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Sample records for high oxidation rate

  1. High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods

    Merchan-Merchan, W; Taylor, A M; Saveliev, A V

    2008-01-01

    Single-step flame synthesis of iron oxide nanorods is performed using iron probes inserted into an opposed-flow methane oxy-flame. The high temperature reacting environment of the flame tends to convert elemental iron into a high density layer of iron oxide nanorods. The diameters of the iron oxide nanorods vary from 10 to 100 nm with a typical length of a few microns. The structural characterization performed shows that nanorods possess a highly ordered crystalline structure with parameters corresponding to cubic magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) with the [100] direction oriented along the nanorod axis. Structural variations of straight nanorods such as bends, and T-branched and Y-branched shapes are frequently observed within the nanomaterials formed, opening pathways for synthesis of multidimensional, interconnected networks

  2. High rate capability of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    Takeuchi, E.S.; Zelinsky, M.A.; Keister, P.

    1986-01-01

    High rate characteristics of the lithium/silver vanadium oxide system were investigated in test cells providing four different limiting surface areas. The cells were tested by constant current and constant resistance discharge with current densities ranging from 0.04 to 6.4 mA/cm/sup 2/. The maximum current density under constant resistance and constant current discharges which would deliver 50% of theoretical capacity was determined. The ability of the cells to deliver high current pulses was evaluated by application of 10 second pulses with current densities ranging from 3 to 30 mA/cm/sup 2/. The voltage delay characteristics of the cells were determined after 1 to 3 months of storage at open circuit voltage or under low level background currents. The volumetric and gravimetric energy density of the SVO system is compared to other cathode materials

  3. Oxidative stress does not influence local sweat rate during high-intensity exercise.

    Meade, Robert D; Fujii, Naoto; Poirier, Martin P; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? We evaluated whether oxidative stress attenuates the contribution of nitric oxide to sweating during high-intensity exercise. What is the main finding and its importance? In contrast to our previous report of an oxidative stress-mediated reduction in nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilatation in this cohort during intense exercise, we demonstrated no influence of local ascorbate administration on the sweating response during moderate- (∼51% peak oxygen uptake) or high-intensity exercise (∼72% peak oxygen uptake). These new findings provide important mechanistic insight into how exercise-induced oxidative stress impacts sudomotor activity. Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent sweating is diminished during high- but not moderate-intensity exercise. We evaluated whether this impairment stems from increased oxidative stress during high-intensity exercise. On two separate days, 11 young (24 ± 4 years) men cycled in the heat (35°C) at a moderate [500 W; 52 ± 6% peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak )] or high (700 W; 71 ± 5% V̇O2 peak ) rate of metabolic heat production. Each session included two 30 min exercise bouts separated by a 20 min recovery period. Local sweat rate was monitored at four forearm skin sites continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with the following: (i) lactated Ringer solution (Control); (ii) 10 mm ascorbate (Ascorbate; non-selective antioxidant); (iii) 10 mm N G -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor); or (iv) 10 mm ascorbate plus 10 mm l-NAME (Ascorbate + l-NAME). During moderate exercise, sweat rate was attenuated at the l-NAME and Ascorbate + l-NAME sites (both ∼1.0 mg min -1  cm -2 ; all P < 0.05) but not at the Ascorbate site (∼1.1 mg min -1  cm -2 ; both P ≥ 0.28) in comparison to the Control site (∼1.1 mg min -1  cm -2 ). However, no differences were observed between treatment sites (∼1.4 mg min -1  cm -2 ; P = 0

  4. High-rate reduction of copper oxide using atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma microjets

    Tajima, Satomi; Tsuchiya, Shouichi; Matsumori, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Shigeki; Ichiki, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of copper oxide was performed using an atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma (AP-ICP) microjet while varying the input power P between 15 and 50 W. Cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) and cupric oxide (CuO) were formed on the sputtered Cu surface by thermal annealing. Dynamic behavior of the microplasma jet, optical emission from H atoms, the substrate temperature, chemical bonding states of the treated surface, and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer were measured to study the fundamental reduction process. Surface composition and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer changed significantly with P. Rapid reduction of CuO and Cu 2 O was achieved at a rate of 493 nm/min at P = 50 W since high-density H atoms were produced by the AP-ICP microjet.

  5. High-rate reduction of copper oxide using atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma microjets

    Tajima, Satomi; Tsuchiya, Shouichi [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Matsumori, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Shigeki [Panasonic Factory Solutions Co., Ltd., 2-7 Matsuba-cho, Kadoma-city, Osaka, 571-8502 (Japan); Ichiki, Takanori, E-mail: ichiki@sogo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Institute of Engineering Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Reduction of copper oxide was performed using an atmospheric-pressure inductively coupled plasma (AP-ICP) microjet while varying the input power P between 15 and 50 W. Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) and cupric oxide (CuO) were formed on the sputtered Cu surface by thermal annealing. Dynamic behavior of the microplasma jet, optical emission from H atoms, the substrate temperature, chemical bonding states of the treated surface, and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer were measured to study the fundamental reduction process. Surface composition and the thickness of the reduced Cu layer changed significantly with P. Rapid reduction of CuO and Cu{sub 2}O was achieved at a rate of 493 nm/min at P = 50 W since high-density H atoms were produced by the AP-ICP microjet.

  6. High basal metabolic rate does not elevate oxidative stress during reproduction in laboratory mice.

    Brzęk, Paweł; Książek, Aneta; Ołdakowski, Łukasz; Konarzewski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Increased oxidative stress (OS) has been suggested as a physiological cost of reproduction. However, previous studies reported ambiguous results, with some even showing a reduction of oxidative damage during reproduction. We tested whether the link between reproduction and OS is mediated by basal metabolic rate (BMR), which has been hypothesized to affect both the rate of radical oxygen species production and antioxidative capacity. We studied the effect of reproduction on OS in females of laboratory mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low (L-BMR) BMR, previously shown to differ with respect to parental investment. Non-reproducing L-BMR females showed higher oxidative damage to lipids (quantified as the level of malondialdehyde in internal organ tissues) and DNA (quantified as the level of 8-oxodG in blood serum) than H-BMR females. Reproduction did not affect oxidative damage to lipids in either line; however, it reduced damage to DNA in L-BMR females. Reproduction increased catalase activity in liver (significantly stronger in L-BMR females) and decreased it in kidneys. We conclude that the effect of reproduction on OS depends on the initial variation in BMR and varies between studied internal organs and markers of OS.

  7. Patterning crystalline indium tin oxide by high repetition rate femtosecond laser-induced crystallization

    Cheng, Chung-Wei; Lin, Cen-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chih; Lee, Yi-Ju; Chen, Jenq-Shyong

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for patterning crystalline indium tin oxide (c-ITO) patterns on amorphous ITO (a-ITO) thin films by femtosecond laser irradiation at 80 MHz repetition rate followed by chemical etching. In the proposed approach, the a-ITO film is transformed into a c-ITO film over a predetermined area via the heat accumulation energy supplied by the high repetition rate laser beam, and the unirradiated a-ITO film is then removed using an acidic etchant solution. The fabricated c-ITO patterns are observed using scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The crystalline, optical, electrical properties were measured by X-ray diffraction, spectrophotometer, and four point probe station, respectively. The experimental results show that a high repetition rate reduces thermal shock and yields a corresponding improvement in the surface properties of the c-ITO patterns.

  8. High rate deposition of transparent conducting oxide thin films by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Ida, Satoshi; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2002-09-02

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films have been deposited at a high rate above 370 nm/min by vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) using sintered oxide fragments as the source material. It was found that the deposition rate of TCO films was strongly dependent on the deposition pressure, whereas the obtained electrical properties were relatively independent of the pressure. Resistivities of 5.6x10{sup -4} and 2.3x10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm and an average transmittance above 80% (with substrate included) in the visible range were obtained in Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films deposited at 100 and 350 deg. C, respectively. In addition, a resistivity as low as 1.4x10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm and an average transmittance above 80% were also obtained in indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films deposited at 300 deg. C. The deposited TCO films exhibited uniform distributions of resistivity and thickness on large area substrates.

  9. High rate deposition of transparent conducting oxide thin films by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Ida, Satoshi; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films have been deposited at a high rate above 370 nm/min by vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) using sintered oxide fragments as the source material. It was found that the deposition rate of TCO films was strongly dependent on the deposition pressure, whereas the obtained electrical properties were relatively independent of the pressure. Resistivities of 5.6x10 -4 and 2.3x10 -4 Ω·cm and an average transmittance above 80% (with substrate included) in the visible range were obtained in Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films deposited at 100 and 350 deg. C, respectively. In addition, a resistivity as low as 1.4x10 -4 Ω·cm and an average transmittance above 80% were also obtained in indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films deposited at 300 deg. C. The deposited TCO films exhibited uniform distributions of resistivity and thickness on large area substrates

  10. Low nitrous oxide production through nitrifier-denitrification in intermittent-feed high-rate nitritation reactors

    Su, Qingxian; Ma, Chun; Domingo-Felez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production from autotrophic nitrogen conversion processes, especially nitritation systems, can be significant, requires understanding and calls for mitigation. In this study, the rates and pathways of N2O production were quantified in two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors...... to maintain high nitritation efficiency and high nitritation rates at 20-26 °C over a period of ∼300 days. Even at the high nitritation efficiencies, net N2O production was low (∼2% of the oxidized ammonium). Net N2O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after each feeding, suggesting...... operated with intermittent feeding and demonstrating long-term and high-rate nitritation. The resulting reactor biomass was highly enriched in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and converted ∼93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium to nitrite. The low DO set-point combined with intermittent feeding was sufficient...

  11. Reduced graphene oxide aerogel with high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes

    Si, Weijiang; Wu, Xiaozhong; Zhou, Jin; Guo, Feifei; Zhuo, Shuping; Cui, Hongyou; Xing, Wei

    2013-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide aerogel (RGOA) is synthesized successfully through a simultaneous self-assembly and reduction process using hypophosphorous acid and I2 as reductant. Nitrogen sorption analysis shows that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of RGOA could reach as high as 830 m2 g-1, which is the largest value ever reported for graphene-based aerogels obtained through the simultaneous self-assembly and reduction strategy. The as-prepared RGOA is characterized by a variety of means such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical tests show that RGOA exhibits a high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes. The specific capacitance of RGOA is calculated to be 211.8 and 278.6 F g-1 in KOH and H2SO4 electrolytes, respectively. The perfect supercapacitive performance of RGOA is ascribed to its three-dimensional structure and the existence of oxygen-containing groups.

  12. High rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane, ethane and propane coupled to thiosulphate reduction.

    Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; Weijma, Jan; Timmers, Peer H A; Buisman, Cees J N

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction and the use of ethane and propane as electron donors by sulphate-reducing bacteria represent new opportunities for the treatment of streams contaminated with sulphur oxyanions. However, growth of microbial sulphate-reducing populations with methane, propane or butane is extremely slow, which hampers research and development of bioprocesses based on these conversions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the growth rate with possible alternative terminal electron acceptors such as thiosulphate and elemental sulphur may be higher, which would facilitate future research. Here, we investigate the use of these electron acceptors for oxidation of methane, ethane and propane, with marine sediment as inoculum. Mixed marine sediments originating from Aarhus Bay (Denmark) and Eckernförde Bay (Germany) were cultivated anaerobically at a pH between 7.2 and 7.8 and a temperature of 15 °C in the presence of methane, ethane and propane and various sulphur electron acceptors. The sulphide production rates in the conditions with methane, ethane and propane with sulphate were respectively 2.3, 2.2 and 1.8 μmol S L(-1) day(-1). For sulphur, no reduction was demonstrated. For thiosulphate, the sulphide production rates were up to 50 times higher compared to those of sulphate, with 86.2, 90.7 and 108.1 μmol S L(-1) day(-1) for methane, ethane and propane respectively. This sulphide production was partly due to disproportionation, 50 % for ethane but only 7 and 14 % for methane and propane respectively. The oxidation of the alkanes in the presence of thiosulphate was confirmed by carbon dioxide production. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of thiosulphate use as electron acceptor with ethane and propane as electron donors. Additionally, these results indicate that thiosulphate is a promising electron acceptor to increase start-up rates for sulphate-reducing bioprocesses coupled to short-chain alkane oxidation.

  13. Low nitrous oxide production through nitrifier-denitrification in intermittent-feed high-rate nitritation reactors.

    Su, Qingxian; Ma, Chun; Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Kiil, Anne Sofie; Thamdrup, Bo; Jensen, Marlene Mark; Smets, Barth F

    2017-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production from autotrophic nitrogen conversion processes, especially nitritation systems, can be significant, requires understanding and calls for mitigation. In this study, the rates and pathways of N 2 O production were quantified in two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors operated with intermittent feeding and demonstrating long-term and high-rate nitritation. The resulting reactor biomass was highly enriched in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and converted ∼93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium to nitrite. The low DO set-point combined with intermittent feeding was sufficient to maintain high nitritation efficiency and high nitritation rates at 20-26 °C over a period of ∼300 days. Even at the high nitritation efficiencies, net N 2 O production was low (∼2% of the oxidized ammonium). Net N 2 O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after each feeding, suggesting a potential effect of pH on N 2 O production. In situ application of 15 N labeled substrates revealed nitrifier denitrification as the dominant pathway of N 2 O production. Our study highlights operational conditions that minimize N 2 O emission from two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Are high rates of sulphate reduction associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane

    Devol, A H; Ahmed, S I

    1981-01-01

    Classical models of sulphur diagenesis in marine sediments are based on the assumption that the rate of sulphate reduction is first order with respect to oxidizable particulate organic carbon (POC). This assumption requires that oxidizable POC, sulphate concentration and the sulphate reduction rate be highest at the top of the sulphate reduction zone and decrease exponentially with increasing sediment depth. However, to explain recent observations of concave upwards methane distributions, the anaerobic consumption of methane has been proposed. Furthermore, it has been proposed that this consumption takes place near the bottom of the sulphate reducing zone where sulphate concentrations are low. Thus, if sulphate reducing bacteria are associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane, a peak in sulphate reduction rate might be expected in this deep consumption zone. The importance of the process in sedimentary sulphur diagenesis is indicated by calculations estimating that 30 to 75% of the downward sulphate flux at depth may be consumed by methane oxidation within this zone. We present here profiles of sulphate reduction rate in anoxic sediments that show distinct local maxima at the depth where the anaerobic oxidation of methane would be expected. Our measurements were made during July and August 1978 in Saanich Inlet, an anoxic fjord located on the south-east of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The inlet has a shallow sill (approx 70 m) which restricts circulation of the deeper water (maximum depth 225 m) inside the basin to the extent that for about 8 months of the year the bottom waters contain hydrogen sulphide, the inlet is an ideal location for studying sedimentary sulphate reduction because reactions with oxygen and the effects of burrowing organisms can be neglected.

  15. Radiolytic oxidation of iodine in the containment at high temperature and dose rate

    Guilbert, S.; Bosland, L.; Jacquemain, D.; Clement, B.; Andreo, F.; Ducros, G.; Dickinson, S.; Herranz, L.; Ball, J.

    2007-01-01

    Iodine Chemistry is one of the areas of top interest in the field of nuclear power plants (NPP) severe accidents studies. The strong radiological impact of iodine on man health and environment, mostly through its isotope I-131, has made it a key point to get an accurate prediction of the potential iodine release from the NPP containment to the environment in the low probable event of an accident leading to core melt. Released from the fuel as a gaseous form, iodine enters the containment in gaseous or particulate form and undergoes deposition processes that eventually take it to the containment surfaces and sump. Once in the sump, iodine, when present as soluble compounds, gets dissolved as non volatile iodide (I-). Nonetheless, in the presence of radiation and particularly in acidic sumps, iodine can be oxidized to volatile forms such as molecular iodine (I 2 ) and can escape from the sump to the containment atmosphere (sump radiolysis process), thus increasing its potential contribution to the iodine source term. Iodine sump radiolysis has been extensively studied experimentally in the past decades. Experiments have revealed that parameters such as pH, temperature and total iodine concentration have a large impact on iodine volatility. However, experimental data at elevated temperatures (> 80 O C) and elevated dose rates (> 1 kGy.h -1 ) anticipated in containment during a postulated severe accident are too scarce to provide for these relevant conditions an accurate determination of the volatile iodine fractions. Furthermore, some data were obtained from post-irradiation analysis and iodine concentration may be underestimated at the time of measurements compared with that during irradiation, due to post-irradiation reactions. To complete the existing database, the EPICUR program was launched by IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire) and experiments have been performed in the frame of the International Source Term Program (ISTP) to provide on

  16. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  17. Nitrous oxide emissions from high rate algal ponds treating domestic wastewater.

    Alcántara, Cynthia; Muñoz, Raúl; Norvill, Zane; Plouviez, Maxence; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the generation of N2O by microcosms withdrawn from 7-L high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) inoculated with Chlorella vulgaris and treating synthetic wastewater. Although HRAPs microcosms demonstrated the ability to generate algal-mediated N2O when nitrite was externally supplied under darkness in batch assays, negligible N2O emissions rates were consistently recorded in the absence of nitrite during 3.5-month monitoring under 'normal' operation. Thereafter, HRAP A and HRAP B were overloaded with nitrate and ammonium, respectively, in an attempt to stimulate N2O emissions via nitrite in situ accumulation. Significant N2O production (up to 5685±363 nmol N2O/g TSS h) was only recorded from HRAP B microcosms externally supplied with nitrite in darkness. Although confirmation under full-scale outdoors conditions is needed, this study provides the first evidence that the ability of microalgae to synthesize N2O does not affect the environmental performance of wastewater treatment in HRAPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of high repetition rate nitric oxide planar laser induced fluorescence imaging

    Jiang, Naibo

    This thesis has documented the development of a MHz repitition rate pulse burst laser system. Second harmonic and third harmonic efficiencies are improved by adding a Phase Conjugate Mirror to the system. Some high energy fundamental, second harmonic, and third harmonic burst sequences consisting of 1--12 pulses separated in time by between 4 and 12 microseconds are now routinely obtained. The reported burst envelopes are quite uniform. We have also demonstrated the ability to generate ultra-high frequency sequences of broadly wavelength tunable, high intensity laser pulses using a home built injection seeded Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO), pumped by the second and third harmonic output of the pulse burst laser. Typical OPO output burst sequences consist of 6--10 pulses, separated in time by between 6 and 10 microseconds. With third harmonic pumping of the OPO system, we studied four conditions, two-crystal Singly Resonant OPO (SRO) cavity, three-crystal OPO cavity, single pass two-crystal Doubly Resonant OPO (DRO) cavity and double pass two-crystal OPO cavity. The double pass two-crystal OPO cavity gives the best operation in burst mode. For single pass OPO, the average total OPO conversion efficiency is approximately 25%. For double pass OPO, the average total OPO conversion efficiency is approximately 35%. As a preliminary work, we studied 532nm pumping of a single crystal OPO cavity. With single pulse pumping, the conversion efficiency can reach 30%. For both 355nm and 532nm pumping OPO, we have demonstrated injection seeding. The OPO output light linewidth is significantly narrowed. Some preliminary etalon traces are also reported. By mixing the OPO signal output at 622nm with residual third harmonic at 355nm, we obtained 226nm burst sequences with average pulse energy of ˜0.2 mJ. Injection seeding of the OPO increases the energy achieved by a factor of ˜2. 226nm burst sequences with reasonably uniform burst envelopes are reported. Using the system we

  19. Novel texturing method for sputtered zinc oxide films prepared at high deposition rate from ceramic tube targets

    Hüpkes J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sputtered and wet-chemically texture etched zinc oxide (ZnO films on glass substrates are regularly applied as transparent front contact in silicon based thin film solar cells. In this study, chemical wet etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF and subsequently in diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl on aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al films deposited by magnetron sputtering from ceramic tube targets at high discharge power (~10 kW/m target length is investigated. Films with thickness of around 800 nm were etched in diluted HCl acid and HF acid to achieve rough surface textures. It is found that the etching of the films in both etchants leads to different surface textures. A two steps etching process, which is especially favorable for films prepared at high deposition rate, was systematically studied. By etching first in diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF and subsequently in diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl these films are furnished with a surface texture which is characterized by craters with typical diameter of around 500 − 1000 nm. The resulting surface structure is comparable to etched films sputtered at low deposition rate, which had been demonstrated to be able to achieve high efficiencies in silicon thin film solar cells.

