WorldWideScience

Sample records for high ph ammonia

  1. High pH ammonia toxicity, and the search for life on the Jovian planets.

    Deal, P H; Souza, K A; Mack, H M

    1975-10-01

    Jovian plants have enviroments apparently suitable for the evolution of life, but nevertheless, present severe challenges to organisms. One such challenge arises from the presence of ammonia. Ammonia is an efficient biocide, its effect being dependent on pH as well as on concentration. The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural enviornments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, survival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is, nevertheless, two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Our data support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  2. High Ph, Ammonia Toxicity, and the Search for Life on the Jovian Planets

    Deal, P. H.; Souza, K. A.; Mack, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural environments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, urvival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Results support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  3. Hydrogen ion (Ph), ammonia, dissolved oxygen and nitrite ...

    Hydrogen ion (pH), dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrite concentrations were studied monthly in two systems (re-circulatory and semi-intensive of 3 m2 sizes) each for six months. The systems were each stocked with 200 g of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Results showed that all parameters were within acceptable limits ...

  4. Inhibition of Direct Electrolytic Ammonia Oxidation Due to a Change in Local pH

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical ammonia oxidation has gained a lot of attention recently as an efficient method for ammonia removal from wastewater, for the use in ammonia-based fuel cells and the production of high purity hydrogen. Thermally decomposed iridium oxide films (TDIROF) have been shown to be catalytically active for direct ammonia oxidation in aqueous solutions if NH 3 is present. However, the process was reported to be rapidly inhibited on TDIROF. Herein, we show that this fast inhibition of direct ammonia oxidation does not result from surface poisoning by adsorbed elemental nitrogen (N ads ). Instead, we propose that direct ammonia oxidation and oxygen evolution can lead to a drop of the local pH at the electrode resulting in a low availability of the actual reactant, NH 3 . The hypothesis was tested with cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments on stagnant and rotating disk electrodes (RDE). The CV experiments on the stagnant electrode revealed that the decrease of the ammonia oxidation peaks was considerably reduced by introducing an idle phase at open circuit potential between subsequent scans. Furthermore, the polarization of the TDIROF electrode into the hydrogen evolution region (HER) resulted in increased ammonia oxidation peaks in the following anodic scans which can be explained with an increased local pH after the consumption of protons in the HER. On the RDE, the ammonia oxidation peaks did not decrease in immediately consecutive scans. These findings would not be expected if surface poisoning was responsible for the fast inhibition but they are in good agreement with the proposed mechanism of pH induced limitation by the reactant, NH 3 . The plausibility of the mechanism was also supported by our numerical simulations of the processes in the Nernstian diffusion layer. The knowledge about this inhibition mechanism of direct ammonia oxidation is especially important for the design of electrochemical cells for wastewater treatment. The mechanism is not only

  5. Defences against ammonia toxicity in tropical air-breathing fishes exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia: a review.

    Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Wilson, J M; Randall, D J

    2004-10-01

    In the tropics, air-breathing fishes can be exposed to environmental ammonia when stranded in puddles of water during the dry season, during a stay inside a burrow, or after agricultural fertilization. At low concentrations of environmental ammonia, NH(3) excretion is impeded, as in aerial exposure, leading to the accumulation of endogenous ammonia. At high concentrations of environmental ammonia, which results in a reversed NH(3) partial pressure gradient (DeltaP(NH3)), there is retention of endogenous ammonia and uptake of exogenous ammonia. In this review, several tropical air-breathing fishes (giant mudskipper, African catfish, oriental weatherloach, swamp eel, four-eyed sleeper, abehaze and slender African lungfish), which can tolerate high environmental ammonia exposure, are used as examples to demonstrate how eight different adaptations can be involved in defence against ammonia toxicity. Four of these adaptations deal with ammonia toxicity at branchial and/or epithelial surfaces: (1) active excretion of NH(4)(+); (2) lowering of environmental pH; (3) low NH(3) permeability of epithelial surfaces; and (4) volatilization of NH(3), while another four adaptations ameliorate ammonia toxicity at the cellular and subcellular levels: (5) high tolerance of ammonia at the cellular and subcellular levels; (6) reduction in ammonia production; (7) glutamine synthesis; and (8) urea synthesis. The responses of tropical air-breathing fishes to high environmental ammonia are determined apparently by behavioural adaptations and the nature of their natural environments.

  6. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  7. Nanoparticle assembled microcapsules for application as pH and ammonia sensor

    Amali, Arlin Jose; Awwad, Nour H.; Rana, Rohit Kumar; Patra, Digambara

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: HPTS encapsulated nanoparticle assembled microcapsule is exploited as dual excitations ratiometic pH sensor. This nanoparticle assembled microcapsule based fluorescence sensor can determine ammonia and offers a robust, simple and fast sensing material. Highlights: ► A novel HPTS encapsulated nanoparticle assembled microcapsule is developed. ► Its dual excitation facilitates a ratiometic pH sensor. ► It is successfully applied for the determination of ammonia. ► It provides a robust, simple and fast sensing material. - Abstract: The encapsulation of molecular probes in a suitable nanostructured matrix can be exploited to alter their optical properties and robustness for fabricating efficient chemical sensors. Despite high sensitivity, simplicity, selectivity and cost effectiveness, the photo-destruction and photo-bleaching are the serious concerns while utilizing molecular probes. Herein we demonstrate that hydroxy pyrene trisulfonate (HPTS), a pH sensitive molecular probe, when encapsulated in a microcapsule structure prepared via the assembly of silica nanoparticles mediated by poly-L-lysine and trisodium citrate, provides a robust sensing material for pH sensing under the physiological conditions. The temporal evolution under continuous irradiation indicates that the fluorophore inside the silica microcapsule is extraordinarily photostable. The fluorescence intensity alternation at dual excitation facilitates for a ratiometic sensing of the pH, however, the fluorescence lifetime is insensitive to hydrogen ion concentration. The sensing scheme is found to be robust, fast and simple for the measurement of pH in the range 5.8–8.0, and can be successfully applied for the determination of ammonia in the concentration range 0–1.2 mM, which is important for aquatic life and the environment.

  8. Effect of pH on the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion characteristics of SUS321 for pressure vessel of SMART in pure water, ammonia aqueous solutions of pH 8.5 ∼ 11.5 at 300 .deg. C were evaluated by using static autoclaves. SUS321 specimen in the high temperature ammonia aqueous solution has weight gain or loss by the 4 reactions. And it depends on the refreshing period of the aqueous solution. So additional experiments by recirculating loop system were required to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

  9. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  10. The effect of pH on the properties of ammonium uranate precipitated with gaseous ammonia

    Woolfrey, J.L.

    1976-11-01

    Ammonium uranate (AU) powders were precipitated from a uranyl nitrate solution using gaseous ammonia to determine the effect of pH of precipitation on their composition and morphology. Increasing pH of precipitation increased the ammonia and nitrate contents and the specific surface area but decreased the crystallite size of the AU powders. The specific surface area was also increased by increasing the ammonia content of the powder. The composition and morphology of the powders were similar to those reported in the literature for AU precipitated with NH 4 OH. (author)

  11. The effect of pH and ADP on ammonia affinity for human glutamate dehydrogenases

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Pajecka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) uses ammonia to reversibly convert α-ketoglutarate to glutamate using NADP(H) and NAD(H) as cofactors. While GDH in most mammals is encoded by a single GLUD1 gene, humans and other primates have acquired a GLUD2 gene with distinct tissue expression profile. The two...... human isoenzymes (hGDH1 and hGDH2), though highly homologous, differ markedly in their regulatory properties. Here we obtained hGDH1 and hGDH2 in recombinant form and studied their Km for ammonia in the presence of 1.0 mM ADP. The analyses showed that lowering the pH of the buffer (from 8.0 to 7.......0) increased the Km for ammonia substantially (hGDH1: from 12.8 ± 1.4 mM to 57.5 ± 1.6 mM; hGDH2: from 14.7 ± 1.6 mM to 62.2 ± 1.7 mM), thus essentially precluding reductive amination. Moreover, lowering the ADP concentration to 0.1 mM not only increased the K0.5 [NH4 (+)] of hGDH2, but also introduced...

  12. Polymorphisms in Renal Ammonia Metabolism Genes Correlate With 24-Hour Urine pH

    Benjamin K. Canales

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: Overall, these findings suggest that variants in common genes involved in ammonia metabolism may substantively contribute to basal urine pH regulation. These variations might influence the likelihood of developing disease conditions associated with altered urine pH, such as uric acid or calcium phosphate kidney stones.

  13. Nanoparticle assembled microcapsules for application as pH and ammonia sensor.

    Amali, Arlin Jose; Awwad, Nour H; Rana, Rohit Kumar; Patra, Digambara

    2011-12-05

    The encapsulation of molecular probes in a suitable nanostructured matrix can be exploited to alter their optical properties and robustness for fabricating efficient chemical sensors. Despite high sensitivity, simplicity, selectivity and cost effectiveness, the photo-destruction and photo-bleaching are the serious concerns while utilizing molecular probes. Herein we demonstrate that hydroxy pyrene trisulfonate (HPTS), a pH sensitive molecular probe, when encapsulated in a microcapsule structure prepared via the assembly of silica nanoparticles mediated by poly-L-lysine and trisodium citrate, provides a robust sensing material for pH sensing under the physiological conditions. The temporal evolution under continuous irradiation indicates that the fluorophore inside the silica microcapsule is extraordinarily photostable. The fluorescence intensity alternation at dual excitation facilitates for a ratiometic sensing of the pH, however, the fluorescence lifetime is insensitive to hydrogen ion concentration. The sensing scheme is found to be robust, fast and simple for the measurement of pH in the range 5.8-8.0, and can be successfully applied for the determination of ammonia in the concentration range 0-1.2 mM, which is important for aquatic life and the environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Fiber Optic Ammonia Sensor Using a Universal pH Indicator

    Adolfo J. Rodríguez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A universal pH indicator is used to fabricate a fiber optic ammonia sensor. The advantage of this pH indicator is that it exhibits sensitivity to ammonia over a broad wavelength range. This provides a differential response, with a valley around 500 nm and a peak around 650 nm, which allows us to perform ratiometric measurements. The ratiometric measurements provide not only an enhanced signal, but can also eliminate any external disturbance due to humidity or temperature fluctuations. In addition, the indicator is embedded in a hydrophobic and gas permeable polyurethane film named Tecoflex®. The film provides additional advantages to the sensor, such as operation in dry environments, efficient transport of the element to be measured to the sensitive area of the sensor, and prevent leakage or detachment of the indicator. The combination of the universal pH indicator and Tecoflex® film provides a reliable and robust fiber optic ammonia sensor.

  15. A Fiber Optic Ammonia Sensor Using a Universal pH Indicator

    Rodríguez, Adolfo J.; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Matías, Ignacio R.; Arregui, Francisco. J.; Domínguez Cruz, Rene F.; May-Arrioja, Daniel. A.

    2014-01-01

    A universal pH indicator is used to fabricate a fiber optic ammonia sensor. The advantage of this pH indicator is that it exhibits sensitivity to ammonia over a broad wavelength range. This provides a differential response, with a valley around 500 nm and a peak around 650 nm, which allows us to perform ratiometric measurements. The ratiometric measurements provide not only an enhanced signal, but can also eliminate any external disturbance due to humidity or temperature fluctuations. In addition, the indicator is embedded in a hydrophobic and gas permeable polyurethane film named Tecoflex®. The film provides additional advantages to the sensor, such as operation in dry environments, efficient transport of the element to be measured to the sensitive area of the sensor, and prevent leakage or detachment of the indicator. The combination of the universal pH indicator and Tecoflex® film provides a reliable and robust fiber optic ammonia sensor. PMID:24583969

  16. Treatment of reactive process wastewater with high-level ammonia by blow-off method

    Chen Xiaotong; Quan Ying; Wang Yang; Fu Genna; Liu Bing; Tang Yaping

    2012-01-01

    The ceramic UO 2 kernels for nuclear fuel elements of high temperature gas cooled reactors were prepared through sol-gel process with uranyl nitrate, which produces process wastewater containing high-level ammonia and uranium. The blow-off method on a bench scale was investigated to remove ammonia from reactive wastewater. Under the optimized operating conditions, the ammonia can be removed by more than 95%, with little reactive uranium distilled. The effects of pH, heating temperature and stripping time were studied. Static tests with ion-exchange resin indicate that ammonia removal treatment increases uranium accumulation in anion exchange resin. (authors)

  17. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas

    Ammonia is the major toxicant in full scale anaerobic digesters of animal wastes which are rich in proteins and/or urea, such as pig or poultry wastes. Ammonia inhibition decreases methane production rates, increases volatile fatty acids concentration and leads to economic losses for the biogas...... was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to determine...... exclusively to strict aceticlastic methanogens. Results obtained in this study, demonstrated for the first time that strictly aceticlastic methanogens, derived from an enriched culture, can efficiently produce methane under high ammonia levels....

  18. Mechanism of ammonia excretion in the freshwater leech Nephelopsis obscura: characterization of a primitive Rh protein and effects of high environmental ammonia

    Quijada-Rodriguez, Alex R.; Treberg, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about nitrogenous excretion in freshwater invertebrates. In the current study, the nitrogen excretion mechanism in the carnivorous ribbon leech, Nephelopsis obscura, was investigated. Excretion experiments showed that the ribbon leech is ammonotelic, excreting 166.0 ± 8.6 nmol·grams fresh weight (gFW)−1·h−1 ammonia and 14.7 ± 1.9 nmol·gFW−1·h−1 urea. Exposure to high and low pH hampered and enhanced, respectively, ammonia excretion rates, indicating an acid-linked ammonia trapping mechanism across the skin epithelia. Accordingly, compared with body tissues, the skin exhibited elevated mRNA expression levels of a newly identified Rhesus protein and at least in tendency the Na+/K+-ATPase. Pharmacological experiments and enzyme assays suggested an ammonia excretion mechanism that involves the V-ATPase, Na+/K+-ATPase, and carbonic anhydrase, but not necessarily a functional microtubule system. Most importantly, functional expression studies of the identified Rh protein cloned from leech skin tissue revealed an ammonia transport capability of this protein when expressed in yeast. The leech Rh-ammonia transporter (NoRhp) is a member of the primitive Rh protein family, which is a sister group to the common ancestor of vertebrate ammonia-transporting Rh proteins. Exposure to high environmental ammonia (HEA) caused a new adjustment of body ammonia, accompanied with a decrease in NoRhp and Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA levels, but unaltered ammonia excretion rates. To our knowledge, this is only the second comprehensive study regarding the ammonia excretion mechanisms in a freshwater invertebrate, but our results show that basic processes of ammonia excretion appear to also be comparable to those found in freshwater fish, suggesting an early evolution of ionoregulatory mechanisms in freshwater organisms. PMID:26180186

  19. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsills siliquoidea)

    Wang, N.; Erickson, R.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20??C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  20. Optimization of biomethanation focusing on high ammonia loaded processes

    Wang, Han

    , could theoretically mitigate the ammonia inhibition problem (Angelidaki et al., 1999). Therefore, the effect of co-digestion of cattle manure with lipids (i.e. glycerol trioleate (GTO)) under high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N·L-1) in anaerobic continuous stirred tank (CSTR) reactors (RGTO) was assessed....... Additionally, for comparison purposes, a soluble carbohydrate (i.e. glucose) was also used as a co-substrate in an identical CSTR reactor (RGLU). At 5 g NH4+-N·L-1, relative methane production of RGTO and RGLU, was 10.5% and 41% compared to the expected uninhibited production, respectively. At the same time....... The results derived from this study clearly demonstrated a 31.3% increase in methane production yield in the CSTR reactor, at steady-state, after bioaugmentation. It indicated that this new solution to counteract ammonia inhibition was more practical and effective compared with other methods applied today...

  1. Expression and properties of the highly alkalophilic phenylalanine ammonia-lyase of thermophilic Rubrobacter xylanophilus.

    Klaudia Kovács

    Full Text Available The sequence of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC: 4.3.1.24 of the thermophilic and radiotolerant bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxPAL was identified by screening the genomes of bacteria for members of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase family. A synthetic gene encoding the RxPAL protein was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli TOP 10 in a soluble form with an N-terminal His6-tag and the recombinant RxPAL protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The activity assay of RxPAL with l-phenylalanine at various pH values exhibited a local maximum at pH 8.5 and a global maximum at pH 11.5. Circular dichroism (CD studies showed that RxPAL is associated with an extensive α-helical character (far UV CD and two distinctive near-UV CD peaks. These structural characteristics were well preserved up to pH 11.0. The extremely high pH optimum of RxPAL can be rationalized by a three-dimensional homology model indicating possible disulfide bridges, extensive salt-bridge formation and an excess of negative electrostatic potential on the surface. Due to these properties, RxPAL may be a candidate as biocatalyst in synthetic biotransformations leading to unnatural l- or d-amino acids or as therapeutic enzyme in treatment of phenylketonuria or leukemia.

  2. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia.

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-02-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L during 30 days, resulting in an average recovery rate of 80 g-N/m(2)/d. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 0.71±0.5 W/m(2) was generated at 2.85 A/m(2). Both current driven NH4(+) migration and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMDC performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative effect on the ammonia transportation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recognition of Relevant ORP, pH, and DO Bending Points in Ammonia Removal from Drinking Water through Online BAF System

    Hassimi Abu Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify the relevant bending points in ORP, pH, and DO profiles in ammonia removal through online monitoring. A novelty BAF system as newl application for drinking water treatment that equipped with ORP, pH, DO NH4 + and NO3 − sensors was used. Two types of polluted drinking water strength (low and high strength with various NH4 + concentrations and aeration flow were treated at a fixed-time reaction of 24 h. Experiments were conducted at four track studies (TS of TS1 (NH4 += 50 mg/L, aeration = 0.3 L/min, TS2 (NH4 + = 100 mg/L, aeration = 2.0 L/min, TS3 (NH4 += 100 mg/L, no aeration and TS4 (NH4 += 10 mg/L, aeration = 0.1 L/min. The results showed that the removal of NH4 + was more than 95% for TS1, TS2, and TS4. From the online monitoring performances, DO elbow and ammonia valley appeared in ORP and pH profiles, respectively. Similarly, new positive plateaus were observed in DO, indicating that the nitrifiers stopped to consume the DO after NH4 + was completely removed. Hence, based on the bending points, the aeration system is possible to be automatically stopped just after DO elbow and ammonia valley appears in order to save the energy consumption and to shorten the time demands for the drinking water treatment process.

  4. Ammonia complexes of metals in aqueous solutions with high concentrations of ammonia

    Padar, T.G.; Novikov, L.K.; Stupko, T.V.; Isaev, I.D.; Pashkov, G.L.; Mironov, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Potentiometric method, glass electrodes and Bierrum function were used to study the formation of ammonia complexes of magnesium, calcium, cadmium, zinc, copper(2) and silver in 2.0 mol/dm 3 aqueous solutions of ammonia nitrate with 0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations at 25.0 deg C. Step constants of stability of studied complexes were calculated and their compositions were determined with account of nonideal character of aqueous-salt solutions with ammonia concentrations above 1.0 mol/dm 3 . Values of correction effects on salting out ammonia action for Bierrum function in solutions with 1.0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations were found

  5. Ammonia stress under high environmental ammonia induces Hsp70 and Hsp90 in the mud eel, Monopterus cuchia.

    Hangzo, Hnunlalliani; Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Saha, Shrabani; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2017-02-01

    The obligatory air-breathing mud eel (Monopterus cuchia) is frequently being challenged with high environmental ammonia (HEA) exposure in its natural habitats. The present study investigated the possible induction of heat shock protein 70 and 90 (hsp70, hsc70, hsp90α and hsp90β) genes and more expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins under ammonia stress in different tissues of the mud eel after exposure to HEA (50 mM NH 4 Cl) for 14 days. HEA resulted in significant accumulation of toxic ammonia in different body tissues and plasma, which was accompanied with the stimulation of oxidative stress in the mud eel as evidenced by more accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) during exposure to HEA. Further, hyper-ammonia stress led to significant increase in the levels of mRNA transcripts for inducible hsp70 and hsp90α genes and also their translated proteins in different tissues probably as a consequence of induction of hsp70 and hsp90α genes in the mud eel. However, hyper-ammonia stress was neither associated with any significant alterations in the levels of mRNA transcripts for constitutive hsc70 and hsp90β genes nor their translated proteins in any of the tissues studied. More abundance of Hsp70 and Hsp90α proteins might be one of the strategies adopted by the mud eel to defend itself from the ammonia-induced cellular damages under ammonia stress. Further, this is the first report of ammonia-induced induction of hsp70 and hsp90α genes under hyper-ammonia stress in any freshwater air-breathing teleost.

  6. with rice hulls on pH and ammonia emissions from poultry houses

    The use of aluminum sulfate [alum; Al2(SO3)4·14H2O] as top dressing to poultry litter has been proven in reducing ammonia (NH3) volatilization under both laboratory and field tests; however, there has been no information of alum application in mixing methods from poultry litter or rice hulls. The aim of the experiment was ...

  7. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation experiments were conducted at high pressure (30 bar and 100 bar) under oxidizing and stoichiometric conditions, respectively, and temperatures ranging from 450 to 925 K. The oxidation of ammonia was slow under stoichiometric conditions in the temperature range investigated. Under...... oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  8. Ammonia Monitor

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  9. Flexible ammonia handling strategies using both cutaneous and branchial epithelia in the highly ammonia-tolerant Pacific hagfish.

    Clifford, Alexander M; Weinrauch, Alyssa M; Edwards, Susan L; Wilkie, Michael P; Goss, Greg G

    2017-08-01

    Hagfish consume carrion, potentially exposing them to hypoxia, hypercapnia, and high environmental ammonia (HEA). We investigated branchial and cutaneous ammonia handling strategies by which Pacific hagfish ( Eptatretus stoutii ) tolerate and recover from high ammonia loading. Hagfish were exposed to HEA (20 mmol/l) for 48 h to elevate plasma total ammonia (T Amm ) levels before placement into divided chambers for a 4-h recovery period in ammonia-free seawater where ammonia excretion ( J Amm ) was measured independently in the anterior and posterior compartments. Localized HEA exposures were also conducted by subjecting hagfish to HEA in either the anterior or posterior compartments. During recovery, HEA-exposed animals increased J Amm in both compartments, with the posterior compartment comprising ~20% of the total J Amm compared with ~11% in non-HEA-exposed fish. Plasma T Amm increased substantially when whole hagfish and the posterior regions were exposed to HEA. Alternatively, plasma T Amm did not elevate after anterior localized HEA exposure. J Amm was concentration dependent (0.05-5 mmol/l) across excised skin patches at up to eightfold greater rates than in skin sections that were excised from HEA-exposed hagfish. Skin excised from more posterior regions displayed greater J Amm than those from more anterior regions. Immunohistochemistry with hagfish-specific anti-rhesus glycoprotein type c (α-hRhcg; ammonia transporter) antibody was characterized by staining on the basal aspect of hagfish epidermis while Western blotting demonstrated greater expression of Rhcg in more posterior skin sections. We conclude that cutaneous Rhcg proteins are involved in cutaneous ammonia excretion by Pacific hagfish and that this mechanism could be particularly important during feeding. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia...... recovery and electricity production. In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7g-N/L during 30days, resulting in an average recovery rate of 80g-N/m2/d. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 0.71±0.5W/m2 was generated at 2.85A/m2. Both current driven NH4+ migration...... and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMDC performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative...

  11. A fiber optic ammonia sensor using a universal pH indicator

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Adolfo Josué; Domínguez Cruz, Rene F.; May Arrioja, Daniel A.; Ruiz Zamarreño, Carlos; Matías Maestro, Ignacio; Arregui San Martín, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    A universal pH indicator is used to fabricate a fiber optic ammonia sensor. The advantage of this pH indicator is that it exhibits sensitivity toammonia over a broad wavelength range. This provides a differential response, with a valley around 500 nm and a peak around 650 nm, which allows us to perform ratiometric measurements. The ratiometric measurements provide not only an enhanced signal, but can also eliminate any external disturbance due to humidity or temperature fluctuations. In addit...

  12. Simultaneous removal of ammonia and N-nitrosamine precursors from high ammonia water by zeolite and powdered activated carbon.

    Xue, Runmiao; Donovan, Ariel; Zhang, Haiting; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Inniss, Enos; Eichholz, Todd; Shi, Honglan

    2018-02-01

    When adding sufficient chlorine to achieve breakpoint chlorination to source water containing high concentration of ammonia during drinking water treatment, high concentrations of disinfection by-products (DBPs) may form. If N-nitrosamine precursors are present, highly toxic N-nitrosamines, primarily N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), may also form. Removing their precursors before disinfection should be a more effective way to minimize these DBPs formation. In this study, zeolites and activated carbon were examined for ammonia and N-nitrosamine precursor removal when incorporated into drinking water treatment processes. The test results indicate that Mordenite zeolite can remove ammonia and five of seven N-nitrosamine precursors efficiently by single step adsorption test. The practical applicability was evaluated by simulation of typical drinking water treatment processes using six-gang stirring system. The Mordenite zeolite was applied at the steps of lime softening, alum coagulation, and alum coagulation with powdered activated carbon (PAC) sorption. While the lime softening process resulted in poor zeolite performance, alum coagulation did not impact ammonia and N-nitrosamine precursor removal. During alum coagulation, more than 67% ammonia and 70%-100% N-nitrosamine precursors were removed by Mordenite zeolite (except 3-(dimethylaminomethyl)indole (DMAI) and 4-dimethylaminoantipyrine (DMAP)). PAC effectively removed DMAI and DMAP when added during alum coagulation. A combination of the zeolite and PAC selected efficiently removed ammonia and all tested seven N-nitrosamine precursors (dimethylamine (DMA), ethylmethylamine (EMA), diethylamine (DEA), dipropylamine (DPA), trimethylamine (TMA), DMAP, and DMAI) during the alum coagulation process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The sensitivity of particle pH to NH3: Can high NH3 cause London Fog conditions?

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Nenes, A.

    2017-12-01

    High ammonia emissions from agriculture or other sources have been suggested to elevate ambient particle pH levels to near neutral acidity (pH=7), a condition that promotes rapid SO2 oxidation by NO2 to form aerosol sulfate concentration consistent with "London fog" levels. This mechanism has been used to explain pollution haze events in China. Predicted pH for locations in the US and Europe show fine particles are highly acidic with pH typically less than 2. The results are consistent with measured ammonia and nitric acid gas-particle partitioning, validating predicted pH levels. Using these data sets from representative sites around the world we conduct a thermodynamic analysis of aerosol pH and its sensitivity to ammonia levels. We find that particle pH, regardless of ammonia levels, is always acidic even for the unusually high ammonia levels found in highly polluted Asian cities, Beijing (pH=4.5) and Xi'an (pH=5), locations where sulfate production from NOx is proposed. These results indicate that sulfur dioxide oxidation through a NO2-mediated pathway is not likely in China, nor any other region of the world (e.g., US, Mediterranean) since the fine aerosol is consistently acidic. The mildly acidic conditions would, however, permit rapid oxidation of sulfur dioxide through transition metal chemistry. The limited alkalinity from the carbonate buffer in dust and seasalt can provide the only likely set of conditions where NO2-mediated oxidation of SO2 outcompetes with other well-established pathways.

  14. Staging properties of potassium-ammonia ternary graphite intercalation compounds at high ammonia pressure

    Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-04-01

    The pressure dependence of the (00l) x-ray diffraction patterns of the ternary graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)xC24 has been studied in the range 0.5-11 kbar (for which x~4.5) using a diamond anvil cell. A special apparatus for loading the cell with liquid ammonia at room temperature has been constructed and is briefly described. In these experiments, the pressure-transmitting fluid was also an intercalant, namely ammonia. Therefore, the chemical potential of this species was linearly coupled to the applied pressure in contrast to the usual case where the pressure-transmitting fluid is chemically passive. The pressure dependences of the basal spacings and of the relative intensities of key reflections have been measured, as have the compressibilities of the stage-1 and stage-2 components of the two-phase system. Basal-spacing anomalies and anomalies in the relative intensities occur at pressures of ~3.5 and 8.0 kbar and are tentatively attributed to in-plane coordination changes in the potassium-ammonia ratio. Using thermodynamic arguments and Le Chatelier's principle we show quantitatively that a staging phase transition from pure stage-1 phase to an admixture of stage-1 and stage-2 is expected with increased pressure above 10 bar in agreement with experiment. The saturation ammonia compositions (x values) of the admixed stages are found to be 4.5 and 5.4 for the stage-1 and -2 components, respectively. This result is interpreted as evidence that the composition is not sterically limited but is determined by the binding energy of ammonia for potassium and by the perturbation to this energy from the guest-host interaction.

  15. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  16. Relationships between dry matter content, ensiling, ammonia-nitrogen, and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility in high-moisture corn samples.

    Ferraretto, L F; Taysom, K; Taysom, D M; Shaver, R D; Hoffman, P C

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to determine relationships between high-moisture corn (HMC) dry matter (DM), ammonia-N [% of crude protein (CP)], and soluble CP concentrations, and pH, with 7-h ruminal in vitro starch digestibility (ivStarchD), and (2) to evaluate the effect of ensiling on pH, ammonia-N, soluble CP, and ivStarchD measurements in HMC. A data set comprising 6,131 HMC samples (55 to 80% DM) obtained from a commercial feed analysis laboratory was used for this study. Month of sample submittal was assumed to be associated with length of the ensiling period. Data for month of sample submittal were analyzed using Proc Mixed in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) with month as a fixed effect. Regressions to determine linear and quadratic relationships between ivStarchD and ammonia-N, soluble CP, pH, and DM content were performed using Proc Mixed. The ivStarchD increased by 9 percentage units from October to August of the following year. Similar results were observed for ammonia-N and soluble CP with increases from 1.8 to 4.6% of CP and 31.3 to 46.4% of CP, respectively, from October to August of the following year. Ammonia-N was positively related to ivStarchD (R(2)=0.61). The DM content of HMC at silo removal was negatively related (R(2)=0.47) to ivStarchD with a decrease of 1.6 percentage units in ivStarchD per 1-percentage-unit increase in DM content. The pH of HMC was negatively related to ammonia-N (R(2)=0.53), soluble CP (R(2)=0.57), and ivStarchD (R(2)=0.51). Combined, ammonia-N, DM, soluble CP, and pH provided a good prediction of ivStarchD (adjusted R(2)=0.70). Increasing pH, ammonia-N, soluble CP, and ivStarchD values indicate that HMC may need up to 10 mo of ensiling to reach maximum starch digestibility. Ammonia-N, DM content, soluble CP concentration, and pH are good indicators of ruminal in vitro starch digestibility for high-moisture corn. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  18. Acclimation to extremely high ammonia levels in continuous biomethanation process and the associated microbial community dynamics

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    Acclimatized anaerobic communities to high ammonia levels can offer a solution to the ammonia toxicity problem in biogas reactors. In the current study, a stepwise acclimation strategy up to 10 g NH4+-N L−1, was performed in mesophilic (37 ± 1 °C) continuously stirred tank reactors. The reactors...... change throughout the ammonia acclimation process. Clostridium ultunense, a syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria, increased significantly alongside with hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanoculleus spp., indicating strong hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity at extreme ammonia levels (>7 g NH4+-N L−1...

  19. Enhancement of lipid accumulation by oleaginous yeast through phosphorus limitation under high content of ammonia.

    Huang, Xiangfeng; Luo, Huijuan; Mu, Tianshuai; Shen, Yi; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Jia

    2018-04-18

    Low concentrations of acetic acid were used as carbon source to cultivate Cryptococcus curvatus MUCL 29819 for lipid production under high content of ammonia. Phosphorus limitation combined with initial pH regulation (pH = 6) weakened inhibition of free ammonia and promoted lipid accumulation. In batch cultivation, the produced lipid content and yield was 30.3% and 0.92 g/L, higher than those under unlimited condition (18.3% and 0.64 g/L). The content of monounsaturated fatty acid also increased from 37.3% (unlimited condition) to 45.8% (phosphorus-limited condition). During sequencing batch cultivation (SBC), the lipid content reached up to 51.02% under phosphorus-limited condition while only 31.88% under unlimited condition, which can be explained by the higher conversion efficiency of the carbon source to lipid. The total energy consumption including lipid extraction, transesterification and purification was 7.47 and 8.33 GJ under phosphorus-limited and unlimited condition, respectively. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Ammonia synthesis over multi-promoted iron catalysts obtained by high-energy ball-milling

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of producing ammonia synthesis catalysts from high-energy ball-milling of a simple mixture of the constituent oxides has been investigated. The effect of ball-milling the fused oxidic precursor of the industrial KM1 ammonia synthesis catalyst has also been studied. The results show...

  1. Effects of pH and H2O2 on ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate transformations during UV254nm irradiation: Implications to nitrogen removal and analysis.

    Wang, Junli; Song, Mingrui; Chen, Baiyang; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Rongshu

    2017-10-01

    In order to achieve better removal and analyses of three dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) species via ultraviolet-activated hydrogen peroxide (UV/H 2 O 2 ) process, this study systematically investigated the rates of photo-oxidations of ammonia/ammonium (NH 3 /NH 4 + ) and nitrite (NO 2 - ) as well as the photo-reduction of nitrate (NO 3 - ) at varying pH and H 2 O 2 conditions. The results showed that the mass balances of nitrogen were maintained along irradiation despite of interconversions of DIN species, suggesting that no nitrogen gas (N 2 ) or other nitrogen-containing compound was formed. NH 3 was more reactive than NH 4 + with hydroxyl radical (OH), and by a stepwise H 2 O 2 addition method NH 3 /NH 4 + can be completely converted to NO x - ; NO 2 - underwent rapid oxidation to form NO 3 - when H 2 O 2 was present, suggesting that it is an intermediate compound linking NH 3 /NH 4 + and NO 3 - ; but once H 2 O 2 was depleted, NO 3 - can be gradually photo-reduced back to NO 2 - at high pH conditions. Other than H 2 O 2 , the transformation kinetics of DINs were all dependent on pH, but to varying aspects and extents: the NH 3 photo-oxidation favored a pH of 10.3, which fell within the pK a values of NH 4 + (9.24) and H 2 O 2 (11.6); the NO 3 - photo-reduction increased with increasing pH provided that it exceeds the pK a of peroxynitrous acid (6.8); while the NO 2 - photo-oxidation remained stable unless the pH neared the pK a of H 2 O 2 (11.6). The study thereby demonstrates a picture of the evolutions of DIN species together during UV/H 2 O 2 irradiation process, and for the first time presents a method to achieve complete conversion of NH 4 + to NO 3 - with UV/H 2 O 2 process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    Michele C ePereira e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively, and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 µgN.h-1.gdw-1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 µgN.h-1.gdw-1. Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10% the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%. Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step towards defining a NOR for soil nitrification. Moreover, the clear effect of soil texture established here suggests that the NOR should be defined in a soil-type-specific manner.

  3. A quality enhancement green strategy for broiler meat by application of turmeric (Curcuma longa powder as litter amendment to affect microbes, ammonia emission, pH and moisture

    K.G.S.C. Katukurunda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In multi-cultural Sri Lankan conditions, poultry meat is paramount importance in ensuring food security and improving nutrition. Issues as contact dermatitis and ammonia emission in broiler industry which caused by diminished litter parameters cause reduction of meat quality, profits and environmental conditions. Therefore use of Turmeric (Curcuma longa (TM powder as an antiseptic litter amendment at several application levels to enhance litter parameters with microbial demolition was attempted. Three months old broiler litter (2 kg sample was taken and initial pH and moisture was determined. Turmeric was used to mix at levels of 0%, 1%, 3%, 5% and 8% (w/w. After mixing, 150 g of mixed litter was placed in container for each level of the 4 replicates, incubated for 5h and analyzed for Total Plate Count (TPC, Yeast and Mold Count (YMC, total Nematode Count (NC, ammonia emission, pH and moisture. Significant reduction (p <0.05 of total bacteria was seen (20%, 46%, 95% and 96% when 1%, 3%, 5% and 8% applications of TM. The YMC reduction was also significant (p <0.05 (34%, 41%, 55% and 65%. Total nematode reduction (p <0.05 was 22%, 45%, 62.5% and 70%. A significant (p <0.05 pH reduction with increment of TM also seen (0.1, 2, 3 and 3%. Moisture (% was increased (p <0.05 (6, 0.78, 19 and 1%. Ammonia emission was significantly decreased (p <0.05 by increased TM (64, 68, 73 and 84% against control. It was concluded that the bacterial, fungal, nematode counts, pH and Ammonia emission of broiler litter can be significantly reduced with the application of 8% (w/w of turmeric powder.

  4. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  5. Appearance of infused 15N-ammonia in urinary nitrogenous compounds in chickens fed low and high protein diets

    Karasawa, Yutaka

    1984-01-01

    The chickens fed a high protein diet responded to the intraportal administration of ammonia with a remarkable increase in urinary uric acid as well as an appreciable increase in urinary ammonia, while in those fed a low protein diet, the increase was appreciable in tissue glutamine and in urinary ammonia, but a little amount in urinary uric acid in response to the ammonia load. It was demonstrated by the present study that the increases in urinary ammonia and uric acid excretion in response to intraportal ammonia load were the adaptive response to remove the exogenous ammonia from the body. The mode of disposal of the intraportally loaded ammonia was changeable depending on protein intake. (Mori, K.)

  6. A Water-Stable Proton-Conductive Barium(II)-Organic Framework for Ammonia Sensing at High Humidity.

    Guo, Kaimeng; Zhao, Lili; Yu, Shihang; Zhou, Wenyan; Li, Zifeng; Li, Gang

    2018-06-07

    In view of environmental protection and the need for early prediction of major diseases, it is necessary to accurately monitor the change of trace ammonia concentration in air or in exhaled breath. However, the adoption of proton-conductive metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as smart sensors in this field is limited by a lack of ultrasensitive gas-detecting performance at high relative humidity (RH). Here, the pellet fabrication of a water-stable proton-conductive MOF, Ba( o-CbPhH 2 IDC)(H 2 O) 4 ] n (1) ( o-CbPhH 4 IDC = 2-(2-carboxylphenyl)-1 H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid) is reported. The MOF 1 displays enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to NH 3 gas at high RHs (>85%) and 30 °C, and the sensing mechanism is suggested. The electrochemical impedance gas sensor fabricated by MOF 1 is a promising sensor for ammonia at mild temperature and high RHs.

  7. Efficient Total Nitrogen Removal in an Ammonia Gas Biofilter through High-Rate OLAND

    De Clippeleir, Haydée; Courtens, Emilie; Mosquera, Mariela

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia gas is conventionally treated in nitrifying biofilters; however, addition of organic carbon to perform post-denitrification is required to obtain total nitrogen removal. Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND), applied in full-scale for wastewater treatment, can...... offer a cost-effective alternative for gas treatment. In this study, the OLAND application thus was broadened toward ammonia loaded gaseous streams. A down flow, oxygen-saturated biofilter (height of 1.5 m; diameter of 0.11 m) was fed with an ammonia gas stream (248 ± 10 ppmv) at a loading rate of 0...... at water flow rates of 1.3 ± 0.4 m3 m–2 biofilter section d–1. Profile measurements revealed that 91% of the total nitrogen activity was taking place in the top 36% of the filter. This study demonstrated for the first time highly effective and sustainable autotrophic ammonia removal in a gas biofilter...

  8. Insights into high-temperature nitrogen cycling from studies of the thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. (Invited)

    de la Torre, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of the nitrogen cycle has advanced significantly in recent years with the discovery of new metabolic processes and the recognition that key processes such as aerobic ammonia oxidation are more broadly distributed among extant organisms and habitat ranges. Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, is a key component of the nitrogen cycle and, until recently, was thought to be mediated exclusively by the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The discovery that mesophilic marine archaea, some of the most abundant microorganisms on the planet, are capable of oxidizing ammonia to nitrite fundamentally changed our perception of the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are now thought to be significant drivers of nitrification in many marine and terrestrial environments. Most studies, however, have focused on the contribution of AOA to nitrogen cycling in mesophilic environments. Our recent discovery of a thermophilic AOA, Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, has expanded the role and habitat range of AOA to include high temperature environments. Numerous studies have shown that AOA are widely distributed in geothermal habitats with a wide range of temperature and pH. The availability of multiple AOA genome sequences, combined with metagenomic studies from mesophilic and thermophilic environments gives us a better understanding of the physiology, ecology and evolution of these organisms. Recent studies have proposed that the AOA represent the most deeply branching lineage within the Archaea, the Thaumarchaeota. Furthermore, genomic comparisons between AOA and AOB reveal significant differences in the proposed pathways for ammonia oxidation. These genetic differences likely explain fundamental physiological differences such as the resistance of N. yellowstonii and other AOA to the classical nitrification inhibitors allylthiourea and acetylene. Physiological studies suggest that the marine AOA are adapted to oligotrophic

  9. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  10. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  11. Evaluating high pH for control of dreissenid mussels

    Dave Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments were carried out using a custom built flow-through laboratory to test the effect of elevated pH on dreissenid musselsas a potential control method. Both experiments tested the ability of dreissenid pediveligers to settle under conditions of elevated pH and thelong-term survival of adult dreissenids under the same conditions. The two experimental sites had different water quality and differentspecies of dreissenids present. The settlement of quagga mussel pediveligers at the lower Colorado River was inhibited with increasing pH.At the maximum achieved pH of 9.1, there was approximately 90% reduction compared to the maximum settlement observed in the controls.Since the settlement was almost as low in pH 8.9 as at pH 9.1, the inhibition in settlement may have been due to the presence of a precipitateformed under high pH conditions rather than the increase in background pH. No mortality of quagga mussel adults was observed in theexperimental pH levels at the lower Colorado River. At San Justo Reservoir, zebra mussel settlement decreased with increasing pH. Newsettlement was almost entirely absent at the highest pH tested (pH 9.6. The observed mortality of adult zebra mussels was low, but did tendto increase with increasing pH. We also tested the response of adult zebra mussels to short-term exposure to very high pH levels (i.e. pH 10,11, and 12. Adult mussels in poor physical condition experienced 90% mortality after 12 hours at pH 12. For unstressed adult zebra mussels,90% mortality was reached after 120 hours at pH 12. Significant mortalities were also observed both at pH 10 and pH 11. From this study,we conclude that pH elevation could be used both as a preventative treatment to eliminate settlement by dreissenid mussels and as an end ofseason treatment to eliminate adults. The high pH treatment would have to be tailored to the site water quality to prevent formation ofprecipitate during treatment and to minimize corrosive

  12. ZIF-8 immobilized nickel nanoparticles: highly effective catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Li, Pei-Zhou; Aranishi, Kengo; Xu, Qiang

    2012-03-28

    Highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully immobilized by the zeolitic metal-organic framework ZIF-8 via sequential deposition-reduction methods, which show high catalytic activity and long durability for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of aqueous ammonia borane (NH(3)BH(3)) at room temperature. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  13. Feasible metabolisms in high pH springs of the Philippines.

    Cardace, Dawn; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Woycheese, Kristin M; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign targeting high pH, H2-, and CH4-emitting serpentinite-associated springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to rank feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs between sampling years, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms. In all, this geochemistry-based assessment of feasible metabolisms indicates methane cycling, hydrogen oxidation, some iron and sulfur metabolisms, and ammonia oxidation are feasible reactions in this continental site of serpentinization.

  14. Modified ADM1 for modeling free ammonia inhibition in anaerobic acidogenic fermentation with high-solid sludge.

    Bai, Jie; Liu, He; Yin, Bo; Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xinchun

    2017-02-01

    Anaerobic acidogenic fermentation with high-solid sludge is a promising method for volatile fatty acid (VFA) production to realize resource recovery. In this study, to model inhibition by free ammonia in high-solid sludge fermentation, the anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1) was modified to simulate the VFA generation in batch, semi-continuous and full scale sludge. The ADM1 was operated on the platform AQUASIM 2.0. Three kinds of inhibition forms, e.g., simple inhibition, Monod and non-inhibition forms, were integrated into the ADM1 and tested with the real experimental data for batch and semi-continuous fermentation, respectively. The improved particle swarm optimization technique was used for kinetic parameter estimation using the software MATLAB 7.0. In the modified ADM1, the K s of acetate is 0.025, the k m,ac is 12.51, and the K I_NH3 is 0.02, respectively. The results showed that the simple inhibition model could simulate the VFA generation accurately while the Monod model was the better inhibition kinetics form in semi-continuous fermentation at pH10.0. Finally, the modified ADM1 could successfully describe the VFA generation and ammonia accumulation in a 30m 3 full-scale sludge fermentation reactor, indicating that the developed model can be applicable in high-solid sludge anaerobic fermentation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A Determination and Comparison of Urease Activity in Feces and Fresh Manure from Pig and Cattle in Relation to Ammonia Production and pH Changes

    Dai, Xiaorong; Karring, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia emission from animal production is a major environmental problem and has impacts on the animal health and working environment inside production houses. Ammonia is formed in manure by the enzymatic degradation of urinary urea and catalyzed by urease that is present in feces. We have determined and compared the urease activity in feces and manure (a urine and feces mixture) from pigs and cattle at 25°C by using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. To obtain accurate estimates of kinetic parameters Vmax and K'm, we used a 5 min reaction time to determine the initial reaction velocities based on total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) concentrations. The resulting Vmax value (mmol urea hydrolyzed per kg wet feces per min) was 2.06±0.08 mmol urea/kg/min and 0.80±0.04 mmol urea/kg/min for pig feces and cattle feces, respectively. The K'm values were 32.59±5.65 mmol urea/l and 15.43±2.94 mmol urea/l for pig feces and cattle feces, respectively. Thus, our results reveal that both the Vmax and K'm values of the urease activity for pig feces are more than 2-fold higher than those for cattle feces. The difference in urea hydrolysis rates between animal species is even more significant in fresh manure. The initial velocities of TAN formation are 1.53 mM/min and 0.33 mM/min for pig and cattle manure, respectively. Furthermore, our investigation shows that the maximum urease activity for pig feces occurs at approximately pH 7, and in cattle feces it is closer to pH 8, indicating that the predominant fecal ureolytic bacteria species differ between animal species. We believe that our study contributes to a better understanding of the urea hydrolysis process in manure and provides a basis for more accurate and animal-specific prediction models for urea hydrolysis rates and ammonia concentration in manures and thus can be used to predict ammonia volatilization rates from animal production. PMID:25397404

  16. Ammonia production, excretion, toxicity, and defense in fish: A Review

    Alex Y K Ip

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+ transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood-brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood-brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood-brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia-tolerance, respectively.

  17. Efeito da acidez no controle da produção de amônia e crescimento microbiano Acidity effect (pH in regulating ammonia production and microbial growth

    Rogério de Paula Lana

    2000-12-01

    and microbial protein measured. The starch had small effect on microbial growth, but levels of 50 mg/10 mL and on completely inhibited the ammonia production. The inhibition was probably due to pH effect, since it showed higher correlation with ammonia production than the starch (0.95 vs. -0.59. Once the largest amount of tripticase was used for ammonia production, and that it was highly inhibited by acidity, mild decrease in ruminal pH by the use of concentrate can be useful to reduce losses of dietary protein by ruminal fermentation. In fact, higher amount of degradable protein could be added to the diet, helpfully the benefit of the synchronism of the starch and protein sources, as for their degradations, in the formulation of diets for ruminant animal.

  18. Ammonia chemistry at SMART

    Na, J. W.; Seong, G. W.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, W. C.; Choi, B. S.; Kim, J. P.; Lee, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is used as the pH control agent of primary water at SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Some of this ammonia is decomposed to hydrogen and nitrogen by radiation in the reactor core. The produced hydrogen gas is used for the removal of dissolved oxygen in the coolant. Some of nitrogen gas in pressurizer is dissolved into the primary water. Because ammonia, hydrogen and nitrogen which is produced by ammonia radiolysis are exist in the coolant at SMART, ammonia chemistry at SMART is different with lithium-boron chemistry at commercial PWR. In this study, the pH characteristics of ammonia and the solubility characteristics of hydrogen and nytrogen were analyzed for the management of primary water chemistry at SMART

  19. A highly selective and wide range ammonia sensor—Nanostructured ZnO:Co thin film

    Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cobalt doped nanostructured ZnO thin films were spray deposited on glass substrates. • Co-doped ZnO film was highly selective towards ammonia than ethanol, methanol, etc. • The range of ammonia detection was improved significantly by doping cobalt in ZnO. - Abstract: Ammonia sensing characteristics of undoped and cobalt (Co)-doped nanostructured ZnO thin films were investigated. Polycrystalline nature with hexagonal wurtzite structure and high crystalline quality with dominant (0 0 2) plane orientation of Co-doped ZnO film were confirmed by the X-ray diffractogram. Scanning electron micrographs of the undoped film demonstrated the uniform deposition of sphere-shaped grains. But, smaller particles with no clear grain boundaries were observed for Co-doped ZnO thin film. Band gap values were found to be 3.26 eV and 3.22 eV for undoped and Co-doped ZnO thin films. Ammonia sensing characteristics of Co-doped ZnO film at room temperature were investigated in the concentration range of 15–1000 ppm. Variation in the sensing performances of Co-doped and pure ZnO thin films has been analyzed and compared

  20. A pH-based control of ammonia in biogas during anaerobic digestion of artificial pig manure and maize silage

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Domnanovich, A.M.; Braun, R.; Holubar, P.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to prove that ammonia can be present in biogas from anaerobic digestion and to control this ammonia by reducing the reactor pH. Ammonia containing biogas was produced for a period of more than 100 days, with a maximum of 332 ppm. Especially during periods of high free

  1. A novel PSB-EDI system for high ammonia wastewater treatment, biomass production and nitrogen resource recovery: PSB system.

    Wang, Hangyao; Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Guangming; Yan, Guokai; Lu, Haifeng; Sun, Liyan

    A novel process coupling photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) with electrodeionization (EDI) treatment was proposed to treat high ammonia wastewater and recover bio-resources and nitrogen. The first stage (PSB treatment) was used to degrade organic pollutants and accumulate biomass, while the second stage (EDI) was for nitrogen removal and recovery. The first stage was the focus in this study. The results showed that using PSB to transform organic pollutants in wastewater into biomass was practical. PSB could acclimatize to wastewater with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2,300 mg/L and an ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) concentration of 288-4,600 mg/L. The suitable pH was 6.0-9.0, the average COD removal reached 80%, and the biomass increased by an average of 9.16 times. The wastewater COD removal was independent of the NH4(+)-N concentration. Moreover, the PSB functioned effectively when the inoculum size was only 10 mg/L. The PSB-treated wastewater was then further handled in an EDI system. More than 90% of the NH4(+)-N was removed from the wastewater and condensed in the concentrate, which could be used to produce nitrogen fertilizer. In the whole system, the average NH4(+)-N removal was 94%, and the average NH4(+)-N condensing ratio was 10.0.

  2. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  3. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    de Cassia Pereira e Silva, M.; Poly, F.; Guillaumaud, N.; van Elsas, J.D.; Falcao Salles, J.

    2012-01-01

    The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators) of

  4. A new slurry pH model accounting for effects of ammonia and carbon dioxide volatilization on solution speciation

    Petersen, V.; Markfoged, R.; Hafner, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    a reduced variable that combines time and location and an analytical approach to solving the resulting system of equations using Mathematica. To evaluate the model, we made measurements of pH at a resolution of 0.1 mm in the top 30 mm of an ammonium bicarbonate solution. These measurements show the creation...

  5. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity.

  6. Evaluation of SG blowdown demineralizer performance by replacement of ammonia with ethanolamine as a PWR secondary pH control agent

    Rhee, I.H. [Department of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Soonchunhyang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.J. [Operation Management Team, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Four Korean PWR plants have adopted ethanolamine (ETA) as a secondary pH control agent to increase the pH at the liquid phase, which raises the pH in the SG blowdown system. The run time of the SG blowdown demineralizer can be reduced by the increased number of ionic chemical species primarily due to ETA. Contrary to the possible prevention of SG degradation, the replacement of ammonia with ETA results in the water chemistry difficulties and more frequent generation of spent resin. A comprehensive experimental data set for binary, ternary, quaternary, and quinary cation and anion adsorption was developed from small-volume batch tests at total cation or anion concentrations of 0.01 and 0.05 N to obtain the selectivity coefficients of many cations and anions normally present in the PWR secondary system water. In addition, the kinetic study using the bench-scale column was performed to examine the breakthrough point of an ion and to calculate the ratio of inlet to outlet concentration at the column, so called Decontamination Factor, in the different background electrolyte. The batch equilibrium tests indicated that the ion selectivity is higher for an ion of higher valence and is not uniform in the different composition and ionic strength. The preference of an ion on ion exchange resin rather tends to be lower with higher ionic strength. The leakage of an ion from the ion exchange column is not also uniform in time in the various composition and total concentration. Therefore the ion selectivity and breakthrough time are different in ammonia and ethanolamine background electrolytes. The run time of SG blowdown demineralizer can be shorter than it can be expected due to the elevated ionic strength as well as the increased dissolved solids. The quantitative run time can be estimated by such ion exchange models as semi-empirical mass action and surface complexation models. The demineralizer can be used longer by increasing the ratios of cation to anion exchange resins in

  7. Evaluation of SG blowdown demineralizer performance by replacement of ammonia with ethanolamine as a PWR secondary pH control agent

    Rhee, I.H.; Yim, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Four Korean PWR plants have adopted ethanolamine (ETA) as a secondary pH control agent to increase the pH at the liquid phase, which raises the pH in the SG blowdown system. The run time of the SG blowdown demineralizer can be reduced by the increased number of ionic chemical species primarily due to ETA. Contrary to the possible prevention of SG degradation, the replacement of ammonia with ETA results in the water chemistry difficulties and more frequent generation of spent resin. A comprehensive experimental data set for binary, ternary, quaternary, and quinary cation and anion adsorption was developed from small-volume batch tests at total cation or anion concentrations of 0.01 and 0.05 N to obtain the selectivity coefficients of many cations and anions normally present in the PWR secondary system water. In addition, the kinetic study using the bench-scale column was performed to examine the breakthrough point of an ion and to calculate the ratio of inlet to outlet concentration at the column, so called Decontamination Factor, in the different background electrolyte. The batch equilibrium tests indicated that the ion selectivity is higher for an ion of higher valence and is not uniform in the different composition and ionic strength. The preference of an ion on ion exchange resin rather tends to be lower with higher ionic strength. The leakage of an ion from the ion exchange column is not also uniform in time in the various composition and total concentration. Therefore the ion selectivity and breakthrough time are different in ammonia and ethanolamine background electrolytes. The run time of SG blowdown demineralizer can be shorter than it can be expected due to the elevated ionic strength as well as the increased dissolved solids. The quantitative run time can be estimated by such ion exchange models as semi-empirical mass action and surface complexation models. The demineralizer can be used longer by increasing the ratios of cation to anion exchange resins in

  8. On the development of high temperature ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pumps

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Markussen, Wiebke Brix; Reinholdt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pumps (HACHP) are a promising technology for development of ecient high temperature industrial heat pumps. Using 28 bar components HACHPs up to 100 °C are commercially available. Components developed for 50 bar and 140 bar show that these pressure...... limits may be possible to exceed if needed for actual applications. Feasible heat supply temperatures using these component limits are investigated. A feasible solution is defined as one that satisfies constraints on the COP, low and high pressure, compressor discharge temperature, vapour water content...... and volumetric heat capacity. The ammonia mass fraction and the liquid circulation ratio both influence these constraining parameters. The paper investigates feasible combinations of these parameters through the use of a numerical model. 28 bar components allow temperatures up to 111 °C, 50 bar up to 129°C...

