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Sample records for high prandtl numbers

  1. Dissipation in dynamos at low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A

    2010-01-01

    Using simulations of helically driven turbulence, it is shown that the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy dissipation scales with the magnetic Prandtl number in power law fashion with an exponent of approximately 0.6. Over six orders of magnitude in the magnetic Prandtl number the magnetic field is found to be sustained by large-scale dynamo action of alpha-squared type. This work extends a similar finding for small magnetic Prandtl numbers to the regime of large magnetic Prandtl numbers. At large magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated viscously, lowering thus the amount of magnetic energy dissipation, which means that simulations can be performed at magnetic Reynolds numbers that are large compared to the usual limits imposed by a given resolution. This is analogous to an earlier finding that at small magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated resistively, lowering the amount of kinetic energy dissipation, so simulations can then be performed at much larger fluid Reynolds...

  2. Azimuthal Magnetorotational Instability at low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, A; Willis, A P; Avila, M

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to be one of the most powerful sources of turbulence in hydrodynamically stable quasi-Keplerian flows, such as those governing accretion disk flows. Although the linear stability of these flows with applied external magnetic field has been studied for decades, the influence of the instability on the outward angular momentum transport, necessary for the accretion of the disk, is still not well known. In this work we model Keplerian rotation with Taylor-Couette flow and imposed azimuthal magnetic field using both linear and nonlinear approaches. We present scalings of instability with Hartmann and Reynolds numbers via linear analysis and direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the two magnetic Prandtl numbers of $1.4 \\cdot 10^{-6}$ and $1$. Inside of the instability domains modes with different axial wavenumbers dominate, resulting in sub-domains of instabilities, which appear different for each $Pm$. The DNS show the emergence of 1- and 2-frequency spatio-te...

  3. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  4. High Prandtl number effect on Rayleigh-Bénard convection heat transfer at high Rayleigh number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Li, Jing; Ji, Shui; Chang, Huajian

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents results of the Rayleigh-Bénard convection heat transfer in silicon oil confined by two horizontal plates, heated from below, and cooled from above. The Prandtl numbers considered as 100-10,000 corresponding to three types of silicon oil. The experiments covered a range of Rayleigh numbers from 2.14·109 to 2.27·1013. The data points that the Nusselt number dependents on the Rayleigh number, which is asymptotic to a 0.248 power. Furthermore, the experiment results can fit the data in low Rayleigh number well.

  5. Prandtl number of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi; Azumi, Masafumi

    1993-12-01

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The Prandtl number, the ratio between the ion viscosity and the thermal conductivity is obtained for the anomalous transport process which is caused by the self-sustained turbulence in the toroidal plasma. It is found that the Prandtl number is of order unity both for the ballooning mode turbulence in tokamaks and for the interchange mode turbulence in helical system. The influence on the anomalous transport and fluctuation level is evaluated. Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number are also discussed. (author).

  6. Anatomy of a laminar starting thermal plume at high Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaille, Anne; Limare, Angela; Touitou, Floriane; Kumagai, Ichiro; Vatteville, Judith

    2011-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a plume generated from a small heat source in a high Prandtl number fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The velocity field was determined with particle image velocimetry, while the temperature field was measured using differential interferometry and thermochromic liquid crystals. The combination of these different techniques run simultaneously allows us to identify the different stages of plume development, and to compare the positions of key-features of the velocity field (centers of rotation, maximum vorticity locations, stagnation points) respective to the plume thermal anomaly, for Prandtl numbers greater than 103. We further show that the thermal structure of the plume stem is well predicted by the constant viscosity model of Batchelor (Q J R Met Soc 80: 339-358, 1954) for viscosity ratios up to 50.

  7. Effects of external environment on thermocapillary convection of high prandtl number fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the influence of external environment on thermocapillary convection in high Prandtl number (Pr=68 liquid. The geometric model of physical problem is that the the liquid bridge surrounded by ambient air under zero or ground gravity. The interface velocity, temperature, heat flux and flow pattern in the liquid bridge are presented and discussed under different conditions by changing the external environment. The buoyancy convection produces a symmetrical vortex in the liquid bridge. The ambient air affects the distributions of the temperature velocity and heat flux on the interface by changing the thermocapillary convection.

  8. Experimental container shape dependence and heat transport scaling of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of high-Prandtl-number fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stephen; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Both experiments and simulations on Rayleigh-Bénard convection with fluids of Prandtl numbers 5 and below have shown that the container shape influences the flow structure. Here, we investigate similar dependences of convection of fluids with Prandtl numbers of up to 104. The convection cells have aspect ratio of order unity, and we use cubic and cylindrical shapes. Visual analysis using a noninvasive photochromic dye technique indicates the distinct large-scale flow patterns in both square and cylindrical test cells. The stability of these flow patterns is explored. Also presented are results on the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  9. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Olspert, N; Warnecke, J; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    (abidged) Context: Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers. Results: We find that the rotation profiles for high thermal diffusivity show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased. This coincides with a change in the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. The total magnetic energy ...

  10. Dynamos at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-01-01

    We present a MHD shell model suitable for the computation of various energy fluxes of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for very small and very large magnetic Prandtl numbers $\\mathrm{Pm}$; such computations are inaccessible to direct numerical simulations. For small $\\mathrm{Pm}$, we observe that the both kinetic and magnetic energy spectra scale as $k^{-5/3}$ in the inertial range, but the dissipative magnetic energy scales as $k^{-17/3}$. Here, the kinetic energy at large length scale feeds the large-scale magnetic field that cascades to small-scale magnetic field, which gets dissipated by Joule heating. The large $\\mathrm{Pm}$ dynamo has a similar behaviour except that the dissipative kinetic energy scales as $k^{-13/3}$. For this case, the large-scale velocity field transfers energy to large-scale magnetic field, which gets transferred to small-scale velocity and magnetic fields. The energy of the small-scale magnetic field also gets transferred to the small-scale velocity field. The energy accumulated at s...

  11. Magnetic dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2010-11-19

    Amplification of magnetic field due to kinematic turbulent dynamo action is studied in the regime of small magnetic Prandtl numbers. Such a regime is relevant for planets and stars interiors, as well as for liquid-metal laboratory experiments. A comprehensive analysis based on the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model is reported, which establishes the dynamo threshold and the dynamo growth rates for varying kinetic helicity of turbulent fluctuations. It is proposed that in contrast with the case of large magnetic Prandtl numbers, the kinematic dynamo action at small magnetic Prandtl numbers is significantly affected by kinetic helicity, and it can be made quite efficient with an appropriate choice of the helicity spectrum.

  12. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  13. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓϑ, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ). We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmcrit, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rmcrit is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rmcrit provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  14. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.; Warnecke, J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers (from 0.25 to 2 and from 0.25 to 5, respectively). Differential rotation and large-scale magnetic fields are produced self-consistently. Results: We find that for high thermal diffusivity, the rotation profiles show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased, corresponding to an increase of the Prandtl number. This coincides with and results in a change of the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the clearly cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers and give way to irregular sign changes or quasi-stationary states. The total (mean and fluctuating) magnetic energy increases as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number in the range studied here (5-151), but the energies of the mean magnetic fields level off at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. The differential rotation is strongly affected by the magnetic fields and almost vanishes at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. In some of our most turbulent cases, however, we find that two regimes are possible, where either differential rotation is strong and mean magnetic fields are relatively weak, or vice versa. Conclusions: Our simulations indicate a strong nonlinear feedback of magnetic fields on differential rotation, leading to qualitative changes in the behaviors of large

  15. Diffusion in anisotropic fully developed turbulence: Turbulent Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the leading order of approximation of a perturbation theory the influence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the turbulent Prandtl number in the framework of the model of a passively advected scalar field by the turbulent velocity field driven by the Navier-Stokes equation is investigated for spatial dimensions d >2 . The influence of the presence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy in the model on the stability of the Kolmogorov scaling regime is briefly discussed. It is shown that with increasing of the value of the spatial dimension the region of stability of the scaling regime also increases. The regions of stability of the scaling regime are studied as functions of the anisotropy parameters for spatial dimensions d =3 ,4 , and 5. The dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is studied in detail for the most interesting three-dimensional case. It is shown that the anisotropy of turbulent systems can have a rather significant impact on the value of the turbulent Prandtl number, i.e., on the rate of the corresponding diffusion processes. In addition, the relevance of the so-called weak anisotropy limit results are briefly discussed, and it is shown that there exists a relatively large region of small absolute values of the anisotropy parameters where the results obtained in the framework of the weak anisotropy approximation are in very good agreement with results obtained in the framework of the model without any approximation. The dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is also briefly investigated for spatial dimensions d =4 and 5. It is shown that the dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is very similar for all studied cases (d =3 ,4 , and 5), although the numerical values of the corresponding turbulent Prandtl numbers are different.

  16. Numerical demonstration of fluctuation dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, A B; Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C; McWilliams, J C; Proctor, M R E

    2007-05-18

    Direct numerical simulations of incompressible nonhelical randomly forced MHD turbulence are used to demonstrate for the first time that the fluctuation dynamo exists in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number Rm>1 and small magnetic Prandtl number Pmdynamo on the hydrodynamic Reynolds number Re is obtained for 1 less than or similar Re less than or similar 6700. In the limit Pmdynamo at large and moderate Prandtl numbers: Rmc less than or similar 200 for Re greater than or similar 6000 compared to Rmc approximately 60 for Pm>or=1. It is not yet possible to determine numerically whether the growth rate of the magnetic energy is proportional, Rm1/2 in the limit Rm-->infinity, as it should be if the dynamo is driven by the inertial-range motions at the resistive scale.

  17. Viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Using our reported experimental data of effective thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and viscosity for CuO nanoparticle suspensions, the corresponding thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number are calculated. With the hard sphere model and considering effects of particle clustering and surface adsorption, the increase of viscosity for nanoparticle suspension observed is explained. It is shown that the effective thermal conductivity will be strongly affected by the formation and correlated spatial distribution of nanoparticle clusters when compared to viscosity in hosting liquid.

  18. Sensitivity of hydrothermal wave instability of Marangoni convection to the interfacial heat transfer in long liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T.; Nishino, K.; Ueno, I.; Matsumoto, S.; Kamotani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports the sensitivity of hydrothermal wave (HTW) instability of Marangoni convection to the interfacial heat transfer in liquid bridges (LBs) of high Prandtl number fluids (Pr = 67, 112, and 207) formed under the microgravity environment on the International Space Station. The data for instability are collected for a wide range of AR and for TC = 15 and 20 °C, where AR is the aspect ratio (=height/diameter) of the LB and TC is the cooled disk temperature. A significant decrease in critical oscillation frequency as well as an appreciable decrease in the critical Marangoni number is observed for AR > 1.25. This drastic change of instability mechanisms is associated with the reversal of axial traveling direction of HTWs and roll-structures as reported previously. It is found that this reversal is closely related to the interfacial heat transfer, which is evaluated numerically through accounting for both convective and radiative components. A heat transfer ratio, QI/QH, is introduced as a dimensionless parameter for interfacial heat transfer, where QI and QH are the heat transfer rates at the LB-gas and LB-heated disk interfaces, respectively. It is found that HTWs travel in the same direction as the surface flow for QI/QH > 0 (heat-loss condition) while in the opposite direction for QI/QH alters slightly but appreciably the basic temperature and flow field, the alteration that is not accounted for in the previous linear stability analyses for an infinite LB.

  19. The Small-Scale Dynamo at Low Magnetic Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(l) \\propto l^{theta}, where v(l) is the eddy velocity at a scale l. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with theta = 1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with theta = 1/2. In this work we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the...

  20. Scaling in large Prandtl number turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrulle, B

    2011-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of heat transfer $Nu$ in turbulent thermal convection at large Prandtl number $Pr$ using a quasi-linear theory. We show that two regimes arise, depending on the Reynolds number $Re$. At low Reynolds number, $Nu Pr^{-1/2}$ and $Re$ are a function of $Ra Pr^{-3/2}$. At large Reynolds number $Nu Pr^{1/3}$ and $Re Pr$ are function only of $Ra Pr^{2/3}$ (within logarithmic corrections). In practice, since $Nu$ is always close to $Ra^{1/3}$, this corresponds to a much weaker dependence of the heat transfer in the Prandtl number at low Reynolds number than at large Reynolds number. This difference may solve an existing controversy between measurements in SF6 (large $Re$) and in alcohol/water (lower $Re$). We link these regimes with a possible global bifurcation in the turbulent mean flow. We further show how a scaling theory could be used to describe these two regimes through a single universal function. This function presents a bimodal character for intermediate range of Reynolds num...

  1. Transitional boundary layers in low-Prandtl-number convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet D.

    2016-12-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough, the dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes, and an interior region away from the side walls. The latter is dominated by the shear of the large-scale circulation (LSC) roll, which fills the whole cell and continuously varies its orientation. The working fluid is liquid mercury or gallium at a Prandtl number Pr=0.021 for Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105≤Ra≤4 ×108 . The generated turbulent momentum transfer corresponds to macroscopic flow Reynolds numbers with 1.8 ×103≤Re≤4.6 ×104 . In highly resolved spectral element direct numerical simulations, we present the mean profiles of velocity, Reynolds stress, and temperature in inner viscous units and compare our findings with convection experiments and channel flow data. The complex three-dimensional and time-dependent structure of the LSC in the cell is compensated by a plane-by-plane symmetry transformation which aligns the horizontal velocity components and all its derivatives with the instantaneous orientation of the LSC. As a consequence, the torsion of the LSC is removed, and a streamwise direction in the shear flow can be defined. It is shown that the viscous boundary layers for the largest Rayleigh numbers are highly transitional and obey properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ≲102 . The transitional character of the viscous boundary layer is also underlined by the strong enhancement of the fluctuations of the wall stress components with increasing Rayleigh number. An extrapolation of our analysis data suggests that the friction Reynolds number Reτ in the velocity boundary

  2. Direct Transition to Spatiotemporal Chaos in Low Prandtl Number Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, H; Gunton, J D; Xi, Hao-wen; Li, Xiao-jun

    1996-01-01

    We present the first large scale numerical simulation of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection near onset, under free-free boundary conditions for a fluid of Prandtl number $\\sigma=0.5$. We find that a spatiotemporally chaotic state emerges immediately above onset, which we investigate as a function of the reduced control parameter $\\epsilon$. We conclude that the transition from conduction to spatiotemporal chaos is second order and of ``mean field'' character. We also present a simple theory for the time-averaged convective current. Finally, we show that the time-averaged structure factor satisfies a scaling behavior with respect to the correlation length near onset.

  3. Zero-Prandtl-number convection with slow rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Maity, Priyanka; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations of the primary instability and the flow patterns near onset in zero-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with uniform rotation about a vertical axis. The investigations are carried out using direct numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic equations with stress-free horizontal boundaries in rectangular boxes of size $(2\\pi/k_x) \\times (2\\pi/k_y) \\times 1$ for different values of the ratio $\\eta = k_x/k_y$. The primary instability is found to...

  4. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Zero-Prandtl-number convection with slow rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Priyanka; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of our investigations of the primary instability and the flow patterns near onset in zero-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-Bénard convection with uniform rotation about a vertical axis. The investigations are carried out using direct numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic equations with stress-free horizontal boundaries in rectangular boxes of size (2π/kx) × (2π/ky) × 1 for different values of the ratio η = kx/ky. The primary instability is found to depend on η and Ta. Wavy rolls are observed at the primary instability for smaller values of η (1/√{3} ≤ η ≤ 2 except at η = 1) and for smaller values of Ta. We observed Küppers-Lortz (KL) type patterns at the primary instability for η = 1/√{3} and Ta ≥ 40. The fluid patterns are found to exhibit the phenomenon of bursting, as observed in experiments [K. M. S. Bajaj, G. Ahlers, and W. Pesch, "Rayleigh-Bénard convection with rotation at small Prandtl numbers," Phys. Rev. E 65, 056309 (2002)]. Periodic wavy rolls are observed at onset for smaller values of Ta, while KL-type patterns are observed for Ta ≥ 100 for η =√{3}. In case of η = 2, wavy rolls are observed for smaller values of Ta and KL-type patterns are observed for 25 ≤ Ta ≤ 575. Quasi-periodically varying patterns are observed in the oscillatory regime (Ta > 575). The behavior is quite different at η = 1. A time dependent competition between two sets of mutually perpendicular rolls is observed at onset for all values of Ta in this case. Fluid patterns are found to burst periodically as well as chaotically in time. It involved a homoclinic bifurcation. We have also made a couple of low-dimensional models to investigate bifurcations for η = 1, which is used to investigate the sequence of bifurcations.

  6. Double MRT Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulating Natural Convection of Low Prandtl Number Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are testing an efficiency algorithm based on LBM and using it to analyze two-dimensional natural convection with low Prandtl number. Steady state or oscillatory results are obtained using double multiple-relaxation-time thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The velocity and temperature fields are solved using D2Q9 and D2Q5 models, respectively. With different Rayleigh number, the tested natural convection can either achieve to steady state or oscillatory. With fixed Rayleigh number, lower Prandtl number leads to a weaker convection effect, longer oscillation period and higher oscillation amplitude for the cases reaching oscillatory solutions. At fixed Prandtl number, higher Rayleigh number leads to a more notable convection effect and longer oscillation period. Double multiple-relaxation-time thermal lattice Boltzmann method is applied to simulate the low Prandtl number fluid natural convection. Rayleigh number and Prandtl number effects are also investigated when the natural convection...

  7. Global and local statistics in turbulent convection at low Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Scheel, Janet D

    2016-01-01

    Statistical properties of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection at low Prandtl numbers (Pr), which are typical for liquid metals such as mercury, gallium or liquid sodium, are investigated in high-resolution three-dimensional spectral element simulations in a closed cylindrical cell with an aspect ratio of one and are compared to previous turbulent convection simulations in air. We compare the scaling of global momentum and heat transfer. The scaling exponents are found to be in agreement with experiments. Mean profiles of the root-mean-square velocity as well as the thermal and kinetic energy dissipation rates have growing amplitudes with decreasing Prandtl number which underlies a more vigorous bulk turbulence in the low-Pr regime. The skin-friction coefficient displays a Reynolds-number dependence that is close to that of an isothermal, intermittently turbulent velocity boundary layer. The thermal boundary layer thicknesses are larger as Pr decreases and conversely the velocity boundary layer thicknesses be...

  8. Fluctuation dynamo and turbulent induction at small Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-10-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial range, flux freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anticorrelated and produce an "antidynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in laboratory experiments of turbulent induction.

  9. Fluctuation Dynamo and Turbulent Induction at Small Prandtl Number

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial-range, flux-freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field-lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anti-correlated and produce an "anti-dynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth-rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in...

  10. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: two-loop approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M; Remecký, R

    2011-10-01

    The turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the framework of the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, where the magnetic field behaves as a passive vector field advected by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, is calculated by the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation. It is shown that the two-loop corrections to the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the kinematic MHD turbulence are less than 2% of its leading order value (the one-loop value) and, at the same time, the two-loop turbulent magnetic Prandtl number is the same as the two-loop turbulent Prandtl number obtained in the corresponding model of a passively advected scalar field. The dependence of the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number on the spatial dimension d is investigated and the source of the smallness of the two-loop corrections for spatial dimension d=3 is identified and analyzed.

  11. Dynamos at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers: insights from shell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K.; Kumar, Rohit

    2016-12-01

    We present an MHD shell model suitable for computation of various energy fluxes of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for very small and very large magnetic Prandtl numbers $\\mathrm{Pm}$; such computations are inaccessible to direct numerical simulations. For small $\\mathrm{Pm}$, we observe that both kinetic and magnetic energy spectra scale as $k^{-5/3}$ in the inertial range, but the dissipative magnetic energy scales as $k^{-11/3}\\exp(-k/k_\\eta)$. Here, the kinetic energy at large length scale feeds the large-scale magnetic field that cascades to small-scale magnetic field, which gets dissipated by Joule heating. The large-$\\mathrm{Pm}$ dynamo has a similar behaviour except that the dissipative kinetic energy scales as $k^{-13/3}$. For this case, the large-scale velocity field transfers energy to the large-scale magnetic field, which gets transferred to small-scale velocity and magnetic fields; the energy of the small-scale magnetic field also gets transferred to the small-scale velocity field, and the energy thus accumulated is dissipated by the viscous force.

  12. Zero-Prandtl-number convection with slow rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Maity, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations of the primary instability and the flow patterns near onset in zero-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection with uniform rotation about a vertical axis. The investigations are carried out using direct numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic equations with stress-free horizontal boundaries in rectangular boxes of size $(2\\pi/k_x) \\times (2\\pi/k_y) \\times 1$ for different values of the ratio $\\eta = k_x/k_y$. The primary instability is found to depend on $\\eta$ and $Ta$. Wavy rolls are observed at the primary instability for smaller values of $\\eta$ ($1/\\sqrt{3} \\le \\eta \\le 2$ except at $\\eta = 1$) and for smaller values of $Ta$. We observed K\\"{u}ppers-Lortz (KL) type patterns at the primary instability for $\\eta = 1/\\sqrt{3}$ and $ Ta \\ge 40$. The fluid patterns are found to exhibit the phenomenon of bursting, as observed in experiments [Bajaj et al. Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 65}, 056309 (2002)]. Periodic wavy rolls are observed at onset for smaller values of $Ta$...

  13. Viscous range of turbulent scalar of large Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, J.

    1995-02-01

    The analytical theory of a turbulent scalar, developed in previous papers is extended to the case of large Prandtl number. The fluctuation character of the least principal rate of strain gamma has an important effect upon the scalar spectrum. The scalar variance spectrum in the viscous range is F(k) = 4.472 (nu/epsilon)(exp 1/2) chi k(exp -1) H(x), X is identical to (k/k(sub b))(exp 2), H(x) is a dimensionless universal function and is determined by solving numerically the closed spectral dynamical equations. A simple fitting formula of the numerical result is H(x) = 0.7687 exp(- 3.79x) + 0.2313 exp(-11.13 x), which corresponds a two-values fluctuation model of gamma. Here upsilon is the kinematic viscosity, k(sub b) is identical to (epsilon/upsilon mu(exp 2))(exp 1/4) is the Batchelor wavenumber, mu is the scalar diffusivity, and epsilon and eni are respectively the energy and variance dissipation rates.

  14. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl numbers obtained with MHD Taylor-Couette flow experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M

    2008-01-01

    The stability problem of MHD Taylor-Couette flows with toroidal magnetic fields is considered in dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number. Only the most uniform (but not current-free) field with B\\_in = B\\_out has been considered. For high enough Hartmann numbers the toroidal field is always unstable. Rigid rotation, however, stabilizes the magnetic (kink-)instability. The axial current which drives the instability is reduced by the electromotive force induced by the instability itself. Numerical simulations are presented to probe this effect as a possibility to measure the turbulent conductivity in a laboratory. It is shown numerically that in a sodium experiment (without rotation) an eddy diffusivity 4 times the molecular diffusivity appears resulting in a potential difference of ~34 mV/m. If the cylinders are rotating then also the eddy viscosity can be measured. Nonlinear simulations of the instability lead to a turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of 2.1 for a molecular magnetic Prandtl number of 0.01. The...

  15. Sustained Turbulence in Differentially Rotating Magnetized Fluids at Low Magnetic Prandtl Number

    CERN Document Server

    Nauman, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    We show for the first time that sustained turbulence is possible at low magnetic Prandtl number for Keplerian flows with no mean magnetic flux. Our results indicate that increasing the vertical domain size is equivalent to increasing the dynamical range between the energy injection scale and the dissipative scale. This has important implications for a large variety of differentially rotating systems with low magnetic Prandtl number such as protostellar disks and laboratory experiments.

  16. Sustained Turbulence in Differentially Rotating Magnetized Fluids at Low Magnetic Prandtl Number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Pessah, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    We show for the first time that sustained turbulence is possible at low magnetic Prandtl number for Keplerian flows with no mean magnetic flux. Our results indicate that increasing the vertical domain size is equivalent to increasing the dynamical range between the energy injection scale...... and the dissipative scale. This has important implications for a large variety of differentially rotating systems with low magnetic Prandtl number such as protostellar disks and laboratory experiments....

  17. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in helical kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: two-loop renormalization group result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M; Remecký, R; Zalom, P

    2013-04-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique, the influence of helicity (spatial parity violation) on the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated in the two-loop approximation. It is shown that the presence of helicity decreases the value of the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number and, at the same time, the two-loop helical contribution to the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number is at most 4.2% (in the case with the maximal helicity) of its nonhelical value. These results demonstrate, on one hand, the potential importance of the presence of asymmetries in processes in turbulent environments and, on the other hand, the rather strong stability of the properties of diffusion processes of the magnetic field in the conductive turbulent environment with the spatial parity violation in comparison to the corresponding systems without the spatial parity violation. In addition, obtained results are compared to the corresponding results found for the two-loop turbulent Prandtl number in the model of passively advected scalar field. It is shown that the turbulent Prandtl number and the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number, which are the same in fully symmetric isotropic turbulent systems, are essentially different when one considers the spatial parity violation. It means that the properties of the diffusion processes in the turbulent systems with a given symmetry breaking can considerably depend on the internal tensor structure of advected quantities.

  18. Investigation of the helium proportion influence on the Prandtl number value of gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Burtsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates an influence of helium fraction (light gases on the Prandtl number value for binary and more complex gas mixtures.It is shown that a low value of the Prandtl number (Pr-number results in decreasing a temperature recovery factor value and, respectively, in reducing a recovery temperature value on the wall (thermoinsulated wall temperature with the compressive gas flow bypassing it. This, in turn, allows us to increase efficiency of gasdynamic energy separation in Leontyev's tube.The paper conducts a numerical research of the influence of binary and more complex gas mixture composition on the Prandtl number value. It is shown that a mixture of two gases with small and large molecular weight allows us to produce a mixture with a lower value of the Prandtl number in comparison with the initial gases. Thus, the value of Prandtl number decreases by 1.5-3.2 times in comparison with values for pure components (the more a difference of molar mass of components, the stronger is a decrease.The technique to determine the Prandtl number value for mixtures of gases in the wide range of temperatures and pressure is developed. Its verification based on experimental data and results of numerical calculations of other authors is executed. It is shown that it allows correct calculation of binary and more complex mixtures of gasesFor the mixtures of inert gases it has been obtained that the minimum value of the Prandtl number is as follows: for helium - xenon mixtures (He-Xe makes 0.2-0.22, for helium - krypton mixtures (He-Kr – 0.3, for helium - argon mixes (He-Ar – 0.41.For helium mixture with carbon dioxide the minimum value of the Prandtl number makes about 0.4, for helium mixture with N2 nitrogen the minimum value of the Prandtl number is equal to 0.48, for helium-methane (CH4 - 0.5 and helium – oxygen (O2 – 0.46.This decrease is caused by the fact that the thermal capacity of mixture changes under the linear law in regard to the

  19. Turbulent magnetic field amplification from the smallest to the largest magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, Stefano; Schober, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The small-scale dynamo provides a highly efficient mechanism for the conversion of turbulent into magnetic energy. In astrophysical environments, such turbulence often occurs at high Mach numbers, implying steep slopes in the turbulent spectra. It is thus a central question whether the small-scale dynamo can amplify magnetic fields in the interstellar or intergalactic media, where such Mach numbers occur. To address this long-standing issue, we employ the Kazantsev model for turbulent magnetic field amplification, systematically exploring the effect of different turbulent slopes, as expected for Kolmogorov, Burgers, the Larson laws and results derived from numerical simulations. With the framework employed here, we give the first solution encompassing the complete range of magnetic Prandtl numbers, including Pm > 1. We derive scaling laws of the growth rate as a function of hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds number for Pm > 1 for all types of turbulence. A central result concerns the regime of Pm ~ 1, where t...

  20. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of $\\alpha$, and thus the large-sca...

  1. The influence of the Prandtl number on the thermal performance of tubes with the separation and reattachment enhancement mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabas, T.J.; Arman, B.

    1992-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that the heat-transfer performance of an enhanced tube with transverse, rectangular disruptions can be predicted with a numerical modeling method, an accomplishment not previously achieved. This computer code is then used to determine the influence of the Prandtl number. The numerical simulation demonstrated that six distinct regions exist: the three rib surfaces, the upstream and downstream recirculation regions, and the boundary-layer development zone. Three zones dominate the thermal performance: the rib top and downstream faces and the downstream recirculation zone. The thermal performance at the rib region begins to dominate tile overall performance as the Prandtl number becomes large. The contribution from the downstream recirculation zone becomes more important and dominates for low Prandtl number fluids such as air. The Reynolds number dependence at the rib region and the downstream recirculation zone is similar to that for reattaching flows with exponents in the 0.65 to 0.75 range. The location of the maximum in the recirculation moves closer to the rib with increasing Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and is bounded upstream by the location of the maximum wall shear stress and downstream by the reattachment length. The high turbulence level near the surface in this region is responsible for the heat-transfer enhancement.

  2. The influence of the Prandtl number on the thermal performance of tubes with the separation and reattachment enhancement mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabas, T.J.; Arman, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the heat-transfer performance of an enhanced tube with transverse, rectangular disruptions can be predicted with a numerical modeling method, an accomplishment not previously achieved. This computer code is then used to determine the influence of the Prandtl number. The numerical simulation demonstrated that six distinct regions exist: the three rib surfaces, the upstream and downstream recirculation regions, and the boundary-layer development zone. Three zones dominate the thermal performance: the rib top and downstream faces and the downstream recirculation zone. The thermal performance at the rib region begins to dominate tile overall performance as the Prandtl number becomes large. The contribution from the downstream recirculation zone becomes more important and dominates for low Prandtl number fluids such as air. The Reynolds number dependence at the rib region and the downstream recirculation zone is similar to that for reattaching flows with exponents in the 0.65 to 0.75 range. The location of the maximum in the recirculation moves closer to the rib with increasing Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and is bounded upstream by the location of the maximum wall shear stress and downstream by the reattachment length. The high turbulence level near the surface in this region is responsible for the heat-transfer enhancement.

  3. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers: single mode solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The onset of dynamo action is investigated within the context of a newly developed low Rossby, low magnetic Prandtl number, convection-driven dynamo model. The model represents an asymptotically exact form of an $\\alpha^2$ mean field dynamo model in which the small-scale convection is represented explicitly by the finite amplitude, single mode convective solutions first investigated by Bassom and Zhang (Geophys.~Astrophys.~Fluid Dyn., \\textbf{76}, p.223, 1994). Both steady and oscillatory convection are considered for a variety of horizontal planforms. The kinematic helicity is observed to be a monotonically increasing function of the Rayleigh number; as a result, very small magnetic Prandtl number dynamos can be found for a sufficiently large Rayleigh number. All dynamos are found to be oscillatory with an oscillation frequency that increases as the strength of the convection is increased and the magnetic Prandtl number is reduced. Single mode solutions which exhibit boundary layer behavior in the kinematic ...

  4. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  5. Challenges in simulation and modeling of heat transfer in low-Prandtl number fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetzbach, G., E-mail: groetzbach@kit.edu [Karlsruher Inst. fuer Technologie (KIT), Inst. fuer Kern-und Energietechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear heat transfer applications with low-Prandtl number fluids are often in the transition range between conduction and convection dominated regimes. Most flows in reactors involve also anisotropic turbulent fluxes and strong buoyancy influences. The relevance and complexity of the required heat flux modelling is discussed depending on engineering issues. The needed acceptable models range from turbulent Prandtl number concepts, over algebraic flux models, to full second order models in RANS as well as in LES, all with special liquid metal extensions. Recommendations are deduced for the promising HYBRID models. The listed remaining challenges show the need for further development of models and instrumentation. (author)

  6. Optimal Prandtl number for heat transfer in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Clercx, H.J.H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Numerical data for the heat transfer as a function of the Prandtl (Pr)and Rossby (Ro) numbers in turbulent rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection are presented for Rayleigh number Ra = 10 8 When Ro is ﬿xed, the heat transfer enhancement with respect to the non-rotating value shows a maximum as a functi

  7. The Numerical Study on the Influence of Prandtl Number and Height of the Enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Je-Young; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated numerically the internal flow depending on Prandtl number of fluid and height of enclosure. The two-dimensional numerical simulations were performed for several heights of enclosure in the range between 0.01 m and 0.074 m. It corresponds to the aspect ratio (H/L) ranged from 0.07 to 0.5. Prandtl number was 0.2, 0.7 and 7. Rayleigh number based on the height of enclosure ranged between 8.49x10{sup 3} and 1.20x10{sup 8}. The numerical calculations were carried out using FLUENT 6.3. In order to confirm the influence of Prandtl number and height of side walls on the internal flow and heat transfer of the horizontal enclosure, the numerical study is carried out using the FLUENT 6.3. The numerical results for the condition of top cooling only agree well with Rayleigh-Benard natural convection. When the top and side walls were cooled, the internal flow of enclosure is more complex. The thickness of thermal and velocity boundary layer varies with Prandtl number. For Pr>1 the behavior of cells is unstable and irregular owing to the entrained plume, whereas the internal flow for Pr<1 is stable and regular. Also, the number of cells increases depending on decrease of height. As a result, the heat exchange increases.

  8. Helical turbulent Prandtl number in the A model of passive vector advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatič, M.; Zalom, P.

    2016-11-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation, turbulent Prandtl numbers are obtained in the general A model of passive vector advected by fully developed turbulent velocity field with violation of spatial parity introduced via the continuous parameter ρ ranging from ρ =0 (no violation of spatial parity) to |ρ |=1 (maximum violation of spatial parity). Values of A represent a continuously adjustable parameter which governs the interaction structure of the model. In nonhelical environments, we demonstrate that A is restricted to the interval -1.723 ≤A ≤2.800 (rounded to 3 decimal places) in the two-loop order of the field theoretic model. However, when ρ >0.749 (rounded to 3 decimal places), the restrictions may be removed, which means that presence of helicity exerts a stabilizing effect onto the possible stationary regimes of the system. Furthermore, three physically important cases A ∈{-1 ,0 ,1 } are shown to lie deep within the allowed interval of A for all values of ρ . For the model of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (A =-1 ) up to date unknown helical values of the turbulent Prandtl number have been shown to equal 1 regardless of parity violation. Furthermore, we have shown that interaction parameter A exerts strong influence on advection-diffusion processes in turbulent environments with broken spatial parity. By varying A continuously, we explain high stability of the kinematic MHD model (A =1 ) against helical effects as a result of its proximity to the A =0.912 (rounded to 3 decimal places) case where helical effects are completely suppressed. Contrary, for the physically important A =0 model, we show that it lies deep within the interval of models where helical effects cause the turbulent Prandtl number to decrease with |ρ | . We thus identify internal structure of interactions given by the parameter A , and not the vector character of the admixture itself being the dominant factor influencing

  9. Helical turbulent Prandtl number in the A model of passive vector advection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatič, M; Zalom, P

    2016-11-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation, turbulent Prandtl numbers are obtained in the general A model of passive vector advected by fully developed turbulent velocity field with violation of spatial parity introduced via the continuous parameter ρ ranging from ρ=0 (no violation of spatial parity) to |ρ|=1 (maximum violation of spatial parity). Values of A represent a continuously adjustable parameter which governs the interaction structure of the model. In nonhelical environments, we demonstrate that A is restricted to the interval -1.723≤A≤2.800 (rounded to 3 decimal places) in the two-loop order of the field theoretic model. However, when ρ>0.749 (rounded to 3 decimal places), the restrictions may be removed, which means that presence of helicity exerts a stabilizing effect onto the possible stationary regimes of the system. Furthermore, three physically important cases A∈{-1,0,1} are shown to lie deep within the allowed interval of A for all values of ρ. For the model of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (A=-1) up to date unknown helical values of the turbulent Prandtl number have been shown to equal 1 regardless of parity violation. Furthermore, we have shown that interaction parameter A exerts strong influence on advection-diffusion processes in turbulent environments with broken spatial parity. By varying A continuously, we explain high stability of the kinematic MHD model (A=1) against helical effects as a result of its proximity to the A=0.912 (rounded to 3 decimal places) case where helical effects are completely suppressed. Contrary, for the physically important A=0 model, we show that it lies deep within the interval of models where helical effects cause the turbulent Prandtl number to decrease with |ρ|. We thus identify internal structure of interactions given by the parameter A, and not the vector character of the admixture itself being the dominant factor influencing diffusion

  10. Modeling of MHD turbulent heat transfer in channel flows imposed wall-normal magnetic fields under the various Prandtl number fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu, E-mail: yamamotoy@yamanashi.ac.jp [Division of Mechanical Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki, E-mail: kunugi@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku 615-8540, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We show the applicability to predict the heat transfer imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field by means of the zero-equation heat transfer model. • Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers with various molecular Prandtl number fluids were obtained. • Improvements of the prediction accuracy in turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate under the magnetic fields were accomplished. - Abstract: Zero-equation heat transfer models based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number are evaluated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for fully developed channel flows imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field. Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers are estimated by DNS data of various molecular Prandtl number fluids. From the viewpoint of highly-accurate magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) heat transfer prediction, the parameters of the turbulent eddy viscosity of the k–É› model are optimized under the magnetic fields. Consequently, we use the zero-equation model based on a constant turbulent Prandtl number to demonstrate MHD heat transfer, and show the applicability of using this model to predict the heat transfer.

  11. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael A.; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field is dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. However, our results are limited to the linear, kinematic dynamo regime; future simulations that include the Lorentz force are therefore necessary to assess the robustness of these results.

  12. Near-wall variable-Prandtl-number turbulence model for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon (sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  13. A Fokker-Planck Model of the Boltzmann Equation with Correct Prandtl Number for Polyatomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiaud, J.; Mieussens, L.

    2017-09-01

    We propose an extension of the Fokker-Planck model of the Boltzmann equation to get a correct Prandtl number in the Compressible Navier-Stokes asymptotics for polyatomic gases. This is obtained by replacing the diffusion coefficient (which is the equilibrium temperature) by a non diagonal temperature tensor, like the Ellipsoidal-Statistical model is obtained from the Bathnagar-Gross-Krook model of the Boltzmann equation, and by adding a diffusion term for the internal energy. Our model is proved to satisfy the properties of conservation and a H-theorem. A Chapman-Enskog analysis shows how to compute the transport coefficients of our model. Some numerical tests are performed to illustrate that a correct Prandtl number can be obtained.

  14. Similarities between 2D and 3D convection for large Prandtl number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PANDEY AMBRISH; VERMA MAHENDRA K; CHATTERJEE ANANDO G; DUTTA BIPLAB

    2016-07-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh–Bénard convection (RBC), we perform a comparative study of the spectra and fluxes of energy and entropy, and the scaling of large-scale quantities for large and infinite Prandtl numbers in two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions. We observe close similarities between the 2D and 3D RBC, in particular, the kinetic energy spectrum $E^{u}(k) ∼ k^{−13/3}$, and the entropy spectrum exhibits a dual branch with a dominant $k^{−2}$ spectrum. We showed that the dominant Fourier modes in 2D and 3D flows are very close. Consequently, the 3D RBC is quasi-two-dimensional, which is the reason for the similarities between the 2D and 3D RBC for large and infinite Prandtl numbers.

  15. A Fokker-Planck Model of the Boltzmann Equation with Correct Prandtl Number for Polyatomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiaud, J.; Mieussens, L.

    2017-07-01

    We propose an extension of the Fokker-Planck model of the Boltzmann equation to get a correct Prandtl number in the Compressible Navier-Stokes asymptotics for polyatomic gases. This is obtained by replacing the diffusion coefficient (which is the equilibrium temperature) by a non diagonal temperature tensor, like the Ellipsoidal-Statistical model is obtained from the Bathnagar-Gross-Krook model of the Boltzmann equation, and by adding a diffusion term for the internal energy. Our model is proved to satisfy the properties of conservation and a H-theorem. A Chapman-Enskog analysis shows how to compute the transport coefficients of our model. Some numerical tests are performed to illustrate that a correct Prandtl number can be obtained.

  16. Simulation of Heat Transfer to the Gas Coolant with Low Prandtl Number Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Kulikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns the simulating peculiarities of heat transfer to the gas coolants with low values of the Prandtl number, in particular, to the binary mixtures of inert gases.The paper presents simulation results of heat transfer to the fully established flow of a helium-xenon mixture in the round tube of 6 mm in diameter with the boundary condition of the second kind. It considers a flow of three helium-xenon mixtures with different helium content and molecular Prandtl numbers within the range 0.239–0.322 and with Reynolds numbers ranged from 10000 to 50000. During numerical simulation a temperature factor changed from 1.034 to 1.061. CFD-code STAR-CCM+ that is designed for solving a wide range of problems of hydrodynamics, heat transfer and stress was used as the primary software.The applicability of the five models for the turbulent Prandtl number is examined. It is shown that the choice of the model has a significant influence on the heat transfer coefficient. The paper presents structural characteristics of the flow in the wall region. It estimates a thermal stabilization section to be approximately as long as 30 diameters of tube.Simulation results are compared with the known data on heat transfer to gas coolants with low values of the Prandtl number. It is shown that V2F low-Reynolds number -ε turbulence model with an approximation for the turbulent Prandtl number used according Kays-CrawfordWeigand gives the best compliance with the results predicted by relationships of Kays W.M. and Petukhov B.S. The approximating correlation summarizes a set of simulation results.Application of the work results is reasonable when conducting the numerical simulation of heat transfer to binary gas mixtures in channels of different forms. The presented approximating correlation allows rapid estimate of heat transfer coefficients to the gas coolants with a low value of the molecular Prandl number within the investigated range with a flow through the

  17. Subcritical convection in a rapidly rotating sphere at low Prandtl number

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Celine

    2016-01-01

    We study non-linear convection in a low Prandtl number fluid ($Pr = 0.01-0.1$) in a rapidly rotating sphere with internal heating. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which variations of the axial vorticity along the rotation axis are neglected, whereas the temperature field is fully three-dimensional. We identify two separate branches of convection close to onset: (i) a well-known weak branch for Ekman numbers greater than $10^{-6}$, which is continuous at the onset (supercritical bifurcation) and consists of a superposition of thermal Rossby waves, and (ii) a novel strong branch at lower Ekman numbers, which is discontinuous at the onset. The strong branch becomes subcritical for Ekman numbers of the order of $10^{-8}$. On the strong branch, the Reynolds number of the flow is greater than $10^3$, and a strong zonal flow with multiple jets develops, even close to the non-linear onset of convection. We find that the subcriticality is amplified by decreasing the Prandtl nu...

  18. An analysis of spatially varying turbulent Prandtl number in a flow with local acceleration and deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunbum; Lee, Wook; Kang, Seongwon; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) is an important parameter in turbulent flows used in many engineering models for heat transfer. In the present study, spatial variation of Prt in a wall-bounded turbulent flow is investigated using DNS. We derived a form of Prt applicable to a general flow configuration, using the least-square method in a manner consistent with the turbulent viscosity model in LES. For a flow subject to local acceleration and deceleration induced by the wall geometry, we performed a parametric study for the Reynolds number, Prandtl number and a geometric factor using DNS. A comparison of the data from DNS and RANS with a constant Prt indicates the potential of improved RANS predictions using the present variable Prt subject to the local flow field. Also, it is observed that the local pressure gradient has an important effect on the Prt field. From the flow statistics, a few flow variables showing higher correlations with Prt are identified. An elementary model for Prt is devised, and used for RANS prediction producing a more accurate prediction of the heat transfer rate. Corresponding author

  19. Numerical prediction of film cooling effectiveness over flat plate using variable turbulent prandtl number closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochrymiuk, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to predict the film cooling effectiveness on the fiat plate with a three- dimensional discrete-hole film cooling arrangement. The effects of basic geometrical characteristics of the holes, i.e. diameter D, length L and pitch S/D were studied. Different turbulent heat transfer models based on constant and variable turbulent Prandtl number approaches were considered. The variability of the turbulent Prandtl number Pr t in the energy equation was assumed using an algebraic relation proposed by Kays and Crawford, or employing the Abe, Kondoh and Nagano eddy heat diffusivity closure with two differential transport equations for the temperature variance k θ and its destruction rate ɛ θ . The obtained numerical results were directly compared with the data that came from an experiment based on Transient Liquid Crystal methodology. All implemented models for turbulent heat transfer performed sufficiently well for the considered case. It was confirmed, however, that the two- equation closure can give a detailed look into film cooling problems without using any time-consuming and inherently unsteady models.

