundamental assumption on which existing segmentation techniques are based. This paper describes a new seeded region growing method to overcome the limitations of the existing segmentation techniques. Three criteria are used for region growing control: 1) Each pixel is merged into the globally closest region in the multifeature space. 2) "Geographic similarity" is introduced to overcome the problem that myocardial tissue, despite having the same property (i.e., perfusion status), may be segmented into several different regions using existing segmentation methods. 3) "Equal opportunity competence" criterion is employed making results independent of processing order. This novel segmentation method is applied to in vivo intracardiac ultrasound images using pathology as the reference method for the ground truth. The corresponding results demonstrate that this method is reliable and effective.

  13. High regional genetic differentiation of an endangered relict plant Craigia yunnanensis and implications for its conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Of the genus Craigia, widespread in the Tertiary, only two relict species survived to modern times. One species is now possibly extinct and the other one, Craigia yunnanensis, is severely endangered. Extensive surveys have located six C. yunnanensis populations in Yunnan province, southwest China. Using fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP, the genetic diversity and population structure of these populations were examined. It was found that genetic diversity of C. yunnanensis was moderate at the species level, but low at regional and population levels. Analysis of population structure showed significant genetic differentiation between Wenshan and Dehong regions, apparently representing two geographically isolated for long time refuges. There are also clear indications of isolation between populations, which, together with anthropogenically caused decline of population size, will lead to general loss of the species genetic variation with subsequent loss of adaptive potential. To conserve the genetic integrity of C. yunnanensis, we recommend that ex-situ conservation should include representative samples from every population of the two differentiated regions (e.g. Wenshan and Dehong. The crosses between individuals originated from different regions should be avoided because of a high risk of outbreeding depression. As all the extant populations of C. yunnanensis are in unprotected areas with strong anthropogenic impact, there is no alternative to reintroduction of C. yunnanensis into suitable protected locations.

  14. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  15. Search for an exotic S=-2, Q=-2 baryon resonance at a mass near 1862 MeV in quasi-real photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V A; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P

    2004-01-01

    A search for an exotic baryon resonance with $S=-2, Q=-2$ has been performed in quasi-real photoproduction on a deuterium target through the decay channel $\\Xi^- \\pi^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^- \\pi^- \\to p \\pi^- \\pi^- \\pi^-$. No evidence for a previously reported $\\Xi^{--}(1860)$ resonance is found in the $\\Xi^- \\pi^-$invariant mass spectrum. An upper limit for the photoproduction cross section of 2.1 nb is found at the 90% confidence level. The photoproduction cross section for the $\\Xi^{0}(1530)$ is found to be between 9 and 24 nb.

  16. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims: We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods: The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results: We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined 60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5 × 1016 cm, a mass of 2.7 × 10-3M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as

  17. Spatial and temporal variations in high turbidity surface water off the Thule region, northwestern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Iida, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Shin; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    Glacial meltwater discharge from the Greenland ice sheet and ice caps forms high turbidity water in the proglacial ocean off the Greenland coast. Although the timing and magnitude of high turbidity water export affect the coastal marine environment, for example, through impacts on biological productivity, little is known about the characteristics of this high turbidity water. In this paper, we therefore report on the spatial and temporal variations in high turbidity water off the Thule region in northwestern Greenland, based on remote sensing reflectance data at a wavelength of 555 nm (Rrs555). The high turbidity area, identified on the basis of high reflectivity (Rrs555 ≥ 0.0070 sr-1), was generally distributed near the coast, where many outlet glaciers terminate in the ocean and on land. The extent of the high turbidity area exhibited substantial seasonal and interannual variability, and its annual maximum extent was significantly correlated with summer air temperature. Assuming a linear relationship between the high turbidity area and summer temperature, annual maximum extent increases under the influence of increasing glacial meltwater discharge, as can be inferred from present and predicted future warming trends.

  18. High Circular Polarization in the Star Forming Region NGC 6334: Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, François; Chrysostomou, A.; Gledhill, T.; Hough, J. H.; Bailey, J.

    The amino-acids which form the building blocks of biological proteins are all left-handed molecules. By contrast, when these molecules are made in the laboratory equal numbers of the right and left-handed versions are made. This homochirality found in biological material may then well be a prerequisite for the origin of life and a number of processes have been proposed to produce the required enantiomeric excess in prebiotic organic molecules. We report here on the detection of high degrees of circular polarisation in the star forming complex NGC 6334, in the constellation Scorpius. This important finding suggests the widespread nature of a potentially efficient process to produce biomolecules with large chiral excess, namely selective (asymmetric) photolysis by circularly polarised light. The mechanism, well known in the laboratory, was first suggested to take place in a star forming region by Bailey et al. (1998) (Science, 281, 672; and this conference), following our discovery of high degrees of near-infrared circular polarisation in the Orion molecular cloud, OMC-1. NGC 6334 is a giant HII region and molecular cloud similar to Orion. These two detections of large circular polarisation, among the small number of sources surveyed so far, lead us to suggest that selective photolysis by circular polarisation may be quite widespread in massive star formation regions.

  19. High-resolution Observation of Moving Magnetic Features in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Deng, Na; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Moving magnetic features (MMFs) are small photospheric magnetic elements that emerge and move outward toward the boundary of moat regions mostly during a sunspot decaying phase, in a serpent wave-like magnetic topology. Studies of MMFs and their classification (e.g., unipolar or bipolar types) strongly rely on the high spatiotemporal-resolution observation of photospheric magnetic field. In this work, we present a detailed observation of a sunspot evolution in NOAA active region (AR) 12565, using exceptionally high resolution Halpha images from the 1.6 New Solar telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and the UV images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The spectropolarimetric measurements of photospheric magnetic field are obtained from the NST Near InfraRed Imaging Spectropolarimeter (NIRIS) at Fe I 1.56 um line. We investigate the horizontal motion of the classified MMFs and discuss the clustering patterns of the geometry and motion of the MMFs. We estimate the rate of flux generation by appearance of MMFs and the role MMFs play in sunspot decaying phase. We also study the interaction between the MMFs and the existing magnetic field features and its response to Ellerman bombs and IRIS bombs respectively at higher layers.