  20. Effects of high-intensity interval training on physical capacities and substrate oxidation rate in obese adolescents.

    Lazzer, S; Tringali, G; Caccavale, M; De Micheli, R; Abbruzzese, L; Sartorio, A

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of a 3-week weight-management program entailing moderate energy restriction, nutritional education, psychological counseling and three different exercise training (a: low intensity, LI: 40 % V'O 2 max; b: high intensity, HI: 70 % V'O 2 max; c: high-intensity interval training, HIIT), on body composition, energy expenditure and fat oxidation rate in obese adolescents. Thirty obese adolescents (age: 15-17 years, BMI: 37.5 kg m -2 ) participated in this study. Before starting (week 0, W0) and at the end of the weight-management program (week 3, W3), body composition was assessed by an impedancemeter; basal metabolic rate (BMR), energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rate were measured during exercise and post-exercise recovery by indirect calorimetry. At W3, body mass (BM) and fat mass (FM) decreased significantly in all groups, the decreases being significantly greater in the LI than in the HI and HIIT subgroups (BM: -8.4 ± 1.5 vs -6.3 ± 1.9 vs -4.9 ± 1.3 kg and FM: -4.2 ± 1.9 vs -2.8 ± 1.2 vs -2.3 ± 1.4 kg, p < 0.05, respectively). V'O 2 peak, expressed in relative values, changed significantly only in the HI and HIIT groups by 0.009 ± 0.005 and 0.007 ± 0.004 L kg FFM -1  min -1 (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the HI and HIIT subgroups exhibited a greater absolute rate of fat oxidation between 50 and 70 % V'O 2 peak at W3. No significant changes were observed at W3 in BMR, energy expenditure during exercise and post-exercise recovery. A 3-week weight-management program induced a greater decrease in BM and FM in the LI than in the HI and HIIT subgroups, and greater increase in V'O 2 peak and fat oxidation rate in the HI and HIIT than in the LI subgroup.

  1. Biphase Cobalt-Manganese Oxide with High Capacity and Rate Performance for Aqueous Sodium-Ion Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Shan, Xiaoqiang [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Charles, Daniel S. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Xu, Wenqian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS). X-ray Science Division; Feygenson, Mikhail [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) outstation Juelich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN); Teng, Xiaowei [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2017-11-22

    Manganese-based metal oxide electrode materials are of great importance in electrochemical energy storage for their favorable redox behavior, low cost and environmental-friendliness. However, their storage capacity and cycle life in aqueous Na-ion electrolytes is not satisfactory. In this paper, we report the development of a bi-phase cobalt-manganese oxide (Co-Mn-O) nanostructured electrode material, comprised of a layered MnO2.H2O birnessite phase and a (Co0.83Mn0.13Va0.04)tetra(Co0.38Mn1.62)octaO3.72 (Va: vacancy; tetra: tetrahedral sites; octa: octahedral sites) spinel phase, verified by neutron total scattering and pair distribution function analyses. The bi-phase Co-Mn-O material demonstrates an excellent storage capacity towards Na-ions in an aqueous electrolyte (121 mA h g-1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s-1 in the half-cell and 81 mA h g-1 at a current density of 2 A g-1 after 5000 cycles in full-cells), as well as high rate performance (57 mA h g-1 a rate of 360 C). Electro-kinetic analysis and in situ X-ray diffraction measurements further confirm that the synergistic interaction between the spinel and layered phases, as well as the vacancy of the tetrahedral sites of spinel phase, contribute to the improved capacity and rate performance of the Co-Mn-O material by facilitating both diffusion-limited redox and capacitive charge storage processes.

  2. Low-Temperature, Chemically Grown Titanium Oxide Thin Films with a High Hole Tunneling Rate for Si Solar Cells

    Yu-Tsu Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a chemically grown titanium oxide (TiO2 on Si to form a heterojunction for photovoltaic devices. The chemically grown TiO2 does not block hole transport. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy was used to study the band alignment. A substantial band offset at the TiO2/Si interface was observed. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS revealed that the chemically grown TiO2 is oxygen-deficient and contains numerous gap states. A multiple-trap-assisted tunneling (TAT model was used to explain the high hole injection rate. According to this model, the tunneling rate can be 105 orders of magnitude higher for holes passing through TiO2 than for flow through SiO2. With 24-nm-thick TiO2, a Si solar cell achieves a 33.2 mA/cm2 photocurrent on a planar substrate, with a 9.4% power conversion efficiency. Plan-view scanning electron microscopy images indicate that a moth-eye-like structure formed during TiO2 deposition. This structure enables light harvesting for a high photocurrent. The high photocurrent and ease of production of chemically grown TiO2 imply that it is a suitable candidate for future low-cost, high-efficiency solar cell applications.

  3. Interface polymerization synthesis of conductive polymer/graphite oxide@sulfur composites for high-rate lithium-sulfur batteries

    Wang, Xiwen; Zhang, Zhian; Yan, Xiaolin; Qu, Yaohui; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid nanostructure that incorporate the merits of conductive polymer nanorods and graphite oxide sheets. • A novel approach based on interface polymerization for synthesizing CP/GO@S ternary composite. • CP/GO@S ternary composite cathode shows enhanced electrochemical properties compared with CP@S binary composite cathode. • PEDOT/GO@S composite is the material system that have best electrochemical performance in all CP/GO@S ternary composites. - Abstract: The novel ternary composites, conductive polymers (CPs)/graphene oxide (GO)@sulfur composites were successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot route and used as cathode materials for Li-S batteries The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/GO and polyaniline (PANI)/GO composites were prepared by interface polymerization of monomers on the surface of GO sheets. Then sulfur was in-situ deposited on the CPs/GO composites in same solution. The component and structure of the composites were characterized by XPS, TGA, FTIR, SEM, TEM and electrochemical measurements. In this structure, the CPs nanostructures are believed to serve as a conductive matrix and an adsorbing agent, while the highly conductive GO will physically and chemically confine the sulfur and polysulfide within cathode. The PEDOT/GO@S composites with the sulfur content of 66.2 wt% exhibit a reversible discharge capacity of 800.2 mAh g −1 after 200 cycles at 0.5 C, which is much higher than that of PANI/GO@S composites (599.1 mAh g −1 ) and PANI@S (407.2 mAh g −1 ). Even at a high rate of 4 C, the PEDOT/GO@S composites still retain a high specific capacity of 632.4 mAh g −1

  4. High rates of denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in arid biological soil crusts from the Sultanate of Oman

    Abed, Raeid M M; Lam, Phyllis; De Beer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of process rate determination, microsensor profiling and molecular techniques, we demonstrated that denitrification, and not anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), is the major nitrogen loss process in biological soil crusts from Oman. Potential denitrification rates were 584...... that nitrogen loss via denitrification is a dominant process in crusts from Oman, which leads to N 2 O gas emission and potentially reduces desert soil fertility....

  5. A low-temperature partial-oxidation-methanol micro reformer with high fuel conversion rate and hydrogen production yield

    Wang, Hsueh-Sheng; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Huang, Yuh-Jeen; Su, Yu-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A low-operating temperature of the POM-mode micro methanol reformer is obtained. • The effect of channel design on the performance is studied. • The effect of solid content and binder’ ratio on the performance is studied. • The centrifugal process is benefit for the modification of performance. • 98% of methanol conversion rate of the micro reformer can be obtained at 180 °C. - Abstract: A partial oxidation methanol micro reformer (POM-μReformer) with finger-shaped channels for low operating temperature and high conversing efficiency is proposed in this study. The micro reformer employs POM reaction for low temperature operation (less than 200 °C), exothermic reaction, and quick start-up, as well as air feeding capability; and the finger type reaction chambers for increasing catalyst loading as well as reaction area for performance enhancement. In this study, centrifugal technique was introduced to assist on the catalyst loading with high amount and uniform distribution. The solid content (S), binder’s ratio (B), and channel design (the ratio between channel’s length and width, R) were investigated in detail to optimize the design parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas chromatography (GC), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) were employed to analyze the performance of the POM-μReformer. The result depicted that the catalyst content and reactive area could be much improved at the optimized condition, and the conversion rate and hydrogen selectivity approached 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, at a very low operating temperature of 180 °C with scarce or no binder in catalyst. The POM-μReformer can supply hydrogen to fuel cells by generating 2.23 J/min for 80% H 2 utilization and 60% fuel cell efficiency at 2 ml/min of supplied reactant gas, including methanol, oxygen and argon at a mixing ratio of 12.2%, 6.1% and 81.7%, respectively

  6. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm 3 NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR 192 Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility ( 2 =1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for 192 Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2±0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0±0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments

  7. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    .... The vacuum are plasma deposition gun developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been used to deposit oxides and nitrides with very precise control over deposition rate and composition.

  8. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  9. Aqueous dissolution rates of uranium oxides

    Steward, S.A.; Mones, E.T.

    1994-10-01

    An understanding of the long-term dissolution of waste forms in groundwater is required for the safe disposal of high level nuclear waste in an underground repository. The main routes by which radionuclides could be released from a geological repository are the dissolution and transport processes in groundwater flow. Because uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel, the dissolution of its matrix in spent fuel is considered the rate-limiting step for release of radioactive fission products. The purpose of our work has been to measure the intrinsic dissolution rates of uranium oxides under a variety of well-controlled conditions that are relevant to a repository and allow for modeling. The intermediate oxide phase U 3 O 8 , triuranium octaoxide, is quite stable and known to be present in oxidized spent fuel. The trioxide, UO 3 , has been shown to exist in drip tests on spent fuel. Here we compare the results of essentially identical dissolution experiments performed on depleted U 3 O 8 and dehyrated schoepite or uranium trioxide monohydrate (UO 3 ·H 2 O). These are compared with earlier work on spent fuel and UO 2 under similar conditions

  10. Highly oxidized superconductors

    Morris, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

  11. Porous Co3O4 nanofibers surface-modified by reduced graphene oxide as a durable, high-rate anode for lithium ion battery

    Hu, Renzong; Zhang, Houpo; Bu, Yunfei; Zhang, Hanyin; Zhao, Bote; Yang, Chenghao

    2017-01-01

    Here we report our findings in synthesis and characterization of porous Co 3 O 4 nanofibers coated with a surface-modification layer, reduced graphene oxide. The unique porous Co 3 O 4 @rGO architecture enables efficient stress relaxation and fast Li + ions and electron transport during discharge/charge cycling. When tested in a half cell, the Co 3 O 4 @rGO electrodes display high Coulombic efficiency, enhanced cyclic stability, and high rate capability (∼900 mAh/g at 1A/g, and ∼600 mAh/g at 5 A/g). The high capacity is contributed by a stable capacity yielded from reversible conversion reactions above 0.8 V vs. Li/Li + , and a increasing capacity induced by the electrolyte decomposition and interfacial storage between 0.8 0.01 V during discahrge. A full cell constructed from a Co 3 O 4 @rGO anode and a LiMn 2 O 4 cathode delivers good capacity retention with operation voltage of ∼2.0 V. These performances are better than those of other full cells using alloy or metal oxide anodes. Our work is a preliminary attempt for practicality of high capacity metal oxide anodes in Li-ion batteries used for the electronic devices.

  12. High rate capacity nanocomposite lanthanum oxide coated lithium zinc titanate anode for rechargeable lithium-ion battery

    Tang, Haoqing; Zan, Lingxing; Zhu, Jiangtao; Ma, Yiheng; Zhao, Naiqin; Tang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Lithium zinc titanate (Li_2ZnTi_3O_8) is an important titanium material of promising candidates for anode materials with superior electrochemical performance and thus has attracted extensive attention. Herein, high capacity, stable Li_2ZnTi_3O_8/La_2O_3 nanocomposite for lithium-ion battery anode is prepared by a facile strategy. Compared to unmodified Li_2ZnTi_3O_8, the Li_2ZnTi_3O_8/La_2O_3 electrode display a high specific capacity of 188.6 mAh g"−"1 and remain as high as 147.7 mAh g"−"1 after 100 cycles at 2.0 A g"−"1. Moreover, a reversible capacity of 76.3 mAh g"−"1 can be obtained after 1000 cycles at 2.0 A g"−"1 and the retention is 42.7% for Li_2ZnTi_3O_8/La_2O_3, which is much higher than un-coated Li_2ZnTi_3O_8. The superior lithium storage performances of the Li_2ZnTi_3O_8/La_2O_3 can be ascribed to the stable layer of protection, small particle size and large surface area. Cyclic voltammograms result reveals that the La_2O_3 coating layer reduces the polarization and improves the electrochemical activity of anode. - Highlights: • Nano layer La_2O_3 coated Li_2ZnTi_3O_8 particles have been prepared via a suspension mixing process followed by heat treatment. • Coated Li_2ZnTi_3O_8 has enhanced high rate capability, cyclic stability and long lifespan performance. • Electrochemical properties were tested in a charge/discharge voltage range of 3.0–0.05 V (vs. Li/Li"+).

  13. High population increase rates.

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems.

  14. Synthesis of hierarchical mesoporous lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide spheres with high rate capability for lithium-ion batteries

    Tong, Wei; Huang, Yudai; Cai, Yanjun; Guo, Yong; Wang, Xingchao; Jia, Dianzeng; Sun, Zhipeng; Pang, Weikong; Guo, Zaiping; Zong, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchical mesoporous LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 spheres have been synthesized by urea-assisted solvothermal method with adding Triton X-100. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared materials were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscope. The results show that the as-prepared samples can be indexed as hexagonal layered structure with hierarchical architecture, and the possible formation mechanism is speculated. When evaluated as cathode material, the hierarchical mesoporous LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 spheres show good electrochemical properties with high initial discharge capacity of 129.9 mAh g-1, and remain the discharge capacity of 95.5 mAh g-1 after 160 cycles at 10C. The excellent electrochemical performance of the as-prepared sample can be attributed to its stable hierarchical mesoporous framework in conjunction with large specific surface, low cation mixing and small particle size. They not only provide a large number of reaction sites for surface or interface reaction, but also shorten the diffusion length of Li+ ions. Meanwhile, the mesoporous spheres composed of nanoparticles can contribute to high rate ability and buffer volume changes during charge/discharge process.

  15. In-situ synthesis of reduced graphene oxide modified lithium vanadium phosphate for high-rate lithium-ion batteries via microwave irradiation

    Wang, Zhaozhi; Guo, Haifu; Yan, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene-decorated Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 is synthesized via microwave irradiation. • Both Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and RGO can be simultaneously achieved through this route. • The GO is reduced by microwave irradiation not the carbon. • Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 /RGO displays excellent high-rate ability and cyclic stability. - Abstract: We report a simple and rapid method to synthesize graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries via microwave irradiation. By treating graphene oxide and the precursor of Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 in a commercial microwave oven, both reduced graphene oxide and Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 could be simultaneously synthesized within 5 min. The structure, morphology and electrochemical performances of as-synthesized graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 are investigated systematically by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, charge/discharge tests, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The XRD result indicates that single-phase graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 with monoclinic structure can be obtained. Both SEM and TEM images show that Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 nanocrystals are embedded in the reduced graphene oxide sheets which could provide an easy path for the electrons and Li-ions during the cycling process. Compared with the pristine Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 electrode, graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exhibits a better high-rate ability and cyclic stability. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the good conductivity of reduced graphene oxide which enhances the electrons and Li-ions transport on the surface of Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . Thus, this simple and rapid method could be promising to synthesize graphene-modified electrode materials

  16. High rate capacity nanocomposite lanthanum oxide coated lithium zinc titanate anode for rechargeable lithium-ion battery

    Tang, Haoqing, E-mail: tanghaoqing@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zan, Lingxing [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Bonn, Bonn 53117 (Germany); Zhu, Jiangtao; Ma, Yiheng [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Naiqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tang, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zytang46@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Lithium zinc titanate (Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) is an important titanium material of promising candidates for anode materials with superior electrochemical performance and thus has attracted extensive attention. Herein, high capacity, stable Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite for lithium-ion battery anode is prepared by a facile strategy. Compared to unmodified Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}, the Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} electrode display a high specific capacity of 188.6 mAh g{sup −1} and remain as high as 147.7 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles at 2.0 A g{sup −1}. Moreover, a reversible capacity of 76.3 mAh g{sup −1} can be obtained after 1000 cycles at 2.0 A g{sup −1} and the retention is 42.7% for Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is much higher than un-coated Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The superior lithium storage performances of the Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be ascribed to the stable layer of protection, small particle size and large surface area. Cyclic voltammograms result reveals that the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating layer reduces the polarization and improves the electrochemical activity of anode. - Highlights: • Nano layer La{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} particles have been prepared via a suspension mixing process followed by heat treatment. • Coated Li{sub 2}ZnTi{sub 3}O{sub 8} has enhanced high rate capability, cyclic stability and long lifespan performance. • Electrochemical properties were tested in a charge/discharge voltage range of 3.0–0.05 V (vs. Li/Li{sup +}).

  17. Lithium Sulfide (Li2S)/Graphene Oxide Nanospheres with Conformal Carbon Coating as a High-Rate, Long-Life Cathode for Li/S Cells.

    Hwa, Yoon; Zhao, Juan; Cairns, Elton J

    2015-05-13

    In recent years, lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cells have attracted great attention as a candidate for the next generation of rechargeable batteries due to their high theoretical specific energy of 2600 W·h kg(-1), which is much higher than that of Li ion cells (400-600 W·h kg(-1)). However, problems of the S cathode such as highly soluble intermediate species (polysulfides Li2Sn, n = 4-8) and the insulating nature of S cause poor cycle life and low utilization of S, which prevents the practical use of Li/S cells. Here, a high-rate and long-life Li/S cell is proposed, which has a cathode material with a core-shell nanostructure comprising Li2S nanospheres with an embedded graphene oxide (GO) sheet as a core material and a conformal carbon layer as a shell. The conformal carbon coating is easily obtained by a unique CVD coating process using a lab-designed rotating furnace without any repetitive steps. The Li2S/GO@C cathode exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of 650 mA·h g(-1) of Li2S (corresponding to the 942 mA·h g(-1) of S) and very low capacity decay rate of only 0.046% per cycle with a high Coulombic efficiency of up to 99.7% for 1500 cycles when cycled at the 2 C discharge rate.

  18. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates.

    Lemaire, R; Menanteau, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10(5) K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  19. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    Lemaire, R., E-mail: romain.lemaire@mines-douai.fr; Menanteau, S. [Mines Douai, EI, F-59508 Douai (France)

    2016-01-15

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10{sup 5} K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  20. Instantaneous global nitrous oxide photochemical rates

    Johnston, H.S.; Serang, O.; Podolske, J.