  20. A Study on Time-Scales Ratio and Turbulent Prandtl Number in Ducts of Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    This investigation concerns numerical time-scales ratio and turbulent Prandtl number in fully developed turbulent flows in ducts of various cross-sections. The low Reynolds number version of a non-linear eddy viscosity model is proposed to predict the Reynolds stresses and the temperature field...... is solved using a two-equation heat flux model. The computed results compare satisfactory with the available experimental data. The time-scale ratio R is defined as the ratio between the dynamic time-scale (k/ε) and the scalar time-scale(0.5θθ/εθ). Based on existing DNS data and calculations in this work...

  1. Heavy gas relaxation in a light gas shock wave at small Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2016-09-01

    The shock wave structure of a binary mixture with very different molecular weights is analyzed using a two-fluid theory in the limit of small Prandtl (Pr) number of the light gas. In particular, the case in which both the density ratio and Λ =Pr/δ Sc are order unity or below is considered, where δ ≪1 is the molecular mass ratio and Sc is the Schmidt number. Approximate analytical solutions are given for weak, and for moderately strong, shock waves. In the former case the solution is continuous, while in the latter case the light gas shock exhibits a discontinuity and the heavy gas relaxes towards the final equilibrium state.

  2. Optimal Prandtl number for heat transfer in rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Numerical data for the heat transfer as a function of the Prandtl (Pr) and Rossby (Ro) numbers in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection are presented for Rayleigh number Ra = 10^8. When Ro is fixed the heat transfer enhancement with respect to the non-rotating value shows a maximum as function of Pr. This maximum is due to the reduced efficiency of Ekman pumping when Pr becomes too small or too large. When Pr becomes small, i.e. for large thermal diffusivity, the heat that is carried by the vertical vortices spreads out in the middle of the cell, and Ekman pumping thus becomes less efficient. For higher Pr the thermal boundary layers (BLs) are thinner than the kinetic BLs and therefore the Ekman vortices do not reach the thermal BL. This means that the fluid that is sucked into the vertical vortices is colder than for lower Pr which limits the efficiency of the upwards heat transfer.

  3. Geoid and topography for infinite Prandtl number convection in a spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1988-01-01

    Geoid anomalies and surface and lower-boundary topographies are calculated for numerically generated thermal convection for an infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq, axisymmetric spherical fluid shell with constant gravity and viscosity, for heating both entirely from below and entirely from within. Convection solutions are obtained for Rayleigh numbers Ra up to 20 times the critical Ra in heating from below and 27 times critical for heating from within. Geoid parallels surface undulations, and boundary deformation generally increases with increasing cell wavelength. Dimensionless geoid and topography in heating from below are about 5 times greater than in heating from within. Values for heating from within correlate more closely with geophysical data than values from heating from below, suggesting a predominance of internal heating in the mantle. The study emphasizes that dynamically induced topography and geoid are sensitive to the mode of heating in the earth's mantle.

  4. Free Convention Heat Transfer from an Isothermal Horizontal Thin Strip: the Influence of the Prandtl Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia Fontana

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous free convection above and below a uniformly heated horizontal plate has been widely investigated,both in the case of an isothermal surface,and of a uniformly heated surface,but always assuming only air as fluid (Pr=0.7).Nevertheless,there are works dealing with horizontal plates whose results show that the Nu dependence on Pr may not be simply expressed by a power law with the same exponent of the Gr one.So it was considered useful to study the Prandtl number influence in the case of the isothermal horizontal strip.Results show that,while for the lower surface of the strip the Nu dependence in Gr can be expressed by a power law with an exponent close to the Gr one,for the upper surface the exponent is sensibly different.Correlating equations related to the investigated situations are proposed.

  5. The Tayler instability at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: Chiral symmetry breaking and synchronizable helicity oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Giesecke, A; Weber, N; Weier, T

    2016-01-01

    The current-driven, kink-type Tayler instability (TI) is a key ingredient of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo model for the generation of stellar magnetic fields, but is also discussed as a mechanism that might hamper the up-scaling of liquid metal batteries. Under some circumstances, the TI involves a helical flow pattern which goes along with some alpha effect. Here we focus on the chiral symmetry breaking and the related impact on the alpha effect that would be needed to close the dynamo loop in the Tayler-Spruit model. For low magnetic Prandtl numbers, we observe intrinsic oscillations of the alpha effect. These oscillations serve then as the basis for a synchronized Tayler-Spruit dynamo model, which could possibly link the periodic tidal forces of planets with the oscillation periods of stellar dynamos.

  6. Turbulent Prandtl number and space-time temperature correlation measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary laeyr flow over a heated flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using an x-probe and temperature fluctuation probe. The experiments resulted in direct measurement of the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of height through the boundary layer for three temperature difference cases. Also, space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime were obtained with a pair of temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities of the T-prime large-scale structure are presented for the three temperature difference cases. The mean convection velocity of the T-prime structure is a function of position y(+) and is found to be independent of the temperature difference for the cases considered.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Pure Noble Gases at Low Density from Ab Initio Prandtl Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Wang, Xiaopo; Liu, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    The experimental data reported in the literature after 2000 have been investigated for the viscosity and thermal conductivity of helium-4, neon, and argon at low density. The well-established values of thermal conductivity by transient hot-wire measurements are not reliable enough for noble gases in the low-pressure gas region. These facts motivate us to determine the thermal conductivity from accurate viscosity data and the ab initio Prandtl number, with an uncertainty of 0.25 % for temperatures ranging between 200 K and 700 K. The theoretical accuracy is superior to the accuracy of the best measurements. The calculated results are accurate enough to be applied as standard values for the thermal conductivity of helium-4, neon, and argon over the considered temperature range.

  8. Model for modulated and chaotic waves in zero-Prandtl-number rotating convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alaka Das; Krishna Kumar

    2008-09-01

    The effects of time-periodic forcing in a few-mode model for zero-Prandtl-number convection with rigid body rotation is investigated. The time-periodic modulation of the rotation rate about the vertical axis and gravity modulation are considered separately. In the presence of periodic variation of the rotation rate, the model shows modulated waves with a band of frequencies. The increase in the external forcing amplitude widens the frequency band of the modulated waves, which ultimately leads to temporally chaotic waves. The gravity modulation, on the other hand, with small frequencies, destroys the quasiperiodic waves at the onset and leads to chaos through intermittency. The spectral power density shows more power to a band of frequencies in the case of periodic modulation of the rotation rate. In the case of externally imposed vertical vibration, the spectral density has more power at lower frequencies. The two types of forcing show different routes to chaos.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann Scheme associated with flexible Prandtl number and specific heat ratio based on the polyatomic ES-BGK model

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Kainan; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann scheme associated with flexible Prandtl number and specific heat ratio is proposed, which is based on the polyatomic ellipsoidal statistics model(ES-BGK). The Prandtl number can be modified by a parameter of the Gaussian distribution and the specific heat ratio can be modified by additional free degrees. For the sake of constructing the scheme proposed, the Gaussian distribution is expanded on the Hermite polynomials and the general term formula for the Hermite coefficients of the Gaussian distribution is deduced. Benchmarks are carried out to verify the scheme proposed. The numerical results are in good agreement with the the analytical solutions.

  10. Numerically Simulated Impact of Gas Prandtl Number and Flow Model on Efficiency of the Machine-less Energetic Separation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Egorov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper regards the influence of one of similarity criteria – the Prandtl number of gas (Pr - on the efficiency of the machine-less energetic separation device (Leontiev pipe, using numerical modeling in ANSYS software. This device, equally as Rank-Hilsch and Hartman-Schprenger pipes, is designed to separate one gas flow into two flows with different temperatures. One flow (supersonic streams out of the pipe with a temperature higher than initial and the other (subsonic flows out with a temperature lower than initial. This direction of energetic separation is true if the Prandtl number is less than 1 that corresponds to gases.The Prandtl number affects the efficiency of running Leontiev pipe indirectly both through a temperature difference on which a temperature recovery factor has an impact and through a thermal conductivity coefficient that shows the impact of heat transfer intensity between gas and solid wall.The Prandtl number range in the course of research was from 0.1 to 0.7. The Prandtl number value equal to 0.7 corresponds to the air or pure gases (for example, inert argon gas. The Prandtl number equal to 0.2 corresponds to the mixtures of inert gases such as helium-xenon.The numerical modeling completed for the supersonic flow with Mach number 2.0 shows that efficiency of the machine-less energetic separation device has been increased approximately 2 times with the Prandtl number decreasing from 0.7 to 0.2. Moreover, for the counter-flow scheme this effect is a little higher due to its larger heat efficiency in comparison with the straight-flow one.Also, the research shows that the main problem for the further increase of the Leontiev pipe efficiency is a small value of thermal conductivity coefficient, which requires an intensification of the heat exchange, especially in the supersonic flow. It can be obtained, for example, by using a system of oblique shock waves in the supersonic channel.

  11. Homoclinic bifurcations in low-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection with uniform rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Maity, P; Pal, P

    2014-01-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations on homoclinic gluing and ungluing bifurcations in low-Prandtl-number ($ 0 \\leq Pr \\leq 0.025 $) Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard system rotating slowly and uniformly about a vertical axis. We have performed simulations with \\textit{stress-free} top and bottom boundaries for several values of Taylor number ($5 \\leq Ta \\leq 50$) near the instability onset. We observe a single homoclinic ungluing bifurcation, marked by the spontaneous breaking of a larger limit cycle into two limit cycles with the variation of the reduced Rayleigh number $r$ for smaller values of $Ta (< 25)$. A pair of homoclinic bifurcations, instead of one bifurcation, is observed with variation of $r$ for slightly higher values of $Ta$ ($25 \\leq Ta \\leq 50$) in the same fluid dynamical system. The variation of the bifurcation threshold with $Ta$ is also investigated. We have also constructed a low-dimensional model which qualitatively captures the dynamics of the system near the homoclinic bifurcations...

  12. Prandtl number scaling of unsteady natural convection boundary layers for Pr>1 fluids under isothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S W; Patterson, J C; Lei, Chengwang

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the scalings incorporating the Prandtl number (Pr) dependence have been obtained by a scaling analysis for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of an initially quiescent isothermal Newtonian fluid of Pr>1 produced by the sudden imposition of a higher temperature on a vertical plate. It is shown that the transient flow behavior of the resulting boundary layer can be described by a three-region structure and at the start-up stage the boundary layer development is one dimensional and independent of height due to the dominance of pure conduction; however, at steady state it becomes two dimensional and height dependent as the flow becomes dominated by convection. Numerical results demonstrate that the scalings representing the thermal boundary layer development accurately represent their Pr dependence over the whole stage of flow development. The scalings representing the viscous boundary layer development are generally in good agreement with the numerical results with the Pr variation over the whole stage of flow development, although there are small deviations from the numerical results with the Pr variation that are within acceptable limits for scaling.

  13. The behavior of magnetic Prandtl number on the Rossby wave instability in the protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Mahmoud; Ebadi, Hossein; Shaji, Zeynab

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the Rossby wave instability (RWI) has become the target of intense theoretical and simulation investigations in dealing to some ambiguous problems such as the planet formation and angular momentum transport in the protoplanetary discs. The role of hydrodynamic turbulence on the RWI theory has been well understood by many theoretical and simulation works. However, less attention has been paid to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in theoretical works related to the RWI. However, the turbulent magnetic Prandtl numbers (Prm), i.e., the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity, is one of the significant parameters in (MHD) turbulence. On the other hand, the gradient and strength of the toroidal magnetic field can affect some variables and parameters in the stationary and perturbation states in some radii which may be lead to important results. In this paper, the whole range of Prm is considered in details with considering the gradient and strength of the toroidal magnetic field. Although complicating the problem, it gives us a comprehensive view on the RWI occurrence in the cold and hot discs. The results show that the Prm can significantly control the RWI occurrence as well as the growth rate of unstable modes. While the magneto-rotational instability cannot be responsible for the angular momentum transport in the protoplanetary discs, our results indicate that the RWI is responsible about this subject in these discs.

  14. Investigation of turbulent Prandtl number subject to local acceleration and deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunbeom; Lee, Wook; Kang, Seongwon; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of the present study is to analyze the turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) varying over space in a wall-bounded turbulent flow under local acceleration and deceleration. The Prt shows the opposite trends for the conditions of acceleration and deceleration. In order to explain these phenomena, the convection velocity from the space-time correlation is investigated. It is shown that small-scale motions experience larger acceleration and deceleration compared to large-scale ones. Also, a discrepancy between the momentum and heat transfer at small scales results in the spatially varying Prt. The budgets of the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance show a hint for the variation of Prt. The results from DNS and RANS with a constant Prt are compared and show that RANS prediction can be improved by using a modeled Prt. From the turbulent statistics, a few flow variables showing higher correlations with Prt are identified. Based on this, simple phenomenological models are devised and the corresponding simulations show a more accurate prediction of the heat transfer rate. Corresponding author.

  15. Magnetic field amplification by small-scale dynamo action: dependence on turbulence models and Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-02-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus it is expected to depend crucially on the nature of the turbulence. In this paper, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(ℓ)proportional ℓ([symbol see text])V}, where ℓ and v(ℓ) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_{crit}, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is Rm(crit) (K) ≈ 110 and for Burgers turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/2) Rm(crit)(B) ≈ 2700. Furthermore, we derive that the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field for a general type of turbulence is Γ proportional Re((1-[symbol see text])/(1+[symbol see text])) in the limit of infinite magnetic Prandtl number. For decreasing magnetic Prandtl number (down to Pm >/~ 10), the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo decreases. The details of this drop depend on the WKB approximation, which becomes invalid for a magnetic Prandtl number of about unity.

  16. Effects of Prandtl number on the laminar cross flow past a heated cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith Kumar, S.; Mathur, Manikandan; Sameen, A.; Anil Lal, S.

    2016-11-01

    Flow past a heated cylinder at constant surface temperature is computationally simulated and analyzed in the laminar regime at moderate buoyancy. The parameters governing the flow dynamics are the Reynolds number, Re, the Richardson number, Ri, and the Prandtl number, Pr. We perform our computations in the range 10 ≤ Re ≤ 35, for which the flow past an unheated cylinder results in a steady separation bubble, and vary the other two parameters in the range 0 ≤ Ri ≤ 2, 0.25 ≤ Pr ≤ 100. The heat transfer from the entire cylinder surface, quantified by the average Nusselt number Nuavg, is shown to obey Nuavg = 0.7435Re0.44Pr0.346 in the mixed convection regime we investigate. For a fixed Re and Pr, the flow downstream of the cylinder becomes asymmetric as Ri is increased from zero, followed by a complete disappearance of the vortices in the recirculation bubble beyond a threshold value of Ri. For a fixed Re and Ri, the vortices in the recirculation bubble are again observed to disappear beyond a threshold Pr, but with the reappearance of both the vortices above a larger threshold of Pr. In the limit of large Pr, the time-averaged flow outside the thermal boundary layer but within the near-wake region regains symmetry about the centerline and ultimately converges to a flow field similar to that of Ri = 0; in the far-wake region, however, we observe asymmetric vortex shedding for moderate Pr. The thermal plume structure in the cylinder wake is then discussed, and the plume generation is identified at points on the cylinder where the Nusselt number is a local minimum. The difference between the plume generation and the flow separation locations on the cylinder is shown to converge to zero in the limit of large Pr. We conclude by plotting the lift and drag coefficients as a function of Ri and Pr, observing that CD decreases with Ri for Pr Prt), where Prt ≈ 7.5.

  17. Velocity amplitudes in global convection simulations: The role of the Prandtl number and near-surface driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Miesch, Mark S.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity κ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity ν is decreased proportionally with κ (fixing the Prandtl number Pr = ν / κ), we find that U increases but asymptotes toward a constant value, as found by Featherstone and Hindman (2016). However, if ν is held fixed while decreasing κ (increasing Pr), we find that U systematically decreases. We attribute this to an enhancement of the thermal content of downflow plumes, which allows them to carry the solar luminosity with slower flow speeds. We contrast this with the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection which is not subject to this luminosity constraint. This dramatic difference in behavior for the two paths in parameter space (fixed Pr or fixed ν) persists whether the heat transport by unresolved, near-surface convection is modeled as a thermal conduction or as a fixed flux. The results suggest that if solar convection can operate in a high-Pr regime, then this might effectively limit the velocity amplitude. Small-scale magnetism is a possible source of enhanced viscosity that may serve to achieve this high-Pr regime.

  18. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann Scheme Approach to Compressible Flows with Flexible Specific-Heat Ratio and Prandtl Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘延标; 许爱国; 张广财; 李英骏

    2011-01-01

    We further develop the lattice Boltzmann (LB) model [Physica A 382 (2007) 502] for compressible flows from two aspects. Firstly, we modify the Bhatnagar Gross Krook (BGK) collision term in the LB equation, which makes the model suitable for simulating flows with different Prandtl numbers. Secondly, the flux limiter finite difference (FLFD) scheme is employed to calculate the convection term of the LB equation, which makes the unphysical oscillations at discontinuities be effectively suppressed and the numerical dissipations be significantly diminished. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmarks, including (i) The thermal Couette flow; (ii) One- and two-dlmenslonal FLiemann problems. Good agreements are obtained between LB results and the exact ones or previously reported solutions. The flexibility, together with the high accuracy of the new model, endows the proposed model considerable potential for tracking some long-standing problems and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  19. Convection under rotation for Prandtl numbers near 1: K{umlt u}ppers-Lortz instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yuchou; Ecke, Robert E. [Condensed-Matter and Thermal Physics and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ahlers, Guenter [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Sciences, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] Pesch, Werner [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The K{umlt u}ppers-Lortz (KL) instability in Rayleigh-B{acute e}nard convection rotated about a vertical axis was studied experimentally using optical-shadowgraph imaging in the rotating frame for dimensionless rotation rates 6{lt}{Omega}{lt}20. Two cylindrical convection cells with radius-to-height ratios {Gamma}=40 and 23 were used. The cells contained CO{sub 2} at 33.1 bar and 16.6 bar with Prandtl numbers {sigma}=0.93 and {sigma}=0.83, respectively. Numerical solutions of the Boussinesq equations with parameter values corresponding to the experiments were obtained for comparison. For {Gamma}=40 and 8{lt}{Omega}{lt}10.5, the initial pattern above onset was time dependent. Its dynamics revealed a mixture of sidewall-nucleated domain-wall motion characteristic of the KL instability and of dislocation-defect motion. For {Omega}{gt}10.5, spontaneous formation of KL domain walls away from the sidewall was observed. For 8{lt}{Omega}{lt}12, there were differences between the two cells very close to onset, but for {epsilon}{approx_gt}0.02 the systems were qualitatively similar. For {Omega}{approx_gt}12 there was no qualitative difference in the behavior of the two cells at any {epsilon}. The average size of a domain containing rolls of approximately the same orientation decreased with increasing {Omega}, and the time dependence speeded up and became dominated by domain-wall propagation. The numerical solutions were qualitatively similar, although there was a tendency for the domains to be larger at the same {epsilon} and {Omega}. The replacement of domains of one orientation by those with another led to a rotation in Fourier space which was characterized by a rotation frequency {omega}{sub a} in the frame rotating at angular velocity {Omega}. Quantitative experimental measurements of {omega}{sub a}, of a correlation length {xi}, and of a domain-switching angle {Theta}{sub s} as functions of {epsilon}{equivalent_to}{Delta}T/{Delta}T{sub c}{minus}1 and {Omega} are

  20. Progress in the prediction of non-unity Prandtl-number turbulent flows using TransAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakehal, D.; Panyasantisuk, J.; Caviezel, D.; Labois, M.; Narayanan, C., E-mail: lakehal@ascomp.ch [ASCOMP GmbH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    We report LES results of the flow and convective heat transfer in a heated channel at a wall shear Reynolds number of Reτ = 150 and 171. The results are compared with available DNS data for various Prandtl number fluids (Pr = 0.1-10). In order to deal with non-unity Pr fluid flows, we have extended the variant of the Dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model of Germano proposed by Lilly to the thermal field, whereby the motion of the unresolved fluid flow and thermal structures is dictated by the resolved thermal-flow field. The base LES strategy as built in the code TransAT has been first validated for a practical case: the thermal-flow in a T junction, showing time-averaged results with excellent agreement with the experiment. The extended SGS model to the thermal field delivers results in line with the DNS data of a heated channel flow, and reveals that the turbulent Prandtl number cannot be fixed in an ad-hoc manner, and is clearly dependent on both the fluid and flow properties. (author)

  1. Dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: mean flow versus fully turbulent motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponty, Y [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Mininni, P D [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States); Pinton, J-F [CNRS UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69007 Lyon (France); Politano, H [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Pouquet, A [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We compute numerically the threshold for dynamo action in Taylor-Green (TG) swirling flows. Kinematic dynamo calculations, for which the flow field is fixed to its time average, are compared to dynamical runs, with the Navier-Stokes and induction equations jointly solved. The dynamo instability for the kinematic calculations is found to have two branches. The dynamical dynamo threshold at low Reynolds numbers lies within the low branch, while at high Reynolds numbers it gets closer to the high branch. Based on these results, the effect of the mean flow and of the turbulent fluctuations in TG dynamos are discussed.

  2. Thermal convection of an internally heated infinite Prandtl number fluid in a spherical shell. [earth core-mantle-surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1980-01-01

    A Galerkin technique is used to study the finite-amplitude axisymmetric steady convective motions of an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid in a spherical shell. Two types of heating are considered: in one case, convection is driven both by internal heat sources in the fluid and by an externally imposed temperature drop across the shell boundaries; in the other case, only internal heat sources drive convection and the lower boundary of the shell is adiabatic. Two distinct classes of axisymmetric steady states are found to be possible: states characterized by temperature and radial velocity fields that are symmetric about an equatorial plane; and a class of solutions that does not possess any symmetry properties about the equatorial plane.

  3. Magnetic Field Amplification by Small-Scale Dynamo Action: Dependence on Turbulence Models, Reynolds and Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2011-01-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus is expected to depend crucially on the nature of turbulence. In this work, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(l) ~ l^theta, where l and v(l) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB-approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_crit, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence (theta=1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is approximately 110 and for Burger...

  4. An assessment of heat-transfer correlations for turbulent water flow through a pipe at Prandtl numbers of 6.0 and 11.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, J. J.; Yung, D. T.; Panchal, C. B.; Layton, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation assessed the accuracy of existing heat-transfer correlations for turbulent flow of water in smooth tubes at Prandtl numbers (Pr) of 6.0 and 11.6. The best correlations were selected for use in designing ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers. Two shell-and-tube heat exchangers, a plain-tube evaporator and a plain-tube condenser, were tested to obtain data for water at Pr = 6.0 (800 F) and Pr = 11.6 (400 F), respectively. From measured values of the overall heat-transfer coefficients, the water-side coefficients were determined by the Wilson plot method. The results were used as a data base for evaluating seven widely used heat-transfer correlations. Overall, the best correlations were found to be Petukhov-Popov and Sleicher-Rouse, both of which agree within + or - 5% with the experimental data over the entire Reynolds number range. The Dittus-Boelter and Sieder-Tate correlations, popular with heat-transfer engineers, underpredict the data by 5% to 15% and thus are considered too conservative. Predictions from the Kays correlation compare favorably with the data at Pr = 6.0 but are slightly high (nonconservative) at Pr = 11.6. The Eagle Ferguson correlation is acceptable at Pr = 6.0 but a little too conservative at Pr = 11.6.

  5. Assessment of RANS at low Prandtl number and simulation of sodium boiling flows with a CMFD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Modelling of boiling sodium flows in a multiphase flow solver. • Rod heated with a constant heat flux in a pipe liquid metal flow. • Sodium boiling flow around a rod heated with a constant heat. • Computations in progress in an assembly constituted of 19 pins equipped with a wrapped wire. - Abstract: In France, Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) have recently received a renewed interest. In 2006, the decision was taken by the French Government to initiate research in order to build a first Generation IV prototype (called ASTRID) by 2020. The improvement in the safety of SFR is one of the key points in their conception. Accidental sequences may lead to a significant increase of reactivity. This is for instance the case when the sodium coolant is boiling within the fissile zone. As a consequence, incipient boiling superheat of sodium is an important parameter, as it can influence boiling process which may appear during some postulated accidents as the unexpected loss of flow (ULOF). The problem is that despite the reduction in core power, when boiling conditions are reached, the flow decreases progressively and vapour expands into the heating zone. A crucial investigating way is to optimize the design of the fissile assemblies of the core in order to lead to stable boiling during a ULOF accident, without voiding of the fissile zone. Moreover, in order to evaluate nuclear plant design and safety, a CFD tool has been developed at EDF in the framework of the nuclear industry. Advanced models dedicated to boiling flows have been implemented and validated against experimental data for ten years now including a wall law for boiling flows, wall transfer for nucleate boiling, turbulence and polydispersion model. This paper aims at evaluating the generalization of these models to SFR. At least two main issues are encountered. Firstly, at low Prandtl numbers such as those of liquid metal, classical approaches derived for unity or close to unity fail to

  6. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  7. Pr数对环形浅液池热毛细对流的影响%EFFECT OF PRANDTL NUMBER ON THERMOCAPILLARY CONVECTION IN SHALLOW ANNULAR POOLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石万元; 李友荣; 彭岚

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of Prandtl (Pr) number on thermocapillary convection instability, the thermocapillary convection in shallow annular pools of silicon melt (Pr = 0.011) and silicone oils with Pr number ranging from 6.7 to 57.9 are investigated using linear stability analysis.The hydrothermal waves (HW) and their critical conditions for the incipience of HWs are determined,especially for those at high value of Pr number. The results indicate that the Mac increases sharply with increasing Pr number when Pr≤l5.9, while it increases slightly with increasing Pr number when Pr > 15.9. When Pr≤15.9, there is only one group of HW in the pool. However, two groups of HW coexist in the pool and they interfere each other when Pr > 15.9. With increasing Pr number, the arms of the main group of HW become longer and their propagation angles decrease gradually. The critical wave number mc and critical phase velocity wc decrease with increasing Pr number.%为了解流体普朗特数(Pr)对热毛细对流的影响,通过线性稳定性分析,确定了环形浅液池内硅熔体(Pr=0.011)和几种硅油(Pr数从6.7至57.9)热毛细对流失稳的临界条件,获得了它们在临界条件下的热流体波,特别是高Pr数硅油的热流体波.结果发现:当Pr≤15.9时,临界Ma数随Pr数的增加迅速上升,此时环形池内只有一组热流体波,呈连续条纹状.当Pr>15.9后,临界Ma数随Pr数的增加变缓,环形池内由波数相同、强弱和传播角不同的两组热流体波组成,二者相互干涉形成忽明忽暗、断断续续的条纹.随着Pr数的增加,其中占据主要地位的一组热流体波变得越来越长,传播角越来越小.临界波数mc和临界相速ωc随Pr数的增加而降低.

  8. Effect of different flow regimes on free convection heat transfer from isothermal convex bodies over all range of Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Pouria; Jafarpur, Khosrow

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, effect of different flow regimes on free convection heat transfer has been examined. In the light of this, a novel analytical method is developed to calculate free convection heat transfer from isothermal convex bodies with arbitrary shape over all range of Rayleigh number in fluids with any Prandtl number. The crux of this method is based on the concept of dynamic behaviors existing in natural convection flow. In the previous models the Body Gravity Function (BGF) and Turbulent Function (TF) have been taken as constant values. In this study, BGF accounts for the effect of body shape and orientation with respect to gravity vector in laminar free convection. Besides, TF accounts for the impact of Prandtl number, body shape and orientation with regard to gravity vector in turbulent free convection. By contrast, it is shown that these two parameters undergo a change through the variation of Rayleigh number and cannot be considered as a constant. These two parameters are modeled based upon the thermal resistance concept. Moreover, two transition criteria happening in free convection heat transfer will be obtained according to this new analytical method (conduction-laminar and laminar-turbulent transitions). Finally, three models (models 1, 2 and 3) are proposed for calculation free convection heat transfer and present results for ten isothermal convex bodies with various aspect ratios (0.298 ≤ √ A /P ≤ 2.470) have been compared with the available experimental and numerical data. Here, the results of model 2 are almost equal to those of model 3. Also, the results of model 1 are more precise than those of model 3 while the parameters computation of model 1 is more intricate in comparison with model 3. On the one hand, the model 1 has an average difference <6 % vis-à-vis numerical data in entire range of Rayleigh number (laminar and turbulent). On the other hand, the average difference of model 1 is not more than 8 % versus experimental data

  9. Experimental study of thermocapillary convection on a liquid bridge consisting of fluid with low Prandtl number in a floating half-zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙祉伟; 韩金虎; 戴乐蓉; 解京昌; 胡文瑞

    1997-01-01

    A device of mercury liquid bridge of floating half-zone is designed to experimentally explore thermo-capillary convection and its instability of a low Prandtl number liquid. Noncontacted diagnostic techniques were developed to monitor surface flow and surface deformation. The surface flow and the influence of a growing surface film (or skin) on the flow were observed It is shown that the film is a key factor in changing the behavior associated with the thermocapillary convection. The experiment indicates that the critical Marangoni number should be much higher than that expected by the numerical simulation. The condition and process of surface film growth are discussed. The surface oscillation of the mercury bridge wrapped with "dirt-film" was observed, and the characteristics and the frequency associated with this oscillation are given.

  10. Local Convective Heat Transfer from Small Heaters to Impinging Submerged Axisymmetric Jets of Seven Coolants with Prandtl Number Ranging from 0.7 to 348

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sun; C.F.Ma; 等

    1997-01-01

    Using seven working fluids,a systematic experimental study was performed to investigate the local convective heat transfer from vertical heaters to impinging circular submerged jets in the range of Reynolds number between 1.17×102 and 3.69×104 with the emphasis placed on the examination of Prandtl number dependence.Heat transfer coefficients at the stagnation point were collected and correlated with the plate held within and beyond the potential core.Radial distribution of the local heat transfer coefficient was measured with five test liquids.Based on the measured profiles of the local heat transfer,a correlation was developed to cover the entire range of the adial distance.Basides the present data,the correlations developed in this work were also compared with a large quantity of available data of circular air jets.General agreement was observed between the air data and the correlations.

  11. Logarithmic temperature profiles of turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in the classical and ultimate state for a Prandtl number of 0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Guenter; He, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental determinations of the temperature field in the interior (bulk) of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection for a cylindrical sample with aspect ratio (diameter over height) of 0.50, both in the classical and in the ultimate state. The Prandtl number was close to 0.8. We find a "logarithmic layer" in which the temperature varies as A*ln(z/L) + B with the distance z from the bottom plate of the sample. The amplitude A varies with radial position r. In the classical state these results are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS); in the ultimate state there are as yet no DNS. A close analogy between the temperature field in the classical state and the "Law of the Wall" for the time-averaged down-stream velocity in shear flow is discussed.

  12. Thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow of a low Prandtl number binary mixture with a -1 capillary ratio in an annular pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Chun-Mei; Li, You-Rong; Chen, Jie-Chao

    2016-08-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations on thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow in an annular pool were carried out. The pool was filled with silicon-germanium melt with an initial silicon mass fraction of 1.99%. The Prandtl number and the Lewis number of the working fluid are 6.37 × 10-3 and 2197.8, respectively. Both the radial temperature gradient and the solute concentration gradient were applied to the annular pool. The capillary ratio was assumed to be -1, which means that the solutal and thermal capillary effects were equal and opposite. Results show that the thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow always occurs at this special case with the capillary ratio of -1, and even in a shallow annular pool with an aspect ratio of 0.05. With the increase of the thermal Marangoni number, four kinds of flow patterns appear orderly, including concentric rolls, petal-like, spoke, and rosebud-like patterns. These flow patterns are strongly influenced by the local interaction between the solutal and thermal capillary effects and the vertical solute concentration gradient near the outer cylinder. A small vortex driven by the dominant solutal capillary effect emerges near the inner cylinder, which is different from the flow pattern in a pure fluid. In addition, the critical thermal Marangoni number of the initial three-dimensional flow decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio of the annular pool.

  13. Numerical investigation of Prandtl number effect on heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a nuclear fuel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Abdul Razak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of liquid metal coolants (such as Sodium, Sodium potassium, Bismuth, Lead, and Lead–bismuth flowing over a nuclear fuel element having non-uniform internal energy generation numerically using finite difference method. The Full Navier Stokes Equations governing the flow were converted into stream function-Vorticity form and solved simultaneously along with energy equation using central finite difference scheme. For the two dimensional steady state heat conduction and Stream-Function Equation, the discretization was done in the form suitable to solve using ‘Line-by-Line Gauss-Seidel’ solution technique whereas the discretization of Vorticity transport and energy equations were done using Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI scheme. After discretization the systems of equations were solved using ‘Thomas Algorithm’. The complete task was done by writing a computer code. The results were obtained in the form of variation of Maximum temperature in the fuel element (hot spots and its location, mean coolant temperature at the exit .The parameters considered for the study were  aspect ratio of fuel element, Ar, conduction-convection parameter Ncc, total energy generation parameter Qt, and flow Reynolds number ReH. The results obtained can be used to minimize the Maximum temperature in the fuel element (hot spots.

  14. Convective Heat Transfer Analysis on Prandtl Fluid Model with Peristalsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alsaedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD on peristaltic transport of Prandtl fluid in a symmetric channel have been studied under the assumptions of long wave length and low-Reynolds number. Channel walls are considered compliant in nature. Series solutions of axial velocity, stream function and temperature are given by using regular perturbation technique for small values of Prandtl fluid parameter. The effects of physical parameters on the velocity, streamlines and temperature are examined by plotting graphs.

  15. Experimental study of heat transfer for parallel flow in tube bundles with constant heat flux and for medium Prandtl numbers; Etude experimentale du transfert de chaleur dans des faisceaux tubulaires en ecoulement parallele pour une densite de flux thermique constante dans le domaine des nombres de Prandtl moyens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The heat transfer parameters were determined experimentally in electrically heated tube bundles for turbulent flow parallel to the axis. The tubes were arranged in a pattern of equilateral triangles. The ratios of the distance between the axes of the tubes to their external diameter were 1.60 and 1.25 in the two test sections studied. The experiments were carried out with distilled water and with a mixture of 60 per cent ethylene glycol and 40 per cent water. The values obtained for the Prandtl numbers in this way fell within the range from 2.3 to 18. The Reynolds numbers were varied between 10{sup 4} and 2.10{sup 5}. The relation between the mean heat transfer coefficients and the friction factor in the tube bundles was found from the experiments as: Nu = [Re Pr {zeta}/8]/[1+{radical}({zeta}/8) 8.8 (Pr-1.3) Pr{sup -0.22}]. The experimentally determined mean Nusselt numbers were also given by the following function: Nu = (0.0122 + 0.00245 p/d) Re{sup 0.86} Pr{sup 0.4}, with a maximum deviation of {+-}4 per cent. For certain local Nusselt numbers, deviations of up to 20 per cent with respect to the relations given were observed. (author) [French] Dans des faisceaux tubulaires a chauffage electrique parcourus par un ecoulement turbulent parallele a l'axe, on a determine experimentalement les parametres du transfert de chaleur. Les centres des sections droites des tubes etaient des sommets de triangles equilateraux. Les rapports de la distance a l'axe des tubes et leur diametre exterieur dans les deux veines de mesure etudiees etaient de 1.60 et 1.25. Des essais furent effectues avec de l'eau distillee ainsi qu'avec un melange de 60 pour cent de glycol ethylenique et 40 pour cent d'eau. Les valeurs des nombres de Prandtl obtenues ainsi etaient situees entre 2.3 a 18. On a fait varier les nombres de Reynolds entre 10{sup 4} et 2.10{sup 5}. La relation entre les nombres caracteristiques de transfert de chaleur moyens et la perte de charge dans

  16. Prandtl-Batchelor flows revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, van L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper laminar flows are considered with closed streamlines. For such flows Prandtl [1905. Űber Flüssigkeitsbewegung bei sehr kleiner Reibung. Verhandlungen des III. Internationalen Mathematiker Kongresses, Heidelberg, 1904, pp. 484-491, Teubner, Leizig. See Gesammelte Abhandlungen II, pp.

  17. Automated Control Surface Design and Sizing for the Prandtl Plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ginneken, D.A.J.; Voskuijl, M.; Van Tooren, M.J.L.; Frediani, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of the primary flight control surfaces, in terms of size, number and location, for fixed wing aircraft (conventional or unconventional). As test case, the methodology is applied to a 300 passenger variant of the Prandtl Plane. This box wing aircraft i

  18. Prandtl and the G\\"ottingen School

    CERN Document Server

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    This is a historical review of "Prandtl and the G\\"ottingen School" from his first work in 1898 to after WWII. We report the development of the boundary layer theory and the investigations that lead Ludwig Prandtl in the spring of 1945 to use a energy cascade model to derive for fully developed turbulence the Kolmogrov length scale. Working at the end of WWII he was not aware of the work by Kolmogorov. Thus Ludwig Prandtl was before Onsager, von Weiz\\"acker, and Heisenberg in rederiving parts of K41 theory. In our historical analysis we rely heavily on exchanges between Ludwig Prandtl with Theodore von K\\'arm\\'an and Goeffrey Ingram Taylor and on the original notes by Ludwig Prandtl and others.

  19. High Rayleigh number convection numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzicco, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    temperature variance dissipations. The achieved results seem to support the idea that the observed transitional behaviors have to be attributed to the change in the topology of the mean flow rather than to a transition from a laminar to a turbulent state of the viscous boundary layers. Other issues accomplished by the simulation concern the study of the scaling properties of the turbulent quantities and length scales in terms of Ra. Finally, further details on the turbulence dynamics are obtained by the analysis of the power spectra and low order structure functions of both the temperature and the velocity components, computed from the numerical probes both within the bulk region and close to the walls. References Roche, PE; Castaing, B; Chabaud, B; Hebral, B. ``Observation of the 1/2 power law in Rayleigh-Benard convection'' Phys. Rev. E, 2001, 6304(4), p. 5303. Niemela, J.J.; Skrbek, L.; Sreenivasan, K.R. and Donnelly, R.J. ``Turbulent convection at very high Rayleigh numbers'' Nature, 405, 243-253 (11 May 2000). Verzicco, R. and Camussi, R. ``Prandtl number effects in convective turbulence'' J. of Fluid Mech., 383, (1999), 55-73.

  20. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  1. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  2. Convective heat transport in stratified atmospheres at low and high Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Evan H

    2016-01-01

    Convection in astrophysical systems is stratified and often occurs at high Rayleigh number (Ra) and low Mach number (Ma). Here we study stratified convection in the context of plane-parallel, polytropically stratified atmospheres. We hold the density stratification ($n_{\\rho}$) and Prandtl number (Pr) constant while varying Ma and Ra to determine the behavior of the Nusselt number (Nu), which quantifies the efficiency of convective heat transport. As Ra increases and $\\text{Ma} \\rightarrow 1$, a scaling of Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.45}$ is observed. As Ra increases to a regime where Ma $\\geq 1$, this scaling gives way to a weaker Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.19}$. In the regime of Ma $\\ll 1$, a consistent Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.31}$ is retrieved, reminiscent of the Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{2/7}$ seen in Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection.

  3. A note on the Prandtl layers

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yan

    2010-01-01

    This note concerns a nonlinear ill-posedness of the Prandtl equation and an invalidity of asymptotic boundary-layer expansions of incompressible fluid flows near a solid boundary. Our analysis is built upon recent remarkable linear ill-posedness results established by G\\'erard-Varet and Dormy [2], and an analysis in Guo and Tice [5]. We show that the asymptotic boundary-layer expansion is not valid for non-monotonic shear layer flows in Sobolev spaces. We also introduce a notion of Weak Lipschitz well-posedness and prove that the nonlinear Prandtl equation is not well-posed in this sense near non-stationary and non-monotonic shear flows. On the other hand, we are able to verify that Oleinik's monotonic solutions are well-posed.

  4. Energetics of slope flows: linear and weakly nonlinear solutions of the extended Prandtl model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, Ivan; Marinović, Ivana; Večenaj, Željko; Grisogono, Branko

    2016-07-01

    The Prandtl model succinctly combines the 1D stationary boundary-layer dynamics and thermodynamics of simple anabatic and katabatic flows over uniformly inclined surfaces. It assumes a balance between the along-the-slope buoyancy component and adiabatic warming/cooling, and the turbulent mixing of momentum and heat. In this study, energetics of the Prandtl model is addressed in terms of the total energy (TE) concept. Furthermore, since the authors recently developed a weakly nonlinear version of the Prandtl model, the TE approach is also exercised on this extended model version, which includes an additional nonlinear term in the thermodynamic equation. Hence, interplay among diffusion, dissipation and temperature-wind interaction of the mean slope flow is further explored. The TE of the nonlinear Prandtl model is assessed in an ensemble of solutions where the Prandtl number, the slope angle and the nonlinearity parameter are perturbed. It is shown that nonlinear effects have the lowest impact on variability in the ensemble of solutions of the weakly nonlinear Prandtl model when compared to the other two governing parameters. The general behavior of the nonlinear solution is similar to the linear solution, except that the maximum of the along-the-slope wind speed in the nonlinear solution reduces for larger slopes. Also, the dominance of PE near the sloped surface, and the elevated maximum of KE in the linear and nonlinear energetics of the extended Prandtl model are found in the PASTEX-94 measurements. The corresponding level where KE>PE most likely marks the bottom of the sublayer subject to shear-driven instabilities. Finally, possible limitations of the weakly nonlinear solutions of the extended Prandtl model are raised. In linear solutions, the local storage of TE term is zero, reflecting the stationarity of solutions by definition. However, in nonlinear solutions, the diffusion, dissipation and interaction terms (where the height of the maximum interaction is

  5. The small-scale dynamo: Breaking universality at high Mach numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schmidt, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) The small-scale dynamo may play a substantial role in magnetizing the Universe under a large range of conditions, including subsonic turbulence at low Mach numbers, highly supersonic turbulence at high Mach numbers and a large range of magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, i.e. the ratio of kinetic viscosity to magnetic resistivity. Low Mach numbers may in particular lead to the well-known, incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence, while for high Mach numbers, we are in the highly compressible regime, thus close to Burgers turbulence. In this study, we explore whether in this large range of conditions, a universal behavior can be expected. Our starting point are previous investigations in the kinematic regime. Here, analytic studies based on the Kazantsev model have shown that the behavior of the dynamo depends significantly on Pm and the type of turbulence, and numerical simulations indicate a strong dependence of the growth rate on the Mach number of the flow. Once the magnetic field saturates on the current ...

  6. Miniaturised Prandtl tube with integrated pressure sensors for micro-thruster plume characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; Ma, Kechun; de Boer, Meint J.; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-01-01

    A miniaturised Prandtl-tube sensor incorporating a 6 mm long 40 μm diameter microchannel with integrated pressure sensors has been realised. The sensor has been designed for the characterisation of rarefied plume flow from a MEMS-based monopropellant propulsion system for high-accuracy attitude

  7. Prandtl-Meyer flow tables for parahydrogen at total temperatures from 30K to 290K and for nitrogen at total temperatures from 100K to 300K at total pressures from 1 ATM to 10 ATM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, R. C.; Adcock, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The dependency of Mach number on the Prandtl-Meyer function was numerically determined by iterating the Prandtl-Meyer function and applying the Muller method to converge on the Mach number for flows in cryogenic parahydrogen and nitrogen at various total pressures and total temperatures. The results are compared with the ideal diatomic gas values and are presented in tabular form.

  8. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  9. Ludwig Prandtl and the growth of fluid mechanics in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Ludwig Prandtl (1875-1953) has been called the father of modern aerodynamics. His name is associated most famously with the boundary layer concept, but also with several other topics in 20th-century fluid mechanics, particularly turbulence (Prandtl's mixing length). Among his disciples are pioneers of modern fluid mechanics like Heinrich Blasius, Theodore von Kármán, and Walter Tollmien. Furthermore, Prandtl founded the Aerodynamische Versuchsanstalt (AVA) and the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Strömungsforschung in Göttingen, nuclei for the growth of fluid mechanics in Germany. In this article I trace this development on the basis of my recent biography of Prandtl.