  20. The distribution of water in the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334I

    CERN Document Server

    Emprechtinger, M; Bell, T; Phillips, T G; Schilke, P; Comito, C; Rolffs, R; van der Tak, F; Ceccarelli, C; Aarts, H; Bacmann, A; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Bergin, E A; Blake, G; Boogert, A; Bottinelli, S; Cabrit, S; Caselli, P; Castets, A; Caux, E; Cernicharo, J; Codella, C; Coutens, A; Crimier, N; Demyk, K; Dominik, C; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Fuente, A; Gerin, M; Goldsmith, P; Helmich, F; Hennebelle, P; Henning, T; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Jacq, T; Kahane, C; Kama, M; Klotz, A; Kooi, J; Langer, W; Lefloch, B; Loose, A; Lord, S; Lorenzani, A; Maret, S; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Nisini, B; Ossenkopf, V; Pacheco, S; Pagani, L; Parise, B; Pearson, J; Risacher, C; Salez, M; Saraceno, P; Schuster, K; Stutzki, J; Tielens, X; van der Wiel, M; Vastel, C; Viti, S; Wakelam, V; Walters, A; Wyrowski, F; Yorke, H

    2010-01-01

    We present observations of twelve rotational transitions of H2O-16, H2O-18, and H2O-17 toward the massive star-forming region NGC 6334 I, carried out with Herschel/HIFI as part of the guaranteed time key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS). We analyze these observations to obtain insights into physical processes in this region. We identify three main gas components (hot core, cold foreground, and outflow) in NGC 6334 I and derive the physical conditions in these components. The hot core, identified by the emission in highly excited lines, shows a high excitation temperature of 200 K, whereas water in the foreground component is predominantly in the ortho- and para- ground states. The abundance of water varies between 4 10^-5 (outflow) and 10^-8 (cold foreground gas). This variation is most likely due to the freeze-out of water molecules onto dust grains. The H2O-18/H2O-17 abundance ratio is 3.2, which is consistent with the O-18/O-17 ratio determined from CO isotopologues. The or...

  1. A high-resolution PAC and BAC map of the SCA2 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechiporuk, T; Nechiporuk, A; Sahba, S; Figueroa, K; Shibata, H; Chen, X N; Korenberg, J R; de Jong, P; Pulst, S M

    1997-09-15

    The spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) gene has been localized to chromosome 12q24.1. To characterize this region and to aid in the identification of the SCA2 gene, we have constructed a 3.9-Mb physical map, which covers markers D12S1328 and D12S1329 known to flank the gene. The map comprises a contig of 84 overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), P1 artificial chromosomes (PACs), and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) onto which we placed 82 PCR markers. We localized eight genes and expressed sequence tags on this map, many of which had not been precisely mapped before. In contrast to YACs, which showed a high degree of chimerism and deletions in this region, PACs and BACs were stable. Only 1 in 65 PACs contained a small deletion, and 2 in 18 BACs were chimeric. The high-resolution physical map, which was used in the identification of the SCA2 gene, will be useful for the positional cloning of other disease genes mapped to this region.

  2. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  3. Characterization of integrons among Escherichia coli in a region at high incidence of ESBL-EC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Ming; Wang, Ming-Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Hong-Jun; Li, Qin; Zhu, Ya-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Objective : The aim of study was to investigate the distribution of the integrons in Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates, and analyze the possible relationship between the antimicrobial resistance profiles and the integrons. Methods : The antimicrobial profiles of 376 E. coli strains were analysed by disk diffusion test. The integron genes and variable regions were detected by PCR. Some amplicons were sequenced to determine the gene cassettes style. Results : Of 376 isolates, 223 isolates (59.3%) were confirmed as ESBL-EC. Comparison to ESBL-negative E. coli, the high rates of resistance to the third and fourth generation of cephalosporins, penicillins and amikacin were found in ESBL-EC. Only class 1 was integron detected in the isolates, and the prevalence of it was 66.5%. It was commonly found in ESBL-EC (77.6%, 173/223), which was higher than that of ESBL-negative E. coli (50.3%, 77/153) (pESBL-EC, while in 9.1% isolates of ESBL-negative E.coli. Conclusion : The high incidence of ESBL-EC with resistance to multiple antibiotics were detected in the isolates from Blood stream infection (BSI). More resistant gene cassettes in ESBL-EC may partially underlie the high resistance to amikacin, while no relation exists between the high incidence of ESBL-EC and classes 1~ 3 integrons in this region.

  4. Ripple-associated high-firing interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By simultaneously recording the activity of individual neurons and field potentials in freely behaving mice, we found two types of interneurons firing at high frequency in the hippocampal CA1 region, which had high correlations with characteristic sharp wave-associated ripple oscillations (100―250 Hz) during slow-wave sleep. The firing of these two types of interneurons highly synchronized with ripple oscillations during slow-wave sleep, with strongly increased firing rates corresponding to individual ripple episodes. Interneuron type I had at most one spike in each sub-ripple cycle of ripple episodes and the peak firing rate was 310±33.17 Hz. Interneuron type II had one or two spikes in each sub-ripple cycle and the peak firing rate was 410±47.61 Hz. During active exploration, their firing was phase locked to theta oscillations with the highest probability at the trough of theta wave. Both two types of interneurons increased transiently their firing rates responding to the startling shake stimuli. The results showed that these two types of high-frequency interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region were involved in the modulation of the hippocampal neural network during different states.