    1979-01-01

    In recent years, vertical profiles of nitrous oxide have been measured by balloon up to midstratosphere at several latitudes between 63 0 N and 73 0 S, including one profile in the tropical zone at 9 0 N. Two rocket flights measured nitrous oxide mixing ratios at 44 and 49 km. From these experimental data plus a large amount of interpolation and extrapolation, we have estimated a global distribution of nitrous oxide up to the altitude of 50 km. With standard global distributions of oxygen and ozone we carried out instantaneous, three-dimensional, global photochemical calculations, using recently measured temperature-dependent cross sections for nitrous oxide. The altitude of maximum photolysis rate of N 2 O is about 30 km at all latitudes, and the rate of photolysis is a maximum in tropical latitudes. The altitude of maximum rate of formation of nitric oxide is latitude dependent, about 26 km at the equator, about 23 km over temperate zones, and 20 km at the summer pole. The global rate of N 2 O destruction is 6.2 x 10 27 molecules s -1 , and the global rate of formation of NO from N 2 O is 1.4 x 10 27 molecules s -1 . The global N 2 O inventory divided by the stratospheric loss rate gives a residence time of about 175 years with respect to this loss process. From the global average N 2 O profile a vertical eddy diffusion profile was derived, and this profile agrees very closely with that of Stewart and Hoffert

  1. Dense CdS thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide coated glass by high-rate microreactor-assisted solution deposition

    Su, Yu-Wei, E-mail: suyuweiwayne@gmail.com [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Ramprasad, Sudhir [Energy Processes and Materials Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Corvallis, OR 9730 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Han, Seung-Yeol; Wang, Wei [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Ryu, Si-Ok [School of Display and Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 214-1 Dae-dong, Gyeonsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Palo, Daniel R. [Barr Engineering Co., Hibbing, MN 55747 (United States); Paul, Brian K. [School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Chang, Chih-hung [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition is demonstrated for the deposition of CdS thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass. The continuous flow system consists of a microscale T-junction micromixer with the co-axial water circulation heat exchanger to control the reacting chemical flux and optimize the heterogeneous surface reaction. Dense, high quality nanocrystallite CdS thin films were deposited at an average rate of 25.2 nm/min, which is significantly higher than the reported growth rate from typical batch chemical bath deposition process. Focused-ion-beam was used for transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation to characterize the interfacial microstructure of CdS and FTO layers. The band gap was determined at 2.44 eV by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. X-ray photon spectroscopy shows the binding energies of Cd 3d{sub 3/2}, Cd 3d{sub 5/2}, S 2P{sub 3/2} and S 2P{sub 1/2} at 411.7 eV, 404.8 eV, 162.1 eV and 163.4 eV, respectively. - Highlights: ► CdS films deposited using continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition (MASD) ► Dense nanocrystallite CdS films can be reached at a rate of 25.2 [nm/min]. ► MASD can approach higher film growth rate than conventional chemical bath deposition.

  2. SnO2 Quantum Dots@Graphene Oxide as a High-Rate and Long-Life Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Zhao, Kangning; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Dong, Yifan; Xu, Wangwang; Niu, Chaojiang; He, Liang; Yan, Mengyu; Qu, Longbin; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-02-03

    Tin-based electrode s offer high theoretical capacities in lithium ion batteries, but further commercialization is strongly hindered by the poor cycling stability. An in situ reduction method is developed to synthesize SnO2 quantum dots@graphene oxide. This approach is achieved by the oxidation of Sn(2+) and the reduction of the graphene oxide. At 2 A g(-1), a capacity retention of 86% is obtained even after 2000 cycles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Simulation of the induction of oxidation of low-density lipoprotein by high copper concentrations: evidence for a nonconstant rate of initiation.

    Abuja, P M; Albertini, R; Esterbauer, H

    1997-06-01

    Kinetic simulation can help obtain deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of complex processes, such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We have previously set up a single-compartment model of this process, initiating with radicals generated externally at a constant rate to show the interplay of radical scavenging and chain propagation. Here we focus on the initiating events, substituting constant rate of initiation (Ri) by redox cycling of Cu2+ and Cu+. Our simulation reveals that early events in copper-mediated LDL oxidation include (1) the reduction of Cu2+ by tocopherol (TocOH) which generates tocopheroxyl radical (TocO.), (2) the fate of TocO. which either is recycled or recombines with lipid peroxyl radical (LOO.), and (3) the reoxidation of Cu+ by lipid hydroperoxide which results in alkoxyl radical (LO.) formation. So TocO., LOO., and LO. can be regarded as primordial radicals, and the sum of their formation rates is the total rate of initiation, Ri. As experimental information of these initiating events cannot be obtained experimentally, the whole model was validated experimentally by comparison of LDL oxidation in the presence and absence of bathocuproine as predicted by simulation. Simulation predicts that Ri decreases by 2 orders of magnitude during lag time. This has important consequences for the estimation of oxidation resistance in copper-mediated LDL oxidation: after consumption of tocopherol, even small amounts of antioxidants may prolong the lag phase for a considerable time.

  4. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...

  5. A high-rate aqueous symmetric pseudocapacitor based on highly graphitized onion-like carbon/birnessite-type manganese oxide nanohybrids

    Makgopa, K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available with the XPS Peak 4.1 program and a Shirley function was used to subtract the back- ground. The metal oxide content in the nanohybrid was deter- mined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) using an STA Jupiter 449 C (Netzsch) in an Ar/O2 atmosphere at a...

  6. The effects of trace element content on pyrite oxidation rates

    Gregory, D. D.; Lyons, T.; Cliff, J. B.; Perea, D. E.; Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Large, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    variability of trace element content from the pyrite samples. These data were then used to select areas of interest for NanoSIMS analyses, which in turn was used to select areas for TEM and APT. These analyses show that the trace element content of pyrite can be highly variable, which may significantly affect the rate of pyrite oxidation.

  7. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  8. Results of the post-irradiation examination of a highly-rated mixed oxide fuel rod from the Mol 7B experiment

    Coquerelle, M.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment MOL 7B was carried out in a epithermal flux in the Belgian reactor BR2. The pin examined contained fuel of initial composition (Usub(0.7)Pusub(0.3))Osub(1.98). It had been irradiated to a maximum burn-up of 13.2 at% at a maximum linear power of 568Wcm -1 . The fuel was clad with coldworked stainless steel. Electron microprobe analysis indicated that a Cr 2 O 3 type oxide was the main constituent of the grey phases in the gap. A metallic phase on the fuel surface had apparently resulted from the mechanical compaction of fragments of cladding that had been depleted in chromium by oxidation. Thus the main components of the phase were iron and nickel. Chromium loss from the inner cladding surface was significant only in the upper regions of the pin. In pin sections that were metallographically examined sigma phase and carbides of the type M 23 C 6 were present at the grain boundaries of the cladding. Cladding corrosion was not an Arrhenius function of the cladding temperature: the amount of metal lost from the inner cladding surface decreased with rise in cladding temperature above 910 K. A contributor to metal loss was the mechanical detachment of fragments of cladding which reformed as a metallic layer on the surface of the fuel. Chromium depletion and sigma phase formation at grain boundaries lowered the cohesive forces between grains which were then mechanically detached. Chromium loss from grain boundaries is mainly the results of oxidation of the cladding by the mixed oxide fuel. Data are presented to support the view that the local average O/M of the fuel determined the rate of oxidation and consequently the extent of chromium depletion. Fuel-cladding mechanical interactions were weak in the upper regions of the pin where metal loss was small

  9. High burn rate solid composite propellants

    Manship, Timothy D.

    High burn rate propellants help maintain high levels of thrust without requiring complex, high surface area grain geometries. Utilizing high burn rate propellants allows for simplified grain geometries that not only make production of the grains easier, but the simplified grains tend to have better mechanical strength, which is important in missiles undergoing high-g accelerations. Additionally, high burn rate propellants allow for a higher volumetric loading which reduces the overall missile's size and weight. The purpose of this study is to present methods of achieving a high burn rate propellant and to develop a composite propellant formulation that burns at 1.5 inches per second at 1000 psia. In this study, several means of achieving a high burn rate propellant were presented. In addition, several candidate approaches were evaluated using the Kepner-Tregoe method with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based propellants using burn rate modifiers and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-based propellants being selected for further evaluation. Propellants with varying levels of nano-aluminum, nano-iron oxide, FeBTA, and overall solids loading were produced using the HTPB binder and evaluated in order to determine the effect the various ingredients have on the burn rate and to find a formulation that provides the burn rate desired. Experiments were conducted to compare the burn rates of propellants using the binders HTPB and DCPD. The DCPD formulation matched that of the baseline HTPB mix. Finally, GAP-plasticized DCPD gumstock dogbones were attempted to be made for mechanical evaluation. Results from the study show that nano-additives have a substantial effect on propellant burn rate with nano-iron oxide having the largest influence. Of the formulations tested, the highest burn rate was a 84% solids loading mix using nano-aluminum nano-iron oxide, and ammonium perchlorate in a 3:1(20 micron: 200 micron) ratio which achieved a burn rate of 1.2 inches per second at 1000

  10. Consolidation of powders of the oxide superconductor YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/Ox by high energy-high rate processing

    Persad, C.; Lee, S.J.; Peterson, D.R.; Swinnea, J.S.; Schmerling, M.

    1988-01-01

    The consolidation response of powders of the superconducting compound YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/Ox is reported. Copper, silver, tin, and Cu-based metallic glass infiltrates have also been employed in preliminary fabricability studies. The processing approach relies on short-duration (< 1s), high-current-density 10000 A/sq.cm, pulse-resistive heating of powders under applied pressures of 200 MPa to 400 MPa. Powders and fabricated disk compacts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and resistivity measurements. X-ray diffraction comparisons of starting powder and consolidated material show retention of the single phase 1-2-3 structure and the development of a preferred orientation. In the consolidated pure YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/0x, Tc onsets of 87K were accompanied by broad transitions. Iodometric analyses indicated oxygen depletion in the as-consolidated disks. Observed oxygen-content profiles across the sample thickness had values 0.11< x <0.35. The variation in the peak processing temperature within the disk was found to correlate with the oxygen content profile.

  11. Enhanced wet air oxidation : synergistic rate acceleration upon effluent recirculation

    Matthew J. Birchmeier; Charles G. Hill; Carl J. Houtman; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2000-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) reactions of cellobiose, phenol, and syringic acid were carried out under mild conditions (155°C; 0.93MPa 02; soluble catalyst, Na5[PV2Mo10O40]). Initial oxidation rates were rapid but decreased to small values as less reactive oxidation products accumulated. Recalcitrant oxidation products were consumed more rapidly, however, if additional...

  12. High Rate Digital Demodulator ASIC

    Ghuman, Parminder; Sheikh, Salman; Koubek, Steve; Hoy, Scott; Gray, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The architecture of High Rate (600 Mega-bits per second) Digital Demodulator (HRDD) ASIC capable of demodulating BPSK and QPSK modulated data is presented in this paper. The advantages of all-digital processing include increased flexibility and reliability with reduced reproduction costs. Conventional serial digital processing would require high processing rates necessitating a hardware implementation in other than CMOS technology such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) which has high cost and power requirements. It is more desirable to use CMOS technology with its lower power requirements and higher gate density. However, digital demodulation of high data rates in CMOS requires parallel algorithms to process the sampled data at a rate lower than the data rate. The parallel processing algorithms described here were developed jointly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The resulting all-digital receiver has the capability to demodulate BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, and DQPSK at data rates in excess of 300 Mega-bits per second (Mbps) per channel. This paper will provide an overview of the parallel architecture and features of the HRDR ASIC. In addition, this paper will provide an over-view of the implementation of the hardware architectures used to create flexibility over conventional high rate analog or hybrid receivers. This flexibility includes a wide range of data rates, modulation schemes, and operating environments. In conclusion it will be shown how this high rate digital demodulator can be used with an off-the-shelf A/D and a flexible analog front end, both of which are numerically computer controlled, to produce a very flexible, low cost high rate digital receiver.

  13. 3D Networked Tin Oxide/Graphene Aerogel with a Hierarchically Porous Architecture for High-Rate Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Chen, Shuangqiang; Sun, Bing; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-09-07

    Low-cost and sustainable sodium-ion batteries are regarded as a promising technology for large-scale energy storage and conversion. The development of high-rate anode materials is highly desirable for sodium-ion batteries. The optimization of mass transport and electron transfer is crucial in the discovery of electrode materials with good high-rate performances. Herein, we report the synthesis of 3 D interconnected SnO2 /graphene aerogels with a hierarchically porous structure as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. The unique 3 D architecture was prepared by a facile in situ process, during which cross-linked 3 D conductive graphene networks with macro-/meso-sized hierarchical pores were formed and SnO2 nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly on the graphene surface simultaneously. Such a 3 D functional architecture not only facilitates the electrode-electrolyte interaction but also provides an efficient electron pathway within the graphene networks. When applied as anode materials in sodium-ion batteries, the as-prepared SnO2 /graphene aerogel exhibited high reversible capacity, improved cycling performance compared to SnO2 , and promising high-rate capability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  15. High-pressure oxidation of ethane

    Hashemi, Hamid; G. Jacobsen, Jon; Rasmussen, Christian T.

    2017-01-01

    Ethane oxidation at intermediate temperatures and high pressures has been investigated in both a laminar flow reactor and a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor measurements at 600–900 K and 20–100 bar showed an onset temperature for oxidation of ethane between 700 and 825 K, depending...... on pressure, stoichiometry, and residence time. Measured ignition delay times in the RCM at pressures of 10–80 bar and temperatures of 900–1025 K decreased with increasing pressure and/or temperature. A detailed chemical kinetic model was developed with particular attention to the peroxide chemistry. Rate...

  16. Oxidation rate in ferritic superheater materials

    Falk, I.

    1992-05-01

    On the steam side of superheater tubes, compact oxide layers are formed which have a tendency to crack and flake off (exfoliate). Oxide particles then travel with the steam and can give rise to erosion damage in valves and on turbine blades. In an evaluation of conditions in superheater tubes from Swedish power boilers, it was found that the exfoliation frequency for one material quality (SS 2218) was greater than for other qualities. Against this background, a literature study has been carried out in order to determine which mechanisms govern the build-up of oxide and the exfoliation phenomenon. The study reveals that the oxide morphology is similar on all ferritic steels with Cr contents up to 5%. and that the oxide properties can therefore be expected to be similar. The reason why the exfoliation frequency is greater for tubes of SS 2218 is probably that the tubes have been exposed to higher temperatures. SS 2218 (2.25 Cr) is normally used in a higher temperature range which is accompanied by improved strength data as compared with SS 2216 (1 Cr). The principal cause of the exfoliation is said to be stresses which arise in the oxide during the cooling-down process associated with shutdowns. The stresses give rise to longitudinal cracks in the oxide, and are formed as a result of differences in thermal expansion between the oxide and the tube material. In addition, accounts are presented of oxidation constants and growth velocities, and thickness and running time. These data constitute a valuable basis for practical estimates of the operating temperature in routine checks and investigations into damage in superheater tubes. (au)

  17. Maximal fat oxidation rates in endurance trained and untrained women

    Stisen, A.B.; Stougaard, O.; Langfort, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the differences in fat oxidation between endurance trained (ET) and untrained (UT) women. Eight ET and nine UT women performed a progressive cycle ergometer test until exhaustion. The rate of fat oxidation was similar at low work rates (...

  18. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride ... hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. ... TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process.

  19. Graphene oxide hydrogel as a restricted-area nanoreactor for synthesis of 3D graphene-supported ultrafine TiO2 nanorod nanocomposites for high-rate lithium-ion battery anodes

    Cheng, Jianli; Gu, Guifang; Ni, Wei; Guan, Qun; Li, Yinchuan; Wang, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene-supported TiO2 nanorod nanocomposites (3D GS-TNR) are prepared using graphene oxide hydrogel as a restricted-area nanoreactor in the hydrothermal process, in which well-distributed TiO2 nanorods with a width of approximately 5 nm and length of 30 nm are conformally embedded in the 3D interconnected graphene network. The 3D graphene oxide not only works as a restricted-area nanoreactor to constrain the size, distribution and morphology of the TiO2; it also work as a highly interconnected conducting network to facilitate electrochemical reactions and maintain good structural integration when the nanocomposites are used as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. Benefiting from the nanostructure, the 3D GS-TNR nanocomposites show high capacity and excellent long-term cycling capability at high current rates. The 3D GS-TNR composites deliver a high initial charge capacity of 280 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C and maintain a reversible capacity of 115 mAh g-1, with a capacity retention of 83% at 20 C after 1000 cycles. Meanwhile, compared with that of previously reported TiO2-based materials, the 3D GS-TNR nanocomposites show much better performance, including higher capacity, better rate capability and long-term cycling stability.

  20. Terbium oxide at high pressures

    Dogra, Sugandha; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Singh, Jasveer; Bandhyopadhyay, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the behaviour of terbium oxide at high pressures. The as received sample was characterized at ambient by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction showed the sample to be predominantly cubic Tb 4 O 7 , although a few peaks also match closely with Tb 2 O 3 . In fact in a recent study done on the same sample, the sample has been shown to be a mixture of Tb 4 O 7 and Tb 2 O 3 . The sample was subjected to high pressures using a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell upto a pressure of about 42 GPa with ruby as pressure monitor

  1. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    Steinbrueck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4 C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests

  2. Pressure effects on high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4

    Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Kwangpyo; Ryu, Taegeun

    2000-01-01

    The pressure effects on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding in high temperature steam have been analyzed. A double layer autoclave was made for the high pressure, high temperature oxidation tests. The experimental test temperature range was 700 - 900 deg C, and pressures were 0.1 - 15 MPa. Steam partial pressure turns out to be an important one rather than total pressure. Steam pressure enhances the oxidation rate of Zry-4 exponentially. The enhancement depends on the temperature, and the maximum exists between 750 - 800 deg C. Pre-existing oxide layer decreases the enhancement about 40 - 60%. The acceleration of oxidation rate by high pressure team seems to be originated from the formation of cracks by abrupt transformation of tetragonal phase in oxide, where the un-stability of tetragonal phase comes from the reduction of surface energy by steam. (author)

  3. Effects of reaction temperature and inlet oxidizing gas flow rate on IG-110 graphite oxidation used in HTR-PM

    Sun Ximing; Dong Yujie; Zhou Yangping; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Zhang Zuoyi; Li Zhengcao

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a selected nuclear graphite (IG-110) used in Pebble-bed Module High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor was investigated under the condition of air ingress accident. The oblate rectangular specimen was oxidized by oxidant gas with oxygen mole fraction of 20% and flow rates of 125–500 ml/min at temperature of 400–1200°C. Experiment results indicate that the oxidation behavior can also be classified into three regimes according to temperature. The regime I at 400–550°C has lower apparent activation energies of 75.57–138.59 kJ/mol when the gas flow rate is 125–500 ml/min. In the regime II at 600–900°C, the oxidation rate restricted by the oxygen supply to graphite is almost stable with the increase of temperature. In the regime III above 900°C, the oxidation rate increases obviously with the increase of temperature.With the increase of inlet gas flow from 125 to 500 ml/min, the apparent activation energy in regime I is increased and the stableness of oxidation rate in regime II is reduced. (author)

  4. The high temperature oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    Hales, R.

    1977-04-01

    High temperature annealing in a dynamic vacuum has been utilised to induce the growth of duplex oxide over the whole surface of stainless steel specimens. It is found that duplex oxide grows at a rate which does not obey a simple power law. The oxidation kinetics and oxide morphology have also been studied for a series of ternary austenitic alloys which cover a range of composition between 5 and 20% chromium. A model has been developed to describe the formation of duplex oxide and the subsequent formation of a 'healing layer' which virtually causes the oxidation process to stop. This phase tends to form at grain boundaries and a relationship has been derived for the reaction kinetics which relates the reaction rate with grain size of the substrate. (author)

  5. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  6. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  7. [Condition optimization for bio-oxidation of high-S and high-As gold concentrate].

    Yang, Caiyun; Dong, Bowen; Wang, Meijun; Ye, Zhiyong; Zheng, Tianling; Huang, Huaiguo

    2015-12-04

    To study the effects of temperature and lixivium return on the concentrate bio-oxidation and rate of gold cyanide leaching. The bioleaching of a high-sulphur (S) and high-arsenic (As) refractory gold concentrate was conducted, and we studied the effects of different temperature (40 ° and 45 °C) and lixivium return (0 and 600 mL) on the bio-oxidation efficiency. The bacterial community structure also was investigated by 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results showed that both the temperature and lixivium return significantly influenced the oxidation system. The temperature rising elevated the oxidation level, while the addition of lixivium depressed the oxidation. Dissimilarity and DCA (detrended correspondence analysis) indicated the effect of temperature on oxidation system was much greater than lixivium. The bacterial community was comprised by Acidithiocacillus caldu (71%) Leptospirillum ferriphilum (23%) and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (6%) indicated by the clone library, and the OTU coverage based on 97% sequence similarity was as high as 93.67%. Temperature rising to 45 T would improve the oxidation efficiency while lixivium return would decrease it. This study is helpful to provide an important guiding value for the industry cost optimization of mesophile bacterial oxidation and reduction process.