  10. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Corrigan, G.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A.G.; Solomon, W. M.; Strintzi, D.; Tsalas, M.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density gradie

  11. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density gra...

  12. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Corrigan, G.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A.G.; Solomon, W. M.; Strintzi, D.; Tsalas, M.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density

  13. On quark number susceptibilities at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Hegde, P; Karsch, F; Miao, C; Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Velytsky, A

    2013-01-01

    We calculated second and fourth order quark number susceptibilities for 2+1 flavor QCD in the high temperature region using two improved staggered fermion formulations. The calculations are performed at several lattice spacing and we show that in the continuum limit the two formulations give consistent results. We compare our continuum extrapolated results on quark number susceptibilities with recent weak coupling calculations, and find that these cannot simultaneously explain the lattice results for second and fourth order quark number susceptibilities.

  14. The influence of surfactants on thermocapillary flow instabilities in low Prandtl melting pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidess, Anton; Kenjereš, Saša; Kleijn, Chris R.

    2016-06-01

    Flows in low Prandtl number liquid pools are relevant for various technical applications and have so far only been investigated for the case of pure fluids, i.e., with a constant, negative surface tension temperature coefficient ∂γ/∂T. Real-world fluids containing surfactants have a temperature dependent ∂γ/∂T > 0, which may change sign to ∂γ/∂T forces are the main driving force, this can have a tremendous effect on the resulting flow patterns and the associated heat transfer. Here we investigate the stability of such flows for five Marangoni numbers in the range of 2.1 × 106 ≤ Ma ≤ 3.4 × 107 using dynamic large eddy simulations, which we validate against a high resolution direct numerical simulation. We find that the five cases span all flow regimes, i.e., stable laminar flow at Ma ≤ 2.1 × 106, transitional flow with rotational instabilities at Ma = 2.8 × 106 and Ma = 4.6 × 106, and turbulent flow at Ma = 1.8 × 107 and Ma = 3.4 × 107.

  15. The influence of surfactants on thermocapillary flow instabilities in low Prandtl melting pools

    CERN Document Server

    Kidess, Anton; Kleijn, Chris R

    2016-01-01

    Flows in low Prandtl number liquid pools are relevant for various technical applications, and have so far only been investigated for the case of pure fluids, i.e. with a constant, negative surface tension temperature coefficient $\\partial\\gamma/\\partial T$. Real-world fluids containing surfactants have a temperature dependent $\\partial\\gamma/\\partial T > 0$, which may change sign to $\\partial\\gamma/\\partial T < 0$ at a critical temperature $T_c$. Where thermocapillary forces are the main driving force, this can have a tremendous effect on the resulting flow patterns and the associated heat transfer. Here we investigate the stability of such flows for five Marangoni numbers in the range of $2.1\\times 10^6 \\leq Ma \\leq 3.4\\times 10^7$ using dynamic large eddy simulations (LES), which we validate against a high resolution direct numerical simulation (DNS). We find that the five cases span all flow regimes, i.e. stable laminar flow at $Ma \\leq 2.1\\times 10^6$, transitional flow with rotational instabilities at...

  16. Chaotic behaviour of high Mach number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvoglis, H.; Ghosh, S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of the super-Alfvenic flow of a two-fluid plasma model with respect to the Mach number and the angle between the flow direction and the magnetic field is investigated. It is found that, in general, a large scale chaotic region develops around the initial equilibrium of the laminar flow when the Mach number exceeds a certain threshold value. After reaching a maximum the size of this region begins shrinking and goes to zero as the Mach number tends to infinity. As a result high Mach number flows in time independent astrophysical plasmas may lead to the formation of 'quasi-shocks' in the presence of little or no dissipation.

  17. Influences of Hall current and chemical reaction in mixed convective peristaltic flow of Prandtl fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Zahir, Hina; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of present analysis is to address the mixed convective peristaltic flow of Prandtl fluid in a planar channel with compliant walls. Effects of applied magnetic field and Hall current are retained. Heat transfer in fluid flow is characterized through convective boundary conditions. Impact of first order chemical reaction together with Soret effect is examined. Problems formulation in view of long wavelength and low Reynolds number consideration is developed. The graphs are obtained numerically for the velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient. Results for Hall parameter and Hartman number on velocity have opposite characteristics.

  18. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We's, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  19. Pair separation in high Reynolds number turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgoin, M O; Xu, H; Joergensen, J B; Bodenschatz, E; Bourgoin, Mickael; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Xu, Haitao; Joergensen, Jacob B.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The separation of two nearby particles in a turbulent flow is fundamental in our everyday lives. Turbulent mixing is important everywhere from mundane applications like stirring milk into a cup of tea to technological processes such as the mixing of chemicals in reactors, combustion engines, or jet turbines. Environmental problems such as the spread of pollutants or bioagents in the atmosphere and oceans are fundamentally turbulent mixing processes. Even biological organisms use it to survive in marine ecosystems. Despite intense scientific inquiry, however, no convincing agreement has been found with the Richardson and Batchelor two-particle dispersion predictions over a wide range of timescales. Here we report measurements in a laboratory water flow at very high turbulence intensities (Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers of R_lambda = 690 and 815) that show excellent agreement with a refinement of Batchelor's prediction. We find that even for large initial spatial separations Batchelor scaling is fulfilled. ...

  20. Turbulent convection experiment at high Rayleigh number to support CAP1400 IVR strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Li, E-mail: mali@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Ji, Shui, E-mail: jishui@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Chang, Huajian, E-mail: changhuajian@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The facility reached high Ra number at 10{sup 12} of CAP1400 working condition. • The fitting formula Nu = 0.085 × Ra{sup 0.315} was established to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer at high Ra for the CAP1400. • The coupling method can accurately and safely predict the heat flow distribution of metal layer in high Ra number conditions. • The experiment results will predict the relationship between axial and radial heat transfer well. - Abstract: The characteristics of the heat transfer and the calculation of heat flux in metal layer are both the critical problems for in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy. Turbulent convection occurs in the metal layer when the Rayleigh number (Ra) becomes sufficient high. The Globe–Dropkin (G–D) correlation (Globe and Dropkin, 1959) and Chu–Churchill (C–C) correlation (Churchill and Chu, 1975) have been widely used to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer, where the valid range of the Ra is from 1.5 × 10{sup 5} to 6.8 × 10{sup 8} in G–D correlation and less than 10{sup 12} in C–C correlation. However, with the increase of reactor power, both the Rayleigh number and the rate of heat transfer below the bottom of metal layer of the molten pool will increase, and in this case the Rayleigh number even can reach 10{sup 11} for the China Advanced Passive Plant CAP1400. Accordingly, the G–D correlation is not suitable for the CAP1400. Therefore, our experiment purposes are to establish the appropriate correlation at high Ra for the CAP1400 and predict the axial and radial distribution of the heat transfer in the metal layer with the heat transfer behavior of metal layer experiment (HELM) facility. The experiments are divided into two parts. Each part concerns 39 runs and 47 experimental conditions. Its corresponding results are obtained at middle Prandtl number (Pr = 7 for water) and the Nusselt number is found to be proportional to Ra{sup 0.315} in the range 3.93 × 10{sup 8} < Ra < 3.57

  1. Numerical simulations of high Knudsen number gas flows and microchannel electrokinetic liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang

    Low pressure and microchannel gas flows are characterized by high Knudsen numbers. Liquid flows in microchannels are characterized by non-conventional driving potentials like electrokinetic forces. The main thrust of the dissertation is to investigate these two different kinds of flows in gases and liquids respectively. High Knudsen number (Kn) gas flows were characterized by 'rarified' or 'microscale' behavior. Because of significant non-continuum effect, traditional CFD techniques are often inaccurate for analyzing high Kn number gas flows. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method offers an alternative to traditional CFD which retains its validity in slip and transition flow regimes. To validate the DSMC code, comparisons of simulation results with theoretical analysis and experimental data are made. The DSMC method was first applied to compute low pressure, high Kn flow fields in partially heated two dimensional channels. The effects of varying pressure, inlet flow and gas transport properties (Kn, Reynolds number, Re and the Prandtl number, Pr respectively) on the wall heat transfer (Nusselt number, Nu) were examined. The DSMC method was employed to explore mixing gas flows in two dimensional microchannels. Mixing of two gas streams (H2 and O2) was considered within a microchannel. The effect of the inlet-outlet pressure difference, the pressure ratio of the incoming streams and the accommodation coefficient of the solid wall on mixing length were all examined. Parallelization of a three-dimensional DSMC code was implemented using OpenMP procedure on a shared memory multi-processor computer. The parallel code was used to simulate 3D high Kn number Couette flow and the flow characteristics are found to be very different from their continuum counterparts. A mathematical model describing electrokinetically driven mass transport phenomena in microfabricated chip devices will also be presented. The model accounts for the principal physical phenomena affecting

  2. Mixing in High Schmidt Number Turbulent Jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul Lewis

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the passive scalar (species concentration) field in the far-field of round, axisymmetric, high Schmidt number (liquid phase), turbulent jets issuing into a quiescent reservoir, by means of a quantitative laser-induced fluorescence technique. Single -point concentration measurements are made on the jet centerline, at axial locations from 100 to 305 nozzle diameters downstream, and Reynolds numbers of 3,000 to 102,000, yielding data with a resolved temporal dynamic range up to 2.5 times 10^5, and capturing as many as 504 large-scale structure passages. Long-time statistics of the jet concentration are found to converge slowly. Between 100 and 300 large-scale structure passages are required to reduce the uncertainty in the mean to 1%, or so. The behavior of the jet varies with Reynolds number. The centerline concentration pdf's become taller and narrower with increasing Re, and the normalized concentration variances correspondingly decrease with Re. The concentration power spectra also evolve with Re. The behavior of the spectral slopes is examined. No constant -1 (Batchelor) spectral slope range is present. Rather, in the viscous region, the power spectra exhibit log-normal behavior, over a range of scales exceeding a factor of 40, in some cases. The frequency of the beginning of this log-normal range scales like Re^{3/4} (Kolmogorov scaling). Mixing in the far-field is found to be susceptible to initial conditions. Disturbances in the jet plenum fluid and near the nozzle exit strongly influence the scalar variance, with larger disturbances causing larger variances, i.e., less homogeneous mixing. The plenum/nozzle geometry also influences the variance. These effects of initial conditions persist for hundreds of diameters from the nozzle exit, over hundreds of large scales. Mixing in these jets differs from gas-phase, order unity Sc, jet mixing. At low to moderate Re, the higher Sc jet is less well mixed. The difference

  3. High speed optical quantum random number generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Martin; Weier, Henning; Nauerth, Sebastian; Marangon, Davide G; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2010-06-07

    We present a fully integrated, ready-for-use quantum random number generator (QRNG) whose stochastic model is based on the randomness of detecting single photons in attenuated light. We show that often annoying deadtime effects associated with photomultiplier tubes (PMT) can be utilized to avoid postprocessing for bias or correlations. The random numbers directly delivered to a PC, generated at a rate of up to 50 Mbit/s, clearly pass all tests relevant for (physical) random number generators.

  4. Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    TOTAL: PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: Discipline Robin Schulze 0.43 0.43 1 Names of Post Doctorates Names of Faculty Supported...Agent, or Firm- Meyertons, Hood , Kivlin, Kowert & Goetze!, P.C.; Eric B. Meyertons (57) ABSTRACT A method of assessing parallel random number...Meyertons, Hood , Kivlin, Kowert & Goetzel, P.C. P.O. Box 398 Austin, TX 78767-0398 Ph: (512) 853-8800 PATENT 5660-14400

  5. Number theory meets high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Feynman amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theory are being expressed in terms of an algebra of functions, extending the familiar logarithms, and associated numbers— periods. The study of these functions (including hyperlogarithms) and numbers (like the multiple zeta values), that dates back to Leibniz and Euler, has attracted anew the interest of algebraic geometers and number theorists during the last decades. The two originally independent developments are recently coming together in an unlikely collaboration between particle physics and what were regarded as the most abstruse branches of mathematics.

  6. Position control of a single pneumatic artificial muscle with hysteresis compensation based on modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Yixiang; Heng, Shuai; Lin, Zhenkun; Zhao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    High-performance position control of pneumatic artificial muscles is limited by their inherent nonlinearity and hysteresis. This study aims to model the length/pressure hysteresis of a single pneumatic artificial muscle and to realize its accurate position tracking control with forward hysteresis compensation. The classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is widely used in hysteresis modelling and compensation. But it is only effective for symmetric hysteresis. Therefore, a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is built to characterize the asymmetric length/pressure hysteresis of a single pneumatic artificial muscle, by replacing the classical play operators with two more flexible elementary operators to independently describe the ascending branch and descending branch of hysteresis loops. On the basis, a position tracking controller, which is composed of cascade forward hysteresis compensation and simple proportional pressure controller, is designed for the pneumatic artificial muscle. Experiment results show that the MPI model can reproduce the length/pressure hysteresis of the pneumatic artificial muscle, and the proposed controller for the pneumatic artificial muscle can track the reference position signals with high accuracy. By modelling the length/pressure hysteresis with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model and using its inversion for compensation, precise position control of a single pneumatic artificial muscle is achieved.

  7. PIV Analysis of Ludwig Prandtl's Historic Flow Visualization Films

    CERN Document Server

    Willert, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Around 1930 Ludwig Prandtl and his colleagues O. Tietjens and W. M\\"uller published two films with visualizations of flows around surface piercing obstacles to illustrate the unsteady process of flow separation. These visualizations were achieved by recording the motion of fine particles sprinkled onto the water surface in water channels. The resulting images meet the relevant criteria of properly seeded recordings for particle image velocimetry (PIV). Processing these image sequences with modern PIV algorithms allows the visualization of flow quantities (e.g. vorticity) that were unavailable prior to the development of the PIV technique. The accompanying fluid dynamics video consists of selected original film sequences overlaid with visualizations obtained through PIV processing.

  8. On the use of the Prandtl mixing length model in the cutting torch modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancinelli, B [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Minotti, F O; Kelly, H, E-mail: bmancinelli@arnet.com.ar [Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The Prandtl mixing length model has been used to take into account the turbulent effects in a 30 A high-energy density cutting torch model. In particular, the model requires the introduction of only one adjustable coefficient c corresponding to the length of action of the turbulence. It is shown that the c value has little effect on the plasma temperature profiles outside the nozzle (the differences being less than 10 %), but severely affects the plasma velocity distribution, with differences reaching about 100% at the middle of the nozzle-anode gap. Within the experimental uncertainties it was also found that the value c = 0.08 allows to reproduce both, the experimental data of velocity and temperature

  9. An efficient compact fourth order FD method for simulating 3-D mantle convection at high Rayleigh number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present an efficient method based on fourth order compact finite-differences for simulating three dimensional mantle convection (i.e. Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the infinite Prandtl number limit) with constant viscosity in a rectangular box. In the high Rayleigh number regime, this thermal convection model has recently been shown to exhibit many of the features of turbulent flow that are typically identified with high Reynolds number flow [1]. High order compact finite schemes are known to be particularly good for simulating turbulent flows because of their spectral like resolution [2], which ameliorates dispersion and anisotropy errors. They have also been shown to be much less susceptible than second order schemes to spurious oscillations for transient convection diffusion equations at large Péclet number (as occurs for the temperature equation in the mantle convection model at high Rayleigh number). Finally, high order schemes have been shown to be more efficient than low order methods in terms of degrees of freedom required to attain a specified error level, which is important for reducing memory requirements so simulations can be performed on emerging low-cost high performance computational platforms like graphics processing units (GPUs). We demonstrate the capabilities of our compact fourth order scheme at accurately capturing such phenomena as transient periods of double layered convection[3] (see Figure 1) and flow reversals using far fewer degrees of freedom than required for traditional second order methods. Finally, we discuss the computational cost of the scheme and its efficient implementation on GPUs. References: [1] M. Breuer and U. Hansen, Turbulent convection in the zero Reynolds number limit, EPL, 86, 24004, 2009. [2] S. K. Lele, Compact finite difference schemes with spectral-like resolution, J. Comput. Phys., 103, 16, 1992. [3] A. P. Boss and I. S. Sacks, Time-dependent models of single- and double-layer mantle convection, Nature, 308

  10. Mechanical Parameters of the Squeeze Film Curvilinear Bearing Lubricated with a Prandtl Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.

    2016-12-01

    Based upon a Prandtl fluid flow model, a curvilinear squeeze film bearing is considered. The equations of motion are given in a specific coordinate system. After general considerations on the Prandtl fluid flow these equations are used to derive the Reynolds equation. The solution of this equation is obtained by a method of successive approximation. As a result one obtains formulae expressing the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. The numerical examples of the Prandtl fluid flow in gaps of two simple bearings are presented.

  11. Effect logs of double diffusion on MHD Prandtl nano fluid adjacent to stretching surface by way of numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, S.; Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, M. Y.; Hussain, Arif; Awais, M.

    The current communication is carried to contemplate the unique and novel characteristics of nanofluids by constructing formulation of Prandtl fluid model. The fascinating aspects of thermo diffusion effects are also accounted in this communication. Mathematical modelling is performed by employing boundary layer approach. Afterwards, similarity variables are selected to convert dimensional non-linear system into dimensionless expressions. The solution of governing dimensionless problem is executed by shooting method (SM). Graphical evaluation is displayed to depict the intrinsic behavior of embedded parameters on dimensionless velocity, temperature, solutal concentration and nanoparticle concentration profiles. Furthermore, the numerical variation for skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, Sherwood number and nano Sherwood number is scrutinized through tables. The assurance of current analysis is affirmed by developing comparison with previous findings available in literature, which sets a benchmark for implementation of computational approach. It is inferred from the computation that concentration profile increases whereas Sherwood number decreases for progressive values of Dufour solutal number.

  12. Prandtl's Boundary Layer Equation for Two-Dimensional Flow: Exact Solutions via the Simplest Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The simplest equation method is employed to construct some new exact closed-form solutions of the general Prandtl's boundary layer equation for two-dimensional flow with vanishing or uniform mainstream velocity. We obtain solutions for the case when the simplest equation is the Bernoulli equation or the Riccati equation. Prandtl's boundary layer equation arises in the study of various physical models of fluid dynamics. Thus finding the exact solutions of this equation is of great importance and interest.

  13. Towards a high-speed quantum random number generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Damien; Burri, Samuel; Charbon, Edoardo; Chunnilall, Christopher; Meneghetti, Alessio; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is of fundamental importance in various fields, such as cryptography, numerical simulations, or the gaming industry. Quantum physics, which is fundamentally probabilistic, is the best option for a physical random number generator. In this article, we will present the work carried out in various projects in the context of the development of a commercial and certified high speed random number generator.

  14. Non-linear control of a hydraulic piezo-valve using a generalised Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Frederik; Minorowicz, Bartosz; Persson, Johan; Plummer, Andrew; Bowen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The potential to actuate proportional flow control valves using piezoelectric ceramics or other smart materials has been investigated for a number of years. Although performance advantages compared to electromagnetic actuation have been demonstrated, a major obstacle has proven to be ferroelectric hysteresis, which is typically 20% for a piezoelectric actuator. In this paper, a detailed study of valve control methods incorporating hysteresis compensation is made for the first time. Experimental results are obtained from a novel spool valve actuated by a multi-layer piezoelectric ring bender. A generalised Prandtl-Ishlinskii model, fitted to experimental training data from the prototype valve, is used to model hysteresis empirically. This form of model is analytically invertible and is used to compensate for hysteresis in the prototype valve both open loop, and in several configurations of closed loop real time control system. The closed loop control configurations use PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) control with either the inverse hysteresis model in the forward path or in a command feedforward path. Performance is compared to both open and closed loop control without hysteresis compensation via step and frequency response results. Results show a significant improvement in accuracy and dynamic performance using hysteresis compensation in open loop, but where valve position feedback is available for closed loop control the improvements are smaller, and so conventional PID control may well be sufficient. It is concluded that the ability to combine state-of-the-art multi-layer piezoelectric bending actuators with either sophisticated hysteresis compensation or closed loop control provides a route for the creation of a new generation of high performance piezoelectric valves.

  15. U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167050.html U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High: CDC And ... THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescriptions for opioid painkillers have dropped since 2010 in the United ...

  16. Promoting Number Theory in High Schools or Birthday Problem and Number Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    The author introduces the birthday problem in this article. This can amuse willing members of any birthday party. This problem can also be used as the motivational first day lecture in number theory for the gifted students in high schools or in community colleges or in undergraduate classes in colleges.

  17. Promoting number theory in high schools or birthday problem and number theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2010-04-01

    The author introduces the birthday problem in this article. This can amuse willing members of any birthday party. This problem can also be used as the motivational first day lecture in number theory for the gifted students in high schools or in community colleges or in undergraduate classes in colleges.

  18. Temperature variance profiles of turbulent thermal convection at high Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-11-01

    We present measurements of the Nusselt number Nu , and of the temperature variance σ2 as a function of vertical position z, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of two cylindrical samples with aspect ratios (diameter D/height L) Γ = 0 . 50 and 0 . 33 . Both samples had D = 1 . 12 m but different L. We used compressed SF6 gas at pressures up to 19 bars as the fluid. The measurements covered the Rayleigh-number range 1013 < Ra < 5 ×1015 at a Prandtl number Pr = 0 . 80 . Near the side wall we found that σ2 is independent of Ra when plotted as a function of z / λ where λ ≡ L / (2 Nu) is a thermal boundary-layer thickness. The profiles σ2 (z / λ) for the two Γ values overlapped and followed a logarithmic function for 20 z / λ 120 . With the observed "-1"-scaling of the temperature power spectra and on the basis of the Perry-Townsend similarity hypothesis, we derived a fitting function σ2 =p1 ln (z / λ) +p2 +p3(z / λ) - 0 . 5 which describes the σ2 data up to z / λ = 1500 . Supported by the Max Planck Society, the Volkswagenstiftung, the DFD Sonderforschungsbereich SFB963, and NSF Grant DMR11-58514.

  19. Simulating High Reynolds Number Flow by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Xiu-Ying; LIU Da-He; ZHOU Jing; JIN Yong-Juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A two-dimensional channel flow with different Reynolds numbers is tested by using the lattice Boltzmann method under different pressure and velocity boundary conditions. The results show that the simulation error increases,and the pressure and the flow rate become unstable under a high Reynolds number. To improve the simulation precision under a high Reynolds number, the number of fluid nodes should be enlarged. For a higher Reynoldsnumber flow, the velocity boundary with an approximately parabolic velocity profile is found to be more adaptive.Blood flow in an artery with cosine shape symmetrical narrowing is then simulated under a velocity boundary condition. Its velocity, pressure and wall shear stress distributions are consistent with previous studies.

  20. August Passenger and Cargo Numbers Set New Highs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Passenger and cargo numbers set new highs in August, the second consecutive month that both areas of operation at Dragonair posted record figures. The airline flew 444,498 passengers in August to record its third consecutive monthly record. The number was 7.7%higher than in July, with travel in both months driven by holiday traffic. August 15 saw a new daily mark set, with 17,220passengers carried on the day.

  1. Numerical simulation of LBGK model for high Reynolds number flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Yang; Shi Bao-Chang; Wang Neng-Chao

    2004-01-01

    A principle of selecting relaxation parameter was proposed to observe the limit computational capability of the incompressible LBGK models developed by Guo ZL (Guo model) and He SY (He model) for high Reynolds number flow.To the two-dimensional driven cavity flow problem, the highest Reynolds numbers covered by Guo and He models are in the range 58000-52900 and 28000-29000, respectively, at 0.3 Mach number and 1/256 lattice space. The simulation results also show that the Guo model has stronger robustness due to its higher accuracy.

  2. The structure of the velocity and passive scalar fields in high Reynolds number and high Peclet number grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarski, Laurent Bernard

    1998-10-01

    Turbulence theories are generally posed for isotropic turbulence in the limit of infinite turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers. Until now, it has been impossible to satisfy these constraints simultaneously in either experiments or simulations. By use of an active grid, devised by Makita, nearly isotropic turbulence with large turbulent Reynolds and Peclet numbers is generated. Turbulent Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor microscale, Rλ, in excess of 700 are achieved. The evolution of the velocity and passive scalar fields from low to high Reynolds and Peclet numbers is studied by generating turbulent fields in wind tunnels. The measurements are made by hot-wire anemometry and cold- wire thermometry. The passive scalar (generated by a mean scalar gradient) is temperature in air. The velocity field shows significant variation with Reynolds number. The slope of the inertial subrange is a function of Reynolds number and is noticeably below the Kolmogorov value of 5/3 for Rλconvective scaling range for the scalar (with slope close to 5/3) is observed for all Peclet numbers. The effects of the internal intermittency of the scalar are present at all Peclet numbers. The scalar field exhibits some (Peclet-number- independent) violations of local isotropy in the direction of the imposed gradient for odd-ordered statistics. The understanding of the 'ramp-cliff' structures (to which this anisotropy is attributed) is extended by describing it in terms of three-point statistics-the most fundamental order at which the odd- ordered statistics can be examined.

  3. Impact of High Mathematics Education on the Number Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Julie; Göbel, Silke M.

    2012-01-01

    In adult number processing two mechanisms are commonly used: approximate estimation of quantity and exact calculation. While the former relies on the approximate number sense (ANS) which we share with animals and preverbal infants, the latter has been proposed to rely on an exact number system (ENS) which develops later in life following the acquisition of symbolic number knowledge. The current study investigated the influence of high level math education on the ANS and the ENS. Our results showed that the precision of non-symbolic quantity representation was not significantly altered by high level math education. However, performance in a symbolic number comparison task as well as the ability to map accurately between symbolic and non-symbolic quantities was significantly better the higher mathematics achievement. Our findings suggest that high level math education in adults shows little influence on their ANS, but it seems to be associated with a better anchored ENS and better mapping abilities between ENS and ANS. PMID:22558077

  4. Wire-number effects on high-power annular z-pinches and some characteristics at high wire number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.

    2000-05-23

    Characteristics of annular wire-array z-pinches as a function of wire number and at high wire number are reviewed. The data, taken primarily using aluminum wires on Saturn are comprehensive. The experiments have provided important insights into the features of wire-array dynamics critical for high x-ray power generation, and have initiated a renaissance in z-pinches when high numbers of wires are used. In this regime, for example, radiation environments characteristic of those encountered during the early pulses required for indirect-drive ICF ignition on the NIF have been produced in hohlraums driven by x-rays from a z-pinch, and are commented on here.

  5. High cetane number paraffinic diesel fuels and emission reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larmi, M.; Tilli, A.; Kaario, O.; Gong, Y.; Antila, E.; Sarjovaara, T.; Hillamo, H.; Hakkinen, K.; Lehto, K. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Brink, A. [Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Finland); Aakko, P. [Saksa VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed high cetane number (CN) paraffinic diesel fuels and emission reduction. The presentation outlined the synthetic and renewable fuels to be studied, including high CN paraffinic diesel fuels like hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) and FT-diesel fuel; high CN paraffinic diesel fuels with high concentration of oxygenates; biogas/NPG and dual fuel combustion in future projects; and neat oxygenates like dimethyl ether in future projects. Fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel and diesel fuel were used as reference fuels. The project objectives were to obtain a significant reduction of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions of 70 per cent without drawbacks in efficiency or power output. The presentation also described combustion implementation; milestones at Aalto University School of Science and Technology (TKK); resources at TKK; the main research engine; LEO with EHVA; a literature study on previous research; fuel properties; HVO properties, density; high cetane number in the literature; and high CN effects. Previous studies that were discussed included direct comparisons with no calibrations; heavy duty engine performance; potential with engine calibration; exhaust gas recirculation; and room for new research. In general, standard test runs have been carried out with existing engines without considering the special properties of the fuels. tabs., figs.

  6. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  7. Distribution of plasmoids in high-Lundquist-number magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A

    2012-12-28

    The distribution function f(ψ) of magnetic flux ψ in plasmoids formed in high-Lundquist-number current sheets is studied by means of an analytic phenomenological model and direct numerical simulations. The distribution function is shown to follow a power law f(ψ)∼ψ(-1), which differs from other recent theoretical predictions. Physical explanations are given for the discrepant predictions of other theoretical models.

  8. Vortex Tubes in Turbulence Velocity Fields at High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Mouri, H

    2008-01-01

    The elementary structures of turbulence, i.e., vortex tubes, are studied using velocity data obtained in laboratory experiments for boundary layers and duct flows at microscale Reynolds numbers 332-1934. While past experimental studies focused on intense vortex tubes, the present study focuses on all vortex tubes with various intensities. We obtain the mean velocity profile. The radius scales with the Kolmogorov length. The circulation velocity scales with the Kolmogorov velocity, in contrast to the case of intense vortex tubes alone where the circulation velocity scales with the rms velocity fluctuation. Since these scaling laws are independent of the configuration for turbulence production, they appear to be universal at high Reynolds numbers.

  9. Entraining Flow of a Concentrated Benthic Suspension: Computations with the Prandtl Mixing-Length Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Prandtl mixing-length model of turbulent exchange of mass and momentum is applied to calculate the entrainment of overlying water into a layer of suspended fine sediment at a horizontal bed. In the field the flow and turbulence in such a concentrated benthic suspension (CBS) are driven by a

  10. Cascades and dissipation ratio in rotating magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at low magnetic Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion

    2010-10-01

    A phenomenology of isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence subject to both rotation and applied magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the triple correlation decay time is the shortest between the eddy turn-over time and the ones associated to the rotating frequency and the Alfvén wave period. For Pm=1 it leads to four kinds of piecewise spectra, depending on four parameters: injection rate of energy, magnetic diffusivity, rotation rate, and applied field. With a shell model of MHD turbulence (including rotation and applied magnetic field), spectra for Pm ≤ 1 are presented, together with the ratio between magnetic and viscous dissipations.

  11. Prandtl number effects in MRT lattice Boltzmann models for shocked and unshocked compressible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper constructs a new multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model which is not only for the shocked compressible fluids,but also for the unshocked compressible fluids.To make the model work for unshocked compressible fluids,a key step is to modify the collision operators of energy flux so that the viscous coefficient in momentum equation is consistent with that in energy equation even in the unshocked system.The unnecessity of the modification for systems under strong shock is analyzed.The model ...

  12. Shear-driven dynamo waves at high magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S M; Cattaneo, F

    2013-05-23

    Astrophysical magnetic fields often display remarkable organization, despite being generated by dynamo action driven by turbulent flows at high conductivity. An example is the eleven-year solar cycle, which shows spatial coherence over the entire solar surface. The difficulty in understanding the emergence of this large-scale organization is that whereas at low conductivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm) dynamo fields are well organized, at high Rm their structure is dominated by rapidly varying small-scale fluctuations. This arises because the smallest scales have the highest rate of strain, and can amplify magnetic field most efficiently. Therefore most of the effort to find flows whose large-scale dynamo properties persist at high Rm has been frustrated. Here we report high-resolution simulations of a dynamo that can generate organized fields at high Rm; indeed, the generation mechanism, which involves the interaction between helical flows and shear, only becomes effective at large Rm. The shear does not enhance generation at large scales, as is commonly thought; instead it reduces generation at small scales. The solution consists of propagating dynamo waves, whose existence was postulated more than 60 years ago and which have since been used to model the solar cycle.

  13. DSMC Simulation of High Mach Number Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The main focus of this work is to characterise the Taylor-Couette flow of an ideal gas between two coaxial cylinders at Mach number Ma = (U_w /√{ kbT_w / m }) in the range 0.01 Boltzmann constant. The cylindrical surfaces are specified as being diffusely reflecting with the thermal accommodation coefficient equal to one. In the present analysis of high Mach number compressible Taylor-Couette flow using DSMC method, wall slip in the temperature and the velocities are found to be significant. Slip occurs because the temperature/velocity of the molecules incident on the wall could be very different from that of the wall, even though the temperature/velocity of the reflected molecules is equal to that of the wall. Due to the high surface speed of the inner cylinder, significant heating of the gas is taking place. The gas temperature increases until the heat transfer to the surface equals the work done in moving the surface. The highest temperature is obtained near the moving surface of the inner cylinder at a radius of about (1.26 r_1).

  14. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J Pietarila; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2011-07-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000(3) grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the local mean field follow a Kolmogorov law. We find that the ratio of the eddy turnover time to the Alfvén time increases with wave number, contrary to the so-called critical balance hypothesis. Residual energy and helicity spectra are also considered; the role played by the conservation of magnetic helicity is studied, and scaling laws are found for the magnetic helicity and residual helicity spectra. We put these results in the context of the dynamics of a globally isotropic MHD flow that is locally anisotropic because of the influence of the strong large-scale magnetic field, leading to a partial equilibration between kinetic and magnetic modes for the energy and the helicity.

  15. Hysteresis phenomenon of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaoliang; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Zhongqi; Yu, Daren

    2016-11-01

    When the hypersonic inlet works at a Mach number higher than the design value, the hypersonic inlet is started with a regular reflection of the external compression shock at the cowl, whereas a Mach reflection will result in the shock propagating forwards to cause a shock detachment at the cowl lip, which is called "local unstart of inlet". As there are two operation modes of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number, the mode transition may occur with the operation condition of hypersonic inlet changing. A cowl-angle-variation-induced hysteresis and a downstream-pressure-variation-induced hysteresis in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition are obtained by viscous numerical simulations in this paper. The interaction of the external compression shock and boundary layer on the cowl plays a key role in the hysteresis phenomenon. Affected by the transition of external compression shock reflection at the cowl and the transition between separated and attached flow on the cowl, a hysteresis exists in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition. The hysteresis makes the operation of a hypersonic inlet very difficult to control. In order to avoid hysteresis phenomenon and keep the hypersonic inlet operating in a started mode, the control route should never pass through the local unstarted boundary.

  16. Turbomachinery for Low-to-High Mach Number Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choon S.; Shah, Parthiv N.

    2004-01-01

    The thrust capability of turbojet cycles is reduced at high flight Mach number (3+) by the increase in inlet stagnation temperature. The 'hot section' temperature limit imposed by materials technology sets the maximum heat addition and, hence, sets the maximum flight Mach number of the operating envelope. Compressor pre-cooling, either via a heat exchanger or mass-injection, has been suggested as a means to reduce compressor inlet temperature and increase mass flow capability, thereby increasing thrust. To date, however, no research has looked at compressor cooling (i.e., using a compressor both to perform work on the gas path air and extract heat from it simultaneously). We wish to assess the feasibility of this novel concept for use in low-to-high Mach number flight. The results to-date show that an axial compressor with cooling: (1) relieves choking in rear stages (hence opening up operability), (2) yields higher-pressure ratio and (3) yields higher efficiency for a given corrected speed and mass flow. The performance benefit is driven: (i) at the blade passage level, by a decrease in the total pressure reduction coefficient and an increase in the flow turning; and (ii) by the reduction in temperature that results in less work required for a given pressure ratio. The latter is a thermodynamic effect. As an example, calculations were performed for an eight-stage compressor with an adiabatic design pressure ratio of 5. By defining non-dimensional cooling as the percentage of compressor inlet stagnation enthalpy removed by a heat sink, the model shows that a non-dimensional cooling of percent in each blade row of the first two stages can increase the compressor pressure ratio by as much as 10-20 percent. Maximum corrected mass flow at a given corrected speed may increase by as much as 5 percent. In addition, efficiency may increase by as much as 5 points. A framework for characterizing and generating the performance map for a cooled compressor has been developed

  17. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  18. High accuracy semidefinite programming bounds for kissing numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittelmann, H.D.; Vallentin, F.

    2009-01-01

    The kissing number in n-dimensional Euclidean space is the maximal number of non-overlapping unit spheres which simultaneously can touch a central unit sphere. Bachoc and Vallentin developed a method to find upper bounds for the kissing number based on semidefinite programming. This paper is a repor

  19. High accuracy semidefinite programming bounds for kissing numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Mittelmann; F. Vallentin (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractThe kissing number in n-dimensional Euclidean space is the maximal number of non-overlapping unit spheres which simultaneously can touch a central unit sphere. Bachoc and Vallentin developed a method to find upper bounds for the kissing number based on semidefinite programming. This

  20. High accuracy semidefinite programming bounds for kissing numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Mittelmann; F. Vallentin (Frank)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractThe kissing number in n-dimensional Euclidean space is the maximal number of non-overlapping unit spheres which simultaneously can touch a central unit sphere. Bachoc and Vallentin developed a method to find upper bounds for the kissing number based on semidefinite programming. This

  1. Statistics of High Atwood Number Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The statistical properties of incompressible shear-driven planar mixing layers between two miscible streams of fluids with different densities are investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulations. The simulations begin from a thin interface perturbed by a thin broadband random disturbance, and the mixing layers are allowed to develop to self-similar states. The temporal simulations are performed in unprecedented domain sizes, with grid sizes up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536, which allows turbulent structures to grow and merge naturally. This allows the flow to reach states far-removed from the initial disturbances, thereby enabling high-quality statistics to be obtained for higher moments, pdfs, and other quantities critical to developing closure models. A wide range of Atwood numbers are explored, ranging from nearly constant density to At=0.87. The consequences of increasing the density contrast are investigated for global quantities, such as growth rates, and asymmetries that form in statistical profiles. Additional simulations in smaller domains are performed to study the effects of domain size.

  2. Interaction of two high Reynolds number axisymmetric turbulent wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obligado, M.; Klein, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With the recent discovery of non-equilibrium high Reynolds number scalings in the wake of axisymmetric plates (Nedic et al., PRL, 2013), it has become of importance to develop an experimental technique that permits to easily discriminate between different wake scalings. We propose an experimental setup that tests the presence of non-equilibrium turbulence using the streamwise variation of velocity fluctuations between two bluff bodies facing a flow. We have studied two different sets of plates (one with regular and another with irregular peripheries) with Hot-Wire Anemometry in a wind tunnel. By acquiring streamwise profiles for different plate separations and identifying the wake interaction length for each separation it is possible to estimate the streamwise evolution of the single wake width. From this evolution it is also possible to deduce the turbulence dissipation scalings. This work generalizes previous studies on the interaction of plane wakes (see Gomes-Fernandes et al., JFM, 2012) to include axisymmetric wakes. We find that the wake interaction length proposed in this cited work and a constant anisotropy assumption can be used to collapse the streamwise developments of the first three moments.

  3. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  4. Real-time inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric actuators with a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a novel real-time inverse hysteresis compensation method for piezoelectric actuators exhibiting asymmetric hysteresis effect. The proposed method directly utilizes a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model to characterize the inverse hysteresis effect of piezoelectric actuators. The hysteresis model is then cascaded in the feedforward path for hysteresis cancellation. It avoids the complex and difficult mathematical procedure for constructing an inversion of the hysteresis model. For the purpose of validation, an experimental platform is established. To identify the model parameters, an adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm is adopted. Based on the identified model parameters, a real-time feedforward controller is implemented for fast hysteresis compensation. Finally, tests are conducted with various kinds of trajectories. The experimental results show that the tracking errors caused by the hysteresis effect are reduced by about 90%, which clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed inverse compensation method with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

  5. On the Global Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions to Prandtl's System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Ying XU; Jun Ning ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Prandtl system for the non-stationary boundary layer in the vicinity of a point where the outer flow has zero velocity. It is assumed that U(t, x, y) = xmU1(t, x), where 0≤x≤L and m≥1. We establish the global existence of the weak solution to this problem. Moreover the uniqueness of the weak solution is proved.

  6. On the existence of convex classical solutions to a generalized Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, A.

    Under reasonably general assumptions, we prove the existence of convex classical solutions for the Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem in fluid dynamics, in which a flow of constant vorticity density is embedded in a potential flow, with a vortex sheet of constant vorticity density as the flow interface. These results apply to Batchelor flows which are confined to a bounded, convex vessel, and for which the limiting interior flow-speed exceeds the limiting exterior flow-speed along the interface.

  7. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  8. The total chromatic number of regular graphs of high degree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The total chromatic number χT (G) of a graph G is the minimum number of colors needed to color the edges and the vertices of G so that incident or adjacent elements have distinct colors. We show that if G is a regular graph and d(G) 32 |V (G)| + 263 , where d(G) denotes the degree of a vertex in G, then χT (G) d(G) + 2.

  9. Vortex Shedding from Tapered Cylinders at high Reynolds Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Andersen, Michael Styrk; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2015-01-01

    percent for strakes of circular cross section. The present paper argues that this height can be reduced for structures where the critical wind velocity for vortex shedding is in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime. The present investigations are aimed for suppressing VIV on offshore wind turbine......^5 (Supercritical). Results indicate that circular strakes with a diameter corresponding to 3 percent of the structures mean diameter can be used to efficiently reduce VIV in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime....

  10. Goldstein's solution of the problem of the aircraft propeller with a finite number of blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmbold, H B

    1931-01-01

    This report examines the Betz theory on frictionless, lightly loaded propellers and Prandtl's addendum extended to moderately loaded propellers. The author then goes on to extend the discussion to Goldstein's solution for propellers with a finite number of blades.

  11. Resolving high Reynolds numbers in SPH simulations of subsonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Accounting for the Reynolds number is critical in numerical simulations of turbulence, particularly for subsonic flow. For Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) with constant artificial viscosity coefficient alpha, it is shown that the effective Reynolds number in the absence of explicit physical viscosity terms scales linearly with the Mach number - compared to mesh schemes, where the effective Reynolds number is largely independent of the flow velocity. As a result, SPH simulations with alpha=1 will have low Reynolds numbers in the subsonic regime compared to mesh codes, which may be insufficient to resolve turbulent flow. This explains the failure of Bauer and Springel (2011, arXiv:1109.4413v1) to find agreement between the moving-mesh code AREPO and the GADGET SPH code on simulations of driven, subsonic (v ~ 0.3 c_s) turbulence appropriate to the intergalactic/intracluster medium, where it was alleged that SPH is somehow fundamentally incapable of producing a Kolmogorov-like turbulent cascade. We show tha...

  12. Crossover from High to Low Reynolds Number Turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef

    1994-01-01

    The Taylor-Reynolds and Reynolds number (Re lambda and Re) dependence of the dimensionless energy dissipation rate c epsilon = epsilon L / u31,rms is derived for statistically stationary isotropic turbulence, employing the results of a variable range mean field theory. Here epsilon is the energy di

  13. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. O

  14. High Reynolds number liquid layer flow with flexible walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S B Gajjar

    2015-05-01

    The stability of liquid layer flow over an inclined flexible wall is studied using asymptotic methods based on the assumption that the Reynolds number is large. The flexible wall behaviour is described by a spring-plate model, and parameters chosen so that the wall flexibility affects the governing boundary layer problem. For the case of a rigid wall, the problem reverts to one studied by Gajjar. Asymptotic analysis of the governing equations leads to the triple-deck equations governing the interaction between the wall layer and the free-surface. The linearised and other solution properties of these set of equations are discussed.

  15. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20 number range of 2800 < Reτ < 30000 , targeting areas in the parameter space identified by Jimenez (2004) as being sparsely populated by pre-existing data. Smooth-wall data are also obtained across a similar Reynolds number range to enable comparison of smooth- and rough-wall structural features. Generally, the data indicate similarity in the outer-layer of smooth- and fully-rough wall-bounded flows.

  16. Design of a High-Reynolds Number Recirculating Water Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Libin; Elbing, Brian

    2014-11-01

    An experimental fluid mechanics laboratory focused on turbulent boundary layers, drag reduction techniques, multiphase flows and fluid-structure interactions has recently been established at Oklahoma State University. This laboratory has three primary components; (1) a recirculating water tunnel, (2) a multiphase pipe flow loop, and (3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. The design of the water tunnel is the focus of this talk. The criteria used for the water tunnel design was that it had to produce a momentum-thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104, negligible flow acceleration due to boundary layer growth, maximize optical access for use of the flow visualization system, and minimize inlet flow non-uniformity. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university/commercial water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105) . These objectives were achieved with a 152 mm (6-inch) square test section that is 1 m long and has a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. The flow non-uniformity was mitigated with the use of a tandem honeycomb configuration, a settling chamber and an 8.5:1 contraction. The design process that produced this final design will be presented along with its current status.