  5. Ripple-associated high-firing interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; ZHANG Lu; PAN JingWei; XIE Kun; LI ShiQi; WANG ZhiRu; LIN LongNian

    2008-01-01

    By simultaneously recording the activity of individual neurons and field potentials in freely behaving mice, we found two types of interneurons firing at high frequency in the hippocampal CA1 region,which had high correlations with characteristic sharp wave-associated ripple oscillations (100-250 Hz)during slow-wave sleep. The firing of these two types of interneurons highly synchronized with ripple oscillations during slow-wave sleep, with strongly increased firing rates corresponding to individual ripple episodes. Interneuron type Ⅰ had at most one spike in each sub-ripple cycle of ripple episodes and the peak firing rate was 310±33.17 Hz. Interneuron type Ⅱ had one or two spikes in each sub-ripple cycle and the peak firing rate was 410±47.61 Hz. During active exploration, their firing was phase locked to theta oscillations with the highest probability at the trough of theta wave. Both two types of interneurons increased transiently their firing rates responding to the startling shake stimuli. The results showed that these two types of high-frequency interneurone in the hippocsmpal CA1 region were involved in the modulation of the hippocampal neural network during different states.

  6. Biometric Properties Estimated from High Resolution Imagery in the Amazon and the Cerrado Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S.; Palace, M. W.; Braswell, B. H.; Bustamante, M.; Ferreira, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Amazon and Cerrado regions are unique ecotypes with complex and varied forest and vegetation structure. Forest structure reveals the dual influences of disturbance and growth. Because these two tropical regions have and are undergoing rapid change due to human encroachment, understanding the forests structure in these ecotypes aids in efforts to quantify carbon dynamics on both regional and global scales. Analysis of data from literature found that canopy cover and biomass are highly correlated in the Cerrado (r2=.86), more so than other structural variables. This indicates that use of radar and lidar to estimate biomass in savannah ecotypes with sparse and clumpy tree cover might be prone to error. Literature also suggests that lidar and radar saturate in high biomass forests. Remote sensing of forest canopy structure estimation has greatly advanced to due the aid of high resolution satellite images. We estimated forest structure using high resolution image data from IKONOS using textural methods such as lacunarity, semivariance, power spectrum, entropy, and a crown characterization algorithm for 11,014 image tiles or sections (1 square km each) extracted from 300 IKONOS images. Our preprocessing of this data calculated top-of-atmosphere reflectance based on metadata from IKONOS image acquisition. A user-trained five category landuse classification was used to determine which areas within an IKONOS tile would be analyzed using textural methods.We compare results with available field measured forest biometric data. We used an Index of Translational Homogeneity (ITH) calculated from our lacunarity results. ITH is an index of average crown width and we estimated an average of 8.1 m +/- 7.7 SD. Our estimate of the range based on semivariance was an average of 11.4 m +/- 7.3 SD. Our crown characterization algorithm estimated average crown width to be 12.5 m +/- 4.0 SD. The average entropy of each tile was 5.7 +/- 0.5 SD. We associated each IKONOS tile with one of

  7. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  8. High Power Radio Wave Interactions within the D-Region Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper highlights the best results obtained during D-region modification experiments performed by the University of Florida at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory between 2007 and 2014. Over this period, we have seen a tremendous improvement in ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency. We have identified methods to characterize ambient and modified ionospheric properties and to discern and quantify specific types of interactions. We have demonstrated several important implications of HF cross-modulation effects, including "Doppler Spoofing" on HF radio waves. Throughout this talk, observations are compared with the predictions of an ionospheric HF heating model to provide context and guidance for future D-region modification experiments.

  9. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) of Hypervariable Mitochondrial DNA Regions for Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Rocha, Alípio; de Amorim, Isis Salviano Soares; Simão, Tatiana de Almeida; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza; Garrido, Rodrigo Grazinoli; Mencalha, Andre Luiz

    2017-08-23

    Forensic strategies commonly are proceeding by analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, new additional strategies have been proposed for forensic science. Thus, this article standardized the high-resolution melting (HRM) of DNA for forensic analyzes. For HRM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from eight individuals were extracted from mucosa swabs by DNAzol reagent, samples were amplified by PCR and submitted to HRM analysis to identify differences in hypervariable (HV) regions I and II. To confirm HRM, all PCR products were DNA sequencing. The data suggest that is possible discriminate DNA from different samples by HRM curves. Also, uncommon dual-dissociation was identified in a single PCR product, increasing HRM analyzes by evaluation of melting peaks. Thus, HRM is accurate and useful to screening small differences in HVI and HVII regions from mtDNA and increase the efficiency of laboratory routines based on forensic genetics. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. High-resolution recombination patterns in a region of human chromosome 21 measured by sperm typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Tiemann-Boege

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, classical crossover studies and linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis of genomic regions suggested that human meiotic crossovers may not be randomly distributed along chromosomes but are focused instead in "hot spots." Recent sperm typing studies provided data at very high resolution and accuracy that defined the physical limits of a number of hot spots. The data were also used to test whether patterns of LD can predict hot spot locations. These sperm typing studies focused on several small regions of the genome already known or suspected of containing a hot spot based on the presence of LD breakdown or previous experimental evidence of hot spot activity. Comparable data on target regions not specifically chosen using these two criteria is lacking but is needed to make an unbiased test of whether LD data alone can accurately predict active hot spots. We used sperm typing to estimate recombination in 17 almost contiguous ~5 kb intervals spanning 103 kb of human Chromosome 21. We found two intervals that contained new hot spots. The comparison of our data with recombination rates predicted by statistical analyses of LD showed that, overall, the two datasets corresponded well, except for one predicted hot spot that showed little crossing over. This study doubles the experimental data on recombination in men at the highest resolution and accuracy and supports the emerging genome-wide picture that recombination is localized in small regions separated by cold areas. Detailed study of one of the new hot spots revealed a sperm donor with a decrease in recombination intensity at the canonical recombination site but an increase in crossover activity nearby. This unique finding suggests that the position and intensity of hot spots may evolve by means of a concerted mechanism that maintains the overall recombination intensity in the region.