  9. Physiological and molecular responses of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) to high environmental ammonia: scavenging for nitrogen.

    Nawata, C Michele; Walsh, Patrick J; Wood, Chris M

    2015-01-15

    In teleosts, a branchial metabolon links ammonia excretion to Na(+) uptake via Rh glycoproteins and other transporters. Ureotelic elasmobranchs are thought to have low branchial ammonia permeability, and little is known about Rh function in this ancient group. We cloned Rh cDNAs (Rhag, Rhbg and Rhp2) and evaluated gill ammonia handling in Squalus acanthias. Control ammonia excretion was <5% of urea-N excretion. Sharks exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 1 mmol(-1) NH4HCO3) for 48 h exhibited active ammonia uptake against partial pressure and electrochemical gradients for 36 h before net excretion was re-established. Plasma total ammonia rose to seawater levels by 2 h, but dropped significantly below them by 24-48 h. Control ΔP(NH3) (the partial pressure gradient of NH3) across the gills became even more negative (outwardly directed) during HEA. Transepithelial potential increased by 30 mV, negating a parallel rise in the Nernst potential, such that the outwardly directed NH4(+) electrochemical gradient remained unchanged. Urea-N excretion was enhanced by 90% from 12 to 48 h, more than compensating for ammonia-N uptake. Expression of Rhp2 (gills, kidney) and Rhbg (kidney) did not change, but branchial Rhbg and erythrocytic Rhag declined during HEA. mRNA expression of branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) increased at 24 h and that of H(+)-ATPase decreased at 48 h, while expression of the potential metabolon components Na(+)/H(+) exchanger2 (NHE2) and carbonic anhydrase IV (CA-IV) remained unchanged. We propose that the gill of this nitrogen-limited predator is poised not only to minimize nitrogen loss by low efflux permeability to urea and ammonia but also to scavenge ammonia-N from the environment during HEA to enhance urea-N synthesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. High solids co-digestion of food and landscape waste and the potential for ammonia toxicity

    Drennan, Margaret F.; DiStefano, Thomas D., E-mail: thomas.distefano@bucknell.edu

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated co-digestion of food and landscape waste with a pilot-scale anaerobic dry digester. • We evaluated reactor performance at 35 °C under low and high organic loading rates. • Performance was stable under low organic loading rate, but declined under high organic loading rate. • Respirometry was employed to investigate potential inhibition due to ammonia. • Landscape waste was unsuitable in increasing the C:N ratio during codigestion. - Abstract: A pilot-scale study was completed to determine the feasibility of high-solids anaerobic digestion (HSAD) of a mixture of food and landscape wastes at a university in central Pennsylvania (USA). HSAD was stable at low loadings (2 g COD/L-day), but developed inhibitory ammonia concentrations at high loadings (15 g COD/L-day). At low loadings, methane yields were 232 L CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed and 229 L CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed, and at high loadings yields were 211 L CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed and 272 L CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed. Based on characterization and biodegradability studies, food waste appears to be a good candidate for HSAD at low organic loading rates; however, the development of ammonia inhibition at high loading rates suggests that the C:N ratio is too low for use as a single substrate. The relatively low biodegradability of landscape waste as reported herein made it an unsuitable substrate to increase the C:N ratio. Codigestion of food waste with a substrate high in bioavailable carbon is recommended to increase the C:N ratio sufficiently to allow HSAD at loading rates of 15 g COD/L-day.

  11. Silica Gel Coated Spherical Micro resonator for Ultra-High Sensitivity Detection of Ammonia Gas Concentration in Air.

    Mallik, Arun Kumar; Farrell, Gerald; Liu, Dejun; Kavungal, Vishnu; Wu, Qiang; Semenova, Yuliya

    2018-01-26

    A silica gel coated microsphere resonator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for measurements of ammonia (NH 3 ) concentration in air with ultra-high sensitivity. The optical properties of the porous silica gel layer change when it is exposed to low (parts per million (ppm)) and even ultra-low (parts per billion (ppb)) concentrations of ammonia vapor, leading to a spectral shift of the WGM resonances in the transmission spectrum of the fiber taper. The experimentally demonstrated sensitivity of the proposed sensor to ammonia is estimated as 34.46 pm/ppm in the low ammonia concentrations range from 4 ppm to 30 ppm using an optical spectrum analyser (OSA), and as 800 pm/ppm in the ultra-low range of ammonia concentrations from 2.5 ppb to 12 ppb using the frequency detuning method, resulting in the lowest detection limit (by two orders of magnitude) reported to date equal to 0.16 ppb of ammonia in air. In addition, the sensor exhibits excellent selectivity to ammonia and very fast response and recovery times measured at 1.5 and 3.6 seconds, respectively. Other attractive features of the proposed sensor are its compact nature, simplicity of fabrication.

  12. The effects of high environmental ammonia on the structure of rainbow trout hierarchies and the physiology of the individuals therein.

    Grobler, Josias M B; Wood, Chris M

    2018-02-01

    Our goals were: (i) to determine whether sublethal concentrations of water-borne ammonia would prevent the formation of a dominance hierarchy, or alter its structure, in groups of 4 juvenile trout; (ii) to investigate the behavioral and physiological responses of individuals of different social rank exposed to a concentration of ammonia that still allowed hierarchy formation. Social hierarchies were created by using a technique in which a food delivery system that created competition also served to isolate individual fish for respirometry. Groups of 4 fish were exposed to elevated ammonia (NH 4 HCO 3 ) 12 h before first feeding; aggression was recorded by video camera during morning feedings. Experimental ammonia concentrations were 700, 1200 and 1500 μmol L -1 at pH 7.3, 12 °C (9.8, 16.8, and 21.0 mg L -1 as total ammonia-N, or 0.0515, 0.0884, and 0.1105 mg L -1 as NH 3 -N). Aggression was severely reduced by 1200 and abolished by 1500 μmol L -1 total ammonia, such that hierarchies did not form. However, groups exposed to 700 μmol L -1 total ammonia still formed stable hierarchies but displayed lower levels of aggression in comparison to control hierarchies. Exposure continued for 11 days. Physiological parameters were recorded on day 5 (end of period 1) and day 10 (end of period 2), while feeding and plasma cortisol were measured on day 11. In control hierarchies, dominant (rank 1) trout generally exhibited higher growth rates, greater increases in condition factor, higher food consumption, and lower cortisol levels than did fish of ranks 2, 3, and 4. In comparison to controls, the 700 μmol L -1 total ammonia hierarchies generally displayed lower growth, lower condition factor increases, lower O 2 consumption, lower cortisol levels, but similar feeding patterns, with smaller physiological differences amongst ranks during period 1. Effects attenuated during period 2, as aggression and physiological measures returned towards

  13. Long-term high-solids anaerobic digestion of food waste: Effects of ammonia on process performance and microbial community.

    Peng, Xuya; Zhang, ShangYi; Li, Lei; Zhao, Xiaofei; Ma, Yao; Shi, Dezhi

    2018-04-22

    A long-term high solids anaerobic digestion of food waste was conducted to identify microbial mechanisms of ammonia inhibition during digestion and to clarify correlations between ammonia accumulation, microbial community dynamics (diversity, composition, and interactions), and process stability. Results show that the effects of ammonia on process performance and microbial community were indirectly caused by volatile fatty acid accumulation. Excess free ammonia blocked acetate metabolism, leading to process instability. Accumulated acetate caused feedback inhibition at the acetogenesis stage, which resulted in considerable accumulation of propionate, valerate, and other long-chain fatty acids. This high concentration of volatile fatty acids reduced the abundance of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria and allowed hydrolytic fermentative bacteria to dominate. The normally interactive and orderly metabolic network was broken, which further exacerbated the process instability. These results improve the understanding of microbial mechanisms which contribute to process instability and provide guidance for the microbial management of anaerobic digesters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High solids co-digestion of food and landscape waste and the potential for ammonia toxicity.

    Drennan, Margaret F; DiStefano, Thomas D

    2014-07-01

    A pilot-scale study was completed to determine the feasibility of high-solids anaerobic digestion (HSAD) of a mixture of food and landscape wastes at a university in central Pennsylvania (USA). HSAD was stable at low loadings (2g COD/L-day), but developed inhibitory ammonia concentrations at high loadings (15 g COD/L-day). At low loadings, methane yields were 232 L CH4/kg COD fed and 229 L CH4/kg VS fed, and at high loadings yields were 211 L CH4/kg COD fed and 272 L CH4/kg VS fed. Based on characterization and biodegradability studies, food waste appears to be a good candidate for HSAD at low organic loading rates; however, the development of ammonia inhibition at high loading rates suggests that the C:N ratio is too low for use as a single substrate. The relatively low biodegradability of landscape waste as reported herein made it an unsuitable substrate to increase the C:N ratio. Codigestion of food waste with a substrate high in bioavailable carbon is recommended to increase the C:N ratio sufficiently to allow HSAD at loading rates of 15 g COD/L-day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ammonia gas transport and reactions in unsaturated sediments: Implications for use as an amendment to immobilize inorganic contaminants

    Zhong, L.; Szecsody, J.E.; Truex, M.J.; Williams, M.D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ammonia transport can be predicted from gas movement and equilibrium partitioning. • Ammonia diffusion rate in unsaturated sediment is a function of water contents. • High pH induced by ammonia causes mineral dissolution and sequential precipitation. • Ammonia treatment effectively immobilized uranium from contaminated sediments. - Abstract: Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants (such as uranium) because it induces a high pore-water pH, causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application of this treatment, further knowledge of ammonia transport in porous media and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia treatment is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate inter-phase (gas/sediment/pore water) reactions, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions, such as flow rate, gas concentration, and water content. Uranium-contaminated sediment was treated with ammonia gas to demonstrate U immobilization. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases the pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas advection front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase upon exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate when the pH declines due to buffering. Up to 85% of

  16. Thiourea-treated graphene aerogel as a highly selective gas sensor for sensing of trace level of ammonia

    Alizadeh, Taher, E-mail: talizadeh@ut.ac.ir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadian, Farzaneh [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Daneshgah Street, P.B179, 56199-11367 Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a result of this study, a new and simple method was proposed for the fabrication of an ultra sensitive, robust and reversible ammonia gas sensor. The sensing mechanism was based upon the change in electrical resistance of a graphene aerogel as a result of sensor exposing to ammonia. Three-dimensional graphene hydrogel was first synthesized via hydrothermal method in the absence or presence of various amounts of thiourea. The obtained material was heated to obtain aerogel and then it was used as ammonia gas sensor. The materials obtained were characterized using different techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thiourea-treated graphene aerogel was more porous (389 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and thermally unstable and exhibited higher sensitivity, shorter response time and better selectivity toward ammonia gas, compared to the aerogel produced in the absence of thiourea. Thiourea amount, involved in the hydrogel synthesis step, was found to be highly effective factor in the sensing properties of finally obtained aerogel. The sensor response time to ammonia was short (100 s) and completely reversible (recovery time of about 500 s) in ambient temperature. The sensor response to ammonia was linear between 0.02 and 85 ppm and its detection limit was found to be 10 ppb (3S/N). - Highlights: • An ammonia gas sensor with ppb level determination capability was proposed. • A new procedure has been introduced for gas sensor fabrication by graphene hydrogel. • Thiourea-treated graphene aerogel was used as excellent ammonia gas sensor.

  17. Effects of high-volume plasmapheresis on ammonia, urea, and amino acids in patients with acute liver failure.

    Clemmesen, J O; Kondrup, J; Nielsen, L B; Larsen, F S; Ott, P

    2001-04-01

    In acute liver failure (ALF), urea production is severely impaired, and detoxification of ammonia by glutamine synthesis plays an important protective role. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of therapeutic high-volume plasmapheresis (HVP) on arterial concentrations and splanchnic exchange rates of ammonia, urea, and amino acids-in particular, glutamine. A quantity of 8 L of plasma was exchanged over the course of 7 h in 11 patients with ALF after development of hepatic encephalopathy grade III-IV. Splanchnic exchange rates of ammonia, urea, and amino acids were measured by use of liver vein catheterization. HVP removed ammonia and glutamine at a rate of 1 micromol/min and 27 micromol/min, respectively. Arterial ammonia decreased from 160 +/- 65 to 114 +/- 50 micromol/L (p HVP) were as follows: for ammonia, -93 +/- 101 versus -70 +/- 80 micromol/min (NS); urea-nitrogen, 0.08 +/- 1.64 versus -0.31 +/- 0.45 mmol/min (NS); alanine, -73 +/- 151 versus 12 +/- 83 micromol/min (p HVP in patients with ALF. The data suggest that this effect of HVP could be explained by increased hepatic urea synthesis and possibly by increased glutamine synthesis in muscle tissue.

  18. Ammonia losses and nitrogen partitioning at a southern High Plains open lot dairy

    Todd, Richard W.; Cole, N. Andy; Hagevoort, G. Robert; Casey, Kenneth D.; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2015-06-01

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of ammonia (NH3). Cattle excrete most ingested nitrogen (N); most urinary N is converted to NH3, volatilized and lost to the atmosphere. Open lot dairies on the southern High Plains are a growing industry and face environmental challenges as well as reporting requirements for NH3 emissions. We quantified NH3 emissions from the open lot and wastewater lagoons of a commercial New Mexico dairy during a nine-day summer campaign. The 3500-cow dairy consisted of open lot, manure-surfaced corrals (22.5 ha area). Lactating cows comprised 80% of the herd. A flush system using recycled wastewater intermittently removed manure from feeding alleys to three lagoons (1.8 ha area). Open path lasers measured atmospheric NH3 concentration, sonic anemometers characterized turbulence, and inverse dispersion analysis was used to quantify emissions. Ammonia fluxes (15-min) averaged 56 and 37 μg m-2 s-1 at the open lot and lagoons, respectively. Ammonia emission rate averaged 1061 kg d-1 at the open lot and 59 kg d-1 at the lagoons; 95% of NH3 was emitted from the open lot. The per capita emission rate of NH3 was 304 g cow-1 d-1 from the open lot (41% of N intake) and 17 g cow-1 d-1 from lagoons (2% of N intake). Daily N input at the dairy was 2139 kg d-1, with 43, 36, 19 and 2% of the N partitioned to NH3 emission, manure/lagoons, milk, and cows, respectively.

  19. Application of zirconia membranes as high-temperature PH sensors

    Neidrach, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The zirconia pH sensor behaves much like the classical glass electrode, but it extends the range of measurement to much higher temperatures - about 300 0 vs 120 0 C. It also has virtues over the glass electrode at lower temperatures because of the absence of an ''alkaline error.'' Like the glass electrode, it is insensitive to changes in the redox potential of the environment and, in turn, it exerts no influence on the environment. Such sensors have been finding application in the direct measurement of the pH of geothermal brines, of water in nuclear reactors, and in high-temperature corrosion studies. The sensors can also be used as ''pseudoreference'' electrodes for the measurement of redox and corrosion potentials in high-temperature media

  20. Excretory nitrogen metabolism and defence against ammonia toxicity in air-breathing fishes.

    Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2014-03-01

    With the development of air-breathing capabilities, some fishes can emerge from water, make excursions onto land or even burrow into mud during droughts. Air-breathing fishes have modified gill morphology and morphometry and accessory breathing organs, which would tend to reduce branchial ammonia excretion. As ammonia is toxic, air-breathing fishes, especially amphibious ones, are equipped with various strategies to ameliorate ammonia toxicity during emersion or ammonia exposure. These strategies can be categorized into (1) enhancement of ammonia excretion and reduction of ammonia entry, (2) conversion of ammonia to a less toxic product for accumulation and subsequent excretion, (3) reduction of ammonia production and avoidance of ammonia accumulation and (4) tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels. Active ammonia excretion, operating in conjunction with lowering of ambient pH and reduction in branchial and cutaneous NH₃ permeability, is theoretically the most effective strategy to maintain low internal ammonia concentrations. NH₃ volatilization involves the alkalization of certain epithelial surfaces and requires mechanisms to prevent NH₃ back flux. Urea synthesis is an energy-intensive process and hence uncommon among air-breathing teleosts. Aestivating African lungfishes detoxify ammonia to urea and the accumulated urea is excreted following arousal. Reduction in ammonia production is achieved in some air-breathing fishes through suppression of amino acid catabolism and proteolysis, or through partial amino acid catabolism leading to alanine formation. Others can slow down ammonia accumulation through increased glutamine synthesis in the liver and muscle. Yet, some others develop high tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels, including tissues in the brain. In summary, the responses of air-breathing fishes to ameliorate ammonia toxicity are many and varied, determined by the behaviour of the species and the nature of the environment in

  1. Ammonia in Jupiter’s troposphere from high-resolution 5-micron spectroscopy

    Giles, Rohini; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia (NH3) abundance is studied using spatially-resolved 5-micron observations from CRIRES, a high-resolution spectrometer at the Very Large Telescope in 2012. The high resolving power (R=96,000) allows the line shapes of three NH3 absorption features to be resolved. These three absorption features have different line strengths and probe slightly different pressure levels, and they can therefore be used to constrain the vertical profile of NH3 in the 1-4 bar pressure range. The instrument slit was aligned north-south along Jupiter's central meridian, allowing us to search for latitudinal variability. The CRIRES observations do not provide evidence for belt-zone variability in NH3, as any spectral differences can be accounted for by the large differences in cloud opacity between the cloudy zones and the cloud-free belts. However, we do find evidence for localised small-scale variability in NH3. Specifically, we detect a strong enhancement in NH3 on the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt (4-6°N). This is consistent with the ‘ammonia plumes’ observed by Fletcher et al. (2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008) at the 500-mbar level using 10-micron observations from TEXES/IRTF, as well as with measurements by Juno’s Microwave Radiometer (Li et al. 2017, doi:10.1002/2017GL073159).

  2. High Resolution Spectra of Carbon Monoxide, Propane and Ammonia for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    Beale, Christopher Andrew

    Spectroscopy is a critical tool for analyzing atmospheric data. Identification of atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure and the existence and concentrations of constituent gases via remote sensing techniques are only possible with spectroscopic data. These form the basis of model atmospheres which may be compared to observations to determine such parameters. To this end, this dissertation explores the spectroscopy of three molecules: ammonia, propane and carbon monoxide. Infrared spectra have been recorded for ammonia in the region 2400-9000 cm-1. These spectra were recorded at elevated temperatures (from 293-973 K) using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). Comparison between the spectra recorded at different temperatures yielded experimental lower state energies. These spectra resulted in the measurement of roughly 30000 lines and about 3000 quantum assignments. In addition spectra of propane were recorded at elevated temperatures (296-700 K) using an FTS. Atmospheres with high temperatures require molecular data at appropriate conditions. This dissertation describes collection of such data and the potential application to atmospheres in our solar system, such as auroral regions in Jupiter, to those of planets orbiting around other stars and cool sub-stellar objects known as brown dwarfs. The spectra of propane and ammonia provide the highest resolution and most complete experimental study of these gases in their respective spectral regions at elevated temperatures. Detection of ammonia in an exoplanet or detection of propane in the atmosphere of Jupiter will most likely rely on the work presented here. The best laboratory that we have to study atmospheres is our own planet. The same techniques that are applied to these alien atmospheres originated on Earth. As such it is appropriate to discuss remote sensing of our own atmosphere. This idea is explored through analysis of spectroscopic data recorded by an FTS on the Atmospheric Chemistry

  3. High yielding mutants of blackgram variety 'PH-25'

    Misra, R.C.; Mohapatra, B.D.; Panda, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    Seeds of blackgram (Vigna mungo L.) variety 'PH-5' were treated with chemical mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), nitrosoguanidine (NG), maleic hydrazide (MH) and sodium azide (NaN 3 ), each at 3 different concentrations. Thirty six mutant lines developed from mutagenic treatments along with parent varieties were tested in M 4 generation. The mutants showed wide variation in most of the traits and multivariante D 2 analysis showed genetic divergence among themselves. Twenty of the thirty mutants showed genetic divergence from parent. Ten selected high yielding mutants were tested in M 5 . Yield and other productive traits of five high yielding mutants in M 4 and M 5 are presented

  4. Urinary excretion of 15N during intraportal infusion of 15N-ammonia in chickens fed low or high protein diet

    Karasawa, Yutaka; Koh, Katsuki; Takahashi, Akira; Sumiya, Ryuta

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine time courses of 15 N in urinary ammonia and total N when 15 N-labeled ammonium acetate was continuously infused for 1 hour into chickens fed a 5 or 20 % protein diet. 15 N-enrichment of urinary nitrogen in the two dietary groups increased sharply in ammonia for the first 20 minutes and to a less extent linearly in total N for the first 30 minutes, and then gradually in both ammonia and total N. Through the ammonia infusion, the 15 N-enrichment of urinary ammonia was higher in the chickens fed the low protein diet than in those fed the high protein diet; both of them were higher than 15 N-enrichments of urinary N, which were almost the same in the two dietary groups. The urinary total N from the infused ammonia rose linearly for the first 40 minutes but thereafter did not rise further in the two dietary groups, whereas the endogenous urinary total N tended to decrease a little in the chichens fed the high protein diet but unchanged in those fed the low protein diet. The urinary ammonia from the infused ammonia increased sharply for the first 20 minutes, then linearly but at a lower rate in the chickens fed the high protein diet, whereas that in the chickens fed the low protein diet rose linearly throughout ammonia infusion. In contrast, the endogenous urinary ammonia showed no change in the chickens fed the high protein diet while it showed a tendency to increase a little in these fed the low protein diet. These results indicate that the increased urinary ammonia and total N during ammonia infusion are derived mostly from the infused ammonia in chickens fed 5 and 20% protein diets. (author)

  5. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...... groups differ in the amino acid composition of their aromatic/arginine regions. The location of the ammonia-permeable aquaporins in the body parallels that of the Rh proteins. This applies to erythrocytes and to cells associated with nitrogen homeostasis and high rates of anabolism. In the liver, AQPs 8...

  6. Elimination of wet return lines in ammonia systems. High-efficiency systems for energy reduction in industrial refrigeration plants with ammonia

    Moensted, A.

    2011-01-15

    The industrial refrigeration system design for ammonia plants has changed very little in the past years and the regulation system for each individual evaporator station is kept at a minimum with a solenoid for the liquid line and a regulator for the hot gas defrost. However, in the machine room there has been extensive development with the introduction of high-performance screw compressors with speed regulators and more efficient regulation systems. With this project, Danish Technological Institute has evaluated that possibilities exist for building more advanced systems at each evaporator system as the savings potential lies in the low-temperature control. There are some technical challenges involved in the development of cost-effective pumps and ejectors for this purpose and the work has commenced. It is possible that the components will be available in the market within few years. The measurement gave some basic data for Koerting to develop an ejector for the refrigeration market. Similarly, the project has provided Grundfos with basic knowledge about the performance requirements for small refrigerant circulation pumps used for establishing local circulation. It is a clear conclusion of the project that using small pumps for local ammonia circulation is beneficial to the performance as well as the energy efficiency of the system. The overall savings potential of the three evaporators amounts to between 13 and 19%. (LN)

  7. High efficient ammonia heat pump system for industrial process water using the ISEC concept. Part 1

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Madsen, C.; Elmegaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Isolated System Energy Charging (ISEC) is to provide a high-efficient ammonia heat pump system for hot water production. The ISEC concept uses two storage tanks for the water, one discharged and one charged. The charged tank is used for the industrial process while the discharged...... tank, is charging. Charging is done by circulating the water in the tank through the condenser several times and thereby gradually heats the water. This result in a lower condensing temperature than if the water was heated in one step. A dynamic model of the system, implemented in Dymola, is used...... to investigate the performance of the ISEC system. The ISEC concept approaches the efficiency of a number of heat pumps in series and the COP of the system may reach 6.8, which is up to 25 % higher than a conventional heat pump heating water in one step....

  8. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  9. Biomass production and nutrient assimilation by a novel microalga, Monoraphidium spp. SDEC-17, cultivated in a high-ammonia wastewater

    Jiang, Liqun; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hou, Qingjie; Han, Fei; Nie, Changliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The algae Monoraphidium SDEC-17 was identified as a suitable feedstock for biofuel. • SDEC-17 has been domesticated to survive in high-ammonia wastewater (CW). • SDEC-17 exhibited robust growth and nutrient assimilation in CW. • CW improved protein accumulation of SDEC-17. - Abstract: To obtain suitable microalgae species for successful algal biomass production from low-cost wastewater, four axenic algae strains were isolated from a local lake. Through acclimation with the high-ammonia complex wastewater (CW) of a gourmet powder factory, one algae species showed good ability to yield biomass and endure high-ammonia conditions (>170 mg L"−"1) in CW. This was verified as a Monoraphidium spp. by molecular identification, and named as SDEC-17. The algae were 27–60 μm in length and 4–10 μm in width, with relatively low specific surface area for withstanding ammonia ingress through the cell membrane. The final biomass densities of SDEC-17 in CW (1.29 ± 0.09 g L"−"1) and BG11 medium (1.31 ± 0.08 g L"−"1) did not show a statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). Moreover, protein content was stimulated to 44% by CW, compared to 35% in BG11. Lipid accumulation of SDEC-17 was not significantly influenced by CW, and fatty acid profiles resembled those of palm oil. The algae would utilize ammonia first under conditions with various nitrogen sources present, and absorb large amounts of phosphorus from the wastewater. Thus, phosphorus and ammonia were removed with efficiencies of nearly 100%, satisfying the discharge standard of pollutants for municipal wastewater treatment plants. These results suggested that Monoraphidium spp. SDEC-17 is a promising candidate for algae biomass production and possibly chemical energy recovery from the complex wastewater.

  10. A highly flexible polymerization technique to prepare fluorescent nanospheres for trace ammonia detection

    Waich, K.; Sandholzer, M.; Mayr, T.; Slugovc, C.; Klimant, I.

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of pH-sensitive nanospheres by emulsion polymerization for the detection of trace levels of ammonia is described. A fluorescent, polymerizable xanthene dye was copolymerized with styrene, crosslinkers and further copolymers aimed at enhancing the sensitivity to obtain materials for sensing of ammonia. A half-seeded technique was used to obtain stable emulsions of the monomers which were cured to obtain nanospheres with covalently attached active components. The nanospheres were embedded in a silicon matrix and the sensor films obtained were investigated regarding their response to ammonia at concentrations between 25 and 1,000 ppb. Sensors containing polystyrene nanospheres crosslinked with divinylbenzene showed the best performance in ammonia measurements exhibiting detection limits (LODs) of less than 25 ppb ammonia.

  11. Promoted Ru on high-surface area graphite for efficient miniaturized production of hydrogen from ammonia

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Klerke, Asbjørn; Quaade, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    decomposition. The catalytic activities for production of hydrogen from ammonia are determined for different promoters and promoter levels on graphite supported ruthenium catalysts. The reactivity trends of the Ru/C catalysts promoted with Cs and Ba are in excellent agreement with those known from earlier......Promoted Ru/C catalysts for decomposition of ammonia are incorporated into micro-fabricated reactors for the first time. With the reported preparation technique, the performance is increased more than two orders of magnitude compared to previously known micro-fabricated reactors for ammonia...... studies of both ammonia synthesis and decomposition, and it is shown how proper promotion can facilitate ammonia decomposition at temperatures below 500 K....

  12. Biohydrogen production from combined dark-photo fermentation under a high ammonia content in the dark fermentation effluent

    Chen, Chun-Yen [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Sustainable Environment Research Center; Lo, Yung-Chung; Yeh, Kuei-Ling [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Chang, Jo-Shu [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Sustainable Environment Research Center; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Microalgae Biotechnology and Bioengineering Lab.

    2010-07-01

    Integrated dark and photo (two-stage) fermentation was employed to enhance the performance of H{sub 2} production. First, the continuous dark fermentation using indigenous Clostridium butyricum CGS5 was carried out at 12 h HRT and fed with sucrose at a concentration of 18750 mg/l. The overall H{sub 2} production rate and H{sub 2} yield were fairly stable with a mean value of 87.5 ml/l/h and 1.015 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose, respectively. In addition, a relatively high ammonia nitrogen content (574 mg/l) in the dark fermentation effluent was observed. The soluble metabolites from dark fermentation, consisting mainly of butyric, lactic and acetic acids, were directly used as the influent of continuous photo-H{sub 2} production process inoculated with Rhodopseudomonas palutris WP 3-5 under the condition of 35oC, 10000 lux irradiation, pH 7.0 and 48 h HRT. The maximum overall hydrogen production rate from photo fermentation was 16.4 ml H{sub 2}/l/h, and the utilization of the soluble metabolites could reach 90%. The maximum H{sub 2} yield dramatically increased from 1.015 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose (in dark fermentation only) to 6.04 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose in the combined dark and photo fermentation. Surprisingly, the operation strategy applied in this work was able to attain an average NH{sub 3}-N removal efficiency of 92%, implying that our photo-H{sub 2} production system has a higher NH{sub 3}-N tolerance, demonstrating its high applicability in an integrated dark-photo fermentation system. (orig.)

  13. Nitrifying Community Analysis in a Single Submerged Attached-Growth Bioreactor for Treatment of High-Ammonia Waste Stream

    Gu, April Z.; Pedros, Philip B; Kristiansen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the nitrifying community structure in a single-stage submerged attached-growth bioreactor (SAGB) that successfully achieved stable nitrogen removal over nitrite of a high-strength ammonia wastewater. The reactor was operated with intermittent aeration and external carbon...

  14. 15N-enrichments of ammonia and glutamine in blood after infusion of 15N-ammonia in chickens fed low or high protein diet

    Karasawa, Yutaka; Koh, Katsuki

    1985-01-01

    In this experment, the blood ammonia and glutamine amide came from infused ammonia were determined when N-15 labeled ammonium acetate was intraportally infused into the chickens fed 5 or 20 % protein diet. The data obtained indicated that the infused ammonia was taken into blood glutamine amide, and also accumulated in blood as it is, in both dietary groups. 10 to 12 months old White Leghorn male birds were used. The experimental diet was fed once a day for 5 days to the birds weighting about 1.2 kg by 35 g per kg body weight. The experimental diet was consumed within 40 min in all cases. Cardiac and portal catheterization were performed for blood collection and ammonia infusion, respectively. After finishing the infusion, blood samples were taken to analyze the ammonia and glutamine contents and their N-15 enrichment. Statistical difference was not observed in the appearance of N-15 in ammonia and glutamine amide between two dietary groups. The N-15 enrichment in blood ammonia and the amide of plasma glutamine, and the calculated exogenous nitrogen in the ammonia and glutamine amide tended to be more in the 5 % protein diet group than the other. (Kako, I.)

  15. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition over High-Performance Ru/Graphene Nanocomposites for Efficient COx-Free Hydrogen Production

    Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly-dispersed Ru nanoparticles were grown on graphene nanosheets by simultaneously reducing graphene oxide and Ru ions using ethylene glycol (EG, and the resultant Ru/graphene nanocomposites were applied as a catalyst to ammonia decomposition for COx-free hydrogen production. Tuning the microstructures of Ru/graphene nanocomposites was easily accomplished in terms of Ru particle size, morphology, and loading by adjusting the preparation conditions. This was the key to excellent catalytic activity, because ammonia decomposition over Ru catalysts is structure-sensitive. Our results demonstrated that Ru/graphene prepared using water as a co-solvent greatly enhanced the catalytic performance for ammonia decomposition, due to the significantly improved nano architectures of the composites. The long-term stability of Ru/graphene catalysts was evaluated for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia at high temperatures, and the structural evolution of the catalysts was investigated during the catalytic reactions. Although there were no obvious changes in the catalytic activities at 450 °C over a duration of 80 h, an aggregation of the Ru nanoparticles was still observed in the nanocomposites, which was ascribed mainly to a sintering effect. However, the performance of the Ru/graphene catalyst was decreased gradually at 500 °C within 20 h, which was ascribed mainly to both the effect of the methanation of the graphene nanosheet under a H2 atmosphere and to enhanced sintering under high temperatures.

  16. High Brain Ammonia Tolerance and Down-Regulation of Na+:K+:2Cl- Cotransporter 1b mRNA and Protein Expression in the Brain of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus, Exposed to Environmental Ammonia or Terrestrial Conditions

    Ip, Yuen K.; Hou, Zhisheng; Chen, Xiu L.; Ong, Jasmine L. Y.; Chng, You R.; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C.; Chew, Shit F.

    2013-01-01

    Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) has been implicated in mediating ischemia-, trauma- or ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling/brain edema in mammals. This study aimed to determine the effects of ammonia or terrestrial exposure on ammonia concentrations in the plasma and brain, and the mRNA expression and protein abundance of nkcc/Nkcc in the brain, of the swamp eel Monopterus albus . Ammonia exposure led to a greater increase in the ammonia concentration in the brain of M. albus than terrestrial exposure. The brain ammonia concentration of M. albus reached 4.5 µmol g-1 and 2.7 µmol g-1 after 6 days of exposure to 50 mmol l-1 NH4Cl and terrestrial conditions, respectively. The full cDNA coding sequence of nkcc1b from M. albus brain comprised 3276 bp and coded for 1092 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 119.6 kDa. A molecular characterization indicated that it could be activated through phosphorylation and/or glycosylation by osmotic and/or oxidative stresses. Ammonia exposure for 1 day or 6 days led to significant decreases in the nkcc1b mRNA expression and Nkcc1b protein abundance in the brain of M. albus. In comparison, a significant decrease in nkcc1b mRNA expression was observed in the brain of M. albus only after 6 days of terrestrial exposure, but both 1 day and 6 days of terrestrial exposure resulted in significant decreases in the protein abundance of Nkcc1b. These results are novel because it has been established in mammals that ammonia up-regulates NKCC1 expression in astrocytes and NKCC1 plays an important role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling and brain edema. By contrast, our results indicate for the first time that M. albus is able to down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of nkcc1b/Nkcc1b in the brain when confronted with ammonia toxicity, which could be one of the contributing factors to its extraordinarily high brain ammonia tolerance. PMID:24069137

  17. High and rapid hydrogen release from thermolysis of ammonia borane near PEM fuel cell operating temperature

    Varma, Arvind; Hwang, Hyun Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    A system for generating and purifying hydrogen. To generate hydrogen, the system includes inlets configured to receive a hydrogen carrier and an inert insulator, a mixing chamber configured to combine the hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, a heat exchanger configured to apply heat to the mixture of hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, wherein the applied heat results in the generation of hydrogen from the hydrogen carrier, and an outlet configured to release the generated hydrogen. To purify hydrogen, the system includes a primary inlet to receive a starting material and an ammonia filtration subassembly, which may include an absorption column configured to absorb the ammonia into water for providing purified hydrogen at a first purity level. The ammonia filtration subassembly may also include an adsorbent member configured to adsorb ammonia from the starting material into an adsorbent for providing purified hydrogen at a second purity level.

  18. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream.

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ(15)NNO2- and δ(18)ONO2-, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus." The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ(18)O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ(18)O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ(18)ONO2- in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying the regulation of

  19. Ammonia intoxication

    Bessman, S.P.; Pal, N.

    1982-01-01

    Data is presented which shows that there is a relation between ammonia concentration in the blood and state of consciousness. The concentrations of GTP and ATP also relate both to the ammonia concentration in blood and the state of consciousness. The rate of protein synthesis in the brain as measured by the percent of intracellular counts that are incorporated into protein is also related to ammonia concentration. These findings of energy depletion and depressed synthesis resulting from energy depletion suggest that the primary lesion in ammonia intoxication involves the Krebs cycle. The greater effect of ammonia on GTP than on ATP metabolism supports the view that the primary site of action of ammonia is at the glutamate dehydrogenase-ketoglutarate reduction step - and is consistent with previous work on this subject. (H.K.)

  20. Highly Active and Specific Tyrosine Ammonia-Lyases from Diverse Origins Enable Enhanced Production of Aromatic Compounds in Bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    Phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyases form cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, which are precursors of a wide range of aromatic compounds of biotechnological interest. Lack of highly active and specific tyrosine ammonia-lyases has previously been a limitation in metabolic engineering approaches...

  1. Composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their contribution to nitrification in a high-temperature hot spring

    Chen, S.; Peng, X.-T.; Xu, H.-C.; Ta, K.-W.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes and associated organisms has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrification in high-temperature environments remains unclear. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface sinter and bottom sediments were 4.8 and 5.3 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Relative abundances of Crenarchaea in both samples were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii", which represented the most abundant operation taxonomic units (OTU) in both sediments. Furthermore, bacterial amoA was not detected in this study. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that AOA and 16S rRNA genes were present in the range of 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 and 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 gene copies g-1 sediment. The cell-specific nitrification rates were estimated to be in the range of 0.41 to 0.79 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, which is consistent with earlier estimates in estuary environments. This study demonstrated that AOA were widely involved in nitrification in this hot spring. It further indicated the importance of archaea rather than bacteria in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  2. A method for measuring pH at high temperatures is presented

    Chaudon, Luc.

    1979-01-01

    Two hydrogen electrodes are used and set up in a PTFE cell comprising two chambers connected through a saturated potassium chloride solution bridge. This cell is put in an autoclave containing hydrogen. The potential difference of the following cell is measured: H 2 , Pt, R solution - KCl saturated solution at 25 0 C - X solution, Pt, H 2 - The pH of the reference solution R is known up to 300 0 C and the X solution must have its pH to be determined. The precision of the measures at 300 0 C is estimated about +-0,1 pH unit. The dissociation constant of water is calculated from pH variations of alcaline solutions up to 300 0 C. The method has helped to measure the pH at 300 0 C of some boric acid solutions, with or without lithium hydroxide additions, in the following concentration range: B: 250 to 1500 ppm and Li: 0 to 3 ppm. Some concentrations are in fact those chosen for the primary circuits of pressurized water reactors. The pH of ammoniacal solutions is measured too and helped to determine the variations of the dissociation constant of ammonia with temperature [fr

  3. Acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms at high pH and high calcium concentration

    Yoshida, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Acetate biodegradation at a high pH and a high calcium concentration was examined to clarify the effect of bacterial activity on the migration of organic 14 C compounds in cementitious repositories. Tamagawa river sediment or Teganuma pond sediment was anaerobically cultured with 5 mM acetate and 10 mM nitrate at pH 9.5-12 at 30 o C. After 20 and 90 days, the acetate concentration of the culture medium was analyzed and found to have decreased below 5 mM at pH ≤ 11. On the other hand, it did not decrease when either sediment was incubated in the absence of nitrate. These results suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can biodegrade acetate under more alkaline conditions than the reported pH range in which nitrate-reducing bacteria can exhibit activity. Acetate biodegradation was also examined at a high calcium concentration. Sediments were anaerobically cultured at pH 9.5 with 5 mM acetate and 10 mM nitrate in solution, equilibrated with ordinary Portland cement hydrate, in which the Ca concentration was 14.6 mM. No decrease in acetate concentration after incubation of the sediments was observed, nor was it lower than in the absence of cementitious composition, suggesting that kinetics of acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms is lowered by a high Ca concentration. - Research highlights: → Acetate biodegradation at a high pH and a high calcium concentration was examined to clarify the effect of bacterial activity on the migration of organic 14 C compounds in cementitious repositories. → Nitrate-reducing bacteria can biodegrade acetate at pH ≤ 11. → Kinetics of acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms might be lowered by a high Ca concentration.

  4. Evaluating high pH for control of dreissenid mussels

    Dave Evans; Sergey E. Mastitsky; Katherine L. Prescott; Thomas H. Prescott; Renata Claudi; Anna Carolina Taraborelli

    2013-01-01

    Two field experiments were carried out using a custom built flow-through laboratory to test the effect of elevated pH on dreissenid musselsas a potential control method. Both experiments tested the ability of dreissenid pediveligers to settle under conditions of elevated pH and thelong-term survival of adult dreissenids under the same conditions. The two experimental sites had different water quality and differentspecies of dreissenids present. The settlement of quagga mussel pediveligers at ...

  5. Pressure pressure-balanced pH sensing system for high temperature and high pressure water

    Tachibana, Koji

    1995-01-01

    As for the pH measurement system for high temperature, high pressure water, there have been the circumstances that first the reference electrodes for monitoring corrosion potential were developed, and subsequently, it was developed for the purpose of maintaining the soundness of metallic materials in high temperature, high pressure water in nuclear power generation. In the process of developing the reference electrodes for high temperature water, it was clarified that the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs is closely related to the corrosion potential determined by dissolved oxygen concentration. As the types of pH electrodes, there are metal-hydrogen electrodes, glass electrodes, ZrO 2 diaphragm electrodes and TiO 2 semiconductor electrodes. The principle of pH measurement using ZrO 2 diaphragms is explained. The pH measuring system is composed of YSZ element, pressure-balanced type external reference electrode, pressure balancer and compressed air vessel. The stability and pH response of YSZ elements are reported. (K.I.)

  6. High-performance liquid chromatography of oligoguanylates at high pH

    Stribling, R.; Deamer, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Because of the stable self-structures formed by oligomers of guanosine, standard high-performance liquid chromatography techniques for oligonucleotide fractionation are not applicable. Previously, oligoguanylate separations have been carried out at pH 12 using RPC-5 as the packing material. While RPC-5 provides excellent separations, there are several limitations, including the lack of a commercially available source. This report describes a new anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography method using HEMA-IEC BIO Q, which successfully separates different forms of the guanosine monomer as well as longer oligoguanylates. The reproducibility and stability at high pH suggests a versatile role for this material.

  7. High rate sulfate reduction at pH 6 in a Ph-auxostat submerged membrane bioreactor fed with formate

    Bijmans, M.F.M.; Peeters, T.W.T.; Lens, P.N.L.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    Many industrial waste and process waters contain high concentrations of sulfate, which can be removed by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This paper reports on mesophilic (30 °C) sulfate reduction at pH 6 with formate as electron donor in a membrane bioreactor with a pH-auxostat dosing system. A

  8. [Effects of nitrogen application level on soil nitrate accumulation and ammonia volatilization in high-yielding wheat field].

    Wang, Dong; Yu, Zhenwen; Yu, Wenming; Shi, Yu; Zhou, Zhongxin

    2006-09-01

    The study showed that during the period from sowing to pre-wintering, the soil nitrate in high-yielding wheat field moved down to deeper layers, and accumulated in the layers below 140 cm. An application rate of 96-168 kg N x hm(-2) increased the nitrate content in 0-60 cm soil layer and the wheat grain yield and its protein content, and decreased the proportion of apparent N loss to applied N and the ammonia volatilization loss from basal nitrogen. Applying 240 kg N x hm(-2) promoted the downward movement of soil nitrate and its accumulation in deeper layers, increased the proportion of apparent N loss to applied N and the ammonia volatilization loss from basal nitrogen, had no significant effect on the protein content of wheat grain, but decreased the grain yield. The appropriate application rate of nitrogen on high-yielding wheat field was 132-204 kg N x hm(-2).

  9. ENGINEERING DESIGN CONFIGURATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL AMMONIA REMOVAL

    Many regions in the United States have excessive levels of nutrients including ammonia in their source waters. For example, farming and agricultural sources of ammonia in the Midwest contribute to relatively high levels of ammonia in many ground waters. Although ammonia in water ...

  10. Wastewater Treatment with Ammonia Recovery System

    M. Örvös; T. Balázs; K. F. Both

    2008-01-01

    From environmental aspect purification of ammonia containing wastewater is expected. High efficiency ammonia desorption can be done from the water by air on proper temperature. After the desorption process, ammonia can be recovered and used in another technology. The calculation method described below give some methods to find either the minimum column height or ammonia rich solution of the effluent.

  11. High-throughput analysis of ammonia oxidiser community composition via a novel, amoA-based functional gene array.

    Guy C J Abell

    Full Text Available Advances in microbial ecology research are more often than not limited by the capabilities of available methodologies. Aerobic autotrophic nitrification is one of the most important and well studied microbiological processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We have developed and validated a microbial diagnostic microarray based on the ammonia-monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene, enabling the in-depth analysis of the community structure of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers. The amoA microarray has been successfully applied to analyse nitrifier diversity in marine, estuarine, soil and wastewater treatment plant environments. The microarray has moderate costs for labour and consumables and enables the analysis of hundreds of environmental DNA or RNA samples per week per person. The array has been thoroughly validated with a range of individual and complex targets (amoA clones and environmental samples, respectively, combined with parallel analysis using traditional sequencing methods. The moderate cost and high throughput of the microarray makes it possible to adequately address broader questions of the ecology of microbial ammonia oxidation requiring high sample numbers and high resolution of the community composition.

  12. Ammonia blood test

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003506.htm Ammonia blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Encephalopathy - ammonia; Cirrhosis - ammonia; Liver failure - ammonia Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ammonia (NH3) - blood ...

  13. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide from swine wastewater during and after acidification treatment: effect of pH, mixing and aeration

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    setup consisting of nine dynamic flux chambers. Three pH levels (pH = 6.0, pH = 5.8 and pH = 5.5), combined with short-term aeration and venting (with an inert gas) treatments were studied. Acidification reduced average NH(3) emissions from swine slurry stored after acidification treatment compared...... to emissions during storage of non-acidified slurry. The reduction were 50%, 62% and 77% when pH was reduce to 6.0, 5.8 and 5.5, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on average CO(2) and H(2)S emissions during storage of slurry after acidification. Aeration of the slurry for 30 min had no effect...

  14. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    Sophie S. Abby

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amoAXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  15. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome.

    Abby, Sophie S; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amo AXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  16. Highly Sensitive Ammonia Probes of a Variable Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), s. 919-923 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0436; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11022 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : vibrationally excited ammonia * inversion-rotation spectra * molecular-transitions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  17. Recovery of ammonia and production of high-grade phosphates from digester effluents

    Conservation and recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from animal wastes and municipal effluents is important because of economic and environmental reasons. In this paper we present a novel technology for separation and recovery of ammonia and phosphorus from liquid swine manure. Phosphorus recovery ...

  18. Recovery of ammonia and production of high-grade phosphates from digester effluents (municipal and livestock)

    Phosphorus (P) recovery of anaerobically digested swine wastewater and side-stream municipal wastewater via magnesium precipitation was enhanced by combining it with the recovery of ammonia (NH3) through gas-permeable membranes and low-rate aeration. The low-rate aeration stripped the natural carbon...

  19. PVP-stabilized Ru–Rh nanoparticles as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane

    Rakap, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the utilization of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles (3.4 ± 1.4 nm) as highly efficient catalysts in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation is reported. They are prepared by co-reduction of ruthenium and rhodium metal ions in ethanol/water mixture by an alcohol reduction method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They are durable and highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane even at very low concentrations and temperature, providing average turnover frequency of 386 mol H 2 (mol cat) −1 min −1 and maximum hydrogen generation rate of 10,680 L H 2 min −1 (mol cat) −1 . Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles also provide activation energy of 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ/mol for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Ru-Rh@PVP NPs provide a TOF of 386 mol H 2 (mol cat) −1 min −1 for hydrolysis of AB. • Maximum HG rate is 9680 L H 2 min −1 (mol cat) −1 for the hydrolysis of AB. • Activation energy is 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ mol −1 for the hydrolysis of AB

  20. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  1. Ammonia Test

    ... of Conditions Not Listed? Not Listed? Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer ... ammonia, but both can damage the eyes, skin, respiratory tract, and, if swallowed, the mouth, throat, and ...

  2. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by high temperature chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    J. Sintermann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements with chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180 °C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the instrument for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150 °C to an air-conditioned trailer where the gas was sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m−2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  3. Nanoscale insight of high piezoelectricity in high-TC PMN-PH-PT ceramics

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Zhang, Qihui; Fang, Bijun; Zhang, Shuai; Zhao, Xiangyong; Ding, Jianning

    2018-03-01

    The piezoelectric properties of the high-Curie temperature (high-TC) 0.15Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.38PbHfO3-0.47PbTiO3 (0.15PMN-0.38PH-0.47PT) ceramics prepared by three different methods were compared. The 0.15PMN-0.38PH-0.47PT ceramics synthesized by the partial oxalate route exhibit the optimum properties, in which d33* = 845.3 pm/V, d33 = 456.2 pC/N, Kp = 67.2%, and TC = 291 °C. The nanoscale origin of the high piezoelectric response of the 0.15PMN-0.38PH-0.47PT ceramics was investigated by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using the ceramics synthesized by the partial oxalate route. Large quantities of fine stripe submicron ferroelectric domains are observed, which form large island domains. In order to give further insights into the piezoelectric properties of the 0.15PMN-0.38PH-0.47PT ceramics from a microscopic point of view, the local poling experiments and local switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy (SS-PFM) were investigated, from which the local converse piezoelectric coefficient d33*(l) is calculated as 220 pm/V.

  4. Study of ammonia process generation from the avian residues aiming the hydrogen production; Estudo do processo da geracao de amonia a partir de residuos avicolas visando a producao de hidrogenio

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos; Abrao, Alcidio; Carvalho, Fatima Maria Sequeira de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: nayara.egute@usp.br

    2010-03-15

    The hydrogen used in fuel cells can be classified as green or black hydrogen. Ammonia as an hydrogen source has the great advantage of being carbon-free. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. Among the factors which influence the ammonia volatilization, are the pH and the nitrogen content. Poultry litter and excreta isolated were also analyzed, The addition of sodium carbonate, with the rise of pH promoted an increase in the levels of ammonia volatilization. The high nitrogen excreta presented higher ammonia volatilization than the other one. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined int his material. (author)

  5. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    Abby, Sophie S.; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally ...

  6. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  7. Calculation notes in support of ammonia releases from waste tank ventilation systems

    Wojdac, L.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ammonia is generated in waste tanks via the degradation of nitrogen compounds. The ammonia is released from the liquids by a mechanism which is dependent on temperature, pH, ionic strength and ammonia concentration. The release of ammonia to the environment occurs via diffusion of ammonia through a stagnant air mass and into the ventilation system

  8. Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

    Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition by ammonium at concentrations above 1000 mgN/L is known to harm the methanogenesis phase of anaerobic digestion. We anaerobically digested swine waste and achieved steady state COD-removal efficiency of around 52% with no fatty-acid or H2 accumulation. As the anaerobic microbial community adapted to the gradual increase of total ammonia-N (NH3-N from 890±295 to 2040±30 mg/L, the Bacterial and Archaeal communities became less diverse. Phylotypes most closely related to hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus (36.4% and Methanobrevibacter (11.6%, along with acetoclastic Methanosaeta (29.3%, became the most abundant Archaeal sequences during acclimation. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in the relative abundances of phylotypes most closely related to acetogens and fatty-acid producers (Clostridium, Coprococcus, and Sphaerochaeta and syntrophic fatty-acid Bacteria (Syntrophomonas, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae species, and Cloacamonaceae species that have metabolic capabilities for butyrate and propionate fermentation, as well as for reverse acetogenesis. Our results provide evidence countering a prevailing theory that acetoclastic methanogens are selectively inhibited when the total ammonia-N concentration is greater than ~1000 mgN/L. Instead, acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens coexisted in the presence of total ammonia-N of ~2000 mgN/L by establishing syntrophic relationships with fatty-acid fermenters, as well as homoacetogens able to carry out forward and reverse acetogenesis.