  8. High temperature oxidation kinetics of dysprosium particles

    Jaques, Brian J.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of dysprosium particles was studied from 500 to 1000 °C. • Activation energy in initial region found as 8–25 kJ/mol, depending on atmosphere. • Activation energy in intermediate region found as 80–95 kJ/mol. • The oxide grows at the metal–oxide interface. • Generally, the formed oxide behaved as a p-type semiconductor. - Abstract: Rare earth elements have been recognized as critical materials for the advancement of many strategic and green technologies. Recently, the United States Department of Energy has invested many millions of dollars to enhance, protect, and forecast their production and management. The work presented here attempts to clarify the limited and contradictory literature on the oxidation behavior of the rare earth metal, dysprosium. Dysprosium particles were isothermally oxidized from 500 to 1000 °C in N{sub 2}–(2%, 20%, and 50%) O{sub 2} and Ar–20% O{sub 2} using simultaneous thermal analysis techniques. Two distinct oxidation regions were identified at each isothermal temperature in each oxidizing atmosphere. Initially, the oxidation kinetics are very fast until the reaction enters a slower, intermediate region of oxidation. The two regions are defined and the kinetics of each are assessed to show an apparent activation energy of 8–25 kJ/mol in the initial region and 80–95 kJ/mol in the intermediate oxidation reaction region. The effects of varying the oxygen partial pressure on the reaction rate constant are used to show that dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generally acts as a p-type semiconductor in both regions of oxidation (with an exception above 750 °C in the intermediate region)

  9. High regression rate, high density hybrid fuels, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR program will investigate high energy density novel nanofuels combined with high density binders for use with an N2O oxidizer. Terves has developed...

  10. Robust binder-free anodes assembled with ultralong mischcrystal TiO2 nanowires and reduced graphene oxide for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion storage

    Shi, Yongzheng; Yang, Dongzhi; Yu, Ruomeng; Liu, Yaxin; Hao, Shu-Meng; Zhang, Shiyi; Qu, Jin; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2018-04-01

    To satisfy increasing power demands of mobile devices and electric vehicles, rationally designed electrodes with short diffusion length are highly imperative to provide highly efficient ion and electron transport paths for high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries. Herein, binder-free electrodes with the robust three-dimensional conductive network are prepared by assembling ultralong TiO2 nanowires with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets for high-performance lithium-ion storage. Ultralong TiO2 nanowires are synthesized and used to construct an interconnecting network that avoids the use of inert auxiliary additives of polymer binders and conductive agents. By thermal annealing, a small amount of anatase is generated in situ in the TiO2(B) nanowires to form abundant TiO2(B)/anatase interfaces for accommodating additional lithium ions. Simultaneously, RGO sheets efficiently enhance the electronic conductivity and enlarge the specific surface area of the TiO2/RGO nanocomposite. The robust 3D network in the binder-free electrode not only effectively avoids the agglomeration of TiO2/RGO components during the long-term charging/discharging process, but also provides direct and fast ion/electron transport paths. The binder-free electrode exhibits a high reversible capacity of 259.9 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C and an excellent cycling performance with a high reversible capacity of 111.9 mA h g-1 at 25 C after 5000 cycles.

  11. High temperature oxidation test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    In a feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its high temperature oxidation resistance was evaluated. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing high temperature oxidation, excessively higher amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, high temperature oxidation test was conducted for ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11mass%Cr PNC-FMS and even 17mass% SUS430 and equivalent to austenitic PNC316. (2) The superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel was attributed to earlier formation of the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer at the matrix and inner oxide scale interface. The grain size of ODS steel is finer than that of PNC-FMS, so the superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel can be attributed to the enhanced Cr-supplying rate throughout the accelerated grain boundary diffusion. Finely dispersed Y 2 O 3 oxide particles in the ODS steel matrix may also stabilized the adherence between the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer and the matrix. (author)

  12. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the inc......The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase...... in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4â10......-10 mol FeS2/gâs are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate...

  13. Understanding High Rate Behavior Through Low Rate Analog

    2014-04-28

    challenges in high rate character- isation of polymers. The most important is that, owing to their low stress wavespeed, the structural response of...box’ tool, to provide supporting date for the rate dependent mechanical character- isation . Experiments were performed on a TA instruments Q800

  14. Initial stages of high temperature metal oxidation

    Yang, C.Y.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The application of XPS and UPS to the study of the initial stages of high temperature (> 350 0 C) electrochemical oxidation of iron and nickel is discussed. In the high temperature experiments, iron and nickel electrodes were electrochemically oxidized in contact with a solid oxide electrolyte in the uhv system. The great advantages of this technique are that the oxygen activity at the interface may be precisely controlled and the ability to run the reactions in uhv allows the simultaneous observation of the reactions by XPS

  15. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly...... diluted in nitrogen. It was found that under the investigated conditions, the onset temperature for methane oxidation ranged from 723 K under reducing conditions to 750 K under stoichiometric and oxidizing conditions. The RCM experiments were carried out at pressures of 15–80 bar and temperatures of 800......–1250 K under stoichiometric and fuel-lean (Φ=0.5) conditions. Ignition delays, in the range of 1–100 ms, decreased monotonically with increasing pressure and temperature. A chemical kinetic model for high-pressure methane oxidation was established, with particular emphasis on the peroxide chemistry...

  16. High-temperature oxidation of ion-implanted tantalum

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Musket, R.G.; Truhan, J.J.; Grabowski, K.S.; Singer, I.L.; Gossett, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation of ion-implanted Ta in two different high temperature regimes has been studied. Oxidations were carried out at 500 0 C in Ar/O 2 mixtures, where oxide growth is known to follow a parabolic rate law in initial stages, and at 1000 0 C in pure O 2 , where a linear-rate behavior obtains. Implanted species include Al, Ce, Cr, Li, Si and Zr at fluences of the order of 10 17 /cm 2 . Oxidized samples were studied using Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, Auger spectroscopy, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Significant differences among the specimens were noted after the milder 500 0 C treatment, specifically, in the amount of oxide formed, the degree of oxygen dissolution in the metal beneath the oxide, and in the redistribution behavior of the implanted solutes. Under the severe 1000 0 C treatment, indications of different solute distributions and of different optical features were found, whereas overall oxidation rate appeared to be unaffected by the presence of the solute. 7 figures

  17. Measurement of sulfur dioxide oxidation rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    Snider, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    SO2-reaction studies in the clouds are examined and summarized to experimentally confirm model predictions and previous field studies regarding dominant SO2-reaction pathways. Controlled amounts of SO2 were released into nonprecipitating orographic clouds, and sulfate yields are compared to oxidant depletions. The sulfate yields were taken from cloud-water samples and liquid-water-concentration measurements, and oxidant-depletion data were generated from continuous gas-phase measurements. Comparisons of Y sub SO4 and D sub H2O2 suggest that H2O2 is the dominant oxidant, and the in-cloud reaction between H2O2 and the bisulfite ion can be expressed by a simple rate that agrees with predictions and laboratory results. The rate measurements are found to be inconsistent with the rate law proposed by Hegg and Hobbs (1982) and with some observational data. The present conclusions are of interest to evaluating the effects of sulfur dioxide emissions on sulfuric acid deposition. 30 refs

  18. Review of oxidation rates of DOE spent nuclear fuel : Part 1 : nuclear fuel

    Hilton, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The long-term performance of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a mined geologic disposal system depends highly on fuel oxidation and subsequent radionuclide release. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels are reviewed in this two-volume report to provide a baseline for comparison with release rate data and technical rationale for predicting general corrosion behavior of DOE SNF. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels in the DOE SNF inventory were organized according to metallic, Part 1, and non-metallic, Part 2, spent nuclear fuels. This Part 1 of the report reviews the oxidation behavior of three fuel types prototypic of metallic fuel in the DOE SNF inventory: uranium metal, uranium alloys and aluminum-based dispersion fuels. The oxidation rates of these fuels were evaluated in oxygen, water vapor, and water. The water data were limited to pure water corrosion as this represents baseline corrosion kinetics. Since the oxidation processes and kinetics discussed in this report are limited to pure water, they are not directly applicable to corrosion rates of SNF in water chemistry that is significantly different (such as may occur in the repository). Linear kinetics adequately described the oxidation rates of metallic fuels in long-term corrosion. Temperature dependent oxidation rates were determined by linear regression analysis of the literature data. As expected the reaction rates of metallic fuels dramatically increase with temperature. The uranium metal and metal alloys have stronger temperature dependence than the aluminum dispersion fuels. The uranium metal/water reaction exhibited the highest oxidation rate of the metallic fuel types and environments that were reviewed. Consequently, the corrosion properties of all DOE SNF may be conservatively modeled as uranium metal, which is representative of spent N-Reactor fuel. The reaction rate in anoxic, saturated water vapor was essentially the same as the water reaction rate. The long-term intrinsic

  19. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob M.; Gersen, Sander; Levinsky, Howard; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Glarborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly

  20. High-rate, High Temperature Acetotrophic Methanogenesis Governed by a Three Population Consortium in Anaerobic Bioreactors

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Manefield, Mike; Batstone, Damien

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acetate oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis has been previously identified to enable high-rate methanogenesis at high temperatures (55 to 65°C), but this capability had not been linked to any key organisms. This study combined RNA-stable isotope probing on 13C-labelled acetate and 16S amplicon sequencing to identify the active micro-organisms involved in high-rate methanogenesis. Active biomass was harvested from three bench-scale thermophilic bioreactors treating waste...

  1. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  2. Effect of reacting surface density on the overall graphite oxidation rate

    Oh, Chang; Kim, Eung; Lim, Jong; Schultz, Richard; Petti, David

    2009-01-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1) Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  3. High-rate lithium thionyl chloride cells

    Goebel, F.

    1982-03-01

    A high-rate C cell with disc electrodes was developed to demonstrate current rates which are comparable to other primary systems. The tests performed established the limits of abuse beyond which the cell becomes hazardous. Tests include: impact, shock, and vibration tests; temperature cycling; and salt water immersion of fresh cells.

  4. Lithium thionyl chloride high rate discharge

    Klinedinst, K. A.

    1980-04-01

    Improvements in high rate lithium thionyl chloride power technology achieved by varying the electrolyte composition, operating temperature, cathode design, and cathode composition are discussed. Discharge capacities are plotted as a function of current density, cell voltage, and temperature.

  5. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  6. Extreme nitrogen deposition can change methane oxidation rate in moist acidic tundra soil in Arctic regions

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Kang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, extreme nitrogen(N) deposition events are observed in Arctic regions where over 90% of the annual N deposition occurred in just a few days. Since Arctic ecosystems are typically N-limited, input of extremely high amount of N could substantially affect ecosystem processes. CH4 is a potent greenhouse gas that has 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 over a 100-year time frame. Ammonium is known as an inhibitor of methane oxidation and nitrate also shows inhibitory effect on it in temperate ecosystems. However, effects of N addition on Arctic ecosystems are still elusive. We conducted a lab-scale incubation experiment with moist acidic tundra (MAT) soil from Council, Alaska to investigate the effect of extreme N deposition events on methane oxidation. Zero point five % methane was added to the head space to determine the potential methane oxidation rate of MAT soil. Three treatments (NH4NO3-AN, (NH4)2SO4-AS, KNO3-PN) were used to compare effects of ammonium, nitrate and salts. All treatments were added in 3 levels: 10μg N gd.w-1(10), 50μg N gd.w-1(50) and 100μg N gd.w-1(100). AN10 and AN50 increased methane oxidation rate 1.7, 6% respectively. However, AN100 shows -8.5% of inhibitory effect. In AS added samples, all 3 concentrations (AN10, AN50, AN100) stimulated methane oxidation rate with 4.7, 8.9, 4%, respectively. On the contrary, PN50 (-9%) and PN100 (-59.5%) exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. We also analyzed the microbial gene abundance and community structures of methane oxidizing bacteria using a DNA-based fingerprinting method (T-RFLP) Our study results suggest that NH4+ can stimulate methane oxidation in Arctic MAT soil, while NO3- can inhibit methane oxidation significantly.

  7. Reduced graphene oxide synthesis by high energy ball milling

    Mondal, O. [Department of Physics, M.U.C Women' s College, Burdwan 713104 (India); Mitra, S. [MLS Prof' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pal, M. [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Datta, A. [University School of Basic and Applied Science (USBAS), Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110075 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chakravorty, D., E-mail: mlsdc@iacs.res.in [MLS Prof' s Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-07-01

    Graphene oxide is transformed to reduced graphene oxide by high energy ball milling in inert atmosphere. The process of ball milling introduces defects and removes oxygen functional groups, thereby creating the possibility of fine tuning the band gap of all intermediate stages of the structural evolution. A limit of the backbone sp{sup 2} network structure has been found which should be able to accommodate defects, before amorphization sets in. The amorphization of graphene oxide is achieved rather quickly in comparison to that of graphite. From thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetric analysis along with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopic studies, it is found that the number of oxygen-containing groups decreases at a faster rate than that of aromatic double bonds with increasing ball milling time with a maximum limit of 3 h. Several characterization techniques (FTIR, Raman, UV–Visible and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) have confirmed that the material synthesized is, indeed, reduced graphene oxide. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide is transformed to reduced graphene oxide by high energy ball milling in inert atmosphere. • Fine tuning the band gap by introducing defects and removing oxygen functional groups. • Introduction of excess defects leads to amorphization. • Photoluminescence has been observed in the UV-blue region.

  8. Zircaloy-oxidation and hydrogen-generation rates in degraded-core accident situations

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1983-02-01

    Oxidation of Zircaloy cladding is the primary source of hydrogen generated during a degraded-core accident. In this paper, reported Zircaloy oxidation rates, either measured at 1500 to 1850 0 C or extrapolated from the low-temperature data obtained at 0 C, are critically reviewed with respect to their applicability to a degraded-core accident situation in which the high-temperature fuel cladding is likely to be exposed to and oxidized in mixtures of hydrogen and depleted steam, rather than in an unlimited flux of pure steam. New results of Zircaloy oxidation measurements in various mixtures of hydrogen and steam are reported for >1500 0 C. The results show significantly smaller oxidation and, hence, hydrogen-generation rates in the mixture, compared with those obtained in pure steam. It is also shown that a significant fraction of hydrogen, generated as a result of Zircaloy oxidation, is dissolved in the cladding material itself, which prevents that portion of hydrogen from reaching the containment building space. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to a more realistic method of quantifying the hydrogen source term for a degraded-core accident analysis

  9. High temperature transient deformation of mixed oxide fuels

    Slagle, O.D.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present recent experimental results on fuel creep under transient conditions at high temperatures. The effect of temperature, stress, heating rate, density and grain size were considered. An empirical formulation is derived for the relationship between strain, stress, temperature and heating rate. This relationship provides a means for incorporating stress relief into the analysis of fuel-cladding interaction during an overpower transient. The effect of sample density and initial grain size is considered by varying the sample parameters. Previously derived steady-state creep relationships for the high temperature creep of mixed oxide fuel were combined with the time dependency of creep found for UO 2 to calculate a transient creep relationship for mixed oxide fuel. These calculated results were found to be in good agreement with the measured high temperature transient creep results

  10. The ion-exchange obtaining of high purity samarium oxide

    Brzyska, W.; Soltysiak, I.; Cygan, J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of lactic acid - EDTA mixture as an eluent for the obtaining of high purity samarium oxide was studied. The studies were carried out at room temperature on cation exchange resin Wofatit KPS X 8. The best results were obtained for lactic acid (0,26 mol/dm 3 ) - EDTA (0,013 mol/dm 3 ) mixture at pH 3,3. As the result of 57% samarium concentrate elution with column load 1:3 and flow rate 0,4 cm/min, over 99% pure samarium oxide with 73% yield has been obtained. The yield of spectrally pure Sm 2 O 3 exceeded 45%. (author)

  11. Release characteristics of tritium from high-purity lithium oxide

    O'Kula, K.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of tritium release from neutronirradiated lithium oxide were determined from isothermal release experiments. High-purity, monocrystalline lithium oxide was purged ex-reactor with helium and helium-hydrogen gas streams. Overall release was found to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion, and was predominantly in the form of condensible species. The result of an independent concentration profile analysis at 923 K was in agreement with the gas release diffusion coefficient. Sweeping the Li 2 O with hydrogen-containing gas was found to enhance tritium removal during the early stage of each run

  12. High Strain Rate Characterisation of Composite Materials

    Eriksen, Rasmus Normann Wilken

    -reinforced polymers, were considered, and it was first shown that the loading history controls equilibrium process. Then the High-speed servo-hydraulic test machine was analysed in terms its ability to create a state of constant strain rate in the specimen. The invertible inertial forces in the load train prevented...... from designing and constructing a high-speed servo-hydraulic test machine and by performing a comprehensive test series. The difficulties encountered in the test work could be addressed with the developed analysis. The conclusion was that the High-speed servo-hydraulic test machine is less suited...... for testing fibre-reinforced polymers due to their elastic behaviour and low strain to failure. This is problematic as the High-speed servo-hydraulic test machine closes the gap between quasi-static tests rates and lower strain rates, which are achievable with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The Split...

  13. Evaluation of exhaled nitric oxide in schoolchildren at different exhalation flow rates.

    Pedroletti, Christophe; Zetterquist, Wilhelm; Nordvall, Lennart; Alving, Kjell

    2002-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air is believed to reflect allergic inflammation in the airways. Measured levels of exhaled NO vary with the exhaled flow rate, which therefore must be standardized. The aim of this study was to estimate the optimal exhalation flow rate when measuring NO in exhaled air. We studied 15 asthmatic children (8-18 y) with elevated NO levels and 15 age-matched controls and focused on how the quality of the NO curve profile, the discriminatory power, and the reproducibility were influenced by the exhalation flow rate. We used an on-line system for NO measurements at six different exhalation flow rates in the interval of 11-382 mL/s. The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) was highly flow-dependent as was expected. Intermediate flow rates yielded a flat and stable NO plateau and were considerably easier to interpret than those obtained at the highest and lowest flow rates. The ratio of FENO between asthmatics and controls was lower at higher flow rates and a considerable overlap in NO values was demonstrated at all flow rates except 50 mL/s. The reproducibility was much lower at more extreme flow rates and was best at 50 mL/s. We conclude that a target exhalation flow rate of approximately 50 mL/s is to be preferred using the single-breath method for on-line NO measurements in schoolchildren.

  14. High-density oxidized porous silicon

    Gharbi, Ahmed; Souifi, Abdelkader; Remaki, Boudjemaa; Halimaoui, Aomar; Bensahel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have studied oxidized porous silicon (OPS) properties using Fourier transform infraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy and capacitance–voltage C–V measurements. We report the first experimental determination of the optimum porosity allowing the elaboration of high-density OPS insulators. This is an important contribution to the research of thick integrated electrical insulators on porous silicon based on an optimized process ensuring dielectric quality (complete oxidation) and mechanical and chemical reliability (no residual pores or silicon crystallites). Through the measurement of the refractive indexes of the porous silicon (PS) layer before and after oxidation, one can determine the structural composition of the OPS material in silicon, air and silica. We have experimentally demonstrated that a porosity approaching 56% of the as-prepared PS layer is required to ensure a complete oxidation of PS without residual silicon crystallites and with minimum porosity. The effective dielectric constant values of OPS materials determined from capacitance–voltage C–V measurements are discussed and compared to FTIR results predictions. (paper)

  15. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  16. High temperature oxidation in boiler environment of chromized steel

    Alia, F. F.; Kurniawan, T.; Asmara, Y. P.; Ani, M. H. B.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-10-01

    The demand for increasing efficiency has led to the development and construction of higher operating temperature power plant. This condition may lead to more severe thickness losses in boiler tubes due to excessive corrosion process. Hence, the research to improve the corrosion resistance of the current operated material is needed so that it can be applied for higher temperature application. In this research, the effect of chromizing process on the oxidation behaviour of T91 steel was investigated under steam condition. In order to deposit chromium, mixture of chromium (Cr) powder as master alloy, halide salt (NH4Cl) powder as activator and alumina (Al2O3) powder as inert filler were inserted into alumina retort together with the steel sample and heated inside furnace at 1050°C for ten hours under argon gas environment. Furthermore, for the oxidation process, steels were exposed at 700°C at different oxidation time (6h-24h) under steam condition. From FESEM/EDX analysis, it was found that oxidation rate of pack cemented steel was lower than the un-packed steel. These results show that Cr from chromizing process was able to become reservoir for the formation of Cr2O3 in high temperature steam oxidation, and its existence can be used for a longer oxidation time.