  11. A Survey of Large Molecules of Biological Interest toward Selected High Mass Star Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remijan, A.; Shiao, Y.-S.; Friedel, D. N.; Meier, D. S.; Snyder, L. E.

    2004-01-01

    We have surveyed three high mass Galactic star forming regions for interstellar methanol (CH3OH), formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), methyl formate (HCOOCH3), methyl cyanide (CH3CN), and ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) with the BIMA Array. From our observations, we have detected two new sources of interstellar HCOOH toward the hot core regions G19.61-0.23 and W75N. We have also made the first detections of CH3CH2CN and HCOOCH3 toward G19.61-0.23. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward G19.61-0.23 is 0.18 which is comparable to the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues toward Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion and W51(approximately 0.10). We have made the first detection of HCOOCH3 toward W75N. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward W75N is 0.26 which is more than twice as large as the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues. Furthermore, the hot core regions around W75N show a chemical differentiation between the O and N cores similar to what is seen toward the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge and W3(OH) and W3(H2O). It is also apparent from our observations that the high mass star forming region G45.47+0.05 does not contain any compact hot molecular core and as a consequence its chemistry may be similar to cold dark clouds. Finally, the formation of CH3COOH appears to favor HMCs with well mixed N and O, despite the fact that CH3COOH does not contain a N atom. If proved to be true, this is an important constraint on CH3COOH formation and possibly other structurally similar biomolecules.

  12. An investigation of tropical Atlantic bias in a high-resolution coupled regional climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricola, Christina M.; Saravanan, R.; Hsieh, Jen-Shan [Texas A and M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College Station, TX (United States); Li, Mingkui; Xu, Zhao [Texas A and M University, Department of Oceanography, College Station, TX (United States); Ocean University of China, Key Laboratory of Physical Oceanography of Ministry of Education, Qingdao (China); Chang, Ping [Texas A and M University, Department of Oceanography, College Station, TX (United States); Ocean University of China, Key Laboratory of Physical Oceanography of Ministry of Education, Qingdao (China); Second Institute of Oceanography, State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2012-11-15

    Coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) commonly fail to simulate the eastern equatorial Atlantic boreal summer cold tongue and produce a westerly equatorial trade wind bias. This tropical Atlantic bias problem is investigated with a high-resolution (27-km atmosphere represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, 9-km ocean represented by the Regional Ocean Modeling System) coupled regional climate model. Uncoupled atmospheric simulations test climate sensitivity to cumulus, land-surface, planetary boundary layer, microphysics, and radiation parameterizations and reveal that the radiation scheme has a pronounced impact in the tropical Atlantic. The CAM radiation simulates a dry precipitation (up to -90%) and cold land-surface temperature (up to -8 K) bias over the Amazon related to an over-representation of low-level clouds and almost basin-wide westerly trade wind bias. The Rapid Radiative Transfer Model and Goddard radiation simulates doubled Amazon and Congo Basin precipitation rates and a weak eastern Atlantic trade wind bias. Season-long high-resolution coupled regional model experiments indicate that the initiation of the warm eastern equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) bias is more sensitive to the local rather than basin-wide trade wind bias and to a wet Congo Basin instead of dry Amazon - which differs from AOGCM simulations. Comparisons between coupled and uncoupled simulations suggest a regional Bjerknes feedback confined to the eastern equatorial Atlantic amplifies the initial SST, wind, and deepened thermocline bias, while barrier layer feedbacks are relatively unimportant. The SST bias in some CRCM simulations resembles the typical AOGCM bias indicating that increasing resolution is unlikely a simple solution to this problem. (orig.)

  13. Searching for high-K isomers in the proton-rich A ˜ 80 mass region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhi-Jun; Jiao, Chang-Feng; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Fu-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations have been performed to investigate the K isomerism in the proton-rich A ˜ 80 mass region. An abundance of high-K states are predicted. These high-K states arise from two and four-quasi-particle excitations, with Kπ = 8+ and Kπ = 16+, respectively. Their excitation energies are comparatively low, making them good candidates for long-lived isomers. Since most nuclei under study are prolate spheroids in their ground states, the oblate shapes of the predicted high-K states may indicate a combination of K isomerism and shape isomerism. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2013CB834402) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11235001, 11320101004 and 11575007)

  14. Simple solar systems for heating, hot water and cooking in high altitude regions with high solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Schwarzer, K. [Solar-Inst., Juelich (Germany); Kleine-Hering, H. [Ecoandina, Salta (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    In connection with a BMBF research project (FKZ 17104.01), a new system has been developed to provide solar heating and hot water. The system is designed to be used in areas with high solar radiation and low ambient temperatures, conditions which occur typically in high altitude regions. The main considerations in developing this system were robust technology, low cost and easy maintenance. To ensure robustness, air is used as the heat transfer medium. Air has the advantage of a low thermal capacity and enables the system to be immediately ready for use, and does not have the disadvantages of water at temperatures below the freezing point. The units were installed in two public buildings in the Argentinean Altiplano at an altitude of 3600 m, as part of a BMZ (Ministry for Cooperation) project. The local partner in the project was Ecoandina. Because of the high level of direct solar insolation in this area, concentrating solar cookers for families and institutions have a very high acceptance. As part of the BMZ project, four community cookers with Fixed-Focus reflectors (Scheffler reflectors) each with 3 kW power were installed. Further installations included solar hot water systems, drip irrigation systems with solar pumps and parabolic cookers for families. One of the villages equipped with these units is now to receive an award for being the first Solar Village in Argentina. (orig.)