  9. High-resolution ammonia emissions inventories in Fujian, China, 2009-2015

    Wu, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yin-Ju; Schwab, James J.; Li, Yang-Fan; Liu, Yuan-Long; Yuan, Chung-Shin

    2017-08-01

    A high-resolution NH3 emission inventory was developed based on the corrected emission factors and county-level activity data. To provide model-ready emission input, the NH3 emission inventory was gridded for the modeling domain at 1 × 1 km resolution using source-based spatial surrogates and a GIS system. The best estimate of total NH3 emission for the province was 228.02 kt in 2015 with a percentage uncertainty of ±16.3%. Four major contributors were farmland ecosystem, livestock wastes, humans and waste treatment, which contributed 39.4%, 43.1%, 4.9%, and 4.2% of the total emissions, respectively. The averaged NH3 emission density for the whole region was 1.88 t km-2 yr-1 and the higher values were found in coastal areas with higher dense populations. The seasonal patterns, with higher emissions in summer, were consistent with the patterns of temperature and planting practices. From 2009 to 2015, annual NH3 emissions increased from 218.49 kt to 228.02 kt. All of these changes are insignificant compared to the estimated overall uncertainties in the analysis, but indicative of changes in the source categories over this period. Between 2009 and 2015, the largest changes occurred in human emissions and waste treatment plants, which were consistent with the process of rapid urbanization. Meanwhile, the decrease of emissions from pigs was slightly higher than the increased emissions from broilers and the increased emissions from meat goats and beef cattle due to the combine effects of increasingly stringent environmental requirements for pig farms and shift away from pork consumption to beef, chicken and mutton. The validity of the estimates was further evaluated using uncertainty analysis, comparison with previous studies, and correlation analysis between emission density and observed ground ammonia. The inventories reflect the changes in economic progress and environmental protection and can provide scientific basis for the establishment of effective PM2.5 control

  10. Excess glycogen does not resolve high ultimate pH of oxidative muscle.

    England, Eric M; Matarneh, Sulaiman K; Oliver, Emily M; Apaoblaza, Ariel; Scheffler, Tracy L; Shi, Hao; Gerrard, David E

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen content can impact the extent of postmortem pH decline. Compared to glycolytic muscles, oxidative muscles contain lower glycogen levels antemortem which may contribute to the higher ultimate pH. In an effort to explore further the participation of glycogen in postmortem metabolism, we postulated that increasing the availability of glycogen would drive additional pH decline in oxidative muscles to equivalent pH values similar to the ultimate pH of glycolytic muscles. Glycolysis and pH declines were compared in porcine longissimus lumborum (glycolytic) and masseter (oxidative) muscles using an in vitro system in the presence of excess glycogen. The ultimate pH of the system containing longissimus lumborum reached a value similar to that observed in intact muscle. The pH decline of the system containing masseter samples stopped prematurely resulting in a higher ultimate pH which was similar to that of intact masseter muscle. To investigate further, we titrated powdered longissimus lumborum and masseter samples in the reaction buffer. As the percentage of glycolytic sample increased, the ultimate pH decreased. These data show that oxidative muscle produces meat with a high ultimate pH regardless of glycogen content and suggest that inherent muscle factors associated with glycolytic muscle control the extent of pH decline in pig muscles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro effect of pH on resistance of ruminal bacteria to intracellular potassium depletion, and effect of pH and ionophores on ammonia and microbial protein production Efeito do pH in vitro sobre a resistência de bactérias do rúmen à perda de potássio intracelular e efeito do pH e de ionóforos sobre a produção de amônia e proteína microbiana

    W.M. Leopoldino

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruminal fluid from steers fed on pasture was incubated with artificial media at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in two experiments. In the first, the effect of monensin level on resistance of ruminal bacteria to potassium depletion was evaluated; in the second, effects of the ionophores monensin and lasalocid on ammonia and protein production were quantified. In experiment 1, culture media affected potassium level. The monensin concentration needed to cause half maximal potassium depletion was 2.77µM at pH 5.5 but was 0.056µM at pH 7.0, showing that bacteria incubated at pH 5.5 were more tolerant to monensin than those incubated at pH 7.0. Both ionophores as well as increased acidity caused decreased ammonia production. Both ionophores inhibited ammonia production by 56%, independently of pH. In cultures incubated at pH 5.5 compared to pH 7.0, ammonia production was decreased by 50.5%, independently of the ionophores. Therefore, effects of ionophores and acidity were additive, and the maximum inhibition occurred in the presence of an ionophore at low pH (75.2%. Microbial protein production was lowest when lasalocid was present in a low pH culture medium, causing inhibition of microbial growth.Em dois estudos, o líquido ruminal de bovinos mantidos sob pastagem foi usado para incubação in vitro em diferentes meios artificiais com valores de pH 5,5 e 7,0, para avaliar a ação de níveis crescentes de monensina na resistência à perda de potássio de bactérias do rúmen e verificar o efeito de monensina e lasalocida na produção de amônia e de proteína microbiana em pH 5,5 e 7,0. O meio utilizado para determinar a perda de potássio interferiu nos valores absolutos de potássio. A concentração de monensina necessária para causar a metade da perda máxima de potássio foi de 2,77µM em pH 5,5 e 0,056µM em pH 7,0, evidenciando que as bactérias incubadas em meios com pH 5,5 foram mais resistentes à monensina que aquelas incubadas em meios com pH 7

  12. Influence of ammonia on leaching behaviors of incineration fly ash and its geochemical modeling

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Guan, Zhen Zhen; Chen, De Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Incineration fly ash could be contaminated with NH3 that was slipped from the ammonia-based selective non-catalytic reduction(SNCR) process and from evaporation of municipal solid wastes' leachate involved in the wastes. This research was conducted to investigate the impacts of ammonia on leaching....... It was proved that at pH>9, the leaching of DOC increased significantly in the presence of high concentrations of ammonia (≥1357 mg·L-1), but there was little effect when the ammonia level in eluates was not higher than 537 mg·L-1. At pH12, for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn, their leaching species were predominantly...... by precipitation/dissolution and surface complexation/precipitation processes; Visual MINTEQ modeling could well describe the leaching behaviors of Al, Cu, Pb and Zn from incineration fly ash....

  13. Ammonia toxicity: from head to toe?

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Rackayova, Veronika; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Vairappan, Balasubramaniyan; Ott, Peter; Rose, Christopher F

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia is diffused and transported across all plasma membranes. This entails that hyperammonemia leads to an increase in ammonia in all organs and tissues. It is known that the toxic ramifications of ammonia primarily touch the brain and cause neurological impairment. However, the deleterious effects of ammonia are not specific to the brain, as the direct effect of increased ammonia (change in pH, membrane potential, metabolism) can occur in any type of cell. Therefore, in the setting of chronic liver disease where multi-organ dysfunction is common, the role of ammonia, only as neurotoxin, is challenged. This review provides insights and evidence that increased ammonia can disturb many organ and cell types and hence lead to dysfunction.

  14. NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIO OF COMETARY AMMONIA FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF C/2014 Q2 (LOVEJOY)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    The icy materials present in comets provide clues to the origin and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems. High-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) were performed on 2015 January 11 (at 1.321 au pre-perihelion) with the High Dispersion Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. We derive the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of NH{sub 2} (126 ± 25), as well as the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of the H{sub 2}O{sup +} ion (2.77 ± 0.24) and NH{sub 2} (3.38 ± 0.07), which correspond to nuclear spin temperatures of >24 K (3 σ lower limit) and 27 ± 2 K, respectively. We also derive the intensity ratio of the green-to-red doublet of forbidden oxygen lines (0.107 ± 0.007). The ammonia in the comet must have formed under low-temperature conditions at ∼10 K or less to reproduce the observed {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in this molecule if it is assumed that the {sup 15}N-fractionation of ammonia occurred via ion–molecule chemical reactions. However, this temperature is inconsistent with the nuclear spin temperatures of water and ammonia estimated from the OPRs. The interpretation of the nuclear spin temperature as the temperature at molecular formation may therefore be incorrect. An isotope-selective photodissociation of molecular nitrogen by protosolar ultraviolet radiation might play an important role in the {sup 15}N-fractionation observed in cometary volatiles.

  15. PVP-stabilized Ru–Rh nanoparticles as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane

    Rakap, Murat, E-mail: mrtrakap@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Herein, the utilization of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles (3.4 ± 1.4 nm) as highly efficient catalysts in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation is reported. They are prepared by co-reduction of ruthenium and rhodium metal ions in ethanol/water mixture by an alcohol reduction method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They are durable and highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane even at very low concentrations and temperature, providing average turnover frequency of 386 mol H{sub 2} (mol cat){sup −1} min{sup −1} and maximum hydrogen generation rate of 10,680 L H{sub 2} min{sup −1} (mol cat){sup −1}. Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles also provide activation energy of 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ/mol for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Ru-Rh@PVP NPs provide a TOF of 386 mol H{sub 2} (mol cat){sup −1} min{sup −1} for hydrolysis of AB. • Maximum HG rate is 9680 L H{sub 2} min{sup −1} (mol cat){sup −1} for the hydrolysis of AB. • Activation energy is 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ mol{sup −1} for the hydrolysis of AB.

  16. Nanowire-templated microelectrodes for high-sensitivity pH detection

    Antohe, V.A.; Radu, Adrian; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Mária

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive pH capacitive sensor has been designed by confined growth of vertically aligned nanowire arrays on interdigited microelectrodes. The active surface of the device has been functionalized with an electrochemical pH transducer (polyaniline). We easily tune the device features...... by combining lithographic techniques with electrochemical synthesis. The reported electrical LC resonance measurements show considerable sensitivity enhancement compared to conventional capacitive pH sensors realized with microfabricated interdigited electrodes. The sensitivity can be easily improved...

  17. Oxygen consumption remains stable while ammonia excretion is reduced upon short time exposure to high salinity in Macrobrachium acanthurus (Caridae: Palaemonidae, a recent freshwater colonizer

    Carolina A. Freire

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Palaemonid shrimps occur in the tropical and temperate regions of South America and the Indo-Pacific, in brackish/freshwater habitats, and marine coastal areas. They form a clade that recently (i.e., ~30 mya invaded freshwater, and one included genus, Macrobrachium Bate, 1868, is especially successful in limnic habitats. Adult Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 dwell in coastal freshwaters, have diadromous habit, and need brackish water to develop. Thus, they are widely recognized as euryhaline. Here we test how this species responds to a short-term exposure to increased salinity. We hypothesized that abrupt exposure to high salinity would result in reduced gill ventilation/perfusion and decreased oxygen consumption. Shrimps were subjected to control (0 psu and experimental salinities (10, 20, 30 psu, for four and eight hours (n = 8 in each group. The water in the experimental containers was saturated with oxygen before the beginning of the experiment; aeration was interrupted before placing the shrimp in the experimental container. Dissolved oxygen (DO, ammonia concentration, and pH were measured from the aquaria water, at the start and end of each experiment. After exposure, the shrimp’s hemolymph was sampled for lactate and osmolality assays. Muscle tissue was sampled for hydration content (Muscle Water Content, MWC. Oxygen consumption was not reduced and hemolymph lactate did not increase with increased salinity. The pH of the water decreased with time, under all conditions. Ammonia excretion decreased with increased salinity. Hemolymph osmolality and MWC remained stable at 10 and 20 psu, but osmolality increased (~50% and MWC decreased (~4% at 30 psu. The expected reduction in oxygen consumption was not observed. This shrimp is able to tolerate significant changes in water salt concentrations for a few hours by keeping its metabolism in aerobic mode, and putatively shutting down branchial salt uptake to avoid massive salt

  18. Highly sensitive room temperature ammonia gas sensor based on Ir-doped Pt porous ceramic electrodes

    Liu, Wenlong [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China); Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Yu [Department of chemical and materials engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Do, Jing-Shan, E-mail: jsdo@ncut.edu.tw [Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@cdu.edu.cn [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the Pt and Pt-Ir porous ceramic electrodes. • The gas sensors based on the Pt and Pt-Ir alloy electrodes possess good sensing performances. • The reaction path of the ammonia on platinum has been discussed. - Abstract: Room temperature NH{sub 3} gas sensors based on Pt and Pt-Ir (Ir doping Pt) porous ceramic electrodes have been fabricated by both electroplating and sputtering methods. The properties of the gaseous ammonia sensors have been examined by polarization and chronoamperometry techniques. The influence of humidity on the features of the resulting sensors in the system has also been discussed, and the working potential was optimized. Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the electrode. With increasing the relative humidity, the response of the Pt-Ir(E)/Pt(S)/PCP sensor to NH{sub 3} gas could be enhanced remarkably, and the sensitivity increases from 1.14 to 12.06 μA ppm{sup −1} cm{sup −2} .Then we have also discussed the sensing mechanism of the Pt-Ir sensor and the result has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the electrode surface before and after reaction in the end.

  19. Highly selective transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N2 based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions system.

    Ji, Youzhi; Bai, Jing; Li, Jinhua; Luo, Tao; Qiao, Li; Zeng, Qingyi; Zhou, Baoxue

    2017-11-15

    A highly selective method for transforming ammonia nitrogen to N 2 was proposed, based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions (PEC-chlorine) system. The PEC-chlorine system was facilitated by a visible light response WO 3 nanoplate array (NPA) electrode in an ammonia solution containing chloride ions (Cl - ). Under illumination, photoholes from WO 3 promote the oxidation of Cl - to chlorine radical (Cl). This radical can selectively transform ammonia nitrogen to N 2 (79.9%) and NO 3 - (19.2%), similar to the breakpoint chlorination reaction. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 10.6% (PEC without Cl - ) to 99.9% with the PEC-chlorine system within 90 min operation, which can be attributed to the cyclic reactions between Cl - /Cl and the reaction intermediates (NH 2 , NHCl, etc.) that expand the degradation reactions from the surface of the electrodes to the whole solution system. Moreover, Cl is the main radical species contributing to the transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N 2 , which is confirmed by the tBuOH capture experiment. Compared to conventional breakpoint chlorination, the PEC-chlorine system is a more economical and efficient means for ammonia nitrogen degradation because of the fast removal rate, no additional chlorine cost, and its use of clean energy (since it is solar-driven). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopu...

  1. Measurement of the Extracellular pH of Adherently Growing Mammalian Cells with High Spatial Resolution Using a Voltammetric pH Microsensor.

    Munteanu, Raluca-Elena; Stǎnicǎ, Luciana; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Gáspár, Szilveszter

    2018-05-15

    There are only a few tools suitable for measuring the extracellular pH of adherently growing mammalian cells with high spatial resolution, and none of them is widely used in laboratories around the world. Cell biologists very often limit themselves to measuring the intracellular pH with commercially available fluorescent probes. Therefore, we built a voltammetric pH microsensor and investigated its suitability for monitoring the extracellular pH of adherently growing mammalian cells. The voltammetric pH microsensor consisted of a 37 μm diameter carbon fiber microelectrode modified with reduced graphene oxide and syringaldazine. While graphene oxide was used to increase the electrochemically active surface area of our sensor, syringaldazine facilitated pH sensing through its pH-dependent electrochemical oxidation and reduction. The good sensitivity (60 ± 2.5 mV/pH unit), reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤3% for the same pH measured with 5 different microsensors), and stability (pH drift around 0.05 units in 3 h) of the built voltammetric pH sensors were successfully used to investigate the acidification of the extracellular space of both cancer cells and normal cells. The results indicate that the developed pH microsensor and the perfected experimental protocol based on scanning electrochemical microscopy can reveal details of the pH regulation of cells not attainable with pH sensors lacking spatial resolution or which cannot be reproducibly positioned in the extracellular space.

  2. Revisiting the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on carbon-supported metal nanoparticle catalysts

    Li, Zhe-Fei; Wang, Yuxuan; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A procedure to pretreat electrocatalysts to study the ammonia oxidation is provided. • N ads and O/OH ads were identified as the major deactivation species that prevent ammonia oxidatoin. • The electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanisms for ammonia oxidation were elucidated. • The onset potential for ammonia oxidation is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. • Ammonia electro-oxidation involves a complex decoupled electron and proton transfer process. - Abstract: The ammonia electro-oxidation reaction (AOR) has been studied due to its promising applications in ammonia electrolysis, wastewater remediation, direct ammonia fuel cells, and sensors. However, it is difficult to compare and analyze the reported electrocatalytic activity of AOR reliably, likely due to the variation in catalyst synthesis, electrode composition, electrode morphology, and testing protocol. In this paper, the electro-oxidation of ammonia on different carbon-supported precious metal nanoparticle catalysts was revisited. The effect of experimental conditions, electrochemical test parameters, electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanism of the catalysts were investigated. Pt/C catalyst possesses the highest electrocatalytic activity, while Ir/C and Rh/C show lower overpotential. The onset potential of the AOR is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. N ads is one major cause of deactivation accompanied with the formation of surface O/OH ads at high potentials. The coulombic efficiency of N ads formation on Pt is about 1% initially and gradually decreases with reaction time. Increase in ammonia concentration leads to increase in current density, while increase in hydroxyl ions concentration can enhance the current density and reduce the overpotential simultaneously. The slopes of AOR onset potential and hydrogen adsorption/desorption potential of Pt/C as a function of pH

  3. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education.

    Doyle, Kari M H; Vale, Ronald D

    2013-11-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K-12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K-12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K-12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education.

  4. Glycopyrrolate in toxic exposure to ammonia gas

    Bhalla A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH 3 is a highly water-soluble, colorless, irritant gas with a unique pungent odor. Liquid ammonia stored under high pressure is still widely used for refrigeration in cold stores used for storing grains. Severe toxicity may occur following accidental exposure. We report an interesting case of accidental exposure to ammonia treated with glycopyrrolate along with other supportive measures.

  5. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  6. PH measurement under pressure and at high temperatures; Mesure du pH sous pression et a temperature elevee

    Fournie, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Le Peintre, M; Mahieu, C [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1961-07-01

    In the first part the development and operation of a glass electrode under pressure at room temperature is described. The pressure equilibrium between the inside and outside of the glass membrane several centimetres thick is obtained instantaneously by means of a siphon. The use of a silicone oil as electrical insulator makes possible the working of the glass electrode with the siphon at high pressures (100 kg/cm{sup 2}). In the second part, we determined the pH of various buffer solutions up to 250 deg. C using a cell of our design having two hydrogen electrodes. The values thus obtained for the buffer solutions make it possible to verify and calibrate the pH electrodes independently of the oxido-reduction potential of the medium. In the third part we give the results obtained up to 200 deg. C with the glass electrodes developed in conjunction with the Societe St Gobain. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, nous exposons la mise au point et le fonctionnement d'une electrode en verre sous pression a la temperature ordinaire. L'equilibrage instantane de la pression a l'interieur et a l'exterieur de la membrane en verre de quelques diziemes de millimetres d'epaisseur s'effectue par l'intermediaire d'un siphon. L'emploi d'une huile de silicone comme isolant electrique a permis le fonctionnement de l'electrode en verre a siphon sous haute pression (1000 kg/cm{sup 2}). Dans une deuxieme partie, nous avons determine jusqu'a 250 deg. C les valeurs du pH des diverses solutions tampons avec une cellule de notre conception a deux electrodes d'hydrogene. Les valeurs des solutions tampons ainsi obtenues permettent de verifier et d'etalonner les electrodes a pH independantes du potentiel d'oxydo-reduction du milieu. Dans une troisieme partie, nous relatons les resultats obtenus jusqu'a 200 deg. C avec les electrodes en verre mis au point en collaboration avec la Societe Saint-Gobain. (auteur)

  7. Mass transfer dynamics of ammonia in high rate biomethanation of poultry litter leachate.

    Gangagni Rao, A; Gandu, Bharath; Swamy, Y V

    2012-04-01

    In the present study possibility of coupling biofilter to arrest ammonia (NH(3)) emission to the atmosphere from the integrated UASB and stripper (UASB+ST) system treating poultry litter leachate was studied. UASB+ST with biofilter (UASB+ST+BF) exhibited removal efficiency (RE) of NH(3) in the range of 98-99% (below 28 ppmV (parts per million by volume)) with low cost agricultural residue as a bedding material. Mass transfer dynamics of TAN in the system revealed that TAN loss to atmosphere was below 1% in UASB+ST+BF where as it was in the range of 70-90% in UASB+ST. Cost estimates revealed that financial implications due to the addition of biofilter were below 10% of total capital cost. TAN retained in the bedding material of biofilter could also be utilized as soil conditioner upon saturation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-catalyst high-weight% hydrogen storage in an N-heterocycle synthesized from lignin hydrogenolysis products and ammonia.

    Forberg, Daniel; Schwob, Tobias; Zaheer, Muhammad; Friedrich, Martin; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Kempe, Rhett

    2016-10-20

    Large-scale energy storage and the utilization of biomass as a sustainable carbon source are global challenges of this century. The reversible storage of hydrogen covalently bound in chemical compounds is a particularly promising energy storage technology. For this, compounds that can be sustainably synthesized and that permit high-weight% hydrogen storage would be highly desirable. Herein, we report that catalytically modified lignin, an indigestible, abundantly available and hitherto barely used biomass, can be harnessed to reversibly store hydrogen. A novel reusable bimetallic catalyst has been developed, which is able to hydrogenate and dehydrogenate N-heterocycles most efficiently. Furthermore, a particular N-heterocycle has been identified that can be synthesized catalytically in one step from the main lignin hydrogenolysis product and ammonia, and in which the new bimetallic catalyst allows multiple cycles of high-weight% hydrogen storage.

  9. High pH mobile phase effects on silica-based reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic columns

    Kirkland, J.J.; Straten, van M.A.; Claessens, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    Aqueous mobile phases above pH 8 often cause premature column failure, limiting the utility of silica-based columns for applications requiring high pH. Previous studies suggest that covalently bound silane ligands are hydrolyzed and removed by high-pH mobile phases. However, we found that the

  10. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment. PMID:23995944

  11. Screening for the effects of natural plant extracts at different pH on in vitro rumen microbial fermentation of a high-concentrate diet for beef cattle.

    Cardozo, P W; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Kamel, C

    2005-11-01

    Six natural plant extracts and three secondary plant metabolites were tested at five doses (0, 0.3, 3, 30, and 300 mg/L) and two different pH (7.0 and 5.5) in a duplicate 9 x 5 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine their effects on in vitro microbial fermentation using ruminal fluid from heifers fed a high-concentrate finishing diet. Treatments were extracts of garlic (GAR), cinnamon (CIN), yucca (YUC), anise (ANI), oregano (ORE), and capsicum (CAP) and pure cinnamaldehyde (CDH), anethole (ATL), and eugenol (EUG). Each treatment was tested in triplicate and in two periods. Fifty milliliters of a 1:1 ruminal fluid-to-buffer solution were introduced into polypropylene tubes supplied with 0.5 g of DM of a 10:90 forage:concentrate diet (15.4% CP, 16.0% NDF; DM basis) and incubated for 24 h at 39 degrees C. Samples were collected for ammonia N and VFA concentrations. The decrease in pH from 7.0 to 5.5 resulted in lower (P cattle diets may differ depending on ruminal pH. When pH was 5.5, GAR, CAP, YUC, and CDH altered ruminal microbial fermentation in favor of propionate, which is more energetically efficient.

  12. High-resolution inventory of ammonia emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China from 1978 to 2008

    Xu, P.; Liao, Y. J.; Lin, Y. H.; Zhao, C. X.; Yan, C. H.; Cao, M. N.; Wang, G. S.; Luan, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    The quantification of ammonia (NH3) emissions is essential to the more accurate quantification of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, improved air quality and the assessment of ammonia-related agricultural policy and climate mitigation strategies. The quantity, geographic distribution and historical trends of these emissions remain largely uncertain. In this paper, a new Chinese agricultural fertilizer NH3 (CAF_NH3) emissions inventory has been compiled that exhibits the following improvements: (1) a 1 × 1 km gridded map on the county level was developed for 2008; (2) a combined bottom-up and top-down method was used for the local correction of emission factors (EFs) and parameters; (3) the temporal patterns of historical time trends for 1978-2008 were estimated and the uncertainties were quantified for the inventories; and (4) a sensitivity test was performed in which a province-level disaggregated map was compared with CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008. The total CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008 were 8.4 TgNH3 yr-1 (a 6.6-9.8 Tg interquartile range). From 1978 to 2008, annual NH3 emissions fluctuated with three peaks (1987, 1996 and 2005), and total emissions increased from 3.2 to 8.4 Tg at an annual rate of 3.0 %. During the study period, the contribution of livestock manure spreading increased from 37.0 to 45.5 % because of changing fertilization practices and the rapid increase in egg, milk, and meat consumption. The average contribution of synthetic fertilizer, which has a positive effect on crop yields, was approximately 38.3 % (minimum: 33.4 %; maximum: 42.7 %). With rapid urbanization causing a decline in the rural population, the contribution of the rural excrement sector varied widely between 20.3 % and 8.5 %. The average contributions of cake fertilizer and straw returning were approximately 3.8 and 4.5 %, respectively, thus small and stable. Collectively, the CAF_NH3 emissions reflect the nation's agricultural policy to a certain extent. An effective approach to

  13. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on two-terminal microsensors eliminating the need for a reference electrode, is simple in structure and can be fabricated on a variety of substrates such as PET, PI and PVC. • SWNTs as an ideal one dimensional material are carboxyl-functionalized to make the pH sensor show high sensitivity and outstanding flexibility for practical applications. • DEP technique is used to manipulate and position SWNTs into appropriate locations and desired formations to improve the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of pH value, resulting in better overall device performance. • Mechanical bendability of the pH sensor, which arises from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs, offer a significant improvement for applications that are difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional sensors on rigid substrates. - Abstract: The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H"+) and hydroxide (OH"−) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H"+ and OH"− ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results shows that the

  14. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou, E-mail: jyshao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on two-terminal microsensors eliminating the need for a reference electrode, is simple in structure and can be fabricated on a variety of substrates such as PET, PI and PVC. • SWNTs as an ideal one dimensional material are carboxyl-functionalized to make the pH sensor show high sensitivity and outstanding flexibility for practical applications. • DEP technique is used to manipulate and position SWNTs into appropriate locations and desired formations to improve the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of pH value, resulting in better overall device performance. • Mechanical bendability of the pH sensor, which arises from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs, offer a significant improvement for applications that are difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional sensors on rigid substrates. - Abstract: The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H{sup +}) and hydroxide (OH{sup −}) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H{sup +} and OH{sup −} ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results

  15. PhC-4 new high-speed camera with mirror scanning

    Daragan, A.O.; Belov, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    The description of the optical system and the construction of the high-speed PhC-4 photographic camera with mirror scanning of the continuously operating type is given. The optical system of the camera is based on the foursided rotating mirror, two optical inlets and two working sectors. The PhC-4 camera provides the framing rate up to 600 thousand frames per second. (author)

  16. Biotreatment of ammonia- and butanal-containing waste gases.

    Weckhuysen, B; Vriens, L; Verachtert, H

    1994-10-01

    The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 with 4-16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibition of Nitrobacter species, when the free ammonia concentration was rising in the percolate. It should be easy to control such inhibition through periodic analysis of the liquid phase by using a filter-scrubber combination. Such a combination was studied for butanal removal. Butanal was removed with an elimination efficiency of 80% by a scrubber-filter combination at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 and a high butanal input concentration. Mixing the filter material with CaCO3 and pH control of the liquid in the scrubber resulted in an increase of the elimination efficiency. These results, combined with previous results on the biofiltration of butanal and butyric acid, allow us to discuss the influence of odour compounds on the removal efficiency of such systems and methods for control. The results were used to construct a full-size system, which is described.

  17. Ammonia Emissions from Agriculture in China

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important alkaline pollutant in the atmosphere and it has various environmental and climatic effects. We will present an improved bottom-up estimate of ammonia emissions from agriculture in China at 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution and monthly variability. Ammonia emissions from fertilizer use are derived using data of crop planting area, fertilizer application time and rate for 18 main crops. Ammonia emission factors from fertilizer use are estimated as a function of soil properties such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and agricultural activity information such as crop type, fertilizer type, and application mode. We further consider ambient temperature and wind speed to account for the meteorological influences on ammonia emission factors of fertilizer use. We also estimate the ammonia emission from livestock over China using the mass-flow methodology. The derived ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 4.55 Tg NH3 from fertilizer use and 6.96 Tg from livestock. Henan and Jiangsu provinces are the two largest emitting areas for ammonia from fertilizer use (470 Gg NH3 and 365 Gg NH3). Henan (621 Gg NH3) and Shandong (533 Gg NH3) have the largest ammonia emissions from livestock. Both ammonia emissions from fertilizer use and livestock have distinct seasonal variations; peaking in June for fertilizer use (822 Gg NH3) and in July for livestock (1244 Gg NH3), and are both lowest in January (80 Gg and 241 Gg, respectively). Combining with other ammonia source (eg. human waste and transport) estimates from the REAS v2.1 emission inventory, we show that total ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 14.0 Tg NH3 a-1. Comparisons with satellite measurements of ammonia columns will also be presented.

  18. Links between seawater flooding, soil ammonia oxidiser communities and their response to changes in salinity.

    Nacke, Heiko; Schöning, Ingo; Schindler, Malte; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2017-11-01

    Coastal areas worldwide are challenged by climate change-associated increases in sea level and storm surge quantities that potentially lead to more frequent flooding of soil ecosystems. Currently, little is known of the effects of inundation events on microorganisms controlling nitrification in these ecosystems. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of seawater flooding on the abundance, community composition and salinity tolerance of soil ammonia oxidisers. Topsoil was sampled from three islands flooded at different frequencies by the Wadden Sea. Archaeal ammonia oxidiser amoA genes were more abundant than their betaproteobacterial counterparts, and the distribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidiser amoA and 16S rRNA gene sequences significantly differed between the islands. The findings indicate selection of ammonia oxidiser phylotypes with greater tolerance to high salinity and slightly alkaline pH (e.g. Nitrosopumilus representatives) in frequently flooded soils. A cluster phylogenetically related to gammaproteobacterial ammonia oxidisers was detected in all samples analysed in this survey. Nevertheless, no gammaprotebacterial amoA genes could be amplified via PCR and only betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidisers were detected in enrichment cultures. A slurry-based experiment demonstrated the tolerance of both bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers to a wide range of salinities (e.g. Wadden Sea water salinity) in soil naturally exposed to seawater at a high frequency. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Eficiência microbiana, fluxo de compostos nitrogenados no abomaso, amônia e pH ruminais, em bovinos recebendo dietas contendo feno de capim-tifton 85 de diferentes idades de rebrota Microbial efficiency, abomasal nitrogen compounds flow, ruminal ammonia and ruminal pH in cattle fed diets containing tifton 85 bermudagrass hays at different regrowth ages

    Karina Guimarães Ribeiro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a eficiência de síntese microbiana, o fluxo de compostos nitrogenados no abomaso, o balanço de compostos nitrogenados, a taxa de passagem da digesta ruminal, a concentração de amônia e o pH ruminais, em bovinos recebendo rações contendo feno de capim-tifton 85 de diferentes idades de rebrota. Utilizaram-se quatro animais zebu, com peso médio de 340 kg, fistulados no rúmen e abomaso, distribuídos em um delineamento em quadrado latino 4 x 4. Todas as rações continham 60% de volumoso e 40% de concentrado. O volumoso foi constituído de feno de capim-tifton 85 de 28, 35, 42 e 56 dias de idade e o concentrado continha fubá de milho e mistura mineral. Os microorganismos ruminais foram quantificados utilizando-se as bases purinas como indicador. O pH e N-amoniacal foram mensurados, no fluido ruminal, antes e 2; 4 e 6 horas após o fornecimento da ração. A taxa de passagem foi determinada pelo modelo unicompartimental, utilizando-se o óxido crômico como indicador. As eficiências de síntese microbiana não foram influenciadas pela idade do feno na ração, apresentando valores médios de 31,32 g Nbact/kg MODR; 30,74 g Nbact/kg CHODR; 337,4 g MSbact/kg CHODR; e 12,5 g PBbact/100 g NDT. Estimaram-se máximos fluxos de compostos nitrogenados totais, amoniacais e não-amoniacais, de 119,0; 9,76; e 109,6 g/dia, com a inclusão de feno com 39,7; 37,6; e 39,9 dias de idade, respectivamente, e fluxo de compostos nitrogenados bacterianos de 80,54 g/dia, em média. O balanço de nitrogênio, a taxa de passagem, as concentrações de amônia e o pH ruminais também não foram influenciados pela idade do feno na ração, encontrando-se valores de 30,67 g/dia; 3,2%/h; 9,7 mg/100mL (máximo às 1,38h e 6,08 (mínimo às 6,64h, respectivamente.The microbial efficiency synthesis, the abomasum nitrogen compounds flow, the nitrogen compounds balance, the passage rate of ruminal digest, the ruminal ammonia concentration and ruminal pH in

  20. High contributions of vehicular emissions to ammonia in three European cities derived from mobile measurements

    Elser, Miriam; El-Haddad, Imad; Maasikmets, Marek; Bozzetti, Carlo; Wolf, Robert; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Slowik, Jay G.; Richter, Rene; Teinemaa, Erik; Hüglin, Christoph; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Ambient ammonia (NH3) measurements were performed with a mobile platform in three European cities: Zurich (Switzerland), Tartu (Estonia) and Tallinn (Estonia) deploying an NH3 analyzer based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. A heated inlet line along with an auxiliary flow was used to minimize NH3 adsorption onto the inlet walls. In addition, a detailed characterization of the response and recovery times of the measurement system was used to deconvolve the true NH3 signal from the remaining adsorption-induced hysteresis. Parallel measurements with an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to correct the observed NH3 for the contribution of ammonium nitrate, which completely evaporated in the heated line at the chosen temperature, in contrast to ammonium sulfate. In this way a quantitative measurement of ambient gaseous NH3 was achieved with sufficient time resolution to enable measurement of NH3 point sources with a mobile sampling platform. The NH3 analyzer and the aerosol mass spectrometer were complemented by an aethalometer and various gas-phase analyzers to enable a complete characterization of the sources of air pollution, including the spatial distributions and the regional background concentrations and urban increments of all measured components. Although at all three locations similar increment levels of organic aerosols were attributed to biomass burning and traffic, traffic emissions clearly dominated the city enhancements of NH3, equivalent black carbon (eBC) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Urban increments of 3.4, 1.8 and 3.0 ppb of NH3 were measured in the traffic areas in Zurich, Tartu and Tallinn, respectively, representing an enhancement of 36.6, 38.3 and 93.8% over the average background concentrations. Measurements in areas strongly influenced by traffic emissions (including tunnel drives) were used to estimate emission factors (EF) for the traffic-related pollutants. The obtained median EFs range between 136.8-415.1 mg kg-1 fuel for NH3, 157.1-734.8 mg

  1. Interactive effect of high environmental ammonia and nutritional status on ecophysiological performance of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) acclimated to reduced seawater salinities.

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Pipralia, Nitin; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the interactive effect of ammonia toxicity, salinity challenge and nutritional status on the ecophysiological performance of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Fish were progressively acclimated to normal seawater (32ppt), to brackish water (20ppt and 10ppt) and to hyposaline water (2.5ppt). Following acclimation to different salinities for two weeks, fish were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA, 20mg/L ∼1.18mM representing 50% of 96h LC50 value for ammonia) for 12h, 48h, 84h and 180h, and were either fed (2% body weight) or fasted (unfed for 7 days prior to HEA exposure). Biochemical responses such as ammonia (Jamm) and urea excretion rate, plasma ammonia, urea and lactate, plasma ions (Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+)) and osmolality, muscle water content (MWC) and liver and muscle energy budget (glycogen, lipid and protein), as well as branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and H(+)-ATPase activity, and branchial mRNA expression of NKA and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) were investigated in order to understand metabolic and ion- osmoregulatory consequences of the experimental conditions. During HEA, Jamm was inhibited in fasted fish at 10ppt, while fed fish were still able to excrete efficiently. At 2.5ppt, both feeding groups subjected to HEA experienced severe reductions and eventually a reversion in Jamm. Overall, the build-up of plasma ammonia in HEA exposed fed fish was much lower than fasted ones. Unlike fasted fish, fed fish acclimated to lower salinities (10ppt-2.5ppt) could maintain plasma osmolality, [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and MWC during HEA exposure. Thus fed fish were able to sustain ion-osmotic homeostasis which was associated with a more pronounced up-regulation in NKA expression and activity. At 2.5ppt both feeding groups activated H(+)-ATPase. The expression of NKCC1 was down-regulated at lower salinities in both fed and fasted fish, but was upregulated within each salinity after a few days of HEA exposure. Though an

  2. Effects of high medium pH on growth, metabolism and transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Peña, Antonio; Sánchez, Norma Silvia; Álvarez, Helber; Calahorra, Martha; Ramírez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stopped by maintaining the pH of the medium in a pH-stat at pH 8.0 or 9.0. Studying its main physiological capacities and comparing cells after incubation at pH 6.0 vs. 8.0 or 9.0, we found that (a) fermentation was moderately decreased by high pH and respiration was similar and sensitive to the addition of an uncoupler, (b) ATP and glucose-6-phosphate levels upon glucose addition increased to similar levels and (c) proton pumping and K(+) transport were also not affected; all this indicating that energy mechanisms were preserved. Growth inhibition at high pH was also not due to a significant lower amino acid transport by the cells or incorporation into proteins. The cell cycle stopped at pH 9.0, probably due to an arrest as a result of adjustments needed by the cells to contend with the changes under these conditions, and microarray experiments showed some relevant changes to this response. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  3. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  4. Properties and expression of Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit isoforms in the brain of the swamp eel, Monopterus albus, which has unusually high brain ammonia tolerance.

    Xiu L Chen

    Full Text Available The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, can survive in high concentrations of ammonia (>75 mmol l(-1 and accumulate ammonia to high concentrations in its brain (4.5 µmol g(-1. Na(+/K(+-ATPase (Nka is an essential transporter in brain cells, and since NH4(+ can substitute for K(+ to activate Nka, we hypothesized that the brain of M. albus expressed multiple forms of Nka α-subunits, some of which might have high K(+ specificity. Thus, this study aimed to clone and sequence the nka α-subunits from the brain of M. albus, and to determine the effects of ammonia exposure on their mRNA expression and overall protein abundance. The effectiveness of NH4(+ to activate brain Nka from M. albus and Mus musculus was also examined by comparing their Na(+/K(+-ATPase and Na(+/NH4(+-ATPase activities over a range of K(+/NH4(+ concentrations. The full length cDNA coding sequences of three nkaα (nkaα1, nkaα3a and nkaα3b were identified in the brain of M. albus, but nkaα2 expression was undetectable. Exposure to 50 mmol l(-1 NH4Cl for 1 day or 6 days resulted in significant decreases in the mRNA expression of nkaα1, nkaα3a and nkaα3b. The overall Nka protein abundance also decreased significantly after 6 days of ammonia exposure. For M. albus, brain Na(+/NH4(+-ATPase activities were significantly lower than the Na(+/K(+-ATPase activities assayed at various NH4(+/K(+ concentrations. Furthermore, the effectiveness of NH4(+ to activate Nka from the brain of M. albus was significantly lower than that from the brain of M. musculus, which is ammonia-sensitive. Hence, the (1 lack of nkaα2 expression, (2 high K(+ specificity of K(+ binding sites of Nkaα1, Nkaα3a and Nkaα3b, and (3 down-regulation of mRNA expression of all three nkaα isoforms and the overall Nka protein abundance in response to ammonia exposure might be some of the contributing factors to the high brain ammonia tolerance in M. albus.

  5. Intracellular product recycling in high succinic acid producing yeast at low pH

    Wahl, S.A.; Bernal Martinez, C.; Zhao, Zheng; van Gulik, W.M.; Jansen, Mickel L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of succinic acid has progressed dramatically, and a series of high-producing hosts are available. At low cultivation pH and high titers, the product transport can become bidirectional, i.e. the acid is reentering

  6. High-frequency dynamics of ocean pH: a multi-ecosystem comparison.

    Gretchen E Hofmann

    Full Text Available The effect of Ocean Acidification (OA on marine biota is quasi-predictable at best. While perturbation studies, in the form of incubations under elevated pCO(2, reveal sensitivities and responses of individual species, one missing link in the OA story results from a chronic lack of pH data specific to a given species' natural habitat. Here, we present a compilation of continuous, high-resolution time series of upper ocean pH, collected using autonomous sensors, over a variety of ecosystems ranging from polar to tropical, open-ocean to coastal, kelp forest to coral reef. These observations reveal a continuum of month-long pH variability with standard deviations from 0.004 to 0.277 and ranges spanning 0.024 to 1.430 pH units. The nature of the observed variability was also highly site-dependent, with characteristic diel, semi-diurnal, and stochastic patterns of varying amplitudes. These biome-specific pH signatures disclose current levels of exposure to both high and low dissolved CO(2, often demonstrating that resident organisms are already experiencing pH regimes that are not predicted until 2100. Our data provide a first step toward crystallizing the biophysical link between environmental history of pH exposure and physiological resilience of marine organisms to fluctuations in seawater CO(2. Knowledge of this spatial and temporal variation in seawater chemistry allows us to improve the design of OA experiments: we can test organisms with a priori expectations of their tolerance guardrails, based on their natural range of exposure. Such hypothesis-testing will provide a deeper understanding of the effects of OA. Both intuitively simple to understand and powerfully informative, these and similar comparative time series can help guide management efforts to identify areas of marine habitat that can serve as refugia to acidification as well as areas that are particularly vulnerable to future ocean change.

  7. Ammonia volatilization from sows on grassland

    Sommer, S. G.; Søgaard, H. T.; Møller, H. B.; Morsing, S.

    According to regulations, sows with piglets on organic farms must graze on pastures. Volatilization of ammonia (NH 3) from urine patches may represent a significant source of nitrogen (N) loss from these farms. Inputs of N are low on organic farms and losses may reduce crop production. This study examined spatial variations in NH 3 volatilization using a movable dynamic chamber, and the pH and total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content in the topsoil of pastures with grazing sows was measured during five periods between June 1998 and May 1999. Gross NH 3 volatilization from the pastures was also measured with an atmospheric mass balance technique during seven periods from September 1997 until June 1999. The dynamic chamber study showed a high variation in NH 3 volatilization because of the distribution of urine; losses were between 0 and 2.8 g NH 3-N m -2 day -1. Volatilization was highest near the feeding area and the huts, where the sows tended to urinate. Ammonia volatilization rate was linearly related to the product of NH 3 concentration in the boundary layer and wind speed. The NH 3 in the boundary layer was in equilibrium with NH 3 in soil solution. Gross NH 3 volatilization was in the range 0.07-2.1 kg NH 3-N ha -1 day -1 from a pasture with 24 sows ha -1. Ammonia volatilization was related to the amount of feed given to the sows, incident solar radiation and air temperature during measuring periods, and also to temperature, incident solar radiation and rain 1-2 days before measurements. Annual ammonia loss was 4.8 kg NH 3-N sow -1.

  8. High sensitivity pH sensing on the BEOL of industrial FDSOI transistors

    Rahhal, Lama; Ayele, Getenet Tesega; Monfray, Stéphane; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Fornacciari, Benjamin; Pardoux, Eric; Chevalier, Celine; Ecoffey, Serge; Drouin, Dominique; Morin, Pierre; Garnier, Philippe; Boeuf, Frederic; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2017-08-01

    In this work we demonstrate the use of Fully Depleted Silicon On Insulator (FDSOI) transistors as pH sensors with a 23 nm silicon nitride sensing layer built in the Back-End-Of-Line (BEOL). The back end process to deposit the sensing layer and fabricate the electrical structures needed for testing is detailed. A series of tests employing different pH buffer solutions has been performed on transistors of different geometries, controlled via the back gate. The main findings show a shift of the drain current (ID) as a function of the back gate voltage (VB) when different pH buffer solutions are probed in the range of pH 6 to pH 8. This shift is observed at VB voltages swept from 0 V to 3 V, demonstrating the sensor operation at low voltage. A high sensitivity of up to 250 mV/pH unit (more than 4-fold larger than Nernstian response) is observed on FDSOI MOS transistors of 0.06 μm gate length and 0.08 μm gate width. She is currently working as a Postdoctoral researcher at Institut des nanotechnologies de Lyon in collaboration with STMicroelectronics and Université de Sherbrook (Canada) working on ;Integration of ultra-low-power gas and pH sensors with advanced technologies;. Her research interest includes selection, machining, optimisation and electrical characterisation of the sensitive layer for a low power consumption gas sensor based on advanced MOS transistors.

  9. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education

    Doyle, Kari M. H.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K–12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K–12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K–12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education. PMID:24174464

  10. Polyamine stress at high pH in Escherichia coli K-12

    Tate Daniel P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyamines such as spermine and spermidine are required for growth of Escherichia coli; they interact with nucleic acids, and they bind to ribosomes. Polyamines block porins and decrease membrane permeability, activities that may protect cells in acid. At high concentrations, however, polyamines impair growth. They impair growth more severely at high pH, probably due to their increased uptake as membrane-permeant weak bases. The role of pH is critical in understanding polyamine stress. Results The effect of polyamines was tested on survival of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 in extreme acid or base (pH conditions outside the growth range. At pH 2, 10 mM spermine increased survival by 2-fold, and putrescine increased survival by 30%. At pH 9.8, however, E. coli survival was decreased 100-fold by 10 mM spermine, putrescine, cadaverine, or spermidine. At pH 8.5, spermine decreased the growth rate substantially, whereas little effect was seen at pH 5.5. Spermidine required ten-fold higher concentrations to impair growth. On proteomic 2-D gels, spermine and spermidine caused differential expression of 31 different proteins. During log-phase growth at pH 7.0, 1 mM spermine induced eight proteins, including PykF, GlpK, SerS, DeaD, OmpC and OmpF. Proteins repressed included acetate-inducible enzymes (YfiD, Pta, Lpd as well as RapA (HepA, and FabB. At pH 8.5, spermine induced additional proteins: TnaA, OmpA, YrdA and NanA (YhcJ and also repressed 17 proteins. Four of the proteins that spermine induced (GlpK, OmpA, OmpF, TnaA and five that were repressed (Lpd, Pta, SucB, TpiA, YfiD show similar induction or repression, respectively, in base compared to acid. Most of these base stress proteins were also regulated by spermidine, but only at ten-fold higher concentration (10 mM at high pH (pH 8.5. Conclusion Polyamines increase survival in extreme acid, but decrease E. coli survival in extreme base. Growth inhibition by spermine and

  11. Adsorption of Ammonia on Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Under the Landfill Circumstance

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Zhang, Zhen [Taizhou University, Linhai (China); Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng [Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-08-15

    The adsorption characteristics of ammonia on MSWI bottom ash were investigated. The effect of the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the adsorption process was discussed. Results showed that the adsorption could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 156.2 mg/g. The optimum adsorption of ammonia was observed when the pH was 6.0. High level of ion and organic matter could restrict the adsorption to a low level. The above results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of ammonia in the landfill, which is related to the variation of the landfill circumstance.

  12. Functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for U removal from low and high pH groundwater

    Li, Dien, E-mail: dien.li@srs.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Egodawatte, Shani [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Larsen, Sarah C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Serkiz, Steven M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Seaman, John C. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles were functionalized with organic molecules. • The functionalized nanoparticles had high surface areas and consistent pore sizes. • The functionalized nanoparticles were easily separated due to their magnetism. • They exhibited high capacity for uranium removal from low- or high-pH groundwater. - Abstract: U(VI) species display limited adsorption onto sediment minerals and synthetic sorbents in pH <4 or pH >8 groundwater. In this work, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) with magnetite nanoparticle cores were functionalized with various organic molecules using post-synthetic methods. The functionalized MMSNs were characterized using N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), {sup 13}C cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that mesoporous silica (MCM-41) particles of 100–200 nm formed around a core of magnetic iron oxide, and the functional groups were primarily grafted into the mesopores of ∼3.0 nm in size. The functionalized MMSNs were effective for U removal from pH 3.5 and 9.6 artificial groundwater (AGW). Functionalized MMSNs removed U from the pH 3.5 AGW by as much as 6 orders of magnitude more than unfunctionalized nanoparticles or silica and had adsorption capacities as high as 38 mg/g. They removed U from the pH 9.6 AGW as much as 4 orders of magnitude greater than silica and 2 orders of magnitude greater than the unfunctionalized nanoparticles with adsorption capacities as high as 133 mg/g. These results provide an applied solution for treating U contamination that occurs at extreme pH environments and a scientific foundation for solving critical industrial issues related to environmental stewardship and nuclear power production.

  13. Diurnal variation in ruminal pH on the digestibility of highly digestible perennial ryegrass during continuous culture fermentation.

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Thorne, P L; Egan, A R

    2004-06-01

    Dairy cows grazing high-digestibility pastures exhibit pronounced diurnal variation in ruminal pH, with pH being below values considered optimal for digestion. Using a dual-flow continuous culture system, the hypothesis that minimizing diurnal variation in pH would improve digestion of pasture when pH was low, but not at a higher pH, was tested. Four treatments were imposed, with pH either allowed to exhibit normal diurnal variation around an average pH of 6.1 or 5.6, or maintained at constant pH. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four, 9-d experimental periods. A constant pH at 5.6 compared with a constant pH of 6.1 reduced the digestibility of organic matter (OM), neutral detergent (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) by 7, 14, and 21%, respectively. When pH was allowed to vary (averaging 5.6), digestion of OM, NDF, and ADF were reduced by 15,30, and 36%, respectively, compared with pH varying at 6.1. There was little difference in digestion parameters when pH was either constant or varied with an average pH of 6.1. However, when average pH was 5.6, maintaining a constant pH significantly increased digestion of OM, NDF, and ADF by 5, 25, and 24% compared with a pH that exhibited normal diurnal variation. These in vitro results show that gains in digestibility and potential milk production can be made by minimizing diurnal variation in ruminal pH, but only when ruminal pH is low (5.6). However, larger gains in productivity can be achieved by increasing average daily ruminal pH from 5.6 to 6.1.

  14. [Characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments].

    Guo, Fang; Chen, Kun-Kun; Jiang, Guang-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Karst aquifers are one of the most important aquifers in Southwestern China. One of the characteristics of karst aquifers is the enhanced permeability permits high flow velocities are capable of transporting suspended and bedload sediments. Mobile sediment in karst may act as a vector for the transport of contaminates. 14 sediment samples were collected from two underground rivers in two typical karst areas in Liuzhou city, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China. According to simulated experiment methods, characteristic of adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on sediment was studied. The results of ammonia nitrogen adsorption dynamics on sediments showed that the maximum adsorption velocity was less than 2 h. The adsorption balance quantity in 5 h accounted for 71% - 98% of the maximum adsorption quantity. The maximum adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen was 385.5 mg/kg, which was sediment from a cave in the middle areas of Guancun underground river system. The study of isotherm adsorption indicated adsorption quantity of NH4+ increase followed by incremental balance concentration of NH4+ in the aquatic phase. Adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen in sediments has a relative linear relationship with adsorption balance concentrations. Adsorption-desorption balance concentrations were all low, indicating sediments from underground rivers have great adsorption potential. Under the condition of low and high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen in overlying water, Langmuir and Tempkin couldn't simulate or simulate results couldn't reach remarkable level, whilst Linear and Freundlich models could simulate well. Research on different type sediments, sampling times and depths from two underground rivers shows characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments doesn't have good correspondence with the type of sediments. One of the reasons is there is no big difference between sediments in the development of climate, geology, hydrological conditions

  15. Isolation and cultivation of microalgae select for low growth rate and tolerance to high pH

    Berge, Terje; Daugbjerg, Niels; Hansen, Per Juel

    2012-01-01

    Harmful microalgal blooms or red tides are often associated with high levels of pH. Similarly, species and strains of microalgae cultivated in the laboratory with enriched media experience recurrent events of high pH between dilutions with fresh medium. To study the potential for laboratory...... of upper pH tolerance limits were higher in the younger (20 years). These results suggest selection of strains best adapted to tolerate or postpone/avoid events of high pH in the laboratory. Our data have implications for experimental studies of pH response and reaction norms in general of microalgae...

  16. Equilibrium studies on liquid ammonia-potassium amide-hydrogen system at high pressures and temperatures (Preprint No. CA-10)

    Donde, M.M.; Srinivasa, K.; Raman, S.

    1989-04-01

    Insoluble deposits were observed to form during the operation of Heavy Water Plant at Talcher, based on ammonia-hydrogen exchange process with potassium amide as catalyst. Experiments were undertaken to investigate this phenomenon under controlled conditions in the laboratory employing high pressures and elevated temperatures. It was observed that deposit formation was very minimal in the autoclave and no visible deposit was left on the strainer-filter, in all the experiments. Deposit analysis showed the presence of potassium hydroxide monohydrate as major component and alpha-potassium hydroxide and potassium azide as minor components. It is suggested that the presence of hydroxide may be due to the reaction of amide with the residual moisture in the system during the experiment and any ingress of moisture while opening for collection of deposit. Azide formation is explained by following reactions occurring during the experiments. NH 3 +KNH 2 →NH 2 -NH 2 +KH; NH 2 -NH 2 +KNH 2 →KN 3 +3H 2 . (author). 1 fig

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal effect of high pH and paraffin wax ...

    The antibacterial and antifungal effects of high pH (9, 10) and paraffin wax were determined. Determination of antibacterial and antifungal activity of the combined treatments was achieved by aerobic mesophilic count of bacteria and fungi on the surface of the tomatoes, peppers and oranges using serial dilution and pour ...

  18. Ceria-supported ruthenium nanoparticles as highly active and long-lived catalysts in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Tonbul, Yalçın; Özkar, Saim

    2016-07-05

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on ceria (Ru(0)/CeO2) were in situ generated from the reduction of ruthenium(iii) ions impregnated on ceria during the hydrolysis of ammonia borane. Ru(0)/CeO2 was isolated from the reaction solution by centrifugation and characterized by ICP-OES, BET, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDS and XPS techniques. All the results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles were successfully supported on ceria and the resulting Ru(0)/CeO2 is a highly active, reusable and long-lived catalyst for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane with a turnover frequency value of 361 min(-1). The reusability tests reveal that Ru(0)/CeO2 is still active in the subsequent runs of hydrolysis of ammonia borane preserving 60% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fifth run. Ru(0)/CeO2 provides a superior catalytic lifetime (TTO = 135 100) in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here includes the formation kinetics of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles. The rate constants for the slow nucleation and autocatalytic surface growth of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles were obtained using hydrogen evolution as a reporter reaction. An evaluation of rate constants at various temperatures enabled the estimation of activation energies for both the reactions, Ea = 60 ± 7 kJ mol(-1) for the nucleation and Ea = 47 ± 2 kJ mol(-1) for the autocatalytic surface growth of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, as well as the activation energy of Ea = 51 ± 2 kJ mol(-1) for the catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

  19. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.

    Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott

    2011-03-01

    Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.

  20. Virtual Lab Experiment: Physics Educational Technology (PhETPhoto Electric Effect for Senior High School

    Supurwoko Supurwoko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduced these Physics Educational Technology (PhET Simulation and demonstrated their utility for Senior High School Students. The PhET simulations are very involved, interactive animated environments that create a unique opportunity for students. In each case, we demonstrate that discussion simulations are more productive, for developing student conceptual understanding  for photo electric effect than traditional discussion without simulations. During the discussion with PhET simulation, students can construct their  understanding about concepts photo electric effect within this framework. Students learn by building on their prior understanding through a series of constrained and supportives exploration. The simulations support an interactive approach and constrain students productively.

  1. Roughage/concentrate ratio on ruminal ammonia concentration, pH and volatile fatty acids in crossbred dairy cows Relação volumoso:concentrado sobre as concentrações ruminais de amônia, ph e ácidos graxos em vacas leiteiras mestiças

    Cellyneude de Souza Olivindo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective with this study was to evaluate the effects of concentrate levels in ruminal ammonia concentration, pH and volatile fatty acids (VFA. Twelve canulated cows, no lactating and no pregnant, were randomly distributed in blocks. Cows were fed Russel grass (Cynodon sp hay ad libitum and concentrate in the proportions of 25%, 50% and 75% of dry matter. Two experimental periods, which 23 days for diet adaptation, and the 28th day for rumen fluid sampling (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours. Ruminal N-NH3 concentration reduced by increasing the levels of concentrate in diets. Rumen pH reduced with sampling time and concentrate level. Total VFA concentration were not affected, but acetate:propionate ratio increased.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da inclusão de níveis crescentes de concentrados nas rações, sobre as concentrações de amônia e pH ruminal e sobre as concentrações dos ácidos graxos voláteis no rúmen. Foram utilizadas doze fêmeas bovinas, não lactantes e não gestantes, dotadas de cânulas ruminais distribuídas em blocos casualizados em um arranjo fatorial 6 x 3. Estes animais foram alimentados á vontade com feno Russel grass (Cynodon sp e concentrados nas proporções de 25%, 50% ou 75% com base na matéria seca. O experimento constou de dois sub-períodos experimentais com duração de 28 dias cada, sendo 23 dias de adaptação, e o 28 para a colheita de líquido ruminal (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 e 12 horas. Observou-se redução linear nas concentrações de N-NH3 com o aumento dos níveis de concentrado; o pH reduziu linearmente em função dos tempos de coleta das amostras e dos níveis de concentrados nas rações. Não houve efeito significativo das proporções de concentrados sobre a concentração de AGVs totais, porém foi observado um efeito linear significativo sobre as relações acetato:propionato.