  17. Binary tree models of high-Reynolds-number turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik; Dormy, Emmanuel; Frick, Peter

    1997-08-01

    We consider hierarchical models for turbulence, that are simple generalizations of the standard Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell models (E. B. Gledzer, Dokl, Akad. Nauk SSSR 209, 5 (1973) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 18, 216 (1973)]; M. Yamada and K. Ohkitani, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 4210 (1987)). The density of degrees of freedom is constant in wave-number space. Looking only at this behavior and at the quadratic invariants in the inviscid unforced limit, the models can be thought of as systems living naturally in one spatial dimension, but being qualitatively similar to hydrodynamics in two (2D) and three dimensions. We investigated cascade phenomena and intermittency in the different cases. We observed and studied a forward cascade of enstrophy in the 2D case.

  18. Convection in an ideal gas at high Rayleigh numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of convection in a layer filled with ideal gas are presented. The control parameters are chosen such that there is a significant variation of density of the gas in going from the bottom to the top of the layer. The relations between the Rayleigh, Peclet, and Nusselt numbers depend on the density stratification. It is proposed to use a data reduction which accounts for the variable density by introducing into the scaling laws an effective density. The relevant density is the geometric mean of the maximum and minimum densities in the layer. A good fit to the data is then obtained with power laws with the same exponent as for fluids in the Boussinesq limit. Two relations connect the top and bottom boundary layers: The kinetic energy densities computed from free fall velocities are equal at the top and bottom, and the products of free fall velocities and maximum horizontal velocities are equal for both boundaries.

  19. Effects of viscoelasticity in the high Reynolds number cylinder wake

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, David

    2012-01-16

    At Re = 3900, Newtonian flow past a circular cylinder exhibits a wake and detached shear layers which have transitioned to turbulence. It is the goal of the present study to investigate the effects which viscoelasticity has on this state and to identify the mechanisms responsible for wake stabilization. It is found through numerical simulations (employing the FENE-P rheological model) that viscoelasticity greatly reduces the amount of turbulence in the wake, reverting it back to a state which qualitatively appears similar to the Newtonian mode B instability which occurs at lower Re. By focusing on the separated shear layers, it is found that viscoelasticity suppresses the formation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which dominates for Newtonian flows, consistent with previous studies of viscoelastic free shear layers. Through this shear layer stabilization, the viscoelastic far wake is then subject to the same instability mechanisms which dominate for Newtonian flows, but at far lower Reynolds numbers. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2012.

  20. Quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, B F N; Cambon, C; Delache, A; Bos, W J T

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the anisotropy of homogeneous turbulence in an electrically conducting fluid submitted to a uniform magnetic field, for low magnetic Reynolds number, in the quasi- static approximation. We interpret disagreeing previous predictions between linearized theory and simulations: in the linear limit, the kinetic energy of transverse velocity components, normal to the magnetic field, decays faster than the kinetic energy of the axial component, along the magnetic field (Moffatt (1967)); whereas many numerical studies predict a final state characterised by dominant energy of transverse velocity components. We investigate the corresponding nonlinear phenomenon using Direct Numerical Simulations of freely-decaying turbulence, and a two-point statistical spectral closure based on the Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian model. The transition from the three-dimensional turbulent flow to a "two-and-a-half-dimensional" flow (Montgomery & Turner (1982)) is a result of the combined effects of short-time linear J...

  1. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, J.B. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  2. On the Number of Galaxies at High Redshift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Zaninetti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The number of galaxies at a given flux as a function of the redshift, z, is derived when the z-distance relation is non-standard. In order to compare different models, the same formalism is also applied to the standard cosmology. The observed luminosity function for galaxies of the zCOSMOS catalog at different redshifts is modeled by a new luminosity function for galaxies, which is derived by the truncated beta probability density function. Three astronomical tests, which are the photometric maximum as a function of the redshift for a fixed flux, the mean value of the redshift for a fixed flux, and the luminosity function for galaxies as a function of the redshift, compare the theoretical values of the standard and non-standard model with the observed value. The tests are performed on the FORS Deep Field (FDF catalog up to redshift z = 1.5 and on the zCOSMOS catalog extending beyond z = 4. These three tests show minimal differences between the standard and the non-standard models.

  3. High-resolution copy number arrays in cancer and the problem of normal genome copy number variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    High-resolution techniques for analysis of genome copy number (CN) enable the analysis of complex cancer somatic genetics. However, the analysis of these data is difficult, and failure to consider a number of issues in depth may result in false leads or unnecessary rejection of true positives. First, segmental duplications may falsely generate CN breakpoints in aneuploid samples. Second, even when tumor data were each normalized to matching lymphocyte DNA, we still observed copy number polymorphisms masquerading as somatic alterations due to allelic imbalance. We investigated a number of different solutions and determined that evaluating matching normal DNA, or at least using locally derived normal baseline data, were preferable to relying on current online databases because of poor cross-platform compatibility and the likelihood of excluding genuine small somatic alterations.

  4. GPU Implementation of Two-Dimensional Rayleigh-Benard Code with High Resolution and Extremely High Rayleigh Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    model assumed convection was occurring only from heating below and that no other sources of heating were present, such as the radioactive decay of elements that would normally contribute to heating in the mantle. Our calculations attempted to push the potential computing power of the Tesla C2070 Fermi GPU to see how it would perform under the strain of a large grid size and an extremely large Rayleigh number. The array size of our model was 4500x2500 with a Rayleigh number of 5*10^10 and a Prandtl number of infinity. According to our estimates, each timestep for the 4500x2500 grid would take approximately 1 to 2 seconds per timestep. This calculation was based on the order of tenths of a microsecond per timestep grid point.

  5. Plasmoid Instability in High-Lundquist-Number Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist ($S$) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when $S$ exceeds a critical value $\\sim10^{4}$, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfv\\'enic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as $S^{1/4}$. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of $S$, and the distribution function $f(\\psi)$ of plasmoid magnetic flux $\\psi$ follows a power law $f(\\psi)\\sim\\psi^{-1}$. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion f...

  6. A new definition of Bejan number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new definition of Bejan number will be generated by replacing the thermal diffusivity with the mass diffusivity. For example, the Schmidt number is the mass transfer analog of the Prandtl number. For the case of Reynolds analogy (Sc = Pr = = 1, both current and new definitions of Bejan number are the same. This new definition is useful and needed for diffusion of mass (mass diffusion.

  7. Plasmoid instability in high-Lundquist-number magnetic reconnectiona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-01

    Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist (S) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when S exceeds a critical value ˜104, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as S1/4. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of S, and the distribution function f(ψ) of plasmoid magnetic flux ψ follows a power law f(ψ)˜ψ-1. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion for onset is not satisfied. The rich variety of possible reconnection dynamics is organized in the framework of a phase diagram.

  8. Numerical investigation of homogeneous condensation in Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Cheng, W.; Luo, X.; Yang, J.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of heat addition induced by condensation of water vapor on Prandtl-Meyer flows is investigated numerically. Two configurations are considered to study the formation of the stationary waves and the movement of the oscillatory shocks caused by homogeneous condensation. One is a nozzle-shaped channel bounded by lower and upper walls, and the other is an upper unbounded corner expansion. For the first configuration, cases with a sharp corner and a rounded corner are compared to highlight the influence of the sharp corner, where the cooling rate is very large. The density variation in the zone near the corner is smoothed, and the influence on the flow structure caused by the sharp corner is very limited in the neighborhood of the sharp corner. For a relatively low initial saturation, the structures of the condensation shock in the numerical simulation agree well with the experimental results in the literature. The increase of the initial saturation makes the condensation shock move upstream, and eventually leads to an unsteady shock motion. The tendency is similar to that in the condensation process in nozzles. For the unbounded corner expansion, the wave structure forms a two-dimensional distribution. Multiple shock waves are observed in the numerical schlieren image, which are caused by a sequence of quenching (by the condensation shock) and rebuilding (by the Prandtl-Meyer expansion) of the condensation. This mutual interaction can also be recognized by the wavy shape of the nucleation rate distribution.

  9. Numerical investigation of homogeneous condensation in Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Cheng, W.; Luo, X.; Yang, J.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of heat addition induced by condensation of water vapor on Prandtl-Meyer flows is investigated numerically. Two configurations are considered to study the formation of the stationary waves and the movement of the oscillatory shocks caused by homogeneous condensation. One is a nozzle-shaped channel bounded by lower and upper walls, and the other is an upper unbounded corner expansion. For the first configuration, cases with a sharp corner and a rounded corner are compared to highlight the influence of the sharp corner, where the cooling rate is very large. The density variation in the zone near the corner is smoothed, and the influence on the flow structure caused by the sharp corner is very limited in the neighborhood of the sharp corner. For a relatively low initial saturation, the structures of the condensation shock in the numerical simulation agree well with the experimental results in the literature. The increase of the initial saturation makes the condensation shock move upstream, and eventually leads to an unsteady shock motion. The tendency is similar to that in the condensation process in nozzles. For the unbounded corner expansion, the wave structure forms a two-dimensional distribution. Multiple shock waves are observed in the numerical schlieren image, which are caused by a sequence of quenching (by the condensation shock) and rebuilding (by the Prandtl-Meyer expansion) of the condensation. This mutual interaction can also be recognized by the wavy shape of the nucleation rate distribution.

  10. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leriche, E., E-mail: emmanuel.leriche@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, LMFA-UJM St-Etienne, CNRS UMR 5509 Universite de St-Etienne, 23 rue Docteur Paul Michelon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Soldati, A., E-mail: soldati@uniud.it [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, IT-33100 Udine (Italy); Deville, M.O., E-mail: michel.deville@epfl.ch [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. > Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. > Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. > Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. > Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}) and three values of the particle diameter (d{sub p} = 15, 25, 35 [{mu}m]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water {rho}{sub w} = 1000 [kg/m{sup 3}] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift

  11. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0277 Experimental Investigation of Turbulence- Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE [U] Experimental investigation of turbulence- chemistry interaction in high-Reynolds-number 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER turbulent...flames. Mixture fraction is an important variable in understanding and modeling turbulent mixing and turbulence- chemistry interaction, two key

  12. Dual solutions in MHD stagnation-point flow of Prandtl fluid impinging on shrinking sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.S.AKBAR; Z.H.KHAN; R.U.HAQ; S.NADEEM

    2014-01-01

    The present article investigates the dual nature of the solution of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation-point flow of a Prandtl fluid model towards a shrinking surface. The self-similar nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by the shooting method. It is found that the dual solutions of the flow exist for cer-tain values of the velocity ratio parameter. The special case of the first branch solutions (the classical Newtonian fluid model) is compared with the present numerical results of stretching flow. The results are found to be in good agreement. It is also shown that the boundary layer thickness for the second solution is thicker than that for the first solution.

  13. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  14. Numerical analyses of high Reynolds number flow of high pressure fuel gas through rough pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Margherita; Morini, Mirko; Pinelli, Michele [ENDIF - Engineering Department in Ferrara, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1 - 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, a CFD commercial code is used to evaluate the pressure drop through pipes in a stream of high pressure gas. Both hexahedral and tetrahedral grids are considered. Preliminarily, a grid sensitivity analysis is carried out by comparing CFD results with analytical results. Each grid is characterized by a different number and thickness of layers in order to investigate the behavior of the grid with respect to the boundary layer. Then, the model is validated by using a literature test case, in which high pressure gas flow through a rough pipe is experimentally studied. Moreover, various equations of state (i.e., constant properties, Ideal Gas and Redlich-Kwong equations) and boundary conditions (e.g., pressure, mass flow, etc.) are taken into consideration and compared. Finally, the model is used to extrapolate the behavior of gaseous fuels (i.e., natural gas, biogas and hydrogen-methane mixture) flowing at high pressure through pipes of different roughness. The analyses show that the radial depth of the prism layers on pipe wall has to be controlled to allow the correct resolution of the boundary layer. Moreover, the results highlight that the first element height of the prism layer should be high enough to avoid inconsistencies in the rough model application. At the same time, the grid used for calculations does not strongly influence the numerical results and hence tune of the first element height to perfectly fit the roughness is not always justified. The final analysis on the different gaseous fuels put into evidence the capability of the CFD analysis to determine the energy performance of fuel transportation in gas pipeline. (author)

  15. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for two out-of-plane piping elbows at high Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; McKeown, P.T.

    1999-02-08

    Pressure drops of multiple piping elbows were experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used methods for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses and also to provide a qualification database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer codes. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. Recent single elbow test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40x 106 Reynolds number) than those from current correlations. This single piping elbow data has been extended in this study to a multiple elbow configuration of two elbows that are 90o out-of-plane relative to each other. The effects of separation distance and Reynolds number have been correlated and presented in a form that can be used for design application. Contrary to earlier extrapolations from low Reynolds numbers (Re c 1.0x 106), a strong Reynolds number dependence was found to exist. The combination of the high Reynolds number single elbow data with the multiple elbow interaction effects measured in this study shows that earlier design correlations are conservative by significant margins at high Reynolds numbers. Qualification of CFD predictions with this new high Reynolds number database will help guide the need for additional high Reynolds number testing of other piping configurations. The study also included velocity measurements at several positions downstream of the first and second test elbows using an ultrasonic flowmeter. Reasonable agreement after the first test elbow was found relative to flow fields that are known to exist from low Reynolds number visual tests and also from CFD predictions. This data should help to qualify CFD predictions of the three-dimensional flow stream downstream of the second test elbow.

  16. Large Eddy Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at high Reynolds number stratified flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dana; Goodman, Lou; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities (KHI) at high Reynolds numbers are performed using the Large Eddy Simulation technique. Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 are achieved using our model. The resulting data set is used to examine the effect of Reynolds number on various statistics, including dissipation flux coefficient, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and Thorpe length scale. It is shown that KHI are qualitatively different at high Re, up to and including the onset of vortex pairing and billow collapse and quantitatively different afterward. The effect of Richardson number is also examined. The results are discussed as they apply to ocean experiments.

  17. High-Quality Random Number Generation Software for High-Performance Computing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Random number (RN) generation is the key software component that permits random sampling. Software for parallel RN generation (RNG) should be based on RNGs that are...

  18. The influence of tip clearance and Prandtl number on turbulent forced convection heat transfer of rectangular fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin

    2016-12-01

    The turbulent forced convection heat transfer of rectangular fins in a duct was investigated by varying the tip clearance and Pr. Mass transfer experiments using a H2SO4-CuSO4 electroplating system were performed based on the analogy between heat and mass transfers. FLUENT 6.3 was used for calculations. Turbulent models were tested and the Reynolds Stress Model was chosen, which showed a 1.15 % discrepancy with the existing correlation for a simple tube flow when Pr = 2, but 13 % when Pr = 2014. For a more complex fin channel, the discrepancy increased up to 30 %. The optimal tip clearances, corresponding to maximum heat transfer rates, did not vary with Pr, which is explained using the temperature contours. The results were also compared with the laminar case where Pr influenced the optimal tip clearance.

  19. Velocity Amplitudes in Global Convection Simulations: The Role of the Prandtl Number and Near-Surface Driving

    CERN Document Server

    O'Mara, Bridget; Featherstone, Nicholas A; Augustson, K C

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity $\\kappa$ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity $\

  20. Real time demonstration of high bitrate quantum random number generation with coherent laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Symul, T; Lam, P K; 10.1063/1.3597793

    2011-01-01

    We present a random number generation scheme that uses broadband measurements of the vacuum field contained in the radio-frequency sidebands of a single-mode laser. Even though the measurements may contain technical noise, we show that suitable algorithms can transform the digitized photocurrents into a string of random numbers that can be made arbitrarily correlated with a subset of the quantum fluctuations (high quantum correlation regime) or arbitrarily immune to environmental fluctuations (high environmental immunity). We demonstrate up to 2 Gbps of real time random number generation that were verified using standard randomness tests.

  1. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  2. Is Ultra-High Reynolds Number Necessary for Comprehensive Log Scaling in a Turbulent Boundary Layer?

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Shivsai Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in an extraordinary turbulent boundary layer called the sink flow, displaying a perfect streamwise invariance, show a wide extent of logarithmic scaling for moments of streamwise velocity up to order 12, even at moderate Reynolds numbers. This is in striking contrast to canonical constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers that show such comprehensive log scaling only at ultra-high Reynolds numbers. This suggests that for comprehensive log scaling, ultra-high-Reynolds-number is not a necessary condition; while specific details of the sink flow are special, the relevance to general turbulent boundary layers is that the sink flow underscores the importance of the streamwise invariance condition that needs to be met in a general flow for obtaining log scaling. Indeed, a simple theory shows that, for log scaling in the inertial sublayer, the invariance of dimensionless mean velocity and higher-order moments along a mean streamline is a necessary and sufficient condition. Ultra-high Reynolds number pri...

  3. Multiscale structures of resistive magnetic reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Takahiro; Kusano, Kanya

    Magnetic reconnection is the most important process of explosive phenomena in space plasmas. The magnetic Reynolds number for the space plasmas are extremely high in general since those plasmas are thought to be collisionless or semi-collisional. However, magnetic reconnection rate becomes low as magnetic Reynolds number increases within the framework of a stationary resistive MHD model. Thus, modern models of magnetic reconnection often include kinetic effects such as the Hall effect to explain realistic explosive magnetic reconnection. It is thought, on the other hand, that the MHD approximation is valid for the plasmas within a very wide range of scales since the scale gap between the macro-and micro-scale is quite large, e.g., in the solar corona, the ratio of the macro to micro will be more than 107 . Such multiscale structures of MHD with wide range of scales, however, have not been clarified so far. Therefore, in this paper, resistive magnetic reconnection at high magnetic Reynolds numbers are investigated using very high-resolution MHD simulations. Simulation results show that the magnetic energy at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is explosively released, while that at not-so-high magnetic Reynolds numbers is steadily dissipated. In the case of high magnetic Reynolds numbers, multiple small scale plasmoids are intermittently created and ejected via secondary tearing modes in a nonlinearly developed thin current sheet. It is revealed that a secondary plasmoid is not only accelerated up to a local magnetosonic speed toward the down-stream region but also perturbs the up-stream region. Thus, complicated multiscale structures appear around the magnetic field reversal layer. Perspective for the high-resolution simulation of extremely high magnetic Reynolds numbers will be also discussed.

  4. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics of superthermal electrons with high-number harmonic EC radiation in tokamak reactor plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minashin P.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of spectroscopic diagnostics of the average perpendicular-to-magnetic-field momentum of the superthermal component of the electron velocity distribution (EVD, based on the high-number-harmonic electron cyclotron (EC radiation, is suggested for nuclear fusion-reactor plasmas under condition of a strong auxiliary heating (e.g. in tokamak DEMO, a next step after tokamak ITER. The method is based on solving an inverse problem for reconstruction of the EVD in parallel and perpendicular-to-magnetic-field components of electron momentum at high and moderate energies responsible for the emission of the high-number-harmonic EC radiation.

  6. Estimation Prospects of the Source Number Density of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Hajime; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of accurately estimating the source number density of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) using small-scale anisotropy in their arrival distribution. The arrival distribution has information on their source and source distribution. We calculate the propagation of UHE protons in a structured extragalactic magnetic field (EGMF) and simulate their arrival distribution at the Earth using our previously developed method. The source number density that can best reprodu...

  7. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  8. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier–Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number’. PMID:28167585

  9. Quadruplex MAPH: improvement of throughput in high-resolution copy number screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Susan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variation (CNV in the human genome is recognised as a widespread and important source of human genetic variation. Now the challenge is to screen for these CNVs at high resolution in a reliable, accurate and cost-effective way. Results Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH is a sensitive, high-resolution technology appropriate for screening for CNVs in a defined region, for a targeted population. We have developed MAPH to a highly multiplexed format ("QuadMAPH" that allows the user a four-fold increase in the number of loci tested simultaneously. We have used this method to analyse a genomic region of 210 kb, including the MSH2 gene and 120 kb of flanking DNA. We show that the QuadMAPH probes report copy number with equivalent accuracy to simplex MAPH, reliably demonstrating diploid copy number in control samples and accurately detecting deletions in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC samples. Conclusion QuadMAPH is an accurate, high-resolution method that allows targeted screening of large numbers of subjects without the expense of genome-wide approaches. Whilst we have applied this technique to a region of the human genome, it is equally applicable to the genomes of other organisms.

  10. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  11. The effects of nozzle geometry on waterjet breakup at high Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Pourdeyhimi, B. [Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center, North Carolina State University, NC 27695-8301, Raleigh (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Waterjet breakup is traditionally considered to follow the Ohnesorge classification. In this classification, high Reynolds number waterjets are considered to atomize quickly after discharge. By generating a constricted waterjet where the water flow stays detached all the way through the nozzle, we have observed the first wind-induced breakup mode at high Reynolds numbers. Such a peculiar behavior, however, was not observed in non-constricted waterjets. Our results indicate that, constricted jets do not follow the Ohnesorge classification, in contrast to the non-constricted waterjets. We discuss the impact of nozzle geometry on the characteristics of waterjets and support our discussion by numerical simulations. (orig.)

  12. Qualification of a Method to Calculate the Irrecoverable Pressure Loss in High Reynolds Number Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, K. C.; Coffield, R. D.

    2002-09-01

    High Reynolds number test data has recently been reported for both single and multiple piping elbow design configurations at earlier ASME Fluid Engineering Division conferences. The data of these studies ranged up to a Reynolds number of 42 x 10[sup]6 which is significantly greater than that used to establish design correlations before the data was available. Many of the accepted design correlations, based on the lower Reynolds number data, date back as much as fifty years. The new data shows that these earlier correlations are extremely conservative for high Reynolds number applications. Based on the recent high Reynolds number information a new recommended method has been developed for calculating irrecoverable pressure loses in piping systems for design considerations such as establishing pump sizing requirements. This paper describes the recommended design approach and additional testing that has been performed as part of the qualification of the method. This qualification testing determined the irrecoverable pressure loss of a piping configuration that would typify a limiting piping section in a complicated piping network, i.e., multiple, tightly coupled, out-of-plane elbows in series under high Reynolds number flow conditions. The overall pressure loss measurements were then compared to predictions, which used the new methodology to assure that conservative estimates for the pressure loss (of the type used for pump sizing) were obtained. The recommended design methodology, the qualification testing and the comparison between the predictions and the test data are presented. A major conclusion of this study is that the recommended method for calculating irrecoverable pressure loss in piping systems is conservative yet significantly lower than predicted by early design correlations that were based on the extrapolation of low Reynolds number test data.

  13. ITER-W monoblocks under high pulse number transient heat loads at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenhoff, Th., E-mail: T.Loewenhoff@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Linke, J., E-mail: J.Linke@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Pintsuk, G., E-mail: G.Pintsuk@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Pitts, R.A., E-mail: Richard.Pitts@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Riccardi, B., E-mail: Bruno.Riccardi@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy Joint Undertaking, Josep Pla No. 2 – T B3 7/01, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    In the context of using a full-tungsten (W) divertor for ITER, thermal shock resistance has become even more important as an issue that may potentially influence the long term performance. To address this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER-W monoblock mock ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). This paper discusses the JUDITH 2 experiments. Two different base temperatures, 1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen superimposed by ∼18,000/100,000 transient events (Δt = 0.48 ms) of 0.2 and 0.6 GW/m{sup 2}. Results showed a stronger surface deterioration at higher base temperature, quantified by an increase in roughening. This is intensified if the same test is done after preloading (exposure to high temperature without transients), especially at higher base temperature when the material recrystallizes.

  14. High-order lattice Boltzmann models for wall-bounded flows at finite Knudsen numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchter, C; Schleifenbaum, W

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a large number of high-order discrete velocity models for solving the Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for finite Knudsen number flows. Using the Chapman-Enskog formalism, we prove for isothermal flows a relation identifying the resolved flow regimes for low Mach numbers. Although high-order lattice Boltzmann models recover flow regimes beyond the Navier-Stokes level, we observe for several models significant deviations from reference results. We found this to be caused by their inability to recover the Maxwell boundary condition exactly. By using supplementary conditions for the gas-surface interaction it is shown how to systematically generate discrete velocity models of any order with the inherent ability to fulfill the diffuse Maxwell boundary condition accurately. Both high-order quadratures and an exact representation of the boundary condition turn out to be crucial for achieving reliable results. For Poiseuille flow, we can reproduce the mass flow and slip velocity up to the Knudsen number of 1. Moreover, for small Knudsen numbers, the Knudsen layer behavior is recovered.

  15. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  16. High Reynolds Number Studies in the Wake of a Submarine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Juan; Reynolds, Ryan; Smits, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    Results are presented from submarine wake studies conducted in Princeton University's High Reynolds Number Test Facility (HRTF). Compressed air is used as a working fluid enabling Reynolds numbers based on length of up to 10^8, about 1/5 of full scale. Measurements at Reynolds numbers up to 3 x10^6 have been completed, and show that, for the model condition without fins, the wake mean velocity was self-similar at locations 6 and 9 diameters downstream. Also, PIV at Reynolds numbers near 10^4 showed that when the yaw angle was varied the sail-tip and sail-hull junction vortices increased in magnitude emphasizing the importance of fully understanding the flow characteristics of a maneuvering submarine.

  17. Unsteady Numerical Simulation of Flow around 2-D Circular Cylinder for High Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Ai; Dakui Feng; Hengkui Ye; Lin Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,2-D computational analyses were conducted for unsteady high Reynolds number flows around a smooth circular cylinder in the supercritical and upper-transition flow regimes,i.e.8.21×104<Re<l.54×106.The calculations were performed by means of solving the 2-D Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a k-ε turbulence model.The calculated results,produced flow structure drag and lift coefficients,as well as Strouhal numbers.The findings were in good agreement with previous published data,which also supplied us with a good understanding of the flow across cylinders of different high Reynolds numbers.Meanwhile,an effective measure was presented to control the lift force on a cylinder,which points the way to decrease the vortex induced vibration of marine structure in future.

  18. Subsurface Signature of the Internal Wave Field Radiated by Submerged High Reynolds Number Stratified Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-26

    parametric subharmonic instability. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stratified turbulent wakes, high Reynolds numbers, internal waves, nonlinear effects, harmonics, mean...beam and the potential for parametric subharmonic instability. In all these efforts, a uniform linear stratification was considered. A subset of our...found for all simulated waves. c) For sufficiently high-amplitude beams, a parametric subharmonic instability is observed after a long enough time

  19. Diagonal and off-diagonal quark number susceptibilities at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, H -T; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schadler, H -P

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum extrapolated lattice QCD results for up to fourth order diagonal and off-diagonal quark number susceptibilities in the high temperature region of 300-700 MeV. Lattice QCD calculations are performed using 2+1 flavors of highly improved staggered quarks with nearly physical quark masses and at four different lattice spacings. Comparisons of our results with recent weak coupling perturbative calculations yield reasonably good agreements for the entire temperature range.

  20. On the Control of Plants with Hysteresis: Overview and a Prandtl-Ishlinskii Hysteresis Based Control Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingqing Wang; Chun-Yi Su; Yonghong Tan

    2005-01-01

    The development of control techniques to mitigate the effects of unknown hysteresis preceding with plants has recently re-attracted significant attention. In this paper, we first give a brief review of presently developed hysteresis models and hysteresis compensating control methods.Then, with the use of the Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model, we propose a robust adaptive control scheme. The novelty is that the model of hysteresis nonlinearities is firstly fused with the available control techniques without necessarily constructing a hysteresis inverse. The global stability of the adaptive system and tracking a desired trajectory to a certain precision are achieved. Simulations performed on a nonlinear system illustrate and clarify the approach.

  1. Self-similar decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoof, R.A.; Huisman, S.G.; Veen, van der R.C.A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds-number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e., the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder (Re i =2×10 6 , the outer cylinder is at rest) is stopped within 12 s, thus fully removing the energy input to the syst

  2. Construction of thiostrepton-inducible, high-copy-number expression vectors for use in Streptomyces spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takano, Eriko; White, Janet; Thompson, Charles J.; Bibb, Mervyn J.

    1995-01-01

    A high-copy-number plasmid expression vector (pIJ6021) was constructed that contains a thiostrepton-inducible promoter, PtipA, from Streptomyces lividans 66. The promoter and ribosome-binding site of tipA lie immediately upstream from a multiple cloning site (MCS) which begins with a NdeI site (5'-C

  3. A comparative study of near-wall turbulence in high and low Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M. M.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2001-03-01

    The present study explores the effects of Reynolds number, over three orders of magnitude, in the viscous wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. Complementary experiments were conducted both in the boundary layer wind tunnel at the University of Utah and in the atmospheric surface layer which flows over the salt flats of the Great Salt Lake Desert in western Utah. The Reynolds numbers, based on momentum deficit thickness, of the two flows were Rθ=2×103 and Rθ≈5×106, respectively. High-resolution velocity measurements were obtained from a five-element vertical rake of hot-wires spanning the buffer region. In both the low and high Rθ flows, the length of the hot-wires measured less than 6 viscous units. To facilitate reliable comparisons, both the laboratory and field experiments employed the same instrumentation and procedures. Data indicate that, even in the immediate vicinity of the surface, strong influences from low-frequency motions at high Rθ produce noticeable Reynolds number differences in the streamwise velocity and velocity gradient statistics. In particular, the peak value in the root mean square streamwise velocity profile, when normalized by viscous scales, was found to exhibit a logarithmic dependence on Reynolds number. The mean streamwise velocity profile, on the other hand, appears to be essentially independent of Reynolds number. Spectra and spatial correlation data suggest that low-frequency motions at high Reynolds number engender intensified local convection velocities which affect the structure of both the velocity and velocity gradient fields. Implications for turbulent production mechanisms and coherent motions in the buffer layer are discussed.

  4. Dynamic unified RANS-LES simulations of high Reynolds number separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan; Stoellinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The development of hybrid RANS-LES methods is seen to be a very promising approach to enable efficient simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows involving flow separation. To contribute to further advances, we present a new, theoretically well based, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method, referred to as DLUM. It is applied to a high Reynolds number flow involving both attached and separated flow regimes: a periodic hill flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 37 000. Its performance is compared to pure LES, pure RANS, other hybrid RANS-LES (given by DLUM modifications), and experimental observations. It is shown that the use of this computational method offers huge cost reductions (which scale with Re/200, Re refers to the Reynolds number) of very high Reynolds number flow simulations compared to LES, it is much more accurate than RANS, and more accurate than LES, which is not fully resolved. In particular, this conclusion does also apply to the comparison of DLUM and pure LES simulations on rather coarse grids, which are often simply required to deal with simulations of very high Reynolds number flows: the DLUM provides mean velocity fields which are hardly affected by the grid, whereas LES velocity fields reveal significant shortcomings. We identified the reason for the superior performance of our new dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method compared to LES: it is the model's ability to respond to a changing resolution with adequate turbulent viscosity changes by ensuring simultaneously a physically correct turbulence length scale specification under the presence of interacting RANS and LES modes.

  5. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  6. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of high-Schmidt number mass transfer in a turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Isabelle; Magnaudet, Jacques

    1997-02-01

    Mass transfer through the solid boundary of a turbulent channel flow is analyzed by means of large-eddy simulation (LES) for Schmidt numbers Sc=1, 100, and 200. For that purpose the subgrid stresses and fluxes are closed using the Dynamic Mixed Model proposed by Zang et al. [Phys. Fluids A 5, 3186 (1993)]. At each Schmidt number the mass transfer coefficient given by the LES is found to be in very good quantitative agreement with that measured in the experiments. At high Schmidt number this coefficient behaves like Sc-2/3, as predicted by standard theory and observed in most experiments. The main statistical characteristics of the fluctuating concentration field are analyzed in connection with the well-documented statistics of the turbulent motions. It is observed that concentration fluctuations have a significant intensity throughout the channel at Sc=1 while they are negligible out of the wall region at Sc=200. The maximum intensity of these fluctuations depends on both the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers and is especially influenced by the intensity of the velocity fluctuations present in the buffer layer of the concentration field. At Sc=1, strong similarities are observed between the various terms contributing to the turbulent kinetic energy budget and their counterpart in the budget of the variance of concentration fluctuations. At high Schmidt number, the latter budget is much more influenced by the small turbulent structures subsisting in the viscous sublayer. The instantaneous correlation between the spatial characteristics of the concentration field and those of the velocity field is clearly demonstrated by the presence of low- and high-concentration streaks close to the wall. The geometrical characteristics of these structures are found to be highly Sc dependent. In particular their spanwise wavelength is identical to that of the streamwise velocity streaks at Sc=1 while it is reduced by half at Sc=200. Analysis of the co-spectra between concentration and

  8. Design and installation of a high Reynolds number recirculating water tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Libin

    The High-Reynolds Number Fluid Mechanics Laboratory has recently been established at Oklahoma State University (OSU). The three primary components of the laboratory are 1) a recirculating water tunnel, 2) a multiphase pipe flow facility, and 3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of the water tunnel, which will be used for high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer research. Two main design criteria for the water tunnel were to achieve a momentum thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104 and to have high optical access to the flow surfaces in the test section. This is being achieved with a 1 m. long test section and a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105). The water tunnel is powered by a 150 hp motor and a 4500 gpm capacity centrifugal pump. The water tunnel is designed for a maximum operating pressure of 40 psi. This will make the facility a low cost option to perform high-Reynolds number aerodynamic and hydrodynamic tests. Improved flow imaging capability is a major advantage to liquid based fluid facilities because of the increased density for seeding and reduced field-of-view for equivalent Reynolds number. The laboratory's state-of-the-art flow visualization system can be used for time-resolved and phase averaged stereo- particle-image-velocimetry (sPIV), laser-induced-fluorescence, and high-speed imaging. Design provisions are also made to allow a multi-phase loop to share the pump and motor configuration of this water tunnel facility. The major design decisions that went into the design of the water tunnel facility are discussed. The design considerations that were taken into account for the test section, flow conditioning sections and the entire flow loop are discussed in greater detail. The final configuration and the technical drawings of the water

  9. High copy number of mitochondrial DNA predicts poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; He, Shuixiang; Zhu, Xingmei; Qiao, Wei; Zhang, Juan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in colon cancer were associated with clinicopathological parameters and postsurgical outcome. By quantitative real-time PCR assay, the mtDNA copy number was detected in a cohort of colon cancer and matched adjacent colon tissues (n = 162). The majority of patients had higher mtDNA content in colon cancer tissues than matched adjacent colon tissues. Moreover, high mtDNA content in tumor tissues was associated with larger tumor size, higher serum CEA level, advanced TNM stage, vascular emboli, and liver metastases. Further survival curve analysis showed that high mtDNA content was related to the worst survival in patients with colon cancer at advanced TNM stage. High mtDNA content is a potential effective factor of poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

  10. Two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows with high Mach number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanbiao; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Yu, Xijun; Li, Yingjun

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved lattice Boltzmann model for compressible Navier-Stokes system with high Mach number. The model is composed of three components: (i) the discrete-velocity-model by M. Watari and M. Tsutahara [Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 036306], (ii) a modified Lax-Wendroff finite difference scheme where reasonable dissipation and dispersion are naturally included, (iii) artificial viscosity. The improved model is convenient to compromise the high accuracy and stability. The included dispersion term can effectively reduce the numerical oscillation at discontinuity. The added artificial viscosity helps the scheme to satisfy the von Neumann stability condition. Shock tubes and shock reflections are used to validate the new scheme. In our numerical tests the Mach numbers are successfully increased up to 20 or higher. The flexibility of the new model makes it suitable for tracking shock waves with high accuracy and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  11. All-optical random number generation using highly nonlinear fibers by numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juanfen; Liang, Junqiang; Li, Pu; Yang, Lingzhen; Wang, Yuncai

    2014-06-01

    A new scheme of all-optical random number generation based on the nonlinear effects in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLF) is proposed. The scheme is comprised of ultra-wide band chaotic entropy source, all-optical sampler, all-optical comparator and all-optical exclusive-or (XOR), which are mainly realized by four-wave mixing (FWM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) in highly nonlinear fibers. And we achieve 10 Gbit/s random numbers through numerically simulating all the processes. The entire operations are completed in the all-optical domain, which may overcome the bottleneck problem of electronic devices, and apply directly in high-speed all-optical communication network.

  12. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  13. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  14. [Number, viability, and diversity of the filterable forms of prokaryotes in sphagnous high-moor peat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, L V; Lapygina, E V; Kadulin, M S; Konova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The number, potential viability, and taxonomic diversity (at the level of phylum) of the filterable forms of prokaryotes (FFP) are estimated in the main genetic horizons of high-moor peat. It was shown that the number of FFP reached 500 million cells in 1 g, i.e., up to 5% of the general size bacteria. The portion of viable cells among FFP (93-98%) was higher than that for the general size bacteria (60-68%). FISH-analysis (fluorescence in situ hybridization) showed that FFP contained the same phylogenetic groups as the population of general size bacteria (domain Archea and phylum Actinobacteria, Cytophaga, and Proteobacteria of the domain Bacteria).

  15. A TAILORED FINITE POINT METHOD FOR THE HELMHOLTZ EQUATION WITH HIGH WAVE NUMBERS IN HETEROGENEOUS MEDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Houde Han; Zhongyi Huang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a tailored-finite-point method for the numerical simulation of the Helmholtz equation with high wave numbers in heterogeneous medium. Our finite point method has been tailored to some particular properties of the problem, which allows us to obtain approximate solutions with the same behaviors as that of the exact solution very naturally. Especially, when the coefficients are piecewise constant, we can get the exact solution with only one point in each subdomain. Our finite-point method has uniformly convergent rate with respect to wave number k in L2-norm.

  16. Significance of the Formal Quantum Number in the Highly Excited Vibration of the DCN Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑敦胜; 吴国祯

    2002-01-01

    For the eigenstates of the highly excited vibration of the simple molecule DCN with two stretching modes, a classical approach in a multi-dimensional coset phase space is employed to show that the formal quantum numbers are related to regular or 1east "irregular" trajectories, with zero or least Lyapunov exponents, and are always located in the inner regions of the phase space. This property reflects that they are the approximate constants of motion. It is also demonstrated that formal quantum numbers correspond to the significant phase space density.

  17. Robust simulations of viscoelastic flows at high Weissenberg numbers with the streamfunction/log-conformation formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    A new streamfunction/log-conformation formulation of incompressible viscoelastic flows is presented. The log-conformation representation guaranties the positive-definiteness of the conformation tensor and obviates the high Weissenberg number problem. The streamfunction is defined as a vector...... potential of the velocity field, and provides a pressureless formulation of the conservation laws, which automatically enforces the incompressibility. The resulting numerical method is free from velocity-pressure decoupling errors, and can achieve stable calculations for large Courant numbers, which improve...... the robustness and the efficiency of the solver. The two-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid inside the lid-driven cavity is simulated for a large range of Weissenberg numbers. The numerical results demonstrate the second-order accuracy of our scheme, and our solutions are in good agreement with the available...

  18. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Brice; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Linares, Antia Lamas; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-01-01

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40% efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79% +/- 2% detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88% +/- 3% at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficienc...

  19. Noise-free high-efficiency photon-number-resolving detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, D; Miller, A J; Nam, S W; Rosenberg, Danna; Lita, Adriana E.; Miller, Aaron J.; Nam, Sae Woo

    2005-01-01

    High-efficiency optical detectors that can determine the number of photons in a pulse of monochromatic light have applications in a variety of physics studies, including post-selection-based entanglement protocols for linear optics quantum computing and experiments that simultaneously close the detection and communication loopholes of Bell's inequalities. Here we report on our demonstration of fiber-coupled, noise-free, photon-number-resolving transition-edge sensors with 88% efficiency at 1550 nm. The efficiency of these sensors could be made even higher at any wavelength in the visible and near-infrared spectrum without resulting in a higher dark-count rate or degraded photon-number resolution.

  20. On the high rank $\\pi/3$ and $2\\pi/3$-congruent number elliptic curves

    CERN Document Server

    Janfada, A S

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we try to find high rank elliptic curves in the family $E_{n,\\theta}$ defined over $\\mathbb Q$ by the equation $y^2=x^3+2snx-(r^2-s^2)n^2x$, where $0 < \\theta < \\pi$, $\\cos(\\theta) = s/r$ is rational with $0\\leq |s| number problem as a generalization of the classical congruent number problem. We consider two special cases $\\theta=\\pi/3$ and $\\theta=2\\pi/3$. Then by searching in a certain known family of $\\theta$-congruent numbers and using Mestre-Nagao sum as a sieving tool, we find some square free integers $n$ such that $E_{n, \\theta}(\\mathbb Q)$ has Mordell-Weil rank up to 7 in the first case and 6 in the second case.

  1. On the motion of non-spherical particles at high Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of available methodology for dealing with the motion of non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers in the Eulerian- Lagrangian methodology for dispersed flow. First, an account of the various attempts to classify the various shapes and the efforts...... motion it is necessary to account for the non-coincidence between the center of pressure and center of gravity which is a direct consequence of the inertial pressure forces associated with particles at high Reynolds number flow. Extensions for non-spherical particles at higher Reynolds numbers are far...... in between and usually based on semi-heuristic approaches utilizing concepts from airfoil theory such as profile lift. Even for regular particles there seems to be a long way before a complete theory can be formulated. For irregular particles with small aspect ratio, where the secondary motion...

  2. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  3. Neutral pion number fluctuations at high multiplicity in pp-interactions at 50 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov V. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of E-190 experiment (project Thermalization with 50 GeV proton beam irradiation of SVD-2 setup are presented. MC simulation has shown the linear dependence of number of photons detected in electromagnetic calorimeter and the average number of neutral pions. Multiplicity distribution of neutral pion, N0, for total number of particles in the event, Ntot = Nch + N0, are obtained with corrections on the setup acceptance, triggering and efficiency of the event reconstruction. The scaled variance of neutral pion fluctuations, ω = D/ , versus total multiplicity is measured. The fluctuations increase at Ntot > 18. According to quantum statistics models this behavior can indicate a pion condensate formation in the high pion multiplicity system. This effect has been observed for the first time.

  4. A robust approach to the generation of high-quality random numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisadi, Zahra; Fontana, Giorgio; Moser, Enrico; Pucker, Georg; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    A random number generation approach comprising a silicon nanocrystals LED (Si-NCs LED), silicon single photon avalanche photodiode (Si SPAD) and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is introduced. The Si-NCs LED is the source of entropy with photon emission in the visible range detectable by silicon detectors allowing the fabrication of an all-silicon-based device. The proposed quantum random number generator (QRNG) is robust against variations of the internal and external parameters such as aging of the components, changing temperature, the ambient interferences and the silicon detector artifacts. The raw data show high quality of randomness and passed all the statistical tests in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) tests suite without the application of a post-processing algorithm. The efficiency of random number generation is 4-bits per detected photon.

  5. Regularized characteristic boundary conditions for the Lattice-Boltzmann methods at high Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissocq, Gauthier; Gourdain, Nicolas; Malaspinas, Orestis; Eyssartier, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the investigations done to adapt the Characteristic Boundary Conditions (CBC) to the Lattice-Boltzmann formalism for high Reynolds number applications. Three CBC formalisms are implemented and tested in an open source LBM code: the baseline local one-dimension inviscid (BL-LODI) approach, its extension including the effects of the transverse terms (CBC-2D) and a local streamline approach in which the problem is reformulated in the incident wave framework (LS-LODI). Then all implementations of the CBC methods are tested for a variety of test cases, ranging from canonical problems (such as 2D plane and spherical waves and 2D vortices) to a 2D NACA profile at high Reynolds number (Re =105), representative of aeronautic applications. The LS-LODI approach provides the best results for pure acoustics waves (plane and spherical waves). However, it is not well suited to the outflow of a convected vortex for which the CBC-2D associated with a relaxation on density and transverse waves provides the best results. As regards numerical stability, a regularized adaptation is necessary to simulate high Reynolds number flows. The so-called regularized FD (Finite Difference) adaptation, a modified regularized approach where the off-equilibrium part of the stress tensor is computed thanks to a finite difference scheme, is the only tested adaptation that can handle the high Reynolds computation.

  6. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  7. The Dynamics of Very High Alfvén Mach Number Shocks in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Burgess, David; Scholer, Manfred; Masters, Adam; Sulaiman, Ali H.