  15. An Automated Approach for Mapping Persistent Ice and Snow Cover over High Latitude Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Selkowitz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed an automated approach for mapping persistent ice and snow cover (glaciers and perennial snowfields from Landsat TM and ETM+ data across a variety of topography, glacier types, and climatic conditions at high latitudes (above ~65°N. Our approach exploits all available Landsat scenes acquired during the late summer (1 August–15 September over a multi-year period and employs an automated cloud masking algorithm optimized for snow and ice covered mountainous environments. Pixels from individual Landsat scenes were classified as snow/ice covered or snow/ice free based on the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI, and pixels consistently identified as snow/ice covered over a five-year period were classified as persistent ice and snow cover. The same NDSI and ratio of snow/ice-covered days to total days thresholds applied consistently across eight study regions resulted in persistent ice and snow cover maps that agreed closely in most areas with glacier area mapped for the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI, with a mean accuracy (agreement with the RGI of 0.96, a mean precision (user’s accuracy of the snow/ice cover class of 0.92, a mean recall (producer’s accuracy of the snow/ice cover class of 0.86, and a mean F-score (a measure that considers both precision and recall of 0.88. We also compared results from our approach to glacier area mapped from high spatial resolution imagery at four study regions and found similar results. Accuracy was lowest in regions with substantial areas of debris-covered glacier ice, suggesting that manual editing would still be required in these regions to achieve reasonable results. The similarity of our results to those from the RGI as well as glacier area mapped from high spatial resolution imagery suggests it should be possible to apply this approach across large regions to produce updated 30-m resolution maps of persistent ice and snow cover. In the short term, automated PISC maps can be used to

  16. An automated approach for mapping persistent ice and snow cover over high latitude regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, David J.; Forster, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated approach for mapping persistent ice and snow cover (glaciers and perennial snowfields) from Landsat TM and ETM+ data across a variety of topography, glacier types, and climatic conditions at high latitudes (above ~65°N). Our approach exploits all available Landsat scenes acquired during the late summer (1 August–15 September) over a multi-year period and employs an automated cloud masking algorithm optimized for snow and ice covered mountainous environments. Pixels from individual Landsat scenes were classified as snow/ice covered or snow/ice free based on the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI), and pixels consistently identified as snow/ice covered over a five-year period were classified as persistent ice and snow cover. The same NDSI and ratio of snow/ice-covered days to total days thresholds applied consistently across eight study regions resulted in persistent ice and snow cover maps that agreed closely in most areas with glacier area mapped for the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI), with a mean accuracy (agreement with the RGI) of 0.96, a mean precision (user’s accuracy of the snow/ice cover class) of 0.92, a mean recall (producer’s accuracy of the snow/ice cover class) of 0.86, and a mean F-score (a measure that considers both precision and recall) of 0.88. We also compared results from our approach to glacier area mapped from high spatial resolution imagery at four study regions and found similar results. Accuracy was lowest in regions with substantial areas of debris-covered glacier ice, suggesting that manual editing would still be required in these regions to achieve reasonable results. The similarity of our results to those from the RGI as well as glacier area mapped from high spatial resolution imagery suggests it should be possible to apply this approach across large regions to produce updated 30-m resolution maps of persistent ice and snow cover. In the short term, automated PISC maps can be used to rapidly

  17. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Schuh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1 ground studies and (2 atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS and an underlying biosphere (SiB3 model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous global inversions including the Transcom suite of inversions have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into larger aggregated regions. An extreme example of this might be where corrections to NEE imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and Ecosystem Respiration (ER is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a

  18. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jose V., E-mail: josev.mathew@gmail.com; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  19. Separated exclusive kaon production cross sections up to Q2=2.1 GeV2 and the kaon form factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmignotto, Marco; Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are a key observable in probing hadronic structure, providing us with important information about underlying physical quantities related to nonperturbative QCD. Light mesons composed of a valence quark-antiquark pair can be described by a single electric form factor and have been shown to be a great laboratory for these studies. Using electroproduction experiments, a successful program was developed at Jefferson Laboratory for probing the charged pion form factor in the regime of Q2 up to 2.45 GeV2. This provided a first glimpse at a possible transition from the nonperturbative to the perturbative regime, and also information on the structure of the pion. The kaon is the next lightest existing hadron, providing an interesting channel for assessing the strangeness degree of freedom with mesons. Although the kaon is relatively unexploited to date, there are promising results from experiments of the 6 GeV era of Jefferson Laboratory with potential for kaon form factor extractions. In this talk we will present the recent analysis of the t-channel kaon cross section and discuss the relative contribution of longitudinal and transverse photons to the cross section up to Q2 values of 2.1 GeV2 and prospects for form factor extractions. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418 and by the JSA Graduate Fellowship.