  2. Spectrophotometric high-precision seawater pH determination for use in underway measuring systems

    S. Aßmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous sensors are required for a comprehensive documentation of the changes in the marine carbon system and thus to differentiate between its natural variability and anthropogenic impacts. Spectrophotometric determination of pH – a key variable of the seawater carbon system – is particularly suited to achieve precise and drift-free measurements. However, available spectrophotometric instruments are not suitable for integration into automated measurement systems (e.g. FerryBox since they do not meet the major requirements of reliability, stability, robustness and moderate cost. Here we report on the development and testing of a~new indicator-based pH sensor that meets all of these requirements. This sensor can withstand the rough conditions during long-term deployments on ships of opportunity and is applicable to the open ocean as well as to coastal waters with a complex matrix and highly variable conditions. The sensor uses a high resolution CCD spectrometer as detector connected via optical fibers to a custom-made cuvette designed to reduce the impact of air bubbles. The sample temperature can be precisely adjusted (25 °C ± 0.006 °C using computer-controlled power supplies and Peltier elements thus avoiding the widely used water bath. The overall setup achieves a measurement frequency of 1 min−1 with a precision of ±0.0007 pH units, an average offset of +0.0005 pH units to a reference system, and an offset of +0.0081 pH units to a certified standard buffer. Application of this sensor allows monitoring of seawater pH in autonomous underway systems, providing a key variable for characterization and understanding of the marine carbon system.

  3. Enhanced electrochemomechanical activity of polyaniline films towards high pH region: contribution of Donnan effect

    Takashima, Wataru; Nakashima, Megumi; Pandey, Shyam S.; Kaneto, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Enhancement of electrochemomechanical deformation (ECMD) and expansion of ECMD activity towards high pH have been simultaneously achieved in the electrolytes equilibrated with HCl and NaCl solutions for polyaniline (PANI) film. The maximum deformation has been reached to 6.7% in the mixture of 3 M HCl and 3 M NaCl equilibrated at pH 3 at ambient temperature. By comparing the fact that the ECMD magnitude is 3.2% in 1 M HCl equilibrated at pH 0.5, the simple judicious selection of electrolyte condition leads to the enhancement of ECMD magnitude by around two times. The concentration dependence on both electrical conductivity and absorption spectra elucidates the increase of protonation ratio as a function of electrolyte concentration. The results indicate that the high concentration retains both the electrochemical and ECMD activities in PANI film towards high pH region, which is the enhanced functionality of PANI supported by Donnan effect

  4. High performance vanadia-anatase nanoparticle catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Highly active nanoparticle SCR deNO(x) catalysts composed of amorphous vanadia on crystalline anatase have been prepared by a sol-gel, co-precipitation method using decomposable crystallization seeds. The catalysts were characterized by means of XRPD, TEM/SEM, FT-IR, nitrogen physisorption and NH(3......) catalysts reported in the literature in the examined temperature range of 200-400 degrees C. The catalysts showed very high resistivity towards potassium poisoning maintaining a 15-30 times higher activity than the equally poisoned industrial reference catalyst, upon impregnation by 280 mu mole potassium....../g of catalyst. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  5. Study of the acceleration of ammonia generation process from poultry residues aiming at hydrogen production

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), Elementary Analysis (CHN), Thermogravimetry and GC/MS - Gas chromatography/ Mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  6. Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli on broiler carcasses subjected to a high pH scald and low pH postpick chlorine dip.

    Berrang, M E; Windham, W R; Meinersmann, R J

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the individual and combined effects of a high pH scald and a postpick chlorine dip on bacteria present on broiler carcasses. In each of 3 replications, a flock was sampled at several sites within a commercial broiler processing plant. Carcasses were sampled by whole carcass rinse before and after treated scalding at mean pH 9.89 or control scalding at mean pH 6.88. Other carcasses from the same flock run on both the treated and control scald lines were collected and sampled before and after a chlorine dip tank operated at mean total chlorine level of 83.3 mg/kg and pH 6.04. Rinses were cultured for numbers of Campylobacter and Escherichia coli and presence or absence of Salmonella. High pH scald was more effective than standard scald to lessen the prevalence and numbers of Campylobacter on broiler carcasses; a lower prevalence was maintained through the postpick chlorine dip tank. The pH of the scald tank made no difference in numbers of E. coli recovered from broiler carcasses at any tested point on the processing line. High pH scald was not more effective than standard scald to lessen Salmonella prevalence. Furthermore, it is unclear why the postpick chlorine dip effectively lessened Salmonella prevalence on only the control scald line. Although no evidence exists that these treatments have an additive effect when used in series, each treatment shows some promise individually. Further optimization may result in more effective decontamination of broiler carcasses.

  7. pH dependent green synthesis of gold nanoparticles by completely C6-carboxylated curdlan under high temperature and various pH conditions.

    Qiu, Wen-Yi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Yao-Yao; Ding, Zhi-Chao; Wu, Li-Xia; Cai, Wu-Dan; Yan, Jing-Kun

    2018-01-01

    A C6-carboxylated curdlan (C6-Cc) obtained from 4-acetamido-TEMPO-mediated oxidation of curdlan was used both as a reducing and stabilizing agent for green synthesis of pH-responsive AuNPs, which was carried out by controlling the pH of the C6-Cc solution at a high temperature (100°C). C6-Cc presented a semi-flexible random coil chain in the aqueous medium at pH 5.5 and became more expanded and rigid in alkaline conditions (pH 7.1-12.0), though the primary chemical structure of C6-Cc was virtually unchanged with the pH variation. The AuNPs prepared with C6-Cc at various pHs were characterized by various instrumental measurements. The shapes and sizes of AuNPs were found to be strongly dependent on the pH of the C6-Cc solution. The C6-Cc-decorated AuNPs exhibited a more well-dispersed spherical morphology with smaller particle sizes under alkaline conditions (pH 7.1-12.0). Through this study, a facile, simple, and green method has been demonstrated for preparation of stimuli-sensitive AuNPs using biocompatible polyanionic polysaccharides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioaugmentation of an acetate-oxidising anaerobic consortium in up-flow sludge blanket reactor subjected to high ammonia loads

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the major inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process leading to suboptimal utilisation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks and causing economical losses to the biogas plants. However, ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... was tested. The co-cultivation in fed-batch of a fast-growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) with the SAO culture was also investigated. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that bioaugmentation of SAO culture in a UASB reactor was not possible most probably due to the slow...

  9. CuNi NPs supported on MIL-101 as highly active catalysts for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane

    Gao, Doudou; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhou, Liqun; Yang, Kunzhou

    2018-01-01

    The catalysts containing Cu, Ni bi-metallic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by in-situ reduction of Cu2+ and Ni2+ salts into the highly porous and hydrothermally stable metal-organic framework MIL-101 via a simple liquid impregnation method. When the total amount of loading metal is 3 × 10-4 mol, Cu2Ni1@MIL-101 catalyst shows higher catalytic activity comparing to CuxNiy@MIL-101 with different molar ratio of Cu and Ni (x, y = 0, 0.5, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3). Cu2Ni1@MIL-101 catalyst has the highest catalytic activity comparing to mono-metallic Cu and Ni counterparts and pure bi-metallic CuNi nanoparticles in hydrolytic dehydrogeneration of ammonia borane (AB) at room temperature. Additionally, in the hydrolysis reaction, the Cu2Ni1@MIL- 101 catalyst possesses excellent catalytic performances, which exhibit highly catalytic activity with turn over frequency (TOF) value of 20.9 mol H2 min-1 Cu mol-1 and a very low activation energy value of 32.2 kJ mol-1. The excellent catalytic activity has been successfully achieved thanks to the strong bi-metallic synergistic effects, uniform distribution of nanoparticles and the bi-functional effects between CuNi nanoparticles and the host of MIL-101. Moreover, the catalyst also displays satisfied durable stability after five cycles for the hydrolytically releasing H2 from AB. The non-noble metal catalysts have broad prospects for commercial applications in the field of hydrogen-stored materials due to the low prices and excellent catalytic activity.

  10. High Sensitive pH Sensor Based on AlInN/GaN Heterostructure Transistor.

    Dong, Yan; Son, Dong-Hyeok; Dai, Quan; Lee, Jun-Hyeok; Won, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chen, Dunjun; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2018-04-24

    The AlInN/GaN high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) indicates better performances compared with the traditional AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. The present work investigated the pH sensor functionality of an analogous HEMT AlInN/GaN device with an open gate. It was shown that the Al 0.83 In 0.17 N/GaN device demonstrates excellent pH sense functionality in aqueous solutions, exhibiting higher sensitivity (−30.83 μA/pH for AlInN/GaN and −4.6 μA/pH for AlGaN/GaN) and a faster response time, lower degradation and good stability with respect to the AlGaN/GaN device, which is attributed to higher two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and a thinner barrier layer in Al 0.83 In 0.17 N/GaN owning to lattice matching. On the other hand, the open gate geometry was found to affect the pH sensitivity obviously. Properly increasing the width and shortening the length of the open gate area could enhance the sensitivity. However, when the open gate width is too larger or too small, the pH sensitivity would be suppressed conversely. Designing an optimal ratio of the width to the length is important for achieving high sensitivity. This work suggests that the AlInN/GaN-based 2DEG carrier modulated devices would be good candidates for high-performance pH sensors and other related applications.

  11. High Sensitive pH Sensor Based on AlInN/GaN Heterostructure Transistor

    Yan Dong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The AlInN/GaN high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT indicates better performances compared with the traditional AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. The present work investigated the pH sensor functionality of an analogous HEMT AlInN/GaN device with an open gate. It was shown that the Al0.83In0.17N/GaN device demonstrates excellent pH sense functionality in aqueous solutions, exhibiting higher sensitivity (−30.83 μA/pH for AlInN/GaN and −4.6 μA/pH for AlGaN/GaN and a faster response time, lower degradation and good stability with respect to the AlGaN/GaN device, which is attributed to higher two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG density and a thinner barrier layer in Al0.83In0.17N/GaN owning to lattice matching. On the other hand, the open gate geometry was found to affect the pH sensitivity obviously. Properly increasing the width and shortening the length of the open gate area could enhance the sensitivity. However, when the open gate width is too larger or too small, the pH sensitivity would be suppressed conversely. Designing an optimal ratio of the width to the length is important for achieving high sensitivity. This work suggests that the AlInN/GaN-based 2DEG carrier modulated devices would be good candidates for high-performance pH sensors and other related applications.

  12. Ammonia Concentrations in Different Aquaculture Holding Tanks ...

    High unionized ammonia recorded in the collapsible and concrete ponds was from excretion of high protein rich feed, decomposition of uneaten feed, high stocking density, low water exchange rates, water source and the alkaline medium of the systems. Low unionized ammonia in earthen pond and natural pond was ...

  13. Removal of nitrogen from swine manure by ammonia stripping; Reduccion del contenido en nitrogeno amoniacal del purin procino mediante la tecnica de stripping

    Hidalgo, M. D.; Alamo, J. del; Nunez, U.; Irusta, R. [Grupo de Tecnologia Ambiental . Laboratorio de Analisis y Estudios Medioambientales. Valladolid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Lab scale experiments were undertaken to investigate air stripping as method for removing ammonia from cattle effluents and, more concretely, from the liquid fraction of swine manure. The effects of packet size, influent pH, air to liquid flow ratio and liquid recirculation flow in the stripping tower were investigated. The high ammonia removal efficiency of the air stripping method indicates that it could provide an interim solution for current waste management problems in the swine industry. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. Ammonia Synthesis at Low Pressure.

    Cussler, Edward; McCormick, Alon; Reese, Michael; Malmali, Mahdi

    2017-08-23

    Ammonia can be synthesized at low pressure by the use of an ammonia selective absorbent. The process can be driven with wind energy, available locally in areas requiring ammonia for synthetic fertilizer. Such wind energy is often called "stranded," because it is only available far from population centers where it can be directly used. In the proposed low pressure process, nitrogen is made from air using pressure swing absorption, and hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water. While these gases can react at approximately 400 °C in the presence of a promoted conventional catalyst, the conversion is often limited by the reverse reaction, which makes this reaction only feasible at high pressures. This limitation can be removed by absorption on an ammine-like calcium or magnesium chloride. Such alkaline metal halides can effectively remove ammonia, thus suppressing the equilibrium constraints of the reaction. In the proposed absorption-enhanced ammonia synthesis process, the rate of reaction may then be controlled not by the chemical kinetics nor the absorption rates, but by the rate of the recycle of unreacted gases. The results compare favorably with ammonia made from a conventional small scale Haber-Bosch process.

  15. Molybdenum (6) determination by the method of high-frequency and pH titration

    Lukianets, I.G.; Kulish, N.G.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility to determine Mo(6) using the method of high frequency and pH-metric titration is investigated. By means of the high frequency contact R-cell Mo(6) titration is performed using different precipitators: 8-oxiquinoline, lead nitrate and acetate and silver nitrate. It is established that the best conditions are achieved during titration of 67.2-1343 mg/10 ml Mo(6) with lead acetate (pH 4.5-6.5). Relative standard deviation Ssub(r) constitutes 0.005 pH-metric titration of Mo(6) with complexone 3 is studied. The range of Mo(6) concentrations determined constitutes 13.43-134.3 mg at pH initial value of 3.5-5.5. Relative standard deviation Ssub(r) constitutes 0.003. Techniques of molybdenum determination in ferromolybdenum using the method of high frequency and pH-metric titration are developed [ru

  16. High efficient ammonia heat pump system for industrial process water using the ISEC concept. Part 2

    Olesen, Martin F.; Madsen, Claus; Olsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The Isolated System Energy Charging (ISEC) concept allows for a high efficiency of a heat pump system for hot water production. The ISEC concept consists of two water storage tanks, one charged and one discharged. The charged tank is used for the industrial process, while the discharged tank...... is charging. The charging of the tank is done by recirculating water through the condenser and thereby gradually heating the water. The modelling of the system is described in Part I [1]. In this part, Part II, an experimental test setup of the tank system is reported, the results are presented and further...... modelling of the heat pump and tank system is performed (in continuation of Part I). The modelling is extended to include the system performance with different natural refrigerants and the influence of different types of compressors....

  17. Full scale application of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters for treatment of rejection water with high ammonia concentrations from sludge dewatering. Final report; Untersuchungen zur autotrophen Stickstoffentfernung aus ammoniumreichem Filtratwasser der Schlammentwaesserung mit grosstechnischer Realisierung in Tropfkoerpern. Abschlussbericht

    Neumueller, B.; Metzger, J.W.; Pinnekamp, J.

    2003-07-01

    At many municipal wastewater treatment plants a considerable fraction of nitrogen is recirculated from the anaerobic sludge dewatering. This amounts up to 20% of the total influent nitrogen load of the wastewater treatment plant. The separate treatment of this sludge liquor creates new capacities for the treatment plant and improves effluent quality. A new process for treatment of this sludge liquor with ammonium-nitrogen concentrations above 600 mg/l is the autotrophic denitrification after partial nitritation. At the University of Stuttgart the first semi-technical trickling filter plant was built by which autotrophic denitrification was achieved. At the wastewater treatment plant of Sindelfingen the first full-scale implementation of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters has been designed and built. In a first trickling filter 60% of ammonia is transformed to nitrite. The investigations showed, that a few mg/l of free ammonia in this trickling filter were sufficient to inhibit the nitratation but not the nitritation. To achieve this, operating conditions as pH and temperature are of great importance. The concentration of free ammonia should be kept constant because there is an adaption of the microorganisms to free ammonia. After a decrease of the free ammonia concentration the inhibition of the nitratation declines. By thermally killing the biomass and restarting the process, can guarantee a total inhibition of the nitratation, while the concentration of free ammonia is low. In the second, closed trickling filter (anoxic conditions) ammonium is converted autotrophically to nitrogen with nitrite as electron acceptor. It was possible to set up the anoxic ammonium oxidation in full scale without inoculating the process. The very slow growth of the anammox-bacteria leads to a long adaptation phase of the process. All operating conditions such as anoxic conditions, high temperature and a concentration of nitrite below 70 mg/l have to be observed

  18. Submillimeter-wave and far-infrared spectroscopy of high-J transitions of the ground and ν2 = 1 states of ammonia.

    Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C; Drouin, Brian J; Sung, Keeyoon; Pirali, Olivier; Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Endres, Christian P; Shiraishi, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Kaori; Matsushima, Fusakazu

    2010-11-07

    Complete and reliable knowledge of the ammonia spectrum is needed to enable the analysis and interpretation of astrophysical and planetary observations. Ammonia has been observed in the interstellar medium up to J=18 and more highly excited transitions are expected to appear in hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs. As a result, there is considerable interest in observing and assigning the high J (rovibrational) spectrum. In this work, numerous spectroscopic techniques were employed to study its high J transitions in the ground and ν(2)=1 states. Measurements were carried out using a frequency multiplied submillimeter spectrometer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a tunable far-infrared spectrometer at University of Toyama, and a high-resolution Bruker IFS 125 Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Synchrotron SOLEIL. Highly excited ammonia was created with a radiofrequency discharge and a dc discharge, which allowed assignments of transitions with J up to 35. One hundred and seventy seven ground state and ν(2)=1 inversion transitions were observed with microwave accuracy in the 0.3-4.7 THz region. Of these, 125 were observed for the first time, including 26 ΔK=3 transitions. Over 2000 far-infrared transitions were assigned to the ground state and ν(2)=1 inversion bands as well as the ν(2) fundamental band. Of these, 1912 were assigned using the FTS data for the first time, including 222 ΔK=3 transitions. The accuracy of these measurements has been estimated to be 0.0003-0.0006 cm(-1). A reduced root mean square error of 0.9 was obtained for a global fit of the ground and ν(2)=1 states, which includes the lines assigned in this work and all previously available microwave, terahertz, far-infrared, and mid-infrared data. The new measurements and predictions reported here will support the analyses of astronomical observations by high-resolution spectroscopy telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The comprehensive experimental rovibrational energy levels

  19. Optical fiber pH sensors for high temperature water. Final report

    McCrae, D.; Saaski, E.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of this program was the development of an optical pH measurement system capable of operating in a high-temperature aqueous environment. This project built upon a dual-wavelength fiber optic sensing system previously developed by Research International which utilizes light-emitting diodes as light sources and provides remote absorption spectroscopy via a single bidirectional optical fiber. Suitable materials for constructing an optical pH sensing element were identified during the program. These included a sapphire/Ti/Pt/Au thin-film reflector, quartz and sapphire waveguides, a poly(benzimidazole) matrix, and an azo chromophore indicator. By a suitable combination of these design elements, it appears possible to optically measure pH in aqueous systems up to a temperature of about 150 degrees C. A pH sensing system capable of operating in high-purity, low-conductivity water was built using quasi-evanescent wave sensing techniques. The sensing element incorporated a novel, mixed cellulose/cellulose acetate waveguide to which an azo indicator was bound. Testing revealed that the system could reproducibly respond to pH changes arising from 1 ppm differences in the morpholine content of low-conductivity water without influencing the measurement. The sensing system was stable for 150 hrs at room temperature, and no loss or degradation of the pH-responsive optical indicator was seen in 160 hrs at 50 degrees C. However, the prototype polymer waveguide lost transparency at 1.7% per day during this same 50 degrees C test. Additional effort is warranted in the areas of water-compatible waveguides and evanescent-wave detection methods

  20. Turnover-dependent inactivation of the nitrogenase MoFe-protein at high pH.

    Yang, Kun-Yun; Haynes, Chad A; Spatzal, Thomas; Rees, Douglas C; Howard, James B

    2014-01-21

    Proton uptake accompanies the reduction of all known substrates by nitrogenase. As a consequence, a higher pH should limit the availability of protons as a substrate essential for turnover, thereby increasing the proportion of more highly reduced forms of the enzyme for further study. The utility of the high-pH approach would appear to be problematic in view of the observation reported by Pham and Burgess [(1993) Biochemistry 32, 13725-13731] that the MoFe-protein undergoes irreversible protein denaturation above pH 8.65. In contrast, we found by both enzyme activity and crystallographic analyses that the MoFe-protein is stable when incubated at pH 9.5. We did observe, however, that at higher pHs and under turnover conditions, the MoFe-protein is slowly inactivated. While a normal, albeit low, level of substrate reduction occurs under these conditions, the MoFe-protein undergoes a complex transformation; initially, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited for substrate reduction at pH 9.5, yet in a second, slower process, the MoFe-protein becomes irreversibly inactivated as measured by substrate reduction activity at the optimal pH of 7.8. The final inactivated MoFe-protein has an increased hydrodynamic radius compared to that of the native MoFe-protein, yet it has a full complement of iron and molybdenum. Significantly, the modified MoFe-protein retains the ability to specifically interact with its nitrogenase partner, the Fe-protein, as judged by the support of ATP hydrolysis and by formation of a tight complex with the Fe-protein in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. The turnover-dependent inactivation coupled to conformational change suggests a mechanism-based transformation that may provide a new probe of nitrogenase catalysis.

  1. Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite at high pH: effects on soft tissue and dentin.

    Jungbluth, Holger; Marending, Monika; De-Deus, Gustavo; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    When sodium hypochlorite solutions react with tissue, their pH drops and tissue sorption decreases. We studied whether stabilizing a NaOCl solution at a high pH would increase its soft-tissue dissolution capacity and effects on the dentin matrix compared with a standard NaOCl solution of the same concentration and similar initial pH. NaOCl solutions were prepared by mixing (1:1) a 10% stock solution with water (standard) or 2 mol/L NaOH (stabilized). Physiological saline and 1 mol/L NaOH served as the controls. Chlorine content and alkaline capacity of NaOCl solutions were determined. Standardized porcine palatal soft-tissue specimens and human root dentin bars were exposed to test and control solutions. Weight loss percentage was assessed in the soft-tissue dissolution assay. Three-point bending tests were performed on the root dentin bars to determine the modulus of elasticity and flexural strength. Values between groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (α pH level of 7.5, respectively. The stabilized NaOCl dissolved significantly more soft tissue than the standard solution, and the pH remained high. It also caused a higher loss in elastic modulus and flexure strength (P < .05) than the control solutions, whereas the standard solution did not. NaOH-stabilized NaOCl solutions have a higher alkaline capacity and are thus more proteolytic than standard counterparts. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Size reduction of ammonia scrubbers for pig and poultry houses: Use of conditional bypass vent at high air loading rates

    Melse, R.W.; Wagenberg, van A.V.; Mosquera, J.

    2006-01-01

    In The Netherlands, both acid and biological air scrubbers are used for removal of ammonia from exhaust air at pig and poultry houses. Current regulations require that scrubbers are dimensioned for treating the maximum airflow rate that may occur, so on average these systems are overdimensioned and

  3. Session 4: High-throughput screening of supported catalysts for CO{sub x}-free hydrogen production from ammonia

    Hongchao, Liu; Hua, Wang; Zhongmin, Liu; Jianghan, Shen [Natural Gas Utilization and Applied Catalysis Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, P. R. (China)

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we used a multi-stream mass spectrometer screening (MSMSS) technique and a multi-stream reactor to select promising candidates from supported transition metal catalyst library, and then combinatorially nitrided and tested silica and SAB-15 supported Mo catalysts for hydrogen production from ammonia. (authors)

  4. Urease inhibitor for reducing ammonia emissions from an open-lot beef cattle feedyard in the Texas High Plains

    Reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal feeding operations is important from the perspective of environmental policy and its impact on agriculture. In laboratory studies, urease inhibitors have been effective in reducing NH3 emissions from beef cattle manure, however there has been little t...

  5. No-core fiber-based highly sensitive optical fiber pH sensor.

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Pathak, Akhilesh Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2017-05-01

    The present work describes the fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber pH sensor using a sol–gel technique. The sensing head configuration is incorporated using a short section of no-core fiber, coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate and spliced at the end of a single mode fiber with a bulge. Different types of indicators (bromophenol blue, cresol red, and chlorophenol red) were used to achieve a wide pH range from 2 to 13. High sensitivities of the fabricated device were found to be 1.02 and ? 0.93 ?? nm / pH for acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. From the characterization results, it was noted that there is an impact of ionic strength and an effect of the temperature of liquid on the response characteristic, which is an advantage of the existing device over the other pH sensors. The fabricated sensor exhibited good reflection spectrum, indicating a blueshift in resonance wavelength for alkaline solutions and a redshift for acidic solutions.

  6. A wide range and highly sensitive optical fiber pH sensor using polyacrylamide hydrogel

    Pathak, Akhilesh Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2017-12-01

    In the present study we report the fabrication and characterization of no-core fiber sensor (NCFS) using smart hydrogel coating for pH measurement. The no-core fiber (NCF) is stubbed between two single-mode fibers with SMA connector before immobilizing of smart hydrogel. The wavelength interrogation technique is used to calculate the sensitivity of the proposed sensor. The result shows a high sensitivity of 1.94 nm/pH for a wide range of pH values varied from 3 to 10 with a good linear response. In addition to high sensitivity, the fabricated sensor provides a fast response time with a good stability, repeatability and reproducibility.

  7. PRETREATMENT AND FRACTIONATION OF CORN STOVER BY AMMONIA RECYCLE PERCOLATION PROCESS. (R831645)

    Corn stover was pretreated with aqueous ammonia in a flow-through column reactor,a process termed as Ammonia Recycle Percolation (ARP). The aqueous ammonia causesswelling and efficient delignification of biomass at high temperatures. The ARPprocess solubilizes abou...

  8. Aquatic Life Criteria - Ammonia

    Documents related to EPA's final 2013 Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Ammonia (Freshwater). These documents pertain to the safe levels of Ammonia in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  9. The Effect of pH and High-Pressure Homogenization on Droplet Size

    Ah Pis Yong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to revisit the effect of high pressure on homogenization and the influence of pH on the emulsion droplet sizes. The high-pressure homogenization (HPH involves two stages of processing, where the first stage involves in blending the coarse emulsion by a blender, and the second stage requires disruption of the coarse emulsion into smaller droplets by a high-pressure homogenizer. The pressure range in this review is in between 10-500 MPa. The homogenised droplet sizes can be reduced by increasing the homogenization recirculation, and there is a threshold point beyond that by applying pressure only, the size cannot be further reduced. Normally, homogenised emulsions are classified by their degree of kinetic stability. Dispersed phase present in the form of droplets while continuous phase also known as suspended droplets. With a proper homogenization recirculation and pressure, a more kinetically stable emulsion can be produced. The side effects of increasing homogenization pressure are that it can cause overprocessing of the emulsion droplets where the droplet sizes become larger rather than the expected smaller size. This can cause kinetic instability in the emulsion. The droplet size is usually measured by dynamic light scattering or by laser light scattering technique. The type of samples used in this reviews are such as chocolate and vanilla based powders; mean droplet sizes samples; basil oil; tomato; lupin protein; oil; skim milk, soymilk; coconut milk; tomato homogenate; corn; egg-yolk, rapeseed and sunflower; Poly(4-vinylpyridine/silica; and Complex 1 until complex 4 approaches from author case study. A relationship is developed between emulsion size and pH. Results clearly show that lower pH offers smaller droplet of emulsion and the opposite occurs when the pH is increased.

  10. Secondary side water chemistry pH control strategy improvements

    Roumiguiere, Fernando-Mario; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Drexler, Andreas [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    When selecting a pH control strategy, plant design and operation characteristics have to be carefully considered. The strategy should be tailored to the plant-specific needs and requirements. Owing to the complexity of the interrelated variables, the best way is to perform a modeling with a suitable computer code. This work investigated the possibility of complementing the classic high pH all-volatile treatment (H-AVT) by addition of an organic amine at low concentrations complementarily to ammonia dosing to locally increase the pH in the water phase of the wet steam areas to counteract flow-assisted corrosion (FAC). Alternative conditioning scenarios were considered and calculated for comparative analysis using a computer code. The results obtained argue for the convenience of using ammonia as the main alkalizing agent whenever possible, avoiding multiple amine concepts and their associated drawbacks. (orig.)

  11. Implementation of flowsheet change to minimize hydrogen and ammonia generation during chemical processing of high level waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Lambert, Dan P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, Matthew S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Luther, Michelle C. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Brandenburg, Clayton H. [Univ.of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Testing was completed to develop a chemical processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), designed to vitrify and stabilize high level radioactive waste. DWPF processing uses a reducing acid (formic acid) and an oxidizing acid (nitric acid) to rheologically thin the slurry and complete the necessary acid base and reduction reactions (primarily mercury and manganese). Formic acid reduces mercuric oxide to elemental mercury, allowing the mercury to be removed during the boiling phase of processing through steam stripping. In runs with active catalysts, formic acid can decompose to hydrogen and nitrate can be reduced to ammonia, both flammable gases, due to rhodium and ruthenium catalysis. Replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid eliminates the generation of rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen and ammonia. In addition, mercury reduction is still effective with glycolic acid. Hydrogen, ammonia and mercury are discussed in the body of the report. Ten abbreviated tests were completed to develop the operating window for implementation of the flowsheet and determine the impact of changes in acid stoichiometry and the blend of nitric and glycolic acid as it impacts various processing variables over a wide processing region. Three full-length 4-L lab-scale simulations demonstrated the viability of the flowsheet under planned operating conditions. The flowsheet is planned for implementation in early 2017.

  12. Feasible Metabolic Schema Associated with High pH Springs in the Philippines

    DAWN eCARDACE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A field campaign targeting high pH springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to evaluate feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms.

  13. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan; Shin-Won Kang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal?s pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The...

  14. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-03

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures.

  15. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies. [phase diagram for the ammonia water system

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Schwake, A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of the P-T-X diagram for 0 less than or = X less than or = 0.50 and in the development of techniques for measuring adiabats of phases of NH3-H2O. The partial phase diagram is presented, investigations of the compositions of ammonia ices are described, and methods for obtaining the infrared spectra of ices are discussed.

  16. Counteracting ammonia inhibition in anaerobic digestion by removal with a hollow fiber membrane contactor.

    Lauterböck, B; Ortner, M; Haider, R; Fuchs, W

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of membrane contactors for continuous ammonia (NH₃-N) removal in an anaerobic digestion process and to counteract ammonia inhibition. Two laboratory anaerobic digesters were fed slaughterhouse wastes with ammonium (NH₄⁺) concentrations ranging from 6 to 7.4 g/L. One reactor was used as reference reactor without any ammonia removal. In the second reactor, a hollow fiber membrane contactor module was used for continuous ammonia removal. The hollow fiber membranes were directly submerged into the digestate of the anaerobic reactor. Sulfuric acid was circulated in the lumen as an adsorbent solution. Using this set up, the NH₄⁺-N concentration in the membrane reactor was significantly reduced. Moreover the extraction of ammonia lowered the pH by 0.2 units. In combination that led to a lowering of the free NH₃-N concentration by about 70%. Ammonia inhibition in the reference reactor was observed when the concentration exceeded 6 g/L NH₄⁺-N or 1-1.2 g/L NH₃-N. In contrast, in the membrane reactor the volatile fatty acid concentration, an indicator for process stability, was much lower and a higher gas yield and better degradation was observed. The chosen approach offers an appealing technology to remove ammonia directly from media having high concentrations of solids and it can help to improve process efficiency in anaerobic digestion of ammonia rich substrates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis of ammonia using sodium melt.

    Kawamura, Fumio; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2017-09-14

    Research into inexpensive ammonia synthesis has increased recently because ammonia can be used as a hydrogen carrier or as a next generation fuel which does not emit CO 2 . Furthermore, improving the efficiency of ammonia synthesis is necessary, because current synthesis methods emit significant amounts of CO 2 . To achieve these goals, catalysts that can effectively reduce the synthesis temperature and pressure, relative to those required in the Haber-Bosch process, are required. Although several catalysts and novel ammonia synthesis methods have been developed previously, expensive materials or low conversion efficiency have prevented the displacement of the Haber-Bosch process. Herein, we present novel ammonia synthesis route using a Na-melt as a catalyst. Using this route, ammonia can be synthesized using a simple process in which H 2 -N 2 mixed gas passes through the Na-melt at 500-590 °C under atmospheric pressure. Nitrogen molecules dissociated by reaction with sodium then react with hydrogen, resulting in the formation of ammonia. Because of the high catalytic efficiency and low-cost of this molten-Na catalyst, it provides new opportunities for the inexpensive synthesis of ammonia and the utilization of ammonia as an energy carrier and next generation fuel.

  18. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    For the sol–gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol–gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water–ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1–2 μm). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol–gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of ∼900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH – ) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: “Local chemical etching” and sol–gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: ► Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. ► “Local chemical etching” and sol–gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. ► The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  19. USE OF ZEOLITE FOR REMOVING AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-CAUSED TOXCITY IN MARINE TOXICITY IDENTIFCATION EVALUATIONS (TIES)

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifyi...

  20. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  1. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...

  2. Microbial communities in low permeability, high pH uranium mine tailings: characterization and potential effects.

    Bondici, V F; Lawrence, J R; Khan, N H; Hill, J E; Yergeau, E; Wolfaardt, G M; Warner, J; Korber, D R

    2013-06-01

    To describe the diversity and metabolic potential of microbial communities in uranium mine tailings characterized by high pH, high metal concentration and low permeability. To assess microbial diversity and their potential to influence the geochemistry of uranium mine tailings using aerobic and anaerobic culture-based methods, in conjunction with next generation sequencing and clone library sequencing targeting two universal bacterial markers (the 16S rRNA and cpn60 genes). Growth assays revealed that 69% of the 59 distinct culturable isolates evaluated were multiple-metal resistant, with 15% exhibiting dual-metal hypertolerance. There was a moderately positive correlation coefficient (R = 0·43, P tailings depth was shown to influence bacterial community composition, with the difference in the microbial diversity of the upper (0-20 m) and middle (20-40 m) tailings zones being highly significant (P tailings zone being significant (P tailings environment, along with their demonstrated capacity for transforming metal elements, suggests that these organisms have the potential to influence the long-term geochemistry of the tailings. This study is the first investigation of the diversity and functional potential of micro-organisms present in low permeability, high pH uranium mine tailings. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Highly Sensitive and Reproducible SERS Sensor for Biological pH Detection Based on a Uniform Gold Nanorod Array Platform.

    Bi, Liyan; Wang, Yunqing; Yang, Ying; Li, Yuling; Mo, Shanshan; Zheng, Qingyin; Chen, Lingxin

    2018-05-09

    Conventional research on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based pH sensors often depends on nanoparticle aggregation, whereas the variability in nanoparticle aggregation gives rise to poor repeatability in the SERS signal. Herein, we fabricated a gold nanorod array platform via an efficient evaporative self-assembly method. The platform exhibits great SERS sensitivity with an enhancement factor of 5.6 × 10 7 and maintains excellent recyclability and reproducibility with relative standard deviation (RSD) values of less than 8%. On the basis of the platform, we developed a highly sensitive bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy)-linked (BMP) SERS-based pH sensor to report pH ranging from pH 3.0 to pH 8.0. The intensity ratio variation of 1004 and 1096 cm -1 in 4-MPy showed excellent pH sensitivity, which decreased as the surrounding pH increased. Furthermore, this BMP SERS-based pH sensor was employed to measure the pH value in C57BL/6 mouse blood. We have demonstrated that the pH sensor has great advantages such as good stability, reliability, and accuracy, which could be extended for the design of point-of-care devices.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique.

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-11-09

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal's pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R² is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors.

  5. Photocatalytic degradation of aqueous ammonia by using TiO{sub 2}−ZnO/LECA hybrid photocatalyst

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Sharifnia, Shahram, E-mail: sharif@razi.ac.ir; Shavisi, Yaser

    2016-12-01

    A novel hybrid structure of TiO{sub 2}−ZnO photocatalyst which immobilized on light expanded clay aggregate (LECA) support was applied for efficient removal of ammonia from synthetic wastewater. This photocatalyst was successfully prepared by a simple method and characterized by FESEM, FTIR, UV–vis, and PL techniques. LECA granules were used as support due to their low weight and high porosity surface. Compared with the pure TiO{sub 2} and ZnO, the hybrid photocatalyst had a significant effect on its properties such as photoluminescence and UV visible absorption. The coupled Ti:Zn photocatalyst with molar ratio of 1:2 exhibited the lowest photoluminescence emission intensity and maximum photocatalytic degradation of ammonia in aqueous solution. For evaluating performance of the hybrid photocatalyst, the effect of various parameters such as initial feed concentration, pH of solution, and photocatalyst dosage on the ammonia photodegradation rate were systematically investigated. The optimal pH, catalyst loading, and initial concentration of ammonia were obtained to be ≈ 11, 25 g/L, and 400 mg/L, respectively. Also, in the optimal conditions, 95.2% ammonia removal was achieved during 3 h of UV irradiation. The discussions were based on the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers generated in the TiO{sub 2}−ZnO composite. - Highlights: • A hybrid structure of TiO{sub 2}−ZnO/LECA was applied for photocatalytic removal of ammonia. • Hybrid photocatalyst had a significant effect on photoluminescence and UV–vis absorption. • Coupled Ti:Zn photocatalyst (molar ratio = 1:2) exhibited max. photocatalytic degradation. • Optimal conditions: pH ≈ 11, catalyst loading = 25 g/L, and initial concentration = 400 mg/L. • In optimal conditions 95.2% ammonia removal was achieved during 3 h of UV irradiation.

  6. CuCo2O4 nanoplate film as a low-cost, highly active and durable catalyst towards the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane for hydrogen production

    Liu, Quanbing; Zhang, Shengjie; Liao, Jinyun; Feng, Kejun; Zheng, Yuying; Pollet, Bruno G.; Li, Hao

    2017-07-01

    Catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane is one of the most promising routes for the production of clean hydrogen as it is seen as a highly efficient and safe method. However, its large-scale industrial application is either limited by the high cost of the catalyst (usually a noble metal based catalyst) or by the low activity and poor reusability (usually a non-noble metal catalyst). In this study, we have successfully prepared three low-cost CuCo2O4 nanocatalysts, namely: (i) Ti supported CuCo2O4 film made of CuCo2O4 nanoplates, (ii) Ti supported CuCo2O4 film made of CuCo2O4 nanosheets, and (iii) unsupported CuCo2O4 nanoparticles. Among the three catalysts used for the hydrolytic dehydrogeneration of ammonia borane, the CuCo2O4 nanoplate film exhibits the highest catalytic activity with a turnover frequency (TOF) of ∼44.0 molhydrogen min-1 molcat-1. This is one of the largest TOF value for noble-metal-free catalysts ever reported in the literature. Moreover, the CuCo2O4 nanoplate film almost keeps its original catalytic activity after eight cycles, indicative of its high stability and good reusability. Owing to its advantages, the CuCo2O4 nanoplate film can be a promising catalyst for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane, which may find important applications in the field of hydrogen energy.

  7. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite

  8. Migration characteristics of cobalt-60 through sandy soil in high pH solution

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Migration characteristics of 60 Co through sandy soil in high pH solution has been investigated by both column and batch techniques. The association of 60 Co with the sandy soil and its components were studied by sequential extraction techniques. The concentration profile of 60 Co in the sandy soil column was composed of two exponential curves showing that 60 Co would consist of immobile and mobile fractions. The immobile 60 Co was retained by the sandy soil and was distributed near the top. Though the mobile 60 Co was little sorbed by soil and migrated through the soil column, maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents decreased slightly with increasing path length of the soil column. The sequential extraction of 60 Co from the sandy soil and from its components showed that 60 Co was sorbed by both manganese oxide and clay minerals. And manganese oxide is one of the responsible soil components for the observed decrease in the maximum concentration of 60 Co in the effluents. Although the content of manganese oxide in the sandy soil was 0.13%, manganese oxide is the important component to prevent from the migration of 60 Co in the high pH solution. (author)

  9. Nutritional Status as the Key Modulator of Antioxidant Responses Induced by High Environmental Ammonia and Salinity Stress in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Zinta, Gaurav; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity fluctuation is one of the main factors affecting the overall fitness of marine fish. In addition, water borne ammonia may occur simultaneously with salinity stress. Additionally, under such stressful circumstances, fish may encounter food deprivation. The physiological and ion-osmo regulatory adaptive capacities to cope with all these stressors alone or in combination are extensively addressed in fish. To date, studies revealing the modulation of antioxidant potential as compensatory response to multiple stressors are rather lacking. Therefore, the present work evaluated the individual and combined effects of salinity challenge, ammonia toxicity and nutritional status on oxidative stress and antioxidant status in a marine teleost, European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Fish were acclimated to normal seawater (32 ppt), to brackish water (20 ppt and 10 ppt) and to hypo-saline water (2.5 ppt). Following acclimation to different salinities for two weeks, fish were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA, 20 mg/L representing 50% of 96h LC50 value for ammonia) for 12 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h, and were either fed (2% body weight) or fasted (unfed for 7 days prior to HEA exposure). Results show that in response to decreasing salinities, oxidative stress indices such as xanthine oxidase activity, levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA) increased in the hepatic tissue of fasted fish but remained unaffected in fed fish. HEA exposure at normal salinity (32 ppt) and at reduced salinities (20 ppt and 10 ppt) increased ammonia accumulation significantly (84 h-180 h) in both feeding regimes which was associated with an increment of H2O2 and MDA contents. Unlike in fasted fish, H2O2 and MDA levels in fed fish were restored to control levels (84 h-180 h); with a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and

  10. Biogas production from undiluted chicken manure and maize silage: A study of ammonia inhibition in high solids anaerobic digestion.

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Banks, Charles J; Heaven, Sonia; Liu, Ronghou

    2016-10-01

    The feasibility of co-digestion of chicken manure (CM) and maize silage (MS) without water dilution was investigated in 5-L digesters. Specific methane production (SMP) of 0.309LCH4g(-1) volatile solids (VS) was achieved but only at lower %CM. Above a critical threshold for total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), estimated at 7gNL(-1), VFA accumulated with a characteristic increase in acetic acid followed by its reduction and an increase in propionic acid. During this transition the predominant methanogenic pathway was hydrogenotrophic. Methanogenesis was completely inhibited at TAN of 9gNL(-1). The low digestibility of the mixed feedstock led to a rise in digestate TS and a reduction in SMP over the 297-day experimental period. Methanogenesis appeared to be failing in one digester but was recovered by reducing the %CM. Co-digestion was feasible with CM ⩽20% of feedstock VS, and the main limiting factor was ammonia inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal Structure and Superconductivity of PH 3 at High Pressures

    Liu, Hanyu [Geophysical; Department; Li, Yinwei [School; Gao, Guoying [State; Tse, John S. [Department; State; Naumov, Ivan I. [Geophysical

    2016-02-04

    We have performed a systematic structure search on solid PH3 at high pressures using the particle swarm optimization method. At 100–200 GPa, the search led to two structures which along with others have P–P bonds. These structures are structurally and chemically distinct from those predicted for the high-pressure superconducting H2S phase, which has a different topology (i.e., does not contain S–S bonds). Phonon and electron–phonon coupling calculations indicate that both structures are dynamically stable and superconducting. The pressure dependence and critical temperature for the monoclinic (C2/m) phase of 83 K at 200 GPa are in excellent agreement with a recent experimental report.

  12. Isolation and characterization of Burkholderia fungorum Gan-35 with the outstanding ammonia nitrogen-degrading ability from the tailings of rare-earth-element mines in southern Jiangxi, China.

    Feng, Ai-Juan; Xiao, Xi; Ye, Cong-Cong; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Qing; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Hong, Yue-Hui; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2017-12-01

    The exploitation of rare-earth-element (REE) mines has resulted in severe ammonia nitrogen pollution and induced hazards to environments and human health. Screening microorganisms with the ammonia nitrogen-degrading ability provides a basis for bioremediation of ammonia nitrogen-polluted environments. In this study, a bacterium with the outstanding ammonia nitrogen-degrading capability was isolated from the tailings of REE mines in southern Jiangxi Province, China. This strain was identified as Burkholderia fungorum Gan-35 according to phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses. The optimal conditions for ammonia-nitrogen degradation by strain Gan-35 were determined as follows: pH value, 7.5; inoculum dose, 10%; incubation time, 44 h; temperature, 30 °C; and C/N ratio, 15:1. Strain Gan-35 degraded 68.6% of ammonia nitrogen under the optimized conditions. Nepeta cataria grew obviously better in the ammonia nitrogen-polluted soil with strain Gan-35 than that without inoculation, and the decrease in ammonia-nitrogen contents of the former was also more obvious than the latter. Besides, strain Gan-35 exhibited the tolerance to high salinities. In summary, strain Gan-35 harbors the ability of both ammonia-nitrogen degradation at high concentrations and promoting plant growth. This work has reported a Burkholderia strain with the ammonia nitrogen-degrading capability for the first time and is also the first study on the isolation of a bacterium with the ammonia nitrogen-degrading ability from the tailings of REE mines. The results are useful for developing an effective method for microbial remediation of the ammonia nitrogen-polluted tailings of REE mines.

  13. On the problem of silica solubility at high pH

    Eikenberg, J.

    1990-07-01

    The aqueous system Na 2 O-H 2 O-SiO 2 is considered to play an important role when strong alkaline pore waters of a cement based intermediate level radioactive waste repository intrude into the rock formations surrounding the near field. Under such conditions unknown quantities of silica may dissolve. Therefore the pH-dependence of the solubility of amorphous silica and quartz is investigated by a parameter variation study using the geochemical speciation code MINEQL/EIR. Published silica solubility data obtained in sodium hydroxide solutions at 25 and 90 o C are compared with the results of four models which use different proposed values of the rather uncertain equilibrium constants. Of main interest is the question of whether, in a high pH region, the silica solubility can be explained with different monomeric species only, or to what extent additional polymeric silica species have to be considered as well. The solubility of amorphous silica at 25 o C is well understood up to a pH of about 10.5, where it is determined by the solubility product and the first dissociation constant of monomeric silic acid. The most probable cause of the increased solubility of amorphous silica in the region between pH 10.5 and 11.3 is the formation of dimers, trimers and tetramers. Below a total silica concentration of 0.001 M and pH ≤ 10.0, however, polymerisation proves to be insignificant. Besides low temperature studies using amorphous silica, the solubility of quartz has also been measured in NaOH solutions at 90 o C. As is the case at lower temperatures, the reported values for the second dissociation constant at 90 o C scatter widely. It can be shown that in a NaOH medium up to 0.1 M only mononuclear silica species are stable. Therefore it is concluded that the trend of monomers to form polymers decreases strongly with temperature. In strong NaOH solutions at elevated temperatures, silica-sodium ion pairing seems to gain importance. (author) 12 figs., 9 tabs., 65 refs

  14. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    A. Kürten

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization–atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs, as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds concentrations during the night than during the day indicate that these HOMs do not efficiently self-nucleate as no nighttime NPF is observed. Observed iodic acid probably originates from an iodine-containing reservoir substance, but the iodine signals are very likely too low to have a significant effect on NPF.

  15. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L with an average recovery rate of 0.18 g-N/L(CSTR...... performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative effect on the ammonia transportation. In continuous reactor operation, 112% extra biogas production was achieved due to ammonia recovery. High-throughput molecular sequencing analysis showed an impact...... of ammonia recovery on the microbial community composition in the integrated system. Results clearly indicate the great potential of the SMRC-CSTR-coupled system for efficient and cost-effective ammonia recovery, energy production and treatment of ammonia-rich residues....

  16. Effect of different ammonia sources on aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Kissas, Konstantinos

    2018-01-01

    Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) was usually used as a model ammonia source to simulate ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion (AD) of nitrogen-rich feedstocks. However, ammonia in AD originates mainly from degradation of proteins, urea and nucleic acids, which is distinct from NH4Cl. Thus......, in this study, the inhibitory effect of a “natural” ammonia source (urea) and NH4Cl, on four pure methanogenic strains (aceticlastic: Methanosarcina thermophila, Methanosarcina barkeri; hydrogenotrophic: Methanoculleus bourgensis, Methanoculleus thermophilus), was assessed under mesophilic (37 °C......) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. The results showed that urea hydrolysis increased pH significantly to unsuitable levels for methanogenic growth, while NH4Cl had a negligible effect on pH. After adjusting initial pH to 7 and 8, urea was significantly stronger inhibitor with longer lag phases to methanogenesis...

  17. Fabrication and Evaluation of a New High-Temperature pH Sensor for Use in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Jung, Yong Ju [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Jei Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A new high-temperature pH sensor has been successfully developed by reforming the internal reference systems of the pH sensors based on oxygen-ion conducting ceramic membrane. The conventional internal reference system, a mixture of Ni and NiO, has been replaced with partially oxidized Ni powders, where Ni and NiO coexist on the surface of particles, in order to avoid the cumbersome mixing step of Ni and NiO particles. The partially oxidized Ni particles were made by oxidizing Ni under air atmosphere at 600 .deg. C and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy. The viability of the pH sensor developed was assessed in boric acid (1000 ppm-B) / lithium hydroxide (1 to 3 ppm-Li) buffer solutions at 280 .deg. C. The pH sensor showed excellent accuracy with a small error less than ±0.2 pH units.

  18. Fabrication and Evaluation of a New High-Temperature pH Sensor for Use in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Jung, Yong Ju; Yeon, Jei Won

    2010-01-01

    A new high-temperature pH sensor has been successfully developed by reforming the internal reference systems of the pH sensors based on oxygen-ion conducting ceramic membrane. The conventional internal reference system, a mixture of Ni and NiO, has been replaced with partially oxidized Ni powders, where Ni and NiO coexist on the surface of particles, in order to avoid the cumbersome mixing step of Ni and NiO particles. The partially oxidized Ni particles were made by oxidizing Ni under air atmosphere at 600 .deg. C and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy. The viability of the pH sensor developed was assessed in boric acid (1000 ppm-B) / lithium hydroxide (1 to 3 ppm-Li) buffer solutions at 280 .deg. C. The pH sensor showed excellent accuracy with a small error less than ±0.2 pH units

  19. Molecular gated-AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for pH detection.

    Ding, Xiangzhen; Yang, Shuai; Miao, Bin; Gu, Le; Gu, Zhiqi; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Baojun; Wang, Hong; Wu, Dongmin; Li, Jiadong

    2018-04-18

    A molecular gated-AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor has been developed for pH detection. The sensing surface of the sensor was modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to provide amphoteric amine groups, which would play the role of receptors for pH detection. On modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, the transistor exhibits good chemical stability in hydrochloric acid solution and is sensitive for pH detection. Thus, our molecular gated-AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor acheived good electrical performances such as chemical stability (remained stable in hydrochloric acid solution), good sensitivity (37.17 μA/pH) and low hysteresis. The results indicate a promising future for high-quality sensors for pH detection.

  20. Transport phenomena in high Tc superconductors. Resume of Ph.D thesis

    Crisan, I.A.

    1994-01-01

    This is an extended abstract of the Ph. D. thesis devoted to the transport phenomena in high-Tc superconductors. There are three chapters. The first chapter presents an overview of the essential theoretical aspects concerning the vortex dynamics particularly in ceramic superconductors. The chapter two gives a description of the preparation methods of superconductor samples used by the author as well as the measurement devices for volt-ampere characteristics and the associated electronic circuitry. In the third chapter there are presented the experimental data obtained from different samples prepared in different temperature and magnetic field conditions. The obtained results are finally interpreted in the frame of existent or original models. (M.I.C.). 31 Refs

  1. Long photoperiods sustain high pH in Arctic kelp forests

    Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Marbà, Núria; Sanz-Martin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Concern on the impacts of ocean acidification on calcifiers, such as bivalves, sea urchins, and foraminifers, has led to efforts to understand the controls on pH in their habitats, which include kelp forests and seagrass meadows. The metabolism of these habitats can lead to diel fluctuation in pH...... with increases during the day and declines at night, suggesting no net effect on pH at time scales longer than daily. We examined the capacity of subarctic and Arctic kelps to up-regulate pH in situ and experimentally tested the role of photoperiod in determining the capacity of Arctic macrophytes to up......-regulate pH. Field observations at photoperiods of 15 and 24 hours in Greenland com- bined with experimental manipulations of photoperiod show that photoperiods longer than 21 hours, characteristic of Arctic summers, are conducive to sustained up-regulation of pH by kelp photosynthesis. We report a gradual...

  2. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  3. Method for forming ammonia

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  4. Spatially and size selective synthesis of Fe-based nanoparticles on ordered mesoporous supports as highly active and stable catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    Lu, An-Hui; Nitz, Joerg-Joachim; Comotti, Massimiliano; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Schlichte, Klaus; Lehmann, Christian W; Terasaki, Osamu; Schüth, Ferdi

    2010-10-13

    Uniform and highly dispersed γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼6 nm supported on CMK-5 carbons and C/SBA-15 composites were prepared via simple impregnation and thermal treatment. The nanostructures of these materials were characterized by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, XPS, SEM, TEM, and nitrogen sorption. Due to the confinement effect of the mesoporous ordered matrices, γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were fully immobilized within the channels of the supports. Even at high Fe-loadings (up to about 12 wt %) on CMK-5 carbon no iron species were detected on the external surface of the carbon support by XPS analysis and electron microscopy. Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 showed the highest ammonia decomposition activity of all previously described Fe-based catalysts in this reaction. Complete ammonia decomposition was achieved at 700 °C and space velocities as high as 60,000 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1). At a space velocity of 7500 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1), complete ammonia conversion was maintained at 600 °C for 20 h. After the reaction, the immobilized γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were found to be converted to much smaller nanoparticles (γ-Fe(2)O(3) and a small fraction of nitride), which were still embedded within the carbon matrix. The Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 catalyst is much more active than the benchmark NiO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at high space velocity, due to its highly developed mesoporosity. γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles supported on carbon-silica composites are structurally much more stable over extended periods of time but less active than those supported on carbon. TEM observation reveals that iron-based nanoparticles penetrate through the carbon layer and then are anchored on the silica walls, thus preventing them from moving and sintering. In this way, the stability of the carbon-silica catalyst is improved. Comparison with the silica supported iron oxide catalyst reveals that the presence of a thin layer of carbon is essential for increased catalytic activity.