    2017-02-01

    Astrophysical shocks, such as planetary bow shocks or supernova remnant shocks, are often in the high or very-high Mach number regime, and the structure of such shocks is crucial for understanding particle acceleration and plasma heating, as well inherently interesting. Recent magnetic field observations at Saturn’s bow shock, for Alfvén Mach numbers greater than about 25, have provided evidence for periodic non-stationarity, although the details of the ion- and electron-scale processes remain unclear due to limited plasma data. High-resolution, multi-spacecraft data are available for the terrestrial bow shock, but here the very high Mach number regime is only attained on extremely rare occasions. Here we present magnetic field and particle data from three such quasi-perpendicular shock crossings observed by the four-spacecraft Cluster mission. Although both ion reflection and the shock profile are modulated at the upstream ion gyroperiod timescale, the dominant wave growth in the foot takes place at sub-proton length scales and is consistent with being driven by the ion Weibel instability. The observed large-scale behavior depends strongly on cross-scale coupling between ion and electron processes, with ion reflection never fully suppressed, and this suggests a model of the shock dynamics that is in conflict with previous models of non-stationarity. Thus, the observations offer insight into the conditions prevalent in many inaccessible astrophysical environments, and provide important constraints for acceleration processes at such shocks.

  8. A distortion of very-high-redshift galaxy number counts by gravitational lensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Yan, Haojing; Windhorst, Rogier A; Mao, Shude

    2011-01-13

    The observed number counts of high-redshift galaxy candidates have been used to build up a statistical description of star-forming activity at redshift z ≳ 7, when galaxies reionized the Universe. Standard models predict that a high incidence of gravitational lensing will probably distort measurements of flux and number of these earliest galaxies. The raw probability of this happening has been estimated to be ∼0.5 per cent (refs 11, 12), but can be larger owing to observational biases. Here we report that gravitational lensing is likely to dominate the observed properties of galaxies with redshifts of z ≳ 12, when the instrumental limiting magnitude is expected to be brighter than the characteristic magnitude of the galaxy sample. The number counts could be modified by an order of magnitude, with most galaxies being part of multiply imaged systems, located less than 1 arcsec from brighter foreground galaxies at z ≈ 2. This lens-induced association of high-redshift and foreground galaxies has perhaps already been observed among a sample of galaxy candidates identified at z ≈ 10.6. Future surveys will need to be designed to account for a significant gravitational lensing bias in high-redshift galaxy samples.

  9. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  10. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  11. On the existence of convex classical solutions to a generalized Prandtl-Batchelor free-boundary problem-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, A.

    We give an analytical proof of the existence of convex classical solutions for the (convex) Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem in fluid dynamics. In this problem, a convex vortex core of constant vorticity μ >0 is embedded in a closed irrotational flow inside a closed, convex vessel in ℜ 2. The unknown boundary of the vortex core is a closed curve Γ along which (v+)^2-(v^-)^2=Λ , where v+ and v- denote, respectively, the exterior and interior flow-speeds along Γ and Λ is a given constant. Our existence results all apply to the natural multidimensional mathematical generalization of the above problem. The present existence theorems are the only ones available for the Prandtl-Batchelor problem for Λ >0, because (a) the author's prior existence treatment was restricted to the case where Λ <0, and because (b) there is no analytical existence theory available for this problem in the non-convex case, regardless of the sign of Λ .

  12. PUFKEY: A High-Security and High-Throughput Hardware True Random Number Generator for Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfang Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Random number generators (RNG play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks.

  13. Effects of excitation around jet preferred mode Strouhal number in high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely reported in the literature that the jet preferred mode Strouhal number varies over a large range of 0.2-0.6, depending upon the facility where the measurement is made as well as the measurement techniques and the location in the jet plume where the measurement is taken. This study investigates this wide variation and potential explanations for it. Active flow control is used to show that the jet is receptive to excitation over a large range of Strouhal numbers and azimuthal modes. The wide variation in the preferred mode Strouhal number is shown to be tightly linked to the evolution, spacing, and scale of the coherent flow structures, which dominate the jet shear layer's development. The low-end of the range is determined by the minimum Strouhal number at which structures begin to interact with one another in the jet plume. Below this range, structures have no significant effect on the plume's statistical properties. For Strouhal numbers at the high-end of the range, the development of coherent flow structures shifts upstream toward the nozzle exit and the structures disintegrate earlier in the jet plume. The earlier development and disintegration prevent these structures from strongly impacting the entire flowfield. The results imply that upstream perturbations in the flow present in various facilities could be responsible for the variations in the measured jet preferred mode Strouhal number. Experimental results from schlieren imaging and near- and far-field microphone measurements are used to investigate the preferred mode Strouhal number across this range.

  14. High-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, Mehmet A.; Pieprzyk, Josef; Li, Jing; Luo, Mingxing; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiao, Fuyuan

    2016-08-01

    We propose an approach that achieves high-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding. In particular, we encode a key with the Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers and then use k-Chebyshev maps to achieve consecutive and flexible key expansion and apply the pre-shared classical information between Alice and Bob and fountain codes for privacy amplification to solve the security of the exchange of classical information via the classical channel. Consequently, our high-capacity protocol does not have the limitations imposed by orbital angular momentum and down-conversion bandwidths, and it meets the requirements for longer distances and lower error rates simultaneously.

  15. Particle-based simulations of steady-state mass transport at high P\\'eclet numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Thomas; Rajah, Luke; Cohen, Samuel I A; Yates, Emma V; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chrisopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional approaches for simulating steady-state distributions of particles under diffusive and advective transport at high P\\'eclet numbers involve solving the diffusion and advection equations in at least two dimensions. Here, we present an alternative computational strategy by combining a particle-based rather than a field-based approach with the initialisation of particles in proportion to their flux. This method allows accurate prediction of the steady state and is applicable even at high P\\'eclet numbers where traditional particle-based Monte-Carlo methods starting from randomly initialised particle distributions fail. We demonstrate that generating a flux of particles according to a predetermined density and velocity distribution at a single fixed time and initial location allows for accurate simulation of mass transport under flow. Specifically, upon initialisation in proportion to their flux, these particles are propagated individually and detected by summing up their Monte-Carlo trajectories in p...

  16. High-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, Mehmet A.; Pieprzyk, Josef; Li, Jing; Luo, Mingxing; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiao, Fuyuan

    2016-11-01

    We propose an approach that achieves high-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding. In particular, we encode a key with the Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers and then use k-Chebyshev maps to achieve consecutive and flexible key expansion and apply the pre-shared classical information between Alice and Bob and fountain codes for privacy amplification to solve the security of the exchange of classical information via the classical channel. Consequently, our high-capacity protocol does not have the limitations imposed by orbital angular momentum and down-conversion bandwidths, and it meets the requirements for longer distances and lower error rates simultaneously.

  17. The Simulation of High Reynolds Number Cavity Flow Based on Fractional Volumetric Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Shan-ling; ZHU Ping; LIN Zhong-qin

    2005-01-01

    The fractional volumetric lattice Boltzmann method with much better stability was used to simulate two dimensional cavity flows. Because the effective viscosity was reduced by the fraction factor, it is very effective forsimulating high Reynolds number flows. Simulations were carried out on a uniform grids system. The stream lines and the velocity profiles obtained from the simulations agree well with the standard lattice Boltzmann method simulations. Comparisons of detailed flow patterns with other studies via location of vortex centers are also satisfactory.

  18. High-Reynolds Number Viscous Flow Simulations on Embedded-Boundary CartesianGrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    term goal of this research is to develop algorithms to simulate high Reynolds number turbulent flow in complicated geometries using embedded boundary...Spalding’s formula of matching the pro- files actually computed in the flow field by the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. In particular the profiles ...turbu- lent viscosity to be computed, see e.g. the profiles in the bottom row of Fig. 4. The streamwise velocity and especially the turbulent viscosity

  19. Axisymmetric instability of the Poiseuille-Couette flow between concentric cylinders at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkov, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    For the pressure-driven flow in an annular channel with a wall moving in the axial direction, its linear instability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations at high Reynolds numbers is investigated within the framework of the triple-deck theory. When the gap between the cylinders is sufficiently small (as compared to the radii of the cylinders), it is shown that the perturbations can split into two wave packets, the first of which grows faster and moves at a higher velocity.

  20. Note: A high Mach number arc-driven shock tube for turbulence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J B; Alexander, A B; Johnson, J A

    2013-04-01

    A high Mach arc-driven shock tube has been built at the Center for Plasma Science and Technology of Florida A&M University to study shock waves. A larger apparatus with higher voltage was built to study more stable shock waves and subsequent plasmas. Initial measurements of the apparatus conclude that the desired Mach numbers can be reached using only two-thirds the maximum possible energy that the circuit can provide.

  1. Assessing Model Assumptions for Turbulent Premixed Combustion at High Karlovitz Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    flames in the high-Karlovitz regime are characterized and modeled using Direct Numerical Simulations ( DNS ) with detailed chemistry. To enable the present...Simulations, detailed chemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...information. 15. SUBJECT TERMS. Key words or phrases identifying major concepts in the report. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION. Enter security classification

  2. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei number concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jurányi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS=0.12–1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.. In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using dry number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN number concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation.

    Despite the high average organic mass fraction (~45% in the fine mode, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA, AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used to determine particle hygroscopicity required for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  3. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei number concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurányi, Z.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kammermann, L.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS=0.12-1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.). In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using dry number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS) and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP) in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN number concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation. Despite the high average organic mass fraction (~45%) in the fine mode, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used to determine particle hygroscopicity required for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  4. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  5. Tomo-PIV Measurement of High Reynolds Number Dissipation Scale Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Nickels, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the sources of dissipative intermittency in high Reynolds number turbulence is of significant interest, especially given the increasing affordability of LES. Coherent dissipation scale structures have been identified in numerous numerical and experiment investigations, although the latter are typically restricted by the need for accurate resolution of extremely small fast motions. These investigations are therefore often limited to one-dimensional measurements, making the study of these 3D structures and their relationship to the dissipation field difficult. The current investigation employs a very large water mixing tank (2m in diameter), which uses counter-rotating impellors to generate high Reynolds number turbulence (Rλ 1000) that is close to isotropic and homogeneous. The large scale of the tank brings the smallest scales within the resolution of Tomo-PIV, allowing full 3D realization of these structures. This unique experimental setup presents a number of challenges, which include: seeding density limitations imposed by optical attenuation through the tank; demanding light sheet intensity requirements; and the extremely high computational cost of Tomographic reconstruction for the thousands of velocity fields required for statistical analysis. Initial results will be presented along with future plans for measurement refinement.

  6. High-Energy String Scattering Amplitudes and Signless Stirling Number Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chi Lee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We give a complete proof of a set of identities (7 proposed recently from calculation of high-energy string scattering amplitudes. These identities allow one to extract ratios among high-energy string scattering amplitudes in the fixed angle regime from high-energy amplitudes in the Regge regime. The proof is based on a signless Stirling number identity in combinatorial theory. The results are valid for arbitrary real values L rather than only for L=0,1 proved previously. The identities for non-integer real value L were recently shown to be realized in high-energy compactified string scattering amplitudes [He S., Lee J.C., Yang Y., arXiv:1012.3158]. The parameter L is related to the mass level of an excited string state and can take non-integer values for Kaluza-Klein modes.

  7. LIFT FORCE ON ROTATING SPHERE AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS AND HIGH ROTATIONAL SPEEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    The lift force on an isolated rotating sphere in a uniform flow was investigated by means of a three-dimensional numerical simulation for low Reynolds numbers (based on the sphere diameter) (Re < 68.4) and high dimensionless rotational speeds (Γ< 5). The Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian coordinate system were solved using a finite volume formulation based on SIMPLE procedure. The accuracy of the numerical simulation was tested through a comparison with available theoretical, numerical and experimental results at low Reynolds numbers, and it was found that they were in close agreement under the above mentioned ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed. From a detailed computation of the flow field around a rotational sphere in extended ranges of the Reynolds number and rotational speed, the results show that, with increasing the rotational speed or decreasing the Reynolds number, the lift coefficient increases. An empirical equation more accurate than those obtained by previous studies was obtained to describe both effects of the rotational speed and Reynolds number on the lift force on a sphere. It was found in calculations that the drag coefficient is not significantly affected by the rotation of the sphere. The ratio of the lift force to the drag force, both of which act on a sphere in a uniform flow at the same time, was investigated. For a small spherical particle such as one of about 100μm in diameter, even if the rotational speed reaches about 106 revolutions per minute, the lift force can be neglected as compared with the drag force.

  8. High-Resolution Analysis of Gene Copy Number Alterations in Human Prostate Cancer Using CGH on cDNA Microarrays: Impact of Copy Number on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of target genes for genetic rearrangements in prostate cancer and the impact of copy number changes on gene expression are currently not well understood. Here, we applied high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH on cDNA microarrays for analysis of prostate cancer cell lines. CGH microarrays identified most of the alterations detected by classical chromosomal CGH, as well as a number of previously unreported alterations. Specific recurrent regions of gain (28 and loss (18 were found, their boundaries defined with sub-megabasepair accuracy. The most common changes included copy number decreases at 13% and gains at iq and 5p. Refined mapping identified several sites, such as at 13q (33-44, 49-51, 74-76 Mbp from the p-telomere, which matched with minimal regions of loss seen in extensive loss of heterozygosity mapping studies of large numbers of tumors. Previously unreported recurrent changes were found at 2p, 2q, 3p, 17q (losses, at 3q, 5p, 6p (gains. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic data revealed the role of individual candidate target genes for genomic alterations as well as a highly significant (P < .0001 overall association between copy number levels and the percentage of differentially expressed genes. Across the genome, the overall impact of copy number on gene expression levels was, to a large extent, attributable to low-level gains and losses of copy number, corresponding to common deletions and gains of often large chromosomal regions.

  9. High resolution measurement of DUF1220 domain copy number from whole genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astling, David P; Heft, Ilea E; Jones, Kenneth L; Sikela, James M

    2017-08-14

    DUF1220 protein domains found primarily in Neuroblastoma BreakPoint Family (NBPF) genes show the greatest human lineage-specific increase in copy number of any coding region in the genome. There are 302 haploid copies of DUF1220 in hg38 (~160 of which are human-specific) and the majority of these can be divided into 6 different subtypes (referred to as clades). Copy number changes of specific DUF1220 clades have been associated in a dose-dependent manner with brain size variation (both evolutionarily and within the human population), cognitive aptitude, autism severity, and schizophrenia severity. However, no published methods can directly measure copies of DUF1220 with high accuracy and no method can distinguish between domains within a clade. Here we describe a novel method for measuring copies of DUF1220 domains and the NBPF genes in which they are found from whole genome sequence data. We have characterized the effect that various sequencing and alignment parameters and strategies have on the accuracy and precision of the method and defined the parameters that lead to optimal DUF1220 copy number measurement and resolution. We show that copy number estimates obtained using our read depth approach are highly correlated with those generated by ddPCR for three representative DUF1220 clades. By simulation, we demonstrate that our method provides sufficient resolution to analyze DUF1220 copy number variation at three levels: (1) DUF1220 clade copy number within individual genes and groups of genes (gene-specific clade groups) (2) genome wide DUF1220 clade copies and (3) gene copy number for DUF1220-encoding genes. To our knowledge, this is the first method to accurately measure copies of all six DUF1220 clades and the first method to provide gene specific resolution of these clades. This allows one to discriminate among the ~300 haploid human DUF1220 copies to an extent not possible with any other method. The result is a greatly enhanced capability to analyze the

  10. EXAMINATION OF NUMBERS OF STUDENTS APPLIED TO FINE ARTS HIGH SCHOOL: A PESSIMISTIC VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahit AKSU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study, aiming to examine student quantities applied to Fine Arts high School according to various variables was implemented with General Scanning Technic among Scanning Model and documentary scanning from Descriptive Researches. When we examine applications made to Fine Arts High School Music Departments Special Talent Exams in 2014-2015 Semester we see that less than 30 applications were made to 45% of departments having 30 students quota and because significant numbers of students didn’t apply to necessitate making exams and nearly half of these departments couldn’t get qualified and quantified students and in general in talent exams 71% of Music Departments of Fine Arts High Schools couldn’t fill their student quotas, even in the second placement special talent exam made for 2014-2015 semester 22 GSL Music Departments couldn’t reach their student qouota and when examine this year’s applications to Music Departments of Fine Arts High Schools with the last year’s rate number of applications decreased between 3-70% and schools with such decrease were equal to 60% of study sampling. This situation gives important messages and implies that: success rate of students graduating from these schools will decrease year by year and this fact will reflect to higher education institutions giving professional music education.

  11. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  12. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  13. High-Density Physical Random Number Generator Using Spin Signals in Multidomain Ferromagnetic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Chun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-density random number generator (RNG based on spin signals in a multidomain ferromagnetic layer in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ is proposed and fabricated. Unlike conventional spin-based RNGs, the proposed method does not require one to control an applied current, leading to a time delay in the system. RNG demonstrations are performed at room temperature. The randomness of the bit sequences generated by the proposed RNG is verified using the FIPS 140-2 statistical test suite provided by the NIST. The test results validate the effectiveness of the proposed RNGs. Our results suggest that we can obtain high-density, ultrafast RNGs if we can achieve high integration on the chip.

  14. Experimental investigation of late time Rayleigh-Taylor mixing at high Atwood number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchandra, Prasoon; Mikhaeil, Mark; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of late time, high Reynolds number (Re >20000) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is studied using statistically steady experiments performed in a multi-layer gas tunnel. The density ratio of air and air-Helium mixture used in the present experiment results in an Atwood number 0.73. Three types of diagnostics - back-lit visualization, hot-wire anemometry and stereo particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) - are employed to obtain mixing width, velocity and density fields, with S-PIV employed for the first time for such experimental conditions. Velocity and density statistics, and their correlations (u', v', w',ρ' ,ρ'v') are presented. Calculations of probability density functions (p.d.f.s) and energy spectra are made to provide further insight into the flow physics. Energy budget of the flow is also discussed.

  15. High Throughput Pseudorandom Number Generator Based on Variable Argument Unified Hyperchaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new multioutput and high throughput pseudorandom number generator. The scheme is to make the homogenized Logistic chaotic sequence as unified hyperchaotic system parameter. So the unified hyperchaos can transfer in different chaotic systems and the output can be more complex with the changing of homogenized Logistic chaotic output. Through processing the unified hyperchaotic 4-way outputs, the output will be extended to 26 channels. In addition, the generated pseudorandom sequences have all passed NIST SP800-22 standard test and DIEHARD test. The system is designed in Verilog HDL and experimentally verified on a Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA for a maximum throughput of 16.91 Gbits/s for the native chaotic output and 13.49 Gbits/s for the resulting pseudorandom number generators.

  16. High-speed quantum-random number generation by continuous measurement of arrival time of photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Hua, Zhang; Liao, Qinghong; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel high speed and multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring arrival time of photons with a common starting point. To obtain the unbiased and post-processing free random bits, the measured photon arrival time is converted into the sum of integral multiple of a fixed period and a phase time. Theoretical and experimental results show that the phase time is an independent and uniform random variable. A random bit extraction method by encoding the phase time is proposed. An experimental setup has been built and the unbiased random bit generation rate could reach 128 Mb/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 8 bits per detected photon. The random numbers passed all tests in the statistical test suite.

  17. Hierarchy of kissing numbers for exceptional Lie symmetry groups in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Department of Physics University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-01-15

    We are constructing a hierarchy of kissing numbers representing singular contact points of hyper-spheres in exceptional Lie symmetry groups lattice arrangement embedded in the 26 dimensional bosonic strings spacetime. That way we find a total number of points and dimensions equal to 548. This is 52 more than the order of E{sub 8}E{sub 8} of heterotic string theory and leads to the prediction of 69 elementary particles at an energy scale under 1 T. In other words, our mathematical model predicts nine more particles than what is currently experimentally known to exist in the standard model of high energy physics namely only 60. The result is thus in full agreement with all our previous theoretical findings.

  18. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  19. Time resolved, near wall PIV measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willert, C.; Soria, J.; Stanislas, M.; Amili, O.; Bellani, G.; Cuvier, C.; Eisfelder, M.; Fiorini, T.; Graf, N.; Klinner, J.

    2016-11-01

    We report on near wall measurements of a turbulent pipe flow at shear Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 40000 acquired in the CICLoPE facility near Bologna, Italy. With 900 mm diameter and 110 m length the facility offers a well-established turbulent flow with viscous length scales ranging from y+ = 85 μ m at Reτ = 5000 to y+ = 11 μ m at Reτ = 40000 . These length scales can be resolved with a high-speed PIV camera at image magnification near unity. For the measurement the light of a high-speed, double-pulse laser is focused into a 300 μ m thin light sheet that is introduced radially into the pipe. The light scattered by 1 μ m water-glycerol droplet seeding is observed from the side by the camera via a thin high-aspect ratio mirror with a field of view covering 20mm in wall-normal and 5mm in stream-wise direction. Statistically converged velocity profiles could be achieved using 70000 samples per sequence acquired at low laser repetition rates (100Hz). Higher sampling rates of 10 kHz provide temporally coherent data from which frequency spectra can be derived. Preliminary analysis of the data shows a well resolved inner peak that grows with increasing Reynolds number. (Project funding through EuHIT - www.euhit.org)

  20. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  1. Turbulent Flow Physics and Noise in High Reynolds Number Compressible Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    In this talk I will present a snapshot of our ongoing research in high Reynolds number turbulent compressible jets. The high speed axisymmetric jet work (Mach 0.6 - 1.1) has been jointly performed with Spectral Energies LLC through AFRL support and involves 10 kHz and large window PIV data extracted from the near field jet plume, simultaneously sampled with near field pressure and far field noise. We have learned from the simultaneously sampled 10 kHz PIV near field plume and far field noise data, using POD/OID and Wavelet filtering, that there are certain "loud" velocity modes that have low averaged turbulent kinetic energy content but strongly correlate with the far field noise. From the large window PIV data obtained at Mach 1.0 and 1.1, specific POD modes were found to contain important physics of the problem. For example, the large-scale structure of the jet, shock-related fluctuations, and turbulent mixing regions of the flow were isolated through POD. By computing cross correlations, particular POD modes were found to be related to particular noise spectra. I will conclude with a description of our complex nozzle work which uses the multi-stream supersonic single expansion rectangular nozzle (SERN) recently installed in our large anechoic chamber at SU. This work is funded from both AFOSR (joint with OSU with a primary focus on flow physics) and Spectral Energies LLC (via AFRL funds with a focus on noise). Particular emphasis will be on insight gained into this complex 3D flow field (and its relationship to the far field noise) from applications of POD, Wavelet filtering and DMD to various numerical (LES) and experimental (PIV, high speed schlieren, near and far field pressure) data sets, at a core nozzle Mach number of 1.6 and a second stream Mach number of 1.0.

  2. Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    of Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014014. Fig. 4 Turbulent transport as a fraction of total transport plotted versus Re for each of four...Diffusion in Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014062. [9] George, E., Glimm, J., Grove, J. W., Li, X.-L., Liu, Y.-J., Xu, Z.-L., and Zhao, N., 2003...ABSTRACT Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context Report Title Mix is a critical input to hydro

  3. Efficient high speed communications over electrical powerlines for a large number of users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Tripathi, K.; Latchman, H.A. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Affordable broadband Internet communication is currently available for residential use via cable modem and other forms of digital subscriber lines (DSL). Powerline communication (PLC) systems were never considered seriously for communications due to their low speed and high development cost. However, due to technological advances PLCs are now spreading to local area networks and broadband over power line systems. This paper presented a newly proposed modification to the standard HomePlug 1.0 MAC protocol to make it a constant contention window-based scheme. The HomePlug 1.0 was developed based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA). It is currently the most commonly used technology of power line communications, supporting a transmission rate of up to 14 Mbps on the power line. However, the throughput performance of this original scheme becomes critical when the number of users increases. For that reason, a constant contention window based medium access control protocol algorithm of HomePlug 1.0 was proposed under the assumption that the number of active stations is known. An analytical framework based on Markov Chains was developed in order to model this modified protocol under saturation conditions. Modeling results accurately matched the actual performance of the system. This paper revealed that the performance can be improved significantly if the variables were parameterized in terms of the number of active stations. 15 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  4. DNS/LES Simulations of Separated Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) simulations of flow through a periodic channel with a constriction are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model at two Reynolds numbers of 2800 and 10595. The LES equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. DNS are performed for the lower Reynolds number case using a fine grid and the data are used to validate the LES results obtained with a coarse and a medium size grid. LES simulations are also performed for the higher Reynolds number case using a coarse and a medium size grid. The results are compared with an existing reference data set. The DNS and LES results agreed well with the reference data. Reynolds stresses, sub-grid eddy viscosity, and the budgets for the turbulent kinetic energy are also presented. It is found that the turbulent fluctuations in the normal and spanwise directions have the same magnitude. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the production peaks near the separation point region and the production to dissipation ratio is very high on the order of five in this region. It is also observed that the production is balanced by the advection, diffusion, and dissipation in the shear layer region. The dominant term is the turbulent diffusion that is about two times the molecular dissipation.

  5. Opposing Shear-Induced Forces Dominate Inertial Focusing in Curved Channels and High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Keinan, Eliezer; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Inertial focusing is the migration of particles in fluid toward equilibrium, where current theory predicts that shear-induced and wall-induced lift forces are balanced. First reported in 1961, this Segre-Silberberg effect is particularly useful for microfluidic isolation of cells and particles. Interestingly, recent work demonstrated particle focusing at high Reynolds numbers that cannot be explained by current theory. In this work, we show that non-monotonous velocity profiles, such as those developed in curved channels, create peripheral velocity maxima around which opposing shear-induced forces dominate over wall effects. Similarly, entry effects amplified in high Reynolds flow produce an equivalent trapping mechanism in short, straight channels. This new focusing mechanism in the developing flow regime enables a 10-fold miniaturization of inertial focusing devices, while our model corrects long-standing misconceptions about the nature of mechanical forces governing inertial focusing in curved channels.

  6. Stability of High Rayleigh-Number Equilibrium Solutions of the Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Corson, Lindsey; Chini, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    There has been significant renewed interest in dissolution-driven convection in porous layers owing to the potential impact of this process on carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers. In this talk, we present some numerically-exact equilibrium solutions to the porous medium convection problem in small laterally-periodic domains at high Rayleigh number Ra . The ``uni-cellular'' equilibrium solutions first found by Corson and Chini (2011) by solving the steady Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations are recovered and, in the interior (i.e. away from upper and lower boundary layers), are shown to have the same horizontal-mean structure as the ``heat-exchanger'' solutions identified by Hewitt et al. (2012). Secondary stability analysis of the steady solutions is performed, and implications for high-Ra porous medium convection are discussed. Funding from NSF Award 0928098 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  8. Baryon Number, Strangeness and Electric Charge Fluctuations in QCD at High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, M; Jung, C; Karsch, F; Kaczmarek, O; Laermann, E; Mawhinney, R D; Miao, C; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Söldner, W

    2008-01-01

    We analyze baryon number, strangeness and electric charge fluctuations as well as their correlations in QCD at high temperature. We present results obtained from lattice calculations performed with an improved staggered fermion action (p4-action) at two values of the lattice cut-off with almost physical up and down quark masses and a physical value for the strange quark mass. We compare these results, with an ideal quark gas at high temperature and a hadron resonance gas model at low temperature. We find that fluctuations and correlations are well described by the former already for temperatures about 1.5 times the transition temperature. At low temperature qualitative features of the lattice results are well described by a hadron resonance gas model. Higher order cumulants, which become increasingly sensitive to the light pions, however show deviations from a resonance gas in the vicinity of the transition temperature.

  9. Electron acceleration in a nonrelativistic shock with very high Alfv\\'en Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Y; Hoshino, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron acceleration associated with various plasma kinetic instabilities in a nonrelativistic, very-high-Alfv\\'en Mach-number ($M_A \\sim 45$) shock is revealed by means of a two-dimensional fully kinetic PIC simulation. Electromagnetic (ion Weibel) and electrostatic (ion-acoustic and Buneman) instabilities are strongly activated at the same time in different regions of the two-dimensional shock structure. Relativistic electrons are quickly produced predominantly by the shock surfing mechanism with the Buneman instability at the leading edge of the foot. The energy spectrum has a high-energy tail exceeding the upstream ion kinetic energy accompanying the main thermal population. This gives a favorable condition for the ion acoustic instability at the shock front, which in turn results in additional energization. The large-amplitude ion Weibel instability generates current sheets in the foot, implying another dissipation mechanism via magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional shock structure in the very-hi...

  10. The high Reynolds number flow through an axial-flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierke, W. C.; Straka, W. A.; Taylor, P. D.

    1993-11-01

    The high Reynolds number pump (HIREP) facility at ARL Penn State has been used to perform a low-speed, large-scale experiment of the incompressible flow of water through a two-blade-row turbomachine. HIREP can involve blade chord Reynolds numbers as high as 6,000,000 and can accommodate a variety of instrumentation in both a stationary and a rotating frame of reference. The objectives of this experiment were as follows: to provide a database for comparison with three-dimensional, viscous (turbulent) flow computations; to evaluate the engineering models; and to improve our physical understanding of many of the phenomena involved in this complex flow field. The experimental results include a large quantity of data acquired throughout HIREP. A five-hole probe survey of the inlet flow 37.0 percent chord upstream of the inlet guide vane (IGV) leading edge is sufficient to give information for the inflow boundary conditions, while some static-pressure information is available to help establish an outflow boundary condition.

  11. Specularly reflected He sup 2+ at high Mach number quasi-parallel shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuselier, S.A.; Lennartsson, O.W. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)); Thomsen, M.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Russell, C.T. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1990-04-01

    Upstream from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE 1 often observes two types of suprathermal He{sup 2+} distributions. Always present to some degree is an energetic (several keV/eto 17.4 keV/e, the maximum energy of the detector) diffuse He{sup 2+} distribution. Sometimes, apparently when the Alfven Mach number, M{sub A}, is high enough and the spacecraft is near the shock (within a few minutes of a crossing), a second type of suprathermal He{sup 2+} distribution is also observed. This nongyrotropic, gyrating He{sup 2+} distribution has velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field that are consistent with near-specular reflection of a portion of the incident solar wind He{sup 2+} distribution off the shock. Specularly reflected and diffuse proton distributions are associated with these gyrating He{sup 2+} distributions. The presence of these gyrating He{sup 2+} distributions suggests that specular reflection is controlled primarily by magnetic forces in high Mach number quasi-parallel shocks and that these distributions may be a seed population for more energetic diffuse He{sup 2+} distributions.

  12. The effect of high frequency sound on Culicoides numbers collected with suction light traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert J. Venter

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, are involved in the transmission of various pathogens that cause important diseases of livestock worldwide. The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of these insects on livestock could play an important role as part of an integrated control programme against diseases transmitted by these midges. The objective of this study was to determine whether high frequency sound has any repellent effect on Culicoides midges. The number of midges collected with 220 V Onderstepoort white light traps fitted with electronic mosquito repellents (EMRs, emitting 5-20 KHz multi-frequency sound waves, was compared with that of two untreated traps. Treatments were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although fewer midges were collected in the two traps fitted with EMRs, the average number collected over eight consecutive nights was not significantly different. The EMRs also had no influence on any of the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer or the species composition of the Culicoides population as determined with light traps. The results indicate that high frequency sound has no repellent effect on Culicoides midges. There is therefore no evidence to support their promotion or use in the protection of animals against pathogens transmitted by Culicoides midges.

  13. Cardiovascular and Renal Effects of High Salt Diet in GDNF+/- Mice with Low Nephron Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schlote

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To test the suggested association of low nephron number and later development of renal and cardiovascular disease we investigated the effects of high sodium diet in heterozygous GDNF+/- mice. Methods: Aged wild type and GDNF+/- mice were grouped together according to high sodium (HS, 4% or low sodium (LS, 0.03% diet for 4 weeks. The heart, the aorta and the kidneys were processed for morphometric and stereological evaluations and TaqMan PCR. Results: On HS GDNF+/- mice showed significantly higher drinking volume and urine production than wt and mean arterial blood pressure tended to be higher. Heart weight was higher in GDNF+/- than in wt, but the difference was only significant for LS. HS significantly increased cardiac interstitial tissue in GDNF+/-, but not in wt. On LS GDNF+/- mice had significantly larger glomeruli than wt and HS led to an additional two fold increase of glomerular area compared to LS. On electron microscopy glomerular damage after HS was seen in GDNF+/-, but not in wt. Dietary salt intake modulated renal IL-10 gene expression in GDNF+/-. Conclusion: In the setting of 30% lower nephron number HS diet favoured maladaptive changes of the kidney as well as of the cardiovascular system.

  14. Three-dimensional effects on airfoil measurements at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark; Hultmark, Marcus; Hansen, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum codes (BEM) are widely used in the wind turbine industry to determine a turbine's operational range and its limits. Empirical two-dimensional airfoil data serve as the primary and fundamental input to the BEM code. Consequently, the results of BEM simulations are strongly dependent on the accuracy of these data. In this presentation, an experimental study is described in which airfoils of different aspect ratios were tested at identical Reynolds numbers. A high-pressure wind tunnel facility is used to achieve large Reynolds numbers of Rec = 3 ×106 , even with small chord lengths. This methodology enables testing of very high aspect ratio airfoils to characterize 3-D effects on the lift and drag data. The tests were performed over a large range of angles of attack, which is especially important for wind turbines. The effect of varying aspect ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil is discussed with emphasis on the outcome of a BEM simulation. The project was partially funded by NSF CBET-1435254 (program manager Dr. Gregory Rorrer).

  15. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change.

  16. Apparatus for measuring pressure-driven transport through channels at high Knudsen numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsiou, S.; Holst, B.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The pressure-driven gas flow through micro- and nano-porous structures is particularly interesting for innovative technologies such as microelectromechanical and nano-mechanical-electrical systems. The classical continuum assumption breaks down for rarefied flow through channels with a characteristic dimension comparable to the mean free path of the gas. Theories based on molecular interactions have been formulated to predict the flow at high Knudsen numbers. Measuring rarefied gas flow experimentally is a challenge since only a few studies have been able to determine flowrates in the molecular flow regime. Here we present the design of an experimental apparatus, which can be used to measure the flow of gases through nano- and microscale channels in the flow regimes where molecular effects are critical. The equations used to design the apparatus are given, focusing on the slip and transition flow regimes (together sometimes called "Intermediate flow regime"). A channel with a diameter of 325 μm ± 5μm and a length of 2 mm was tested experimentally with the apparatus for a wide range of Knudsen numbers (10-2 < Kn < 1 × 105) demonstrating its suitability through the slip and transition regime (2.23 × 10-2 < Kn < 2.26).

  17. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  18. Assessment of an Euler-Interacting Boundary Layer Method Using High Reynolds Number Transonic Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Maddalon, Dal V.

    1998-01-01

    Flight-measured high Reynolds number turbulent-flow pressure distributions on a transport wing in transonic flow are compared to unstructured-grid calculations to assess the predictive ability of a three-dimensional Euler code (USM3D) coupled to an interacting boundary layer module. The two experimental pressure distributions selected for comparative analysis with the calculations are complex and turbulent but typical of an advanced technology laminar flow wing. An advancing front method (VGRID) was used to generate several tetrahedral grids for each test case. Initial calculations left considerable room for improvement in accuracy. Studies were then made of experimental errors, transition location, viscous effects, nacelle flow modeling, number and placement of spanwise boundary layer stations, and grid resolution. The most significant improvements in the accuracy of the calculations were gained by improvement of the nacelle flow model and by refinement of the computational grid. Final calculations yield results in close agreement with the experiment. Indications are that further grid refinement would produce additional improvement but would require more computer memory than is available. The appendix data compare the experimental attachment line location with calculations for different grid sizes. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and calculated attachment line locations.

  19. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  20. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  1. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in high Reynolds-number magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J; Schäfer, T; Grauer, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling behavior of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in homogeneous and isotropic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by means of an exact hierarchy of structure function equations as well as by direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional MHD turbulence. In particular, rescaling relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are derived and utilized in order to compare different scaling behavior in the inertial range. It is found that there are no substantial differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions in MHD turbulence. This finding stands in contrast to the case of hydrodynamic turbulence which shows persistent differences even at high Reynolds numbers. We propose a physical picture that is based on an effective reduction of pressure contributions due to local regions of same magnitude and alignment of velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Finally, our findings underline the importance of the pressure term for ...

  2. Particle-number conserving analysis of the high-spin structure of $^{159}$Ho

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The high-spin rotational bands in odd-$Z$ nuclei $^{159}$Ho ($Z=67$) are investigated using the cranked shell model with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving method, in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The experimental moments of inertia and alignments and their variations with the rotational frequency $\\hbar\\omega$ are reproduced very well by the calculations. The splitting between the signature partners of the yrast band $7/2^-[523]$ is discussed and the splitting of the excited band $7/2^+[404]$ above $\\hbar\\omega \\sim 0.30$~MeV is predicted due to the level crossing with $1/2^+[411]$. The calculated $B(E2)$ transition probabilities are also suggested for future experiments.

  3. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  4. Measuring Absolute RNA Copy Numbers at High Temporal Resolution Reveals Transcriptome Kinetics in Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick D.L. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcript regulation is essential for cell function, and misregulation can lead to disease. Despite technologies to survey the transcriptome, we lack a comprehensive understanding of transcript kinetics, which limits quantitative biology. This is an acute challenge in embryonic development, where rapid changes in gene expression dictate cell fate decisions. By ultra-high-frequency sampling of Xenopus embryos and absolute normalization of sequence reads, we present smooth gene expression trajectories in absolute transcript numbers. During a developmental period approximating the first 8 weeks of human gestation, transcript kinetics vary by eight orders of magnitude. Ordering genes by expression dynamics, we find that “temporal synexpression” predicts common gene function. Remarkably, a single parameter, the characteristic timescale, can classify transcript kinetics globally and distinguish genes regulating development from those involved in cellular metabolism. Overall, our analysis provides unprecedented insight into the reorganization of maternal and embryonic transcripts and redefines our ability to perform quantitative biology.

  5. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G.; Kauzlarić, David

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered.

  6. High initial amplitude and high Mach number effects on the evolution of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikanati, A; Oron, D; Sadot, O; Shvarts, D

    2003-02-01

    Effects of high-Mach numbers and high initial amplitudes on the evolution of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov shock-wave induced hydrodynamic instability are studied using theoretical models, experiments, and numerical simulations. Two regimes in which there is a significant deviation from the linear dependence of the initial velocity on the initial perturbation amplitude are defined and characterized. In one, the observed reduction of the initial velocity is primarily due to large initial amplitudes. This effect is accurately modeled by a vorticity deposition model, quantifying both the effect of the initial perturbation amplitude and the exact shape of the interface. In the other, the reduction is dominated by the proximity of the shock wave to the interface. This effect is modeled by a modified incompressible model where the shock wave is mimicked by a moving bounding wall. These results are supplemented with high initial amplitude Mach 1.2 shock-tube experiments, enabling separation of the two effects. It is shown that in most of the previous experiments, the observed reduction is predominantly due to the effect of high initial amplitudes.

  7. Mitigation of naphthenate related production upsets in high TAN (Total Acid Number) crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostojic, Nik [Maersk Oil, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vijn, Pieter; Reiners, Robert [Champion Technologies Europe BV, Delden (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a strategy for prediction, evaluation and mitigation of calcium naphthenate related production problems. Developing fields with acidic crude in the North Sea, West Africa, Bohai Bay (China) and Brazil is becoming more common in recent years. The high acid crude contains a considerable amount of naphthenic acids, typically having a Total Acid Number (TAN) higher than 0.5 mg KOH/g. Formation of either hard type 'calcium naphthenate precipitates' or soft type 'sodium carboxylate/emulsions' during crude oil production can lead to severe flow assurance and separation problems. In severe cases this may lead to production shutdowns to clean-up the equipment. A number of different naphthenate mitigation approaches have been published but no one particular approach is considered to be the most efficient as it depends significantly on the particular field conditions. Initially, this problem was addressed by deploying large volumes of (usually organic) acid, but more recently high efficiency low dose naphthenate inhibitors have been introduced. For predicting naphthenate scaling potential, methods were developed to determine the concentration of 1230 Dalton naphthenic tetra acid (ARN acids) in either deposit or crude oil and this information can be used to locate and potentially isolate the problem to a certain reservoir. Also, methods were developed to design suitable low dose naphthenate inhibitors. As these inhibitors are field tested, monitoring is required to ensure the product is performing most efficiently. In cases of tight emulsions however, this is less difficult as the oil dehydration and water quality is affected instantly. Methods were developed to allow monitoring of the calcium naphthenate deposition in field trails, thus allow trending and evaluation of the chemicals performance. After detailed analyses and discussions of the developed methods, a North Sea case history is presented reviewing several years of treating

  8. The variational multiscale element free Galerkin method for MHD flows at high Hartmann numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the paper is the development of an efficient numerical algorithm for the solution of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow problems with either fully insulating walls or partially insulating and partially conducting walls. Toward this, we first extend the influence domain of the shape function for the element free Galerkin (EFG) method to have arbitrary shape. When the influence factor approaches 1, we find that the EFG shape function almost has the Delta property at the node (i.e. the value of the EFG shape function of the node is nearly equal to 1 at the position of this node) as well as the property of slices in the influence domain of the node (i.e. the EFG shape function in the influence domain of the node is nearly constructed by different functions defined in different slices). Therefore, for MHD flow problems at high Hartmann numbers we follow the idea of the variational multiscale finite element method (VMFEM) to combine the EFG method with the variational multiscale (VM) method, namely the variational multiscale element free Galerkin (VMEFG) method is proposed. Subsequently, in order to validate the proposed method, we compare the obtained approximate solutions with the exact solutions for some problems where such exact solutions are known. Finally, several benchmark problems of MHD flows are simulated and the numerical results indicate that the VMEFG method is stable at moderate and high values of Hartmann number. Another important feature of this method is that the stabilization parameter has appeared naturally via the solution of the fine scale problem. Meanwhile, because this proposed method is a type of meshless method, it can avoid the need for meshing, a very demanding task for complicated geometry problems.

  9. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and Its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-number Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  10. High Reynolds number flows about bodies of revolution with application to submarines and torpedoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Juan M.

    x 106, which seem to have collapsed. The sail wake experiments demonstrated the significance of the sail tip vortex when the submarine is at a nonzero yaw angle. As the yaw angle is increased the circulation of the sail tip vortex increases. As the yaw angle is further increased the boundary layer separates from the sail with an overall drop in circulation. A similar phenomenon is observed for the junction vortex with the exception that when the yaw angle is further increased to 17 degrees the circulation continues to increase at a slower rate. Also, the circulation values for the sail tip vortex are about an order of magnitude larger than those of the junction vortex. The effects of the support on the wake development are similar to the effects introduced by the sail on a submarine wake (except for the absence of the tip flow). The presence of the support affects the flow differently for different Reynolds numbers emphasizing the importance of high Reynolds number studies to better understand submarine flows.

  11. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  12. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  13. The stability of stratified spatially periodic shear flows at low Péclet number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaud, Pascale, E-mail: pgaraud@ucsc.edu [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Gallet, Basile [Service de Physique de l’Etat Condensé, DSM/IRAMIS, CNRS UMR 3680, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Bischoff, Tobias [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 170-25, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    This work addresses the question of the stability of stratified, spatially periodic shear flows at low Péclet number but high Reynolds number. This little-studied limit is motivated by astrophysical systems, where the Prandtl number is often very small. Furthermore, it can be studied using a reduced set of “low-Péclet-number equations” proposed by Lignières [“The small-Péclet-number approximation in stellar radiative zones,” Astron. Astrophys. 348, 933–939 (1999)]. Through a linear stability analysis, we first determine the conditions for instability to infinitesimal perturbations. We formally extend Squire’s theorem to the low-Péclet-number equations, which shows that the first unstable mode is always two-dimensional. We then perform an energy stability analysis of the low-Péclet-number equations and prove that for a given value of the Reynolds number, above a critical strength of the stratification, any smooth periodic shear flow is stable to perturbations of arbitrary amplitude. In that parameter regime, the flow can only be laminar and turbulent mixing does not take place. Finding that the conditions for linear and energy stability are different, we thus identify a region in parameter space where finite-amplitude instabilities could exist. Using direct numerical simulations, we indeed find that the system is subject to such finite-amplitude instabilities. We determine numerically how far into the linearly stable region of parameter space turbulence can be sustained.