  17. High frame rate synthetic aperture duplex imaging

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    aperture flow imaging as demonstrated in this paper. Synthetic aperture, directional beamforming, and cross-correlation are used to produce B-mode and vector velocity images at high frame rates. The frame rate equals the effective pulse repetition frequency of each imaging mode. Emissions for making the B...... estimation is −1.8% and the relative standard deviation 5.4%. The approach can thus estimate both high and low velocities with equal accuracy and thereby makes it possible to present vector flow images with a high dynamic range. Measurements are made using the SARUS research scanner, a linear array......Conventional color flow images are limited in velocity range and can either show the high velocities in systole or be optimized for the lower diastolic velocities. The full dynamics of the flow is, thus, hard to visualize. The dynamic range can be significantly increased by employing synthetic...

  18. Oxygen transfer rates and requirements in oxidative biocatalysis

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Rehn, Gustav; Woodley, John

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions offer several important benefits such as regio- and stereoselectivity, avoiding the use of toxic metal based catalysts and replacing oxidizing reagents by allowing the use of oxygen. However, the development of biocatalytic oxidation processes is a complex task......-up is relatively straight forward (Gabelman and Hwang, 1999), and membrane contactors are implemented for various industrial applications (Klaassen et al., 2005)....

  19. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  20. Baltimore District Tackles High Suspension Rates

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on how the Baltimore District tackles its high suspension rates. Driven by an increasing belief that zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are ineffective, more educators are embracing strategies that do not exclude misbehaving students from school for offenses such as insubordination, disrespect, cutting class, tardiness, and…

  1. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  2. Oxidative stress and the high altitude environment

    Jakub Krzeszowiak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years there has been considerable interest in mountain sports, including mountaineering, owing to the general availability of climbing clothing and equipment as well trainings and professional literature. This raised a new question for the environmental and mountain medicine: Is mountaineering harmful to health? Potential hazards include the conditions existing in the alpine environment, i.e. lower atmospheric pressure leading to the development of hypobaric hypoxia, extreme physical effort, increased UV radiation, lack of access to fresh food, and mental stress. A reasonable measure of harmfulness of these factors is to determine the increase in the level of oxidative stress. Alpine environment can stimulate the antioxidant enzyme system but under specific circumstances it may exceed its capabilities with simultaneous consumption of low-molecular antioxidants resulting in increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This situation is referred to as oxidative stress. Rapid and uncontrolled proliferation of reactive oxygen species leads to a number of adverse changes, resulting in the above-average damage to the lipid structures of cell membranes (peroxidation, proteins (denaturation, and nucleic acids. Such situation within the human body cannot take place without resultant systemic consequences. This explains the malaise of people returning from high altitude and a marked decrease in their physical fitness. In addition, a theory is put forward that the increase in the level of oxidative stress is one of the factors responsible for the onset of acute mountain sickness (AMS. However, such statement requires further investigation because the currently available literature is inconclusive. This article presents the causes and effects of development of oxidative stress in the high mountains.

  3. Isothermal oxidation behavior of ternary Zr-Nb-Y alloys at high temperature

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id [Research Center for Nuclear Materials and Radiometry, Jl. Tamansari 71, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Soepriyanto, Syoni; Basuki, Eddy Agus [Metallurgy Engineering, Institute Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Wiryolukito, Slameto [Materials Engineering, Institute Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The effect of yttrium content on isothermal oxidation behavior of Zr-2,5%Nb-0,5%Y, Zr-2,5%Nb-1%Y Zr-2,5%Nb-1,5%Y alloy at high temperature has been studied. High temperature oxidation carried out at tube furnace in air at 600,700 and 800°C for 1 hour. Optical microscope is used for microstructure characterization of the alloy. Oxidized and un oxidized specimen was characterized by x-ray diffraction. In this study, kinetic oxidation of Zr-2,5%Nb with different Y content at high temperature has also been studied. Characterization by optical microscope showed that microstructure of Zr-Nb-Y alloys relatively unchanged and showed equiaxed microstructure. X-ray diffraction of the alloys depicted that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of zirconium alloys is monoclinic ZrO2 while unoxidised alloy showed two phase α and β phase. SEM-EDS examination shows that depletion of Zr composition took place under the oxide layer. Kinetic rate of oxidation of zirconium alloy showed that increasing oxidation temperature will increase oxidation rate but increasing yttrium content in the alloys will decrease oxidation rate.

  4. Oxidative removal of quinclorac by permanganate through a rate-limiting [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Song, Dean; Cheng, Hanyang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Sun, Huiqing; Kong, Fanyu; Liang, Rongning; Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-04-05

    Quinclorac, a widely used herbicide in agriculture, has been recognized as an emerging environmental pollutant owing to its long persistence and potential risk to humans. However, no related information is available on the degradation of quinclorac by employing oxidants. Herein, the reactivity of quinclorac with permanganate was systematically investigated in water by combining experimental and computational approaches. The reaction followed overall second-order kinetics pointing to a bimolecular rate-limiting step. The second-order rate constant was found to be 3.47 × 10-3 M-1 s-1 at 25 °C, which was independent of pH over the range from 5 to 9 and was dependent on temperature over the range from 19 to 35 °C. The initial product was identified by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS to be mono-hydroxylated quinclorac, which was more susceptible to further oxidation. The result could be supported by the complete simulation of the reaction process in DFT calculations, indicating the [3 + 2] cycloaddition oxidation of the benzene ring in the rate-limiting step. The plausible mechanism was then proposed, accompanied by the analysis of the HOMO indicating the hydroxylation position and of the ESP suggesting a more electron-rich moiety. Considering the high effectiveness and low toxicity, permanganate oxidation was considered to be a very promising technique for removing quinclorac from aquatic environments.

  5. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Martínez A.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc. or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.. In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s−1 in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB. Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  6. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  7. Highly crumpled solar reduced graphene oxide electrode for supercapacitor application

    Mohanapriya, K.; Ahirrao, Dinesh J.; Jha, Neetu

    2018-04-01

    Highly crumpled solar reduced graphene oxide (CSRGO) was synthesized by simple and rapid method through freezing the solar reduced graphene oxide aqueous suspension using liquid nitrogen and used as electrode material for supercapacitor application. This electrode material was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-Ray diffractometer (XRD) and Raman Spectroscopy techniques to understand the morphology and structure. The electrochemical performance was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using 6M KOH electrolyte. The CSRGO exhibit high specifc capacitance of 210.1 F g-1 at the current density of 0.5 A g-1 and shows excellent rate capability. These features make the CSRGO material as promising electrode for high-performance supercapacitors.

  8. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  9. Electronics for very high rate tracking detectors

    Williams, H.H.; Dressnandt, N.; Ekenberg, T.; Gerds, E.J.; Newcomer, F.M.; Tedja, S.; Van Berg, R.; Van der Speigel, J.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented on a system of electronics designed for very high rate tracking detectors at the SSC and LHC. The primary goal was a system for signal detection, time measurement, and readout for the straw tracker for SDC. An integrated circuit incorporating eight channels of amplifier-shaper-discriminator (including detector tail cancellation), and two different integrated circuits for time measurement are described. The performance of tracking measurements up to counting rates of 8 MHz per wire is reported, as well as preliminary results from a baseline restoration circuit. (orig.)

  10. High-temperature oxidation behavior of dense SiBCN monoliths: Carbon-content dependent oxidation structure, kinetics and mechanisms

    Li, Daxin; Yang, Zhihua; Jia, Dechang; Wang, Shengjin; Duan, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qishuai; Miao, Yang; Rao, Jiancun; Zhou, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The scale growth for all investigated monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be depicted by a linear or parabolic rate law. •The carbon-rich monoliths oxidize at 1500 °C according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. •The excessive carbon in SiBCN monoliths deteriorates the oxidation resistance. •The oxidation resistance stems from the characteristic oxide structures and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C). -- Abstract: The high temperature oxidation behavior of three SiBCN monoliths: carbon-lean SiBCN with substantial Si metal, carbon-moderate SiBCN and carbon-rich SiBCN with excessive carbon, was investigated at 1500 °C for times up to15 h. Scale growth for carbon-lean and −moderate monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be described by a linear or parabolic rate law, while the carbon-rich monoliths oxidize according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. The microstructures of the oxide scale compose of three distinct layers. The passivating layer of carbon and boron containing amorphous SiO 2 and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C) both benefit the oxidation resistance.

  11. High strain rate studies in rock

    Grady, D.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic compression studies using high velocity impact are usually considered to involve a catastrophic process of indeterminate loading rate by which a material is brough to a shock compressed state. Although this is frequently the case, methods are also available to control the rate of strain during the shock compression process. One of the most accurate of these methods makes use of the anomalous nonlinear elastic property of glass to transform an initial shock or step wave input into a ramp wave of known amplitude and duration. Fused silica is the most carefully calibrated material for this purpose and, when placed between the test specimen and the impact projectile, can provide loading strain rates in the range of 10 4 /s to 10 6 /s for final stress states of approximately 3.9 GPa or less.Ramp wave compression experiments have been conducted on dolomite at strain rates of 3 x 10 4 /s. Both initial yielding and subsequent deformation at this strain rate agrees well with previous shock wave studies (epsilon-dotapprox.10 6 /s) and differs substantially from quasi-static measurements (epsilon-dotapprox.10 -4 /s). The ramp wave studies have also uncovered a pressure-induced phase transition in dolomite initiating at 4.0 GPa

  12. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  13. New insight of high temperature oxidation on self-exfoliation capability of graphene oxide

    Liu, Yuhang; Zeng, Jie; Han, Di; Wu, Kai; Yu, Bowen; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) via Hummers method is usually divided into two steps: low temperature oxidation at 35 °C (step I oxidation) and high temperature oxidation at 98 °C (step II oxidation). However, the effects of these two steps on the exfoliation capability and chemical structure of graphite oxide remain unclear. In this study, both the functional group content of graphite oxide and the entire evolution of interlayer spacing were investigated during the two steps. Step I oxidation is a slowly inhomogeneous oxidation step to remove unoxidized graphite flakes. The prepared graphite oxide can be easily self-exfoliated but contains a lot of organic sulfur. During the first 20 min of step II oxidation, the majority of organic sulfur can be efficiently removed and graphite oxide still remains a good exfoliation capability due to sharp increasing of carboxyl groups. However, with a longer oxidation time at step II oxidation, the decrease of organic sulfur content is slowed down apparently but without any carboxyl groups forming, then graphite oxide finally loses self-exfoliation capability. It is concluded that a short time of step II oxidation can produce purer and ultralarge GO sheets via self-exfoliation. The pure GO is possessed with better thermal stability and liquid crystal behavior. Besides, reduced GO films prepared from step II oxidation show better mechanical and electric properties after reducing compared with that obtained only via step I oxidation.

  14. High repetition rate intense ion beam source

    Hammer, D.A.; Glidden, S.C.; Noonan, B.

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a ≤ 150kV, 40kA, 100ns high repetition rate pulsed power system and intense ion beam source which is now in operation at Cornell University. Operation of the Magnetically-controlled Anode Plasma (MAP) ion diode at > 100Hz (burst mode for up to 10 pulse bursts) provides an initial look at repetition rate limitations of both the ion diode and beam diagnostics. The pulsed power systems are capable of ≥ 1kHz operation (up to 10 pulse bursts), but ion diode operation was limited to ∼100Hz because of diagnostic limitations. By varying MAP diode operating parameters, ion beams can be extracted at a few 10s of keV or at up to 150keV, the corresponding accelerating gap impedance ranging from about 1Ω to about 10Ω. The ability to make hundreds of test pulses per day at an average repetition rate of about 2 pulses per minute permits statistical analysis of diode operation as a function of various parameters. Most diode components have now survived more than 10 4 pulses, and the design and construction of the various pulsed power components of the MAP diode which have enabled us to reach this point are discussed. A high speed data acquisition system and companion analysis software capable of acquiring pulse data at 1ms intervals (in bursts of up to 10 pulses) and processing it in ≤ min is described

  15. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites.

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A; Thomas, Edwin L

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  16. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  17. High-frame-rate digital radiographic videography

    King, Nicholas S. P.; Cverna, Frank H.; Albright, Kevin L.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Yates, George J.; McDonald, Thomas E.; Flynn, Michael J.; Tashman, Scott

    1994-10-01

    High speed x-ray imaging can be an important tool for observing internal processes in a wide range of applications. In this paper we describe preliminary implementation of a system having the eventual goal of observing the internal dynamics of bone and joint reactions during loading. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) gated and image intensified camera systems were used to record images from an x-ray image convertor tube to demonstrate the potential of high frame-rate digital radiographic videography in the analysis of bone and joint dynamics of the human body. Preliminary experiments were done at LANL to test the systems. Initial high frame-rate imaging (from 500 to 1000 frames/s) of a swinging pendulum mounted to the face of an X-ray image convertor tube demonstrated high contrast response and baseline sensitivity. The systems were then evaluated at the Motion Analysis Laboratory of Henry Ford Health Systems Bone and Joint Center. Imaging of a 9 inch acrylic disk with embedded lead markers rotating at approximately 1000 RPM, demonstrated the system response to a high velocity/high contrast target. By gating the P-20 phosphor image from the X-ray image convertor with a second image intensifier (II) and using a 100 microsecond wide optical gate through the second II, enough prompt light decay from the x-ray image convertor phosphor had taken place to achieve reduction of most of the motion blurring. Measurement of the marker velocity was made by using video frames acquired at 500 frames/s. The data obtained from both experiments successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. Several key areas for improvement are discussed along with salient test results and experiment details.

  18. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  19. High counting rate resistive-plate chamber

    Peskov, V.; Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.

    1993-05-01

    Parallel-plate avalanche chambers (PPAC) are widely used in physics experiments because they are fast ( 5 counts/mm 2 . A resistive-plate chamber (RPC) is similar to the PPAC in construction except that one or both of the electrodes are made from high resistivity (≥10 10 Ω·cm) materials. In practice RPCs are usually used in the spark mode. Resistive electrodes are charged by sparks, locally reducing the actual electric field in the gap. The size of the charged surface is about 10 mm 2 , leaving the rest of the detector unaffected. Therefore, the rate capability of such detectors in the spark mode is considerably higher than conventional spark counters. Among the different glasses tested the best results were obtained with electron type conductive glasses, which obey Ohm's law. Most of the work with such glasses was done with high pressure parallel-plate chambers (10 atm) for time-of-flight measurements. Resistive glasses have been expensive and produced only in small quantities. Now resistive glasses are commercially available, although they are still expensive in small scale production. From the positive experience of different groups working with the resistive glasses, it was decided to review the old idea to use this glass for the RPC. This work has investigated the possibility of using the RPC at 1 atm and in the avalanche mode. This has several advantages: simplicity of construction, high rate capability, low voltage operation, and the ability to work with non-flammable gases

  20. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. On high interest rates in Brazil

    Francisco Lafaiete Lopes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the question of why interest rates are so high in Brazil as compared to the international average. It looks at theoretical arguments based on excessive government deficits, structural lack of private savings, inflation bias, excessive investment demand and fear of floating. An informal look at the evidence does not strongly corroborate any of these arguments. Hence a wise central bank should consider "testing" the market to make sure it is not dealing with an extreme equilibrium configuration or a long standing disequilibrium.

  2. Flashing motor at high transition rate

    Ai Baoquan; Wang Liqiu; Liu Lianggang

    2007-01-01

    The movement of a Brownian particle in a fluctuating two-state periodic potential is investigated. At high transition rate, we use a perturbation method to obtain the analytical solution of the model. It is found that the net current is a peaked function of thermal noise, barrier height and the fluctuation ratio between the two states. The thermal noise may facilitate the directed motion at a finite intensity. The asymmetry parameter of the potential is sensitive to the direction of the net current

  3. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  4. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  5. A high-performance flexible fibre-shaped electrochemical capacitor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide.

    Li, Yingru; Sheng, Kaixuan; Yuan, Wenjing; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-01-11

    A fibre-shaped solid electrochemical capacitor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide has been fabricated, exhibiting high specific capacitance and rate capability, long cycling life and attractive flexibility.

  6. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  8. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  9. Thermogravimetric study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr, a candidate alloy for high-temperature strain gages, was investigated by thermogravimetry. Although the bulk alloy exhibits linear electrical resistivity versus temperature and stable resistivity at elevated temperatures, problems attributed to oxidation occur when this material is fabricated into strain gages. In this work, isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) was used to study the oxidation kinetics. Results indicate that the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr was approximately parabolic in time at 600 C but exhibited greater passivation from 700 to 900 C. At 1100 C, the oxidation rate again increased.

  10. Ultra Fast, High Rep Rate, High Voltage Spark Gap Pulser

    1995-07-01

    current rise time. The spark gap was designed to have a coaxial geometry reducing its inductance. Provisions were made to pass flowing gas between the...ULTRA FAST, HIGH REP RATE, HIGH VOLTAGE SPARK GAP PULSER Robert A. Pastore Jr., Lawrence E. Kingsley, Kevin Fonda, Erik Lenzing Electrophysics and...Modeling Branch AMSRL-PS-EA Tel.: (908)-532-0271 FAX: (908)-542-3348 U.S. Army Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Directorate Ft. Monmouth

  11. Operation of high rate microstrip gas chambers

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Hoch, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe recent measurements carried out in well controlled and reproducible conditions to help understanding the factors affecting the short and long term behaviour of Microstrip Gas Chambers. Special care has been taken concerning the gas purity and choice of materials used in the system and for the detectors construction. Detectors built on glasses with surface resistivity in the range $10^{13}-10^{15} \\Omega/\\Box$ have shown satisfactory performance as they do not show charging-up process at high rate and stand the large doses required for the future high luminosity experiments (~10 mC·cm-1·yr-1). Concerning the lifetime measurements, it has been observed that chambers manufactured on high-resistivity glass are far more susceptible of suffering ageing than detectors made on low resistivity, electron-conducting supports, independently of the metal used for the artwork (chromium or gold) at least in clean gas conditions. The successfully operation in the laboratory of detectors manufactured on diamond-...

  12. HfO2 - rare earth oxide systems in the region with high content of rare earth oxide

    Shevchenko, A.V.; Lopato, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of annealing and hardenings (10 2 -10 4 deg/s cooling rate) and differential thermal analysis elements of state diagrams of HfO 2 - rare earth oxide (rare earths-La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Er, Yb, Lu, Sc) systems from 1800 deg C up to melting in the range of 60-100 mol% rare earth oxide concentration were constructed. Regularities of HfQ 2 addition effect on high-temperature polymorphic transformations of rare earth oxides were studied. Results of investigation were discussed from viewpoint of crystal chemistry

  13. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  14. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on graphene oxide sheets as high-performance electrochromic material

    Chang, Xueting; Sun, Shibin; Dong, Lihua; Hu, Xiong; Yin, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electrochromic mechanism of tungsten oxide nanowires-reduced graphene oxide composite. - Highlights: • A novel inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid composite was prepared. • The hybrid composite has sandwich-like structure. • The hybrid composite exhibited high-quality electrohcromic performance. - Abstract: In this work, we report the synthesis of a novel hybrid electrochromic composite through nucleation and growth of ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires on graphene oxide sheets using a facile solvothermal route. The competition between the growth of tungsten oxide nanowires and the reduction of graphene oxide sheets leads to the formation of sandwich-structured tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide composite. Due to the strongly coupled effect between the ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires and the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets, the novel electrochromic composite exhibited high-quality electrochromic performance with fast color-switching speed, good cyclic stability, and high coloration efficiency. The present tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide composite represents a new approach to prepare other inorganic-reduced graphene oxide hybrid materials for electrochemical applications

  15. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  16. A comparison between different oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel ongoing in situ oxide dissolution in High Voltage Electron Microscope

    Monnet, I.; Van den Berghe, T.; Dubuisson, Ph.