  5. Serpentinization-Influenced Groundwater Harbors Extremely Low Diversity Microbial Communities Adapted to High pH.

    Twing, Katrina I; Brazelton, William J; Kubo, Michael D Y; Hyer, Alex J; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; McCollom, Tom M; Schrenk, Matthew O

    2017-01-01

    Serpentinization is a widespread geochemical process associated with aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks that produces abundant reductants (H 2 and CH 4 ) for life to exploit, but also potentially challenging conditions, including high pH, limited availability of terminal electron acceptors, and low concentrations of inorganic carbon. As a consequence, past studies of serpentinites have reported low cellular abundances and limited microbial diversity. Establishment of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (California, U.S.A.) allowed a comparison of microbial communities and physicochemical parameters directly within serpentinization-influenced subsurface aquifers. Samples collected from seven wells were subjected to a range of analyses, including solute and gas chemistry, microbial diversity by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metabolic potential by shotgun metagenomics, in an attempt to elucidate what factors drive microbial activities in serpentinite habitats. This study describes the first comprehensive interdisciplinary analysis of microbial communities in hyperalkaline groundwater directly accessed by boreholes into serpentinite rocks. Several environmental factors, including pH, methane, and carbon monoxide, were strongly associated with the predominant subsurface microbial communities. A single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) of Betaproteobacteria and a few OTUs of Clostridia were the almost exclusive inhabitants of fluids exhibiting the most serpentinized character. Metagenomes from these extreme samples contained abundant sequences encoding proteins associated with hydrogen metabolism, carbon monoxide oxidation, carbon fixation, and acetogenesis. Metabolic pathways encoded by Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria, in particular, are likely to play important roles in the ecosystems of serpentinizing groundwater. These data provide a basis for further biogeochemical studies of key processes in serpentinite subsurface environments.

  6. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  7. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Dynamic-Range Multichannel Optical-Fiber pH Sensor Based on PWM Technique

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a highly sensitive multichannel pH sensor that is based on an optical-fiber pulse width modulation (PWM) technique. According to the optical-fiber PWM method, the received sensing signal’s pulse width changes when the optical-fiber pH sensing-element of the array comes into contact with pH buffer solutions. The proposed optical-fiber PWM pH-sensing system offers a linear sensing response over a wide range of pH values from 2 to 12, with a high pH-sensing ability. The sensitivity of the proposed pH sensor is 0.46 µs/pH, and the correlation coefficient R2 is approximately 0.997. Additional advantages of the proposed optical-fiber PWM pH sensor include a short/fast response-time of about 8 s, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of about 0.019, easy fabrication, low cost, small size, reusability of the optical-fiber sensing-element, and the capability of remote sensing. Finally, the performance of the proposed PWM pH sensor was compared with that of potentiometric, optical-fiber modal interferometer, and optical-fiber Fabry–Perot interferometer pH sensors with respect to dynamic range width, linearity as well as response and recovery times. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing abilities than the above-mentioned pH sensors. PMID:27834865

  8. High pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors: Laboratory studies of the water-rich region of the system ammonia-water

    Nicol, Malcolm; Johnson, Mary; Boone, Steven; Cynn, Hyunchee

    1987-01-01

    Several studies relative to high pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors are summarized. The behavior of gas-ice mixtures at very high pressures, studies of the phase diagram of (NH3) sub x (H2O) sub 1-x at pressures to 5GPa and temperatures from 240 to 370 K, single crystal growth of ammonia dihydrate at room temperature in order to determine their structures by x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy of chemical reactions during shock compression in order to evaluate how the reactions affect the interpretation of equation of state data obtained by shock methods, and temperature and x-ray diffraction measurements made on resistively heated wire in diamond anvil cells in order to obtain phase and structural data relevant to the interiors of terrestrial planets are among the studies discussed.

  9. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  10. A high-density ammonia storage/delivery system based on Mg(NH3)6Cl2 for SCR-DeNOx in vehicles

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Quaade, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    ammonia density of up to 93% of that of liquid ammonia. This provides a long lasting ammonia storage (approximate to 20000 km of driving per 6.2 L Mg(NH(3))(6)Cl(2) for an average medium-sized vehicle). The controlled thermal decomposition of Mg(NH(3))(6)Cl(2) was demonstrated. A small reactor......(NE(3))(6)Cl(2) ideal for use as an ammonia storage compound in both diesel and lean-burn gasoline-driven automobiles. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. A fluorescent probe which allows highly specific thiol labeling at low pH

    Nielsen, Jonas W.; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa E.

    2012-01-01

    and properties of a thiol-specific reagent, fluorescent cyclic activated disulfide (FCAD), which includes the fluorescein moiety as fluorophore and utilizes a variation of thiol-disulfide exchange chemistry. The leaving-group character of FCAD makes it reactive at pH 3, allowing modification at low pH, limiting...

  12. On the pH and Osmotic Stress Tolerance of High Ethanol Tolerant ...

    Saccharomyces yeast strains Y13, Y522 and Y1189 isolated from fermenting palm wine juice showed marked differences in their optimum growth pH and possessed osmotolerance comparable to established industrial yeast strains. Shifts in medium pH beyond the growth optimum elicited obvious reductions in growth rate ...

  13. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  14. Long photoperiods sustain high pH in Arctic kelp forests.

    Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Marbà, Núria; Sanz-Martin, Marina; Hendriks, Iris E; Thyrring, Jakob; Carstensen, Jacob; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Duarte, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Concern on the impacts of ocean acidification on calcifiers, such as bivalves, sea urchins, and foraminifers, has led to efforts to understand the controls on pH in their habitats, which include kelp forests and seagrass meadows. The metabolism of these habitats can lead to diel fluctuation in pH with increases during the day and declines at night, suggesting no net effect on pH at time scales longer than daily. We examined the capacity of subarctic and Arctic kelps to up-regulate pH in situ and experimentally tested the role of photoperiod in determining the capacity of Arctic macrophytes to up-regulate pH. Field observations at photoperiods of 15 and 24 hours in Greenland combined with experimental manipulations of photoperiod show that photoperiods longer than 21 hours, characteristic of Arctic summers, are conducive to sustained up-regulation of pH by kelp photosynthesis. We report a gradual increase in pH of 0.15 units and a parallel decline in pCO 2 of 100 parts per million over a 10-day period in an Arctic kelp forest over midsummer, with ample scope for continued pH increase during the months of continuous daylight. Experimental increase in CO 2 concentration further stimulated the capacity of macrophytes to deplete CO 2 and increase pH. We conclude that long photoperiods in Arctic summers support sustained up-regulation of pH in kelp forests, with potential benefits for calcifiers, and propose that this mechanism may increase with the projected expansion of Arctic vegetation in response to warming and loss of sea ice.

  15. The high pH chemical and radiation compatibility of various liner materials

    Whyatt, G.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a flexible membrane liner that has been proposed to line a concrete vault in which liquid low-level radioactive waste will be solidified. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene liners were tested at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in an EPA method 9090 format to determine their chemical compatibility with the waste. Radiation effects were also investigated. The liners were immersed in a highly caustic (pH>14), primarily inorganic solution at 90 degrees C. The liners were subjected to radiation doses up to 38.9 Mrad, which was the expected dose the liner would receive over a 30-year life inside the vault. Recent changes have placed the liner outside the vault. The acceptance criteria for judging the compatibility of the liner with radiation would be different that those used for judging chemical compatibility. The radiation damage over the life of the liner can be simulated in a short-term test. Both HDPE and polypropylene liners were judged to be acceptable from a chemical and radiation standpoint when placed outside of the vault, while several other liners were not compatible. Radiation did not have a significant effect on chemical degradation rates

  16. The high pH chemical and radiation compatibility of various liner materials

    Whyatt, G.; Farnsworth, R.

    1990-01-01

    A flexible membrane liner has been proposed to line a concrete vault in which liquid low-level radioactive waste will be solidified. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene liners were tested at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in an EPA method 9090 format to determine their chemical compatibility with the waste. Radiation effects were also investigated. The liners were immersed in a highly caustic (pH>14), primarily inorganic solution at 90 degrees C. The liners were subjected to radiation doses up to 38.9 Mrad, which was the expected dose the liner would receive over a 30-year life inside the vault. Recent changes have placed the liner outside the vault. The acceptance criteria for judging the compatibility of the liner with radiation should be different than those used for judging chemical compatibility. The radiation damage over the life of the liner can be simulated in a short-term test. Both HDPE and polypropylene liners were judged to be acceptable from a chemical and radiation standpoint when placed outside of the vault, while several other liners were not compatible. Radiation did not have a significant effect on chemical degradation rates

  17. High Sensitivity pH Sensor Based on Porous Silicon (PSi) Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor.

    Al-Hardan, Naif H; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Ahmed, Naser M; Jalar, Azman; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim; Chiu, Weesiong; Al-Rawi, Hamzah N

    2016-06-07

    In this study, porous silicon (PSi) was prepared and tested as an extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) for pH sensing. The prepared PSi has pore sizes in the range of 500 to 750 nm with a depth of approximately 42 µm. The results of testing PSi for hydrogen ion sensing in different pH buffer solutions reveal that the PSi has a sensitivity value of 66 mV/pH that is considered a super Nernstian value. The sensor considers stability to be in the pH range of 2 to 12. The hysteresis values of the prepared PSi sensor were approximately 8.2 and 10.5 mV in the low and high pH loop, respectively. The result of this study reveals a promising application of PSi in the field for detecting hydrogen ions in different solutions.

  18. High Sensitivity pH Sensor Based on Porous Silicon (PSi Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor

    Naif H. Al-Hardan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, porous silicon (PSi was prepared and tested as an extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET for pH sensing. The prepared PSi has pore sizes in the range of 500 to 750 nm with a depth of approximately 42 µm. The results of testing PSi for hydrogen ion sensing in different pH buffer solutions reveal that the PSi has a sensitivity value of 66 mV/pH that is considered a super Nernstian value. The sensor considers stability to be in the pH range of 2 to 12. The hysteresis values of the prepared PSi sensor were approximately 8.2 and 10.5 mV in the low and high pH loop, respectively. The result of this study reveals a promising application of PSi in the field for detecting hydrogen ions in different solutions.

  19. Recovery of gold from solutions with ammonia and thiosulfate using activated carbon

    Vargas, C.; Navarro, P.; Araya, E.; Pavez, F.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2006-01-01

    The recovery of gold from solutions containing thiosulfate and ammonia using granular activated carbon was studied,evaluating the adsorption and elution stages. The influence of ammonia and thiosulfate concentration and the presence of impurities such as copper and zinc were also evaluated. In the presence of ammonia there was a concentration which maximized the adsorption of gold, while thiosulfate and impurities presence was harmful for the adsorption of gold. during elution, ammonia and thiosulfate concentration, pH regulator and temperature were evaluated. Ammonia favored the process as long as thiosulfate showed a maximum starting from which the elution diminishes. The effect of the pH regulator was very important; If was revealed that when the pH was regulated with caustic ammonia, a synergic effect appeared which favored the elution. Temperature favored the elution process, with activation energy of 9.13 kJ/mol. (Author) 25 refs

  20. The origin of mouth-exhaled ammonia.

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-09-01

    It is known that the oral cavity is a production site for mouth-exhaled NH3. However, the mechanism of NH3 production in the oral cavity has been unclear. Since bacterial urease in the oral cavity has been found to produce ammonia from oral fluid urea, we hypothesize that oral fluid urea is the origin of mouth-exhaled NH3. Our results show that under certain conditions a strong correlation exists between oral fluid urea and oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) (rs = 0.77, p oral fluid NH3 and mouth-exhaled NH3 (rs = 0.81, p oral fluid pH. Bacterial urease catalyses the hydrolysis of oral fluid urea to ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3). Oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) and pH determine the concentration of oral fluid NH3, which evaporates from oral fluid into gas phase and turns to mouth-exhaled NH3.

  1. Effects of chronic ammonia exposure on ammonia metabolism and excretion in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma.

    Gao, Na; Zhu, Limei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Yi, Meisheng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ammonia is highly toxic to aquatic organisms, but whether ammonia excretion or ammonia metabolism to less toxic compounds is the major strategy for detoxification in marine fish against chronic ammonia exposure is unclear to date. In this study, we investigated the metabolism and excretion of ammonia in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma during chronic ammonia exposure. The fish were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl spiked seawater for 8 weeks. Exposure of 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl had deleterious effects on the fish, including significant reductions in growth, feed intake, and total protein content. However, the fish could take strategies to detoxify ammonia. The tissue ammonia (T Amm ) in the 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments was significantly higher than those in the 0 and 0.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments after 2 weeks of exposure, but it recovered with prolonged exposure time, ultimately reaching the control level after 8 weeks. The amino acid catabolic rate decreased to reduce the gross ammonia production with the increasing ambient ammonia concentration. The concentrations of most metabolites remained constant in the 0-0.6 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments, whereas 5 amino acids and 3 energy metabolism-related metabolites decreased in the 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatment. J Amm steadily increased in ambient ammonia from 0 to 0.6 mmol l -1 and slightly decreased when the ambient ammonia concentration increased to 1.1 mmol l -1 . Overall, marine medaka cope with sublethal ammonia environment by regulating the tissue T Amm via reducing the ammonia production and increasing ammonia excretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovery of ammonia and production of high-grade phosphates from side-stream digester effluents using gas-permeable membranes

    Phosphorus recovery was combined with ammonia recovery using gas-permeable membranes. In a first step, the ammonia and alkalinity were removed from municipal side-stream wastewater using low-rate aeration and a gas-permeable membrane manifold. In a second step, the phosphorus was removed using magne...

  3. High protein diet induces pericentral glutamate dehydrogenase and ornithine aminotransferase to provide sufficient glutamate for pericentral detoxification of ammonia in rat liver lobules

    Boon, L.; Geerts, W. J.; Jonker, A.; Lamers, W. H.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism. Nitrogen enters the liver as free ammonia and as amino acids of which glutamine and alanine are the most important precursors. Detoxification of ammonia to urea involves deamination and transamination, By applying quantitative in situ

  4. Bioaugmentation of Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidizing Culture in Biogas Reactors Exposed to Increasing Levels of Ammonia

    Westerholm, Maria; Levén, Lotta

    2012-01-01

    The importance of syntrophic acetate oxidation for process stability in methanogenic systems operating at high ammonia concentrations has previously been emphasized. In this study we investigated bioaugmentation of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing (SAO) cultures as a possible method for decreasing the adaptation period of biogas reactors operating at gradually increased ammonia concentrations (1.5 to 11 g NH4+-N/liter). Whole stillage and cattle manure were codigested semicontinuously for about 460 days in four mesophilic anaerobic laboratory-scale reactors, and a fixed volume of SAO culture was added daily to two of the reactors. Reactor performance was evaluated in terms of biogas productivity, methane content, pH, alkalinity, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) content. The decomposition pathway of acetate was analyzed by isotopic tracer experiments, and population dynamics were monitored by quantitative PCR analyses. A shift in dominance from aceticlastic methanogenesis to SAO occurred simultaneously in all reactors, indicating no influence by bioaugmentation on the prevailing pathway. Higher abundances of Clostridium ultunense and Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans were associated with bioaugmentation, but no influence on Syntrophaceticus schinkii or the methanogenic population was distinguished. Overloading or accumulation of VFA did not cause notable dynamic effects on the population. Instead, the ammonia concentration had a substantial impact on the abundance level of the microorganisms surveyed. The addition of SAO culture did not affect process performance or stability against ammonia inhibition, and all four reactors deteriorated at high ammonia concentrations. Consequently, these findings further demonstrate the strong influence of ammonia on the methane-producing consortia and on the representative methanization pathway in mesophilic biogas reactors. PMID:22923397

  5. Observations of atmospheric ammonia from TANSO-FTS/GOSAT

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Saitoh, Naoko; Shiomi, Kei

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric ammonia has large impacts on the nitrogen cycles or atmospheric environment such as nucleation of PM2.5 particles. It is reported that ammonia in the atmosphere has been increasing rapidly with the growth of population globally and this trend must continue in the future. Satellite observation is an effective approach to get to know the global perspectives of the gas. Atmospheric ammonia is observable using the thermal infrared (TIR) spectra, and IASI, TES and CrIS had been revealed those distributions. GOSAT also has TIR band including the ammonia absorption bands. GOSAT has the shorter revisit cycle than that of the other hyper-spectral TIR sounders mentioned above, therefore, the shorter time-scale events can be represented. In addition to the importance of the impacts of ammonia itself, the concentration ratio between ammonia and the other trace gases such as CO which is one of the main targets of the GOSAT-2 project is useful as the indicator of their emission sources. In this study, we introduce an algorithm to retrieve the column amount of atmospheric ammonia based on non-linear optimal estimation (Rogers, 2000) from GOSAT spectra in the ammonia absorption band between 960 - 970 cm-1. Temperature and water vapor profiles are estimated in advance of the ammonia retrieval. The preliminary results showed significant high concentrations of ammonia in the Northern India and the Eastern China as pointed out in the previous researches. We will discuss the global distribution of ammonia in the presentation.

  6. High performance flexible pH sensor based on polyaniline nanopillar array electrode.

    Yoon, Jo Hee; Hong, Seok Bok; Yun, Seok-Oh; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Tae Jae; Lee, Kyoung G; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-03-15

    Flexible pH sensor technologies have attracted a great deal of attention in many applications, such as, wearable health care devices and monitors for chemical and biological processes. Here, we fabricated flexible and thin pH sensors using a two electrode configuration comprised of a polyaniline nanopillar (PAN) array working electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. In order to provide nanostructure, soft lithography using a polymeric blend was employed to create a flexible nanopillar backbone film. Polyaniline-sensing materials were deposited on a patterned-nanopillar array by electrochemical deposition. The pH sensors produced exhibited a near-Nernstian response (∼60.3mV/pH), which was maintained in a bent state. In addition, pH sensors showed other excellent sensor performances in terms of response time, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity, and stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...... tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...

  8. Detection of irradiated peppers by viscosity measurement at extremely high pH

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko

    1996-01-01

    The viscosities of aqueous suspensions of irradiated peppers determined after heat gelatinization were influenced by the pH of the suspension to a greater degree than those of unirradiated ones. Viscosity measurement under an extremely alkaline condition (pH 13.8) resulted in a significant different between irradiated peppers and unirradiated ones, irrespective of the planting locality and storage period. All of the pepper samples irradiated at 5 kGy showed viscosity values significantly lower than unirradiated ones. (Author)

  9. Dynamic patterns and ecological impacts of declining ocean pH in a high-resolution multi-year dataset.

    Wootton, J Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A; Forester, James D

    2008-12-02

    Increasing global concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) are predicted to decrease ocean pH, with potentially severe impacts on marine food webs, but empirical data documenting ocean pH over time are limited. In a high-resolution dataset spanning 8 years, pH at a north-temperate coastal site declined with increasing atmospheric CO(2) levels and varied substantially in response to biological processes and physical conditions that fluctuate over multiple time scales. Applying a method to link environmental change to species dynamics via multispecies Markov chain models reveals strong links between in situ benthic species dynamics and variation in ocean pH, with calcareous species generally performing more poorly than noncalcareous species in years with low pH. The models project the long-term consequences of these dynamic changes, which predict substantial shifts in the species dominating the habitat as a consequence of both direct effects of reduced calcification and indirect effects arising from the web of species interactions. Our results indicate that pH decline is proceeding at a more rapid rate than previously predicted in some areas, and that this decline has ecological consequences for near shore benthic ecosystems.

  10. Corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel in concrete for nuclear facilities exposed in high chloride and low pH environment

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Raman, Vedarajan

    2010-01-01

    The Cl ion concentration and pH were monitored by inserting micro-electrodes into artificial pores in the mortar which was exposed in 0.5 mol/l chloride solution (pH 4.0). At the same time, the electrochemical behavior of the reinforcing steel was investigated by EIS. The Cl ion concentration in the mortar was obtained using Ag/AgCl micro-electrodes, showing that this behavior is generally controlled by diffusion. When the diffusion equation was used in this work, the diffusion coefficient (D c ) showed a high value of D c = 9.5 x 10 -5 mm 2 /s. Similarly, the pH in the mortar was obtained using W/WO x micro-electrodes. With a 10 mm cover thickness, pH continued to decrease to pH 8.0, which was considered by penetration of H + ions from the surface. Based on the results of monitoring with the micro-electrodes, solutions simulating those in the pores in mortar were prepared and used in EIS measurements. The charge transfer resistance R ct in the simulated solutions showed good correspondence with the impedance Z (Z 1mHz -Z sol ) in the actual mortar. This is attributed to the fact that the corrosion of reinforcing steel was controlled by the solution conditions (mainly Cl concentration and pH) in the pores in mortar.

  11. Fate of high loads of ammonia in a pond and wetland downstream from a hazardous waste disposal site.

    Cutrofello, Michele; Durant, John L

    2007-07-01

    Halls Brook (eastern Massachusetts, USA) is a significant source of total dissolved ammonia (sum of NH(3) and NH(4)(+); (NH(3))(T)) to the Aberjona River, a water body listed for NH(3) impairment on the Clean Water Act section 303(d) list. We hypothesized (1) that (NH(3))(T) in Halls Brook derived from a hazardous waste site via groundwater discharging to a two-basin pond that feeds the brook; and (2) that transport of (NH(3))(T) to the Aberjona River was controlled by lacustrine and wetland processes. To test these hypotheses we measured (NH(3))(T) levels in the brook, the pond, and a wetlands directly downstream of the pond during both dry and wet weather over a ten month period. In addition, we analyzed sediment cores and nitrogen isotopes, and performed mass balance calculations. Groundwater discharge from beneath the hazardous waste site was the major source of (NH(3))(T) (20-67 kg d(-1)) and salinity to the north basin of the pond. The salty bottom waters of the north basin were anoxic on all sampling dates, and exhibited relatively stable (NH(3))(T) concentrations between 200 and 600 mg Nl(-1). These levels were >100-times higher than typical background levels, and 8-24-times above the acute effects level for (NH(3))(T) toxicity. Bottom waters from the north basin continuously spill over into the south basin contributing approximately 50% of the (NH(3))(T) load entering this basin. The remainder comes from Halls Brook, which receives (NH(3))(T) loadings from as yet unknown sources upstream. During storm events up to 50% of the mass of (NH(3))(T) was flushed from the south basin and into the wetlands. The wetlands acted as a (NH(3))(T) sink in dry weather in the growing season and a discharge-dependent (NH(3))(T) source to the Aberjona River during rainstorms.

  12. Ammonia Release on ISS

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Crew: Approximately 53% metabolic load Product of protein metabolism Limit production of ammonia by external regulation NOT possbile Payloads Potential source Scientific experiments Thorough safety review ensures sufficient levels of containment

  13. Reactor for removing ammonia

    Luo, Weifang [Livermore, CA; Stewart, Kenneth D [Valley Springs, CA

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  14. Origins of high pH mineral waters from ultramafic rocks, Central Portugal

    Marques, Jose M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.marques@ist.ult.pt; Carreira, Paula M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional No 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Rosario [Departamento de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Ed. C6, 3oP, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matias, Maria J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Goff, Fraser E. [Earth and Planetary Sciences Department MSCO3-2040, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-000 (United States); Basto, Maria J.; Graca, Rui C.; Aires-Barros, Luis [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Luis [Junta de Freguesia, Av. da Libertacao, 45-D, 7460-002, Cabeco de Vide (Portugal)

    2008-12-15

    This paper reviews the geochemical, isotopic ({sup 2}H, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C, {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C) and numerical modelling approaches to evaluate possible geological sources of the high pH (11.5)/Na-Cl/Ca-OH mineral waters from the Cabeco de Vide region (Central-Portugal). Water-rock interaction studies have greatly contributed to a conceptual hydrogeological circulation model of the Cabeco de Vide mineral waters, which was corroborated by numerical modelling approaches. The local shallow groundwaters belong to the Mg-HCO{sub 3} type, and are derived by interaction with the local serpentinized rocks. At depth, these type waters evolve into the high pH/Na-Cl/Ca-OH mineral waters of Cabeco de Vide spas, issuing from the intrusive contact between mafic/ultramafic rocks and an older carbonate sequence. The Cabeco de Vide mineral waters are supersaturated with respect to serpentine indicating that they may cause serpentinization. Magnesium silicate phases (brucite and serpentine) seem to control Mg concentrations in Cabeco de Vide mineral waters. Similar {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O suggest a common meteoric origin and that the Mg-HCO{sub 3} type waters have evolved towards Cabeco de Vide mineral waters. The reaction path simulations show that the progressive evolution of the Ca-HCO{sub 3} to Mg-HCO{sub 3} waters can be attributed to the interaction of meteoric waters with serpentinites. The sequential dissolution at CO{sub 2} (g) closed system conditions leads to the precipitation of calcite, magnesite, amorphous silica, chrysotile and brucite, indicating that the waters would be responsible for the serpentinization of fresh ultramafic rocks (dunites) present at depth. The apparent age of Cabeco de Vide mineral waters was determined as 2790 {+-} 40 a BP, on the basis of {sup 14}C and {sup 13}C values, which is in agreement with the {sup 3}H concentrations being below the detection limit.

  15. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  16. Design of flexible PANI-coated CuO-TiO2-SiO2 heterostructure nanofibers with high ammonia sensing response values

    Pang, Zengyuan; Nie, Qingxin; Lv, Pengfei; Yu, Jian; Huang, Fenglin; Wei, Qufu

    2017-06-01

    We report a room-temperature ammonia sensor with extra high response values and ideal flexibility, including polyaniline (PANI)-coated titanium dioxide-silicon dioxide (TiO2-SiO2) or copper oxide-titanium dioxide-silicon dioxide (CuO-TiO2-SiO2) composite nanofibers. Such flexible inorganic TiO2-SiO2 and CuO-TiO2-SiO2 composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning, followed by calcination. Then, in situ polymerization of aniline monomers was carried out with inorganic TiO2-SiO2 and CuO-TiO2-SiO2 composite nanofibers as templates. Gas sensing tests at room temperature indicated that the obtained CuO-TiO2-SiO2/PANI composite nanofibers had much higher response values to ammonia gas (ca. 45.67-100 ppm) than most of those reported before as well as the prepared TiO2-SiO2/PANI composite nanofibers here. These excellent sensing properties may be due to the P-N, P-P heterojunctions and a structure similar to field-effect transistors formed on the interfaces between PANI, TiO2, and CuO, which is p-type, n-type, and p-type semiconductor, respectively. In addition, the prepared free-standing CuO-TiO2-SiO2/PANI composite nanofiber membrane was easy to handle and possessed ideal flexibility, which is promising for potential applications in wearable sensors in the future.

  17. A selective and sensitive optical sensor for dissolved ammonia detection via agglomeration of fluorescent Ag nanoclusters and temperature gradient headspace single drop microextraction.

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Gao, Zhong Feng; Zhang, Ying; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, a simple sensor platform is presented for highly selective and sensitive detection of dissolved ammonia in aqueous solutions without pretreatment based on temperature gradient headspace single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) technique, and fluorescence and UV-vis spectrophotometry are utilized with the Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) functioned by citrate and glutathione as the probe. The sensing mechanism is based on the volatility of ammonia gas and the active response of Ag NCs to pH change caused by the introduction of ammonia. High pH can make the Ag NCs agglomerate and lead to the obvious decrease of fluorescence intensity and absorbance of Ag NCs solution. Moreover, the presented method exhibits a remarkably high selectivity toward dissolved ammonia over most of inorganic ions and amino acid, and shows a good linear range of 10-350μM (0.14-4.9mgNL -1 ) with a low detection limit of 336nM (4.70μgNL -1 ) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, the practical applications of the sensor have been successfully demonstrated by detecting dissolved ammonia in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  19. Biotreatment of ammonia and butanal containing waste gases

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Vriens, L.; Verachtert, H.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3·m–2·h–1 with 4–16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibitio...

  20. In situ electrochemical enrichment and isolation of a magnetite-reducing bacterium from a high pH serpentinizing spring.

    Rowe, Annette R; Yoshimura, Miho; LaRowe, Doug E; Bird, Lina J; Amend, Jan P; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nealson, Kenneth H; Okamoto, Akihiro

    2017-06-01

    Serpentinization is a geologic process that produces highly reduced, hydrogen-rich fluids that support microbial communities under high pH conditions. We investigated the activity of microbes capable of extracellular electron transfer in a terrestrial serpentinizing system known as 'The Cedars'. Measuring current generation with an on-site two-electrode system, we observed daily oscillations in current with the current maxima and minima occurring during daylight hours. Distinct members of the microbial community were enriched. Current generation in lab-scale electrochemical reactors did not oscillate, but was correlated with carbohydrate amendment in Cedars-specific minimal media. Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes were consistently enriched from lab electrochemical systems on δ-MnO 2 and amorphous Fe(OH) 3 at pH 11. However, isolation of an electrogenic strain proved difficult as transfer cultures failed to grow after multiple rounds of media transfer. Lowering the bulk pH in the media allowed us to isolate a Firmicutes strain (Paenibacillus sp.). This strain was capable of electrode and mineral reduction (including magnetite) at pH 9. This report provides evidence of the in situ activity of microbes using extracellular substrates as sinks for electrons at The Cedars, but also highlights the potential importance of community dynamics for supporting microbial life through either carbon fixation, and/or moderating pH stress. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The removal of ammonia from sanitary landfill leachate using a series of shallow waste stabilization ponds.

    Leite, V D; Pearson, H W; de Sousa, J T; Lopes, W S; de Luna, M L D

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficiency of a shallow (0.5 m deep) waste stabilization pond series to remove high concentrations of ammonia from sanitary landfill leachate. The pond system was located at EXTRABES, Campina Grande, Paraiba, Northeast Brazil. The pond series was fed with sanitary landfill leachate transported by road tanker to the experimental site from the sanitary landfill of the City of Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. The ammoniacal-N surface loading on the first pond of the series was equivalent to 364 kg ha(-1) d(-1) and the COD surface loading equivalent to 3,690 kg ha(-1) d(-1). The maximum mean ammonia removal efficiency was 99.5% achieved by the third pond in the series which had an effluent concentration of 5.3 mg L(-1) ammoniacal-N for an accumulative HRT of 39.5 days. The removal process was mainly attributed to ammonia volatilization (stripping) from the pond surfaces as a result of high surface pH values and water temperatures of 22-26°C. Shallow pond systems would appear to be a promising technology for stripping ammonia from landfill leachate under tropical conditions.

  2. Recovery of ammonia from anaerobically digested manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Maria Cruz García-González

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen (N can be recovered from different types of wastewaters. Among these wastewaters, anaerobically digested swine manure (digestate has the highest N content in ammonia form (NH3. It is desirable to reduce N in digestate effluents to safely incorporate them in arable soil in N vulnerable zones (NVZ and to mitigate NH3 emissions during N land application. Additional benefit is to minimize inhibition of the anaerobic process by removing NH3 during the anaerobic digestion process. This work aimed to apply the gas-permeable membrane technology to evaluate ammonia (NH3 recovery from high-ammonia digested swine manure. Anaerobically digested swine manure with NH4+ content of 4,293 mg N L−1 was reduced by 91 % (to 381 mg N L−1 during the 32-day experiment. Although the results showed a total N recovery efficiency of 71 %, it is possible to increase this recovery efficiency to > 90 % by adjusting the area of the membrane system to match the high free ammonia concentration (FA in digested swine manure. Moreover, final digestate pH and alkalinity were kept around 8.1 and 8,923 mgCaCO3 L−1, which are convenient for the anaerobic process or incorporation in arable soil when the process is finished.

  3. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha D.

    2016-01-01

    sections with 30-32 pigs with or without daily adjustment of slurry pH to below 6. Ammonia losses from reference sections with untreated slurry were between 9.5 and 12.4% of N excreted, and from sections with acidified slurry between 3.1 and 6.2%. Acidification reduced total emissions of NH3 by 66 and 71......% in spring and autumn experiments, and by 44% in the summer experiment. Regression models were used to investigate sources and controls of NH3 emissions. There was a strong relationship between NH3 emissions and ventilation rate during spring and autumn, but less so during summer where ventilation rates were...

  4. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  5. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  6. Secondary side water chemistry pH control strategy improvements

    Roumiguiere, Fernando-Mario; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Drexler, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Over the years the PWR plant operators were aware of the need of optimizing the pH control strategy in the water-steam cycle with the focus on improvement of steam generator performance with the main goal of reducing the corrosion product ingress into the steam generators and their consequences: SG fouling, SG tube corrosion beneath deposits. To achieve this goal, it becomes necessary to harmonize three requirements: a. High overall pH along the circuit for suppression of general corrosion, requiring a volatile amine to ensure a suitable distribution in steam areas and condenser, and b. High local pH at the water phase of two-phase flow areas, requiring an either rather low volatile amine to ensure high pH in the wet steam water film, or larger amounts of a volatile amine. c. Sufficient amount of hydrazine to ensure reducing conditions in the steam generators. The basic strategy of AREVA NP GmbH (formerly KWU), successfully applied in German nuclear power plants since the late seventies consisted on the achievement of the necessary pH by means of ammonia, as generated by thermal decomposition of hydrazine. By dosing of hydrazine at the necessary amounts to ensure reducing conditions, also sufficient ammonia is generated to achieve a high overall pH along the cycle, being the target pH (25 deg. C) ≥ 9.8 resulting in < 1 ppb Fe in final feed water. This treatment is known as H-AVT (High pH - All Volatile Treatment). Main prerequisite for its application is to have a copper-free system. Eventually, H-AVT started to be applied later at some other western nuclear power plants. In some units, the high condenser exhaust flow rate applied caused a considerable amount of ammonia being removed from the cycle, resulting in too low ammonia concentrations to maintain a sufficiently high pH, making the addition of ammonia necessary. AREVA NP GmbH together with plant operators investigated the possibility of complementing the applied classical H-AVT by addition of an advanced

  7. Hypoxia induced expression of endogenous markers in vitro is highly influenced by pH

    Sorensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Genes such as carbonic anhydrase IX (Ca9), glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), osteopontin (OPN) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) have been suggested as hypoxic markers, but inconsistent results suggest that factors other than oxygen influence their expression. The current study is a detailed investigation using a range of pH values from 6.3 to 7.5 in two human cell lines to establish the pH dependency of hypoxia induced gene expression. Methods: Human tumour cell lines (uterine cervix squamous cell carcinoma (SiHa) and pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma [FaDu DD ]) were used. Hypoxia was induced by gassing cells in airtight chambers with various oxygen concentrations (21%, 1%, 0.1%, 0.01% and 0%) for up to 24 h. The media were titrated to a range of pH values (7.5, 7.0, 6.7, 6.5 and 6.3). Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. Results: In both SiHa and FaDu DD cells Ca9 and LOX reached the highest level of expression at 1% oxygen. In FaDu DD cells, a pH of 6.5 had a medium suppression effect on the hypoxia induced expression of Ca9. pH 6.3 resulted in severe suppression of expression for Ca9 and LOX in both SiHa and FaDu DD . Glut1 and LDH-A had a similar expression pattern to each other, with a maximum expression at 0.01% oxygen, in both cell lines. For these genes pH 6.5 and 6.3 changed the expression pattern in SiHa cells. OPN was up regulated at low oxygen in SiHa cells, but was not induced by hypoxia in FaDu DD cells. Conclusion: As tumour hypoxia occurs in a deprived microenvironment, other environmental factors, for example low pH, might interact with the effect of low oxygen concentration on gene expression. This study shows that pH in two cell lines has a profound influence on the oxygen dependent induction of certain endogenous hypoxic markers

  8. Effects of Iodide and Hydrogen Peroxide on Measuring High Temperature pH in Various Lithium Borate Buffer Solutions

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yun, Myung Hee; Yeon, Jei Won; Song, Kyu Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In a reactor coolant system of nuclear power plants, the need for reliable high temperature pH electrodes has resulted from interests in the corrosion and corrosion product behaviors of the structural materials in a high temperature coolant system. In developing the electrodes for measuring the high temperature pH of aqueous solutions, it is necessary to note two major problems: the chemical stability of an electrode against other chemical impurities, and an electrode's integrity as the temperature and pressure are varied between operational extremes. Over the past decade Macdonald et al. and Danielson et al. have developed many ceramic membrane pH electrodes based on a yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide. However, there are still many experimental difficulties associated with the problems in obtaining electrochemical information across different pressure boundaries and against many kinds of chemical impurities caused by the radiolysis of water and the leakage of a fuel clad. In the present work, we investigated the effects of the environmental factors on a high temperature pH. The selected environmental factors are as follows: system pressure, and chemical species such as iodide and hydrogen peroxide ions.

  9. Starch source in high concentrate rations does not affect rumen pH, histamine and lipopolysaccharide concentrations in dairy cows

    Pilachai, R.; Schonewille, J.T.; Thamrongyoswittayakul, C.; Aiumlamai, S.; Wachirapakom, C.; Everts, H.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of ground corn by cassava meal on rumen pH, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and histamine concentrations under typical Thai feeding conditions (high concentrate diets and rice straw as the sole source of roughage) was investigated. Four rumen-fistulated crossbred Holstein, non-pregnant, dry

  10. Enhanced hydrogen evolution rates at high pH with a colloidal cadmium sulphide–platinum hybrid system

    Schneider, Julian; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Pesch, Georg R.; Yang Teoh, Wey

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced hydrogen generation rates at high pH using colloidal cadmium sulphide nanorods decorated with Pt nanoparticles. We introduce a simplified procedure for the decoration and subsequent hydrogen generation, reducing both the number of working steps and the materials costs. Different Pt precursor concentrations were tested to reveal the optimal conditions for the efficient hydrogen evolution. A sharp increase in hydrogen evolution rates was measured at pH 13 and above, a condition at which the surface charge transfer was efficiently mediated by the formation of hydroxyl radicals and further consumption by the sacrificial triethanolamine hole scavenger

  11. Enhanced hydrogen evolution rates at high pH with a colloidal cadmium sulphide–platinum hybrid system

    Schneider, Julian; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L., E-mail: andrey.rogach@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics (CFP), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Pesch, Georg R.; Yang Teoh, Wey [Clean Energy and Nanotechnology (CLEAN) Laboratory, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate enhanced hydrogen generation rates at high pH using colloidal cadmium sulphide nanorods decorated with Pt nanoparticles. We introduce a simplified procedure for the decoration and subsequent hydrogen generation, reducing both the number of working steps and the materials costs. Different Pt precursor concentrations were tested to reveal the optimal conditions for the efficient hydrogen evolution. A sharp increase in hydrogen evolution rates was measured at pH 13 and above, a condition at which the surface charge transfer was efficiently mediated by the formation of hydroxyl radicals and further consumption by the sacrificial triethanolamine hole scavenger.

  12. Determination of free acid in high level liquid wastes by means of fixed pH value

    Li Jifu; Duan Shirong; Wu Xi; Yu Xueren

    1991-01-01

    For the determination of free acid in high level liquid wastes, 8% potassium oxalate solution with pH 6.50 as a complex agent of hydrolizable ion is added to 1 AW and the solution is titrated with standard sodium hydroxide to reach the original pH value. The quantity of free acid is calculated by standard sodium hydroxide consumed. This method is simple, rapid and accurate. The relative error of analysis is less than ±4%. The average percentage of recovery is 99.6-101.0%

  13. Physiological plasticity of the thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii in response to a changing environment

    Jewell, T.; Johnson, A.; Gelsinger, D.; de la Torre, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    consumed NH3 from NH4Cl when both substrates were provided in equal molar concentrations. However, the urease alpha subunit ureC was expressed in both the presence and absence of urea. One consequence of urea hydrolysis is consumption of intracellular protons during the reaction. As ammonia oxidation produces H+, leading to a decrease in pH, the hydrolysis of urea prior to ammonia oxidation may help alleviate metabolism-driven pH change in HL72. A survey of archaeal ureC sequences from metagenomic data covering a range of hydrothermal features revealed that ureolytic potential is common to many Nitrosocaldus-like organisms and is geographically widespread. Measurements of urea from siliceous circumneutral springs indicate that the concentrations are generally low, below 10 μM. One possible explanation for low steady state urea concentrations is high consumption rates by ureolytic organisms. This, combined with abiotic thermal degradation, may mask high fluxes of urea in microbial hot spring communities.

  14. The solubility and sorption of nickel and niobium under high pH conditions

    Pilkington, N.J.; Stone, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The solubilities of nickel and niobium were measured in a range of cement-equilibrated waters. For nickel the effects of cellulose degradation products and of chloride were examined and the dependence of nickel solubility on pH was measured. The sorption of nickel and niobium on to cement representative of the ''near field'' of a radioactive waste repository was also measured. (author)

  15. Cerebral ammonia metabolism in hyperammonemic rats

    Cooper, A J; Mora, S N; Cruz, N F; Gelbard, A S

    1985-06-01

    The short-term metabolic fate of blood-borne (/sup 13/N)ammonia was determined in the brains of chronically (8- or 14-week portacaval-shunted rats) or acutely (urease-treated) hyperammonemic rats. Using a freeze-blowing technique it was shown that the overwhelming route for metabolism of blood-borne (/sup 13/N)ammonia in normal, chronically hyperammonemic and acutely hyperammonemic rat brain was incorporation into glutamine (amide). However, the rate of turnover of (/sup 13/N)ammonia to L-(amide-/sup 13/N)glutamine was slower in the hyperammonemic rat brain than in the normal rat brain. The activities of several enzymes involved in cerebral ammonia and glutamate metabolism were also measured in the brains of 14-week portacaval-shunted rats. The rat brain appears to have little capacity to adapt to chronic hyperammonemia because there were no differences in activity compared with those of weight-matched controls for the following brain enzymes involved in glutamate/ammonia metabolism: glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamine transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate decarboxylase. The present findings are discussed in the context of the known deleterious effects on the CNS of high ammonia levels in a variety of diseases.

  16. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Institute of Process Engineering and Power Plant Technology, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 23, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Aabo (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  17. Changing noise levels in a high CO2/lower pH ocean

    Brewer, P. G.; Hester, K. C.; Peltzer, E. T.; Kirkwood, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    We show that ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion and from increased respiration/reduced ventilation, has significantly reduced ocean sound absorption and thus increased ocean noise levels in the kHz frequency range. Below 10 kHz, sound absorption occurs due to well known chemical relaxations in the B(OH)3/B(OH)4- and HCO3-/CO32- systems. The pH dependence of these chemical relaxations results in decreased sound absorption (α = dB/km) as the ocean becomes more acidic from increased CO2 levels. The scale of surface ocean pH change today from the +105 ppmv change in atmospheric CO2 is about - 0.12 pH, resulting in frequency dependent decreases in sound absorption that now exceed 12% over pre- industrial. Under reasonable projections of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions and other sources a pH change of 0.3 units or more can be anticipated by mid-century, resulting in a decrease in α by almost 40%. Increases in water temperature have a smaller effect but also contribute to decreased sound absorption. Combining a lowering of 0.3 pH units with an increase of 3°C, α will decrease further to almost 45%. Ambient noise levels in the ocean within the auditory range critical for environmental, military, and economic interests are set to increase significantly due to the combined effects of decreased absorption and increasing sources from mankind's activities. Incorporation of sound absorption in modeling future ocean scenarios (R. Zeebe, personal communication) and long-term monitoring possibly with the aid of modern cabled observatories can give insights in how ocean noise will continue to change and its effect on groups such as marine mammals which communicate in the affected frequency range.

  18. Flocculation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with Different Phenotypic Traits by Metal Cations and High pH

    Jianhua Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Concentrating algal cells by flocculation as a prelude to centrifugation could significantly reduce the energy and cost of harvesting the algae. However, how variation in phenotypic traits such as cell surface features, cell size and motility alter the efficiency of metal cation and pH-induced flocculation is not well understood. Our results demonstrate that both wild-type and cell wall-deficient strains of the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii efficiently flocculate (>90% at an elevated pH of the medium (pH 11 upon the addition of divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium (>5 mM. The trivalent ferric cation (at 10 mM proved to be essential for promoting flocculation under weak alkaline conditions (pH ∼8.5, with a maximum efficiency that exceeded 95 and 85% for wild-type CC1690 and the cell wall-deficient sta6 mutant, respectively. Near complete flocculation could be achieved using a combination of 5 mM calcium and a pH >11, while the medium recovered following cell removal could be re-cycled without affecting algal growth rates. Moreover, the absence of starch in the cell had little overall impact on flocculation efficiency. These findings contribute to our understanding of flocculation in different Chlamydomonas strains and have implications with respect to inexpensive methods for harvesting algae with different phenotypic traits. Additional research on the conditions (e.g., pH and metal ions used for efficient flocculation of diverse algal groups with diverse characteristics, at both small and large scale, will help establish inexpensive procedures for harvesting cell biomass.

  19. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    Ronan, Patrick J.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48 h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01–2.36 mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. Tritiated ammonia formation

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Evaluation of the Addition liquor with high ammonia and Carbon Dioxide contentin the still 208 of the “Comandante Che Guevara” industry (ECG

    María Elena Magaña-Haynes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adding fresh liquor through the 5th ring in still 208 of distilling liquor product (liquor obtained as a result of ammonium carbonate leaching of lateritic ore in the “Comandante Che Guevara” industry, were evaluated with the objective of reducing the dissolved nickel content of the effluent there from, as well as to improve the characteristics of the nickel carbonate which is delivered to the calcinations process. For the development of the survey, the same methodology used in 2001 for the test was applied. The results showed that by adding fresh liquor, it is possible to reduce the dissolved nickel content at the exit of the distillation column, so that the need for precipitation is minimized, thereby reducing the consumption of reagents and the and the cost for their acquisition. It was possible to corroborate the relationship between the content of NH3 at the discharge and the nickel dissolved therein appreciating that to achieve these results it is necessary to maintain the ammonia in the discharge between 1,0-1,8 g/L. The carbonate obtained in the column where liquor is added with high CO2 and NH3 reached high values of this last element in its composition and to the extent that increased sulphur content decreased. It was also seen an increase in the size of the coarse carbonates particles, which will influence in a decrease of energy consumption.

  2. HWVP submerged bed scrubber waste treatment by ion exchange at high pH

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Eakin, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is expected to produce aqueous waste streams that will require further processing for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) removal prior to incorporation into grout. Fluor Daniel, Inc. has recommended that zeolite be added to these waste streams for adsorption of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) following pH adjustment by sodium hydroxide (NAOH) addition. Filtration will then used to remove the TRU elements associated with the process solids and the zeolite containing the Cs and Sr

  3. Development of high temperature and pressure zirconia-based pH sensors

    Danielson, M.J.; Koski, O.H.; Myers, J.

    1985-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia pH sensors are suitable for use from 100-300 0 C. A new Pt internal half cell is discussed which results in a considerable simplification in their calibration. A degradation process takes place after prolonged exposure to 300 0 C conditions and is manifested by a loss of full Nerstian response at temperature ≤ 200 0 C. A hypothesis for the degradation process is discussed

  4. HWVP submerged bed scrubber waste treatment by ion exchange at high pH

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Eakin, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is expected to produce aqueous waste streams that will require further processing for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) removal prior to incorporation into grout. Fluor Daniel, Inc. has recommended that zeolite be added to these waste streams for adsorption of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) following pH adjustment by sodium hydroxide (NAOH) addition. Filtration will then used to remove the TRU elements associated with the process solids and the zeolite containing the Cs and Sr.

  5. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO 4 − adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 . • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O 4 − , in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O 4 − , as an analogue for Tc(VII)O 4 − . Batch Re(VII)O 4 − sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 (s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH 4 + (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO 4 − under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  6. Gold cementation with zinc powder from leaching solutions with ammonia-thiosulphate

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Alvarez, R.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2005-01-01

    The cementation of gold with powder of zinc, from solutions with thiosulphate and ammonia, was studied. the variables evaluated were: thiosulphate concentration, ammonia concentration, pH, copper concentration and zinc concentration. the results have revealed the great importance of ammonia/thiosulphate relationship in this process and that the impurities presence like copper and zinc will to inhibit the cementation process. (Author) 16 refs

  7. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the la......The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...

  8. Respiratory ammonia output and blood ammonia concentration during incremental exercise

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Kort, E; van der Mark, TW; Grevink, RG; Verkerke, GJ

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the increase of ammonia concentration and lactate concentration in blood was accompanied by an increased expiration of ammonia during graded exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test. Blood ammonia, blood lactate

  9. Treatment of effluents from ammonia plants--3. Ozonation of amines in an effluent from a reforming plant serving an ammonia complex

    Wilde, F G.N.D.

    1977-01-01

    The use of ozone in aqueous solutions was studied in an investigation of the oxidation of methylamines in the process condensate from an ammonia plant. Good conversion of trimethylamine to the nonodorous oxidation product could be achieved with a 1:1.5 ratio of amine to ozone when ozone passed into a packed tower through which an alkaline solution of the amine was flowing. Mono- and dimethylamine did not react as readily. The importance of a high pH value is stressed.

  10. Kinetics of chlorine--ammonia reactions in seawater. Annual report, June 1, 1977--May 31, 1978

    Johnson, J.D.; Inman, G.W. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    By employing stopped-flow techniques, rate constants were determined for the reactions of hypochlorous acid with bromide and ammonia in solutions at different pH's and salinities. Values for the specific rate constants at 25 0 C are 3.8 x 10 3 and 3.1 x 10 6 liters/mole-s, respectively for the following reactions HOC1 + Br - → HOBr + C1 - and HOC1 + NH 3 → NH 2 C1 + H 2 O. Speciation experiments were done with full strength chlorinated seawater enriched with ammonia. The resultant solutions were analyzed by uv spectroscopy, amperometric titration, and a membrane electrode. At low ammonia nitrogen and high initial chlorine concentrations, hypobromous acid and tribromamine formed. As the ratio of C1 2 to N was decreased, some dibromamine was observed and at ratios less than 1:1, monochloramine formed and eventually predominated. Preliminary experiments were also done to determine a rate constant for the oxidation of bromide by monochloramine. Results showed that even in full strength seawater the reaction was quite slow ;half life approx. 28 hours for [NH 2 C1] 0 2 ). The reaction was found to be pH dependent and yielded an unidentified product with a uv absorbance peak near 220 nm. 22 figures

  11. Intragastric pH and pressure profiles after intake of the high-caloric, high-fat meal as used for food effect studies.

    Koziolek, M; Schneider, F; Grimm, M; Modeβ, Chr; Seekamp, A; Roustom, T; Siegmund, W; Weitschies, W

    2015-12-28

    The intraluminal conditions of the fed stomach are critical for drug release from solid oral dosage forms and thus, often associated with the occurrence of food effects on oral bioavailability. In this study, intragastric pH and pressure profiles present after the ingestion of the high-caloric, high-fat (964 kcal) FDA standard breakfast were investigated in 19 healthy human subjects by using the telemetric SmartPill® capsule system (26 × 13 mm). Since the gastric emptying of such large non-digestible objects is typically accomplished by the migrating motor complex phase III activity, the time required for recurrence of fasted state motility determined the gastric emptying time (GET). Following the diet recommendations of the FDA guidance on food effect studies, the mean GET of the telemetric motility capsule was 15.3 ± 4.7 h. Thus, the high caloric value of the standard breakfast impeded gastric emptying before lunch in 18 out of 19 subjects. During its gastric transit, the capsule was exposed to highly dynamic conditions in terms of pH and pressure, which were mainly dependent on further meal and liquid intake, as well as the intragastric capsule deposition behavior. Maximum pH values in the stomach were measured immediately after capsule intake. The median pH value of the 5 min period after capsule ingestion ranged between pH 3.3 and 5.3. Subsequently, the pH decreased relatively constantly and reached minimum values of pH 0-1 after approximately 4 h. The maximum pressure within the stomach amounted to 293 ± 109 mbar and was clearly higher than the maximum pressure measured at the ileocaecal junction (60 ± 35 mbar). The physiological data on the intraluminal conditions within the fed stomach generated in this study will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of food effects on oral drug product performance.

  12. High environmental ammonia exposure has developmental-stage specific and long-term consequences on the cortisol stress response in zebrafish.

    Williams, Tegan A; Bonham, Luke A; Bernier, Nicholas J

    2017-12-01

    The capacity for early life environmental stressors to induce programming effects on the endocrine stress response in fish is largely unknown. In this study we determined the effects of high environmental ammonia (HEA) exposure on the stress response in larval zebrafish, assessed the tolerance of embryonic and larval stages to HEA, and evaluated whether early life HEA exposure has long-term consequences on the cortisol response to a novel stressor. Exposure to 500-2000μM NH 4 Cl for 16h did not affect the gene expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system components in 1day post-fertilization (dpf) embryos, but differentially increased crfa, crfb and CRF binding protein (crfbp) expression and stimulated both dose- and time-dependent increases in the whole body cortisol of 5dpf larvae. Pre-acclimation to HEA at 1dpf did not affect the cortisol response to a subsequent NH 4 Cl exposure at 5dpf. In contrast, pre-acclimation to HEA at 5dpf caused a small but significant reduction in the cortisol response to a second NH 4 Cl exposure at 10dpf. While continuous exposure to 500-2000μM NH 4 Cl between 0 and 5dpf had a modest effect on mean survival time, exposure to 400-1000μM NH 4 Cl between 10 and 14dpf decreased mean survival time in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, pre-acclimation to HEA at 5dpf significantly decreased the risk of mortality to continuous NH 4 Cl exposure between 10 and 14dpf. Finally, while HEA at 1dpf did not affect the cortisol stress response to a novel vortex stressor at 5dpf, the same HEA treatment at 5dpf abolished vortex stressor-induced increases in whole body cortisol at 10 and 60dpf. Together these results show that the impact of HEA on the cortisol stress response during development is life-stage specific and closely linked to ammonia tolerance. Further, we demonstrate that HEA exposure at the larval stage can have persistent effects on the capacity to respond to stressors in later life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog 14 C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism

  14. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  15. Manure application and ammonia volatilization

    Huijsmans, J.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: manure application, ammonia volatilization, environmental conditions, application technique, incorporation technique, draught force, work organization, costs Livestock manure applied on farmland is an important source of ammonia (NH3) volatilization, and NH3 is a major atmospheric

  16. Pasteurization of fruit juices of different pH values by combined high hydrostatic pressure and carbon dioxide.

    Li, Wang; Pan, Jian; Xie, Huiming; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Dianfei; Zhu, Zhaona

    2012-10-01

    The inactivation of the selected vegetative bacteria Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Lactobacillus plantarum by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in physiological saline (PS) and in four fruit juices with pHs ranging from 3.4 to 6.3, with or without dissolved CO(2), was investigated. The inactivation effect of HHP on the bacteria was greatly enhanced by dissolved CO(2). Effective inactivation (>7 log) was achieved at 250 MPa for E. coli and 350 MPa for L. innocua and L. plantarum in the presence of 0.2 M CO(2) at room temperature for 15 min in PS, with additional inactivation of more than 4 log for all three bacteria species compared with the results with HHP treatment alone. The combined inactivation by HHP and CO(2) in tomato juice of pH 4.2 and carrot juice of pH 6.3 showed minor differences compared with that in PS. By comparison, the combined effect in orange juice of pH 3.8 was considerably promoted, while the HHP inactivation was enhanced only to a limited extent. In another orange juice with a pH of 3.4, all three strains lost their pressure resistance. HHP alone completely inactivated E. coli at relatively mild pressures of 200 MPa and L. innocua and L. plantarum at 300 MPa. Observations of the survival of the bacteria in treated juices also showed that the combined treatment caused more sublethal injury, which increased further inactivation at a relatively mild pH of 4.2 during storage. The results indicated that the combined treatment of HHP with dissolved CO(2) may provide an effective method for the preservation of low- or medium-acid fruit and vegetable juices at relatively low pressures. HHP alone inactivated bacteria effectively in high-acid fruit juice.