  14. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  15. Radiative properties of high wire number tungsten arrays with implosion times up to 250 ns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C. A.; Douglas, M. R.; Struve, K. W.; Spielman, R. B.; Stygar, W. A.; Peterson, D. L.; Roderick, N. F.; Haines, M. G.; Beg, F. N.; Ruiz-Camacho, J.

    1999-09-01

    High wire number, 25-mm-diameter tungsten wire arrays have been imploded on the 8-MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., AIP Conference Proceeding 195, 3 (American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, NY 1989)], operating in a long-pulse mode. By varying the mass of the arrays from 710 to 6140 μg/cm, implosion times of 130-250 ns have been obtained with implosion velocities of 50-25 cm/μs, respectively. These Z-pinch implosions produced plasmas with millimeter diameters that radiated 600-800 kJ of x-rays, with powers of 20-49 TW; the corresponding pulsewidths were 19-7.5 ns, with risetimes ranging from 6.5 to 4.0 ns. These powers and pulsewidths are similar to those achieved with 50-ns implosion times on Saturn. Two-dimensional, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic calculations indicate that the imploding shells in these long implosion time experiments are comparable in width to those in the short-pulse cases. This can be due to lower initial perturbations. A heuristic wire array model suggests that the reduced perturbations, in the long-pulse cases, may be due to the individual wire merger occurring well before the acceleration of the shell. The experiments and modeling suggest that 150-200 ns implosion time Z-pinches could be employed for high-power, x-ray source applications.

  16. High numbers of heat-loving bacteria found in cold Arctic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-09-15

    This article reported on a study of subzero sediments in the Arctic Ocean off the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen where scientists from the University of Calgary detected high numbers of thermophilic bacteria. The spores may offer an opportunity to trace seepages of fluids from hot sub-seafloor habitats and potentially indicate undiscovered offshore petroleum reservoirs. The Arctic spores that appear to have been transported from deeper hot spots were revived during experimental incubations at 40 to 60 degrees Celsius. Ongoing surveys are expected to identify the source, or sources, of these misplaced microbes. Since these bacteria are anaerobic, their high abundance and steady supply into the sediments indicate they are coming from a large oxygen-free habitat. One possible source may be a deep pressurized oil reservoir from which upward-leaking hydrocarbons carry bacteria into overlying seawater. Another source could be related to fluid circulation through warm ocean crust at spreading ridges. The thermophiles may get carried out of the abyssal hot spots by ocean currents that disperse them to the cold sediments. The spores also offer insight for understanding how biodiversity is maintained by the passive dispersal of small cells over large distances.

  17. Extending the restricted nonlinear model for wall-turbulence to high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretheim, Joel; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice

    2016-11-01

    The restricted nonlinear (RNL) model for wall-turbulence is motivated by the long-observed streamwise-coherent structures that play an important role in these flows. The RNL equations, derived by restricting the convective term in the Navier-Stokes equations, provide a computationally efficient approach due to fewer degrees of freedom in the underlying dynamics. Recent simulations of the RNL system have been conducted for turbulent channel flows at low Reynolds numbers (Re), yielding insights into the dynamical mechanisms and statistics of wall-turbulence. Despite the computational advantages of the RNL system, simulations at high Re remain out-of-reach. We present a new Large Eddy Simulation (LES) framework for the RNL system, enabling its use in engineering applications at high Re such as turbulent flows through wind farms. Initial results demonstrate that, as observed at moderate Re, restricting the range of streamwise varying structures present in the simulation (i.e., limiting the band of x Fourier components or kx modes) significantly affects the accuracy of the statistics. Our results show that only a few well-chosen kx modes lead to RNL turbulence with accurate statistics, including the mean profile and the well-known inner and outer peaks in energy spectra. This work is supported by NSF (WindInspire OISE-1243482).

  18. DNA copy number changes in high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjerkehagen Bodil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are rare and highly aggressive soft tissue tumors showing complex chromosomal aberrations. In order to identify recurrent chromosomal regions of gain and loss, and thereby novel gene targets of potential importance for MPNST development and/or progression, we have analyzed DNA copy number changes in seven high-grade MPNSTs using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH. Results Considerable more gains than losses were observed, and the most frequent minimal recurrent regions of gain included 1q24.1-q24.2, 1q24.3-q25.1, 8p23.1-p12, 9q34.11-q34.13 and 17q23.2-q25.3, all gained in five of seven samples. The 17q23.2-q25.3 region was gained in all five patients with poor outcome and not in the two patients with disease-free survival. cDNA microarray analysis and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR were used to investigate expression of genes located within these regions. The gene lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2 was identified as a candidate target for the 8p23.1-p12 gain. Within 17q, the genes topoisomerase II-α (TOP2A, ets variant gene 4 (E1A enhancer binding protein, E1AF (ETV4 and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (survivin (BIRC5 showed increased expression in all samples compared to two benign tumors. Increased expression of these genes has previously been associated with poor survival in other malignancies, and for TOP2A, in MPNSTs as well. In addition, we have analyzed the expression of five micro RNAs located within the 17q23.2-q25.3 region, but none of them showed high expression levels compared to the benign tumors. Conclusion Our study shows the potential of using DNA copy number changes obtained by array CGH to predict the prognosis of MPNST patients. Although no clear correlations between the expression level and patient outcome were observed, the genes TOP2A, ETV4 and BIRC5 are interesting candidate targets for the 17q gain associated

  19. Genome-wide copy number profiling using high-density SNP array in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, G; Qu, L; Chen, S; Xu, G; Yang, N

    2015-04-01

    Phenotypic diversity is a direct consequence resulting mainly from the impact of underlying genetic variation, and recent studies have shown that copy number variation (CNV) is emerging as an important contributor to both phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility. Herein, we performed a genome-wide CNV scan in 96 chickens from 12 diversified breeds, benefiting from the high-density Affymetrix 600 K SNP arrays. We identified a total of 231 autosomal CNV regions (CNVRs) encompassing 5.41 Mb of the chicken genome and corresponding to 0.59% of the autosomal sequence. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 2.6 to 586.2 kb with an average of 23.4 kb, including 130 gain, 93 loss and eight both gain and loss events. These CNVRs, especially deletions, had lower GC content and were located particularly in gene deserts. In particular, 102 CNVRs harbored 128 chicken genes, most of which were enriched in immune responses. We obtained 221 autosomal CNVRs after converting probe coordinates to Galgal3, and comparative analysis with previous studies illustrated that 153 of these CNVRs were regarded as novel events. Furthermore, qPCR assays were designed for 11 novel CNVRs, and eight (72.73%) were validated successfully. In this study, we demonstrated that the high-density 600 K SNP array can capture CNVs with higher efficiency and accuracy and highlighted the necessity of integrating multiple technologies and algorithms. Our findings provide a pioneering exploration of chicken CNVs based on a high-density SNP array, which contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of genetic variation in the chicken genome and is beneficial to unearthing potential CNVs underlying important traits of chickens. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  20. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  1. On the wave number 2 eastward propagating quasi 2 day wave at middle and high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sheng-Yang; Liu, Han-Li; Pedatella, N. M.; Dou, Xiankang; Liu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    The temperature and wind data sets from the ensemble data assimilation version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model + Data Assimilation Research Testbed (WACCM + DART) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) are utilized to study the seasonal variability of the eastward quasi 2 day wave (QTDW) with zonal wave number 2 (E2) during 2007. The aliasing ratio of E2 from wave number 3 (W3) in the synoptic WACCM data set is a constant value of 4 × 10-6% due to its uniform sampling pattern, whereas the aliasing is latitudinally dependent if the WACCM fields are sampled asynoptically based on the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) sampling. The aliasing ratio based on SABER sampling is 75% at 40°S during late January, where and when W3 peaks. The analysis of the synoptic WACCM data set shows that the E2 is in fact a winter phenomenon, which peaks in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere at high latitudes. In the austral winter period, the amplitudes of E2 can reach 10 K, 20 m/s, and 30 m/s for temperature, zonal, and meridional winds, respectively. In the boreal winter period, the wave perturbations are only one third as strong as those in austral winter. Diagnostic analysis also shows that the mean flow instabilities in the winter upper mesosphere polar region provide sources for the amplification of E2. This is different from the westward QTDWs, whose amplifications are related to the summer easterly jet. In addition, the E2 also peaks at lower altitude than the westward modes.

  2. Hybrid RANS/LES method for high Reynolds numbers, applied to atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

      The use of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict wall-bounded flows has presently been limited to low Reynolds number flows. Since the number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-wall turbulent structures increase rapidly with Reynolds number, LES has been unattainable for...

  3. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments to Design Sweeping Jets for High Reynolds Number Cruise Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Fell, Jared S.; Webb, Sandy R.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The application of a sweeping jet actuator to a circulation control system was initiated by a risk reduction series of experiments to optimize the authority of a single sweeping jet actuator. The sweeping jet design was integrated into the existing Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic- Modular Active Control (FAST-MAC) model by replacing the steady blowing system with an array of thirty-nine sweeping jet cartridges. A constant slot height to wing chord ratio was similar to the steady blowing configuration resulting in each actuator having a unique in size for the sweeping jet configuration. While this paper will describe the scaling and optimization of the actuators for future high Reynolds number applications, the major focus of this effort was to target the transonic flight regime by increasing the amplitude authority of the actuator. This was accomplished by modifying the diffuser of the sweeping jet actuator, and this paper highlights twelve different diffuser designs. The experimental portion of this work was completed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility.

  4. Triple-deck analysis of transonic high Reynolds number flow through slender channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwick, A; Kornfeld, M

    2014-07-28

    In this work, laminar transonic weakly three-dimensional flows at high Reynolds numbers in slender channels, as found in microsupersonic nozzles and turbomachines of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are considered. The channel height is taken so small that the viscous wall layers forming at the channel walls start to interact strongly rather than weakly with the inviscid core flow and, therefore, the classical boundary layer approach fails. The resulting viscous-inviscid interaction problem is formulated using matched asymptotic expansions and found to be governed by a triple-deck structure. As a consequence, the properties of the predominantly inviscid core region and the viscous wall layers have to be calculated simultaneously in the interaction region. Weakly three-dimensional effects caused by surface roughness, upstream propagating flow perturbations, boundary layer separation as well as bifurcating solutions are discussed. Representative results for subsonic as well as supersonic conditions are presented, and the importance of these flow phenomena in technical applications as, for example, a means to reduce shock losses through the use of deformed geometry is addressed.

  5. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  6. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  7. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  8. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  9. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  10. Flow past a rotating cylinder at high Reynolds number using PANS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, high-Reynolds number flow past a rotating cylinder has been simulated using Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method. The simulations are performed at Re = 140000. The spin ratio of the cylinder, which is defined by the ratio of the circumferential speed of the cylinder to the free-stream speed, varies from a = 0 to a = 4. The resolved and the modeled physical scales have been compared with the corresponding LES data for better understanding of the efficacy of the PANS method. The comparison of PANS results with the LES results showed good agreement. It has been recognized that the PANS simulation is able to produce fairly acceptable results using even a coarse-mesh. It is recognized that the time-averaged flow statistics obtained using PANS and URANS simulations are approximately same. However the vortex structure is much better captured by the PANS method. With the increase in the spin ratio, decrease in the time-averaged drag and increase in the time-averaged lift force acting on the cylinder have been observed. The vortices in far wake region are displaced and deformed but those in the vicinity of the cylinder are stretched at the bottom and accumulated over the top of the cylinder.

  11. Magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, G. W., E-mail: gary.paterson@glasgow.ac.uk; Gonçalves, F. J. T.; McFadzean, S.; Stamps, R. L. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); O' Reilly, S.; Bowman, R. [ANSIN, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-28

    We report the static and dynamic magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer test structure with potential applications in broadband absorber and filter devices. To allow fine control over the absorption linewidths and to understand the mechanisms governing the resonances in a tailored structure similar to that expected to be used in real world applications, the multilayer was intentionally designed to have layer thickness and interface roughness variations. Magnetometry measurements show that the sample has complex hysteresis loops with features consistent with single ferromagnetic film reversals. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy allows us to correlate the magnetic properties with structural features, including the film widths and interface roughnesses. Analysis of resonance frequencies from broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of field magnitude and orientation provide values of the local exchange bias, rotatable anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy fields for specific layers in the stack and explain the observed mode softening. The linewidths of the multilayer are adjustable around the bias field, approaching twice that seen at larger fields, allowing control over the bandwidth of devices formed from the structure.

  12. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF FLOW BEHAVIOR IN DRIVEN CAVITY AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudhail Bin Abdul Munir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, due to rapidly increasing computational power, computational methods have become the essential tools to conduct researches in various engineering fields.  In parallel to the development of ultra high speed digital computers, computational fluid dynamics (CFD has become the new third approach apart from theory and experiment in the philosophical study and development of fluid dynamics.  Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is an alternative method to conventional CFD.  LBM is relatively new approach that uses simple microscopic models to simulate complicated microscopic behavior of transport phenomena.  In this paper, fluid flow behaviors of steady incompressible flow inside lid driven square cavity are studied.  Numerical calculations are conducted for different Reynolds numbers by using Lattice Boltzmann scheme.  The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the capability of this lattice Boltzmann scheme for engineering applications particularly in fluid transport phenomena. Keywords-component; lattice Boltzmann method, lid driven cavity, computational fluid dynamics.

  14. Numerical modeling of the impact of regenerator housing on the determination of Nusselt numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Nellis, G.F.; Klein, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    to the regenerator fluid is developed. The model is applied to a range of cases and it is shown that at low Reynolds numbers (well below 100) and at Prandtl numbers appropriate to liquids (7 for water) the regenerator housing may influence the experimental determination of Nusselt numbers significantly. The impact......It is suggested that the housing of regenerators may have a significant impact when experimentally determining Nusselt numbers at low Reynolds and large Prandtl numbers. In this paper, a numerical model that takes the regenerator housing into account as a domain that is thermally coupled...... of the housing on the performance during cyclic steady-state regenerator operation is quantified by comparing the regenerator effectiveness for cases where the wall is ignored and with cases where it is included. It is shown that the effectiveness may be decreased by as much as 18% for the cases considered here...

  15. The Concept of Irrational Numbers in High-School Students and Prospective Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Efraim; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigation of the presence and effect of intuitive obstacles to the concept of irrational number in (n=30) ninth-grade, (n=32) tenth-grade, and (n=29) college students found that only some students manifest genuine intuitive biases. Most students were unable to classify numbers as rational, irrational, and/or real. (Author/MKR)

  16. Pseudosymmetry, high copy number and twinning complicate the structure determination of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 29577) flavodoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelker, Megan; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Shamoo, Yousif

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of oxidized flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 29577) was determined by molecular replacement in two crystal forms, P3(1)21 and P4(3), at 2.5 and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. Structure determination in space group P3(1)21 was challenging owing to the presence of pseudo-translational symmetry and a high copy number in the asymmetric unit (8). Initial phasing attempts in space group P3(1)21 by molecular replacement using a poor search model (46% identity) and multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion were unsuccessful. It was necessary to solve the structure in a second crystal form, space group P4(3), which was characterized by almost perfect twinning, in order to obtain a suitable search model for molecular replacement. This search model with complementary approaches to molecular replacement utilizing the pseudo-translational symmetry operators determined by analysis of the native Patterson map facilitated the selection and manual placement of molecules to generate an initial solution in the P3(1)21 crystal form. During the early stages of refinement, application of the appropriate twin law, (-h, -k, l), was required to converge to reasonable R-factor values despite the fact that in the final analysis the data were untwinned and the twin law could subsequently be removed. The approaches used in structure determination and refinement may be applicable to other crystal structures characterized by these complicating factors. The refined model shows flexibility of the flavin mononucleotide coordinating loops indicated by the isolation of two loop conformations and provides a starting point for the elucidation of the mechanism used for protein-partner recognition.

  17. Spatial patterning of the neonatal EEG suggests a need for a high number of electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaee, Maryam; Freeman, Walter J; Colditz, Paul B; Ramon, Ceon; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for source analysis of neonatal EEG, but currently there is inadequate knowledge about i) the spatial patterning of neonatal scalp EEG and hence ii) the number of electrodes needed to capture neonatal EEG in full spatial detail. This study addresses these issues by using a very high density (2.5mm interelectrode spacing) linear electrode array to assess the spatial power spectrum, by using a high density (64 electrodes) EEG cap to assess the spatial extent of the common oscillatory bouts in the neonatal EEG and by using a neonatal size spherical head model to assess the effects of source depth and skull conductivities on the spatial frequency spectrum. The linear array recordings show that the spatial power spectrum decays rapidly until about 0.5-0.8 cycles per centimeter. The dense array EEG recordings show that the amplitude of oscillatory events decays within 4-6 cm to the level of global background activity, and that the higher frequencies (12-20 Hz) show the most rapid spatial decline in amplitude. Simulation with spherical head model showed that realistic variation in skull conductivity and source depths can both introduce orders of magnitude difference in the spatial frequency of the scalp EEG. Calculation of spatial Nyquist frequencies from the spatial power spectra suggests that an interelectrode distance of about 6-10mm would suffice to capture the full spatial texture of the raw EEG signal at the neonatal scalp without spatial aliasing or under-sampling. The spatial decay of oscillatory events suggests that a full representation of their spatial characteristics requires an interelectrode distance of 10-20mm. The findings show that the conventional way of recording neonatal EEG with about 10 electrodes ignores most spatial EEG content, that increasing the electrode density is necessary to improve neonatal EEG source localization and information extraction, and that prospective source models will need to carefully consider the

  18. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input. PMID:27695432

  19. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input.

  20. Modeling Hysteresis with Inertial-Dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii Model in Wide-Band Frequency-Operated Piezoelectric Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Hassani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major problems occurring in many technical applications is the presence of the hysteretic behavior in sensors and actuators, which causes a nonlinear relationship between input and output variables in such devices. Since the nonlinear phenomenon of hysteresis degrades the performance of the piezoelectric materials and piezoelectric drive mechanisms, for example, in positioning control framework, it has to be characterized in order to mitigate the effect of the nonlinearity in the devices. This paper is aimed to characterize and model the hysteresis in typical piezoelectric actuators under load-free and preloaded circumstances incorporating the inertial effect of the system. For this purpose, the piezoelectric actuator is modeled as a mass-spring-damper system, which is expressed in terms of a stop operator as one of the essential yet efficient hysteresis operators in the Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI model. The reason of utilizing the stop operator in this study is for the sake of control purposes, as the stop operator plays as the inverse of the play operator in the PI model and can be used in a feed-forward controller scheme to suppress the effect of hysteresis in general control framework. The results reveal that this model exhibits better correspondence to the measurement output compared to that of the classical PI model.

  1. Long-range lPIV to resolve the small scales in a jet at high Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Westerweel, J.; Elsinga, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of flows at high Reynolds number is of great interest for the theory of turbulence, in that the large and the small scales of turbulence show a clear separation. But, as the Reynolds number of the flow increases, the size of the Kolmogorov length scale ( η ) drops almost proportion

  2. An autostereoscopic display with high resolution and large number of view zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Li; Hsu, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Chao-Hsu; Wang, Chy-Lin; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Cheng, Shu-Chuan

    2008-02-01

    For a spatial-multiplexed 3D display, trade-off between resolution and number of view-zones are usually unavoidable due to the limited number of pixels on the screen. In this paper, we present a new autostereoscopic system, named as "integrated-screen system," to substantially increase the total number of pixels on the screen, which in turn increase both the resolution and number of view-zones. In the integrated-screen system, a large number of mini-projectors are arrayed and the images are tiled together without seams in between. For displaying 3D images, the lenticular screen with predesigned tilted angle is used for distributing different viewing zones. In order to achieve good performance, we design a brand-new projector with special lens set to meet the low-distortion requirement because the distortion of the image will induce serious crosstalk between view-zones. The proposed system has two advantages. One is the extensibility of the screen size. The size of the display can be chosen based on the applications we deal with, including the size of the projected pixel and the number of viewing zones. The other advantage is that the integrated-screen system provides projected pixels in great density to solve the major problem of the poor resolution that a lenticular-type 3D display has.

  3. Inertia-less convectively-driven dynamo models in the limit of low Rossby number

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Compositional convection is thought to be an important energy source for magnetic field generation within planetary interiors. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, characterizing compositional convection is significantly larger than unity, suggesting that the inertial force may not be important on the small scales of convection. We develop asymptotic dynamo models for the case of small Rossby number and large Prandtl number in which inertia is absent on the convective scale. The relevant diffusivity parameter for this limit is the compositional Roberts number, $q = D/\\eta$, which is the ratio of compositional and magnetic diffusivities. Dynamo models are developed for both order one $q$ and the more geophysically relevant low $q$ limit. For both cases the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy densities, $M$, is asymptotically large and reflects the fact that Alfv\\'en waves have been filtered from the dynamics. Taken together with previous investigations of asymptotic dynamo models for $Pr=O(1)$, our results show that the ...

  4. Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

  5. Leading-edge boundary layer flow : Prandtl's vision, current developments and future perspectives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Theofilis, Vassilis (U. Politecnica de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid, Spain); Fedorov, Alexander V. (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Moscow Region, Russia)

    2004-09-01

    The first viscous compressible three-dimensional BiGlobal linear instability analysis of leading-edge boundary layer flow has been performed. Results have been obtained by independent application of asymptotic analysis and numerical solution of the appropriate partial-differential eigenvalue problem. It has been shown that the classification of three-dimensional linear instabilities of the related incompressible flow [13] into symmetric and antisymmetric mode expansions in the chordwise coordinate persists for compressible, subsonic flow-regime at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers.

  6. Toward accurate high-throughput SNP genotyping in the presence of inherited copy number variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldred Micheala A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent discovery of widespread copy number variation in humans has forced a shift away from the assumption of two copies per locus per cell throughout the autosomal genome. In particular, a SNP site can no longer always be accurately assigned one of three genotypes in an individual. In the presence of copy number variability, the individual may theoretically harbor any number of copies of each of the two SNP alleles. Results To address this issue, we have developed a method to infer a "generalized genotype" from raw SNP microarray data. Here we apply our approach to data from 48 individuals and uncover thousands of aberrant SNPs, most in regions that were previously unreported as copy number variants. We show that our allele-specific copy numbers follow Mendelian inheritance patterns that would be obscured in the absence of SNP allele information. The interplay between duplication and point mutation in our data shed light on the relative frequencies of these events in human history, showing that at least some of the duplication events were recurrent. Conclusion This new multi-allelic view of SNPs has a complicated role in disease association studies, and further work will be necessary in order to accurately assess its importance. Software to perform generalized genotyping from SNP array data is freely available online 1.

  7. Experimental Study of High Moisture Content Gas Flow Across a Cylinder at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. M. Christopher; GUO Liang(郭亮)

    2003-01-01

    The Nusselt number for cross flow of a mixture of air and vapor over a cylinder was measured at moderate Reynolds numbers (3000-7000) for temperatures from 300℃ to 700℃ and for vapor mass fractions of 0.18-0.35. Results are also presented for a set of three cylinders aligned perpendicular to the flow for the same range of conditions. The effect of the vapor concentration and temperature on the convection coefficients was investigated to develop a modified Zhukauskas correlation. The results show that the Nusselt number increases as the moisture content increases and that the increase is more than could be accounted for by typical models for the property variations of mixtures. The exponent of the vapor concentration term in the modified correlation is 0.145 for the entire data set indicating the importance of the property variation due to the moisture content.

  8. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  9. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  10. On the effect of rotation on magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high magnetic Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Benjamin F N; Cambon, Claude; 10.1080/03091929.2010.544655

    2011-01-01

    This article is focused on the dynamics of a rotating electrically conducting fluid in a turbulent state. As inside the Earth's core or in various industrial processes, a flow is altered by the presence of both background rotation and a large scale magnetic field. In this context, we present a set of 3D direct numerical simulations of incompressible decaying turbulence. We focus on parameters similar to the ones encountered in geophysical and astrophysical flows, so that the Rossby number is small, the interaction parameter is large, but the Elsasser number, defining the ratio between Coriolis and Lorentz forces, is about unity. These simulations allow to quantify the effect of rotation and thus inertial waves on the growth of magnetic fluctuations due to Alfv\\'en waves. Rotation prevents the occurrence of equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energies, with a reduction of magnetic energy at decreasing Elsasser number {\\Lambda}. It also causes a decrease of energy transfer mediated by cubic correlations....

  11. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  12. High Resolution Ultrasound Imaging Using Adaptive Beamforming with Reduced Number of Active Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    is proposed. By reducing the number of active sensor elements, an increased resolution can be obtained with the MV beamformer. This observation is directly opposite the well-known relation between the spatial extent of the aperture and the achievable resolution. The investigations are based on Field II...

  13. Status and future prospects of using numerical methods to study complex flows at High Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The calculation of flow fields past aircraft configuration at flight Reynolds numbers is considered. Progress in devising accurate and efficient numerical methods, in understanding and modeling the physics of turbulence, and in developing reliable and powerful computer hardware is discussed. Emphasis is placed on efficient solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Enumeration of high numbers of bacteria using hydrophobic grid-membrane filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, A N; Michaud, G L

    1975-10-01

    Printing a wax grid on a conventional membrane filter yields a device functioning as a most probable number apparatus (MPN), used at a single dilution but with a very large number of growth compartments (e.g., 3,650). By restraining the lateral spread and confluence of colonies, the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter (HGMF) allows growth- or colony-forming units (GU) to be resolved at levels far above those which produce an uncountable lawn on a conventional membrane filter. It also eliminates the size variation of normal bacterial colonies. As a result, the HGMF can give more accurate estimates of the concentration of GU. The method by which grid-cell count observations can be used to obtain MPN estimates of the number of GUs is described, and estimates obtained using the MPN method on the HGMF are compared with those resulting from conventional colony count procedures on membrane filters. A linear relation was observed between MPNGU and the number of GUs, at levels up to 30,000 GUs, for pure cultures of bacteria and for samples of natural waters. The HGMF has great potential for reducing the labor required in quantitative microbiology, since it allows, with one filter, enumeration of microorganisms over a very large concentration range and therefore reduces the need to make dilutions.

  15. High and Low Reynolds number Measurements in a Room with an Impinging Isothermal Jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Hyldgaard, C. E.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The present paper, which is within the work of the lEA - annex 20, presents a series of full-scale velocity measurements in a room with isothermal mixing ventilation. The measurements are in the Reynolds number range 1000 - 7000 based on inlet dimensions. This means that a transition from laminar...

  16. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2015-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detecto

  17. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2015-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detecto

  18. FOCUSING BY A HIGH-POWER, LOW-FRESNEL-NUMBER LENS - THE FLY FACET LENS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STAVENGA, DG; VANHATEREN, JH

    1991-01-01

    Diffraction by fly facet lenses has been investigated by photographing the diffraction patterns at various distances from a facet lens whose power was estimated to be 2.03 x 10(4) D. We studied three different aperture diameters with Fresnel numbers of the order of unity. A large focal shift was pro

  19. Focusing by a high-power, low-Fresnel-number lens : the fly facet lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Hateren, J.H. van

    1991-01-01

    Diffraction by fly facet lenses has been investigated by photographing the diffraction patterns at various distances from a facet lens whose power was estimated to be 2.03 x 10(4) D. We studied three different aperture diameters with Fresnel numbers of the order of unity. A large focal shift was pro

  20. A portable high-quality random number generator for lattice field theory simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lüscher, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The theory underlying a proposed random number generator for numerical simulations in elementary particle physics and statistical mechanics is discussed. The generator is based on an algorithm introduced by Marsaglia and Zaman, with an important added feature leading to demonstrably good statistical properties. It can be implemented exactly on any computer complying with the IEEE--754 standard for single precision floating point arithmetic.

  1. A Portable High-Quality Random Number Generator for Lattice Field Theory Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Luescher, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The theory underlying a proposed random number generator for numerical simulations in elementary particle physics and statistical mechanics is discussed. The generator is based on an algorithm introduced by Marsaglia and Zaman, with an important added feature leading to demonstrably good statistical properties. It can be implemented exactly on any computer complying with the IEEE--754 standard for single precision floating point arithmetic.

  2. High School Timetabling: Modeling and solving a large number of cases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    2012-01-01

    A general model for the timetabling problem of high schools in Denmark is introduced, as seen from the perspective of the commercial system Lectio1, and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search (ALNS) algorithm is proposed for producing solutions. Lectio is a general-purpose cloud-based system...... for high school administration (available only for Danish high schools), which includes an embedded application for creating a weekly timetable. Currently, 230 high schools are customers of Lectio, and 191 have bought access to the timetabling software. This constitutes the majority of high schools...

  3. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  4. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production.

  5. Seeking the purported magic number N= 32 with high-precision mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, S; Blaum, K; Bohm, Ch; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Herfurth, F; Kowalska, M; Litvinov, Y; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Naimi, S; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Stanja, J; Stora, Th; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2011-01-01

    Accounting for the appearance of new magic numbers represents an exacting test for nuclear models. Binding energies o er a clear signature for the presence (or dis- appearance) of shell closures. To determine the strength of the purported N = 32 shell closure, we propose using the Penning-trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP for mass measure- ments of N = 34 isotones 58 Cr ( Z = 24), 55 Sc ( Z = 21) and 54 Ca ( Z = 20), as well as the N = 32 isotones 53 Sc and 52 Ca. We also propose measuring the mass of 60 Cr to test the shell model prediction of a new magic number at N = 34. In addition to the Penning-trap system at ISOLTRAP, we intend to use the newly commissioned multi-re ection time-of- ight mass separator, which enables direct mass measurements on nuclei with half-lives below 50 ms.

  6. Characteristics of a hyperboloid-flare configuration at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvegintsev, V. I.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Chibisov, S. V.; Fletcher, D.; Paris, S.

    2006-12-01

    Results on a hyperboloid-flare model tested in a new hypersonic wind tunnel with adiabatic compression AT-303 based at ITAM SB RAS at M∞ = 10 and 15 and in a wide range of Reynolds numbers are presented. Pressure and heat-flux distributions along the model are compared with data obtained previously in various European hypersonic wind tunnels (Longshot — Belgium, HEG — Germany) and with results of numerical computations. Pressure and heat-flux coefficients measured in the attached flow region are demonstrated to be in good qualitative agreement. Reasons for the differences in results measured in regions of flow separation and reattachment are discussed. Significant viscous effects on characteristics of the flow around the model are demonstrated; a particularly strong effect is exerted on the heat-flux distribution. This fact confirms that it is important to model real Reynolds numbers in wind-tunnel testing of aerospace plane models.

  7. Seeking the purported magic number N= 32 with high-precision mass spectrometry

    CERN Multimedia

    Schweikhard, L C; Herfurth, F; Boehm, C; Manea, V; Blaum, K; Beck, D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K D; Stanja, J; Audi, G; Rosenbusch, M; Wienholtz, F; Litvinov, Y

    Accounting for the appearance of new magic numbers represents an exacting test for nuclear models. Binding energies offer a clear signature for the presence (or disappearance) of shell closures. To determine the strength of the purported N = 32 shell closure, we propose using the Penning-trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP for mass measurements of N = 34 isotones $^{58}$Cr (Z = 24), $^{55}$Sc (Z = 21) and $^{54}$Ca (Z = 20), as well as the N = 32 isotones $^{53}$Sc and $^{52}$Ca. We also propose measuring the mass of $^{60}$Cr to test the shell model prediction of a new magic number at N = 34. In addition to the Penning-trap system at ISOLTRAP, we intend to use the newly commissioned multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator, which enables direct mass measurements on nuclei with half-lives below 50 ms.

  8. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  9. COMPACT FOURTH-ORDER FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEMES FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATION WITH HIGH WAVE NUMBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiping Fu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,two fourth-order accurate compact difference schemes are presented for solving the Helmholtz equation in two space dimensions when the corresponding wave numbers are large.The main idea is to derive and to study a fourth-order accurate compact difference scheme whose leading truncation term,namely,the O(h4) term,is independent of the wave number and the sohrtion of the Helmholtz equation.The convergence property of the compact schemes are analyzed and the implementation of solving the resulting linear algebraic system based on a FFT approach is considered.Numerical results are presented,which support our theoretical predictions.Mathematics subject classification:65M06,65N12.

  10. Performance of High-pressure-ratio Axial-flow Compressor Using Highly Cambered NACA 65-series Blower Blades at High Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Charles H; Guentert, Donald C; Dugan, James F

    1950-01-01

    A complete stage of an axial-flow compressor was designed and built to investigate the possibility of obtaining a high pressure ratio with an acceptable efficiency through the use of the optimum combination of high blade loading and high relative inlet Mach number. Over-all stage performance was investigated over a range of flows at equivalent tip speeds of 418 to 836 feet per second. At design speed (836 ft/sec), a peak total-pressure ration of 1.445 was obtained with an adiabatic efficiency of 0.89. For design angle of attack at the mean radius, a total-pressure ratio of 1.392 was obtained.

  11. A comment on the average foil-hit number for a high-intensity proton ring

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, I

    2002-01-01

    The minimum value of the average foil-hit number is derived for H sup - charge-exchange injection using a stripping foil, in which the H sup - beam is injected at a corner of the stripper foil and the cross-sectional area of the ring beam is increased as a function of time, kt sup 1 sup / sup n , where k and n are constants.

  12. A portable high-quality random number generator for lattice field theory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüscher, Martin

    1994-02-01

    The theory underlying a proposed random number generator for numerical simulations in elementary particle physics and statistical mechanics is discussed. The generator is based on an algorithm introduced by Marsaglia and Zaman, with an important added feature leading to demonstrably good statistical properties. It can be implemented exactly on any computer complying with the IEEE-754 standard for single-precision floating-point arithmetic.

  13. An upper bound on the number of high-dimensional permutations

    CERN Document Server

    Linial, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    What is the higher-dimensional analog of a permutation? If we think of a permutation as given by a permutation matrix, then the following definition suggests itself: A d-dimensional permutation of order n is an [n]^(d+1) array of zeros and ones in which every "line" contains a unique 1 entry. A line here is a set of entries of the form {(x_1,...,x_{i-1},y,x_{i+1},...,x_{d+1})}, for y between 1 and n, some index i between 1 and d+1 and some choice of x_j in [n] for all j except i. It is easy to observe that a one-dimensional permutation is simply a permutation matrix and that a two-dimensional permutation is synonymous with an order-n Latin square. We seek an estimate for the number of d-dimensional permutations. Our main result is the following upper bound on their number: ((1+o(1))(n/e^d))^(n^d). We tend to believe that this is actually the correct number, but the problem of proving the complementary lower bound remains open. Our main tool is an adaptation of Bregman's proof of the Minc conjecture on permane...

  14. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  15. Analysis of the thermomechanical inconsistency of some extended hydrodynamic models at high Knudsen number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadzie, S Kokou; Reese, Jason M

    2012-04-01

    There are some hydrodynamic equations that, while their parent kinetic equation satisfies fundamental mechanical properties, appear themselves to violate mechanical or thermodynamic properties. This paper aims to shed some light on the source of this problem. Starting with diffusive volume hydrodynamic models, the microscopic temporal and spatial scales are first separated at the kinetic level from the macroscopic scales at the hydrodynamic level. Then, we consider Klimontovich's spatial stochastic version of the Boltzmann kinetic equation and show that, for small local Knudsen numbers, the stochastic term vanishes and the kinetic equation becomes the Boltzmann equation. The collision integral dominates in the small local Knudsen number regime, which is associated with the exact traditional continuum limit. We find a subdomain of the continuum range, which the conventional Knudsen number classification does not account for appropriately. In this subdomain, it is possible to obtain a fully mechanically consistent volume (or mass) diffusion model that satisfies the second law of thermodynamics on the grounds of extended non-local-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  16. Plasma Sensor for High Bandwidth Mass-Flow Measurements at High Mach Numbers with RF Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal is aimed at the development of a miniature high bandwidth (1 MHz class) plasma sensor for flow measurements at high enthalpies. This device uses a...

  17. Number Sense-Based Strategies Used by High-Achieving Sixth Grade Students Who Experienced Reform Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsawaie, Othman N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by high-achieving 6th grade students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to solve basic arithmetic problems involving number sense. The sample for the study consisted of 15 high-achieving boys and 15 high-achieving girls in grade 6 from 2 schools in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE. Data for the…

  18. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  19. HOME ADVANTAGE IN HIGH-LEVEL VOLLEYBALL VARIES ACCORDING TO SET NUMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Marcelino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away. Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss, game location (home, away, set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chi-square(18=660.97, p<0.01. Analyses of log-odds of winning a set demonstrate that home teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets, probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition

  20. High Reynolds number test of a NACA 651-213, a equals 0.5 airfoil at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdges, K. P.; Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Pounds, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-Tunnel tests were conducted in the Lockheed-Georgia Company's compressible flow facility to determine the transonic two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA 65 sub 1-213 a = 0.50 airfoil. The results are correlated with data obtained in the NASA-Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel and the NAE high Reynolds number 15x60-inch two-dimensional test facility. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.60 to 0.80 and an angle of attack range from -1 deg to 8 deg. Reynolds numbers, based on the airfoil chord, were varied.

  1. Curling dynamics of naturally curved ribbons from high to low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran Arriagada, Octavio; Massiera, Gladys; Abkarian, Manouk

    2012-11-01

    Curling deformation of thin elastic sheets appears in numerous structures in nature, such as membranes of red blood cells, epithelial tissues or green algae colonies to cite just a few examples. However, despite its ubiquity, the dynamics of curling propagation in a naturally curved material remains still poorly investigated. Here, we present a coupled experimental and theoretical study of the dynamical curling deformation of naturally curved ribbons. Using thermoplastic and metallic ribbons molded on cylinders of different radii, we tune separately the natural curvature and the geometry to study curling dynamics in air, water and in viscous oils, thus spanning a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Our theoretical and experimental approaches separate the role of elasticity, gravity and hydrodynamic dissipation from inertia and emphasize the fundamental differences between the curling of a naturally curved ribbon and a rod described by the classical Elastica. Our work shows evidence for the propagation of a single instability front, selected by a local buckling condition. We show that depending on gravity, and both the Reynolds and the Cauchy numbers, the curling speed and shape are modified by the large scale drag and the local lubrication forces. This work was supported by the French Ministry of Research, the CNRS Physics-Chemistry-Biology Interdisciplinary Pro- gram, the University Montpellier 2 Interdisciplinary Program and the Region Languedoc-Roussillon.

  2. Laminar dispersion at low and high Peclet numbers in finite-length patterned microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrover, Alessandra; Cerbelli, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    Laminar dispersion of solutes in finite-length patterned microtubes is investigated at values of the Reynolds number below unity. Dispersion is strongly influenced by axial flow variations caused by patterns of periodic pillars and gaps in the flow direction. We focus on the Cassie-Baxter state, where the gaps are filled with air pockets, therefore enforcing free-slip boundary conditions at the flat liquid-air interface. The analysis of dispersion is approached by considering the temporal moments of solute concentration. Based on this approach, we investigate the dispersion properties in a wide range of values of the Peclet number, thus gaining insight into how the patterned structure of the microtube influences both the Taylor-Aris and the convection-dominated dispersion regimes. Numerical results for the velocity field and for the moment hierarchy are obtained by means of finite element method solution of the corresponding transport equations. We show that for different patterned geometries, in a range of Peclet values spanning up to six decades, the dispersion features in a patterned microtube are equivalent to those of a microtube characterized by a uniform slip velocity equal to the wall-average velocity of the patterned case. This suggests that two patterned micropipes with different geometry yet characterized by the same flow rate and average wall velocity will exhibit the same dispersion features as well as the same macroscopic pressure drop.

  3. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible.......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary....... The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas...

  4. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary la...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible........ The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary...

  5. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the surface detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ±0.04 ±0.48 (sys))×107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. The logarithmic gain d ln Nμ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 ×1018 eV and 5 ×1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ±0.024 ±0.030 (sys)) .

  6. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach Number, Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Derek; Haberberger, Dan; Fiksel, Gennady; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Barnak, Daniel; Hu, Suxing; Germaschewski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Shocks act to convert incoming supersonic flows to heat, and in collisionless plasmas the shock layer forms on kinetic plasma scales through collective electromagnetic effects. These collisionless shocks have been observed in many space and astrophysical systems [Smith 1975, Smith 1980, Burlaga 2008, Sulaiman 2015], and are believed to accelerate particles, including cosmic rays, to extremely high energies [Kazanas 1986, Loeb 2000, Bamba 2003, Masters 2013, Ackermann 2013]. Of particular importance are the class of high-Mach number, supercritical shocks [Balogh 2013] ($M_A\\gtrsim4$), which must reflect significant numbers of particles back into the upstream to accommodate entropy production, and in doing so seed proposed particle acceleration mechanisms [Blandford 1978, McClements 2001, Caprioli 2014, Matsumoto 2015]. Here we present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient ...

  7. Home advantage in high-level volleyball varies according to set number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao Andrés, José Manuel; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away). Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss), game location (home, away), set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth) and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block) were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chisquare(18)=660.97, pteams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set) and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets), probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition. Key pointsHome teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams.Home teams have higher performance in reception, set and attack in the total of the sets.The advantage of home teams is more pronounced at the beginning of the game (first set) and in two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets) suggesting intra-game variation in home advantage.Analysis by sets showed that home teams have a better performance in the attack and

  8. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  9. Control of mean and fluctuating forces on a circular cylinder at high Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanping Shao; Jianming Wang

    2007-01-01

    A narrow strip is used to control mean and fluctuating forces on a circular cylinder at Reynolds numbers from 2.0 x 104 to 1.0 x 105. The axes of the strip and cylinder are parallel. The control parameters are strip width ratio and strip position characterized by angle of attack and distance from the cylinder. Wind tunnel tests show that the vortex shedding from both sides of the cylinder can be suppressed, and mean drag and fluctuating lift on the cylinder can be reduced if the strip is installed in an effective zone downstream of the cylinder. A phenomenon of mono-side vortex shedding is found. The strip-induced local changes of velocity profiles in the near wake of the cylinder are measured, and the relation between base suction and peak value in the power spectrum of fluctuating lift is studied. The control mechanism is then discussed from different points of view.

  10. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  11. Numerical analysis of jet impingement heat transfer at high jet Reynolds number and large temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    was investigated at a jet Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 and a temperature difference between jet inlet and wall of 1600 K. The focus was on the convective heat transfer contribution as thermal radiation was not included in the investigation. A considerable influence of the turbulence intensity at the jet inlet......Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall was investigated numerically for a ratio of 2 between the jet inlet to wall distance and the jet inlet diameter. The influence of turbulence intensity at the jet inlet and choice of turbulence model on the wall heat transfer...... was observed in the stagnation region, where the wall heat flux increased by a factor of almost 3 when increasing the turbulence intensity from 1.5% to 10%. The choice of turbulence model also influenced the heat transfer predictions significantly, especially in the stagnation region, where differences of up...

  12. Connecting Neutrino Masses and Dark Matter by High-dimensional Lepton Number Violation Operator

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new model with the Majorana neutrino masses generated at two-loop level, in which the lepton number violation (LNV) processes, such as neutrinoless double beta decays, are mainly induced by the dimension-7 LNV effective operator O_7=\\bar l_R^c \\gamma^\\mu L_L(D_mu \\Phi) \\Phi \\Phi. Note that it is necessary to impose an Z_2 symmetry in order that O_7 dominates over the conventional dimension-5 Weinberg operator, which naturally results in a stable Z_2-odd neutral particle to be the cold dark matter candidate. More interestingly, due to the non-trivial dependence of the charged lepton masses, the model predicts the neutrino mass matrix to be in the form of the normal hierarchy. We also focus on a specific parameter region of great phenomenological interests, such as electroweak precision tests, dark matter direct searches along with its relic abundance, and lepton flavor violation processes.

  13. Relaminarization of wall turbulence by high-pressure ramps at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Kwonyul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transition from the turbulent towards the laminar flow regime was investigated experimentally by progressively increasing the pressure up to 400 MPa in a fully developed pipe flow operated with silicone oil as the working fluid. Using hot-wire anemometry, it is shown indirectly that at low Reynolds numbers a rapid increase in pressure modifies the turbulence dynamics owing to the processes which induce the effects caused by fluid compressibility in the region very close to the wall. The experimental results confirm that under such circumstances, the traditional mechanism responsible for self-maintenance of turbulence in wall-bounded flows is altered in such a way as to lead towards a state in which turbulence cannot persist any longer.