    2012-01-01

    ODS materials are considered for nuclear applications but previous experimental studies have shown a partial dissolution of some oxides under neutron irradiation. In this work, electron irradiations were used to evaluate the stability of the oxides depending on the chemical composition of the oxide dispersion. Four ferritic steels based on EM10 (Fe–9Cr–1Mo) and reinforced respectively by Al 2 O 3 , MgO, MgAl 2 O 4 and Y 2 O 3 , were studied. These materials were irradiated with 1 MeV or 1.2 MeV electrons in a High Voltage Electron Microscope. This technique allows to follow one single oxide and to determine the evolution of its size during the irradiation. In situ HVEM observations indicate that the dissolution rate depends on the chemical composition of the oxide, on the temperature and on the irradiation dose.

  17. A study on the improvement of oxidation resistance of OAE-added stainless steels for high temperature applications

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gil Moo

    1996-01-01

    Since the manufacturing temperature of stainless steels is relatively high, oxidation at the elevated temperature becomes important. The chemical and physical properties of the protective oxide film which was formed on the stainless steels at high temperature for the oxidation resistance are important in determining the rate of oxidation and the life of equipment exposed to high temperature oxidizing environments. In this study, the oxidation behavior of STS 309S and STS 409L added by a small amount of oxygen active element(each + 0.5wt% Hf and Y) was studied to improve oxidation resistance. In the cyclic oxidation, while OAE-free specimens showed relatively poor oxidation resistance due to spallations and cracks of Cr-rich oxide layer, OAE-added specimens improved cyclic oxidation resistance assumably due to constant oxidation rate with stable oxide layers at high temperature. Especially Hf improved cyclic oxidation resistance by forming Cr-rich oxide layer preventing internal oxidation in STS 309S. (author)

  18. High performance supercapacitors using metal oxide anchored graphene nanosheet electrodes

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2011-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles were chemically anchored onto graphene nanosheets (GNs) and the resultant composites - SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs (58% of GNs loading) - coated over conductive carbon fabric substrates were successfully used as supercapacitor electrodes. The results showed that the incorporation of metal oxide nanoparticles improved the capacitive performance of GNs due to a combination of the effect of spacers and redox reactions. The specific capacitance values (with respect to the composite mass) obtained for SnO2/GNs (195 F g-1) and RuO 2/GNs (365 F g-1) composites at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the present study are the best ones reported to date for a two electrode configuration. The resultant supercapacitors also exhibited high values for maximum energy (27.6, 33.1 and 50.6 W h kg-1) and power densities (15.9, 20.4 and 31.2 kW kg-1) for SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs respectively. These findings demonstrate the importance and great potential of metal oxide/GNs based composite coated carbon fabric in the development of high-performance energy-storage systems. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA)

    Hylton, Alan; Raible, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    high-rate laser terminals. These must interface with the existing, aging data infrastructure. The High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA) project is designed to provide networked store, carry, and forward capability to optimize data flow through both the existing radio frequency (RF) and new laser communications terminal. The networking capability is realized through the Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocol, and is used for scheduling data movement as well as optimizing the performance of existing RF channels. HiDRA is realized as a distributed FPGA memory and interface controller that is itself controlled by a local computer running DTN software. Thus HiDRA is applicable to other arenas seeking to employ next-generation communications technologies, e.g. deep space. In this paper, we describe HiDRA and its far-reaching research implications.

  20. Isotopic exchange rate of sodium ions between hydrous metal oxides and aqueous solutions

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Hiromichi

    1991-01-01

    To elucidate the kinetics of ion-exchange reaction on hydrous metal oxide, the isotopic exchange rates of sodium ions between hydrous metal oxides such as hydrous tin (IV), niobium (V), zirconium (IV) and titanium (IV) oxides, and aqueous solutions were measured radiochemically and compared with each other. The rate of reaction cannot be understood by an unified view since the rate controlling step differs with the kind of exchangers. The rate constants relevant to each exchanger such as diffusion constants and their activation energies were also determined. (author)

  1. High-temperature oxidation of Zircaloy in hydrogen-steam mixtures

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Oxidation rates of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes have been measured in hydrogen-steam mixtures at 1200 to 1700 0 C. For a given isothermal oxidation temperature, the oxide layer thicknesses have been measured as a function of time, steam supply rate, and hydrogen overpressure. The oxidation rates in the mixtures were compared with similar data obtained in pure steam and helium-steam environments under otherwise identical conditions. The rates in pure steam and helium-steam mixtures were equivalent and comparable to the parabolic rates obtained under steam-saturated conditions and reported in the literature. However, when the helium was replaced with hydrogen of equivalent partial pressure, a significantly smaller oxidation rate was observed. For high steam-supply rates, the oxidation kinetics in a hydrogen-steam mixture were parabolic, but the rate was smaller than for pure steam or helium-steam mixtures. Under otherwise identical conditions, the ratio of the parabolic rate for hydrogen-steam to that for pure steam decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing steam-supply rate

  2. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  3. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy. Center for Accelerator Science and Education

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  4. High temperature oxidation behavior of TiAl-based intermetallics

    Stroosnijder, M.F.; Sunderkoetter, J.D.; Haanappel, V.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    TiAl-based intermetallic compounds have attracted considerable interest as structural materials for high-temperature applications due to their low density and substantial mechanical strength at high temperatures. However, one major drawback hindering industrial application arises from the insufficient oxidation resistance at temperatures beyond 700 C. In the present contribution some general aspects of high temperature oxidation of TiAl-based intermetallics will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of the influence of alloying elements, in particular niobium, and of the effect of nitrogen in the oxidizing environment on the high temperature oxidation behavior of such materials

  5. Highly Efficient, Durable Regenerative Solid Oxide Stack, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop a highly efficient regenerative solid oxide stack design. Novel structural elements allow direct internal...

  6. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  7. Anaerobic methane oxidation rates at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments from Kattegat and Skagerrak (Denmark)

    Iversen, N.; Jorgensen, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant radiotracer measurements were made of in situ rates of sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in 2-3-m-long sediment cores. Methane accumulated to high concentrations (> 1 mM CH 4 ) only below the sulfate zone, at 1 m or deeper in the sediment. Sulfate reduction showed a broad maximum below the sediment surface and a smaller, narrow maximum at the sulfate-methane transition. Methane oxidation was low (0.002-0.1 nmol CH 4 cm -3 d -1 ) throughout the sulfate zone and showed a sharp maximum at the sulfate-methane transition, coinciding with the sulfate reduction maximum. Total anaerobic methane oxidation at two stations was 0.83 and 1.16 mmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 , of which 96% was confined to the sulfate-methane transition. All the methane that was calculated to diffuse up into the sulfate-methane transition was oxidized in this zone. The methane oxidation was equivalent to 10% of the electron donor requirement for the total measured sulfate reduction. A third station showed high sulfate concentrations at all depths sampled and the total methane oxidation was only 0.013 mmol m -2 d -1 . From direct measurements of rates, concentration gradients, and diffusion coefficients, simple calculations were made of sulfate and methane fluxes and of methane production rates

  8. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  9. The accelerated oxidation of zircaloy-4 at 700∼900 .deg. C in high pressure steam

    Kim, K. P.; Park, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    To find the effect of pressure on the high temperature oxidation of zircaloy-4, an autoclave capable of measuring the degree of oxidation at high temperatures and high pressure was manufactured. The specimens used in experiments are commercially available Zircaloy-4 used in Kori nuclear power plants. All the measurements were done at 700∼900 .deg. C in steam. Pressure effects were noticed. The oxide thickness was much thicker in high pressure steam, comparing to that in the 1 atm steam. And, the higher is the steam pressure, the thicker becomes the oxide. The enhancement of oxide growth rate at 700∼900 .deg. C in high pressure steam is approximately propotion to the power of 1.0∼1.6 of the ratio of experimental steam pressure to critical steam pressure. There is a critical steam pressure above that the oxidation rate enhances. The critical steam pressure was measured as 30∼40 bar. The enhanced oxidation seems from the oxide cracking due to the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation at high pressure steam

  10. Study of the oxidation of Fe-Cr alloys at high temperatures

    Carneiro, J.F.; Sabioni, A.C.S.

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-1.5%Cr, Fe-5.0%Cr, Fe-10%Cr and Fe- 15%Cr model alloys were investigated from 700 to 850 deg C, in air atmosphere. The oxidation treatments were performed in a thermobalance with a sensitivity of 1μg. The oxide films grown by oxidation of the alloys were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxide films are Fe-Cr spinels with variable composition depending on the alloy composition. For all conditions studied, the oxidation kinetics of these alloys follow a parabolic law. The comparison of the oxidation rates of the four alloys, at 700 deg C, shows that the parabolic oxidation constants decrease from 1.96x10 -9 g 2 .cm -4 .s -1 , for the alloy Fe-1.5% Cr, to 1.18 x 10-14g 2 .cm -4 .s -1 for the alloy Fe-15% Cr. Comparative analysis of the oxidation behavior of the Fe-10%Cr and Fe-15%Cr alloys, between 700 and 850 deg C, shows that the oxidation rates of these alloys are comparable to 800 deg C, above this temperature the Fe-10%Cr alloy shows lower resistance to oxidation. (author)

  11. Potential rates of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, nitrate reduction and denitrification in the young barley rhizosphere

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Potential activities (enzyme contents) of ammonium (NH4+) oxidizing, nitrite (NO2-) oxidizing, nitrate (NO3-) reducing and denitrifying bacteria were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil obtained from young barley plants in the field. The activities as well as pools of inorganic N (NH4+, NO2...

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    CdS nanoparticles prepared in reverse micellar system was incorporated into ... The molar ratio of various constituents of the hydrothermal gel was ... other synthesis techniques for the preparation of iron oxide nanocomposites using.

  13. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  14. High mitogenomic evolutionary rates and time dependency.

    Subramanian, S.; Denver, D.R.; Millar, C.D.; Heupink, T.; Aschrafi, A.; Emslie, S.D.; Baroni, C.; Lambert, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Using entire modern and ancient mitochondrial genomes of Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) that are up to 44000 years old, we show that the rates of evolution of the mitochondrial genome are two to six times greater than those estimated from phylogenetic comparisons. Although the rate of

  15. Anodic oxidation of oxytetracycline: Influence of the experimental conditions on the degradation rate and mechanism

    Annabel Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The anodic oxidation of oxytetracycline was performed with success using as anode a boron-doped diamond electrode. The experiments were conducted in batch mode, using two different electrochemical cells: an up-flow cell, with recirculation, that was used to evaluate the influence of recirculation flow rate; and a stirred cell, used to determine the influence of the applied current density. Besides oxytetracyclin electrodegradation rate and mineralization extent, oxidation by-products were also assessed. Both the flow rate and the applied current density have shown positive influence on the oxytetracycline oxidation rate. On the other hand, the mineralization degree presented the highest values at the lowest flow rate and the lowest current density tested. The main oxidation by-products detected were oxalic, oxamic and maleic acids.

  16. Comparison of the oxidation rate and degree of graphitization of selected IG and NBG nuclear graphite grades

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-10-01

    The oxidation rate and degree of graphitization (DOG) were determined for some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) and compared in view of their filler coke type (i.e., pitch or petroleum coke) and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 and 960 °C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 l/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. The DOG was determined based on the lattice parameter c determined from an X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600-950 °C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5-10% weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 °C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608-808 °C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control. A relationship between the oxidation rate and DOG was not observed.

  17. Comparison of the oxidation rate and degree of graphitization of selected IG and NBG nuclear graphite grades

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation rate and degree of graphitization (DOG) were determined for some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) and compared in view of their filler coke type (i.e., pitch or petroleum coke) and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 and 960 deg. C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 l/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. The DOG was determined based on the lattice parameter c determined from an X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600-950 deg. C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5-10% weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 deg. C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608-808 deg. C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control. A relationship between the oxidation rate and DOG was not observed

  18. Oxidation behaviour of titanium in high temperature steam

    Moroishi, T; Shida, Y [Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Central Research Labs.

    1978-03-01

    The oxidation of pure titanium was studied in superheated steam at 400 -- 550/sup 0/C. The effects of prior cold working and several heat treatment conditions on the oxidation were examined and also the effects of the addition of small amounts of iron and oxygen were investigated. The oxidation mechanism of pure titanium is discussed in relation to the scale structure and the oxidation kinetics. Hydrogen absorption rate was also measured. As a result, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The oxidation of pure titanium in steam was faster than in air and breakaway oxidation was observed above 500/sup 0/C after the specimen had gained a certain weight. Prior cold working and heat treatment conditions scarcely affected the oxidation rate, whereas the specimen containing small amounts of iron and oxygen showed a little more rapid oxidation. (2) At 500 and 550/sup 0/C a dark grey inner scale and a yellow-brown outer scale were formed. The outer scale was apt to exfoliate after the occurrence of breakaway oxidation. At 400 and 450/sup 0/C only a dark grey scale was observed. All of these oxides were identified as the rutile type, TiO/sub 2/. Furthermore, the presence of a thin and uniform oxygen rich layer beneath the external scale was confirmed at all test temperatures. (3) The measured weight gain approximately followed the cubic rate law; this would be expected for the following reason; one component of the weight gain is due to the dissolved oxygen, the amount of which remains constant after the early stages of oxidation. The second component is due to the parabolic growth of the external TiO/sub 2/ scale. When these contributions are added a pseudo-cubic weight gain curve results. (4) It was shown that 50 percent of the hydrogen generated during the oxidation was absorbed into the metal.

  19. Oxidation behaviour of titanium in high temperature steam

    Moroishi, Taishi; Shida, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    The oxidation of pure titanium was studied in superheated steam at 400 -- 550 0 C. The effects of prior cold working and several heat treatment conditions on the oxidation were examined and also the effects of the addition of small amounts of iron and oxygen were investigated. The oxidation mechanism of pure titanium is discussed in relation to the scale structure and the oxidation kinetics. Hydrogen absorption rate was also measured. As a result, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The oxidation of pure titanium in steam was faster than in air and breakaway oxidation was observed above 500 0 C after the specimen had gained a certain weight. Prior cold working and heat treatment conditions scarcely affected the oxidation rate, whereas the specimen containing small amounts of iron and oxygen showed a little more rapid oxidation. (2) At 500 and 550 0 C a dark grey inner scale and a yellow-brown outer scale were formed. The outer scale was apt to exfoliate after the occurrence of breakaway oxidation. At 400 and 450 0 C only a dark grey scale was observed. All of these oxides were identified as the rutile type, TiO 2 . Furthermore, the presence of a thin and uniform oxygen rich layer beneath the external scale was confirmed at all test temperatures. (3) The measured weight gain approximately followed the cubic rate law; this would be expected for the following reason; one component of the weight gain is due to the dissolved oxygen, the amount of which remains constant after the early stages of oxidation. The second component is due to the parabolic growth of the external TiO 2 scale. When these contributions are added a pseudo-cubic weight gain curve results. (4) It was shown that 50 percent of the hydrogen generated during the oxidation was absorbed into the metal. (auth.)

  20. Oxidation Behavior of Some Cr Ferritic Steels for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Mohamed, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of three high Cr ferritic steels designated 1Al, RA and 5Al with different levels of Al, Si, Mn and Hf has been investigated in the present work. These steels have been developed as candidates for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) interconnect. Specimens of these alloys have been subjected to isothermal as well as cyclic oxidation in air. Isothermal oxidation tests are conducted in the temperature range 800 - 1000 degree C for time periods up to 1000 h. cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 800 and 1000 degree C for twenty 25 - h cycles giving a total cyclic exposure time of 500 h. The growth rate of the oxide scales was found to follow a parabolic law over a certain oxidation period which changed with alloy composition and oxidation temperature. The value of the parabolic rate constant increased with increasing oxidation temperature. At 800 and 900 degree C alloy 1Al exhibited higher oxidation resistance compared to the other two alloys. Alloy RA showed spalling behavior when oxidized at 900 degree C and the extent of spalling increased with increasing the oxidation temperature to 1000 degree C. Alloy 5Al oxidized at 1000 degree C showed the highest oxidation resistance among the investigated alloys. Alloy 1Al and RA showed similar scale morphology and composition. X- ray diffraction analysis revealed that the scales developed on these alloys consist of Cr 2 O 3 with an outer layer of MnCr 2 O 4 and a minor amount of FeCr 2 O 4 spinels. Alloy 5Al developed scale consisting of γ- Al 2 O 3 at 800 degree C and γ and α- Al 2 O 3 at 900 degree C. Oxidation of alloy 5Al at 1000 degree C led to formation of a scale consisting mainly of the protective phase α Al 2 O 3 . The presence of 0.84 wt% Al and 0.95 wt % Si in alloy 1Al enhanced its oxidation resistance compared to alloy RA which contains only 0.29 wt% Si and is Al - free. This enhancement was attributed to formation of internal oxidation zone in alloy 1Al just beneath the oxide / alloy

  1. Oxidation of zircaloy-2 in high temperature steam

    Ikeda, Seiichi; Ito, Goro; Ohashi, Shigeo

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation tests were conducted for zircaloy-2 in steam at temperature ranging from 900 to 1300 0 C to clarify its oxidation kinetics as a nuclear fuel cladding materials in case of a loss-of-coolant accident. The influence of maximum temperature and heating rate of the specimen on its oxidation rate in steam was investigated. The changes in mechanical properties of the specimens after oxidation tests are also studied. The results obtained were summarized as follows: (1) The weight of the specimen after oxidation in steam increased two times as the time required to reach the maximum temperature increased from 1 to 10 mins. (2) The kinetics of oxidation of zircaloy-2 in steam were not affected by the difference in the surface condition before test such as chemical polishing or pre-oxidation in steam. (3) The dominant growth of oxide film on the surface of zircaloy-2 was observed at the initial stage of oxidation in steam. However, the thickness of oxygen-rich solid solution layer under the film increased gradually with the progress of oxidation and the ratio of oxygen in oxide to that in solid solution has a constant value of 8:2. (4) The breakaway took place only in the specimen subjected to 900 0 C repeated heating. This penomenon was caused by the local growth of the oxide below a crack of the oxide film resulting from the reheating of the specimen. (5) The results of bending tests showed that the deflection until fracture of the specimen was smaller for the one heated at a higher temperature even if the weight increase was of the same order of magnitude for both specimens. (6) It was concluded that the ductility of zircaloy-2 decreased remarkably at a heating temperature in excess of 1100 0 C for more than 5 min. (auth.)

  2. Oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr in a dynamic high temperature environment

    Tenney, D. R.; Young, C. T.; Herring, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr has been studied in static and high-speed flowing air environments at 1100 and 1200 C. It has been found that the stable oxide morphologies formed on the specimens exposed to the static and dynamic environments were markedly different. The faceted crystal morphology characteristic of static oxidation was found to be unstable under high-temperature, high-speed flow conditions and was quickly replaced by a porous NiO 'mushroom' type structure. Also, it was found that the rate of formation of CrO3 from Cr2O3 was greatly enhanced by high gas velocity conditions. The stability of Cr2-O3 was found to be greatly improved by the presence of an outer NiO layer, even though the NiO layer was very porous. An oxidation model is proposed to explain the observed microstructures and overall oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr alloys.