  20. Cross sections and Rosenbluth separations in 1H(e, e'K+)Lambda up to Q2=2.35 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coman, M; Aniol, K A; Baker, K; Boeglin, W U; Breuer, H; Bydzovsky, P; Camsonne, A; Cha, J; Chang, C; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Chen, J -P; Chudakov, E A; Cisbani, E; Cole, L; Cusanno, F; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A P; Dieterich, S; Dohrmann, F; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Filoti, O; Fissum, K; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, F; Gomez, J; Gueye, P; Hansen, J O; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huber, G M; Iodice, M; Jackson, C; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Kanda, K; Keppel, C; King, P; Klein, F; Kozlov, K; Kramer, K; Kramer, L; Lagamba, L; LeRose, J J; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Marrone, S; McCormick, K; Michaels, R W; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Nanda, S; Palomba, M; Pattichio, V; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Punjabi, V A; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Reitz, B; Roche, R E; Roos, P; Saha, A; Sarty, A J; Sato, Y; Sirca, S; Sotona, Miloslav; Tang, L; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Uzzle, A; Vacheret, A; Wang, K; Wijessoriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Yaron, I; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-05-01

    The kaon electroproduction reaction 1H(e,e'K+)Lambda was studied as a function of the virtual-photon four-momentum, Q2, total energy, W, and momentum transfer, t, for different values of the virtual- photon polarization parameter. Data were taken at electron beam energies ranging from 3.40 to 5.75 GeV. The center of mass cross section was determined for 21 kinematics corresponding to Q2 of 1.90 and 2.35 GeV2 and the longitudinal, sigmaL, and transverse, sigmaT , cross sections were separated using the Rosenbluth technique at fixed W and t. The separated cross sections reveal a flat energy dependence at forward kaon angles not satisfactorily described by existing electroproduction models. Influence of the kaon pole on the cross sections was investigated by adopting an off-shell form factor in the Regge model which better describes the observed energy dependence of sigmaT and sigmaL.

  1. The dynamics of the quasielastic 16O(e,e'p) reaction at Q^2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)^2

    CERN Document Server

    Fissum, K G; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K A; Auerbach, L; Baker, F T; Berthot, J; Bertozzi, W; Bertin, P Y; Bimbot, L; Böglin, W; Brash, E J; Breton, V; Breuer, H; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cardman, S L; Cates, G D; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chen, J P; Cisbani, E; Dale, D S; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; Diederich, B; Djawotho, P; Domingo, John J; Ducret, J E; Epstein, M B; Ewell, L A; Finn, J M; Fonvieille, H; Frois, B; Frullani, S; Gao, J; Garibaldi, F; Gasparian, A; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Gorbenko, V; Gorringe, T P; Hersman, F W; Holmes, R; Holtrop, M; D'Hose, N; Howell, C; Huber, G M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Iodice, M; Jaminion, S; Jones, M K; Joo, K; Jutier, C; Kahl, W; Kato, S; Kelly, J J; Kerhoas, S; Khandaker, M; Khayat, M; Kino, K; Korsch, W; Kramer, L; Kumar, K S; Kumbartzki, G; Laveissière, G; Leone, A; Le Rose, J J; Levchuk, L G; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N K; Lolos, G J; Lourie, W R; Madey, R; Maeda, K; Malov, S; Manley, D M; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Martino, J; McCarthy, J S; McCormick, K; McIntyre, J; Van der Meer, R L J; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Mougey, J; Nanda, S; Neyret, D; Offermann, E; Papandreou, Z; Perdrisat, C F; Perrino, R; Petratos, G G; Platchkov, S; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Prout, D L; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Quéméner, G; Ransome, R D; Ravel, O; Roblin, Y; Roché, R; Rowntree, D; Rutledge, G A; Rutt, M p; Saha, A; Saitô, T; Sarty, A J; Serdarevic-Offermann, A; Smith, T P; Soldi, A; Sorokin, P; Souder, P A; Suleiman, R; Templon, J A; Terasawa, T; Todor, L; Tsubota, H; Ueno, H; Ulmer, E P; Urciuoli, G M; Vernin, P; van Verst, S; Vlahovic, B; Voskanyan, H; Watson, J W; Weinstein, B L; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zainea, D G; Zeps, V; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z L; Vignote, J M; Udias, J R; Debruyne, J; Ryckebuschand, D

    2004-01-01

    The physics program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab commenced in the summer of 1997 with a detailed investigation of the 16O(e,e'p) reaction in quasielastic, constant (q,w) kinematics at Q^2 ~ 0.8 (GeV/c)^2, q ~ 1 GeV/c, and w ~ 445 MeV. Use of a self-calibrating, self-normalizing, thin-film waterfall target enabled a systematically rigorous measurement. Differential cross-section data for proton knockout were obtained for 0 < Emiss < 120 MeV and 0 < pmiss < 350 MeV/c. These results have been used to extract the ALT asymmetry and the RL, RT, RLT, and RL+TT effective response functions. Detailed comparisons of the data with Relativistic Distorted-Wave Impulse Approximation, Relativistic Optical-Model Eikonal Approximation, and Relativistic Multiple-Scattering Glauber Approximation calculations are made. The kinematic consistency of the 1p-shell normalization factors extracted from these data with respect to all available 16O(e,e'p) data is examined. The Q2-dependence of the normalization factors is also...

  2. Cross sections and Rosenbluth separations in 1H(e, e'K+)Lambda up to Q2=2.35 GeV2

    CERN Document Server

    Coman, M; Aniol, K A; Baker, K; Boeglin, W U; Breuer, H; Bydzovsky, P; Camsonne, A; Cha, J; Chang, C C; Chant, N; Chen, J -P; Chudakov, E A; Cisbani, E; Cole, L; Cusanno, F; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A P; Dieterich, S; Dohrmann, F; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Filoti, O; Fissum, K; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, F; Gomez, J; Gueye, P; Hansen, J O; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huber, G M; Iodice, M; Jackson, C; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Kanda, K; Keppel, C; King, P; Klein, F; Kozlov, K; Kramer, K; Kramer, L; Lagamba, L; LeRose, J J; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Marrone, S; McCormick, K; Michaels, R W; Mitchell, J; Miyoshi, T; Nanda, S; Palomba, M; Pattichio, V; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Punjabi, V A; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Reitz, B; Roche, R E; Roos, P; Saha, A; Sarty, A J; Sato, Y; Sirca, S; Sotona, M; Tang, L; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Uzzle, A; Vacheret, A; Wang, K; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Yaron, I; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2009-01-01