  14. Driving large magnetic Reynolds number flow in highly ionized, unmagnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Peterson, E.; Milhone, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Cooper, C.; Désangles, V.; Khalzov, I.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    Electrically driven, unmagnetized plasma flows have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment with magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the predicted Rmcrit = 200 threshold for flow-driven MHD instability excitation. The plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive lanthanum hexaboride cathodes which generate a J ×B torque in helium and argon plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies are presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that the edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force, and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to the Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce larger velocity shear and has the correct flow profile for studying the magnetorotational instability.

  15. Total Chromatic Number of Graphs of High Degree%高度图的全色数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢德政; 邱远

    2001-01-01

    证明了:如果图G的最大度顶点数r(G)满足r(G)≤|V(G)|-Δ(G)-1,且δ(G)+2Δ(G)≥(5)/(2)|V(G)|+(3. 则G的全色数xT(G)=Δ(G)+1.%It is proved that if the number r(G) of vertices with maximum degree Δ(G) in a graph G satisfies r(G)≤|V(G)|-Δ(G)- 1 and δ(G)+2Δ(G)≥(5)/(2)|V(G)|+(3)/(2), t hen xT(G)=δ(g)+1.

  16. Transition of effective hydraulic properties from low to high Reynolds number flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesapillai, R.; Steeb, H.; Hartmaier, A.

    2014-07-01

    We numerically analyze fluid flow through porous media up to a limiting Reynolds number of O(103). Due to inertial effects, such processes exhibit a gradual transition from laminar to turbulent flow for increasing magnitudes of Re. On the macroscopic scale, inertial transition implies nonlinearities in the relationship between the effective macroscopic pressure gradient and the filter velocity, typically accounted for in terms of the quadratic Forchheimer equation. However, various inertia-based extensions to the linear Darcy equation have been discussed in the literature; most prominently cubic polynomials in velocity. The numerical results presented in this contribution indicate that inertial transition, as observed in the apparent permeability, hydraulic tortuosity, and interfacial drag, is inherently of sigmoidal shape. Based on this observation, we derive a novel filtration law which is consistent with Darcy's law at small Re, reproduces Forchheimer's law at large Re, and exhibits higher-order leading terms in the weak inertia regime.

  17. Optimization design study of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils for the high-efficiency propeller of low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil makes a great impact on designing a high-efficiency propeller for low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere. At high altitude,low-Reynolds-number airfoils are supposed to have high lift-drag ratio or high endurance factor at cruising attack angle along with good stall characteristics. To design such a high-performance low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil,the paper established a hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform by combing direct search optimization algorithm EXTREM and airfoil flow field solver XFOIL to automatically and quickly calculate aerodynamic performance function of airfoil by computer. It provides an effective solution to multi-point design problem of low-speed low-Reynolds-number airfoil. It can be seen from the results of three typical optimization examples,the new airfoil E387_OPT2,FX63-137_OPT2 and S1223_OPT2 based on hot low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils (Eppler 387 airfoil,Wortmann FX63-137 airfoil and S1223 airfoil) can meet the optimization design requirements and have very good aerodynamic characteristics in both design state and non-design state. Thus,the applicability and effectiveness of hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform are verified.

  18. High Frontier - The Journal for Space and Missile Professionals. Volume 4, Number 1, November 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    States Air Force Weapons School Maj Christopher S. Putman ...weapons and tac- tics at the US Air Force Weapons School (USAFWS). Maj Chris Putman takes the reader inside this school and describes in detail the...High Frontier Your United States Air Force Weapons School Maj Christopher S. Putman Operations Officer, 328th Weapons Squadron Nellis AFB

  19. The Changing Instructional Role of the High School Librarian. Occasional Papers Number 173.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    This paper examines the changing instructional role of the high school librarian from 1951 to 1984 to determine: (1) if the purported changes in the instructional role have been fictional or factual; (2) if the changes were those of substance or of form; (3) if the changes represented a process of growth and development in direct relationship to…

  20. Is High School Economically Relevant for Noncollege Youth? Number 95-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, William J.

    A rational apathy (RAP) model has been proposed that divides high school students into groups that face different sets of short-term rewards for school involvement. Students bound for competitive and less competitive colleges make up the first two groups, but those who do not intend to pursue higher education are the third group. The RAP model…

  1. Quantum state engineering, purification, and number-resolved photon detection with high-finesse optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Muschik, Christine A.; Giedke, Geza

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a multifunctional setup consisting of high-finesse optical cavities, beam splitters, and phase shifters. The basic scheme projects arbitrary photonic two-mode input states onto the subspace spanned by the product of Fock states |n>|n> with n=0,1,2,.... This protocol does no...

  2. Achievement Motivation Training for Potential High School Dropouts. Achievement Motivation Development Project Working Paper Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    This pilot project sought to determine if instruction in achievement motivation would help potential dropouts to complete their schooling. Subjects were tenth grade students in a suburban Boston high school. A one-week residential course during winter and spring vacations was taken by one group of six boys and a second group of four. Equated…

  3. High Frontier: The Journal for Space and Missile Professionals. Volume 7, Number 4, August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    galvanized President Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Congress to give the US the ability to operate in and from space. On the civilian side, these...August 1958, after concluding the first ever submerged voyage under the North Pole ). U S N av y High Frontier 24 Initial Criteria and Screening...causing the project to revert to the heavier stainless steel gear system with wet lubricant used by prior projects. To keep the lubricant from

  4. Subsurface Signature of the Internal Wave Field Radiation by Submerged High Reynolds Number Stratified Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-26

    primary beam and the potential for parametric subharmonic instability. In all these efforts, a uniform linear stratification was considered. A subset of...243) is found for all simulated waves. c) For sufficiently high-amplitude beams, a parametric subharmonic instability is observed after a long... subharmonic instability (PSI) manifests itself in the form of more horizontal like isophase lines at //7>50. (b) jcz-contour plot of horizontal velocity

  5. Investigation into High Barmah Forest Virus Disease Case Numbers Reported in the Northern Territory, Australia in 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurucz, Nina; Markey, Peter; Draper, Anthony; Melville, Lorna; Weir, Richard; Davis, Steven; Warchot, Allan; Boyd, Rowena; Stokeld, Danielle

    2016-02-01

    Between October 2012 and October 2013, unprecedented high numbers of Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease cases were reported in the Northern Territory (NT). An investigation was launched by the NT Department of Health in cooperation with the Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries and the Department of Land Resource Management to investigate possible causes for this phenomenon. The investigation included virus isolations from mosquitoes collected in Darwin urban areas, BFV antibody testing in peri-urban small mammals and a human BFV disease case series investigation of recent cases. No BFV was isolated from the 4641 mosquitoes tested, none of the mammals tested positive for BFV antibodies, and the high BFV disease case numbers did not correlate with the relatively low mosquito vector numbers trapped in 2012-2013. It was estimated that up to 89% of the 79 human cases investigated did not have an acute arboviral illness and therefore had tested falsely positive. An Alere PanBio BFV immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test kit is generally used to test for BFV, with the BFV disease case definition based on immunoglobulin M positives only. Other jurisdictions in Australia also reported high numbers of BFV disease cases, with the majority of the cases suspected to be false positives. Therefore, current testing methods need to be revised to reflect the true numbers of BFV disease cases occurring in Australia and to provide correct diagnoses for patients.

  6. Magnetic reconnection and stochastic plasmoid chains in high-Lundquist-number plasmas

    KAUST Repository

    Loureiro, N. F.

    2012-04-13

    A numerical study of magnetic reconnection in the large-Lundquist-number (S), plasmoid-dominated regime is carried out for S up to 10 7. The theoretical model of Uzdensky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 235002 (2010)] is confirmed and partially amended. The normalized reconnection rate is Ẽ eff ∼ 0.02 independently of S for S ≫ 10 4. The plasmoid flux (ψ) and half-width (w x) distribution functions scale as f (ψ) ∼ - ψ -2 and f (w x) ∼ w x -2. The joint distribution of ψ and w x shows that plasmoids populate a triangular region w x ≲ψ/B 0, where B 0 is the reconnecting field. It is argued that this feature is due to plasmoid coalescence. Macroscopic "monster" plasmoids with w x ∼ 10 % of the system size are shown to emerge in just a few Alfvén times, independently of S, suggesting that large disruptive events are an inevitable feature of large-S reconnection. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined impinging air jet at high jet Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Y.; Baydar, E. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of an unconfined air jet that is impinged normally onto a heated flat plate have been experimentally investigated for high Reynolds numbers ranging from 30,000 to 70,000 and a nozzle-to-plate spacing range of 1-10. The mean and turbulence velocities by using hot-wire anemometry and impingement surface pressures with pressure transducer are measured. Surface temperature measurements are made by means of an infrared thermal imaging technique. The effects of Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing on the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics are described and compared with similar experiments. It was seen that the locations of the second peaks in Nusselt number distributions slightly vary with Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing. The peaks in distributions of Nusselt numbers and radial turbulence intensity are compatible for spacings up to 3. The stagnation Nusselt number was correlated for the jet Reynolds number and the nozzle-to-plate spacing as Nu{sub st}{proportional_to}Re {sup 0.69}(H/D){sup 0.019}. (orig.)

  8. Generation and Evolution of High-Mach-Number Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Fox, W.; Haberberger, D.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Barnak, D. H.; Hu, S. X.; Germaschewski, K.

    2017-07-01

    We present the first laboratory generation of high-Mach-number magnetized collisionless shocks created through the interaction of an expanding laser-driven plasma with a magnetized ambient plasma. Time-resolved, two-dimensional imaging of plasma density and magnetic fields shows the formation and evolution of a supercritical shock propagating at magnetosonic Mach number Mms≈12 . Particle-in-cell simulations constrained by experimental data further detail the shock formation and separate dynamics of the multi-ion-species ambient plasma. The results show that the shocks form on time scales as fast as one gyroperiod, aided by the efficient coupling of energy, and the generation of a magnetic barrier between the piston and ambient ions. The development of this experimental platform complements present remote sensing and spacecraft observations, and opens the way for controlled laboratory investigations of high-Mach number collisionless shocks, including the mechanisms and efficiency of particle acceleration.

  9. High Frontier: The Journal for Space and Missile Professionals. Volume 7, Number 1, November 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    that keep senior leaders across the government awake at night—taking a cue from William Shakespeare to “let slip the dogs of war” on today’s...technologyhorizons. asp. 7 Michael Macrone, “The dogs of war,” Brush Up Your Shakespeare , Cader Company, 1990, eNotes.com. 2007, 17 August 2010, http://www...enotes.com/ shakespeare -quotes/dogs-war. 8 Lt Gen Larry D. James, “Schriever V Wargame: The Boundaries of Space and Cyberspace,” High Frontier 5, no. 4

  10. Long-range μPIV in the turbulent region of a jet, at high Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Elsinga, G.E.; Westerweel, J.

    The present work involves the investigation of the fine scale motions in the turbulent region of a high Reynolds number air jet. In the fully developed region of the jets, the small scales of turbulence are assumed to be isotropic, and expected to contain elongated vortices (worms), whose diameter s

  11. Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics of pipe flows measured with 3D-PTV at moderate and high Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, J.L.G.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) measurements have provided accurate Eulerian and Lagrangian high-order statistics of velocity and acceleration fluctuations and correlations at Reynolds number 10,300, based on the bulk velocity and the pipe diameter. Spatial resolution requir

  12. Summary of the Blind Test Campaign to predict the High Reynolds number performance of DU00-W-210 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Özlem Ceyhan; Pires, Oscar; Munduate, Xabier;

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a blind test campaign organized in the AVATAR project to predict the high Reynolds number performance of a wind turbine airfoil for wind turbine applications. The DU00-W-210 airfoil was tested in the DNW-HDG pressurized wind tunnel in order to investigate the ...

  13. Organotin-catalyzed highly regioselective thiocarbonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates and synthesis of deoxy carbohydrates in a minimum number of steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Tanigawa, Satoko; Takemoto, Yuki; Yoshimatsu, Hirofumi; Onomura, Osamu

    2012-04-16

    Nonprotected carbohydrates: The catalytic regioselective thiocarbonylation of carbohydrates by using organotin dichloride under mild conditions was demonstrated. The reaction afforded various deoxy saccharides in high yields and excellent regioselectivity in a minimum number of steps. The regioselectivity of the thiocarbonylation is attributed to the intrinsic character of the carbohydrates based on the stereorelationship of their hydroxy groups (see scheme).

  14. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  15. Methods of Minimization of Calculations in High Energy Physics: 2. Minimization of number of vectors in problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarev, Alexander L.

    1997-01-01

    The various ways to reduce number of vectors describing condition of particles for high energy physics problems are presented. In particular decomposition of any vector with respect to the basis, consisting of any four linearly independent vectors, including the orthonormal basis; construction of orthonormal bases from vectors of a problem; expression of one vector of problem through other is considered.

  16. Inhibitory control and visuo-spatial reversibility in Piaget's seminal number conservation task: a high-density ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Grégoire; Simon, Grégory; Vidal, Julie; Houdé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present high-density event-related potential (ERP) study on 13 adults aimed to determine whether number conservation relies on the ability to inhibit the overlearned length-equals-number strategy and then imagine the shortening of the row that was lengthened. Participants performed the number-conservation task and, after the EEG session, the mental imagery task. In the number-conservation task, first two rows with the same number of tokens and the same length were presented on a computer screen (COV condition) and then, the tokens in one of the two rows were spread apart (INT condition). Participants were instructed to determine whether the two rows had an identical number of tokens. In the mental imagery task, two rows with different lengths but the same number of tokens were presented and participants were instructed to imagine the tokens in the longer row aligning with the tokens in the shorter row. In the number-conservation task, we found that the amplitudes of the centro-parietal N2 and fronto-central P3 were higher in the INT than in the COV conditions. In addition, the differences in response times between the two conditions were correlated with the differences in the amplitudes of the fronto-central P3. In light of previous results reported on the number-conservation task in adults, the present results suggest that inhibition might be necessary to succeed the number-conservation task in adults even when the transformation of the length of one of the row is displayed. Finally, we also reported correlations between the speed at which participants could imagine the shortening of one of the row in the mental imagery task, the speed at which participants could determine that the two rows had the same number of tokens after the tokens in one of the row were spread apart and the latency of the late positive parietal component in the number-conservation task. Therefore, performing the number-conservation task might involve mental transformation processes in

  17. Addendum to the paper "Two-Dimensional Infinite Prandtl Number Convection: Structure of Bifurcated Solutions, J. Nonlinear Sci., 17(3), 199-220, 2007"

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this addendum to the mentioned article by Park is to provide some remarks on bifurcation theories for nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE) and their applications to fluid dynamics problems. We only wish to comment and list some related literatures, without any intention to provide a complete survey.

  18. Effect of Coriolis and centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer at high rotation number and high density ratio in non orthogonally internal cooling channel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahim Berrabah Miloud Aminallah

    .... The density ratios were 0.13, 0.23 and 0.50. The results show that at high buoyancy parameter and high rotation number with a low density ratio, the flow in the first passage is governed by the secondary flow induced by the rotation whereas...

  19. Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number: new results from a hybrid spectral compact finite difference and dual grid resolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Yeung, P. K.; Gotoh, T.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number (Sc) (low molecular diffusivity) is characterized by fluctuations that arise at sub-Kolmogorov scales and are hence difficult to resolve or measure. Simulations in the recent past have provided some basic results but were still limited in either the Reynolds number or the Schmidt number. We have developed a massively parallel implementation of a hybrid pseudo-spectral and combined compact finite difference technique where the velocity and scalar fields are computed at different grid resolutions (the latter up to 81923). A specific target is the scalar field maintained by a uniform mean gradient at Taylor-scale Reynolds number 140 and Sc = 512 , which is comparable to the value (700) for salinity in the ocean. Preliminary results at moderately high Sc are in support of Batchelor (k-1) scaling for the spectrum in the viscous-convective range, followed by exponential fall-off in the viscous-diffusive range. Data over a wide range of Reynolds and Schmidt numbers are used to examine the approach to local isotropy and a saturation of intermittency suggested by previous work. Supported by NSF Grant ACI-1036170 and a subaward via UIUC.

  20. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Increases the Copy Number of Mitochondrial DNA in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Al-Kafaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has been linked to the pathogenicity of diabetic nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that mtDNA copy number may be increased in human mesangial cells in response to high glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS to compensate for damaged mtDNA. The effect of manganese superoxide dismutase mimetic (MnTBAP on glucose-induced mtDNA copy number was also examined. The copy number of mtDNA was determined by real-time PCR in human mesangial cells cultured in 5 mM glucose, 25 mM glucose, and mannitol (osmotic control, as well as in cells cultured in 25 mM glucose in the presence and absence of 200 μM MnTBAP. Intracellular ROS was assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in human mesangial cells. The copy number of mtDNA was significantly increased when human mesangial cells were incubated with 25 mM glucose compared to 5 mM glucose and mannitol. In addition, 25 mM glucose rapidly generated ROS in the cells, which was not detected in 5 mM glucose. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number was significantly decreased and maintained to normal following treatment of cells with 25 mM glucose and MnTBAP compared to 25 mM glucose alone. Inclusion of MnTBAP during 25 mM glucose incubation inhibited mitochondrial superoxide in human mesangial cells. Increased mtDNA copy number in human mesangial cells by high glucose could contribute to increased mitochondrial superoxide, and prevention of mtDNA copy number could have potential in retarding the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Convective heat transfer studies at high temperatures with pressure gradient for inlet flow Mach number of 0.45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, A. C. F.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Hinckel, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements were determined for a flat plate with and without pressure gradient for various free stream temperatures, wall temperature ratios, and Reynolds numbers for an inlet flow Mach number of 0.45, which is a representative inlet Mach number for gas turbine rotor blades. A shock tube generated the high temperature and pressure air flow, and a variable geometry test section was used to produce inlet flow Mach number of 0.45 and accelerate the flow over the plate to sonic velocity. Thin-film platinum heat gages recorded the local heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The free stream temperatures varied from 611 R (339 K) to 3840 R (2133 K) for a T(w)/T(r,g) temperature ratio of 0.87 to 0.14. The Reynolds number over the heat gages varied from 3000 to 690,000. The experimental heat transfer data were correlated with laminar and turbulent boundary layer theories for the range of temperatures and Reynolds numbers and the transition phenomenon was examined.

  2. Chromosomal evolution of the Canidae. I. Species with high diploid numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R K; Nash, W G; O'Brien, S J

    1987-01-01

    The Giemsa banding patterns of seven canid species, including the grey wolf (Canis lupus), the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), the bush dog (Speothos venaticus), the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), the grey fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis), and the fennec (Fennecus zerda), are presented and compared. Relative to other members of Canidae, these species have high diploid complements (2n greater than 64) consisting of largely acrocentric chromosomes. They show a considerable degree of chromosome homoeology, but relative to the grey wolf, each species is either missing chromosomes or has unique chromosomal additions and rearrangements. Differences in chromosome morphology among the seven species were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic history. The results suggest that the South American canids are closely related to each other and are derived from a wolf-like progenitor. The fennec and the bat-eared fox seem to be recent derivatives of a lineage that branched early from the wolf-like canids and which also includes the grey fox.

  3. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical report {number_sign}4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1995-08-03

    In order to study combustion performance under conditions similar to that in the AFBC system, the authors conducted a series of experiments at a heating rate of 100 C/min using the TGA/FTIR/MS system. Results indicate that more hydrocarbons are evolved at the faster heating rate, owing to incomplete combustion of the fuel. Chlorinated organic compounds can be formed at high heating rates. Certain oxidation products such as organic acids and alcohols are obtained at the slow heating rate. To simulate the conditions used in the atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) at Western Kentucky University, studies were also conducted using a quartz tube in a tube furnace. The temperature conditions were kept identical to those of the combustor. The products evolved from the combustion of coal, PVC, and mixtures of the two were trapped in suitable solvents at different temperatures, and analyzed using the Shimadzu GC/MS system. The detection limits and the GC/MS analytical parameters were also established. The experiments were conducted keeping in mind the broader perspective; that of studying conditions conducive to the formation of chlorinated organic compounds from the combustion of coal/MSW blends. 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Simulation of three-dimensional nonideal MHD flow at high magnetic Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A conservative TVD scheme is adopted to solve the equations governing the three-dimensional flow of a nonideal compressible conducting fluid in a magnetic field.The eight-wave equations for magnetohydrodynamics(MHD) are proved to be a non-strict hyperbolic system,therefore it is difficult to develop its eigenstructure.Powell developed a new set of equations which cannot be numerically simulated by conservative TVD scheme directly due to its non-conservative form.A conservative TVD scheme augmented with a new set of eigenvectors is proposed in the paper.To validate this scheme,1-D MHD shock tube,unsteady MHD Rayleigh problem and steady MHD Hartmann problem for different flow conditions are simulated.The simulated results are in good agreement with the existing analytical results.So this scheme can be used to effectively simulate high-conductivity fluids such as cosmic MHD problem and hypersonic MHD flow over a blunt body,etc.

  5. The effects of an algal biofilm on the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to increased drag. As with other types of roughness on aquatic surfaces, biofilms increase skin friction and thus induce severe drag penalties. In fact, slime layers appear to induce greater drag than would be predicted by the roughness height alone. Our work indicates that this is likely due to two characteristics of algal biofilms: i) flexible streamers that protrude into the flow, and ii) the compliant nature of a biofilm layer. High resolution PIV was used to measure the turbulent boundary layer flow over diatomaceous biofilm grown under dynamic conditions. Local mean streamwise velocity profiles were used to estimate the local wall shear stresses and to determine the similarity between the inner and outer layers of the boundary layer and those of a smooth wall. Spatially explicit turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Reynolds shear stress (RSS), swirling strength and quadrant analyses over the biofilm were compared to those over a smooth wall and a rigid mesh roughness. We found that the combination of canopy flow due to streamers coupled with compliant wall-flow interactions result in large wall shear stresses and higher turbulence. Funding provided by the ONR NURP program and the NSF GRIP program.

  6. High resolution spectroscopy of a small number of particles in a solid

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, T A

    2000-01-01

    The technique of single molecule spectroscopy in solids is investigated, with the view to extending this technique to the detection of single ions of titanium in sapphire. High-resolution experimental apparatus was set-up to study single particles in solids and to allow hole-burning experiments to be carried out. Hole-burning processes were investigated in samples of uranium doped strontium tungstate with concentrations of 500 ppm and 200 ppm. Hole-burning at different laser intensities revealed a homogeneous linewidth of (6.3 +- 0.1) MHz for the stronger doped sample. The weaker doped sample was determined to have a homogeneous linewidth less than the laser linewidth. The relaxation behaviour of holes, monitored between 10-20 K, was also examined. The relaxation process was found to be similar to an activated process with an attempt frequency of 309 s sup - sup 1 and it was concluded that the process was some form of tunnelling with strong phonon coupling. Repeatable, stable single molecules of terrylene in ...

  7. Effects of Pressure and Number of Turns on Microstructural Homogeneity Developed in High-Pressure Double Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahedi, Mohammad; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Paydar, Mohammad Hossein; Zheng, Shijian; Xiong, Ting; Knezevic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    With electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, we study the rate of grain refinement and the uniformity in the evolution of microstructure in commercial purity Cu samples during high-pressure double torsion (HPDT). We aim to identify the processing conditions that would produce a microstructure that is both refined and uniform across the sample in grain size, texture, and intra-granular misorientation with minimal energy input. Two processing variables, pressure and number of turns, are probed. To provide a reference for HPDT, the investigation is also carried out using the standard high-pressure torsion (HPT) technique. For both processes, grain sizes decrease with the number of turns and applied pressure. Under pressure of 600 MPa and 4 torsional turns, HPDT provided a more homogeneous grain structure than HPT. Likewise, we also demonstrate that for the same processing condition, HPDT again produces the more homogeneous grain structure. It is found that a more homogeneous grain structure is achieved after doubling number of turns than doubling the pressure amount to 1.2 GPa. However, the rate of grain refinement substantially increases with doubling the pressure. Considering these results, the HPDT process, compared to HPT, takes better advantage of the role that high pressure plays in shear strain-induced grain refinement and homogenizing the microstructure. Last, analysis of the applied work finds that the least amount of work required for achieving fine and homogeneous microstructure occurs when the applied pressure is maximized and number of turns is minimized.

  8. Study on lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation and its application at high Reynolds number flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation is developed in the article to simulate fluid flow at high Reynolds numbers. A subgrid model is used as a large eddy simulation model in the numerical simulation for high Reynolds flow. The idea of subgrid model is based on an assumption to include the physical effects that the unresolved motion has on the resolved fluid motion. It takes a simple form of eddy viscosity models for the Reynolds stress. Lift and drag evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation takes momentum-exchange method for curved body surface. First of all, the present numerical method is validated at low Reynolds numbers. Second, the developed lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation method is performed to solve flow problems at high Reynolds numbers. Some detailed quantitative comparisons are implemented to show the effectiveness of the present method. It is demonstrated that lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation model can efficiently simulate high Reynolds numbers’ flows.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with altered chloroplast numbers and chloroplast movement exhibit impaired adjustments to both low and high light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königer, Martina; Delamaide, Joy A; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Harris, Gary C

    2008-01-01

    The effects of chloroplast number and size on the capacity for blue light-dependent chloroplast movement, the ability to increase light absorption under low light, and the susceptibility to photoinhibition were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Leaves of wild-type and chloroplast number mutants with mean chloroplast numbers ranging from 120 to two per mesophyll cell were analysed. Chloroplast movement was monitored as changes in light transmission through the leaves. Light transmission was used as an indicator of the ability of leaves to optimize light absorption. The ability of leaves to deal with 3 h of high light stress at 10 degrees C and their capacity to recover in low light was determined by measuring photochemical efficiencies of PSII using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Chloroplast movement was comparable in leaves ranging in chloroplast numbers from 120 to 30 per mesophyll cell: the final light transmission levels after exposure to 0.1 (accumulation response) and 100 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) (avoidance response) were indistinguishable, the chloroplasts responded quickly to small increases in light intensity and the kinetics of movement were similar. However, when chloroplast numbers per mesophyll cell decreased to 18 or below, the accumulation response was significantly reduced. The avoidance response was only impaired in mutants with nine or fewer chloroplasts, both in terms of final transmission levels and the speed of movement. Only mutants lacking both blue light receptors (phot1/phot2) or those with drastically reduced chloroplast numbers and severely impacted avoidance responses showed a reduced ability to recover from high light stress.

  10. High fat feeding affects the number of GPR120 cells and enteroendocrine cells in the mouse stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eWidmayer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term intake of dietary fat is supposed to be associated with adaptive reactions of the organism and it is assumptive that this is particularly true for fat responsive epithelial cells in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies suggest that epithelial cells expressing the receptor for medium and long chain fatty acids, GPR120 (FFAR4, may operate as fat sensors. Changes in expression level and/or cell density are supposed to be accompanied with a consumption of high fat (HF diet. To assess whether feeding a HF diet might impact on the expression of fatty acid receptors or the number of lipid sensing cells as well as enteroendocrine cell populations, gastric tissue samples of non-obese and obese mice were compared using a real time PCR and immunohistochemical approach. In this study, we have identified GPR120 cells in the corpus region of the mouse stomach which appeared to be brush cells. Monitoring the effect of HF diet on the expression of GPR120 revealed that after 3 weeks and 6 months the level of mRNA for GPR120 in the tissue was significantly increased which coincided with and probably reflected a significant increase in the number of GPR120 positive cells in the corpus region; in contrast, within the antrum region, the number of GPR120 cells decreased. Furthermore, dietary fat intake also led to changes in the number of enteroendocrine cells producing either ghrelin or gastrin. After 3 weeks and even more pronounced after 6 months the number of ghrelin cells and gastrin cells was significantly increased. These results imply that a HF diet leads to significant changes in the cellular repertoire of the stomach mucosa. Whether these changes are a consequence of the direct exposure to high fat in the luminal content or a physiological response to the high level of fat in the body remains elusive.

  11. Pulse number controlled laser annealing for GeSn on insulator structure with high substitutional Sn concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moto, Kenta; Matsumura, Ryo; Sadoh, Taizoh; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline GeSn-on-insulator structures with high Sn concentration (>8%), which exceeds thermal equilibrium solid-solubility (˜2%) of Sn in Ge, are essential to achieve high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices. We investigate non-thermal equilibrium growth of Ge1-xSnx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) on quartz substrates by using pulsed laser annealing (PLA). The window of laser fluence enabling complete crystallization without film ablation is drastically expanded (˜5 times) by Sn doping above 5% into Ge. Substitutional Sn concentration in grown layers is found to be increased with decreasing irradiation pulse number. This phenomenon can be explained on the basis of significant thermal non-equilibrium growth achieved by higher cooling rate after PLA with a lower pulse number. As a result, GeSn crystals with substitutional Sn concentration of ˜12% are realized at pulse irradiation of single shot for the samples with the initial Sn concentration of 15%. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy measurements reveal the high quality of the grown layer. This technique will be useful to fabricate high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices on insulating substrates.

  12. Stabilized MLPG-VF-based method with CBS scheme for laminar flow at high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjilela, Vali; Salimi, Davood; Tavasoli, Ali; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin vorticity-stream function (MLPG-VF) method is extended to solve two-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer equations for high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. The characteristic-based split (CBS) scheme which uses unity test function is employed for discretization, and the moving least square (MLS) method is used for interpolation of the field variables. Four test cases are considered to evaluate the present algorithm, namely lid-driven cavity flow with Reynolds numbers up to and including 104, flow over a backward-facing step at Reynolds number of 800, natural convection in a square cavity for Rayleigh numbers up to and including 108, and natural convection in a concentric square outer cylinder and circular inner cylinder annulus for Rayleigh numbers up to and including 107. In each case, the result obtained using the proposed algorithm is either compared with the results from the literatures or with those obtained using conventional numerical techniques. The present algorithm shows stable results at lower or equal computational cost compared to the other upwinding schemes usually employed in the MLPG method. Close agreements between the compared results as well as higher accuracy of the proposed method show the ability of this stabilized algorithm.

  13. High Rayleigh number convection in rectangular enclosures with differentially heated vertical walls and aspect ratios between zero and unity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Siavash A.

    1988-01-01

    High Rayleigh number convection in a rectangular cavity with insulated horizontal surfaces and differentially heated vertical walls was analyzed for an arbitrary aspect ratio smaller than or equal to unity. Unlike previous analytical studies, a systematic method of solution based on linearization technique and analytical iteration procedure was developed to obtain approximate closed-form solutions for a wide range of aspect ratios. The predicted velocity and temperature fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  14. Flight and wind-tunnel measurements showing base drag reduction provided by a trailing disk for high Reynolds number turbulent flow for subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a trailing disk, or trapped vortex concept, in reducing the base drag of a large body of revolution was studied from measurements made both in flight and in a wind tunnel. Pressure data obtained for the flight experiment, and both pressure and force balance data were obtained for the wind tunnel experiment. The flight test also included data obtained from a hemispherical base. The experiment demonstrated the significant base drag reduction capability of the trailing disk to Mach 0.93 and to Reynolds numbers up to 80 times greater than for earlier studies. For the trailing disk data from the flight experiment, the maximum decrease in base drag ranged form 0.08 to 0.07 as Mach number increased from 0.70 to 0.93. Aircraft angles of attack ranged from 3.9 to 6.6 deg for the flight data. For the trailing disk data from the wind tunnel experiment, the maximum decrease in base and total drag ranged from 0.08 to 0.05 for the approximately 0 deg angle of attack data as Mach number increased from 0.30 to 0.82.

  15. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-07

    developed a new Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP), with a sensing wire over an order of magnitude smaller than current commercial hot - wires ...concern is the accuracy of our hot wire measurements. In this respect, the primary issues are the temporal and spatial response of the probes. The...is the local mean velocity and/is the frequency in Hz. In each case, the range of wavenumbers corresponding to the hot wire length lw is shown as

  16. Effect of Hartmann layer resolution for MHD flow in a straight, conducting duct at high Hartmann numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sharanya Subramanian; P K Swain; A V Deshpande; P Satyamurthy

    2015-05-01

    Conventionally, obtaining a converged solution for a MagnetoHydro-Dynamic problem entails a highly resolved Hartmann boundary layer, leading to excessive time and computational requirements. For high Hartmann number flows through electrically conducting channels, majority of the current loops close through the walls and the Hartmann layer contributes only a small fraction of the global current path. Hence, the effect on flow parameters due to coarsening the mesh of the Hartmann Layer was investigated using the ANSYS FLUENT code. Numerical simulations have been carried out in square and rectangular ducts with wall conductance ratio of 0.156 and 0.078 respectively. Magnetic field was varied from 1T to 4T to obtain solution for Hartmann numbers $(Ha = Ba \\sqrt{\\sigma/\\mu})$ in the range of 260–1040 for the square duct, and 520–2080 for the rectangular duct. B, $\\alpha$, $\\mu$, and $\\sigma$ are the strength of applied magnetic field, characteristic length of the channel, dynamic viscosity and electrical conductivity of the fluid respectively. The errors in estimating core and side layer peak velocity and fully developed pressure gradient were found to be low even for a grid system having 46% coarser grid than a well-resolved system. The analysis indicated that for high Hartmann number flows through thick, conducting ducts, coarsening the mesh in the Hartmann boundary layer reduced computational time, not compromising on the solution accuracy and appears to be a promising option for complex geometry MHD simulation.

  17. Wall-resolved LES of high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition for wall modeling in LES: LESFOIL revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kengo; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    Wall-resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of an airfoil flow involving a turbulent transition and separations near stall condition at a high Reynolds number 2.1 x 106 (based on the freestream velocity and the airfoil chord length) is conducted by using K computer. This study aims to provide the wall-resolved LES database including detailed turbulence statistics for near-wall modeling in LES and also to investigate the flow physics of the high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition. The LES well predicts the laminar separation bubble, turbulent reattachment and turbulent separation. The LES also clarified unsteady flow features associated with shear-layer instabilities: high frequency unsteadiness at St = 130 at the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and low frequency unsteadiness at St = 1.5 at the separated turbulent shear-layer near the trailing edge. Regarding the near-wall modeling in LES, the database indicates that the pressure term in the mean streamwise-momentum equation is not negligible at the laminar and turbulent separated regions. This fact suggests that widely used equilibrium wall model is not sufficient and the inclusion of the pressure term is necessary for wall modeling in LES of such flow. This research used computational resources of the K computer provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project (Project ID: hp140028). This work was supported by KAKENHI (Grant Number: 16K18309).

  18. [Selective alteration of the declarative memory systems in patients treated with a high number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami-González, L; Boget-Llucià, T; Bernardo, M; Marcos, T; Cañizares-Alejos, S; Penadés, R; Portella, M J; Castelví, M; Raspall, T; Salamero, M

    The reversible electrochemical effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on specific areas of the brain enable the neuroanatomical bases of some cognitive functions to be studied. In research carried out on memory systems, a selective alteration of the declarative ones has been observed after treatment with ECT. Little work has been done to explore the differential alteration of the memory subsystems in patients with a high number of ECT sessions. AIM. To study the declarative and non declarative memory system in psychiatric patients submitted to maintenance ECT treatment, with a high number of previous ECT sessions. 20 patients submitted to treatment with ECT (10 diagnosed as having depression and 10 with schizophrenia) and 20 controls, who were paired by age, sex and psychopathological diagnosis. For the evaluation of the declarative memory system, the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) logical memory test was used. The Hanoi Tower procedural test was employed to evaluate the non declarative system. Patients treated with ECT performed worse in the WMS logical memory test, but this was only significant in patients diagnosed as suffering from depression. No significant differences were observed in the Hanoi Tower test. A selective alteration of the declarative systems was observed in patients who had been treated with a high number of ECT sessions, while the non declarative memory systems remain unaffected.

  19. Analysis of Causes Leading to High Bromine Number of C8+Aromatics and Short Clay Service Life and Countermeasures Proposed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yousong; Ni Xiaoliang; Yan Jun

    2007-01-01

    After comparing the operating status of other catalytic reforming units and evaluation of the side-cut stream tests,the refinery investigated the influence of the feedstock property,clay types,and operating regime of the clay tower and catalytic reforming unit on the service life of the clay.Test results had revealed that the low potential aromatic content of the reformer feed and high operating severity were the critical causes leading to high bromine number of the C8+ aromatics feed for the PX unit and the shortened service life of clay.This article also puts forward the corresponding remedial measures.

  20. High fat feeding affects the number of GPR120 cells and enteroendocrine cells in the mouse stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, Patricia; Goldschmid, Hannah; Henkel, Helena; Küper, Markus; Königsrainer, Alfred; Breer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Long-term intake of dietary fat is supposed to be associated with adaptive reactions of the organism and it is assumptive that this is particularly true for fat responsive epithelial cells in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies suggest that epithelial cells expressing the receptor for medium and long chain fatty acids, GPR120 (FFAR4), may operate as fat sensors. Changes in expression level and/or cell density are supposed to be accompanied with a consumption of high fat (HF) diet. To assess whether feeding a HF diet might impact on the expression of fatty acid receptors or the number of lipid sensing cells as well as enteroendocrine cell populations, gastric tissue samples of non-obese and obese mice were compared using a real time PCR and immunohistochemical approach. In this study, we have identified GPR120 cells in the corpus region of the mouse stomach which appeared to be brush cells. Monitoring the effect of HF diet on the expression of GPR120 revealed that after 3 weeks and 6 months the level of mRNA for GPR120 in the tissue was significantly increased which coincided with and probably reflected a significant increase in the number of GPR120 positive cells in the corpus region; in contrast, within the antrum region, the number of GPR120 cells decreased. Furthermore, dietary fat intake also led to changes in the number of enteroendocrine cells producing either ghrelin or gastrin. After 3 weeks and even more pronounced after 6 months the number of ghrelin cells and gastrin cells was significantly increased. These results imply that a HF diet leads to significant changes in the cellular repertoire of the stomach mucosa. Whether these changes are a consequence of the direct exposure to HF in the luminal content or a physiological response to the high level of fat in the body remains elusive.

  1. Higher numbers of memory B-cells and Th2-cytokine skewing in high responders to hepatitis B vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedée, A M C M; Kannegieter, N; Öztürk, K; van Loveren, H; Janssen, R; Buisman, A M

    2016-04-27

    In the present study, differences in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific memory B-cell responses between low and high responders to hepatitis B vaccine (HepB), based on levels of antibodies against HBsAg (anti-HBs), were determined. In addition, HBsAg specific T-cell responses between high (anti-HBs level >20,000 IU/L) and low (anti-HBs level Numbers of HBsAg-specific B-cells, plasma immunoglobulin G (Ig) levels, and T-cell cytokine concentrations were measured in low and high responders directly before and one month after the second booster vaccination. In advance, an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Spot (ELISpot) Assay was optimized for the determination of HBsAg-specific B-cell responses. The number of HBsAg-specific B-cells was significantly higher (pnumbers of HBsAg-specific B-cells were significantly correlated (RS=0.66, psignificant correlation (RS=0.6975, p=0.007) between the IL-13 levels and the plasma IgG levels post-booster was found. Subsequently, the IL-13 level in the high-responder group post-booster was significantly higher compared to the low-responder group. Since activation of the B-cell response after vaccination is induced by Th2 cells and IL-13 is produced by these cells, we conclude that the difference in HBsAg-specific Th2 cells is involved in determining the differences in anti-HBs level and memory B-cell numbers between low and high responders.

  2. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Manuel, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium. - Highlights: • Regular solutions of quasilinear hyperbolic systems may evolve into shocks. • The shock location is found for high frequency fast MHD waves. • The result is applied to static axisymmetric equilibria. • The previous process may lead to the formation of sheet currents and destruction of the equilibrium.

  3. High Training Volumes are Associated with a Low Number of Self-Reported Sick Days in Elite Endurance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mårtensson, Kristina Nordebo, Christer Malm

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that high exercise loads increase the risk of infection, most frequently reported as upper respiratory tract infections, by suppressing the immune system. Most athletes will not train when experiencing sickness due to the fear of health complications. However, high training volumes are incompatible with high rates of non-training days, regardless of the cause. The purpose of this observational study was to examine the relationship between self-reported, exercise-constraining days of sickness (days when the athlete decided not to train due to symptoms of disease, either self-reported or by a physician and the volumes of exercise training in elite endurance athletes by analyzing data from training logs kept for several years. The subjects included 11 elite endurance athletes (8 male, 3 female competing at national and international levels in cross-country skiing, biathlon and long-distance running. Training logs available from these 11 subjects added to a total of 61 training years. The number of training hours per year (462, 79-856; median, range was significantly and negatively correlated to the reported number of days not training due to sickness (15, 0-164 by a 3rd degree polynomial regression (R2 = 0.48, F ratio = 18, p < 0.0001. We conclude that elite endurance athletes can achieve high training volumes only if they also experience few sick-days.

  4. Discovery of common Asian copy number variants using integrated high-resolution array CGH and massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hansoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Ju, Young Seok; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E; Kim, Sheehyun; Lee, Seungbok; Suh, Dongwhan; Hong, Dongwan; Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Yoo, Yun Joo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Yavartanoo, Maryam; Chang, Young Wha; Ha, Jung-Sook; Chong, Wilson; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Darvishi, Katayoon; Kim, Hyeran; Yang, Song Ju; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Hurles, Matthew E; Scherer, Stephen W; Carter, Nigel P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Lee, Charles; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for the majority of human genomic diversity in terms of base coverage. Here, we have developed and applied a new method to combine high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data with whole-genome DNA sequencing data to obtain a comprehensive catalog of common CNVs in Asian individuals. The genomes of 30 individuals from three Asian populations (Korean, Chinese and Japanese) were interrogated with an ultra-high-resolution array CGH platform containing 24 million probes. Whole-genome sequencing data from a reference genome (NA10851, with 28.3x coverage) and two Asian genomes (AK1, with 27.8x coverage and AK2, with 32.0x coverage) were used to transform the relative copy number information obtained from array CGH experiments into absolute copy number values. We discovered 5,177 CNVs, of which 3,547 were putative Asian-specific CNVs. These common CNVs in Asian populations will be a useful resource for subsequent genetic studies in these populations, and the new method of calling absolute CNVs will be essential for applying CNV data to personalized medicine.

  5. On the flow and thermal characteristics of high Reynolds numbers (2800-17000) dye cell: simulation and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, G K; Prakash, O; Biswal, R; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational and experimental studies on wavelength/frequency fluctuation characteristics of high pulse repetition rate (PRR: 18 kHz) dye laser pumped by frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The temperature gradient in the dye solution is found to be responsible for wavelength fluctuations of the dye laser at low flow rates (2800number (ReT) and the range of eddy sizes present in the turbulent flow are found to be responsible for the fluctuations at high flow rates (8400high PRR pumping.

  6. Two-step simulation of velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Schmidt number in turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of passive scalar in the high Schmidt number turbulent mixing process requires higher computational cost than that of velocity fields, because the scalar is associated with smaller length scales than velocity. Thus, full simulation of both velocity and passive scalar with high Sc for a practical configuration is difficult to perform. In this work, a new approach to simulate velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Sc is suggested to reduce the computational cost. First, the velocity fields are resolved by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, by extracting the velocity information from LES, the scalar inside a moving fluid blob is simulated by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This two-step simulation method is applied to a turbulent jet and provides a new way to examine a scalar mixing process in a practical application with smaller computational cost. NSF, Samsung Scholarship.

  7. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  8. Numerical study on flow separation in 90° pipe bend under high Reynolds number by k-ε modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun Dutta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper makes an effort to find the flow separation characteristics under high Reynolds number in pipe bends. Single phase turbulent flow through pipe bends is investigated using k-ε turbulence model. After the validation of present model against existing experimental results, a detailed study has been performed to study the influence of Reynolds number on flow separation and reattachment. The separation region and the velocity field of the primary and the secondary flows in different sections have been illustrated. Numerical results show that flow separation can be clearly visualized for bend with low curvature ratio. Distributions of the velocity vector show the secondary motion clearly induced by the movement of fluid from inner to outer wall of the bend leading to flow separation. This paper provides numerical results to understand the flow characteristics of fluid flow in 90° bend pipe.