  3. Enhanced Rate Capability of Oxide Coated Lithium Titanate within Extended Voltage Ranges

    Ahn, Dongjoon [College of Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Xiao, Xingcheng, E-mail: xingcheng.xiao@gm.com [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Lithium titanate (Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} or LTO) is a promising negative electrode material of high-power lithium-ion batteries, due to its superior rate capability and excellent capacity retention. However, the specific capacity of LTO is less than one half of that of graphite electrode. In this work, we applied ultrathin oxide coating on LTO by the atomic layer deposition technique, aiming for increasing the energy density by extending the cell voltage window and specific capacity of LTO. We demonstrated that a few nanometer thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can suppress the mechanical distortion of LTO cycled at low potential, which enable the higher specific capacity and excellent capacity retention. Furthermore, the surface coating can facilitate the charge transfer, leading to significantly improved rate capabilities, comparing with the uncoated LTO.

  4. High Temperature Oxidation of Superalloys and Intermetallic Compounds

    2010-02-28

    Oxid. Met. Vol.14, pp. 217-234. 1980. 20. T.A. Rannanarayanan, M. Raghavan and R. Petrovic-Luton. Metallic Yttrium Additions to High Temperatura ... Temperatura Alloys: Influence of AI2O3 Scale Properties. Oxid. Met. Vol.22, pp. 83-100. 1984. 21. High-temperature characterization of reactively

  5. Effects of the Air Flow Rate on The Oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 Nuclear Graphite Grades

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan; Jang, Joon-Hee

    2007-01-01

    For a VHTR, graphite oxidation is regarded as a critical phenomenon for degrading the integrity of graphite components under normal or abnormal conditions. The oxidation of a graphite core component can occur by air which may permeate into the primary coolant operation and/or by impurities contained in the He coolant, or by air ingress during a severe accident. It is well known that the oxidation properties of a graphite are highly dependent on the source of raw materials, impurities, microstructures (crystallites, pore structure), and on the processing and environmental parameters, such as the forming methods, the coolant type, moisture and impurity content, temperature, flow rate and the oxygen potential of the coolants. A lot of work has been performed on the oxidation of graphite since the 1960s, and, for example, in the case of the temperature, a widely accepted oxidation model on the effects of a temperature has already been developed. However, in the case of the flow rate, even for its expected effects in a VHTR, for example, as to the expected changes in the bypass flow (10-20 %) during an operation, no systematic works have been performed. In this respect, as a preliminary study, the effects of an air flow rate on the oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 nuclear graphite were investigated

  6. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  7. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  8. High-pressure pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob M.; Glarborg, Peter

    2018-01-01

    against the present data as well as ignition delay times and flame speed measurements from literature. The model predicted the onset of fuel conversion and the composition of products from the flow reactor experiments fairly well. It also predicted well ignition delays above 900 K whereas it overpredicted...... reported flame speeds slightly. The results of sensitivity analyses revealed the importance of the reaction between ethanol and the hydroperoxyl radical for ignition at high pressure and intermediate temperatures. An accurate determination of the rate coefficients for this reaction is important to improve......The pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol has been investigated at temperatures of 600–900 K, a pressure of 50 bar and residence times of 4.3–6.8 s in a laminar flow reactor. The experiments, conducted with mixtures highly diluted in nitrogen, covered fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) of 0.1, 1.0, 43...

  9. The preparation of TiO2@rGO nanocomposite efficiently activated with UVA/LED and H2O2 for high rate oxidation of acetaminophen: Catalyst characterization and acetaminophen degradation and mineralization

    Cheshme Khavar, Amir Hossein; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Mahjoub, Ali Reza

    2018-05-01

    The present work was focused on the preparation of TiO2@rGO nanocomposite using an innovative facile synthesis method and the investigation of its photocatalytic activity in a UVA/LED photoreactor. The XRD patterns indicated anatase structure for all samples. Presence of rGO in nanocomposites was confirmed by FT-IR and Raman spectra. Also, mono-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles on rGO sheet were shown in the SEM and HRTEM images. The prepared TiO2@rGO nanocomposite was used as the photocatalyst for degradation of acetaminophen (ACT) in the photoreactor illuminated with UVA/LEDs having the intensity of 95 μW/cm2. The complete degradation of 50 mg/L ACT was attained within 50 min in the LED/TiO2@rGO process while P25/LED process only showed 17% ACT degradation under similar experimental conditions. The photocatalytic activity was strongly affected by the rGO to TiO2 ratio in the nanocomposites and the highest photocatalytic activity was observed at 3.0 wt.% of rGO. Reaction with free radOH was the main mechanism involved in the ACT photodegradation in the TiO2@rGO/LED process under the selected conditions. The performance of LED/TiO2@rGO process improved by four and three times in ACT degradation and mineralization, respectively, at the presence of H2O2. As made TiO2@rGO nanocompsite could preserve its catalytic activity during five consecutive recycles in the process. Accordingly, TiO2@rGO nanocomposite is an active and stable catalyst in the UVA/LED photoreactor for high rate degradation of pharmaceuticals in the contaminated water.

  10. High temperature oxidation of slurry coated interconnect alloys

    Persson, Åsa Helen

    with this interaction mechanism mainly give a geometrical protection against oxidation by blocking oxygen access at the surface of the oxide scale. The protecting effect is gradually reduced as the oxide scale grows thicker than the diameter of the coating particles. Interaction mechanism B entails a chemical reaction...... scale. The incorporated coating particles create a geometrical protection against oxidation that should not loose their effect after the oxide scale has grown thicker than the diameter of the coating particles. The two single layer coatings consisting of (La0.85Sr0.15)MnO3 + 10% excess Mn, LSM, and (La0......In this project, high temperature oxidation experiments of slurry coated ferritic alloys in atmospheres similar to the atmosphere found at the cathode in an SOFC were conducted. From the observations possible interaction mechanisms between the slurry coatings and the growing oxide scale...

  11. Oxidative degradation of phenols in sono-Fenton-like systems upon high-frequency ultrasound irradiation

    Aseev, D. G.; Sizykh, M. R.; Batoeva, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The kinetics of oxidative degradation of phenol and chlorophenols upon acoustic cavitation in the megahertz range (1.7 MHz) is studied experimentally in model systems, and the involvement of in situ generated reactive oxygen species (ROSs) is demonstrated. The phenols subjected to high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are ranked in terms of their rate of conversion: 2,4,6-trichlorophenol > 2,4-dichlorophenol 2-chlorophenol > 4-chlorophenol phenol. Oxidative degradation upon HFUS irradiation is most efficient at low concentrations of pollutants, due to the low steady-state concentrations of the in situ generated ROSs. A dramatic increase is observed in the efficiency of oxidation in several sonochemical oxidative systems (HFUS in combination with other chemical oxidative factors). The system with added Fe2+ (a sono-Fenton system) derives its efficiency from hydrogen peroxide generated in situ as a result of the recombination of OH radicals. The S2O8 2-/Fe2+/HFUS system has a synergetic effect on substrate oxidation that is attributed to a radical chain mechanism. In terms of the oxidation rates, degrees of conversion, and specific energy efficiencies of 4-chlorophenol oxidation based on the amount of oxidized substance per unit of expended energy the considered sonochemical oxidative systems form the series HFUS < S2O8 2-/HFUS < S2O8 2-/Fe2+/HFUS.

  12. Kinetics of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-based cermets

    Chicardi, E.; Córdoba, J.M.; Gotor, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-Co cermets was studied. • A parabolic oxidation kinetic was determined in cermets between 700 °C and 1200 °C. • This parabolic kinetic behaviour is due to the existence of a protective layer. • The protective layer formed was a complex Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2 oxide with rutile structure. • The oxidation rate is controlled by the Ti and O_2 diffusion through the Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2. - Abstract: The kinetics of the high-temperature oxidation of titanium–tantalum carbonitride-based cermets with different Ti/Ta ratios was studied. Isothermal oxidation tests were conducted under static air for 48 h at temperatures between 700 °C and 1200 °C. The oxidation satisfied the parabolic kinetics, characteristic of the existence of a protective oxide layer. The apparent activation energy suggests the rate-controlling process during oxidation is the simultaneous inward and outward diffusion of oxygen and titanium, respectively, through the formed protective layer, consisting mainly of a rutile phase. A higher Ta(V) content in the rutile decreased the oxygen diffusivity due to the reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration.

  13. Ceramic high-rate timing RPCs

    Lopes, L.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.; Hennetier, L.; Pereira, A.; Sousa Correia, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Following some previous work, we report here considerable improvements on the counting rate capability of timing RPCs by the use of ceramic electrodes with a resistivity of 10 9 Ω.cm. The X-ray sensitivity of the detector depends linearly on the counting rate with a slope of 9% per 100 kHz/cm 2 , free from charge depletion effects, while keeping a timing accuracy, measured with 511 keV synchronous photon pairs, around 90 ps σ up to 75 kHz/cm 2

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by ...

  15. Water-soluble highly fluorinated graphite oxide

    Jankovský, O.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Matějková, Stanislava; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Šembera, Filip; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2014), s. 1378-1387 ISSN 2046-2069 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : graphene oxide * electronic- properties * monolayer graphene * raman-spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  16. In vivo oxidation in remelted highly cross-linked retrievals.

    Currier, B H; Van Citters, D W; Currier, J H; Collier, J P

    2010-10-20

    Elimination of free radicals to prevent oxidation has played a major role in the development and product differentiation of the latest generation of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearing materials. In the current study, we (1) examined oxidation in a series of retrieved remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings from a number of device manufacturers and (2) compared the retrieval results with findings for shelf-stored control specimens. The hypothesis was that radiation-cross-linked remelted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene would maintain oxidative stability in vivo comparable with the stability during shelf storage and in published laboratory aging tests. Fifty remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners and nineteen remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tibial inserts were received after retrieval from twenty-one surgeons from across the U.S. Thirty-two of the retrievals had been in vivo for two years or more. Each was measured for oxidation with use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A control series of remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners from three manufacturers was analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure free radical content and with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to measure oxidation initially and after eight to nine years of shelf storage in air. The never-implanted, shelf-aged controls had no measurable free-radical content initially or after eight to nine years of shelf storage. The never-implanted controls showed no increase in oxidation during shelf storage. Oxidation measurements showed measurable oxidation in 22% of the retrieved remelted highly cross-linked liners and inserts after an average of two years in vivo. Because never-implanted remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight

  17. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    Nasu, S; Morimoto, S; Kawakami, T; Kuzushita, K; Takano, M

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure sup 5 sup 7 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO sub 3 , CaFeO sub 3 and La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 O sub 3. The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO sub 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  18. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy of perovskite iron oxide

    Nasu, Saburo; Suenaga, Tomoya; Morimoto, Shotaro; Kawakami, Takateru; Kuzushita, Kaori; Takano, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy using a diamond anvil cell has been performed for perovskite iron oxides SrFeO 3 , CaFeO 3 and La 1/3 Sr 2/3 O 3 . The charge states and the magnetic dependency to pressure were determined. Pressure magnetic phase diagrams of these perovskite iron oxides are determined up to about 70 GPa. To be clear the magnetic ordered state, they are measured up to 7.8 T external magnetic fields at 4.5K. The phase transition of these perovskite oxides to ferromagnetisms with high magnetic ordered temperature is observed. In higher pressure, high spin-low spin transition of oxides besides CaFeO 3 is generated. The feature of Moessbauer spectroscopy, perovskite iron oxide and Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure are explained. (S.Y.)

  19. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Al-Mansoori, Muntaser; Al-Shaibani, Sahar; Al-Jaeedi, Ahlam; Lee, Jisung; Choi, Daniel; Hasoon, Falah S.

    2017-12-01

    Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2). The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF)-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2) layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  20. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Muntaser Al-Mansoori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2. The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2 layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  1. Depth Profiling Analysis of Aluminum Oxidation During Film Deposition in a Conventional High Vacuum System

    Kim, Jongmin; Weimer, Jeffrey J.; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of aluminum thin films deposited in a conventional high vacuum chamber has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and depth profiling. The state of the Al layer was preserved by coating it with a protective MgF2 layer in the deposition chamber. Oxygen concentrations in the film layers were determined as a function of sputter time (depth into the film). The results show that an oxidized layer is formed at the start of Al deposition and that a less extensively oxidized Al layer is deposited if the deposition rate is fast. The top surface of the Al layer oxidizes very quickly. This top oxidized layer may be thicker than has been previously reported by optical methods. Maximum oxygen concentrations measured by XPS at each Al interface are related to pressure to rate ratios determined during the Al layer deposition.

  2. Transition to high rate aerospace NDI processes

    Vanderheiden, Bert; Thomson, Clint; Ivakhnenko, Igor; Garner, Chuck

    2018-04-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of carbon fiber composite materials in military and commercial aircraft, processes to manufacture and inspect the structural components must evolve to ensure economic viability. Inspection techniques which were developed to inspect products produced at a rate of one or two structures a month are not fast or flexible enough to inspect more than 8500 parts per month. This presentation describes the evolution of phased array ultrasonic inspection systems to provide the increased rate capacity, the flexibility to accommodate multiple unique designs, and the ability to rapidly adjust to product design changes. The paper will describe how system developments were made in response to new programs resulting in a much less expensive, higher degree of accuracy, increased flexibility, and lower cycle time inspections.

  3. High exposure rate hardware ALARA plan

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure and to control contamination levels and airborne radioactivity concentrations. HERH waste is hardware found in the N-Fuel Storage Basin, which has a contact dose rate greater than 1 R/hr and used filters. This waste will be collected in the fuel baskets at various locations in the basins

  4. Why Are Real Interest Rates So High?

    Zvi Bodie; Alex Kane; Robert L. McDonald

    1983-01-01

    This paper applies the Capital Asset Pricing Model to help explain the anomalous behavior of real interest rates during the last several years. Specifically,we are able to show that the increased volatility of bond prices since the change in Federal Reserve operating procedure in October 1979 has substantially increased the required real risk premium on long term bonds. We also consider and reject the possibility that increased risk alone accounts for the recent increase in the short-term rea...

  5. High-temperature oxidation kinetics of sponge-based E110 cladding alloy

    Yan, Yong; Garrison, Benton E.; Howell, Mike; Bell, Gary L.

    2018-02-01

    Two-sided oxidation experiments were recently conducted at 900°C-1200 °C in flowing steam with samples of sponge-based Zr-1Nb alloy E110. Although the old electrolytic E110 tubing exhibited a high degree of susceptibility to nodular corrosion and experienced breakaway oxidation rates in a relatively short time, the new sponge-based E110 demonstrated steam oxidation behavior comparable to Zircaloy-4. Sample weight gain and oxide layer thickness measurements were performed on oxidized E110 specimens and compared to oxygen pickup and oxide layer thickness calculations using the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. Our study shows that the sponge-based E110 follows the parabolic law at temperatures above 1015 °C. At or below 1015 °C, the oxidation rate was very low when compared to Zircaloy-4 and can be represented by a cubic expression. No breakaway oxidation was observed at 1000 °C for oxidation times up to 10,000 s. Arrhenius expressions are given to describe the parabolic rate constants at temperatures above 1015 °C and cubic rate constants are provided for temperatures below 1015 °C. The weight gains calculated by our equations are in excellent agreement with the measured sample weight gains at all test temperatures. In addition to the as-fabricated E110 cladding sample, prehydrided E110 cladding with hydrogen concentrations in the 100-150 wppm range was also investigated. The effect of hydrogen content on sponge-based E110 oxidation kinetics was minimal. No significant difference was found between as-fabricated and hydrided samples with regard to oxygen pickup and oxide layer thickness for hydrogen contents below 150 wppm.

  6. Efficient and Highly Aldehyde Selective Wacker Oxidation

    Teo, Peili; Wickens, Zachary K.; Dong, Guangbin; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    A method for efficient and aldehyde-selective Wacker oxidation of aryl-substituted olefins using PdCl 2(MeCN) 2, 1,4-benzoquinone, and t-BuOH in air is described. Up to a 96% yield of aldehyde can be obtained, and up to 99% selectivity can be achieved with styrene-related substrates. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Efficient and Highly Aldehyde Selective Wacker Oxidation

    Teo, Peili

    2012-07-06

    A method for efficient and aldehyde-selective Wacker oxidation of aryl-substituted olefins using PdCl 2(MeCN) 2, 1,4-benzoquinone, and t-BuOH in air is described. Up to a 96% yield of aldehyde can be obtained, and up to 99% selectivity can be achieved with styrene-related substrates. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Contribution to the identification of the processes kinetically limiting of the zirconium alloys oxidation; characterization of the oxide films formed at high temperature by solids electrochemistry

    Vermoyal, J.J.

    2000-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes has been extensively studied under several oxidation conditions (temperature, steam, dry air, oxygen...) in order to clarify the mechanism(s) of oxide growth and breakdown. Oxidation rate is generally assumed to be controlled by oxygen diffusion inwards the oxide layer. Nevertheless, several experimental facts, such as acceleration or inhibition of corrosion rate in coupling conditions, suggest that electrochemical processes are involved as a rate determining step. This work is an attempt to shed light about the rate-limiting-mechanism of two zirconium alloys oxidation: Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4) and Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%). Impedance spectroscopy characterizations of oxide films formed in high temperature water and studied in gaseous atmosphere clearly show the difference of electrical properties between the two alloys. The in situ electrochemical and thermogravimetric investigations in gaseous medium, and the polarization effects on oxidation and hydridation of Zr alloys in PWRs conditions indicate that oxygen diffusion can be considered as the limiting kinetic step for Zy-4 oxidation. On the contrary, the acceleration of oxide growth on Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%) under anodic polarization in PWRs conditions (360 deg C) suggests that either the electronic conductivity in the oxide or an interfacial process at least partially control the oxidation rate. Catalytic effects observed in gaseous medium when noble metals increase the oxygen reduction rate would tend to corroborate the oxidation control of this alloy by an interfacial mechanism. An electrochemical description and a heterogeneous kinetics approach based on a diffusion-interfacial process as rate determining step are then proposed. (author)

  9. High-rate, High Temperature Acetotrophic Methanogenesis Governed by a Three Population Consortium in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    Dang Ho

    Full Text Available A combination of acetate oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis has been previously identified to enable high-rate methanogenesis at high temperatures (55 to 65°C, but this capability had not been linked to any key organisms. This study combined RNA-stable isotope probing on 13C-labelled acetate and 16S amplicon sequencing to identify the active micro-organisms involved in high-rate methanogenesis. Active biomass was harvested from three bench-scale thermophilic bioreactors treating waste activated sludge at 55, 60 and 65°C, and fed with 13-C labelled and 12C-unlabelled acetate. Acetate uptake and cumulative methane production were determined and kinetic parameters were estimated using model-based analysis. Pyrosequencing performed on 13C- enriched samples indicated that organisms accumulating labelled carbon were Coprothermobacter (all temperatures between 55 and 65°C, acetoclastic Methanosarcina (55 to 60°C and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter (60 to 65°C. The increased relative abundance of Coprothermobacter with increased temperature corresponding with a shift to syntrophic acetate oxidation identified this as a potentially key oxidiser. Methanosarcina likely acts as both a hydrogen utilising and acetoclastic methanogen at 55°C, and is replaced by Methanothermobacter as a hydrogen utiliser at higher temperatures.

  10. High-rate, High Temperature Acetotrophic Methanogenesis Governed by a Three Population Consortium in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Manefield, Mike; Batstone, Damien

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acetate oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis has been previously identified to enable high-rate methanogenesis at high temperatures (55 to 65°C), but this capability had not been linked to any key organisms. This study combined RNA-stable isotope probing on 13C-labelled acetate and 16S amplicon sequencing to identify the active micro-organisms involved in high-rate methanogenesis. Active biomass was harvested from three bench-scale thermophilic bioreactors treating waste activated sludge at 55, 60 and 65°C, and fed with 13-C labelled and 12C-unlabelled acetate. Acetate uptake and cumulative methane production were determined and kinetic parameters were estimated using model-based analysis. Pyrosequencing performed on 13C- enriched samples indicated that organisms accumulating labelled carbon were Coprothermobacter (all temperatures between 55 and 65°C), acetoclastic Methanosarcina (55 to 60°C) and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter (60 to 65°C). The increased relative abundance of Coprothermobacter with increased temperature corresponding with a shift to syntrophic acetate oxidation identified this as a potentially key oxidiser. Methanosarcina likely acts as both a hydrogen utilising and acetoclastic methanogen at 55°C, and is replaced by Methanothermobacter as a hydrogen utiliser at higher temperatures.