    The kaon electroproduction reaction 1H(e,e'K+)Lambda was studied as a function of the virtual-photon four-momentum, Q2, total energy, W, and momentum transfer, t, for different values of the virtual- photon polarization parameter. Data were taken at electron beam energies ranging from 3.40 to 5.75 GeV. The center of mass cross section was determined for 21 kinematics corresponding to Q2 of 1.90 and 2.35 GeV2 and the longitudinal, sigmaL, and transverse, sigmaT, cross sections were separated using the Rosenbluth technique at fixed W and t. The separated cross sections reveal a flat energy dependence at forward kaon angles not satisfactorily described by existing electroproduction models. Influence of the kaon pole on the cross sections was investigated by adopting an off-shell form factor in the Regge model which better describes the observed energy dependence of sigmaT and sigmaL.

  3. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ˜16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ˜20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs.

  4. A novel candidate region for genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Valverde

    Full Text Available Humans living at high altitude (≥ 2,500 meters above sea level have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1 was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant, and thereby prevent oxidative damage. In addition, the most significant signal in a relative extended haplotype homozygosity analysis was localized to the SFTPD gene, which encodes a surfactant pulmonary-associated protein involved in normal respiration and innate host defense. Our study thus identifies two novel candidate genes and

  5. High blood pressure and obesity in indigenous ashaninkas of Junin region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Candice; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano.; Zavaleta, Carol; Unidad Salud Indígena-Fundación Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.6 Departamento de Geografía, Universidad McGill. Montreal, Canadá. Médico cirujano.; Cabrera, Lilia; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. enfermera, especialista en Salud Pública.; Gilman, Robert H.; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Baltimore, EE. UU. médico, especialista en enfermedades infecciosas.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure and obesity in indigenous Ashaninkas, with limited contact with Western culture, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 in five Ashaninka communities of the Junin region in the jungle of Peru. Individuals aged 35 or older were included. 76 subjects were evaluated (average age 47.4 years old, 52.6 % women) corresponding to 43.2% of the eligible population. The prevalence of hypertension was 14.5% (CI 95%: 6.4-22.6) and the prev...

  6. Asymptotic solution for high vorticity regions in incompressible 3D Euler equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agafontsev, D S; Mailybaev, A A

    2016-01-01

    Incompressible 3D Euler equations develop high vorticity in very thin pancake-like regions from generic large-scale initial conditions. In this work we propose an exact solution of the Euler equations for the asymptotic pancake evolution. This solution combines a shear flow aligned with an asymmetric straining flow, and is characterized by a single asymmetry parameter and an arbitrary transversal vorticity profile. The analysis is based on detailed comparison with numerical simulations performed using a pseudo-spectral method in anisotropic grids of up to 972 x 2048 x 4096.

  7. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  8. Innovation, regional development and relations between high- and low-tech industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis; Winther, Lars

    2011-01-01

    -wage countries with increasingly skilled labour forces. Thus, the inferior growth of the European Union (EU) in the 1990s compared with the USA has been explained by the latter’s higher rate of R&D investments. The paper challenges this rather simplistic view of innovation and examines the regional consequences......The current European policy agenda strongly accentuates the importance of research and development (R&D) as a driver of economic growth. The basic assumption is that high European wage levels make it unlikely that less research-intensive parts of the economy can withstand competition from low...

  9. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  10. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. The patients' clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder mutation. Previous studies

  11. A First Baseline for the Magnets in the High Luminosity LHC Insertion Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Ambrosio, G; Arduini, G; Cerutti, F; De Maria, R; Esposito, L; Fartoukh, S; Ferracin, P; Felice, H; Gupta, R; Kersevan, R; Mokhov, N; Nakamoto, T; Rakno, I; Rifflet, J M; Rossi, L; Sabbi, G L; Segreti, M; Toral, F; Xu, Q; Wanderer, P; van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project aims at accumulating 3000 fb-1 in the years 2023-2035, i.e. ten times more w.r.t. the nominal LHC performance expected for 2010- 2021. One key element to reach this challenging performance is a new insertion region to reduce the beam size in the interaction point by approximately a factor two. This requires larger aperture magnets in the region spanning from the interaction point to the matching section quadrupoles. This aperture has been fixed to 150 mm for the inner triplet quadrupoles in 2012. In this paper we give a first baseline of the interaction region. We discuss the main motivations that lead us to choose the technology, the combination of fields/gradients and lengths, the apertures, the quantity of superconductor, and the operational margin. Key elements are also the constraints given by the energy deposition in terms of heat load and radiation damage; we present the main features related to shielding and heat removal.

  12. Density Profiles in Molecular Cloud Cores Associated with High-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, Lev E

    2009-01-01

    Radial density profiles for the sample of dense cores associated with high-mass star-forming regions from southern hemisphere have been derived using the data of observations in continuum at 250 GHz. Radial density profiles for the inner regions of 16 cores (at distances $\\la 0.2-0.8$ pc from the center) are close on average to the $\\rho\\propto r^{-\\alpha}$ dependence, where $\\alpha=1.6\\pm 0.3$. In the outer regions density drops steeper. An analysis with various hydrostatic models showed that the modified Bonnor-Ebert model, which describes turbulent sphere confined by external pressure, is preferable compared with the logotrope and polytrope models practically in all cases. With a help of the Bonnor-Ebert model, estimates of central density in a core, non-thermal velocity dispersion and core size are obtained. The comparison of central densities with the densities derived earlier from the CS modeling reveals differences in several cases. The reasons of such differences are probably connected with the presen...