  17. Release of ammonia from HAN-type PHA

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design basis for ammonia scrubbers in the DWPF has been issued. This design basis is based on a theoretical model of ammonia evolution from the SRAT, SME and RCT. It is desirable to acquire actual process data on ammonia evolution prior to performing detailed design of scrubbers for DWPF. The evolution of ammonia from the SRAT and SME in the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) was investigated during the HM4 run. In this run, Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA), which was made in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) using the HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process was used, thus resulting in PHA with a high concentration of ammonium ion

  18. Ammonia removal from high salt waste water using natural zeolite; Remocao de amonia de efluentes de alta salinidade utilizando zeolita natural

    Geraldo, Lucia M.L. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Arroyo, Pedro A. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Barros, Maria Angelica S.D.; Pazin, Elenice [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Zola, Andreia S.; Zschornack, Marlon A. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The present work aimed to study ammonium ion exchange using a fixed bed of natural zeolite clinoptilolite. First of all, it was carried out a bi component ion exchange of ammonium (150 mg/L) in the presence of K{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} e Mg{sup 2+}. Thus, clinoptilolite showed a preference for strontium, barium and potassium cations, while there is a higher preference for Nh{sub 4}{sup +} cations instead calcium and magnesium. Secondly, it was studied the multicomponent ion exchange of ammonium (solution containing all cations). It was observed that the presence of competing cations decreases the content of ammonium retained in the bed until breakthrough point. Furthermore, it was also verified that multicomponent exchange in the presence of high salinity solution (60.000 mg/L of Na{sup +}), sodium influences the ion exchange mechanism, decreasing the up take capacity of ammonium for zeolitic bed. On the other hand, ammonium capture increases in the presence of natural effluent that possesses lower salinity (30.000 mg/L). Therefore, the results obtained evidence the application potentiality of clinoptilolite for ammonia up takes from industrial effluents, in what competition conditions by others cations are too severe and for that the zeolite natural presented good performance. (author)

  19. High-Temperature Growth of GaN and Al x Ga1- x N via Ammonia-Based Metalorganic Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    Billingsley, Daniel; Henderson, Walter; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2010-05-01

    The effect of high-temperature growth on the crystalline quality and surface morphology of GaN and Al x Ga1- x N grown by ammonia-based metalorganic molecular-beam epitaxy (NH3-MOMBE) has been investigated as a means of producing atomically smooth films suitable for device structures. The effects of V/III ratio on the growth rate and surface morphology are described herein. The crystalline quality of both GaN and AlGaN was found to mimic that of the GaN templates, with (002) x-ray diffraction (XRD) full-widths at half- maximum (FWHMs) of ~350 arcsec. Nitrogen-rich growth conditions have been found to provide optimal surface morphologies with a root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of ~0.8 nm, yet excessive N-rich environments have been found to reduce the growth rate and result in the formation of faceted surface pitting. AlGaN exhibits a decreased growth rate, as compared with GaN, due to increased N recombination as a result of the increased pyrolysis of NH3 in the presence of Al. AlGaN films grown directly on GaN templates exhibited Pendellösung x-ray fringes, indicating an abrupt interface and a planar AlGaN film. AlGaN films grown for this study resulted in an optimal RMS roughness of ~0.85 nm with visible atomic steps.

  20. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji, E-mail: yarai@illinois.edu

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO{sub 4}{sup −} adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}. • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, as an analogue for Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}. Batch Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −} sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}(s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH{sub 4}{sup +} (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO{sub 4}{sup −} under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  1. Fabrication of highly oriented reduced graphene oxide microbelts array for massive production of sensitive ammonia gas sensors

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Rongfu; Wang, Xiaona; Feng, Wei; Hu, PingAn; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William

    2013-01-01

    Patterning oriented reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into functional structures is significant for its application in electronics and sensors. A large array of highly oriented rGO microbelts are prepared by a soft lithography process. These rGO microbelts have a uniform structure that enables the massive production of graphene electronics using a simple mask shielding process. A high performance NH 3 sensor array which was fabricated from rGO microbelts exhibits a reproducible performance with the relative resistance response (ΔR/R 0 ) reaching 0.35, whilst offering a large concentration range response of 10 ppm ∼38%, showing these sensors to be both highly sensitive and responsive. The impact of working temperature on the response to NH 3 in low and high concentration ranges of NH 3 is also discussed. (paper)

  2. Hydroaminomethylation in supercritical ammonia

    Martin, A.; Kant, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Berlin (Germany); Klein, H.; Jackstell, R.; Beller, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic measurements were carried in the reaction system of hydroaminomethylation of olefins. Mixtures of ammonia, olefins, co-solvents, syngas and products such as nonylamine used as model and water were studied. In dependence on the reaction conditions and the mixtures selected opalescence points in a region from 92-290 bar and 120-172 C were found. (orig.)

  3. Recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membranes: Effect of aeration

    Gas-permeable membranes can recover ammonia from manure, reducing pollution whilst converting ammonia into ammonium salt fertilizer. The process involves manure pH control to increase ammonium (NH4) recovery rate that is normally carried out using an alkali. In this study a new strategy to avoid the...

  4. Impaired drug absorption due to high stomach pH: a review of strategies for mitigation of such effect to enable pharmaceutical product development.

    Mitra, Amitava; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2013-11-04

    Published reports have clearly shown that weakly basic drugs which have low solubility at high pH could have impaired absorption in patients with high gastric pH thus leading to reduced and variable bioavailability. Since such reduction in exposure can lead to significant loss of efficacy, it is imperative to (1) understand the behavior of the compound as a function of stomach pH to inform of any risk of bioavailability loss in clinical studies and (2) develop a robust formulation which can provide adequate exposure in achlorhydric patients. In this review paper, we provide an overview of the factors that can cause high gastric pH in human, discuss clinical and preclinical pharmacokinetic data for weak bases under conditions of normal and high gastric pH, and give examples of formulation strategies to minimize or mitigate the reduced absorption of weakly basic drugs under high gastric pH conditions. It should be noted that the ability to overcome pH sensitivity issues is highly compound dependent and there are no obvious and general solutions to overcome such effect. Further, we discuss, along with several examples, the use of biopharmaceutical tools such as in vitro dissolution, absorption modeling, and gastric pH modified animal models to assess absorption risk of weak bases in high gastric pH and also the use of these tools to enable development of formulations to mitigate such effects.

  5. To measure ammonia and the ammonium-ion in high concentrations with sensitrodes; Messreihen mit Ammoniak- und Ammonium-Sensitroden in ungewoehnlich hohen Konzentrationsbereichen

    Brosche, P. [DBI-EWI GmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Ammonia up to 8 Mol/kg and the ammonium-ion up to 5 Mol/kg were investigated by sensitrodes. Sensitrodes of different manufacturers, the influence of different salts, the temperature (25 and 50 C) and ammonia in mixture with the ammonium-ion were assessed in respect of the result for measuring. The functional correlation between the pH-value and the logarithmus for the ratio of ammonium-ion to ammonia in respect of the equation from Henderson and Hasselbalch was examined. The given concentration for ammonia respectively the ammonium-ion was compared with the calculated concentration of the calibration curve. The investigated sensitrodes may be installed in the manufacturing of ammonium salts in mixture with ammonia as measuring and controlling unit. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ammoniak bis 8 mol/kg und das Ammoniumion bis 5 mol/kg wurden mittels Sensitroden untersucht. Bewertet wurden Sensitroden verschiedener Hersteller, der Einfluss von Salzen, der Temperatur (25 und 50 C) und Ammoniak im Gemisch mit dem Ammoniumion auf das Messergebnis. Der funktionale Zusammenhang zwischen dem pH-Wert und dem Logarithmus des Verhaeltnisses von Ammoniumion und Ammoniak entsprechend der Gleichung von Henderson und Hasselbalch wurde untersucht. Die eingegebenen Konzentrationen an Ammoniak bzw. des Ammoniumions wurden mit den aus den Kalibrierungskurven errechneten Konzentrationen verglichen. Die untersuchten Sensitroden koennen in der Produktion von Ammoniumsalzen im Gemisch mit Ammoniak als Mess- und Steuergeraet eingesetzt werden. (orig.)

  6. Novel chelating agents for iron, manganese, zinc, and copper mixed fertilisation in high pH soil-less cultures.

    López-Rayo, Sandra; Nadal, Paloma; Lucena, Juan J

    2016-03-15

    Studies about simultaneous fertilisation with several micronutrients have increased in recent years, as Fe, Mn and Zn deficiencies may appear in the same culture conditions. In fertigation, the replacement of sulfates by synthetic chelates is essential in areas with high pH irrigation water and substrates. Ethylenediamine-N-(2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid)-N'-(4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (o,p-EDDHA) and ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) are novel chelating agents whose efficacy in simultaneous fertilisation of Zn, Mn and Cu is unknown. This work evaluates the effectiveness of both ligands compared to traditional ligands (EDTA, HEEDTA and DTPA) applied as micronutrient chelate mixtures to soybean and navy bean plants grown in soil-less cultures at high pH by analysing the SPAD and micronutrient nutritional status, including the Composition Nutritional Diagnosis (CND) analysis tool. The application of micronutrients using o,p-EDDHA was more effective in providing Mn and Zn than traditional ligands or sulfates. The application using EDDS increased the Zn nutrition. The results are well correlated with the chemical stability of the formulations. The combined application of Mn and Zn as o,p-EDDHA chelates can represent a more effective source than traditional chelates in micronutrient fertiliser mixtures in soil-less cultures at a high pH. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Forced convection of ammonia. 2. part.: gaseous ammonia - very high wall temperatures (1000 to 3000 K); Convection forcee de l'ammoniac. 2. partie: ammoniac gazeux - cas de tres hautes temperatures de paroi (1000 a 3000{sup 0} K)

    Perroud, P.; Rebiere, J.; Strittmatter, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop of gaseous ammonia in forced convection are experimentally determined. The fluid flows (mass flow rate 0.6 to 2.4 g/s) in a long tungsten tube (d{sub i} = 2.8 mm, d{sub e} = 5.1 mm, L = 700 mm) electrically heated. The temperature of the wall reaches 3000 deg. K and the fluid 2500 deg. K; maximum heat flux 530 w/cm{sup 2}. Ammonia is completely dissociated and the power necessary for dissociation reaches 30 per cent of the total power exchanged. Inlet pressure varies between 6 and 16 bars and the maximum pressure drop in the tube reaches 15 bars. Two regimes of dissociation have been shown: catalytic and homogeneous and the variation of dissociation along the length of the tube is studied. The measured heat transfer coefficients may be about 10 times these calculated by the means of classical formulae. A correlation of experimental results using enthalpy as a driving force for heat transmission is presented. Pressure drops may be calculated by the means of a classical friction factor. (authors) [French] On determine experimentalement les coefficients d'echange thermique et les pertes de charge de l'ammoniac gazeux en convection forcee. Le fluide circule avec un debit en masse compris entre 0.6 et 2.4 g/s (G = 10 a 40 g/cm{sup 2}.s) dans un tube long en tungstene (d{sub i} = 2.8 mm, d{sub e} = 5.1 mm, L = 700 mm), chauffe electriquement. La temperature de paroi atteint 3000 deg. K, celle du fluide 2500 deg. K et le flux de chaleur maximal est de 530 W/cm{sup 2}. L'ammoniac se dissocie completement, la puissance correspondant a la dissociation atteint 30 pour cent de la puissance totale echangee. La pression d'entree varie entre 6 et 16 bars et la chute de pression maximale dans le canal est de 15 bars. On distingue deux regimes de dissociation, catalytique et homogene, et on etudie la variation du taux de dissociation en fonction de la longueur du tube. Les coefficients d'echange thermique mesures

  8. Forced convection of ammonia. 2. part.: gaseous ammonia - very high wall temperatures (1000 to 3000 K); Convection forcee de l'ammoniac. 2. partie: ammoniac gazeux - cas de tres hautes temperatures de paroi (1000 a 3000{sup 0} K)

    Perroud, P; Rebiere, J; Strittmatter, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop of gaseous ammonia in forced convection are experimentally determined. The fluid flows (mass flow rate 0.6 to 2.4 g/s) in a long tungsten tube (d{sub i} = 2.8 mm, d{sub e} = 5.1 mm, L = 700 mm) electrically heated. The temperature of the wall reaches 3000 deg. K and the fluid 2500 deg. K; maximum heat flux 530 w/cm{sup 2}. Ammonia is completely dissociated and the power necessary for dissociation reaches 30 per cent of the total power exchanged. Inlet pressure varies between 6 and 16 bars and the maximum pressure drop in the tube reaches 15 bars. Two regimes of dissociation have been shown: catalytic and homogeneous and the variation of dissociation along the length of the tube is studied. The measured heat transfer coefficients may be about 10 times these calculated by the means of classical formulae. A correlation of experimental results using enthalpy as a driving force for heat transmission is presented. Pressure drops may be calculated by the means of a classical friction factor. (authors) [French] On determine experimentalement les coefficients d'echange thermique et les pertes de charge de l'ammoniac gazeux en convection forcee. Le fluide circule avec un debit en masse compris entre 0.6 et 2.4 g/s (G = 10 a 40 g/cm{sup 2}.s) dans un tube long en tungstene (d{sub i} = 2.8 mm, d{sub e} = 5.1 mm, L = 700 mm), chauffe electriquement. La temperature de paroi atteint 3000 deg. K, celle du fluide 2500 deg. K et le flux de chaleur maximal est de 530 W/cm{sup 2}. L'ammoniac se dissocie completement, la puissance correspondant a la dissociation atteint 30 pour cent de la puissance totale echangee. La pression d'entree varie entre 6 et 16 bars et la chute de pression maximale dans le canal est de 15 bars. On distingue deux regimes de dissociation, catalytique et homogene, et on etudie la variation du taux de dissociation en fonction de la longueur du tube. Les coefficients d'echange thermique mesures peuvent etre environ 10

  9. Improved [13N]ammonia yield from the proton irradiation of water using methane gas

    Krasikova, R.N.; Fedorova, O.S.; Korsakov, M.V.; Landmeier Bennington, B.; Berridge, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Production of N-13 ammonia directly in the cyclotron target has previously been accomplished by use of hydrogen pressurization or by addition of organic compounds, chiefly ethanol. All methods enjoy limited success and then either fail to produce ammonia at high beam dose, or require very high pressures to maintain ammonia production. We report that low-pressure methane gas in the target results in production of radiochemically pure ammonia throughout the feasible range of target irradiation conditions

  10. Marine, freshwater and aerially acclimated mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus) use different strategies for cutaneous ammonia excretion

    Cooper, Christopher A.; Wilson, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins are ammonia gas (NH3) channels known to be involved in ammonia transport in animals. Because of the different osmoregulatory and ionoregulatory challenges faced by teleost fishes in marine and freshwater (FW) environments, we hypothesized that ammonia excretion strategies would differ between environments. Also, we hypothesized that cutaneous NH3 volatilization in air-acclimated fish is facilitated by base secretion. To test these hypotheses, we used the skin of the euryhaline amphibious mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus). The skin excretes ammonia and expresses Rh glycoproteins. Serosal-to-mucosal cutaneous ammonia flux was saturable (0–16 mmol/l ammonia, Km of 6.42 mmol/l). In FW, ammonia excretion increased in response to low mucosal pH but decreased with pharmacological inhibition of Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE) and H+ ATPase. Conversely, in brackish water (BW), lowering the mucosal pH significantly decreased ammonia excretion. Inhibitors of NHE also decreased ammonia excretion in BW fish. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that both the Rh isoform, Rhcg1, and NHE3 proteins colocalized in Na+/K+ ATPase expressing mitochondrion-rich cells in the gills, kidney, and skin. We propose that the mechanisms of cutaneous ammonia excretion in FW K. marmoratus are consistent with the model for branchial ammonia excretion in FW teleost fish. NH4+ excretion appeared to play a stronger role in BW. NH4+ excretion in BW may be facilitated by apical NHE and/or diffuse through paracellular pathways. In aerially acclimated fish, inhibition of NHE and H+ ATPase, but not the Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, significantly affected cutaneous surface pH, suggesting that direct base excretion is not critical for NH3 volatilization. Overall, K. marmoratus use different strategies for excreting ammonia in three different environments, FW, BW, and air, and Rh glycoproteins and NHE are integral to all. PMID:23389109

  11. Direct electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on graphite as a treatment option for stored source-separated urine.

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Fritzsche, Cristina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-02-01

    Electrolysis can be a viable technology for ammonia removal from source-separated urine. Compared to biological nitrogen removal, electrolysis is more robust and is highly amenable to automation, which makes it especially attractive for on-site reactors. In electrolytic wastewater treatment, ammonia is usually removed by indirect oxidation through active chlorine which is produced in-situ at elevated anode potentials. However, the evolution of chlorine can lead to the formation of chlorate, perchlorate, chlorinated organic by-products and chloramines that are toxic. This study focuses on using direct ammonia oxidation on graphite at low anode potentials in order to overcome the formation of toxic by-products. With the aid of cyclic voltammetry, we demonstrated that graphite is active for direct ammonia oxidation without concomitant chlorine formation if the anode potential is between 1.1 and 1.6 V vs. SHE (standard hydrogen electrode). A comparison of potentiostatic bulk electrolysis experiments in synthetic stored urine with and without chloride confirmed that ammonia was removed exclusively by continuous direct oxidation. Direct oxidation required high pH values (pH > 9) because free ammonia was the actual reactant. In real stored urine (pH = 9.0), an ammonia removal rate of 2.9 ± 0.3 gN·m(-2)·d(-1) was achieved and the specific energy demand was 42 Wh·gN(-1) at an anode potential of 1.31 V vs. SHE. The measurements of chlorate and perchlorate as well as selected chlorinated organic by-products confirmed that no chlorinated by-products were formed in real urine. Electrode corrosion through graphite exfoliation was prevented and the surface was not poisoned by intermediate oxidation products. We conclude that direct ammonia oxidation on graphite electrodes is a treatment option for source-separated urine with three major advantages: The formation of chlorinated by-products is prevented, less energy is consumed than in indirect ammonia oxidation and

  12. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode.

  13. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    tested in the study; which is contradicting to the general belief that thermophilic methanogens are more vulnerable to high ammonia loads compared to mesophilic. This unexpected finding underlines the fact that the complete knowledge of ammonia inhibition effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens is still...

  14. Examining Summer Laboratory Research Apprenticeships for High School Students as a Factor in Entry to MD/PhD Programs at Matriculation

    Tai, Robert H.; Kong, Xiaoqing; Mitchell, Claire E.; Dabney, Katherine P.; Read, Daniel M.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2017-01-01

    Do summer laboratory research apprenticeships during high school have an impact on entry into MD/PhD programs? Apart from the nearly decade-long span of time between high school and matriculation into an MD/PhD program, young people have many life-shaping experiences that presumably impact their education and career trajectories. This quantitative…

  15. Effects of end-stage renal disease and dialysis modalities on blood ammonia level.

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nunes, Ane C F; Harley, Kevin T; Said, Hyder; Alipour, Omeed; Lau, Wei Ling; Pahl, Madeleine V

    2017-07-01

    Uremia results in a characteristic breath odor (uremic fetor) which is largely due to its high ammonia content. Earlier studies have shown a strong correlation between breath ammonia and blood urea levels and a 10-fold reduction in breath ammonia after hemodialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease. Potential sources of breath ammonia include: (i) local ammonia production from hydrolysis of urea in the oropharyngeal and respiratory tracts by bacterial flora, and (ii) release of circulating blood ammonia by the lungs. While the effects of uremia and hemodialysis on breath ammonia are well known their effects on blood ammonia are unknown and were explored here. Blood samples were obtained from 23 hemodialysis patients (immediately before and after dialysis), 14 peritoneal dialysis patients, and 10 healthy controls. Blood levels of ammonia, creatinine, urea, and electrolytes were measured. No significant difference was found in baseline blood ammonia between hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and control groups. Hemodialysis procedure led to a significant reduction in urea concentration (P ammonia level in 10 of the 23 patients studied. Change in blood ammonia pre- and post-hemodialysis correlated with change in serum bicarbonate levels (r = 0.61, P ammonia levels after dialysis, there was a strong correlation with drop in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.88, P ammonia compared to the patients who manifested a fall in blood ammonia (124 ± 8 vs. 136 ± 6 mmHg respectively, P = 0.27). Fall in blood urea following hemodialysis in ESRD patients was paradoxically accompanied by a modest rise in blood ammonia levels in 43% of the patients studied, contrasting prior reported effects of hemodialysis on breath ammonia. In this subgroup of patients, changes in blood ammonia during hemodialysis correlated with rise in blood bicarbonate and fall in mean arterial blood pressure. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Highly Stretchable Potentiometric pH Sensor Fabricated via Laser Carbonization and Machining of Carbon-Polyaniline Composite.

    Rahimi, Rahim; Ochoa, Manuel; Tamayol, Ali; Khalili, Shahla; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ziaie, Babak

    2017-03-15

    The development of stretchable sensors has recently attracted considerable attention. These sensors have been used in wearable and robotics applications, such as personalized health-monitoring, motion detection, and human-machine interfaces. Herein, we report on a highly stretchable electrochemical pH sensor for wearable point-of-care applications that consists of a pH-sensitive working electrode and a liquid-junction-free reference electrode, in which the stretchable conductive interconnections are fabricated by laser carbonizing and micromachining of a polyimide sheet bonded to an Ecoflex substrate. This method produces highly porous carbonized 2D serpentine traces that are subsequently permeated with polyaniline (PANI) as the conductive filler, binding material, and pH-sensitive membrane. The experimental and simulation results demonstrate that the stretchable serpentine PANI/C-PI interconnections with an optimal trace width of 0.3 mm can withstand elongations of up to 135% and are robust to more than 12 000 stretch-and-release cycles at 20% strain without noticeable change in the resistance. The pH sensor displays a linear sensitivity of -53 mV/pH (r 2 = 0.976) with stable performance in the physiological range of pH 4-10. The sensor shows excellent stability to applied longitudinal and transverse strains up to 100% in different pH buffer solutions with a minimal deviation of less than ±4 mV. The material biocompatibility is confirmed with NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells via PrestoBlue assays.

  17. pH, Lactate, and Hypoxia: Reciprocity in Regulating High-Affinity Monocarboxylate Transporter Expression in Glioblastoma

    James P. Caruso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly malignant brain tumors harbor the aberrant propensity for aerobic glycolysis, the excessive conversion of glucose to lactic acid even in the presence of ample tissue oxygen. Lactic acid is rapidly effluxed to the tumor microenvironment via a group of plasma-membrane transporters denoted monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs to prevent “self-poisoning.” One isoform, MCT2, has the highest affinity for lactate and thus should have the ability to respond to microenvironment conditions such as hypoxia, lactate, and pH to help maintain high glycolytic flux in the tumor. Yet, MCT2 is considered to not respond to hypoxia, which is counterintuitive. Its response to tumor lactate has not been reported. In this report, we experimentally identify the transcription initiation site/s for MCT2 in astrocytes (normal and glioma (tumor. We then use a BACmid library to isolate a 4.2-kbp MCT2 promoter-exon I region and examine promoter response to glycolysis-mediated stimuli in glioma cells. Reporter analysis of nested-promoter constructs indicated response of MCT2 to hypoxia, pH, lactate, and glucose, the major physiological “players” that facilitate a tumor's growth and proliferation. Immunoblot analysis of native MCT2 expression under altered pH and hypoxia reflected the reporter data. The pH-mediated gene-regulation studies we describe are the first to record H+-based reporter studies for any mammalian system and demonstrate the exquisite response of the MCT2 gene to minute changes in tumor pH. Identical promoter usage also provides the first evidence of astrocytes harnessing the same gene regulatory regions to facilitate astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling, a metabolic feature of normal brain.

  18. High-temperature stability of chemically vapor-deposited tungsten-silicon couples rapid thermal annealed in ammonia and argon

    Broadbent, E.K.; Morgan, A.E.; Flanner, J.M.; Coulman, B.; Sadana, D.K.; Burrow, B.J.; Ellwanger, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid thermal anneal (RTA) in an NH 3 ambient has been found to increase the thermal stability of W films chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Si. W films deposited onto single-crystal Si by low-pressure CVD were rapid thermal annealed at temperatures between 500 and 1100 0 C in NH 3 and Ar ambients. The reactions were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and four-point resistivity probe. High-temperature (≥1000 0 C) RTA in Ar completely converted W into the low resistivity (31 μΩ cm) tetragonal WSi 2 phase. In contrast, after a prior 900 0 C RTA in NH 3 , N inclusion within the W film and at the W/Si interface almost completely suppressed the W-Si reaction. Detailed examination, however, revealed some patches of WSi 2 formed at the interface accompanied by long tunnels extending into the substrate, and some crystalline precipitates in the substrate close to the interface. The associated interfacial contact resistance was only slightly altered by the 900 0 C NH 3 anneal. The NH 3 -treated W film acted as a diffusion barrier in an Al/W/Si contact metallurgy up to at least 550 0 C, at which point some increase in contact resistance was measured

  19. High-temperature stability of chemically vapor-deposited tungsten-silicon couples rapid thermal annealed in ammonia and argon

    Broadbent, E.K.; Morgan, A.E.; Flanner, J.M.; Coulman, B.; Sadana, D.K.; Burrow, B.J.; Ellwanger, R.C.

    1988-12-15

    A rapid thermal anneal (RTA) in an NH/sub 3/ ambient has been found to increase the thermal stability of W films chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Si. W films deposited onto single-crystal Si by low-pressure CVD were rapid thermal annealed at temperatures between 500 and 1100 /sup 0/C in NH/sub 3/ and Ar ambients. The reactions were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and four-point resistivity probe. High-temperature (greater than or equal to1000 /sup 0/C) RTA in Ar completely converted W into the low resistivity (31 ..mu cap omega.. cm) tetragonal WSi/sub 2/ phase. In contrast, after a prior 900 /sup 0/C RTA in NH/sub 3/, N inclusion within the W film and at the W/Si interface almost completely suppressed the W-Si reaction. Detailed examination, however, revealed some patches of WSi/sub 2/ formed at the interface accompanied by long tunnels extending into the substrate, and some crystalline precipitates in the substrate close to the interface. The associated interfacial contact resistance was only slightly altered by the 900 /sup 0/C NH/sub 3/ anneal. The NH/sub 3/-treated W film acted as a diffusion barrier in an Al/W/Si contact metallurgy up to at least 550 /sup 0/C, at which point some increase in contact resistance was measured.

  20. Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Show More Distinct Biogeographic Distribution Patterns than Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria across the Black Soil Zone of Northeast China.

    Liu, Junjie; Yu, Zhenhua; Yao, Qin; Sui, Yueyu; Shi, Yu; Chu, Haiyan; Tang, Caixian; Franks, Ashley E; Jin, Jian; Liu, Xiaobing; Wang, Guanghua

    2018-01-01

    Black soils (Mollisols) of northeast China are highly productive and agriculturally important for food production. Ammonia-oxidizing microbes play an important role in N cycling in the black soils. However, the information related to the composition and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microbes in the black soils has not yet been addressed. In this study, we used the amoA gene to quantify the abundance and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) across the black soil zone. The amoA abundance of AOA was remarkably larger than that of AOB, with ratios of AOA/AOB in the range from 3.1 to 91.0 across all soil samples. The abundance of AOA amoA was positively correlated with total soil C content ( p 0.05). In contrast, the abundance of AOB amoA positively correlated with soil pH ( p = 0.009) but not with total soil C. Alpha diversity of AOA did not correlate with any soil parameter, however, alpha diversity of AOB was affected by multiple soil factors, such as soil pH, total P, N, and C, available K content, and soil water content. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the AOA community was mainly affected by the sampling latitude, followed by soil pH, total P and C; while the AOB community was mainly determined by soil pH, as well as total P, C and N, water content, and sampling latitude, which highlighted that the AOA community was more geographically distributed in the black soil zone of northeast China than AOB community. In addition, the pairwise analyses showed that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) was not correlated with alpha diversity but weakly positively with the abundance of the AOA community ( p = 0.048), whereas PNR significantly correlated positively with the richness ( p = 0.003), diversity ( p = 0.001) and abundance ( p < 0.001) of the AOB community, which suggested that AOB community might make a greater contribution to nitrification than AOA community in the black soils when

  1. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  2. Project Opalinus Clay: Sorption Data Bases For Opalinus Clay Influenced By A High pH Plume

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of groundwater with the large quantities of cement/concrete used in the construction and backfilling of emplacement tunnels containing long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste may give rise to the release of a pulse of hyper alkaline fluid (pH plume) into the surrounding rock. Since the pH of this plume could remain in excess of 12.5 for tens of thousands of years, many minerals in a sedimentary host rock would be unstable leading to dissolution reactions, secondary mineral precipitation and changes in groundwater chemistry. An Opalinus day formation in the Zuercher Weinland, is under consideration by Nagra as a potential host rock for a repository of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of spent fuel and long-lived intermediate-Ievel radioactive waste (ILW). The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of the interactions between a pH plume and Opalinus day on the sorption properties of the formation and to provide appropriate sorption data bases. (author)

  3. Ammonia in Jupiter's troposphere: a comparison of ground-based 5-μm high-resolution spectroscopy and Juno MWR observations

    Giles, R.; Orton, G.; Fletcher, L. N.; Irwin, P. G.; Sinclair, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Latitudinally-resolved 5-micron observations of Jupiter from the CRIRES instrument at the Very Large Telescope are used to measure the spatial variability in Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia (NH3) abundance and these results are compared to the results from Juno's Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The 5-micron spectral region is an atmospheric window, allowing us to probe down to Jupiter's middle troposphere. The high-resolution 2012 CRIRES observations include several spectrally-resolved NH3 absorption features; these features probe slightly different pressure levels, allowing the NH3 vertical profile at 1-4 bar to be constrained. We find that in regions of low cloud opacity, the NH3 abundance must decrease with altitude within this pressure range. The CRIRES observations do not provide evidence for any significant belt-zone variability in NH3, as any difference in the spectral shape can be accounted for by the large differences in cloud opacity between the cloudy zones and the cloud-free belts. However, we do find evidence for a strong localised enhancement in NH3 on the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt (4-6°N). These results can be directly compared with observations from the Juno mission's MWR experiment. Li et al. (2017, doi 10.1002/2017GL073159) have used MWR data to retrieve NH3 abundances at pressure levels of 1-100 bar. In bright, cloud-free regions of the planet, the two datasets are broadly consistent, including the asymmetrical enhancement on the southern edge of the NEB. However, in the cool, cloudy Equatorial Zone, the MWR retrieved abundances are significantly higher than those from CRIRES and forward modeling shows that the MWR vertical distributions are unable to fit the CRIRES data. We will investigate possible explanations for this discrepancy, including the role of tropospheric clouds and temperature variations.

  4. Towards the interaction between calcium carbide and water during gas-chromatographic determination of trace moisture in ultra-high purity ammonia.

    Trubyanov, Maxim M; Mochalov, Georgy M; Suvorov, Sergey S; Puzanov, Egor S; Petukhov, Anton N; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V; Vorotyntsev, Vladimir M

    2018-05-16

    The current study focuses on the processes involved during the flow conversion of water into acetylene in a calcium carbide reaction cell for the trace moisture analysis of ammonia by reaction gas chromatography. The factors negatively affecting the reproducibility and the accuracy of the measurements are suggested and discussed. The intramolecular reaction of the HOCaCCH intermediate was found to be a side reaction producing background acetylene during the contact of wet ammonia gas with calcium carbide. The presence of the HOCaCCH intermediate among the reaction products is confirmed by an FTIR spectral study of calcium carbide powder exposed to wet gas. The side reaction kinetics is evaluated experimentally and its influence on the results of the gas chromatographic measurements is discussed in relation to the determination of the optimal operating parameters for ammonia analysis. The reaction gas chromatography method for the trace moisture measurements in an ammonia matrix was experimentally compared to an FTIR long-path length gas cell technique to evaluate the accuracy limitations and the resource intensity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An inventory of the emission of ammonia from agricultural fertilizer application in China for 2010 and its high-resolution spatial distribution

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Yisheng; Gong, Weiwei; Hou, Xikang; Kroeze, Carolien; Gao, Wei; Luan, Shengji

    2015-01-01

    In an agricultural county like China, agricultural fertilizers are the source of ammonia (NH3) emissions. However, the spatial variability in NH3 emissions is large, and the associated uncertainties affect the reliability of total NH3 emission estimates. In this

  6. Methods of ammonia removal in anaerobic digestion: a review.

    Krakat, Niclas; Demirel, Burak; Anjum, Reshma; Dietz, Donna

    2017-10-01

    The anaerobic digestion of substrates with high ammonia content has always been a bottleneck in the methanisation process of biomasses. Since microbial communities in anaerobic digesters are sensitive to free ammonia at certain conditions, the digestion of nitrogen-rich substrates such as livestock wastes may result in inhibition/toxicity eventually leading to process failures, unless appropriate engineering precautions are taken. There are many different options reported in literature to remove ammonia from anaerobic digesters to achieve a safe and stable process so that along with high methane yields, a good quality of effluents can also be obtained. Conventional techniques to remove ammonia include physical/chemical methods, immobilization and adaptation of microorganisms, while novel methods include ultrasonication, microwave, hollow fiber membranes and microbial fuel cell applications. This paper discusses conventional and novel methods of ammonia removal from anaerobic digesters using nitrogen-rich substrates, with particular focus on recent literature available about this topic.

  7. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... emitted to the air. To identify the key regulators of these transformations we have combined data from studies of microbiology and performance in 10 experimental and full scale filters of varying design, loading, and management. Inhibition by nitrite controlled ammonium oxidation and pH, while biological...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency....

  8. Method for the Determination of Ammonia in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Using Ion Chromatography.

    Christina Vaughan Watson

    Full Text Available Ammonia in mainstream smoke is present in both the particulate and vapor phases. The presence of ammonia in the cigarette filler material and smoke is of significance because of the potential role ammonia could have in raising the "smoke pH." An increased smoke pH could shift a fraction of total nicotine to free-base nicotine, which is reportedly more rapidly absorbed by the smoker. Methods measuring ammonia in smoke typically employ acid filled impingers to trap the smoke. We developed a fast, reliable method to measure ammonia in mainstream smoke without the use of costly and time consuming impingers to examine differences in ammonia delivery. The method uses both a Cambridge filter pad and a Tedlar bag to capture particulate and vapor phases of the smoke. We quantified ammonia levels in the mainstream smoke of 50 cigarette brands from 5 manufacturers. Ammonia levels ranged from approximately 1μg to 23μg per cigarette for ISO smoking conditions and 38μg to 67μg per cigarette for Canadian intense smoking conditions and statistically significance differences were observed between brands and manufacturers. Our findings suggest that ammonia levels vary by brand and are higher under Canadian intense smoking conditions.

  9. Ammonia excretion in Caenorhabditis elegans: mechanism and evidence of ammonia transport of the Rhesus protein CeRhr-1

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; Marini, Anna-Maria; Treberg, Jason R.; Brassinga, Ann-Karen C.; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a bacteriovorous animal, excreting the vast majority of its nitrogenous waste as ammonia (25.3±1.2 µmol gFW−1 day−1) and very little urea (0.21±0.004 µmol gFW−1 day−1). Although these roundworms have been used for decades as genetic model systems, very little is known about their strategy to eliminate the toxic waste product ammonia from their bodies into the environment. The current study provides evidence that ammonia is at least partially excreted via the hypodermis. Starvation reduced the ammonia excretion rates by more than half, whereas mRNA expression levels of the Rhesus protein CeRhr-2, V-type H+-ATPase (subunit A) and Na+/K+-ATPase (α-subunit) decreased correspondingly. Moreover, ammonia excretion rates were enhanced in media buffered to pH 5 and decreased at pH 9.5. Inhibitor experiments, combined with enzyme activity measurements and mRNA expression analyses, further suggested that the excretion mechanism involves the participation of the V-type H+-ATPase, carbonic anhydrase, Na+/K+-ATPase, and a functional microtubule network. These findings indicate that ammonia is excreted, not only by apical ammonia trapping, but also via vesicular transport and exocytosis. Exposure to 1 mmol l−1 NH4Cl caused a 10-fold increase in body ammonia and a tripling of ammonia excretion rates. Gene expression levels of CeRhr-1 and CeRhr-2, V-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase also increased significantly in response to 1 mmol l−1 NH4Cl. Importantly, a functional expression analysis showed, for the first time, ammonia transport capabilities for CeRhr-1 in a phylogenetically ancient invertebrate system, identifying these proteins as potential functional precursors to the vertebrate ammonia-transporting Rh-glycoproteins. PMID:25740900

  10. Acidosis-induced downregulation of hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 and ureagenesis from ammonia.

    Molinas, Sara M; Soria, Leandro R; Marrone, Julieta; Danielli, Mauro; Trumper, Laura; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2015-08-01

    It has been proposed that, during metabolic acidosis, the liver downregulates mitochondrial ammonia detoxification via ureagenesis, a bicarbonate-consuming process. Since we previously demonstrated that hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 channels (mtAQP8) facilitate the uptake of ammonia and its metabolism into urea, we studied whether mtAQP8 is involved in the liver adaptive response to acidosis. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were adapted to acidosis by exposing them to culture medium at pH 7.0 for 40 h. Control cells were exposed to pH 7.4. Hepatocytes exposed to acid medium showed a decrease in mtAQP8 protein expression (-30%, p ammonia was assessed by incubating the cells with (15)N-labeled ammonia and measuring (15)N-labeled urea synthesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. Reduced ureagenesis was found in acidified hepatocytes (-31%, p ammonia in response to acidosis.

  11. Purification of ammonia-containing trap waters from atomic power plant by ozone treatment

    Grachok, M.A.; Prokudina, S.A.; Shulyat'ev, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of research was to study the process of ozonation of ammonia-containing trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant both on the model solutions and on real ones. Different factors (pH of the medium, temperature, concentration of the initial substances) have been studied for their effect on ozonation of aqueous ammonia solutions, model solutions of trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant as well as ammonia-containing trap waters and liquid radioactive wastes delivered to special water treatment at the Kursk Atomic Power Plant. It is shown that in all the cases the highest rate of ammonia oxidation by ozone is observed in the alkaline medium (pH 1.4-11.0) and at 55 deg C. The obtained results have shown that a method of ozonation followed by evaporation of water to be purified can be used to treat ammonia-containing waters from atomic power plant

  12. Effect of ammonia on the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose and tributyrin

    Vasconcelos Fernandes, T.; Keesman, K.J.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia nitrogen is one of the most common inhibitors in the anaerobic digestion of complex wastes containing high concentrations of ammonia like animal manures, blackwater and waste oil from gastronomy. The inhibiting effect of ammonia on methanogenesis has been well established. In contrast, the

  13. The Full-Scale Implementation of an Innovative Biological Ammonia Treatment Process

    Across the United States, high levels of ammonia in drinking water sources can be found, including small communities like Palo, Iowa (approximate population of 1,026). Although ammonia in water does not pose a direct health concern, ammonia nitrification can cause a number of iss...

  14. 1 Ammonia Concentrations in Different Aquaculture 2

    Administrator

    Introduction. Most studies have shown that the best feed for optimal fish production in aquaculture is one rich in high amount of protein. The amount of protein in the ..... Aquatic Science, Florida Coop, Ext. Serv. FA-16, 4 pp. Hargreaves J. A. and Tucker C. S. (2004). Managing. Ammonia in Fish Ponds. SRAC Publication Fact.

  15. Ammonia nitrogen removal from aqueous solution by local agricultural wastes

    Azreen, I.; Lija, Y.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Excess ammonia nitrogen in the waterways causes serious distortion to environment such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic organisms. Ammonia nitrogen removal from synthetic solution was investigated by using 40 local agricultural wastes as potential low cost adsorbent. Some of the adsorbent were able to remove ammonia nitrogen with adsorption capacity ranging from 0.58 mg/g to 3.58 mg/g. The highest adsorption capacity was recorded by Langsat peels with 3.58 mg/g followed by Jackfruit seeds and Moringa peels with 3.37 mg/g and 2.64 mg/g respectively. This experimental results show that the agricultural wastes can be utilized as biosorbent for ammonia nitrogen removal. The effect of initial ammonia nitrogen concentration, pH and stirring rate on the adsorption process were studied in batch experiment. The adsorption capacity reached maximum value at pH 7 with initial concentration of 500 mg/L and the removal rate decreased as stirring rate was applied.

  16. Study of the process for accelerating ammonia generation from poultry residues aiming its hydrogen production; Estudo do processo para a aceleracao da geracao de amonia a partir de residuos avicolas visando a producao de hidrogenio

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos

    2010-07-01

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF), elementary analysis (CHN), thermogravimetry and GC/MS - gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  17. Study of the acceleration of ammonia generation process from poultry residues aiming at hydrogen production; Estudo do processo para a aceleracao da geracao de amonia a partir de residuos avicolas visando a producao de hidrogenio

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos

    2010-07-01

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), Elementary Analysis (CHN), Thermogravimetry and GC/MS - Gas chromatography/ Mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  18. Carbon-dependent alleviation of ammonia toxicity for algae cultivation and associated mechanisms exploration.

    Lu, Qian; Chen, Paul; Addy, Min; Zhang, Renchuan; Deng, Xiangyuan; Ma, Yiwei; Cheng, Yanling; Hussain, Fida; Chen, Chi; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2018-02-01

    Ammonia toxicity in wastewater is one of the factors that limit the application of algae technology in wastewater treatment. This work explored the correlation between carbon sources and ammonia assimilation and applied a glucose-assisted nitrogen starvation method to alleviate ammonia toxicity. In this study, ammonia toxicity to Chlorella sp. was observed when NH 3 -N concentration reached 28.03mM in artificial wastewater. Addition of alpha-ketoglutarate in wastewater promoted ammonia assimilation, but low utilization efficiency and high cost of alpha-ketoglutarate limits its application in wastewater treatment. Comparison of three common carbon sources, glucose, citric acid, and sodium bicarbonate, indicates that in terms of ammonia assimilation, glucose is the best carbon source. Experimental results suggest that organic carbon with good ability of generating energy and hydride donor may be critical to ammonia assimilation. Nitrogen starvation treatment assisted by glucose increased ammonia removal efficiencies and algal viabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the potential for significant ammonia releases from Hanford waste tanks

    Palmer, B.J.; Anderson, C.M.; Chen, G.; Cuta, J.M.; Ferryman, T.A.; Terrones, G.

    1996-07-01

    Ammonia is ubiquitous as a component of the waste stored in the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). Because ammonia is both flammable and toxic, concerns have been raised about the amount of ammonia stored in the tanks and the possible mechanisms by which it could be released from the waste into the head space inside the tanks as well as into the surrounding atmosphere. Ammonia is a safety issue for three reasons. As already mentioned, ammonia is a flammable gas and may contribute to a flammability hazard either directly, if it reaches a high enough concentration in the tank head space, or by contributing to the flammability of other flammable gases such as hydrogen (LANL 1994). Ammonia is also toxic and at relatively low concentrations presents a hazard to human health. The level at which ammonia is considered Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) is 300 ppm (WHC 1993, 1995). Ammonia concentrations at or above this level have been measured inside the head space in a number of SSTs. Finally, unlike hydrogen and nitrous oxide, ammonia is highly soluble in aqueous solutions, and large amounts of ammonia can be stored in the waste as dissolved gas. Because of its high solubility, ammonia behaves in a qualitatively different manner from hydrogen or other insoluble gases. A broader range of scenarios must be considered in modeling ammonia storage and release

  20. Ammonia Generation via a Graphene-Coated Nickel Catalyst

    Fei Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel graphene-coated Ni electrode was developed in this investigation to improve corrosion resistance while unexpectedly enhancing the ammonia generation rate in the electrochemically induced urea to ammonia (eU2A process, which is an electrochemical onsite ammonia generation method. The development of the electrode is crucial for the eU2A reactions since in the ammonia generation process, the concentration of ammonia is inevitably high on the surface of the electrode, leading to severe corrosion of the electrode and the loss of generated ammonia as well. In this paper, the graphene was derived from raw coal by using the chemical vapor deposition method and self-lifted onto a Ni electrode to form a protective layer for corrosion prevention. Transmission electron microscopy showed the synthesized graphene had few-layers and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the coating of graphene was stable during the eU2A reaction. As a result, the ammonia corrosion of the Ni electrode was dramatically reduced by ~20 times with the graphene coating method. More importantly, a higher ammonia generation rate (~2 times was achieved using the graphene-coated Ni working electrode compared to a bare Ni electrode in the eU2A process.

  1. Offline High pH Reversed-Phase Peptide Fractionation for Deep Phosphoproteome Coverage

    Batth, Tanveer S; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation, a process in which kinases modify serines, threonines, and tyrosines with phosphoryl groups is of major importance in eukaryotic biology. Protein phosphorylation events are key initiators of signaling responses which determine cellular outcomes after environmental...... and metabolic stimuli, and are thus highly regulated. Therefore, studying the mechanism of regulation by phosphorylation, and pinpointing the exact site of phosphorylation on proteins is of high importance. This protocol describes in detail a phosphoproteomics workflow for ultra-deep coverage by fractionating...

  2. Effect of competing ions and causticization on the ammonia adsorption by a novel poly ligand exchanger (PLE) ammonia adsorption reagent.

    Chen, Quanzhou; Zhou, Kanggen; Hu, Yuanjuan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Aihe

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a poly ligand exchanger, Cu(II)-loaded chelating resin named ammonia adsorption reagent (AMAR), bearing the functional group of weak iminodiacetate acid, was prepared to efficiently remove ammonia from solutions. Batch adsorption equilibrium experiments were conducted under a range of conditions. The effects of pH on the removal of ammonia by AMAR were investigated at 25 °C. The copper loaded on the resin forms a complex with NH 3 in solution under alkaline condition. The effect of alkaline dosage (AD) on the ammonia adsorption was investigated. The maximum breakthrough bed volumes were obtained when the AD was set as 0.75 mmol OH - /mL. The higher AD did not guarantee the better ammonia removal efficiency due to the forming of Cu(OH) 2 precipitate between OH - in solutions and Cu(II) on the resin. The effect of competing ions on the adsorption breakthrough curve of virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the existence of competing ions had a negative impact on the adsorption capacity for both virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR. After causticization, the AMAR was more resistant to the competing ions comparing with virgin AMAR. The bivalent Ca 2+ affects the ammonia adsorption more than does the monovalent Na + .

  3. Hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation for Ph{sup 1}-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kikuchi, Akira; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science] [and others

    1998-12-01

    In two cases of Philadelphia-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph{sup 1} ALL), we performed allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (AlloBMT) with preconditioning regimen, including hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) (13.5 Gy, in 9 fractions). Their disease statuses at BMT were hematological relapse in case 1 and molecular relapse in case 2. Bone marrow donors were unrelated in case 1, and HLA was a partially mismatched mother in case 2. Regimen-related toxicity was tolerable in both cases. Hematological recovery was rapid, and engraftment was obtained on day 14 in case 1 and on day 12 in case 2. BCR/ABL message in bone marrow disappeared on day 89 in case 1 and on day 19 in case 2 and throughout their subsequent clinical courses. Although short-term MTX and Cy-A continuous infusion were used for GVHD prophylaxis, grade IV GVHD was observed in case 1 and grade III in case 2. Both cases experienced hemorrhagic cystitis because of adenovirus type 11 infection. Although case 1 died of interstitial pneumonitis on day 442, case 2 has been free of disease through day 231. AlloBMT for Ph{sup 1} ALL with preconditioning regimen including hyperfractionated high-dose TBI is considered to be worth further investigation. (author)

  4. Ammonia-free chemical bath method for deposition of microcrystalline cadmium selenide films

    Lokhande, C.D.; Lee, Eun-Ho; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2005-01-01

    Chemical deposition of cadmium selenide (CdSe) films has been carried out from alkaline aqueous solution containing Cd 2+ and Se 2- ions. In general, the alkaline pH of the CdSe deposition bath has been adjusted by addition of liquid ammonia. However, the use of ammonia in large-scale chemical deposition method represents an environmental problem due to its volatility and toxicity. The volatility of ammonia changes the pH of deposition bath and results into irreproducible film properties. In the present paper, ammonia-free and weak alkaline (pH < 9.0) chemical method for cadmium selenide film has been developed. The cadmium selenide films are microcrystalline (grain size 0.5-0.7 μm) with hexagonal crystal structure. These films are photoactive and therefore, useful in photo conversion of light into electrical power

  5. PH sensor

    Artero, C.; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a marine instrument for the measurement of pH in seawater. The measurement system consists of a pH electrode connected to the underwater observatory OBSEA. The extracted data are useful for scientists researching ocean acidification. Peer Reviewed

  6. Dental plaque pH variation with regular soft drink, diet soft drink and high energy drink: an in vivo study.

    Jawale, Bhushan Arun; Bendgude, Vikas; Mahuli, Amit V; Dave, Bhavana; Kulkarni, Harshal; Mittal, Simpy

    2012-03-01

    A high incidence of dental caries and dental erosion associated with frequent consumption of soft drinks has been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pH response of dental plaque to a regular, diet and high energy drink. Twenty subjects were recruited for this study. All subjects were between the ages of 20 and 25 and had at least four restored tooth surfaces present. The subjects were asked to refrain from brushing for 48 hours prior to the study. At baseline, plaque pH was measured from four separate locations using harvesting method. Subjects were asked to swish with 15 ml of the respective soft drink for 1 minute. Plaque pH was measured at the four designated tooth sites at 5, 10 and 20 minutes intervals. Subjects then repeated the experiment using the other two soft drinks. pH was minimum for regular soft drink (2.65 ± 0.026) followed by high energy drink (3.39 ± 0.026) and diet soft drink (3.78 ± 0.006). The maximum drop in plaque pH was seen with regular soft drink followed by high energy drink and diet soft drink. Regular soft drink possesses a greater acid challenge potential on enamel than diet and high energy soft drinks. However, in this clinical trial, the pH associated with either soft drink did not reach the critical pH which is expected for enamel demineralization and dissolution.

  7. A new simple and cheap, high-resolution planar optode imaging system: Application to oxgen and pH sensing

    Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Gunwald, Björn

    2011-01-01

    A simple, high resolution colormetric planar optode imaging approach is presented. The approach is simple and inexpensive yet versatile, and can be used to study the two-dimensional distribution and dynamics of a range of analytes. The imaging approach utilizes the inbuilt color filter of standard...... commercial digital single lens reflex cameras to simultaneously record different colors (red, green, and blue) of luminophore emission light using only one excitation light source. Using the ratio between the intensity of the different colors recorded in a single image analyte concentrations can...... be calculated. The robustness of the approach is documented by obtaining high resolution data of O2 and pH distributions in marine sediments using easy synthesizable sensors. The sensors rely on the platinum(II)octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) and lipophilic 8-Hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium (HPTS...

  8. A simple and inexpensive high resolution color ratiometric planar optode imaging approach: application to oxygen and pH sensing

    Larsen, M.; Borisov, S. M.; Grunwald, B.

    2011-01-01

    A simple, high resolution colormetric planar optode imaging approach is presented. The approach is simple and inexpensive yet versatile, and can be used to study the two-dimensional distribution and dynamics of a range of analytes. The imaging approach utilizes the inbuilt color filter of standard...... commercial digital single lens reflex cameras to simultaneously record different colors (red, green, and blue) of luminophore emission light using only one excitation light source. Using the ratio between the intensity of the different colors recorded in a single image analyte concentrations can...... be calculated. The robustness of the approach is documented by obtaining high resolution data of O-2 and pH distributions in marine sediments using easy synthesizable sensors. The sensors rely on the platinum(II) octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) and lipophilic 8-Hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium (HPTS...

  9. Ammonia Liberation from PRL at Alkaline pH

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The k value was calculated as 4.07 x 10-5 sec-1. The k value was calculated as 4.07 x 10-5 sec-1. One mole prolactin can libebrate 1.29 nmol of NH3 within 36hr of incubation at 37oC.

  10. New highly fluorescent pH indicator for ratiometric RGB imaging of pCO2

    Schutting, Susanne; Klimant, Ingo; Borisov, Sergey M; De Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    A new diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole (DPP) indicator dye for optical sensing of carbon dioxide is prepared via a simple one step synthesis from commercially available low cost ‘Pigment Orange 73’. The pigment is modified via alkylation of one of the lactam nitrogens with a tert-butylbenzyl group. The indicator dye is highly soluble in organic solvents and in polymers and shows pH-dependent absorption (λ max 501 and 572 nm for the protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively) and emission spectra (λ max 524 and 605 nm for the protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively). Both the protonated and the deprotonated forms show high fluorescence quantum yields (Φ prot 0.86; Φ deprot 0.66). Hence, colorimetric read-out and ratiometric fluorescence intensity measurements are possible. The emission of the two forms of the indicator excellently matches the response of the green and the red channels of an RGB camera. This enables imaging of carbon dioxide distribution with a simple and low cost optical set-up. The sensor based on the new DPP dye shows very high sensitivity and is particularly promising for monitoring atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. (paper)

  11. Removal of fluoride, SDS, ammonia and turbidity from semiconductor wastewater by combined electrocoagulation-electroflotation.