  9. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for Cɛ applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote Cɛ ,∞ lie between 0.193 ≤Cɛ ,∞≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure Cɛ ,∞=0.223 .

  10. Preparation of Pt-GO composites with high-number-density Pt nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on GO nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanting Li; Shaochun Tang; Xiangkang Meng

    2016-01-01

    Pt–GO composites with high-number-density Pt nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on GO nanosheets were prepared using ethylene glycol as reducer at 180 °C. The nanoparticles had an average size of 12 nm with corners and edges on their surfaces. The composites had electrochemically active surface area of 31.7 m2 g ? 1 with a ratio (If/Ir ¼ 0.96) of the forward anodic peak current (If) to the reverse anodic peak current (Ir) in cyclic voltammetry curves, which is much higher than those of the reported Pt nano-dendrites/reduced graphene oxide composites.

  11. Preparation of Pt–GO composites with high-number-density Pt nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on GO nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanting Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pt–GO composites with high-number-density Pt nanoparticles dispersed uniformly on GO nanosheets were prepared using ethylene glycol as reducer at 180 °C. The nanoparticles had an average size of 12 nm with corners and edges on their surfaces. The composites had electrochemically active surface area of 31.7 m2 g−1 with a ratio (If/Ir=0.96 of the forward anodic peak current (If to the reverse anodic peak current (Ir in cyclic voltammetry curves, which is much higher than those of the reported Pt nanodendrites/reduced graphene oxide composites.

  12. Numerical study of cavitation inception in the near field of an axisymmetric jet at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Stefano; Knio, Omar M.; Katz, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Cavitation inception in the near field of high Reynolds number axisymmetric jets is analyzed using a simplified computational model. The model combines a vorticity-stream-function finite-difference scheme for the simulation of the unsteady flow field with a simplified representation for microscopic bubbles that are injected at the jet inlet. The motion of the bubbles is tracked in a Lagrangian reference frame by integrating a semiempirical dynamical equation which accounts for pressure, drag, and lift forces. The likelihood of cavitation inception is estimated based on the distributions of pressure and microscopic bubbles. The computations are used to examine the role of jet slenderness ratio, Reynolds number, bubble size, and bubble injection location on the cavitation inception indices. The results indicate that, for all bubble sizes considered, the cavitation inception index increases as the jet slenderness ratio decreases. Larger bubbles entrain more rapidly into the cores of concentrated vortices than smaller bubbles, and the corresponding inception indices are generally higher than those of smaller bubbles. The inception indices for larger bubbles are insensitive to the injection location, while the inception indices of smaller bubbles tend to increase when they are injected inside the shear layer near the nozzle lip. Although it affects the bubble distributions, variation of the Reynolds number leads to insignificant changes in pressure minima and in the inception indices of larger bubbles, having noticeable effect only on the inception indices of smaller bubbles. Computed results are consistent with, and provide plausible explanations for, several trends observed in recent jet cavitation experiments.

  13. Study of the near-wall-turbulent region of the high-Reynolds-number boundary layer using an atmospheric flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Gary J.; Marusic, Ivan

    2006-02-01

    Data from the near-wall-turbulent region of the high-Reynolds-number atmospheric surface layer are used to analyse the attached-eddy model of wall turbulence. All data were acquired during near-neutral conditions at the Surface Layer Turbulence and Environmental Science Test (SLTEST) facility located in the western Utah Great Salt Lake Desert. Instantaneous streamwise and wall-normal components of velocity were collected with a wall-normal array of two-component hot wires within the first 2 m above the surface of the salt flats. Streamwise and wall-normal turbulence intensities and spectra are directly compared to corresponding laboratory data and similarity formulations hypothesized from the attached-eddy model of wall turbulence. This affords the opportunity to compare results with Reynolds numbers varying over three orders of magnitude. The wall-normal turbulence-intensity similarity formulation is extended. The results show good support for the similarity arguments forwarded by the attached-eddy model as well as Townsend's (1956) Reynolds-number similarity hypothesis and lack of the ‘inactive’ motion influence on the wall-normal velocity component. The effects of wall roughness and the spread in the convection velocity due to this roughness are also discussed.

  14. Similarity Solution for High Weissenberg Number Flow of Upper-Convected Maxwell Fluid on a Linearly Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Mohamadali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High Weissenberg boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluids on a stretching surface has been studied. The flow is considered to be steady, low inertial, and two-dimensional. Upon proper scaling and by means of an exact similarity transformation, the nonlinear momentum and constitutive equations of each layer transform into the respective system of highly nonlinear and coupled ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions to the resulting boundary value problem are obtained using an efficient shooting technique in conjunction with a variable stepping method for different values of pressure gradients. It is observed that, unlike the Newtonian flows, in order to maintain a potential flow, normal stresses must inevitably develop. The velocity field and stresses distributions over plate are presented for difference values of pressure gradient and Weissenberg numbers.

  15. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  16. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  17. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  18. Some Aspects of the Modified Newtonian and Prandtl-Meyer-Expansion Method for Axisymmetric Blunt Bodies at Zero Angle of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard D., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    In a recent article on hypersonic flow, Lees and Kubota suggested a modification of the local-expansion method to predict the surface pressures in the region of a nose-cylinder junction where Newtonian theory fails. The modification consists of matching the Newtonian pressure distribution and the Prandtl-Meyer relation at the point on the nose surface where both the pressure and the pressure gradient, predicted by these two solution, are equal. With this approximation, the pressure distribution can be predicted quite accurately up to the nose-cylinder junction for blunt-nosed bodies of continuous curvature, provided centrifugal-force effects are negligible. The purpose of this note is to facilitate the application of Lees' suggestion and to draw attention to some of its consequences.

  19. High-throughput single-cell analysis of low copy number β-galactosidase by a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingling; Huang, Tianxun; Zhu, Shaobin; Zhou, Yingxing; Jiang, Yunbin; Wang, Shuo; Chen, Yuqing; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2013-10-15

    Single-cell analysis is vital in providing insights into the heterogeneity in molecular content and phenotypic characteristics of complex or clonal cell populations. As many essential proteins and most transcription factors are produced at a low copy number, analytical tools with superior sensitivity to enable the analysis of low abundance proteins in single cells are in high demand. β-galactosidase (β-gal) has been the standard cellular reporter for gene expression in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here we report the development of a high-throughput method for the single-cell analysis of low copy number β-gal proteins using a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Upon fluorescence staining with a fluorogenic substrate, quantitative measurements of the basal and near-basal expression of β-gal in single Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells were demonstrated. Statistical distribution can be determined quickly by analyzing thousands of individual cells in 1-2min, which reveals the heterogeneous expression pattern that is otherwise masked by the ensemble analysis. Combined with the quantitative fluorometric assay and the rapid bacterial enumeration by HSFCM, the β-gal expression distribution profile could be converted from arbitrary fluorescence units to protein copy numbers per cell. The sensitivity and speed of the HSFCM offers great capability in quantitative analysis of low abundance proteins in single cells, which would help gaining a deeper insight into the heterogeneity and fundamental biological processes in microbial populations.

  20. An experimental analysis of bed load transport in gravel-bed braided rivers with high grain Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vincenzo, Annamaria; Brancati, Francesco; Pannone, Marilena

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with nearly uniform fluvial gravel (D50=9 mm, D10=5 mm and D90=13 mm) to analyse the relationship between stream power and bed load transport rate in gravel-bed braided rivers at high grain Reynolds numbers. The values of the unit-width dimensionless bed-load rate qb* and unit-width dimensionless stream power ω* were evaluated in equilibrium conditions based on ten different experimental runs. Then, they were plotted along with values obtained during particularly representative field studies documented in the literature, and a regression law was derived. For comparison, a regression analysis was performed using the data obtained from laboratory experiments characterized by smaller grain sizes and, therefore, referring to relatively low grain Reynolds numbers. A numerical integration of Exner's equation was performed to reconstruct the local and time-dependent functional dependence of qb* and ω*. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) At equilibrium, the reach-averaged bed load transport rate is related to the reach-averaged stream power by different regression laws at high and low grain Reynolds numbers. Additionally, the transition from bed to suspended load transport is accelerated by low Re*, with the corresponding bed load discharge increasing with stream power at a lower, linear rate. 2) When tested against the gravel laboratory measurements, the high Re* power law derived in the present study performs considerably better than do previous formulas. 3) The longitudinal variability of the section-averaged equilibrium stream power is much more pronounced than that characterizing the bed load rate, at least for high Re*. Thus, the stream power and its local-scale heterogeneity seem to be directly responsible for transverse sediment re-distribution and, ultimately, for the determination of the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the gravel bedforms. 4) Finally, the stochastic interpretation of the wetted

  1. Theory and implementation of a very high throughput true random number generator in field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonggang; Hui, Cong; Liu, Chong; Xu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of this paper is proposing a new entropy extraction mechanism based on sampling phase jitter in ring oscillators to make a high throughput true random number generator in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) practical. Starting from experimental observation and analysis of the entropy source in FPGA, a multi-phase sampling method is exploited to harvest the clock jitter with a maximum entropy and fast sampling speed. This parametrized design is implemented in a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, where the carry chains in the FPGA are explored to realize the precise phase shifting. The generator circuit is simple and resource-saving, so that multiple generation channels can run in parallel to scale the output throughput for specific applications. The prototype integrates 64 circuit units in the FPGA to provide a total output throughput of 7.68 Gbps, which meets the requirement of current high-speed quantum key distribution systems. The randomness evaluation, as well as its robustness to ambient temperature, confirms that the new method in a purely digital fashion can provide high-speed high-quality random bit sequences for a variety of embedded applications.

  2. Theory and implementation of a very high throughput true random number generator in field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonggang; Hui, Cong; Liu, Chong; Xu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of this paper is proposing a new entropy extraction mechanism based on sampling phase jitter in ring oscillators to make a high throughput true random number generator in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) practical. Starting from experimental observation and analysis of the entropy source in FPGA, a multi-phase sampling method is exploited to harvest the clock jitter with a maximum entropy and fast sampling speed. This parametrized design is implemented in a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, where the carry chains in the FPGA are explored to realize the precise phase shifting. The generator circuit is simple and resource-saving, so that multiple generation channels can run in parallel to scale the output throughput for specific applications. The prototype integrates 64 circuit units in the FPGA to provide a total output throughput of 7.68 Gbps, which meets the requirement of current high-speed quantum key distribution systems. The randomness evaluation, as well as its robustness to ambient temperature, confirms that the new method in a purely digital fashion can provide high-speed high-quality random bit sequences for a variety of embedded applications.

  3. High-Throughput Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidault, Floriane; Mosnier, Amandine; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Somphavong, Silaphet; Paboriboune, Phimpha; Ocheretina, Oksana; Pape, Jean William; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Berland, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis (TB) represents a major public health concern. Understanding the transmission routes of the disease is a key factor for its control and for the implementation of efficient interventions. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) marker typing is a well-described method for lineage identification and transmission tracking. However, the conventional manual genotyping technique is cumbersome and time-consuming and entails many risks for errors, thus hindering its implementation and dissemination. We describe here a new approach using the QIAxcel system, an automated high-throughput capillary electrophoresis system that also carries out allele calling. This automated method was assessed on 1,824 amplicons from 82 TB isolates and tested with sets of markers of 15 or 24 loci. Overall allele-calling concordance between the methods from 140 to 1,317 bp was 98.9%. DNA concentrations and repeatability and reproducibility performances showed no biases in allele calling. Furthermore, turnaround time using this automated system was reduced by 81% compared to the conventional manual agarose gel method. In sum, this new automated method facilitates MIRU-VNTR genotyping and provides reliable results. Therefore, it is well suited for field genotyping. The implementation of this method will help to achieve accurate and cost-effective epidemiological studies, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB, where the high number of strains complicates the surveillance of circulating lineages and requires efficient interventions to be carried out in an urgent manner. PMID:25428144

  4. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03 Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  5. Vortex shedding in high Reynolds number axisymmetric bluff-body wakes: Local linear instability and global bleed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2004-09-01

    In the present work we study the large-scale helical vortex shedding regime in the wake of an axisymmetric body with a blunt trailing edge at high Reynolds numbers, both experimentally and by means of local, linear, and spatiotemporal stability analysis. In the instability analysis we take into account the detailed downstream evolution of the basic flow behind the body base. The study confirms the existence of a finite region of absolute instability for the first azimuthal number in the near field of the wake. Such instability is believed to trigger the large-scale helical vortex shedding downstream of the recirculating zone. Inhibition of vortex shedding is examined by blowing a given flow rate of fluid through the base of the slender body. The extent of the locally absolute region of the flow is calculated as a function of the bleed coefficient, Cb=qb/(πR2u∞), where qb is the bleed flow rate, R is the radius of the base, and u∞ is the incident free-stream velocity. It is shown that the basic flow becomes convectively unstable everywhere for a critical value of the bleed coefficient of Cb*˜0.13, such that no self-excited regime is expected for Cb>Cb*. In addition, we report experimental results of flow visualizations and hot-wire measurements for increasing values of the bleed coefficient. When a sufficient amount of base bleed is applied, flow visualizations indicate that vortex shedding is suppressed and that the mean flow becomes axisymmetric. The critical bleed coefficient predicted by linear instability analysis is shown to fall within the experimental values in the range of Reynolds numbers analyzed here.

  6. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3–800 nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10 min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25–100 nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100 nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3 nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9 cm−3s−1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1 nmh−1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  7. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3-800nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25-100nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9cm-3s-1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1nmh-1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  8. High-Directivity Emissions with Flexible Beam Numbers and Beam Directions Using Gradient-Refractive-Index Fractal Metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He-Xiu; Wang, Guang-Ming; Tao, Zui; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) highly-directive emission system is proposed to enable beam shaping and beam steering capabilities in wideband frequencies. It is composed of an omnidirectional source antenna and several 3D gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lenses. To engineer a broadband impedance match, the design method for these 3D lenses is established under the scenario of free-space excitation by using a planar printed monopole. For realizations and demonstrations, a kind of GRIN metamaterial is proposed, which is constructed by non-uniform fractal geometries. Due to the non-resonant and deep-subwavelength features of the fractal elements, the resulting 3D GRIN metamaterial lenses have extra wide bandwidth (3 to 7.5 GHz), and are capable of manipulating electromagnetic wavefronts accurately, advancing the state of the art of available GRIN lenses. The proposal for the versatile highly-directive emissions has been confirmed by simulations and measurements, showing that not only the number of beams can be arbitrarily tailored but also the beam directions can be steerable. The proposal opens a new way to control broadband highly-directive emissions with pre-designed directions, promising great potentials in modern wireless communication systems. PMID:25034268

  9. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Daniel; Schwarz, Stefan; Bergonier, Dominique; Brisabois, Anne; Feßler, Andrea T; Gilbert, Florence B; Kadlec, Kristina; Lebeau, Benoit; Loisy-Hamon, Fabienne; Treilles, Michaël; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs) and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398) previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51), representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  10. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sobral

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA, known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398 previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51, representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  11. Numerical investigation of the high Reynolds number 3D flow field generated by a self-propelling manta ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzani, Jean-Noel; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    An embedded-boundary (or cut-cell) method for complex geometry with moving boundaries is used to solve the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equation around a self-propelling manta swimming at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The motion of the ray is prescribed using a kinematic model fitted to actual biological data. The dependence of thrust production mechanism on Strouhal and Reynolds numbers is investigated. The vortex core structures are accurately plotted and a correlation between wake structures and propulsive performance is established. This insight is critical in understanding the key flow features that a bio-inspired autonomous vehicle should reproduce in order to swim efficiently. The solution method is implemented, on a block-structured Cartesian grid using a cut-cell approach enabling the code to correctly evaluate the wall shear-stress, a key feature necessary at higher Reynolds. To enhance computational efficiency, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement technique is used. The present method is validated against published experimental results. Supported by ONR MURI.

  12. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  13. A uniquely defined entropy stable matrix dissipation operator for high Mach number ideal MHD and compressible Euler simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Andrew R.; Derigs, Dominik; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2017-03-01

    We describe a unique averaging procedure to design an entropy stable dissipation operator for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and compressible Euler equations. Often in the derivation of an entropy conservative numerical flux function much care is taken in the design and averaging of the entropy conservative numerical flux. We demonstrate in this work that if the discrete dissipation operator is not carefully chosen as well it can have deleterious effects on the numerical approximation. This is particularly true for very strong shocks or high Mach number flows present, for example, in astrophysical simulations. We present the underlying technique of how to construct a unique averaging technique for the discrete dissipation operator. We also demonstrate numerically the increased robustness of the approximation.

  14. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in melanoma comprise high numbers of T-cell clonotypes that are lost during in vitro culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, P; Kirkin, A F; Siim, E;

    2000-01-01

    -associated peptide epitopes. Cultured TIL have been studied in order to unveil characteristics of TIL and the interactions of TIL and melanoma cells. Whether in vitro cultured TIL mirrors the in situ situation has, however, been questioned. In the present study we have taken advantage of T-cell receptor clonotype...... mapping methodology to conduct a full and detailed analysis of the T-cell clonotypes in melanoma lesions and in corresponding lines of TIL established in vitro. All melanoma lesions and the corresponding TIL cultures comprised high numbers of T-cell clonotypes, typically in the range of 40 to more than 60...... that in situ T-cell clonotypes in melanoma are not readily expanded in vitro and that the majority of T-cell clonotypes present in cultured TIL are not present in situ....

  15. A self-sustaining process model of inertial layer dynamics in high Reynolds number turbulent wall flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, G. P.; Montemuro, B.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    Field observations and laboratory experiments suggest that at high Reynolds numbers Re the outer region of turbulent boundary layers self-organizes into quasi-uniform momentum zones (UMZs) separated by internal shear layers termed `vortical fissures' (VFs). Motivated by this emergent structure, a conceptual model is proposed with dynamical components that collectively have the potential to generate a self-sustaining interaction between a single VF and adjacent UMZs. A large-Re asymptotic analysis of the governing incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is performed to derive reduced equation sets for the streamwise-averaged and streamwise-fluctuating flow within the VF and UMZs. The simplified equations reveal the dominant physics within-and isolate possible coupling mechanisms among-these different regions of the flow.

  16. Characteristics of Highly Polymorphic Segmental Copy-Number Variations Observed in Japanese by BAC-Array-CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Norio; Satoh, Yasunari; Sasaki, Keiko; Shimoichi, Yuko; Sugita, Keiko; Katayama, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Segmental copy-number variations (CNVs) may contribute to genetic variation in humans. Reports of the existence and characteristics of CNVs in a large Japanese cohort are quite limited. We report the data from a large Japanese population. We conducted population screening for 213 unrelated Japanese individuals using comparative genomic hybridization based on a bacterial artificial chromosome microarray (BAC-aCGH). We summarize the data by focusing on highly polymorphic CNVs in ≥5.0% of the individual, since they may be informative for demonstrating the relationships between genotypes and their phenotypes. We found a total of 680 CNVs at 16 different BAC-regions in the genome. The majority of the polymorphic CNVs presented on BAC-clones that overlapped with regions of segmental duplication, and the majority of the polymorphic CNVs observed in this population had been previously reported in other publications. Some of the CNVs contained genes which might be related to phenotypic heterogeneity among individuals. PMID:21197411

  17. A High-Throughput Computational Framework for Identifying Significant Copy Number Aberrations from Array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Roberts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable identification of copy number aberrations (CNA from comparative genomic hybridization data would be improved by the availability of a generalised method for processing large datasets. To this end, we developed swatCGH, a data analysis framework and region detection heuristic for computational grids. swatCGH analyses sequentially displaced (sliding windows of neighbouring probes and applies adaptive thresholds of varying stringency to identify the 10% of each chromosome that contains the most frequently occurring CNAs. We used the method to analyse a published dataset, comparing data preprocessed using four different DNA segmentation algorithms, and two methods for prioritising the detected CNAs. The consolidated list of the most commonly detected aberrations confirmed the value of swatCGH as a simplified high-throughput method for identifying biologically significant CNA regions of interest.

  18. A High-Throughput Computational Framework for Identifying Significant Copy Number Aberrations from Array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ian; Carter, Stephanie A.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Barna, Jenny C. J.; Calleja, Mark; Coleman, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Reliable identification of copy number aberrations (CNA) from comparative genomic hybridization data would be improved by the availability of a generalised method for processing large datasets. To this end, we developed swatCGH, a data analysis framework and region detection heuristic for computational grids. swatCGH analyses sequentially displaced (sliding) windows of neighbouring probes and applies adaptive thresholds of varying stringency to identify the 10% of each chromosome that contains the most frequently occurring CNAs. We used the method to analyse a published dataset, comparing data preprocessed using four different DNA segmentation algorithms, and two methods for prioritising the detected CNAs. The consolidated list of the most commonly detected aberrations confirmed the value of swatCGH as a simplified high-throughput method for identifying biologically significant CNA regions of interest. PMID:23008709

  19. Water Tank Experiments on Stratified Flow over Double Mountain-Shaped Obstacles at High-Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stiperski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an overview of the HyIV-CNRS-SecORo (Hydralab IV-CNRS-Secondary Orography and Rotors Experiments laboratory experiments carried out in the CNRM (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques large stratified water flume. The experiments were designed to systematically study the influence of double obstacles on stably stratified flow. The experimental set-up consists of a two-layer flow in the water tank, with a lower neutral and an upper stable layer separated by a sharp density discontinuity. This type of layering over terrain is known to be conducive to a variety of possible responses in the atmosphere, from hydraulic jumps to lee waves and highly turbulent rotors. In each experiment, obstacles were towed through the tank at a constant speed. The towing speed and the size of the tank allowed high Reynolds-number flow similar to the atmosphere. Here, we present the experimental design, together with an overview of laboratory experiments conducted and their results. We develop a regime diagram for flow over single and double obstacles and examine the parameter space where the secondary obstacle has the largest influence on the flow. Trapped lee waves, rotors, hydraulic jumps, lee-wave interference and flushing of the valley atmosphere are successfully reproduced in the stratified water tank. Obstacle height and ridge separation distance are shown to control lee-wave interference. Results, however, differ partially from previous findings on the flow over double ridges reported in the literature due to the presence of nonlinearities and possible differences in the boundary layer structure. The secondary obstacle also influences the transition between different flow regimes and makes trapped lee waves possible for higher Froude numbers than expected for an isolated obstacle.

  20. Are low and high number magnitudes processed differently while resolving the conflict evoked by the SNARC effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Małgorzata; Szumska, Izabela; Wasilewska, Marzena; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2012-07-01

    In the brain, numbers are thought to be represented in a spatially organised fashion on what is known as the Mental Number Line (MNL). The SNARC (Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes) effect refers to the faster responses to digits when the reaction side is congruent with the digit position on the MNL (e.g. a left-handed response to a small magnitude) and the slowing down of responses (inhibition) in the case of incongruity. We examined the electrophysiological correlates of conflict, which are linked to that of inhibition, to shed light on the relationship between the SNARC effect and executive attention. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from twenty-nine participants during a parity-judgment task. The participants responded more quickly on congruent than on incongruent trials. The congruency effect was reflected in early sensory (N1, N2) components above parieto-occipital and frontal regions, as well as in the later P3 component above centro-parietal areas. Moreover, both the N1 amplitude and N2 latency were greater with high than low magnitude digit targets. P3 amplitude modulation implies that the SNARC effect is the result of first evoking the parallel processing of digit magnitude categorisation (in the occipital and central areas) and numeric conflict detection (in the parieto-occipital and frontal areas) and secondly conflict monitoring and resolution localised in the centro-parietal and frontal sites. These results also suggest that the left hemisphere specialises in conflict processing of high magnitude digit targets, while the right hemisphere of low digit magnitudes.

  1. High modal number and triple trisomies are highly correlated favorable factors in childhood B-cell precursor high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the NOPHO ALL 1992/2000 protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Kajsa Maria; Forestier, Erik; Andersen, Mette K

    2013-01-01

    23), or t(12;21). The median age of patients with "classic" high hyperdiploidy was lower than that of patients with translocation-positive high hyperdiploidy (P53/55 (P=0.020/0.024). In multivariate analyses, modal number and triple trisomies were significantly associated with superior event......-free survival in separate analyses with age and white blood cell counts. When including both modal numbers and triple trisomies, only low white blood cell counts were significantly associated with superior event-free survival (P=0.009). We conclude that high modal chromosome numbers and triple trisomies...

  2. Physical state & copy number of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in progression of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV infection and its integration in host genome is a key event in malignant transformation of cervical cells. HPV16 being a dominant HR-HPV type, we undertook this study to analyze if viral load and physical state of the virus correlated with each other in the absence of other confounding variables and examined their potential as predictors of progressive cervical lesions. Methods: Both, viral load and integration status of HPV16 were determined by real time URR PCR and estimation of E2:E6 ratio in a total of 130 PGMY-RLB -confirmed, monotypic HPV16-infected cervical DNA samples from biopsies of cytology-confirmed low grade (LSIL, 30 and high grade (HSIL, 30, and invasive carcinoma, (squamous cell carcinoma SCC, 70 cases. Results: Investigation of DNA samples revealed a gradual increase in HPV16 viral load over several magnitudes and increased frequency of integration from LSIL to HSIL and HSIL to invasive cancer in relation to the severity of lesions in monotypic HPV16-infected cervical tissues. In a substantial number of precancer (11/60 and cancer cases (29/70, HPV16 was detected in concomitant mixed form. The concomitant form of HPV16 genome carried significantly higher viral load. Interpretation & conclusions: Overall, viral load and integration increased with disease severity and could be useful biomarkers in disease progression, at least, in HPV16-infected cervical pre-cancer and cancer lesions.

  3. Unbiased K-mer Analysis Reveals Changes in Copy Number of Highly Repetitive Sequences During Maize Domestication and Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sanzhen; Zheng, Jun; Migeon, Pierre; Ren, Jie; Hu, Ying; He, Cheng; Liu, Hongjun; Fu, Junjie; White, Frank F.; Toomajian, Christopher; Wang, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    The major component of complex genomes is repetitive elements, which remain recalcitrant to characterization. Using maize as a model system, we analyzed whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences for the two maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 using k-mer analysis to quantify the differences between the two genomes. Significant differences were identified in highly repetitive sequences, including centromere, 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), knob, and telomere repeats. Genotype specific 45S rDNA sequences were discovered. The B73 and Mo17 polymorphic k-mers were used to examine allele-specific expression of 45S rDNA in the hybrids. Although Mo17 contains higher copy number than B73, equivalent levels of overall 45S rDNA expression indicates that transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms operate for the 45S rDNA in the hybrids. Using WGS sequences of B73xMo17 doubled haploids, genomic locations showing differential repetitive contents were genetically mapped, which displayed different organization of highly repetitive sequences in the two genomes. In an analysis of WGS sequences of HapMap2 lines, including maize wild progenitor, landraces, and improved lines, decreases and increases in abundance of additional sets of k-mers associated with centromere, 45S rDNA, knob, and retrotransposons were found among groups, revealing global evolutionary trends of genomic repeats during maize domestication and improvement. PMID:28186206

  4. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  5. Layer-number dependent high-frequency vibration modes in few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides induced by interlayer couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qing-Hai; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Jun; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted extensive attention due to their many novel properties. The atoms within each layer in two-dimensional TMDs are joined together by covalent bonds, while van der Waals interactions combine the layers together. This makes its lattice dynamics layer-number dependent. The evolutions of ultralow frequency ( 50 cm‑1) vibration modes in few-layer TMDs and demonstrate how the interlayer coupling leads to the splitting of high-frequency vibration modes, known as Davydov splitting. Such Davydov splitting can be well described by a van der Waals model, which directly links the splitting with the interlayer coupling. Our review expands the understanding on the effect of interlayer coupling on the high-frequency vibration modes in TMDs and other two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2016YFA0301200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11225421, 11474277, 11434010, 61474067, 11604326, 11574305 and 51527901), and the National Young 1000 Talent Plan of China.

  6. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey . I. Selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Chaves-Montero, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Molino, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Vilella-Rojo, G.; Ascaso, B.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cerviño, M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Oteo, I.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, J. F.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so-called dropout technique or Ly-α selection. However, the availability of multifilter data now allows the dropout selections to be replaced by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims: Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing to the study of the brightest, least frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods: The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results: Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z = 2.5,3.0,3.5,4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at mUV(AB) = 24, where mUV refers to the first ALHAMBRA filter redwards of the Ly-α line. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute to the study of the brightest ends of these counts, accurately sampling the surface densities down to mUV(AB) = 21-22. Conclusions: We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a very clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that it is better to do statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination issues in a

  7. High Lithium Transference Number Electrolytes via Creation of 3-Dimensional, Charged, Nanoporous Networks from Dense Functionalized Nanoparticle Composites

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Jennifer L.

    2013-03-26

    High lithium transference number, tLi+, electrolytes are desired for use in both lithium-ion and lithium metal rechargeable battery technologies. Historically, low tLi+ electrolytes have hindered device performance by allowing ion concentration gradients within the cell, leading to high internal resistances that ultimately limit cell lifetime, charging rates, and energy density. Herein, we report on the synthesis and electrochemical features of electrolytes based on nanoparticle salts designed to provide high tLi+. The salts are created by cofunctionalization of metal oxide nanoparticles with neutral organic ligands and tethered lithium salts. When dispersed in a conducting fluid such as tetraglyme, they spontaneously form a charged, nanoporous network of particles at moderate nanoparticle loadings. Modification of the tethered anion chemistry from -SO3 - to -SO3BF3 - is shown to enhance ionic conductivity of the electrolytes by facilitating ion pair dissociation. At a particle volume fraction of 0.15, the electrolyte exists as a self-supported, nanoporous gel with an optimum ionic conductivity of 10 -4 S/cm at room temperature. Galvanostatic polarization measurements on symmetric lithium metal cells containing the electrolyte show that the cell short circuit time, tSC, is inversely proportional to the square of the applied current density tSC ∼ J-2, consistent with previously predicted results for traditional polymer-in-salt electrolytes with low tLi+. Our findings suggest that electrolytes with tLi+ ≈ 1 and good ion-pair dissociation delay lithium dendrite nucleation and may lead to improved lithium plating in rechargeable batteries with metallic lithium anodes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Large scale motions of multiple limit-cycle high Reynolds number annular and toroidal rotor/stator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridel-Bertomeu, Thibault; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.

    2017-06-01

    Rotating cavity flows are essential components of industrial applications but their dynamics are still not fully understood when it comes to the relation between the fluid organization and monitored pressure fluctuations. From computer hard-drives to turbo-pumps of space launchers, designed devices often produce flow oscillations that can either destroy the component prematurely or produce too much noise. In such a context, large scale dynamics of high Reynolds number rotor/stator cavities need better understanding especially at the flow limit-cycle or associated statistically stationary state. In particular, the influence of curvature as well as cavity aspect ratio on the large scale organization and flow stability at a fixed rotating disc Reynolds number is fundamental. To probe such flows, wall-resolved large eddy simulation is applied to two different rotor/stator cylindrical cavities and one annular cavity. Validation of the predictions proves the method to be suited and to capture the disc boundary layer patterns reported in the literature. It is then shown that in complement to these disc boundary layer analyses, at the limit-cycle the rotating flows exhibit characteristic patterns at mid-height in the homogeneous core pointing the importance of large scale features. Indeed, dynamic modal decomposition reveals that the entire flow dynamics are driven by only a handful of atomic modes whose combination links the oscillatory patterns observed in the boundary layers as well as in the core of the cavity. These fluctuations form macro-structures, born in the unstable stator boundary layer and extending through the homogeneous inviscid core to the rotating disc boundary layer, causing its instability under some conditions. More importantly, the macro-structures significantly differ depending on the configuration pointing the need for deeper understanding of the influence of geometrical parameters as well as operating conditions.

  9. A simple high-content cell cycle assay reveals frequent discrepancies between cell number and ATP and MTS proliferation assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Ka Yan Chan

    Full Text Available In order to efficiently characterize both antiproliferative potency and mechanism of action of small molecules targeting the cell cycle, we developed a high-throughput image-based assay to determine cell number and cell cycle phase distribution. Using this we profiled the effects of experimental and approved anti-cancer agents with a range mechanisms of action on a set of cell lines, comparing direct cell counting versus two metabolism-based cell viability/proliferation assay formats, ATP-dependent bioluminescence, MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium reduction, and a whole-well DNA-binding dye fluorescence assay. We show that, depending on compound mechanisms of action, the metabolism-based proxy assays are frequently prone to 1 significant underestimation of compound potency and efficacy, and 2 non-monotonic dose-response curves due to concentration-dependent phenotypic 'switching'. In particular, potency and efficacy of DNA synthesis-targeting agents such as gemcitabine and etoposide could be profoundly underestimated by ATP and MTS-reduction assays. In the same image-based assay we showed that drug-induced increases in ATP content were associated with increased cell size and proportionate increases in mitochondrial content and respiratory flux concomitant with cell cycle arrest. Therefore, differences in compound mechanism of action and cell line-specific responses can yield significantly misleading results when using ATP or tetrazolium-reduction assays as a proxy for cell number when screening compounds for antiproliferative activity or profiling panels of cell lines for drug sensitivity.

  10. High-throughput sequencing and copy number variation detection using formalin fixed embedded tissue in metastatic gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokhwi Kim

    Full Text Available In the era of targeted therapy, mutation profiling of cancer is a crucial aspect of making therapeutic decisions. To characterize cancer at a molecular level, the use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue is important. We tested the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 and nCounter Copy Number Variation Assay in 89 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples to determine whether they are applicable in archival clinical samples for personalized targeted therapies. We validated the results with Sanger sequencing, real-time quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Frequently detected somatic mutations included TP53 (28.17%, APC (10.1%, PIK3CA (5.6%, KRAS (4.5%, SMO (3.4%, STK11 (3.4%, CDKN2A (3.4% and SMAD4 (3.4%. Amplifications of HER2, CCNE1, MYC, KRAS and EGFR genes were observed in 8 (8.9%, 4 (4.5%, 2 (2.2%, 1 (1.1% and 1 (1.1% cases, respectively. In the cases with amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization for HER2 verified gene amplification and immunohistochemistry for HER2, EGFR and CCNE1 verified the overexpression of proteins in tumor cells. In conclusion, we successfully performed semiconductor-based sequencing and nCounter copy number variation analyses in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples. High-throughput screening in archival clinical samples enables faster, more accurate and cost-effective detection of hotspot mutations or amplification in genes.

  11. Extended self-similarity in moment-generating-functions in wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Meneveau, C.; Marusic, I.; Biferale, L.

    2016-08-01

    In wall-bounded turbulence, the moment generating functions (MGFs) of the streamwise velocity fluctuations develop power-law scaling as a function of the wall normal distance z /δ . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units (averaged friction velocity), z is the distance from the wall, q is an independent variable, and δ is the boundary layer thickness. Previous work has shown that this power-law scaling exists in the log-region 3 Reτ0.5≲z+,z ≲0.15 δ where Reτ is the friction velocity-based Reynolds number. Here we present empirical evidence that this self-similar scaling can be extended, including bulk and viscosity-affected regions 30 reference value, qo. ESS also improves the scaling properties, leading to more precise measurements of the scaling exponents. The analysis is based on hot-wire measurements from boundary layers at Reτ ranging from 2700 to 13 000 from the Melbourne High-Reynolds-Number-Turbulent-Boundary-Layer-Wind-Tunnel. Furthermore, we investigate the scalings of the filtered, large-scale velocity fluctuations uzL and of the remaining small-scale component, uzS=uz-uzL . The scaling of uzL falls within the conventionally defined log region and depends on a scale that is proportional to l+˜Reτ1/2 ; the scaling of uzS extends over a much wider range from z+≈30 to z ≈0.5 δ . Last, we present a theoretical construction of two multiplicative processes for uzL and uzS that reproduce the empirical findings concerning the scalings properties as functions of z+ and in the ESS sense.

  12. Vertebral number is highly evolvable in salamanders and newts (family Salamandridae) and variably associated with climatic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntzen, J.W.; Beukema, W.; Galis, F.; Ivanović, A.

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, the relative proportion of the number of trunk and caudal vertebrae is an important determinant of body shape. While among amphibians frogs and toads show low variation in vertebrae numbers, in salamanders the numbers of trunk and caudal vertebrae vary widely, giving rise to phenotyp

  13. The Numerical and Analytical Study of Bifurcation and Multicellular Flow Instability Due to Natural Convection Between Narrow Horizontal Isothermal Cylindrical annuli at High Rayleigh Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    studies, in general, have been much more limited. This thesis concentrates on the high Rayleigh number/small- gap flow regime. It has been found that...just prior to it. Analytical approaches, especially with regard to the high Rayleigh number/small- gap flow regime, have been virtually unexplored. To

  14. Dietary Resistant Starch Supplementation Increases High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number in Pigs Fed a Western Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Todd C; Harding, Scott V; Raslawsky, Amy; Rempel, Curtis B

    2017-05-04

    Resistant starch (RS) has been well characterized for its glycemic control properties; however, there is little consensus regarding the influence of RS on blood lipid concentrations and lipoprotein distribution and size. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the effect of daily RS supplementation in a controlled capsule delivery on biomarkers of cardiovascular (blood lipids, lipoproteins) and diabetes (glucose, insulin) risk in a pig model. Twelve 8-week-old male Yorkshire pigs were placed on a synthetic Western diet and randomly divided into two groups (n = 6/group) for 30 days: (1) a placebo group supplemented with capsules containing unmodified pre-gelatinized potato starch (0 g/RS/day); and (2) an RS group supplemented with capsules containing resistant potato starch (10 g/RS/day). Serum lipids including total-cholesterol (C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides did not differ (p > 0.05) between the RS and placebo groups. Although the total numbers of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles were similar (p > 0.05) between the two groups, total high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles were higher (+28%, p < 0.05) in the RS group compared with placebo, resulting from an increase (p < 0.05) in the small HDL subclass particles (+32%). Compared with the placebo group, RS supplementation lowered (p < 0.05) fasting serum glucose (-20%) and improved (p < 0.05) insulin resistance as estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) without a change in insulin. Additionally, total serum glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) was higher (+141%, p < 0.05) following RS supplementation compared with placebo. This data suggests that in addition to the more well-characterized effect of RS intake in lowering blood glucose and improving insulin sensitivity, the consumption of RS may be beneficial in lipid management strategies by enhancing total

  15. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  16. The CNVrd2 package: measurement of copy number at complex loci using high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang T; Merriman, Tony R; Black, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughout sequencing technologies have made it possible to accurately assign copy number (CN) at CN variable loci. However, current analytic methods often perform poorly in regions in which complex CN variation is observed. Here we report the development of a read depth-based approach, CNVrd2, for investigation of CN variation using high-throughput sequencing data. This methodology was developed using data from the 1000 Genomes Project from the CCL3L1 locus, and tested using data from the DEFB103A locus. In both cases, samples were selected for which paralog ratio test data were also available for comparison. The CNVrd2 method first uses observed read-count ratios to refine segmentation results in one population. Then a linear regression model is applied to adjust the results across multiple populations, in combination with a Bayesian normal mixture model to cluster segmentation scores into groups for individual CN counts. The performance of CNVrd2 was compared to that of two other read depth-based methods (CNVnator, cn.mops) at the CCL3L1 and DEFB103A loci. The highest concordance with the paralog ratio test method was observed for CNVrd2 (77.8/90.4% for CNVrd2, 36.7/4.8% for cn.mops and 7.2/1% for CNVnator at CCL3L1 and DEF103A). CNVrd2 is available as an R package as part of the Bioconductor project: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/CNVrd2.html.

  17. The CNVrd2 package: measurement of copy number at complex loci using high-throughput sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang eNguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughout sequencing technologies have made it possible to accurately assign copy number (CN at CN variable loci. However, current analytic methods often perform poorly in regions in which complex CN variation is observed. Here we report the development of a read depth-based approach, CNVrd2, for investigation of CN variation using high-throughput sequencing data. This methodology was developed using data from the 1000 Genomes Project from the CCL3L1 locus, and tested using data from the DEFB103A locus. In both cases, samples were selected for which paralogue ratio test data were also available for comparison. The CNVrd2 method first uses observed read-count ratios to refine segmentation results in one population. Then a linear regression model is applied to adjust the results across multiple populations, in combination with a Bayesian normal mixture model to cluster segmentation scores into groups for individual CN counts. The performance of CNVrd2 was compared to that of two other read depth-based methods (CNVnator, cn.mops at the CCL3L1 and DEFB103A loci, and the highest concordance with the paralog ratio test method was observed for CNVrd2 (77.8%/90.4% for CNVrd2, 36.7%/4.8% for cn.mops and 7.2%/1% for CNVnator at CCL3L1 and DEF103A. CNVrd2 is available as an R package as part of the Bioconductor project: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/CNVrd2.html.

  18. Detailed flowfield and surface properties for high Knudsen number planar jet impingement at an inclined flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunpei; He, Xin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents two sets of analytical exact solutions for collisionless gas flows from a planar exit, impinging at an inclined flat plate. These analytical results are obtained by using gaskinetic theories. The first set of solutions are for a diffuse reflective plate surface, and the other set of solutions are for a specular reflective plate surface. A virtual nozzle exit is adopted to aid analyzing the specular reflective plate scenario. New formulas for plate surface properties, including velocity slips, pressure, shear stress, and heat flux distributions, are provided. For both problems, the flowfield exact solutions are investigated as well. Numerical simulations with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method are performed to validate these new analytical results, and good agreement is obtained for flows with high Knudsen numbers. The results consider effects from many factors, such as the plate inclination angle, geometry ratios, and exit gas and plate properties (such as exit gas bulk density, gas speed ratio, and exit gas and plate temperatures). Compared with past work, these new solutions are more comprehensive and practical. The results also illustrate that if the plate is quite close to the nozzle exit, it is improper to adopt the traditional treatments of a point source and a simple cosine function.

  19. Enhancing genome-wide copy number variation identification by high density array CGH using diverse resources of pig breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiying Wang

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are important forms of genomic variation, and have attracted extensive attentions in humans as well as domestic animals. In the study, using a custom-designed 2.1 M array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, genome-wide CNVs were identified among 12 individuals from diverse pig breeds, including one Asian wild population, six Chinese indigenous breeds and two modern commercial breeds (Yorkshire and Landrace, with one individual of the other modern commercial breed, Duroc, as the reference. A total of 1,344 CNV regions (CNVRs were identified, covering 47.79 Mb (∼1.70% of the pig genome. The length of these CNVRs ranged from 3.37 Kb to 1,319.0 Kb with a mean of 35.56 Kb and a median of 11.11 Kb. Compared with similar studies reported, most of the CNVRs (74.18% were firstly identified in present study. In order to confirm these CNVRs, 21 CNVRs were randomly chosen to be validated by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR and a high rate (85.71% of confirmation was obtained. Functional annotation of CNVRs suggested that the identified CNVRs have important function, and may play an important role in phenotypic and production traits difference among various breeds. Our results are essential complementary to the CNV map in the pig genome, which will provide abundant genetic markers to investigate association studies between various phenotypes and CNVs in pigs.

  20. An all-statistics, high-speed algorithm for the analysis of copy number variation in genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Lee, Hsing-Chung; Ling, Qingdong; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ko, Yi-An; Tsou, Tsong-Shan; Wang, Sun-Chong; Wu, Li-Ching; Lee, H C

    2011-07-01

    Detection of copy number variation (CNV) in DNA has recently become an important method for understanding the pathogenesis of cancer. While existing algorithms for extracting CNV from microarray data have worked reasonably well, the trend towards ever larger sample sizes and higher resolution microarrays has vastly increased the challenges they face. Here, we present Segmentation analysis of DNA (SAD), a clustering algorithm constructed with a strategy in which all operational decisions are based on simple and rigorous applications of statistical principles, measurement theory and precise mathematical relations. Compared with existing packages, SAD is simpler in formulation, more user friendly, much faster and less thirsty for memory, offers higher accuracy and supplies quantitative statistics for its predictions. Unique among such algorithms, SAD's running time scales linearly with array size; on a typical modern notebook, it completes high-quality CNV analyses for a 250 thousand-probe array in ∼1 s and a 1.8 million-probe array in ∼8 s.