  13. High permeability cores to optimize the stimulation of deeply located brain regions using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, R; Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Roth, Y [Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Zangen, A [Neurobiology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)], E-mail: rnsalvador@fc.ul.pt

    2009-05-21

    Efficient stimulation of deeply located brain regions with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) poses many challenges, arising from the fact that the induced field decays rapidly and becomes less focal with depth. We propose a new method to improve the efficiency of TMS of deep brain regions that combines high permeability cores, to increase focality and field intensity, with a coil specifically designed to induce a field that decays slowly with increasing depth. The performance of the proposed design was investigated using the finite element method to determine the total electric field induced by this coil/core arrangement on a realistically shaped homogeneous head model. The calculations show that the inclusion of the cores increases the field's magnitude by as much as 25% while also decreasing the field's decay with depth along specific directions. The focality, as measured by the area where the field's norm is greater than 1/{radical}2 of its maximum value, is also improved by as much as 15% with some core arrangements. The coil's inductance is not significantly increased by the cores. These results show that the presence of the cores might make this specially designed coil even more suited for the effective stimulation of deep brain regions.

  14. Clinical experience with a high definition exoscope system for surgery of pineal region lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Kurtis; Drazin, Doniel; Black, Keith L; Williams, James; Berci, George; Mamelak, Adam N

    2014-07-01

    VITOM-90 (Karl Storz Endoscopy, Tuttlingen, Germany) is a new technology that can be used as an alternative to the operating microscope. We have found that this device substantially improves surgeon comfort during infra-tentorial supracerebellar approaches to pineal region masses, and now report our experiences. The VITOM-90 is a specially designed scope that is attached to a high definition (HD) digital camera and displayed on a HD video monitor. This system was utilized in five patients undergoing infratentorial supracerebellar approaches for pineal region lesions. Surgical outcomes and pathologies are described. The device was used by three surgeons during five procedures. Three patients underwent surgery in the sitting position and two in the modified prone (Concorde) position. Pathologies included pineocytoma, lipoma, and germinoma. Total resection was achieved in three patients and subtotal in two patients. Surgeon assessment was positive; surgeons indicated that surgery with the VITOM-90 was more comfortable than with the operating microscope. Lack of stereopsis was considered a minor drawback. The VITOM-90 permitted a natural head and neck position. Operating room personnel and residents reported improved visualization of the anatomy. Using the VITOM-90 benefited surgeons during pineal region surgery by reducing strain and allowing the surgeon to operate from a comfortable position without increased operative time or complications. The improved comfort levels may translate into safer, more accurate surgeries in this complex area.

  15. High Resolution HC3N Observations toward the Central Region of Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Soo; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Morimoto, Masaki

    1994-04-01

    We have observed the emission of HC3N J=4-3, 5-4, 10-9 and 12-11 transitions toward the Sgr B2 central region in an area of 150"*150" with resolution of 16"-48". The intensities and central velocities of line profiles show significant variations with positions. In contrast to the intensities of the low J-level transitions which gradually increase from the central source toward the outside region, the HC3N emission of the high J-level transition become stronger toward the central radio continuum source MD5. Systematic change in the radial velocity of each line profile occurs along north-south direction. There are a few peaks in most line profiles, and these indicate that there are multiple velocity components along the line of sight. Distributions of excitation temperature and column density which were estimated from the excitation calculations show the existence of a small(1*2pc), hot(Tex > 50K) core which contains two temperature peaks at about 15" east and north of MD5. The column density of HC3N is (1-3)*10E14 /cm2. Column density at distant position from MD5 is larger than that in the central region. We have deduced that this 'hot-core' has a mass of 10E5 Mo, which is about an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by previous studies.

  16. Updating the asymmetric osmium-catalyzed dihydroxylation (AD) mnemonic. Q2MM modeling and new kinetic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Peter; Tanner, David Ackland; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2003-01-01

    The mnemonic device for predicting stereoselectivities in the Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation (AD) reaction has been updated based on extensive computational studies. Kinetic measurements from competition reactions validate the new proposal. The interactions responsible for the high stereose......The mnemonic device for predicting stereoselectivities in the Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation (AD) reaction has been updated based on extensive computational studies. Kinetic measurements from competition reactions validate the new proposal. The interactions responsible for the high...... stereoselectivity in the title reaction are analyzed in detail and mapped onto the mnemonic device....

  17. A Mid-Infrared View of the High Mass Star Formation Region W51A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, C. L.; Blum, R. D.; Damineli, A.; Conti, P. S.; Gusmão, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the results of a mid-infrared study of G49.5-0.4, or W51A, part of the massive starbirth complex W51. Combining public data from the Spitzer IRAC camera, and Gemini mid-infrared camera T-ReCS at 7.73, 9.69, 12.33, and 24.56 μm, with a spatial resolution of ˜0.″5, we have identified the mid-infrared counterparts of eight ultracompact H ii regions, showing that two radio sources are deeply embedded in molecular clouds and another is a cloud of ionized gas. From the T-ReCS data we have unveiled the central core of the W51 region, revealing massive young stellar candidates. We modeled the spectral energy distribution of the detected sources. The results suggest that the embedded objects are sources with spectral types ranging from B3 to O5, but the majority of the fits indicate stellar objects with B1 spectral types. We also present an extinction map of IRS 2, showing that a region with lower extinction corresponds to the region where a proposed jet of gas has impacted the foreground cloud. From this map, we also derived the total extinction toward the enigmatic source IRS 2E, which amounts to ˜60 mag in the V band. We calculated the color temperature due to thermal emission of the circumstellar dust of the detected sources; the temperatures are in the interval of ˜100-150 K, which corresponds to the emission of dust located at 0.1 pc from the central source. Finally, we show a possible mid-infrared counterpart of a detected source at millimeter wavelengths that was found by Zapata et al. to be a massive young stellar object undergoing a high accretion rate.