    Aoudj, S; Khelifa, A; Drouiche, N

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor industry effluents contain organic and inorganic pollutants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), fluoride and ammonia, at high levels which consists a major environmental issue. A combined EC-EF process is proposed as a post-treatment after precipitation for simultaneous clarification and removal of pollutants. In EC step, a hybrid Fe-Al was used as the soluble anode in order to avoid supplementary EC step. EC-Fe is more suitable for SDS removal; EC-Al is more suitable for fluoride removal, while EC with hybrid Al-Fe makes a good compromise. Clarification and ammonia oxidation were achieved in the EF step. Effects of anodic material, initial pH, current, anion nature, chloride concentration and initial pollutant concentration were studied. The final concentrations may reach 0.27, 6.23 and 0.22 mg L -1 for SDS, fluoride and ammonia respectively. These concentrations are far lower than the correspondent discharge limits. Similarly, the final turbidity was found 4.35 NTU which is lower than 5NTU and the treated water does not need further filtration before discharge. Furthermore, the EC-EF process proves to be sufficiently energy-efficient with less soluble electrode consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental measurements of the solubilities of selected long-lived fission products, activation products and actinide daughters under high pH conditions

    Pilkington, N.J.; Shadbolt, P.J.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    Solubility measurements of several elements have been attempted under high pH and oxic conditions in a range of concrete leachates. The elements investigated were niobium, tin, selenium, lead and thorium. (author)

  13. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4+ with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na+-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression. PMID:27009341

  14. (Bio)electrochemical ammonia recovery

    Kuntke, P.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Rodríguez Arredondo, M.; Georg, S.; Barbosa, S.G.; Heijne, Ter A.; Hamelers, Hubertus V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, (bio)electrochemical systems (B)ES have emerged as an energy efficient alternative for the recovery of TAN (total ammonia nitrogen, including ammonia and ammonium) from wastewater. In these systems, TAN is removed or concentrated from the wastewater under the influence of an

  15. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-05-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS applications.

  16. Immobilization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by polyvinyl alcohol and sodium alginate.

    Dong, Yuwei; Zhang, Yanqiu; Tu, Baojun

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were immobilized by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate. The immobilization conditions and ammonia oxidation ability of the immobilized bacteria were investigated. The following immobilization conditions were observed to be optimal: PVA, 12%; sodium alginate, 1.1%; calcium chloride, 1.0%; inoculum concentration, 1.3 immobilized balls/mL of immobilized medium; pH, 10; and temperature, 30°C. The immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria exhibited strong ammonia oxidation ability even after being recycled four times. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria reached 90.30% under the optimal immobilization conditions. When compared with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria immobilized by sodium alginate alone, the bacteria immobilized by PVA and sodium alginate were superior with respect to pH resistance, the number of reuses, material cost, heat resistance, and ammonia oxidation ability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil by applying an ammonia continuous circulation system

    Zhu, Shufa; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Shuangyan [Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China)

    2016-02-15

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of ammonia continuous circulation enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine contaminated soil and to analyze its influence on soil pH after remediation. An experimental study was carried out in self-made electrokinetic apparatus. The voltage gradient was set at 1.0V/cm and ammonia water with different concentrations was used as electrolyte which circulated in series. Comparative studies were made by using deionized water as electrolyte which circulated separately in one experiment and continuously in another. According to the experiment the continuous circulation of ammonia water increased the current value during the remediation process and maintained current through the soil cell stabler, which not only increased fluorine migration but also reduced energy consumption. Among the given ammonia concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2mol/L) the removal rate increased with ammonia concentration. 0.2mol/L had the highest current (26.8mA), and the removal rate amounted up to 57.3%. By using ammonia circulation enhanced electrokinetic technology, the difference between pH values of cathode soil and anode soil became smaller. Ammonia continuous circulation enhanced electrokinetics can effectively remediate fluorine contaminated soil and the residual ammonia in the soil can also improve soil fertility.

  18. Moderating effect of ammonia on particle growth and stability of quasi-monodisperse silver nanoparticles synthesized by the Turkevich method.

    Gorup, Luiz F; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R; Camargo, Emerson R

    2011-08-15

    A new method to stabilize silver nanoparticles by the addition of ammonia is proposed. Colloidal dispersions of silver nanoparticles were synthesized by the Turkevich method using sodium citrate to reduce silver nitrate at high pH and at 90 °C. After approximately 12 min, a diluted ammonia solution was added to the reaction flask to form soluble diamine silver (I) complexes that played an important growth moderating role, making it possible to stabilize metallic silver nanoparticles with sizes as small as 1.6 nm after 17 min of reaction. Colloidal dispersions were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electronic microscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing the Performance of Gas-Permeable Membranes as an Ammonia Recovery Strategy from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Manure.

    Fillingham, Melanie; VanderZaag, Andrew; Singh, Jessica; Burtt, Stephen; Crolla, Anna; Kinsley, Chris; MacDonald, J Douglas

    2017-10-07

    Capturing ammonia from anaerobically digested manure could simultaneously decrease the adverse effects of ammonia inhibition on biogas production, reduce reactive nitrogen (N) loss to the environment, and produce mineral N fertilizer as a by-product. In this study, gas permeable membranes (GPM) were used to capture ammonia from dairy manure and digestate by the diffusion of gaseous ammonia across the membrane where ammonia is captured by diluted acid, forming an aqueous ammonium salt. A lab-scale prototype using tubular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) GPM was used to (1) characterize the effect of total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration, temperature, and pH on the ammonia capture rate using GPM, and (2) to evaluate the performance of a GPM system in conditions similar to a mesophilic anaerobic digester. The GPM captured ammonia at a rate between 2.2 to 6.3% of gaseous ammonia in the donor solution per day. Capture rate was faster in anaerobic digestate than raw manure. The ammonia capture rate could be predicted using non-linear regression based on the factors of total ammonium nitrogen concentration, temperature, and pH. This use of membranes shows promise in reducing the deleterious impacts of ammonia on both the efficiency of biogas production and the release of reactive N to the environment.

  20. A STUDY OF THE PRESSURE SOLUTION AND DEFORMATION OF QUARTZ CRYSTALS AT HIGH pH AND UNDER HIGH STRESS

    JUNG-HAE CHOI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is generally used as a buffer material in high-level radioactive waste disposal facilities and consists of 50% quartz by weight. Quartz strongly affects the behavior of bentonite over very long periods. For this reason, quartz dissolution experiment was performed under high-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions based on the conditions found in a high-level radioactive waste disposal facility located deep underground. In this study, two quartz dissolution experiments were conducted on 1 quartz beads under low-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions and 2 a single quartz crystal under high-pressure and high-alkalinity conditions. Following the experiments, a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM was used to observe the surfaces of experimental samples. Numerical analyses using the finite element method (FEM were also performed to quantify the deformation of contact area. Quartz dissolution was observed in both experiments. This deformation was due to a concentrated compressive stress field, as indicated by the quartz deformation of the contact area through the FEM analysis. According to the numerical results, a high compressive stress field acted upon the neighboring contact area, which showed a rapid dissolution rate compared to other areas of the sample.

  1. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  2. Closing CO2 Loop in Biogas Production: Recycling Ammonia As Fertilizer.

    He, Qingyao; Yu, Ge; Tu, Te; Yan, Shuiping; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhao, Shuaifei

    2017-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel system for simultaneous ammonia recovery, carbon capture, biogas upgrading, and fertilizer production in biogas production. Biogas slurry pretreatment (adjusting the solution pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand) plays an important role in the system as it significantly affects the performance of ammonia recovery. Vacuum membrane distillation is used to recover ammonia from biogas slurry at various conditions. The ammonia removal efficiency in vacuum membrane distillation is around 75% regardless of the ammonia concentration of the biogas slurry. The recovered ammonia is used for CO 2 absorption to realize simultaneous biogas upgrading and fertilizer generation. CO 2 absorption performance of the recovered ammonia (absorption capacity and rate) is compared with a conventional model absorbent. Theoretical results on biogas upgrading are also provided. After ammonia recovery, the treated biogas slurry has significantly reduced phytotoxicity, improving the applicability for agricultural irrigation. The novel concept demonstrated in this study shows great potential in closing the CO 2 loop in biogas production by recycling ammonia as an absorbent for CO 2 absorption associated with producing fertilizers.

  3. Critical parameters for ammonia

    Sato, M.; Masui, G.; Uematsu, M.

    2005-01-01

    (p, ρ, T) measurements and visual observations of the meniscus for ammonia were carried out carefully in the critical region over the range of temperatures: -1 K (T - T c ) 0.04 K, and of densities: -19 kg . m -3 (ρ - ρ c ) 19 kg . m -3 by a metal-bellows volumometer with an optical cell. Vapor pressures were also measured at T = (310, 350, and 400) K. The critical parameters of T c and ρ c were determined based on the results of observation of the critical opalescence. The critical pressure p c was determined from the present measurements at T c on the vapor pressure curve. Comparisons of the critical parameters with values given in the literature are presented

  4. Critical parameters for ammonia

    Sato, M. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Masui, G. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Uematsu, M. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: uematsu@mech.keio.ac.jp

    2005-09-15

    (p, {rho}, T) measurements and visual observations of the meniscus for ammonia were carried out carefully in the critical region over the range of temperatures: -1 K (T - T {sub c}) 0.04 K, and of densities: -19 kg . m{sup -3} ({rho} - {rho} {sub c}) 19 kg . m{sup -3} by a metal-bellows volumometer with an optical cell. Vapor pressures were also measured at T = (310, 350, and 400) K. The critical parameters of T {sub c} and {rho} {sub c} were determined based on the results of observation of the critical opalescence. The critical pressure p {sub c} was determined from the present measurements at T {sub c} on the vapor pressure curve. Comparisons of the critical parameters with values given in the literature are presented.

  5. Use of aluminum sulfate (alum) to decrease ammonia emissions from beef cattle bedded manure packs

    Confined cattle facilities are an increasingly common housing system in the Northern Great Plains of the United States. Ammonia volatilization from the surface of the floor and bedding in these confined facilities depends on several variables including pH, temperature, and moisture content. When pH ...

  6. Coupling Solid Oxide Electrolyser (SOE) and ammonia production plant

    Cinti, Giovanni; Frattini, Domenico; Jannelli, Elio; Desideri, Umberto; Bidini, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative NH 3 production plant was designed. • CO 2 emissions and energy consumption are studied in three different designs. • High temperature electrolysis allows to achieve high efficiency and heat recovery. • The coupling permits storage of electricity into a liquid carbon free chemical. - Abstract: Ammonia is one of the most produced chemicals worldwide and is currently synthesized using nitrogen separated from air and hydrogen from natural gas reforming with consequent high consumption of fossil fuel and high emission of CO 2 . A renewable path for ammonia production is desirable considering the potential development of ammonia as energy carrier. This study reports design and analysis of an innovative system for the production of green ammonia using electricity from renewable energy sources. This concept couples Solid Oxide Electrolysis (SOE), for the production of hydrogen, with an improved Haber Bosch Reactor (HBR), for ammonia synthesis. An air separator is also introduced to supply pure nitrogen. SOE operates with extremely high efficiency recovering high temperature heat from the Haber-Bosch reactor. Aspen was used to develop a model to study the performance of the plant. Both the SOE and the HBR operate at 650 °C. Ammonia production with zero emission of CO 2 can be obtained with a reduction of 40% of power input compared to equivalent plants.

  7. Chronic toxicity of copper and ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    Wang, N.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Greer, I.E.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Augspurger, T.; Kane, C.M.; Neves, R.J.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to develop methods for conducting chronic toxicity tests with juvenile mussels under flow-through conditions and to determine the chronic toxicity of copper and ammonia to juvenile mussels using these methods. In two feeding tests, two-month-old fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and rainbow mussel (Villosa iris) were fed various live algae or nonviable algal mixture for 28 d. The algal mixture was the best food resulting in high survival (???90%) and growth. Multiple copper and ammonia toxicity tests were conducted for 28 d starting with two-month-old mussels. Six toxicity tests using the algal mixture were successfully completed with a control survival of 88 to 100%. Among copper tests with rainbow mussel, fatmucket, and oyster mussel (Epioblasma capsaeformis), chronic value ([ChV], geometric mean of the no-observed-effect concentration and the lowest-observed-effect concentration) ranged from 8.5 to 9.8 ??g Cu/L for survival and from 4.6 to 8.5 ??g Cu/L for growth. Among ammonia tests with rainbow mussel, fatmucket, and wavy-rayed lampmussel (L. fasciola), the ChV ranged from 0.37 to 1.2 mg total ammonia N/L for survival and from 0.37 to 0.67 mg N/L for growth. These ChVs were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1996 chronic water quality criterion (WQC) for copper (15 ??g/L; hardness 170 mg/L) and 1999 WQC for total ammonia (1.26 mg N/L; pH 8.2 and 20??C). Results indicate that toxicity tests with two-month-old mussels can be conducted for 28 d with >80% control survival; growth was frequently a more sensitive endpoint compared to survival; and the 1996 chronic WQC for copper and the 1999 chronic WQC for total ammonia might not be adequately protective of the mussel species tested. However, a recently revised 2007 chronic WQC for copper based on the biotic ligand model may be more protective in the water tested. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  8. Effects of high voltage electrical stimulation on the rate of pH decline, meat quality and color stability in chilled beef carcasses

    Mombeni, Ehsan Gharib; Mombeini, Manoochehr Gharib; Figueiredo, Lucas Chaves; Siqueira, Luciano Soares Jacintho; Dias, Debora Testoni

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of high voltage electrical stimulation (HVES, 800 Voltage) on rapid decreases in pH values and improvements in meat quality. Methods: A total of 50 beef carcasses were applied, divided into two groups, one as a control and another for HVES. Meat quality was evaluated based on M. longissimus dorsi by examining pH and temperature levels at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 24 h, while color stability was examined seven days after slaughter. Results: HVES decreased the pH...

  9. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ammonia

    Introduction to the ammonia module, when to list ammonia as a candidate cause, ways to measure ammonia, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ammonia, literature reviews and references for the ammonia module.

  10. Serial ammonia measurement in patients poisoned with glufosinate ammonium herbicide.

    Moon, J M; Chun, B J

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether ammonia concentrations can predict delayed neurotoxicity development and neurotoxicity latency in glufosinate ammonium (GLA) herbicide-poisoned patients presenting with an alert mental state and stable hemodynamics. This retrospective observational case study included 26 patients divided into 2 groups: neurotoxicity during hospitalization (complicated group) and without neurotoxicity (noncomplicated group). Thirteen patients (50.0%) experienced neurotoxicity at 16 h post-ingestion. Although ammonia concentrations at presentation did not differ significantly between the two groups, the ammonia level in the complicated group increased significantly at the next measurement and remained significantly higher than that in the noncomplicated group until 48 h after ingestion. The peak ammonia concentration before neurotoxicity development was an independent predictor of neurotoxicity (odds ratio: 1.047, 95% confidence interval: 1.010-1.087, p value = 0.014), and the optimal cutoff value of peak ammonia concentration for predicting neurotoxicity was 101.5 μg/dL. The rate of ammonia increase was not associated with the time latency from ingestion to neurotoxicity development. This study showed that serial ammonia measurements in GLA-poisoned patients may identify those who are at high risk of developing neurotoxicity. However, as this study enrolled few patients, further qualified trials are required to confirm our results and to reveal the etiology of hyperammonemia and its causality in neurotoxicity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Arterial ammonia levels in the management of fulminant liver failure

    Curry S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that an arterial ammonia level greater than 150 mmol/L is highly sensitive for predicting subsequent development of cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. We performed a prospective cohort study to confirm this relationship. We enrolled 22 consecutive patients who presented to our transplant hepatology service with grade 3-4 encephalopathy associated with fulminant liver failure. All patients underwent placement of an intraparenchymal ICP monitor, and every 12 hourly arterial ammonia levels. The prevalence of intracranial hypertension (IHTN in our population was 95% (21/22 patients, with 82 discrete episodes recorded. The sensitivity of arterial ammonia levels to predict the onset of IHTN was 62% (95% CI: 40.8 to 79.3 at a cut point of 150 mmol/L. Arterial ammonia levels preceding the first intracranial hypertension event were less than 150 mmol/L in 8 of 21 patients (39%. Fifty nine of 82 episodes of IHTN (73% occurred when arterial ammonia levels were less than 150 mmol/L. We conclude that the arterial ammonia level is not useful in making decisions regarding management related to cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. In fact, since almost all our study patients with grade III or IV encephalopathy secondary to fulminant liver failure went on to develop intracranial hypertension, our study supports the contention that all such patients might benefit from ICP monitoring regardless of arterial ammonia levels.

  12. Ammonia in the environment: From ancient times to the present

    Sutton, Mark A.; Erisman, Jan Willem; Dentener, Frank; Moeller, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Recent research on atmospheric ammonia has made good progress in quantifying sources/sinks and environmental impacts. This paper reviews the achievements and places them in their historical context. It considers the role of ammonia in the development of agricultural science and air chemistry, showing how these arose out of foundations in 18th century chemistry and medieval alchemy, and then identifies the original environmental sources from which the ancients obtained ammonia. Ammonia is revealed as a compound of key human interest through the centuries, with a central role played by sal ammoniac in alchemy and the emergence of modern science. The review highlights how recent environmental research has emphasized volatilization sources of ammonia. Conversely, the historical records emphasize the role of high-temperature sources, including dung burning, coal burning, naturally burning coal seams and volcanoes. Present estimates of ammonia emissions from these sources are based on few measurements, which should be a future priority. - Past ammonia applications reveal new emphases in biospheric transformations

  13. Recovery of gold from solutions with ammonia and thiosulfate using activated carbon; Recuperacion de oro a partir de disoluciones de amoniaco y tiosulfato utilizando carbon activado

    Vargas, C.; Navarro, P.; Araya, E.; Pavez, F.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2006-07-01

    The recovery of gold from solutions containing thiosulfate and ammonia using granular activated carbon was studied,evaluating the adsorption and elution stages. The influence of ammonia and thiosulfate concentration and the presence of impurities such as copper and zinc were also evaluated. In the presence of ammonia there was a concentration which maximized the adsorption of gold, while thiosulfate and impurities presence was harmful for the adsorption of gold. during elution, ammonia and thiosulfate concentration, pH regulator and temperature were evaluated. Ammonia favored the process as long as thiosulfate showed a maximum starting from which the elution diminishes. The effect of the pH regulator was very important; If was revealed that when the pH was regulated with caustic ammonia, a synergic effect appeared which favored the elution. Temperature favored the elution process, with activation energy of 9.13 kJ/mol. (Author) 25 refs.

  14. Chromium rich smectites from Jordan: a sink for hazardous elements of a high pH plume

    Khoury, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A green earthy chromium rich di-octahedral smectite is widely distributed in Jordan. The green clay mineral is associated with marbles and travertines in central Jordan and in Suweileh area near Amman. A wide range of chromium substitution in the octahedral layer of smectites is indicated in samples from the different localities. The chromium rich smectites followed the precipitation of calcite and preceded the precipitation of opaline silica from highly alkaline paleo-groundwater. SEM photo indicating the sequence of precipitation is shown. These waters were evolved as a result of retrograde alteration and hydration reactions in the metamorphic zone. The secondary mineral precipitation followed the thermal metamorphic event of the bituminous marls. The travertine in central Jordan indicates a long-term analogue of carbonation and remobilization of silica in cementitious barriers for radioactive waste repositories. The presence of Cr-rich smectites and relatively high levels of U in the associated opaline silica may suggest the use of central Jordan outcrops as analogues with the repository disturbed zone. Smectites and silica phases are expected to be a sink for alteration products in the late stage evolution of a high pH plume. (authors)

  15. Anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Inhibition by ammonia

    Hansen, Kaare Hvid; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1998-01-01

    A stable anaerobic degradation of swine manure with ammonia concentration of 6 g-N/litre was obtained in continuously stirred tank reactors with a hydraulic retention time of 15 days, at Four different temperatures. Methane yields of 188, 141, 67 and 22 ml-CH4/g-VS were obtained at 37, 45, 55...... and 60 degrees C, respectively. The yields were significantly lower than the potential biogas yield of the swine manure used (300 ml-CH4/g-VS). A free ammonia concentration of 1.1 g-N/litre or more was found to cause inhibition in batch cultures at pH 8.0 (reactor pH), and higher free ammonia...... concentrations resulted in a decreased apparent specific growth rate. Batch experiments with various mixtures of swine and cattle manure showed that the biogas process was inhibited when the swine-to-cattle manure ratio was higher than 25:75, corresponding to a free ammonia concentration of approximately 1.1 g...

  16. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...... digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m2 /day and current density...... of 4.33 A/m2 were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic...

  17. Ammonia-based quantum computer

    Ferguson, Andrew J.; Cain, Paul A.; Williams, David A.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum computation using two eigenstates of ammonia or similar molecules. Individual ammonia molecules are confined inside fullerenes and used as two-level qubit systems. Interaction between these ammonia qubits takes place via the electric dipole moments, and in particular we show how a controlled-NOT gate could be implemented. After computation the qubit is measured with a single-electron electrometer sensitive enough to differentiate between the dipole moments of different states. We also discuss a possible implementation based on a quantum cellular automaton

  18. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    Substrates that contain high ammonia levels can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process and unstable biogas production. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of different ammonia levels on pure strains of (syntrophic acetate oxidizing) SAO bacteria and hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N......, the total incubation periods of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were significantly shorter compared to the SAO bacteria incubation periods. Thus, it seems that hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be equally, if not more, tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAO bacteria....

  19. Does ammonia trigger hyperventilation in the elasmobranch, Squalus acanthias suckleyi?

    De Boeck, Gudrun; Wood, Chris M

    2015-01-15

    We examined the ventilatory response of the spiny dogfish, to elevated internal or environmental ammonia. Sharks were injected via arterial catheters with ammonia solutions or their Na salt equivalents sufficient to increase plasma total ammonia concentration [TAmm]a by 3-5 fold from 145±21μM to 447±150μM using NH4HCO3 and a maximum of 766±100μM using (NH4)2SO4. (NH4)2SO4 caused a small increase in ventilation frequency (+14%) and a large increase in amplitude (+69%), while Na2SO4 did not. However, CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2) also increased and arterial pHa and plasma bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3(-)]a) decreased. NH4HCO3 caused a smaller increase in plasma ammonia resulting in a smaller but significant, short lived increases in ventilation frequency (+6%) and amplitude (36%), together with a rise in PaCO2 and [HCO3(-)]a. Injection with NaHCO3 which increased pHa and [HCO3(-)]a did not change ventilation. Plasma ammonia concentration correlated significantly with ventilation amplitude, while ventilation frequency showed a (negative) correlation with pHa. Exposure to high environmental ammonia (1500μM NH4HCO3) did not induce changes in ventilation until plasma [TAmm]a increased and ventilation amplitude (but not frequency) increased in parallel. We conclude that internal ammonia stimulates ventilation in spiny dogfish, especially amplitude or stroke volume, while environmental ammonia only stimulates ventilation after ammonia diffuses into the bloodstream. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimation of Hydrazine Decomposition on Measuring the High-Temperature pH in Hydrazine/ETA Solutions at 553 K

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yeon, Jei Won; Yun, Myung Hee; Song, Kyu Seok; Lee, Sang Ill

    2010-01-01

    Hydrazine is one of the most excellent oxygen scavengers used in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants. Furthermore, in some pants, the hydrazine is used as a source of hydrogen required to suppress radiolysis of the coolant water in the primary loop. When hydrazine was exposed in the high temperature and high pressure water, it can be decomposed into the various products such as NH 3 , N 2 , H 2 , and NO 3 ions. As the result, the pH of solution containing hydrazine in the condition of the high temperature and high pressure can be changed by those decomposed products. In the present work, we investigated the decomposition behavior of hydrazine in ETA (ethanol amine) solution. In addition, we measured the high temperature pH at 553 K on the various hydrazine/ETA solutions for confirming the applicability of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)- based pH electrode in secondary circuit of the nuclear power plants

  1. A Dual-Mode Large-Arrayed CMOS ISFET Sensor for Accurate and High-Throughput pH Sensing in Biomedical Diagnosis.

    Huang, Xiwei; Yu, Hao; Liu, Xu; Jiang, Yu; Yan, Mei; Wu, Dongping

    2015-09-01

    The existing ISFET-based DNA sequencing detects hydrogen ions released during the polymerization of DNA strands on microbeads, which are scattered into microwell array above the ISFET sensor with unknown distribution. However, false pH detection happens at empty microwells due to crosstalk from neighboring microbeads. In this paper, a dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor is proposed to have accurate pH detection toward DNA sequencing. Dual-mode sensing, optical and chemical modes, is realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor (CIS) with ISFET pH sensor, and is fabricated in a standard 0.18-μm CIS process. With accurate determination of microbead physical locations with CIS pixel by contact imaging, the dual-mode sensor can correlate local pH for one DNA slice at one location-determined microbead, which can result in improved pH detection accuracy. Moreover, toward a high-throughput DNA sequencing, a correlated-double-sampling readout that supports large array for both modes is deployed to reduce pixel-to-pixel nonuniformity such as threshold voltage mismatch. The proposed CMOS dual-mode sensor is experimentally examined to show a well correlated pH map and optical image for microbeads with a pH sensitivity of 26.2 mV/pH, a fixed pattern noise (FPN) reduction from 4% to 0.3%, and a readout speed of 1200 frames/s. A dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor with suppressed FPN for accurate large-arrayed pH sensing is proposed and demonstrated with state-of-the-art measured results toward accurate and high-throughput DNA sequencing. The developed dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor has great potential for future personal genome diagnostics with high accuracy and low cost.

  2. Ammonia as a respiratory gas in water and air-breathing fishes.

    Randall, David J; Ip, Yuen K

    2006-11-01

    Ammonia is produced in the liver and excreted as NH(3) by diffusion across the gills. Elevated ammonia results in an increase in gill ventilation, perhaps via stimulation of gill oxygen chemo-receptors. Acidification of the water around the fish by carbon dioxide and acid excretion enhances ammonia excretion and constitutes "environmental ammonia detoxification". Fish have difficulties in excreting ammonia in alkaline water or high concentrations of environmental ammonia, or when out of water. The mudskipper, Periphthalmodon schlosseri, is capable of active NH(4)(+) transport, maintaining low internal levels of ammonia. To prevent a back flux of NH(3), these air-breathing fish can increase gill acid excretion and reduce the membrane NH(3) permeability by modifying the phospholipid and cholesterol compositions of their skin. Several air-breathing fish species can excrete ammonia into air through NH(3) volatilization. Some fish detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. The brains of some fish can tolerate much higher levels of ammonia than other animals. Studies of these fish may offer insights into the nature of ammonia toxicity in general.

  3. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  4. Growth of high mobility GaN and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on 4H-SiC by ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy

    Webb, James B.; Tang, H.; Bardwell, J. A.; Coleridge, P.

    2001-01-01

    Ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy has been used to grow high-quality epilayers of GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistor (HFET) structures on insulating 4H-SiC. The growth process, which used a magnetron sputter epitaxy deposited buffer layer of AlN, has been described previously. Ex situ pretreatment of the SiC substrate was found to be unnecessary. For a single 2.0 μm thick silicon doped epilayer, a room temperature (RT) electron mobility of 500 cm2/Vs was measured at a carrier density of 6.6x10 16 cm -3 . For the HFET structure, a room temperature mobility of 1300 cm2/Vs at a sheet carrier density of 3.3x10 12 cm -2 was observed, increasing to 11000 cm2/Vs at 77 K. The surface morphology of the layers indicated a coalesced mesa structure similar to what we observed for growth on sapphire, but with a lower overall defect density and correspondingly larger grain size. The observation of well-resolved Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at fields as low as 3 T indicated a relatively smooth interface. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Benzothiazole-Based AIEgen with Tunable Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer and Restricted Intramolecular Rotation Processes for Highly Sensitive Physiological pH Sensing.

    Li, Kai; Feng, Qi; Niu, Guangle; Zhang, Weijie; Li, Yuanyuan; Kang, Miaomiao; Xu, Kui; He, Juan; Hou, Hongwei; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2018-04-23

    In this work, a benzothiazole-based aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen) of 2-(5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (3) was designed and synthesized, which exhibited multifluorescence emissions in different dispersed or aggregated states based on tunable excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and restricted intramolecular rotation (RIR) processes. 3 was successfully used as a ratiometric fluorescent chemosensor for the detection of pH, which exhibited reversible acid/base-switched yellow/cyan emission transition. More importantly, the pH jump of 3 was very precipitous from 7.0 to 8.0 with a midpoint of 7.5, which was well matched with the physiological pH. This feature makes 3 very suitable for the highly sensitive detection of pH fluctuation in biosamples and neutral water samples. 3 was also successfully used as a ratiometric fluorescence chemosensor for the detection of acidic and basic organic vapors in test papers.

  6. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    and production methods for large-scale production of ammonia. The collaborative ... temperature also causes the equilibrium position to move to the right .... From the equilibrium data measured it was obvious ... ity, performance and lifetime.

  7. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  8. Effect of pH and chloride on the micro-mechanism of pitting corrosion for high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions

    Wang, Yafei; Cheng, Guangxu; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Qiao; Li, Yun; Li, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting behavior of X80 steel in aerated NaCl solutions is studied systematically. • Unique large pit morphology is observed in neutral/acidic NaCl solutions. • In low pH solutions, pit will propagate in the horizontal direction, leading to the shallow shape of pitting morphology; in high pH solutions, the pit sizes are much smaller. • Film growth, which is dependent on the pH and chloride concentration, has great influence on the cathodic reaction by affecting oxygen diffusion process. - Abstract: The pitting corrosion mechanism of high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions with different pH and chloride content was investigated, using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pitting behavior in alkaline solutions was found to be significantly different from that in neutral and acidic solutions. Electrochemical results and SEM images indicate that the product film formed on the steel surface results in different corrosion behavior in an alkaline solution. SEM images show that pH and chloride concentration in the bulk solution have a great influence on the pitting morphology. Unique large pit morphology due to corrosion in neutral/acidic solutions with 0.05 mol/L NaCl was observed. The relationship between solution pH and the effect of chloride concentration is also discussed

  9. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVII. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the methanol fraction of the mobile phase.

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2007-01-05

    The use of methanol-aqueous buffer mobile phases in HPLC is a common election when performing chromatographic separations of ionisable analytes. The addition of methanol to the aqueous buffer to prepare such a mobile phase changes the buffer capacity and the pH of the solution. In the present work, the variation of these buffer properties is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-hydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. It is well established that the pH change of the buffers depends on the initial concentration and aqueous pH of the buffer, on the percentage of methanol added, and on the particular buffer used. The proposed equations allow the pH estimation of methanol-water buffered mobile phases up to 80% in volume of organic modifier from initial aqueous buffer pH and buffer concentration (before adding methanol) between 0.001 and 0.01 mol L(-1). From both the estimated pH values of the mobile phase and the estimated pKa of the ionisable analytes, it is possible to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and therefore, the interpretation of acid-base analytes behaviour in a particular methanol-water buffered mobile phase.

  10. Model-predicted ammonia emission from two broiler houses with different rearing systems

    Lima,Nilsa Duarte Silva; Garcia,Rodrigo Garófallo; Nääs,Irenilza Alencar; Caldara,Fabiana Ribeiro; Ponso,Roselaine

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from broiler production can affect human and animal health and may cause acidification and eutrophication of the surrounding environment. This study aimed to estimate ammonia emissions from broiler litter in two systems of forced ventilation, the tunnel ventilation (TV) and the dark house (DH). The experiment was carried out on eight commercial broiler houses, and the age of the birds (day, d), pH and litter temperature were recorded. Broilers were reared on built-up w...

  11. Model-predicted ammonia emission from two broiler houses with different rearing systems

    Nilsa Duarte Silva Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH3 emissions from broiler production can affect human and animal health and may cause acidification and eutrophication of the surrounding environment. This study aimed to estimate ammonia emissions from broiler litter in two systems of forced ventilation, the tunnel ventilation (TV and the dark house (DH. The experiment was carried out on eight commercial broiler houses, and the age of the birds (day, d, pH and litter temperature were recorded. Broilers were reared on built-up wood shaving litter using an average flock density of 14 bird m–2. Temperature and relative humidity inside the broiler houses were recorded in the morning during the grow-out period. A factorial experimental design was adopted, with two types of houses, four replicates and two flocks with two replicates each. A deterministic model was used to predict ammonia emissions using the litter pH and temperature, and the day of grow-out. The highest litter temperature and pH were found at 42 d of growth in both housing systems. Mean ambient air temperature and relative humidity did not differ in either system. Mean model predicted ammonia emission was higher in the DH rearing system (5200 mg NH3 m−2h−1 at 42 d than in the TV system (2700 mg NH3m−2 h−1 at 42 d. TV presented the lowest mean litter temperature and pH at 42 d of growth. In the last week of the broilers’ grow-out cycle, estimated ammonia emissions inside DH reached 5700 mg m−2h−1 in one of the flocks. Ammonia emissions were higher inside DH, and they did not differ between flocks. Assuming a broiler market weight in Brazil of close to 2 kg, ammonia emissions were equivalent to 12 g NH3 bird-marketed−1. Model-predicted ammonia emissions provided comprehensible estimations and might be used in abatement strategies for NH3 emission.

  12. Impact of pH and Total Soluble Solids on Enzyme Inactivation Kinetics during High Pressure Processing of Mango (Mangifera indica) Pulp.

    Kaushik, Neelima; Nadella, Tejaswi; Rao, P Srinivasa

    2015-11-01

    This study was undertaken with an aim to enhance the enzyme inactivation during high pressure processing (HPP) with pH and total soluble solids (TSS) as additional hurdles. Impact of mango pulp pH (3.5, 4.0, 4.5) and TSS (15, 20, 25 °Brix) variations on the inactivation of pectin methylesterase (PME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and peroxidase (POD) enzymes were studied during HPP at 400 to 600 MPa pressure (P), 40 to 70 °C temperature (T), and 6- to 20-min pressure-hold time (t). The enzyme inactivation (%) was modeled using second order polynomial equations with a good fit that revealed that all the enzymes were significantly affected by HPP. Response surface and contour models predicted the kinetic behavior of mango pulp enzymes adequately as indicated by the small error between predicted and experimental data. The predicted kinetics indicated that for a fixed P and T, higher pulse pressure effect and increased isobaric inactivation rates were possible at lower levels of pH and TSS. In contrast, at a fixed pH or TSS level, an increase in P or T led to enhanced inactivation rates, irrespective of the type of enzyme. PPO and POD were found to have similar barosensitivity, whereas PME was found to be most resistant to HPP. Furthermore, simultaneous variation in pH and TSS levels of mango pulp resulted in higher enzyme inactivation at lower pH and TSS during HPP, where the effect of pH was found to be predominant than TSS within the experimental domain. Exploration of additional hurdles such as pH, TSS, and temperature for enzyme inactivation during high pressure processing of fruits is useful from industrial point of view, as these parameters play key role in preservation process design. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Comparative study of ZnSe thin films deposited from modified chemical bath solutions with ammonia-containing and ammonia-free precursors

    Chen Liangyan; Zhang Daoli; Zhai Guangmei; Zhang Jianbing

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia is one of the complexing agents which are the most commonly used in the precursors of ZnSe thin films by chemical bath deposition, but its high volatility may be harmful to human beings and environments. In our experiments, ZnSe films were obtained from modified chemical solutions with ammonia-containing and ammonia-free precursors. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope (FSEM), and absorption spectrum were applied to investigate the microstructure, morphology and optical properties of the samples obtained from both growth conditions, which were investigated in this work. The ammonia-free chemical bath deposited ZnSe films showed comparable properties with the ammonia-containing ones, indicating that ZnSe films from ammonia-free chemical solution may be preferred buffer layer in thin film solar cells with less environmental contamination.

  14. A comprehensive ammonia emission inventory with high-resolution and its evaluation in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region, China

    Zhou, Ying; Shuiyuan Cheng; Lang, Jianlei; Chen, Dongsheng; Zhao, Beibei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ran; Li, Tingting

    2015-04-01

    A comprehensive ammonia (NH3) emission inventory for the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region was developed based on the updated source-specific emission factors (EFs) and the county-level activity data obtained from a full-coverage investigation launched in the BTH region for the first time. The NH3 emission inventory within 1 km × 1 km grid was generated using source-based spatial surrogates with geographical information system (GIS) technology. The total NH3 emission was 1573.7 Gg for the year 2010. The contributions from livestock, farmland, human, biomass burning, chemical industry, fuel combustion, waste disposal and on-road mobile source were approximately 56.6%, 28.6%, 7.2%, 3.4%, 1.1%, 1.3%, 1.0% and 0.8%, respectively. Among different cities, Shijiazhang, Handan, Xingtai, Tangshan and Cangzhou had higher NH3 emissions. Statistical analysis aiming at county-level emission of 180 counties in BTH indicated that the NH3 emission in most of the counties were less than 16 Gg. The maximum value of the county level emission was approximately 25.5 Gg. Higher NH3 emission was concentrated in the areas with more rural and agricultural activity. Monthly, higher NH3 emission occurred during the period from April to September, which could be attributed to the temperature and timing of planting practice. The validity of the estimated emissions were further evaluated from multiple perspectives covering (1) uncertainty analysis based on Monte Carlo simulation, (2) comparison with other studies, (3) quantitative analysis of improvement in spatial resolution of activity data, and (4) verification based on a comparison of the simulated and observed surface concentrations of ammonium. The detailed and validated ammonia emission inventory could provide valuable information for understanding air pollution formation mechanisms and help guide decision-making with respect to control strategies.

  15. Six Month In Situ High-Resolution Carbonate Chemistry and Temperature Study on a Coral Reef Flat Reveals Asynchronous pH and Temperature Anomalies.

    David I Kline

    Full Text Available Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal and/or pH exposure. Anomalous conditions are defined as values that exceed an empirically estimated threshold for each variable. We present a 200-day time series from June through December 2010 of carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters measured on the Heron Island reef flat. These data reveal that aragonite saturation state, pH, and pCO2 were primarily modulated by biologically-driven changes in dissolved organic carbon (DIC and total alkalinity (TA, rather than salinity and temperature. The largest diel temperature ranges occurred in austral spring, in October (1.5 - 6.6°C and lowest diel ranges (0.9 - 3.2°C were observed in July, at the peak of winter. We observed large diel total pH variability, with a maximum range of 7.7 - 8.5 total pH units, with minimum diel average pH values occurring during spring and maximum during fall. As with many other reefs, the nighttime pH minima on the reef flat were far lower than pH values predicted for the open ocean by 2100. DIC and TA both increased from June (end of Fall to December (end of Spring. Using this high-resolution dataset, we developed exposure metrics of pH and temperature individually for intensity, duration, and severity of low pH and high temperature events, as well as a combined metric. Periods of anomalous temperature and pH exposure were asynchronous on the Heron Island reef flat, which underlines the importance of understanding the dynamics of co-occurrence of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems.

  16. Six Month In Situ High-Resolution Carbonate Chemistry and Temperature Study on a Coral Reef Flat Reveals Asynchronous pH and Temperature Anomalies.

    Kline, David I; Teneva, Lida; Hauri, Claudine; Schneider, Kenneth; Miard, Thomas; Chai, Aaron; Marker, Malcolm; Dunbar, Rob; Caldeira, Ken; Lazar, Boaz; Rivlin, Tanya; Mitchell, Brian Gregory; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal and/or pH exposure. Anomalous conditions are defined as values that exceed an empirically estimated threshold for each variable. We present a 200-day time series from June through December 2010 of carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters measured on the Heron Island reef flat. These data reveal that aragonite saturation state, pH, and pCO2 were primarily modulated by biologically-driven changes in dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), rather than salinity and temperature. The largest diel temperature ranges occurred in austral spring, in October (1.5 - 6.6°C) and lowest diel ranges (0.9 - 3.2°C) were observed in July, at the peak of winter. We observed large diel total pH variability, with a maximum range of 7.7 - 8.5 total pH units, with minimum diel average pH values occurring during spring and maximum during fall. As with many other reefs, the nighttime pH minima on the reef flat were far lower than pH values predicted for the open ocean by 2100. DIC and TA both increased from June (end of Fall) to December (end of Spring). Using this high-resolution dataset, we developed exposure metrics of pH and temperature individually for intensity, duration, and severity of low pH and high temperature events, as well as a combined metric. Periods of anomalous temperature and pH exposure were asynchronous on the Heron Island reef flat, which underlines the importance of understanding the dynamics of co-occurrence of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems.

  17. Nitrogen removal from digested slurries using a simplified ammonia stripping technique.

    Provolo, Giorgio; Perazzolo, Francesca; Mattachini, Gabriele; Finzi, Alberto; Naldi, Ezio; Riva, Elisabetta

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed a novel technique for removing nitrogen from digested organic waste based on a slow release of ammonia that was promoted by continuous mixing of the digestate and delivering a continuous air stream across the surface of the liquid. Three 10-day experiments were conducted using two 50-L reactors. In the first two, nitrogen removal efficiencies were evaluated from identical digestates maintained at different temperatures (30°C and 40°C). At the start of the first experiment, the digestates were adjusted to pH 9 using sodium hydroxide, while in the second experiment pH was not adjusted. The highest ammonia removal efficiency (87%) was obtained at 40°C with pH adjustment. However at 40°C without pH adjustment, removal efficiencies of 69% for ammonia and 47% for total nitrogen were obtained. In the third experiment two different digestates were tested at 50°C without pH adjustment. Although the initial chemical characteristics of the digestates were different in this experiment, the ammonia removal efficiencies were very similar (approximately 85%). Despite ammonia removal, the pH increased in all experiments, most likely due to carbon dioxide stripping that was promoted by temperature and mixing. The technique proved to be suitable for removing nitrogen following anaerobic digestion of livestock manure because effective removal was obtained at natural pH (≈8) and 40°C, common operating conditions at typical biogas plants that process manure. Furthermore, the electrical energy requirement to operate the process is limited (estimated to be 3.8kWhm -3 digestate). Further improvements may increase the efficiency and reduce the processing time of this treatment technique. Even without these advances slow-rate air stripping of ammonia is a viable option for reducing the environmental impact associated with animal manure management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of X80 pipeline steel exposed to high pH solutions with different concentrations of bicarbonate

    Fan, Lin; Du, Cui-wei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Li, Xiao-gang

    2013-07-01

    Susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in high pH solutions with various concentrations of HCO{3/-} at a passive potential of -0.2 V vs. SCE were investigated by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The SCC mechanism and the effect of HCO{3/-} were discussed with the aid of electrochemical techniques. It is indicated that X80 steel shows enhanced susceptibility to SCC with the concentration of HCO{3/-} increasing from 0.15 to 1.00 mol/L, and the susceptibility can be evaluated in terms of current density at -0.2 V vs. SCE. The SCC behavior is controlled by the dissolution-based mechanism in these circumstances. Increasing the concentration of HCO{3/-} not only increases the risk of rupture of passive films but also promotes the anodic dissolution of crack tips. Besides, little susceptibility to SCC is found in dilute solution containing 0.05 mol/L HCO{3/-} for X80 steel. This can be attributed to the inhibited repassivation of passive films, manifesting as a more intensive dissolution in the non-crack tip areas than at the crack tips.

  19. Experimental study of mixed additive of Ni(II) and piperazine on ammonia escape in CO2 capture using ammonia solution

    Ma, Shuangchen; Chen, Gongda; Zhu, Sijie; Wen, Jiaqi; Gao, Ran; Ma, Lan; Chai, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Compound additive was used to obtain high CO 2 absorption efficiency and low NH 3 escape. • Both organic material and metal ion were applied as compound additive. • Influences of additives on CO 2 absorption and NH 3 escape were investigated. • Possible mechanism and products were analyzed by XRD and UV–visible spectrophotometer. - Abstract: In order to obtain high CO 2 absorption efficiency and low ammonia escape rate, mixed additives of piperazine and Ni(II) were used as absorbent in bubbling reactor. The effects of mixed additive on CO 2 absorption efficiency and ammonia escape rate were investigated; the performances of mixed additive in removal process were compared with that of pure ammonia solution. The proposed mechanism was analyzed by XRD and UV–visible spectrophotometer. The mixed additive has well effect on CO 2 absorption efficiency and ammonia escape reduction. The CO 2 absorption efficiency was 72% when 2 wt% ammonia solution mixed with 0.025 mol/L piperazine and 0.05 mol/L Ni(II), higher than that achieved by 3 wt% ammonia solution without additive, and the amount of ammonia loss was nearly 1/3 compared with 3 wt% pure ammonia solution. This paper provided one feasible method which is beneficial to the balance between CO 2 absorption and ammonia escape in CO 2 capture process.

  20. Current as an indicator of ammonia concentration during wastewater treatment in an integrated microbial electrolysis cell - Nitrification system

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2018-01-01

    with synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater. A good linear relationship (R2 = 0.9419) was observed between current (0.5130–3.906 mA) and ammonia levels (0–62.1 mg NH4+-N/L). Such linear relationship was always obtained regardless of the tested external power supply or wastewater pH. The external electrochemical cell......A key challenge for ammonia monitoring during nitrogen removal process is the extra cost and toxic reagent consuming. Herein the feasibility of current generated by an integrated microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) - nitrification reactor as an indicator of initial ammonia levels (NH3/NH4......+) in wastewater was explored. In this loop system, ammonia was first oxidized to nitrate in the nitrification reactor, and then the effluent was introduced into the cathode of MEC where nitrate was reduced as electron acceptor. The correlation between current and ammonia concentration was first investigated...

  1. The influence of normal and high ultimate muscle pH on the microbiology and colour stability of previously frozen black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou) meat.

    Shange, Nompumelelo; Makasi, Thandeka N; Gouws, Pieter A; Hoffman, Louwrens C

    2018-01-01

    Changes in pH, colour and microbiological counts were investigated in previously frozen Biceps femoris (BF) muscles from black wildebeest. Samples were stored under vacuum at refrigerated conditions (4.2±0.8°C) for 12days. Seven BF muscles had a high pH (DFD) (pH≥6) and five had a normal pH (pHmeat decreased. Browning under anaerobic storage conditions was seen, more for normal meat than DFD meat. Initial total viable counts, lactic acid bacteria and coliform counts from samples with normal pH, were significantly higher than counts from the DFD samples. However, overtime DFD meat showed a faster increase for all microorganisms tested compared to normal pH meat. Overall, this study revealed that DFD meat can have a shorter shelf-life than normal pH meat stored at 4.2±0.8°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly efficient treatment of aerobic vaginitis with simple acidic buffered gels: The importance of pH and buffers on the microenvironment of vaginas.

    Sun, Xiaodong; Qiu, Haiying; Jin, Yiguang

    2017-06-15

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) leads to uterus deep infection or preterm birth. Antibacterial agents are not optimal therapeutics of AV. Here, we report a series of temperature-sensitive in situ forming acidic buffered gels for topical treatment of AV, involving lactate, acetate, and citrate gels at pH 3.5, 5.0, and 6.5. AV rat models were prepared following vaginal infection with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro/in vivo studies of the buffered gels were performed compared with ofloxacin gels and blank gels. All the buffered gels showed the lower in vitro antibacterial activities than ofloxacin gels but the better in vivo anti-S. aureus effects and similar anti-E. coli effects. The buffered gels improved Lactobacillus growth in the vaginas. Both the healthy rat vaginal pH and the pH of rat vaginas treated with the buffered gels were about 6.5 though the AV rat models or ones treated with ofloxacin gels still remained at the high pH more than 7.0. After treatments with the buffered gels, the vaginal smears changed to a clean state nearly without aerobic bacteria, the vaginal tissues were refreshed, and the immunoreactions were downregulated. The acidic buffered gels bring rapid decrease of local vaginal pH, high antibacterial activities, improvement of probiotics, and alleviation of inflammation. They are simple, highly efficient, and safe anti-AV formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved......In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...

  4. The dissolution of high-FeO olivine rock from the Lovasjaervi intrusion (SE-Finland) at 25 deg. C as a function of pH

    Duro, Lara; El Aamrani, Fatima; Rovira, Miquel; Gimenez, Javier; Casas, Ignasi; Pablo, Joan de; Bruno, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    The high-FeO olivine-rich rock from the Lovasjaervi intrusion (65% olivine, 20% plagioclase, 8% magnetite, 4% pyroxene and 3% serpentine) has been proposed as a potential redox-active backfill-additive in deep high level nuclear waste repositories. In this work, the authors report on kinetic dissolution studies of this solid under different pH and redox conditions performed by using a flow-through methodology. Assuming that silicon is mainly released to solution from the olivine contained in the solid, the experimental results have been adjusted to an empirical rate law as a function of proton concentration. The proton concentration reaction orders agree with results found in the literature for both acidic and alkaline pH ranges. The calculations conducted with the reactive transport code RETRASO show that at alkaline pH, the olivine rock might have a lower redox buffer capacity than expected

  5. Ammonia removal via microbial fuel cell (MFC) dynamic reactor

    Alabiad, I.; Ali, U. F. M.; Zakarya, I. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Radzi, R. W.; Zulkurnai, N. Z.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate is generally known as high-strength wastewater that is difficult to handle and contains dissolved extracts and suspended matter. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were designed to treat landfill leachate while continuously producing power (voltage output). Three different anodes were tested in MFC reactors: carbon black, activated carbon, and zinc electrodes. Movements in the MFC reactor during treatment were also a key factor for testing. Results showed a difference in ammonia levels in the three anodes used. The study compared the efficiency of static and dynamic modes of MFC in removing ammonia. Continual leachate movement in the reactor could increase the rate of removal of the ammonia components. The setup provided a viable condition for maximum removal because the reactor movement caused the sludge to disintegrate, which allowed ammonia to separate easily from the parent leachate. Ammonia removal also resulted from the transfer of ammonium through the membrane or from ammonia loss. Constant exchange of ionic content benefited the MFC performance by increasing power production and decreasing internal electrode material resistance. This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Padang Siding Landfill, Perlis. The performance of ammonia removal was enhanced using different types of electrodes. In both modes, activated carbon performed better than black carbon and zinc. The respective percentages of ammonia removal for activated carbon of dynamic over static were 96.6%, 66.6%, and 92.8% for activated carbon, zinc, and black carbon. The results provide further information on the possibility of using MFCs in landfill leachate treatment systems.

  6. Atmospheric Fate and Transport of Agricultural Dust and Ammonia

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Fitz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust and odor are significant sources of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. Daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots associated with increased cattle activity in the early evenings are routinely observed, while consistently high ammonia is observed throughout the day. Here we present measurements of aerosol size distributions and concentrations of gas and particulate phase ammonia species collected at a feedlot in Texas during summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. A GRIMM sequential mobility particle sizer and GRIMM 1.108 aerosol spectrometer were used to determine aerosol size distributions in the range of 10 nm to 20 µm aerodynamic diameter at the downwind and upwind edges of the facility. Using aqueous scrubbers, simultaneous measurements of both gas phase and total ammonia species present in the gas and particle phases were also collected. In addition to the continuous measurements at the edges of the facility, coincident aerosol and ammonia measurements were obtain at an additional site further downwind (~3.5 km). Taken together our measurements will be used to quantify aerosol and ammonia dispersion and transport. Relationships between the fate and transport of the aerosols and ammonia will be discussed.

  7. Effects of sodium hypochlorite and high pH buffer solution in electrokinetic soil treatment on soil chromium removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community

    Cang Long; Zhou Dongmei; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Chen Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    Effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), applied as an oxidant in catholyte, and high pH buffer solution on soil Cr removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community during enhanced electrokinetic treatments of a chromium (Cr) contaminated red soil are evaluated. Using pH control system to maintain high alkalinity of soil together with the use of NaClO increased the electrical conductivities of soil pore liquid and electroosmotic flux compared with the control (Exp-01). The pH control and NaClO improved the removal of Cr(VI) and total Cr from the soil. The highest removal percentages of soil Cr(VI) and total Cr were 96 and 72%, respectively, in Exp-04 when the pH value of the anolyte was controlled at 10 and NaClO was added in the catholyte. The alkaline soil environment and introduction of NaClO in the soil enhanced the desorption of Cr(VI) from the soil and promoted Cr(III) oxidation to mobile Cr(VI), respectively. However, the elevated pH and introduction of NaClO in the soil, which are necessary for improving the removal efficiency of soil Cr, resulted in a significantly adverse impact on the functional diversity of soil microbial community. It suggests that to assess the negative impact of extreme conditions for enhancing the extraction efficiencies of Cr on the soil properties and function is necessary

  8. Acclimatization to high-variance habitats does not enhance physiological tolerance of two key Caribbean corals to future temperature and pH.

    Camp, Emma F; Smith, David J; Evenhuis, Chris; Enochs, Ian; Manzello, Derek; Woodcock, Stephen; Suggett, David J

    2016-05-25

    Corals are acclimatized to populate dynamic habitats that neighbour coral reefs. Habitats such as seagrass beds exhibit broad diel changes in temperature and pH that routinely expose corals to conditions predicted for reefs over the next 50-100 years. However, whether such acclimatization effectively enhances physiological tolerance to, and hence provides refuge against, future climate scenarios remains unknown. Also, whether corals living in low-variance habitats can tolerate present-day high-variance conditions remains untested. We experimentally examined how pH and temperature predicted for the year 2100 affects the growth and physiology of two dominant Caribbean corals (Acropora palmata and Porites astreoides) native to habitats with intrinsically low (outer-reef terrace, LV) and/or high (neighbouring seagrass, HV) environmental variance. Under present-day temperature and pH, growth and metabolic rates (calcification, respiration and photosynthesis) were unchanged for HV versus LV populations. Superimposing future climate scenarios onto the HV and LV conditions did not result in any enhanced tolerance to colonies native to HV. Calcification rates were always lower for elevated temperature and/or reduced pH. Together, these results suggest that seagrass habitats may not serve as refugia against climate change if the magnitude of future temperature and pH changes is equivalent to neighbouring reef habitats. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Leaf absorption of atmospheric ammonia emitted from pig slurry applied beneath the canopy of winter wheat

    Gjedde Sommer, S.; Jensen, E.S.; Kofoed Schjoerring, J.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption of volatilized ammonia after application of slurry onto the soil surface (sand) between rows of a wheat crop was studied in two experiments. The slurry was labelled with 15 N-NH 4 . During seven days the accumulated gaseous N loss from the slurry varied from 6.9 to 11.1 g N m -2 . In April ammonia losses from slurry applied beneath a 5 cm high wheat crop were equal to losses from slurry applied to a fallow, but 2.2% of the lost atmospheric ammonia was taken up by the leaves. In May ammonia loss from slurry applied between the rows of a 43 cm high crop was reduced by 6% compared to the loss from fallow, because of a reduced transfer of ammonia from the slurry to the air. Of the emitted ammonia 3.3% was absorbed by the canopy. (au)

  10. Effect of leachate of cementitious materials on the geological media. Experimental study of the influence of high pH plume on rock

    Kato, Hiroshige; Sato, Mitsuyoshi; Owada, Hitoshi; Mihara, Morihiro; Ohi, Takao

    2000-05-01

    Cementitious materials will be used in TRU waste disposal repository. In such cases, it is considered that the migration of alkaline leachates from cementitious materials, so called high pH plume, will cause dissolution of rock and precipitation of secondary minerals. In addition, the high pH plume will move along the flow of groundwater, so it is predicted that rock formation and components of high pH groundwater vary with time and space. However, time and spatial dependence of the variations of secondary minerals and groundwater components has not been clarified. In order to acquire the data of variations of secondary minerals and groundwater components, we carried out the rock alteration experiments with column method. The crushed granodiorite was filled into 4 meters length column (φ 3.7 cm) and artificial cement leachate (pH=13.3; Na=0.1mol/l, K=0.1mol/l, Ca=0.002mol/l) was streamed at flow rates of 0.1 ml/min for 7 months at 80degC. As the result, secondary minerals confirmed on the rock were calcite and C-S-H at upstream of column and C-S-H at mid-downstream. The pH value of the fluid dominated by Na and K did not be decreased by reaction with the rock. In this study, the data relating to the effect of high pH plume on rock over the long term was acquired. (author)

  11. On the stability of the disordered molecular alloy phase of ammonia hemihydrate

    Wilson, C. W.; Bull, C. L.; Stinton, G. W.; Amos, D. M.; Donnelly, M.-E.; Loveday, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The disordered-molecular-alloy phase (DMA) of ammonia hydrates [J. S. Loveday and R. J. Nelmes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4329 (1999)] is unique in that it has substitutional disorder of ammonia and water over the molecular sites of a body centred cubic lattice. Whilst this structure has been observed in ammonia di- and mono-hydrate compositions, it has not been conclusively observed in the ammonia hemihydrate system. This work presents investigations of the structural behaviour of ammonia hemihydrate as a function of P and T. The indications of earlier studies [Ma et al. RSC Adv. 2, 4290 (2012)] that the DMA structure could be produced by compression of ammonia hemihydrate above 20 GPa at ambient temperature are confirmed. In addition, the DMA structure was found to form reversibly both from the melt, and on warming of ammonia hemihydrate phase-II, in the pressure range between 4 and 8 GPa. The route used to make the DMA structure from ammonia mono- and di-hydrates—compression at 170 K to 6 GPa followed by warming to ambient temperature—was found not to produce the DMA structure for ammonia hemihydrate. These results provide the first strong evidence that DMA is a thermodynamically stable form. A high-pressure phase diagram for ammonia hemihydrate is proposed which has importance for planetary modelling

  12. A Pervaporation Study of Ammonia Solutions Using Molecular Sieve Silica Membranes

    Xing Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An innovative concept is proposed to recover ammonia from industrial wastewater using a molecular sieve silica membrane in pervaporation (PV, benchmarked against vacuum membrane distillation (VMD. Cobalt and iron doped molecular sieve silica-based ceramic membranes were evaluated based on the ammonia concentration factor downstream and long-term performance. A modified low-temperature membrane evaluation system was utilized, featuring the ability to capture and measure ammonia in the permeate. It was found that the silica membrane with confirmed molecular sieving features had higher water selectivity over ammonia. This was due to a size selectivity mechanism that favoured water, but blocked ammonia. However, a cobalt doped silica membrane previously treated with high temperature water solutions demonstrated extraordinary preference towards ammonia by achieving up to a 50,000 mg/L ammonia concentration (a reusable concentration level measured in the permeate when fed with 800 mg/L of ammonia solution. This exceeded the concentration factor expected by the benchmark VMD process by four-fold, suspected to be due to the competitive adsorption of ammonia over water into the silica structure with pores now large enough to accommodate ammonia. However, this membrane showed a gradual decline in selectivity, suspected to be due to the degradation of the silica material/pore structure after several hours of operation.

  13. Ammonia synthesis on Au modified Fe(111) and Ag and Cu modified Fe(100) surfaces

    Lytken, Ole; Waltenburg, Hanne Neergaard; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate any influence of steps and possible positive effects of making surface alloys the ammonia synthesis has been investigated over Au modified Fe(111) and Ag and Cu modified Fe(100) single crystals in the temperature range 603-773 K, using a system combining ultra-high vacuum...... and a high-pressure cell. Ammonia was synthesized from a stoichiometric (N-2:3H(2)) gas mixture at a pressure of 2 bar. By deposition of small amounts of An, the ammonia production activity of the Fe(1 1 1) surface can be enhanced. More important, for the gold modified surface, the reaction order in ammonia...

  14. Enzymatic pH Control for Biomimetic Deposition of Calcium Phosphate Coatings

    Nijhuis, A.W.; Reza Nejadnik, M.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; te Riet, J.; Habibovic, Pamela; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Yubao, L.; Bomans, P.H.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study has focused on enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of Calcium Phospate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium

  15. Enzymatic pH control for biomimetic depostion of calcium phosphate coatings

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Riet, te J.; Habibovic, P.; Birgani, Z.T.; Li, Y.B.; Bomans, P.H.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of calcium phospate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium

  16. Enzymatic pH control for biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate coatings

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Riet, J. te; Habibovic, P.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Z.; Li, Y.; Bomans, P.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium

  17. High-electron-mobility GaN grown on free-standing GaN templates by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    Kyle, Erin C. H., E-mail: erinkyle@umail.ucsb.edu; Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wu, Yuh-Renn [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-21

    The dependence of electron mobility on growth conditions and threading dislocation density (TDD) was studied for n{sup −}-GaN layers grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. Electron mobility was found to strongly depend on TDD, growth temperature, and Si-doping concentration. Temperature-dependent Hall data were fit to established transport and charge-balance equations. Dislocation scattering was analyzed over a wide range of TDDs (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} to ∼2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}) on GaN films grown under similar conditions. A correlation between TDD and fitted acceptor states was observed, corresponding to an acceptor state for almost every c lattice translation along each threading dislocation. Optimized GaN growth on free-standing GaN templates with a low TDD (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}) resulted in electron mobilities of 1265 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 296 K and 3327 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 113 K.

  18. A model to explain high values of pH in an alkali sodic soil Modelo para explicar valores elevados de pH em um solo sódico alcalino

    José Guerrero-Alves

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available For alkali sodic soils (pH>8.5, the "hydrolysis of exchangeable sodium" has been used as a possible explanation for the alkalinity production and rise in pH of these soils. As an alternative to this hypothesis, a model was developed to simulate and to explain that the alkalinity production and rise in pH is possible in a soil that accumulates alkaline sodium salts and CaCO3. Several simulations were performed by using different combinations of CO2 partial pressures (P, presence or absence of MgCO3, along with experimental values of exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP and ion concentrations in saturation extracts from an alkali sodic soil (named Pantanal. A hypothetical system with similar conditions to the Pantanal soil but with a Gapon selectivity coefficient (KG of 0.01475 (mmol L-1-1/2 was also considered. Good agreement was obtained between experimental and predicted values for pH and ion concentrations in the soil solution when the model (without MgCO3 was applied to the Pantanal soil. However, KG values calculated for the Pantanal soil were generally higher than 0.01475 (mmol L-1-1/2. Moreover, high pH values and elevated ionic strength were obtained when a KG of 0.01475 (mmol L-1-1/2 was used at high ESP (similar to those found in the Pantanal soil. KG values obtained for the Pantanal soil and the results obtained in the simulation of the hypothetical system are suggesting that a value higher than 0.01475 (mmol L-1-1/2 should be used to adequately simulate the behavior of the Pantanal soil at low ionic strength and high ESP values.Em solos alcalino sódicos (pH>8,5, a "hidrólise de sódio trocável" tem sido usada como uma possível explicação para a produção de álcali e elevação do pH nestes solos. Como uma alternativa a essa hipótese, um modelo foi desenvolvido para simular e explicar que a produção de álcali e elevação do pH é possível num solo que acumula sais alcalinos de sódio e CaCO3. Várias simulações foram

  19. The impact of pH on floc structure characteristic of polyferric chloride in a low DOC and high alkalinity surface water treatment.

    Cao, Baichuan; Gao, Baoyu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mengmeng; Yang, Zhonglian; Yue, Qinyan

    2011-11-15

    The adjustment of pH is an important way to enhance removal efficiency in coagulation units, and in this process, the floc size, strength and structure can be changed, influencing the subsequent solid/liquid separation effect. In this study, an inorganic polymer coagulant, polyferric chloride (PFC) was used in a low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and high alkalinity surface water treatment. The influence of coagulation pH on removal efficiency, floc growth, strength, re-growth capability and fractal dimension was examined. The optimum dosage was predetermined as 0.150 mmol/L, and excellent particle and organic matter removal appeared in the pH range of 5.50-5.75. The structure characteristics of flocs formed under four pH conditions were investigated through the analysis of floc size, effect of shear and particle scattering properties by a laser scattering instrument. The results indicated that flocs formed at neutral pH condition gave the largest floc size and the highest growth rate. During the coagulation period, the fractal dimension of floc aggregates increased in the first minutes and then decreased and larger flocs generally had smaller fractal dimensions. The floc strength, which was assessed by the relationship of floc diameter and velocity gradient, decreased with the increase of coagulation pH. Flocs formed at pH 4.00 had better recovery capability when exposed to lower shear forces, while flocs formed at neutral and alkaline conditions had better performance under higher shear forces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Low Temperature Catalysts for an Integrated Ammonia PEM Fuel Cell

    Hill, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that an integrated ammonia-PEM fuel cell could unlock the potential of ammonia to act as a high capacity chemical hydrogen storage vector and enable renewable energy to be delivered eectively to road transport applications. Catalysts are developed for low temperature ammonia decomposition with activity from 450 K (ruthenium and cesium on graphitised carbon nanotubes). Results strongly suggest that the cesium is present on the surface and close proximity to ruthenium nanoparticl...

  1. Plasmophore sensitized imaging of ammonia release from biological tissues using optodes

    Stroemberg, Niklas; Hakonen, Aron

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A plasmophore sensitized optode for imaging ammonia (NH 3 ) concentrations in muscle tissues was developed. → Ammonia concentrations ranging from 10 nM and upwards can be quantified reversibly with an optical resolution of 127 μm. → The general sensing scheme offers new possibilities for the development of artificial optical noses and tongues. - Abstract: A plasmophore sensitized optode was developed for imaging ammonia (NH 3 ) concentrations in muscle tissues. The developed ammonia sensor and an equivalent non plasmophore version of the sensor were tested side by side to compare their limit of detection, dynamic range, reversibility and overall imaging quality. Bio-degradation patterns of ammonia release from lean porcine skeletal muscle were studied over a period of 11 days. We demonstrate that ammonia concentrations ranging from 10 nM can be quantified reversibly with an optical resolution of 127 μm in a sample area of 25 mm x 35 mm. The plasmophore ammonia optode showed improved reversibility, less false pixels and a 2 nM ammonia detection limit compared to 200 nM for the non-plasmophore sensor. Main principles of the sensing mechanism include ammonia transfer over a gas permeable film, ammonia protonation, nonactin facilitated merocyanine-ammonium coextraction and plasmophore enhancement. The vast signal improvement is suggested to rely on solvatochroism, nanoparticle scattering and plasmonic interactions that are utilized constructively in a fluorescence ratio. In addition to fundamental medicinal and biological research applications in tissue physiology, reversible ammonia quantification will be possible for a majority of demanding imaging and non imaging applications such as monitoring of low ammonia background concentrations in air and non-invasive medicinal diagnosis through medical breath or saliva analysis. The nanoparticle doped sensor constitutes a highly competitive technique for ammonia sensing in complex matrixes and the

  2. Influence of pH of spray solution on optoelectronic properties of cadmium oxide thin films

    Hodlur, R. M.; Rabinal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly conducting transparent cadmium oxide thin films were prepared by the conventional spray pyrolysis technique. The pH of the spray solution is varied by adding ammonia/hydrochloric acid. The effect of pH on the morphology, crystallinity and optoelectronic properties of these films is studied. The structural analysis showed all the films in the cubic phase. For the films with pH < 7 (acidic condition), the preferred orientation is along the (111) direction and for those with pH >7 (alkaline condition), the preferred orientation is along the (200) direction. A lowest resistivity of 9.9 × 10 −4 Ω·cm (with carrier concentration = 5.1 × 10 20 cm −3 , mobility = 12.4 cm 2 /(V·s)) is observed for pH ≈ 12. The resistivity is tuned almost by three orders of magnitude by controlling the bath pH with optical transmittance more than 70%. Thus, the electrical conductivity of CdO films could be easily tuned by simply varying the pH of the spray solution without compromising the optical transparency. (paper)

  3. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa : an in vitro study

    van der Waal, S. V.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Ozok, A. R.; Exterkate, R. A. M.; van Marle, J.; Wesselink, P. R.; de Soet, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    van der Waal SV, van der Sluis LWM, Ozok AR, Exterkate RAM, van Marle J, Wesselink PR, de Soet JJ. The effects of hyperosmosis or high pH on a dual-species biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vitro study. International Endodontic Journal, 44, 11101117, 2011. Aim To

  4. Preliminary investigation on selective laser melting of 17-4ph steel using high laser powers of up to 1500w

    Makoana, Nkutwane W

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High laser powers of up to 1500W were used to additively manufacture 17-4PH samples. Porosity was measured using the image analysis technique, and all samples are fairly dense with a maximum of 0.42 percent porosity....

  5. Hypertrophy of proximal tubular epithelial cells induced by low pH in vitro is independent of ammoniagenesis.

    Bevington, A; Millwater, C J; Walls, J

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis can lead to tubular hypertrophy in vivo. This is thought to arise from stimulation of renal production of ammonia, a known hypertrophic agent. To examine this effect in vitro, confluent opossum (OK) proximal tubular epithelial cells were cultured at acidic pH (7.21 +/- 0.02) or at control pH (7.37 +/- 0.01) for 4 days. Protein content was 9% higher at acidic pH whereas DNA content was unaffected. The resulting increase in mean cell size (protein/DNA ratio) was 10% but correlated inversely with the mass of cells in control wells, varying from +48% at low cell mass to -14% at high cell mass. In contrast, low pH decreased 3H-thymidine incorporation by 9%. However, ammonia production was unaffected. These changes in protein/DNA ratio and 3H-thymidine incorporation cannot therefore be attributed to acid-induced ammoniagenesis and imply that low pH exerts a more direct effect on tubular cell growth than previously envisaged.

  6. Ammonia removal from landfill leachate by air stripping and absorption.

    Ferraz, Fernanda M; Povinelli, Jurandyr; Vieira, Eny Maria

    2013-01-01

    An old landfill leachate was pre-treated in a pilot-scale aerated packed tower operated in batch mode for total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) removal. The stripped ammonia was recovered with a 0.4 mol L(-1) H2SO4 solution, deionized water and tap water. Ca(OH)2 (95% purity) or commercial hydrated lime was added to the raw leachate to adjust its pH to 11, causing removal of colour (82%) and heavy metals (70-90% for Zn, Fe and Mn). The 0.4 molL(-1) H2SO4 solution was able to neutralize 80% of the stripped ammonia removed from 12 L of leachate. The effectiveness of the neutralization of ammonia with deionized water was 75%. Treating 100 L of leachate, the air stripping tower removed 88% of TAN after 72 h of aeration, and 87% of the stripped ammonia was recovered in two 31 L pilot-scale absorption units filled with 20 L of tap water.

  7. Evaluation of ammonia metabolism in the skeletal muscles of patients with cirrhosis using N-13 ammonia PET

    Susumu Shiomi; Etsushi Kawamura; Takehiro Hayashi; Ai Oe; Jin Kotani; Hirotaka Ishizu; Kenji Torii; Joji Kawabe; Akihiro Tamori; Daiki Habu; Tadashi Takeda; Shuhei Nishiguchi

    2004-01-01

    difference of SUV before to after administration of BCAA (0.20). However, the rate of increase in difference of SUV before to after administration in case 2 was high (0.38). In case 1, the blood ammonia level decreased from 54 to 48 g/dl following BCAA therapy. In case 2, it decreased from 112 to 86 g/dl after the same therapy. Conclusions: The increase in radioactivity in both patients by administration of BCAA indicates that BCAA assisted ammonia metabolism in the muscle in patients with liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, the SUV elevation after treatment with BCAA in decompensated liver cirrhosis was more distinct than that in compensated liver cirrhosis. This shows that excess ammonia which cannot be metabolized in the liver is released into the blood and metabolized in the muscles in cases of decompensated liver cirrhosis. Although animal experiments regarding this issue have been reported, examination in humans has not been reported. Using ammonia PET, detailed investigation of the role of ammonia metabolism in the muscle in patients with hepatic encephalopathy, which reflects the prognosis of patients with cirrhosis, will be possible in the future. In conclusion, ammonia metabolism in the muscle of patients with liver cirrhosis could be examined noninvasively under physiological conditions using N-13 ammonia PET. The muscles were found to metabolize ammonia partially, and the role of this contribution to metabolism of ammonia in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis is particularly important. (authors)

  8. Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification

    Laverock, B.; Kitidis, V.; Tait, K.; Gilbert, J. A.; Osborn, A. M.; Widdicombe, S.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by the dissolution of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater, is projected to cause significant changes to marine ecology and biogeochemistry. Potential impacts on the microbially driven cycling of nitrogen are of particular concern. Specifically, under seawater pH levels approximating future OA scenarios, rates of ammonia oxidation (the rate-limiting first step of the nitrification pathway) have been shown to dramatically decrease in seawater, but not in underlying sediments. However, no prior study has considered the interactive effects of microbial ammonia oxidation and macrofaunal bioturbation activity, which can enhance nitrogen transformation rates. Using experimental mesocosms, we investigated the responses to OA of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms inhabiting surface sediments and sediments within burrow walls of the mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura. Seawater was acidified to one of four target pH values (pHT 7.90, 7.70, 7.35 and 6.80) in comparison with a control (pHT 8.10). At pHT 8.10, ammonia oxidation rates in burrow wall sediments were, on average, fivefold greater than in surface sediments. However, at all acidified pH values (pH ≤ 7.90), ammonia oxidation rates in burrow sediments were significantly inhibited (by 79–97%; p < 0.01), whereas rates in surface sediments were unaffected. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances increased significantly as pHT declined; by contrast, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidation (amoA) genes did not vary. This research suggests that OA could cause substantial reductions in total benthic ammonia oxidation rates in coastal bioturbated sediments, leading to corresponding changes in coupled nitrogen cycling between the benthic and pelagic realms. PMID:23980243

  9. A Feasibility Study of Ammonia Recovery from Coking Wastewater by Coupled Operation of a Membrane Contactor and Membrane Distillation

    Po-Hsun Lin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of ammonia (NH3 in the steel manufacturing process wastewater is contributed from the coking wastewater, which is usually treated by biological processes. However, the NH3 in the coking wastewater is typically too high for biological treatment due to its inhibitory concentration. Therefore, a two-stage process including a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC and a modified membrane distillation (MD system was developed and applied to reduce and recover NH3 from coking wastewater. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate different membrane materials, receiving solutions, and operation parameters for the system, remove NH3 from the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L, which is amenable to the biological process, and recover ammonia solution for reuse. As a result, the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE HFMC using sulfuric acid as a receiving solution can achieve a maximum NH3-N transmembrane flux of 1.67 g N/m2·h at pH of 11.5 and reduce NH3 in the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L. The NH3 in the converted ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 was then recovered by the modified MD using ice water as the receiving solution to produce ≥3% of ammonia solution for reuse.

  10. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange...

  11. Simultaneous removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn from stormwater using high-efficiency industrial sorbents: Effect of pH, contact time and humic acid

    Genc-Fuhrman, Hülya; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Ledin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of contact time, solution pH, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the combined removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn is investigated in batch tests using alumina, granulated activated carbon (GAC), and bauxsol coated sand (BCS) as sorbents. It is found that the equilibrium time for Cd......, Cu, Ni and Zn is about 4 h, while no clear equilibrium is observed for As and Cr. It is also found that increasing the pH until pH ~. 8 enhanced Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn removal, but increasing the pH above this point had no major effect. In the cases of As and Cr, higher pH values (i.e. >. 7) decreased...... that natural organic matter may severely influence the removal efficiency, such that, for most metals the removal was reduced to the half, while for Cr it was increased to the double for alumina and BCS. Consequently, a properly working filter set up may not work properly anymore when receiving high loads...

  12. pH sensor using AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Sc2O3 in the gate region

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Ren, F.; Gila, B. P.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    Ungated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) exhibit large changes in current upon exposing the gate region to polar liquids. The polar nature of the electrolyte introduced leds to a change of surface charges, producing a change in surface potential at the semiconductor/liquid interface. The use of Sc 2 O 3 gate dielectric produced superior results to either a native oxide or UV ozone-induced oxide in the gate region. The ungated HEMTs with Sc 2 O 3 in the gate region exhibited a linear change in current between pH 3 and 10 of 37 μA/pH. The HEMT pH sensors show stable operation with a resolution of <0.1 pH over the entire pH range. The results indicate that the HEMTs may have application in monitoring pH solution changes between 7 and 8, the range of interest for testing human blood

  13. Gold cementation with zinc powder from leaching solutions with ammonia-thiosulphate; Cementacion de oro con polvo de cinc en soluciones de lixiviacion coon amoniaco-tiosulfato

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Alvarez, R.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2005-07-01

    The cementation of gold with powder of zinc, from solutions with thiosulphate and ammonia, was studied. the variables evaluated were: thiosulphate concentration, ammonia concentration, pH, copper concentration and zinc concentration. the results have revealed the great importance of ammonia/thiosulphate relationship in this process and that the impurities presence like copper and zinc will to inhibit the cementation process. (Author) 16 refs.

  14. A Road Map Towards High pH Adaptability: Phenomic and Genomic Approaches to Azalea Breeding (Rhododendron sp.)

    A research grant from the Azalea Society of America has enabled us to collect and begin evaluating diverse Rhododendron viscosum germplasm to identify genetic and phenotypic variation for pH adaptability. During the Spring of 2014, we developed novel, in vitro screening methods for Rhododendron to ...

  15. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  16. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics.......Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of reaction paths and energies for the industrial and the biological catalytic ammonia synthesis processes are compared. The industrial catalyst is modeled by a ruthenium surface, while the active part of the enzyme is modeled by a MoFe6S9 complex...

  17. Ammonia-water Rankine cycle

    Bo Hanliang; Ma Changwen; Wu Shaorong

    1997-01-01

    On characteristics of heating source and cooling source in nuclear heating reactor cooperation, the authors advance a new kind of power cycle in which a multicomponent mixture as the work fluid, ammonia-water Rankine cycle, describe its running principle, and compare it with steam Rankine cycle in the same situation. The result is that: the new kind of power cycle, ammonia-water Rankine cycle has higher electricity efficiency; it suits for the situation of heating source and cooling source which offered by nuclear heating reactor cooperation. For low temperature heating source, it maybe has a widely application

  18. High-Resolution Denitrification Kinetics in Pasture Soils Link N2O Emissions to pH, and Denitrification to C Mineralization.

    Md Sainur Samad

    Full Text Available Denitrification in pasture soils is mediated by microbial and physicochemical processes leading to nitrogen loss through the emission of N2O and N2. It is known that N2O reduction to N2 is impaired by low soil pH yet controversy remains as inconsistent use of soil pH measurement methods by researchers, and differences in analytical methods between studies, undermine direct comparison of results. In addition, the link between denitrification and N2O emissions in response to carbon (C mineralization and pH in different pasture soils is still not well described. We hypothesized that potential denitrification rate and aerobic respiration rate would be positively associated with soils. This relationship was predicted to be more robust when a high resolution analysis is performed as opposed to a single time point comparison. We tested this by characterizing 13 different temperate pasture soils from northern and southern hemispheres sites (Ireland and New Zealand using a fully automated-high-resolution GC detection system that allowed us to detect a wide range of gas emissions simultaneously. We also compared the impact of using different extractants for determining pH on our conclusions. In all pH measurements, soil pH was strongly and negatively associated with both N2O production index (IN2O and N2O/(N2O+N2 product ratio. Furthermore, emission kinetics across all soils revealed that the denitrification rates under anoxic conditions (NO+N2O+N2 μmol N/h/vial were significantly associated with C mineralization (CO2 μmol/h/vial measured both under oxic (r2 = 0.62, p = 0.0015 and anoxic (r2 = 0.89, p<0.0001 conditions.

  19. Wastewater centrate ammonia removal by chemisorption processes

    Barbachem, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    it would have had the ARP technology not been in place. The system performed at high ammonia removal efficiencies even after ferric chloride and polymer resin-poisoning events. The pilot plant was subject to weather extremes from 90 o F days in September to 25 o F days in December. The presentation will include a description of both the full-scale the pilot plant processes and the results of the pilot plant study, including: ammonia reduction through the process train; the effects of iron and polymer on process performance; soluble zinc concentrations in the process effluent; and, operational difficulties and lessons learned. (author)

  20. Electrostatic Assemblies of Well-Dispersed AgNPs on the Surface of Electrospun Nanofibers as Highly Active SERS Substrates for Wide-Range pH Sensing.

    Yang, Tong; Ma, Jun; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has shown high promise in analysis and bioanalysis, wherein noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) such as silver nanoparticles were employed as substrates because of their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. However, SERS-based pH sensing was restricted because of the aggregation of NMNPs in acidic medium or biosamples with high ionic strength. Herein, by using the electrostatic interaction as a driving force, AgNPs are assembled on the surface of ethylene imine polymer (PEI)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) electrospun nanofibers, which are then applied as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrate with an enhancement factor (EF) of 10(7)-10(8). When p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) is used as an indicator with its b2 mode, a good and wide linear response to pH ranging from 2.56 to 11.20 could be available, and the as-prepared nanocomposite fibers then could be fabricated as excellent pH sensors in complicated biological samples such as urine, considering that the pH of urine could reflect the acid-base status of a person. This work not only emerges a cost-effective, direct, and convenient approach to homogeneously decorate AgNPs on the surface of polymer nanofibers but also supplies a route for preparing other noble metal nanofibrous sensing membranes.

  1. Speciation modeling of ammonia and other major solutes in anaerobic digesters

    Anaerobic digestion of high-nitrogen wastes can be inhibited by high concentrations of un-ionized ammonia, NH**3 (aq). Understanding the toxicity of NH**3 (aq) to anaerobic digestion requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling its concentration. Previous work on ammonia toxicity in an...

  2. A study on ammonia removal properties using clinoptilolite Part 1 : characterization of clinoptilolite and ammonia removal properties in batch reactor

    Moon, Jeong Min; Chung, Jong Shik [Dept. of Chemical Engineering/School of Environment Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea); Sun, De Shi [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Techonology (China)

    2000-04-01

    A natural zeolite, deposit located at Guryongpo, Young-il bay, was found to be clinoptilolite containing impurities of heulandite and mordenite. Cation exchange capacity(CEC) for ammonia was about 1.41 meq/g from Na{sup +}-form of the zeolite. In batch experiment, removal efficiency of ammonia was increased as particle size of zeolite and initial concentration of Na{sup +} were decreased and SR(Stoichiometric Ratio), time, and initial concentration of ammonia increased. More than 70% aluminum ion could be removed from water having 3 ppm ammonia and 0.7 ppm Al{sup 3+} by the batch adsorption(ion exchange) experiment. Regeneration of used zeolite with NaCl solution of pH=12 has shown more than 95% of regeneration efficiency when SR'(ratio of the amount of NaCl solution employed actually to the amount in a stoichiometric quantity) was equal to 2.0. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Response of O2 and pH to ENSO in the California Current System in a high-resolution global climate model

    Turi, Giuliana; Alexander, Michael; Lovenduski, Nicole S.; Capotondi, Antonietta; Scott, James; Stock, Charles; Dunne, John; John, Jasmin; Jacox, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Coastal upwelling systems, such as the California Current System (CalCS), naturally experience a wide range of O2 concentrations and pH values due to the seasonality of upwelling. Nonetheless, changes in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) have been shown to measurably affect the biogeochemical and physical properties of coastal upwelling regions. In this study, we use a novel, high-resolution global climate model (GFDL-ESM2.6) to investigate the influence of warm and cold ENSO events on variations in the O2 concentration and the pH of the CalCS coastal waters. An assessment of the CalCS response to six El Niño and seven La Niña events in ESM2.6 reveals significant variations in the response between events. However, these variations overlay a consistent physical and biogeochemical (O2 and pH) response in the composite mean. Focusing on the mean response, our results demonstrate that O2 and pH are affected rather differently in the euphotic zone above ˜ 100 m. The strongest O2 response reaches up to several hundreds of kilometers offshore, whereas the pH signal occurs only within a ˜ 100 km wide band along the coast. By splitting the changes in O2 and pH into individual physical and biogeochemical components that are affected by ENSO variability, we found that O2 variability in the surface ocean is primarily driven by changes in surface temperature that affect the O2 solubility. In contrast, surface pH changes are predominantly driven by changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), which in turn is affected by upwelling, explaining the confined nature of the pH signal close to the coast. Below ˜ 100 m, we find conditions with anomalously low O2 and pH, and by extension also anomalously low aragonite saturation, during La Niña. This result is consistent with findings from previous studies and highlights the stress that the CalCS ecosystem could periodically undergo in addition to impacts due to climate change.

  4. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process

  5. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-02-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  6. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  7. Modified Ammonia Removal Model Based on Equilibrium and Mass Transfer Principles

    Shanableh, A.; Imteaz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Yoon et al. 1 presented an approximate mathematical model to describe ammonia removal from an experimental batch reactor system with gaseous headspace. The development of the model was initially based on assuming instantaneous equilibrium between ammonia in the aqueous and gas phases. In the model, a 'saturation factor, β' was defined as a constant and used to check whether the equilibrium assumption was appropriate. The authors used the trends established by the estimated β values to conclude that the equilibrium assumption was not valid. The authors presented valuable experimental results obtained using a carefully designed system and the model used to analyze the results accounted for the following effects: speciation of ammonia between NH 3 and NH 4 + as a function of pH: temperature dependence of the reactions constants; and air flow rate. In this article, an alternative model based on the exact solution of the governing mass-balance differential equations was developed and used to describe ammonia removal without relying on the use of the saturation factor. The modified model was also extended to mathematically describe the pH dependence of the ammonia removal rate, in addition to accounting for the speciation of ammonia, temperature dependence of reactions constants, and air flow rate. The modified model was used to extend the analysis of the original experimental data presented by Yoon et al. 1 and the results matched the theory in an excellent manner

  8. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia.

  9. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN EAR-LOBE CAPILLARY BLOOD IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO ARTERIAL BLOOD AMMONIA

    HUIZENGA, [No Value; GIPS, CH; CONN, HO; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  10. Determination of ammonia in ear-lobe capillary blood is an alternative to arterial blood ammonia

    Huizenga, J. R.; Gips, C. H.; Conn, H. O.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  11. Simultaneous removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn from stormwater using high-efficiency industrial sorbents: Effect of pH, contact time and humic acid.

    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Mikkelsen, Peter S; Ledin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The effect of contact time, solution pH, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the combined removal of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn is investigated in batch tests using alumina, granulated activated carbon (GAC), and bauxsol coated sand (BCS) as sorbents. It is found that the equilibrium time for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn is about 4h, while no clear equilibrium is observed for As and Cr. It is also found that increasing the pH until pH~8 enhanced Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn removal, but increasing the pH above this point had no major effect. In the cases of As and Cr, higher pH values (i.e. >7) decreased their removal. The presence of both 20 and 100mg/L HA suppressed the heavy metal removal except for Cr, and the suppression was higher at the higher HA concentration. Geochemical simulations suggest that this is due to the formation of dissolved HA-metal complexes preventing effective metal sorption. In the case of Cr, the presence of HA increased the removal when using alumina or BCS, while hindering the removal when using GAC. The findings show that the pH-value of the stormwater to be treated must be in the range of 6-7 in order to achieve removal of the full spectrum of metals. The results also show that natural organic matter may severely influence the removal efficiency, such that, for most metals the removal was reduced to the half, while for Cr it was increased to the double for alumina and BCS. Consequently, a properly working filter set up may not work properly anymore when receiving high loads of natural organic acids during the pollen season in spring or during defoliation in autumn and early winter, and during mixing of runoff with snowmelt having a low pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo tank...

  13. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  14. Synthesis of ammonia with microwave plasma

    Xu Wenguo; Yu Aimin; Liu Jun; Jin Qinhan

    1991-01-01

    THe synthesis of ammonia absorbed on 13X zeolite with the aid of microwave plasma is described. The ammonia molecule absorbed on 13X zeolite as ammonium ions were detected by IR spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the ammonia synthesis is facilitated by the surface reactions of NH x (x = 1, 2) radicals adsorbed on zeolite with hydrogen atoms

  15. Ultra-bright red-emitting photostable perylene bisimide dyes: new indicators for ratiometric sensing of high pH or carbon dioxide.

    Pfeifer, David; Klimant, Ingo; Borisov, Sergey M

    2018-05-08

    New pH sensitive perylene bisimide indicator dyes were synthesised and used for fabrication of optical sensors. The highly photostable dyes show absorption/emission bands in the red/near-infrared (NIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum, high molar absorption coefficients (up to 100 000 M-1 cm-1) and fluorescence quantum yields close to unity. The absorption and emission spectra show strong bathochromic shift upon deprotonation of imidazole nitrogen which makes the dyes promising as ratiometric fluorescent indicators. Physical entrapment of the indicators into polyurethane hydrogel enables pH determination in alkaline pH. It is also shown that plastic carbon dioxide solid state sensor can be manufactured via immobilization of the pH indicator in a hydrophilic polymer, along with a quaternary ammonium base. The influence of plasticizer, different lipophilic bases and humidity on the sensitivity of the sensor material were systematically investigated. The disubstituted perylene, particularly, features two deprotonation equilibria enabling sensing over a very broad range from 0.5 to 1000 hPa pCO2. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hydrolysis of solid ammonia borane

    Demirci, Umit B.; Miele, Philippe [Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-07-01

    Ammonia borane NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} is a promising hydrogen storage material by virtue of a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (GHSC) of 19.5 wt%. However, stored hydrogen has to be effectively released, one way of recovering this hydrogen being the metal-catalyzed hydrolysis. The present study focuses on CoCl{sub 2}-catalyzed hydrolysis of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} with the concern of improving the effective GHSC of the system NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O. For that, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} is stored as a solid and H{sub 2}O is provided in stoichiometric amount. By this way, an effective GHSC of 7.8 wt% has been reached at 25 C. To our knowledge, it is the highest value ever reported. Besides, one of the highest hydrogen generation rates (HGRs, 21 ml(H{sub 2}) min{sup -1}) has been found. In parallel, the increases of the water amount and temperature have been studied and the reaction kinetics has been determined. Finally, it has been observed that some NH{sub 3} release, what is detrimental for a fuel cell. To summarize, high performances in terms of GHSCs and HGRs can be reached with NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} and since research devoted to this boron hydride is at the beginning we may be confident in making it viable in a near future. (author)

  17. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  18. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    man and animal urine, and later ammonia recovered from coke manufacture were .... IOOO°C. Since the reaction cannot be moved to the RHS at low temperature, we .... application of the law of mass action kinetics and chemical equilibria ...

  19. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...

  20. Exergy destruction in ammonia scrubbers

    Zisopoulos, Filippos K.; Goot, van der Atze Jan; Boom, Remko M.

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical ammonia scrubbing process by sulfuric acid solution is assessed with the concept of exergy. The exergy destruction of chemical neutralization is mainly (75–94%) due to changes in the chemical exergy of streams and thermal effects from the reaction while mixing effects have a limited

  1. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis. Jayant M Modak. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1159-1167. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1159-1167. Keywords.

  2. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Before synthetic nitrogen fixation, wastes and manures of various types or their decomposition products, and ammonium sulfate, which is a by-product from the coking of coal, were the primary sources of agricultural nitrogen. Chilean saltpetre, saltpetre from hu- man and animal urine, and later ammonia recovered from coke.

  3. Free ammonia offers algal crop protection from predators in dairy wastewater and ammonium-rich media.

    Thomas, Patrick K; Dunn, Gary P; Passero, Maxine; Feris, Kevin P

    2017-11-01

    Cost-effective methods for protecting crops from grazing organisms like rotifers are needed to reduce the risk of pond crashes in mass algal cultures. We present a novel strategy to optimize the exposure time to free ammonia, via control of media pH, in both defined media and dairy anaerobic digester effluent to suppress rotifers and maintain algal productivity. We tested five different free ammonia exposure times (0, 1, 2, 6, and 12h) and found a significant nonlinear effect of exposure time (p0.9) on rotifer survival. In both media types, 6-12h of elevated free ammonia significantly reduced Brachionus plicatilis rotifer survival with no negative effects on Nannochloropsis oculata, while shorter exposure times were insufficient to inhibit rotifers, leading to severe algal culture crashes. These results suggest that algal crops can be protected from rotifers, without productivity loss, by elevating free ammonia for 6 or more hours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  5. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Hainanmycin on Protein Degradation and Populations of Ammonia-producing Bacteria

    Z. B. Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro fermentation was conducted to determine the effects of hainanmycin on protein degradation and populations of ammonia-producing bacteria. The substrates (DM basis for in vitro fermentation consisted of alfalfa hay (31.7%, Chinese wild rye grass hay (28.3%, ground corn grain (24.5%, soybean meal (15.5% with a forage: concentrate of 60:40. Treatments were the control (no additive and hainanmycin supplemented at 0.1 (H0.1, 1 (H1, 10 (H10, and 100 mg/kg (H100 of the substrates. After 24 h of fermentation, the highest addition level of hainanmycin decreased total VFA concentration and increased the final pH. The high addition level of hainanmycin (H1, H10, and H100 reduced (p0.05. After 24 h of fermentation, H10 and H100 increased (p<0.05 concentrations of peptide nitrogen and AA nitrogen and proteinase activity, and decreased (p<0.05 NH3-N concentration and deaminase activity compared with control. Peptidase activitives were not affected by hainanmycin. Hainanmycin supplementation only inhibited the growth of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, which is one of the species of low deaminative activity. Hainanmycin supplementation also decreased (p<0.05 relative population sizes of hyper-ammonia-producing species, except for H0.1 on Clostridium aminophilum. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with hainanmycin could improve ruminal fermentation and modify protein degradation by changing population size of ammonia-producing bacteria in vitro; and the addition level of 10 mg/kg appeared to achieve the best results.

  6. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m -2 week -1 . The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  7. Impacts of an Ammonia Leak on the Cabin Atmosphere of the International Space Station

    Duchesne, Stephanie M.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Son, Chang H.; Perry Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic chemical release into the cabin atmosphere is one of the three major emergency scenarios identified on the International Space Station (ISS). The release of anhydrous ammonia, the coolant used in the U.S. On-orbit Segment (USOS) External Active Thermal Control Subsystem (EATCS), into the ISS cabin atmosphere is one of the most serious toxic chemical release cases identified on board ISS. The USOS Thermal Control System (TCS) includes an Internal Thermal Control Subsystem (ITCS) water loop and an EATCS ammonia loop that transfer heat at the interface heat exchanger (IFHX). Failure modes exist that could cause a breach within the IFHX. This breach would result in high pressure ammonia from the EATCS flowing into the lower pressure ITCS water loop. As the pressure builds in the ITCS loop, it is likely that the gas trap, which has the lowest maximum design pressure within the ITCS, would burst and cause ammonia to enter the ISS atmosphere. It is crucial to first characterize the release of ammonia into the ISS atmosphere in order to develop methods to properly mitigate the environmental risk. This paper will document the methods used to characterize an ammonia leak into the ISS cabin atmosphere. A mathematical model of the leak was first developed in order to define the flow of ammonia into the ISS cabin atmosphere based on a series of IFHX rupture cases. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods were then used to model the dispersion of the ammonia throughout the ISS cabin and determine localized effects and ventilation effects on the dispersion of ammonia. Lastly, the capabilities of the current on-orbit systems to remove ammonia were reviewed and scrubbing rates of the ISS systems were defined based on the ammonia release models. With this full characterization of the release of ammonia from the USOS TCS, an appropriate mitigation strategy that includes crew and system emergency response procedures, personal protection equipment use, and atmosphere monitoring

  8. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn5(OH)8Cl2·2H2O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 °C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 °C and in the LDH at 276 °C.

  9. Stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Fcc-Co surfaces: A DFT study

    Ma, F.F.; Ma, S.H., E-mail: mash.phy@htu.edu.cn; Jiao, Z.Y.; Dai, X.Q.

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • On Co surfaces, oxygen atom not only strengthens ammonia-substrate interaction but also facilitates ammonia dissociation on the Co surfaces. • Pre-adsorbed O atom significantly promotes the stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Co(110), giving rise to N atom strongly binding with the surface. • The dissociation of NH appears to be the rate-determining step on O-covered Co(111) and Co(100) surfaces. • The species N and NH produced in ammonia dehydrogenation are likely responsible for cobalt catalyst deactivation in the excess of oxygen atom. - Abstract: The stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on clean and O-covered Co surfaces have been studied by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that the interaction of species NH{sub x} (x = 0–3) with the Co surfaces become stronger with its further dehydrogenation, and oxygen atom not only strengthens ammonia-substrate interaction but also facilitates ammonia dissociation. Specifically, pre-adsorbed O atom significantly promotes the stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Co(110), giving rise to N atom strongly binding with the surface. In contrast, the dissociation of NH appears to be the rate-determining step on O-covered Co(111) and Co(100) surfaces, due to the high energy barriers. And present results demonstrate that the species N and NH produced in ammonia dehydrogenation are likely responsible for cobalt catalyst deactivation in the excess of oxygen atom.

  10. Stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Fcc-Co surfaces: A DFT study

    Ma, F.F.; Ma, S.H.; Jiao, Z.Y.; Dai, X.Q.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • On Co surfaces, oxygen atom not only strengthens ammonia-substrate interaction but also facilitates ammonia dissociation on the Co surfaces. • Pre-adsorbed O atom significantly promotes the stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Co(110), giving rise to N atom strongly binding with the surface. • The dissociation of NH appears to be the rate-determining step on O-covered Co(111) and Co(100) surfaces. • The species N and NH produced in ammonia dehydrogenation are likely responsible for cobalt catalyst deactivation in the excess of oxygen atom. - Abstract: The stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on clean and O-covered Co surfaces have been studied by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that the interaction of species NH x (x = 0–3) with the Co surfaces become stronger with its further dehydrogenation, and oxygen atom not only strengthens ammonia-substrate interaction but also facilitates ammonia dissociation. Specifically, pre-adsorbed O atom significantly promotes the stepwise dehydrogenation of ammonia on Co(110), giving rise to N atom strongly binding with the surface. In contrast, the dissociation of NH appears to be the rate-determining step on O-covered Co(111) and Co(100) surfaces, due to the high energy barriers. And present results demonstrate that the species N and NH produced in ammonia dehydrogenation are likely responsible for cobalt catalyst deactivation in the excess of oxygen atom.

  11. Archaea produce lower yields of N2 O than bacteria during aerobic ammonia oxidation in soil.

    Hink, Linda; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen fertilisation of agricultural soil contributes significantly to emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N 2 O), which is generated during denitrification and, in oxic soils, mainly by ammonia oxidisers. Although laboratory cultures of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) produce N 2 O, their relative activities in soil are unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that AOB dominate ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production under conditions of high inorganic ammonia (NH 3 ) input, but result mainly from the activity of AOA when NH 3 is derived from mineralisation. 1-octyne, a recently discovered inhibitor of AOB, was used to distinguish N 2 O production resulting from archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation in soil microcosms, and specifically inhibited AOB growth, activity and N 2 O production. In unamended soils, ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production were lower and resulted mainly from ammonia oxidation by AOA. The AOA N 2 O yield relative to nitrite produced was half that of AOB, likely due to additional enzymatic mechanisms in the latter, but ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production were directly linked in all treatments. Relative contributions of AOA and AOB to N 2 O production, therefore, reflect their respective contributions to ammonia oxidation. These results suggest potential mitigation strategies for N 2 O emissions from fertilised agricultural soils. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Soil pH is a Key Determinant of Soil Fungal Community Composition in the Ny-Ålesund Region, Svalbard (High Arctic)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Neng-Fei; Liu, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Yu, Li-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the fungal community composition and its relationships with properties of surface soils in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic). A total of thirteen soil samples were collected and soil fungal community was analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing with fungi-specific primers targeting the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. The following eight soil properties were analyzed: pH, organic carbon (C), organic nitrogen (N), ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N), silicate silicon (SiO42--Si), nitrite nitrogen (NO2--N), phosphate phosphorus (PO43--P), and nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N). A total of 57,952 reads belonging to 541 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found. of these OTUs, 343 belonged to Ascomycota, 100 to Basidiomycota, 31 to Chytridiomycota, 22 to Glomeromycota, 11 to Zygomycota, 10 to Rozellomycota, whereas 24 belonged to unknown fungi. The dominant orders were Helotiales, Verrucariales, Agaricales, Lecanorales, Chaetothyriales, Lecideales, and Capnodiales. The common genera (>eight soil samples) were Tetracladium, Mortierella, Fusarium, Cortinarius, and Atla. Distance-based redundancy analysis (db-rda) and analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) revealed that soil pH (p = 0.001) was the most significant factor in determining the soil fungal community composition. Members of Verrucariales were found to predominate in soils of pH 8–9, whereas Sordariales predominated in soils of pH 7–8 and Coniochaetales predominated in soils of pH 6–7. The results suggest the presence and distribution of diverse soil fungal communities in the High Arctic, which can provide reliable data for studying the ecological responses of soil fungal communities to climate changes in the Arctic. PMID:26955371

  13. Soil pH is a key determinant of soil fungal community composition in the Ny-Ålesund Region, Svalbard (High Arctic

    Tao eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the fungal community composition and its relationships with properties of surface soils in the Ny-Ålesund Region (Svalbard, High Arctic. A total of thirteen soil samples were collected and soil fungal community was analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing with fungi-specific primers targeting the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS region. The following eight soil properties were analyzed: pH, organic carbon (C, organic nitrogen (N, ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N, silicate silicon (SiO42--Si, nitrite nitrogen (NO2--N, phosphate phosphorus (PO43--P and nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N. A total of 57,952 reads belonging to 541 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were found. Of these OTUs, 343 belonged to Ascomycota, 100 to Basidiomycota, 31 to Chytridiomycota, 22 to Glomeromycota, 11 to Zygomycota, 10 to Rozellomycota, whereas 24 belonged to unknown fungi. The dominant orders were Helotiales, Verrucariales, Agaricales, Lecanorales, Chaetothyriales, Lecideales, and Capnodiales. The common genera (>8 soil samples were Tetracladium, Mortierella, Fusarium, Cortinarius, and Atla. Distance-based redundancy analysis (db-rda and analysis of similarities (ANOSIM revealed that soil pH (p=0.001 was the most significant factor in determining the soil fungal community composition. Members of Verrucariales were found to predominate in soils of pH 8-9, whereas Sordariales predominated in soils of pH 7-8 and Coniochaetales predominated in soil samples of pH 6-7. The results suggest the presence and distribution of diverse soil fungal communities in the High Arctic, which can provide reliable data for studying the ecological responses of soil fungal communities to climate changes in the Arctic.

  14. Comparisons Study of Phosphate Removal in Unaerated and Aerated High Calcium Steel Slag Filter System of Different pH Feed

    Ahmad Siti Zu Nurain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess phosphorus in water body will lead to eutrophication. This study investigated the phosphate removal efficiencies of unaerated and aerated filter systems using high composition of Calcium (Ca steel slag as the filter media at different pH values of the wastewater influents. Lab-scale filters were developed using 25 mg/L synthetic wastewater and weekly sampling was done to monitor the phosphate removal efficiencies together with the concentration of metals (Calcium (Ca and Magnesium (Mg. The results show that both unaerated and aerated systems have excellent phosphate removal efficiency at all acidic, neutral and alkaline pH feed, though unaerated systems removed slightly better compared to aerated systems; 76-98% and 69-97% respectively. The dominant phosphate removal mechanism for aerated systems was adsorption, meanwhilefor unaerated systems; both adsorption and precipitation for acidic and neutral pH, whileprecipitation was more dominant at basic pH. The performance of unaerated systems are slightly better compared to aerated systems, however, aerated systems are recommended to be applied when simultaneous removal of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen are concerned.

  15. High pressure effect on the color of minced cured restructured ham at different levels of drying, pH, and NaCl.

    Bak, Kathrine Holmgaard; Lindahl, Gunilla; Karlsson, Anders H; Lloret, Elsa; Ferrini, Gabriele; Arnau, Jacint; Orlien, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    Color changes of minced cured restructured ham was studied considering the effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (600MPa, 13°C, 5min), raw meat pH(24) (low, normal, high), salt content (15, 30g/kg), and drying (20%, 50% weight loss). Raw hams were selected based on pH(24) in Semimembranosus, mixed with additives, frozen, sliced, and dried using the Quick-Dry-Slice® process. Meat color (CIE 1976 L*a*b*) and reflectance spectra were measured before and after HP treatment. HP significantly increased L*, decreased a*, and decreased b* for restructured ham dried to 20% weight loss, regardless of salt content and pH(24). L* and a* were best preserved in high pH/high salt restructured ham. HP had no effect on the color of restructured ham dried to 50% weight loss. HP had no effect on the shape of reflectance curves, indicating that the pigment responsible for minced cured restructured ham color did not change due to HP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes of ammonia, urea contents and transaminase activity in the body during aerial exposure and ammonia loading in Chinese loach Paramisgurnus dabryanus.

    Zhang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Ling-Yu; Gu, Bei-Yi; Fan, Qi-Xue

    2017-04-01

    The Paramisgurnus dabryanus was exposed to 30 mmol L -1 NH 4 Cl solution and air to assessing the change of body ammonia and urea contents and the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). After 48 h of ammonia exposure, ammonia concentration in the plasma, brain, liver and muscle were 3.3-fold, 5.6-fold, 3.5-fold and 4.2-fold, respectively, those of the control values. Plasma, brain, liver and muscle ammonia concentrations increased to 2.2-fold, 3.3-fold, 2.5-fold and 2.9-fold, respectively, those of control values in response to 48 h of aerial exposure. Within the given treatment (ammonia or aerial exposure), there was no change in plasma, brain and liver urea concentrations between exposure durations. The plasma ALT activity was significantly affected by exposure time during aerial exposure, while the liver ALT activity was not affected by ammonia or aerial exposure. Exposure to NH 4 Cl or air had no effect on either plasma or liver AST activity. Our results suggested that P. dabryanus could accumulate quite high level of internal ammonia because of the high ammonia tolerance in its cells and tissues, and NH 3 volatilization would be a possible ammonia detoxification strategy in P. dabryanus. Urea synthesis was not an effective mechanism to deal with environmental or internal ammonia problem. The significant increase of ALT activity in plasma during aerial exposure, indicating that alanine synthesis through certain amino acid catabolism may be subsistent in P. dabryanus.

  17. Energy efficient ammonia heat pump. Final report

    Madsen, Claus; Pijnenburg, B.; Schumann Grindorf, H. [Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Rolf [Alfa Laval, Lund (Sweden); Rasmussen, Bjarne D. [Grundfos, Bjerringbro (Denmark); Gram, S.; Fredborg Jakobsen, D. [Svedan Industri Koeleanlaeg, Greve (Denmark)

    2013-09-15

    The report describes the development of a highly effective ammonia heat pump. Heat pumps play an increasingly important role in the search for more effective use of energy in our society. Highly efficient heat pumps can contribute to reduced energy consumption and improved economy of the systems which they are a part of. An ammonia heat pump with high pressure reciprocating compressor and a novel split condenser was developed to prove potential for efficiency optimization. The split of the condenser in two parts can be utilized to obtain smaller temperature approaches and, thereby, improved heat pump efficiency at an equal heat exchanger area, when compared to the traditional solution with separate condenser and de-superheater. The split condenser design can also be exploited for heating a significant share of the total heating capacity to a temperature far above the condensing temperature. Furthermore, the prototype heat pump was equipped with a plate type evaporator combined with a U-turn separator with a minimum liquid height and a liquid pump with the purpose of creating optimum liquid circulation ratio for the highest possible heat transfer coefficients at the lowest possible pressure drop. The test results successfully confirmed the highest possible efficiency; a COP of 4.3 was obtained when heating water from 40 deg. C to 80 deg. C while operating with evaporating/condensing temperatures of +20 deg C/+73 deg C. (Author)

  18. Recovery of ammonia from anaerobically digested manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Nitrogen (N) can be recovered from different types of wastewaters. Among these wastewaters, anaerobically digested swine manure (digestate) is one with the highest N content in ammonia form. It is desirable to reduce the high ammonia content in swine manure because it reduces biogas production by in...

  19. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.; Weiner, I. David

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of

  20. Effect of pH on simultaneous saccharification and isomerization by glucoamylase and glucose isomerase.

    Mishra, Abha; Debnath Das, Meera

    2002-01-01

    pH and temperature play critical roles in multistep enzymatic conversions. In such conversions, the optimal pH for individual steps differs greatly. In this article, we describe the production of glucoamylase (from Aspergillus oryzae MTCC152 in solid-state fermentation) and glucose isomerase (from Streptomyces griseus NCIM2020 in submerged fermentation), used in industries for producing high-fructose syrup. Optimum pH for glucoamylase was found to be 5.0. For glucose isomerase, the optimum pH ranged between 7.0 and 8.5, depending on the type of buffer used. Optimum temperature for glucoamylase and glucose isomerase was 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively. When both the enzymatic conversions were performed simultaneously at a compromised pH of 6.5, both the enzymes showed lowered activity. We also studied the kinetics at different pHs, which allows the two-step reaction to take place simultaneously. This was done by separating two steps by a thin layer of urease. Ammonia generated by the hydrolysis of urea consumed the hydrogen ions, thereby allowing optimal activity of glucose isomerase at an acidic pH of 5.0.