  11. Parabola-like shaped pH-rate profile for phenols oxidation by aqueous permanganate.

    Du, Juanshan; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Guan, Xiaohong

    2012-08-21

    Oxidation of phenols by permanganate in the pH range of 5.0-9.0 generally exhibits a parabola-like shape with the maximum reaction rate obtained at pH close to phenols' pK(a). However, a monotonic increase or decrease is observed if phenols' pK(a) is beyond the pH range of 5.0-9.0. A proton transfer mechanism is proposed in which the undissociated phenol is directly oxidized by permanganate to generate products while a phenolate-permanganate adduct, intermediate, is formed between dissociated phenol and permanganate ion and this is the rate-limiting step for phenolates oxidation by permanganate. The intermediate combines with H(+) and then decomposes to products. Rate equations derived based on the steady-state approximation can well simulate the experimentally derived pH-rate profiles. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were established among the parameters obtained from the modeling, Hammett constants, and oxygen natural charges in phenols and phenolates. LFERs reveal that chlorine substituents have opposite influence on the susceptibility of phenols and phenolates to permanganate oxidation and phenolates are not necessarily more easily oxidized than their neutral counterparts. The chlorine substituents regulate the reaction rate of chlorophenolates with permanganate mainly by influencing the natural charges of the oxygen atoms of dissociated phenols while they influence the oxidation of undissociated chlorophenols by permanganate primarily by forming intramolecular hydrogen bonding with the phenolic group.

  12. Propane Oxidation at High Pressure and Intermediate Temperatures

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    Propane oxidation at intermediate temperatures (500—900 K) and high pressure (100 bar) has been characterized by conducting experiments in a laminar flow reactor over a wide range of stoichiometries. The onset of fuel oxidation was found to be 600—725 K, depending on mixture stoichiometry...

  13. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  14. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, L C

    2015-01-01

    investigated. RESULTS: After valve surgery, the self-reported health was lower (Short Form-36 (SF-36) Physical Component Scale (PCS): 44.5 vs. 50.6 and Mental Component Scale (MCS): 51.9 vs. 55.0, pClinical signs......BACKGROUND: After heart valve surgery, knowledge on long-term self-reported health status and readmission is lacking. Thus, the optimal strategy for out-patient management after surgery remains unclear. METHODS: Using a nationwide survey with linkage to Danish registers with one year follow-up, we...... included all adults 6-12months after heart valve surgery irrespective of valve procedure, during Jan-June 2011 (n=867). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding health-status (n=742), and answers were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Readmission rates and mortality were...

  15. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-09-20

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project.

  16. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project

  17. Highly Conductive One-Dimensional Manganese Oxide Wires by Coating with Graphene Oxides

    Tojo, Tomohiro; Shinohara, Masaki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Ahm Kim, Yoong; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-10-01

    Through coating with graphene oxides, we have developed a chemical route to the bulk production of long, thin manganese oxide (MnO2) nanowires that have high electrical conductivity. The average diameter of these hybrid nanowires is about 25 nm, and their average length is about 800 nm. The high electrical conductivity of these nanowires (ca. 189.51+/-4.51 µS) is ascribed to the homogeneous coating with conductive graphene oxides as well as the presence of non-bonding manganese atoms. The growth mechanism of the nanowires is theoretically supported by the initiation of morphological conversion from graphene oxide to wrapped structures through the formation of covalent bonds between manganese and oxygen atoms at the graphene oxide edge.

  18. Comparative study of high temperature oxidation behaviour in AISI 304 and AISI 439 stainless steels

    Antônio Claret Soares Sabioni

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a comparison of high temperature oxidation behaviour in AISI 304 austenitic and AISI 439 ferritic stainless steels. The oxidation experiments were performed between 850 and 950 °C, in oxygen and Ar (100 vpm H2. In most cases, it was formed a Cr2O3 protective scale, whose growth kinetics follows a parabolic law. The exception was for the the AISI 304 steel, at 950 °C, in oxygen atmosphere, which forms an iron oxide external layer. The oxidation resistance of the AISI 439 does not depend on the atmosphere. The AISI 304 has the same oxidation resistance in both atmospheres, at 850 °C, but at higher temperatures, its oxidation rate strongly increases in oxygen atmosphere. Concerning the performance of these steels under oxidation, our results show that the AISI 439 steel has higher oxidation resistance in oxidizing atmosphere, above 850 °C, while, in low pO2 atmosphere, the AISI 304 steel has higher oxidation resistance than the AISI 439, in all the temperature range investigated.

  19. The effects of trichloroethane HCl and ion-implantation on the oxidation rate of silicon

    Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, E.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of silicon was studied using a large-scale industrial oxidation system. The characteristics of the oxides resulting from pure hydrogen/oxygen (Hsub(2)/Osub(2)), trichloroethane/oxygen (TCA/Osub(2) and hydrogen chloride/oxygen (HCI/Osub(2)) mixtures are compared. Both HCI and TCA addition to oxygen produced an enhanced oxidation rate. The oxidation rate for TCA/Osub(2) was approximately 30-40% higher than for HCI/Osub(2) mixtures. A molar ratio of TCA/Osub(2) of 1% gives an optimum process for very-large-scale industrial (VLSI) applications. However, 3% HCI/Osub(2) gives comparable results to 1% TCA. In addition, boron and phosphorus implantation are observed to increase the oxidation rate. Phosphorus doping of the silicon yields a higher rate than boron-doped wafers. This behaviour is explained in terms of surface damage and chemistry. It appears that the overall mechanisms governing all these processes are similar. (8 figures, 22 references) (Author)

  20. Modeling low-dose-rate effects in irradiated bipolar-base oxides

    Graves, R.J.; Cirba, C.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Michez, A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Witczak, S.C.

    1997-02-01

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in BJTs. Simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for the low-dose-rate enhancement

  1. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR 192 Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single 192 Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the 192 Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for 192 Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  2. Contribution to the study of the influence of porosity on carbon oxidation rate

    Serpinet, Joseph

    1956-01-01

    In its first part, this research thesis presents and described experiments of carbon oxidation which comprised the measurement of combustion rate in function of the BET surface of new types of graphite samples, and measurements of other kinetic quantities (reaction rate, Arrhenius activation energy, concentration of various gaseous oxides in reaction products). The second part reports a theoretical and experimental study of the possibility of limitation of the reaction rate, by using the slowness of oxygen diffusion within graphite pores. Results are related to the Thiele-Wheeler theory on chemical reactions in catalyst pores. The third part presents and discusses suggested solutions to replace this 'porosity hypothesis', and to explain why oxidation rate is almost never proportional to the BET surface all along the combustion process of a same graphite sample [fr

  3. Insights into the Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of HFPE High Performance Polymer.

    Kunnikuruvan, Sooraj; Parandekar, Priya V; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Thomas K; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-02

    The growing requisite for materials having high thermo-oxidative stability makes the design and development of high performance materials an active area of research. Fluorination of the polymer backbone is a widely applied strategy to improve various properties of the polymer, most importantly the thermo-oxidative stability. Many of these fluorinated polymers are known to have thermo-oxidative stability up to 700 K. However, for space and aerospace applications, it is important to improve its thermo-oxidative stability beyond 700 K. Molecular-level details of the thermo-oxidative degradation of such polymers can provide vital information to improve the polymer. In this spirit, we have applied quantum mechanical and microkinetic analysis to scrutinize the mechanism and kinetics of the thermo-oxidative degradation of a fluorinated polymer with phenylethenyl end-cap, HFPE. This study gives an insight into the thermo-oxidative degradation of HFPE and explains most of the experimental observations on the thermo-oxidative degradation of this polymer. Thermolysis of C-CF3 bond in the dianhydride component (6FDA) of HFPE is found to be the rate-determining step of the degradation. Reaction pathways that are responsible for the experimentally observed weight loss of the polymer is also scrutinized. On the basis of these results, we propose a modification of HFPE polymer to improve its thermo-oxidative stability.

  4. Characteristics of oxide scale formed on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel during early stages of high temperature oxidation

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan, E-mail: swaminathan@kist.re.kr [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of); Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kim, Dong-Ik, E-mail: dongikkim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Initial oxidation characteristics of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel at 650 °C were studied. • Strong segregation and oxidation of Mn and Nb were found in the entire oxide scale. • Surface coverage by metallic Cu-rich precipitates increases with exposure time. • Chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale revealed initial oxidation to be non-selective. • Fe-Cr and Mn-Cr mixed oxides were realized along with binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. - Abstract: Oxide scale evolution on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel 304H at 650 °C, in ambient air, for exposure times 100, 300, 500 and 1000 h, has been investigated. Surface morphology and chemistry of the oxide scale grown were examined using SEM/EDX and XPS. The oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight change using an electronic balance. At the initial stage, up to 500 h of exposure time, the oxidation rate was rapid due to surface reactions governed primarily by oxygen ingress, and then, dropped to a low rate after prolonged oxidation for 1000 h. The diffusion of reactants through the initially formed oxide scale limits the oxidation rate at longer times, thus, the progress of reaction followed the parabolic kinetics. The formed oxide scale was enriched significantly with segregation and subsequent oxidation of Nb, and finely dispersed metallic Cu particles. Within the time frame of oxidation, the oxide scale was mainly composed of mixed oxides such as FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} along with the binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. Moreover, the precipitation fraction of Cu-rich particles on the oxide scale increased markedly with increase of exposure times. The chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale suggests that the oxidation occurred in a non-selective manner.

  5. Anchoring samarium oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for high-performance supercapacitor

    Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Hamid Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Samarium oxide nanoparticles have been anchored on the surface of reduced graphene oxide for the first time. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite show high capacitance, good rate and cycling performance. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite can serve as efficient electrode material for energy storage. • The best composite electrode exhibits specific capacitance of 321 F g{sup −1} in 2 mV s{sup −1}. - Abstract: We have synthesized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (SmNs) and anchored them onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through a self-assembly thereof by utilizing a facile sonochemical procedure. The nanomaterials were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As the next step, the supercapacitive behavior of the resulting nanocomposites were investigated when used as electrode material, through with cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The SmNs decorated RGO (SmN-RGO) nanocomposites were found to possess a specific capacitance (SC) of 321 F g{sup −1} when used in a 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution as an electrolyte, in a scan rate of 2 mV s{sup −1}. The SC of the SmN-RGO based electrodes were also found to be 268 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 2 A g{sup −1} through galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The outstanding properties of the SmN-RGOs were attributed to synergy of the high charge mobility of SmNs and the flexibility of the sheets of RGOs. Additionally, the nano-composite revealed a unique cycling durability (maintaining 99% of its SC even after 4000 cycles).

  6. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  7. Liquid Argon Calorimeter performance at High Rates

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $3\\cdot10^{11}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  8. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    Tyo Keith EJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor or a larger protein (α-amylase. Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b overall transcription/translation repression, and (c oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases.

  9. Nb effect on Zr-alloy oxidation under high pressure steam at high temperatures

    Park, Kwangheon; Yang, Sungwoo; Kim, Kyutae

    2005-01-01

    The high-pressure steam effects on the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and Zirlo (Zry-1%Nb) claddings at high temperature have been analyzed. Test temperature range was 700-900degC, and pressures were 1-150 bars. High pressure-steam enhances oxidation of Zry-4, and the dependency of enhancement looks exponential to steam pressure. The origin of the oxidation enhancement turned out to be the formation of cracks in oxide. The loss of tetragonal phase by high-pressure steam seems related to the crack formation. Addition of Nb as an alloying element to Zr alloy reduces significantly the steam pressure effects on oxidation. The higher compressive stresses and the smaller fraction of tetragonal oxides in Zry-1%Nb seem to be the diminished effect of high-pressure steam on oxidation. (author)

  10. High temperature oxidation of β-NbTi alloys

    Parida, S.C.; Gupta, N.K.; Rama Rao, G.A.; Sen, B.K.; Krishnan, K.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of pure Ti metal and two different β-NbTi alloys with compositions of 85 and 75 at.% Ti were studied using thermogravimetric technique in the temperature range of 1073-1323 K at an interval of 50 K. The value of the power exponent n of the rate equation was found to be close to one suggesting that each reaction follows first order kinetic rate law. X-ray diffraction analysis of oxidation products at each temperature revealed the simultaneous formation of TiO 2 and TiNb 2 O 7 . The rate constants and the activation energies of oxidation reactions for each alloy compositions were evaluated. (author)

  11. Development of high capacity, high rate lithium ion batteries utilizing metal fiber conductive additives

    Ahn, Soonho; Kim, Youngduk; Kim, Kyung Joon; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Hyungkeun; Kim, Myung H.

    As lithium ion cells dominate the battery market, the performance improvement is an utmost concern among developers and researchers. Conductive additives are routinely employed to enhance electrode conductivity and capacity. Carbon particulates—graphite or carbon black powders—are conventional and popular choices as conductive fillers. However, percolation requirements of particles demand significant volumetric content of impalpable, and thereby high area conductive fillers. As might be expected, the electrode active surface area escalates unnecessarily, resulting in overall increase in reaction with electrolytes and organic solvents. The increased reactions usually manifest as an irreversible loss of anode capacity, gradual oxidation and consumption of electrolyte on the cathode—which causes capacity decline during cycling—and an increased threat to battery safety by gas evolution and exothermic solvent oxidation. In this work we have utilized high aspect ratio, flexible, micronic metal fibers as low active area and high conductivity additives. The metal fibers appear well dispersed within the electrode and to satisfy percolation requirements very efficiently at very low volumetric content compared to conventional carbon-based conductive additives. Results from 18650-type cells indicate significant enhancements in electrode capacity and high rate capability while the irreversible capacity loss is negligible.

  12. Tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    Quanci, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The research encompasses the measurement of the tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from lithium oxide, a ceramic tritium-breeding material. A thermal extraction apparatus which allows the accurate measurement of the total tritium inventory and release rate from lithium oxide samples under different temperatures, pressures and carrier-gas compositions with an uncertainty not exceeding 3% was developed. The goal of the Lithium Blanket Module program was to determine if advanced computer codes could accurately predict the tritium production in the lithium oxide blanket of a fusion power plant. A fusion blanket module prototype was built and irradiated with a deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron source. The tritium production throughout the module was modeled with the MCNP three dimensional Monte Carlo code and was compared to the assay of the tritium bred in the module. The MCNP code accurately predicted tritium-breeding trends but underestimated the overall tritium breeding by 30%. The release rate of tritium from small grain polycrystalline sintered lithium oxides with a helium carrier gas from 300 to 450 C was found to be controlled by the first order surface desorption of monotritiated water. When small amounts of hydrogen were added to the helium carrier gas, the first order rate constant increased from the isotopic exchange of hydrogen for tritium at the lithium oxide surface occurring in parallel with the first order desorption process. The isotopic-exchange first order rate constant temperature dependence and hydrogen partial pressure dependence were evaluated

  13. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Syarif, Dani Gustaman

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO 2 . The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe 2 O 3 . Minor element such as Cr 2 O 3 is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO 2 appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate

  14. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id; Syarif, Dani Gustaman, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id [Research Center for Nuclear Materials and Radiometry, Jl. Tamansari 71, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO{sub 2}. The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Minor element such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO{sub 2} appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate.

  15. High School Graduation Rates:Alternative Methods and Implications

    Jing Miao; Walt Haney

    2004-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act has brought great attention to the high school graduation rate as one of the mandatory accountability measures for public school systems. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate the high school graduation rate given the lack of longitudinal databases that track individual students. This study reviews literature on and practices in reporting high school graduation rates, compares graduation rate estimates yielded from alternative methods, and estimates d...

  16. Structure-Activity Relationships for Rates of Aromatic Amine Oxidation by Manganese Dioxide.

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Bylaska, Eric J; Lyon, Molly A; Ness, Stuart C; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-05-17

    New energetic compounds are designed to minimize their potential environmental impacts, which includes their transformation and the fate and effects of their transformation products. The nitro groups of energetic compounds are readily reduced to amines, and the resulting aromatic amines are subject to oxidation and coupling reactions. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) is a common environmental oxidant and model system for kinetic studies of aromatic amine oxidation. In this study, a training set of new and previously reported kinetic data for the oxidation of model and energetic-derived aromatic amines was assembled and subjected to correlation analysis against descriptor variables that ranged from general purpose [Hammett σ constants (σ(-)), pKas of the amines, and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO)] to specific for the likely rate-limiting step [one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox)]. The selection of calculated descriptors (pKa, EHOMO, and Eox) was based on validation with experimental data. All of the correlations gave satisfactory quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), but they improved with the specificity of the descriptor. The scope of correlation analysis was extended beyond MnO2 to include literature data on aromatic amine oxidation by other environmentally relevant oxidants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and phosphate and carbonate radicals) by correlating relative rate constants (normalized to 4-chloroaniline) to EHOMO (calculated with a modest level of theory).

  17. Structure-Activity Relationships for Rates of Aromatic Amine Oxidation by Manganese Dioxide

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J.; Lyon, Molly A.; Science University, Portland, OR; Ness, Stuart C.; Science University, Portland, OR; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Science University, Portland, OR

    2016-01-01

    New energetic compounds are designed to minimize their potential environmental impacts, which includes their transformation and the fate and effects of their transformation products. The nitro groups of energetic compounds are readily reduced to amines, and the resulting aromatic amines are subject to oxidation and coupling reactions. Manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) is a common environmental oxidant and model system for kinetic studies of aromatic amine oxidation. Here in this study, a training set of new and previously reported kinetic data for the oxidation of model and energetic-derived aromatic amines was assembled and subjected to correlation analysis against descriptor variables that ranged from general purpose [Hammett σ constants (σ − ), pK a s of the amines, and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E HOMO )] to specific for the likely rate-limiting step [one-electron oxidation potentials (E ox )]. The selection of calculated descriptors (pK a ), E HOMO , and E ox ) was based on validation with experimental data. All of the correlations gave satisfactory quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), but they improved with the specificity of the descriptor. The scope of correlation analysis was extended beyond MnO 2 to include literature data on aromatic amine oxidation by other environmentally relevant oxidants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and phosphate and carbonate radicals) by correlating relative rate constants (normalized to 4-chloroaniline) to E HOMO (calculated with a modest level of theory).

  18. High temperature oxidation of copper and copper aluminium alloys: Impact on furnace side wall cooling systems

    Plascencia Barrera, Gabriel

    The high temperature oxidation behaviours of copper and dilute Cu-Al alloys were investigated. Experiments were carried out by: (i) Oxidizing under various oxygen potentials at different temperatures using a combined TG-DTA apparatus. (ii) Oxidizing in a muffle furnace (in air) at different temperatures for extended periods of time. The oxidation mechanisms were evaluated based upon the kinetic data obtained as well as by X-ray diffraction and microscopical (SEM and optical) analyses. It was found that oxidation of copper strongly depends on the temperature. Two distinct mechanisms were encountered. Between 300 and 500°C, the oxidation rate is controlled by lateral growth of the oxide on the metal surface, whereas between 600 and 1000°C oxidation is controlled by lattice diffusion of copper ions through the oxide scale. On the other hand, the partial pressure of oxygen only has a small effect on the oxidation of copper. Alloy oxidation is also dependent on the temperature. As temperature increases, more aluminium is required to protect copper from being oxidized. It was shown that if the amount of oxygen that dissolves in the alloy exceeds the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, an internal oxidation layer will develop, leading to the formation of a tarnishing scale. On the other hand if the oxygen content in the alloy lies below the solubility limit of oxygen in copper, no oxidation products will form since a tight protective alumina layer will form on the alloy surface. Surface phenomena may affect the oxidation behaviour of dilute Cu-Al alloys. Immersion tests in molten copper matte and copper converting slag, using laboratory scale cooling elements with various copper based materials, were conducted. Results from these tests showed that alloying copper with 3 to 4 wt% Al decreases the oxidation rate of pure copper by 4 orders of magnitude; however due to a significant drop in thermal conductivity, the ability to extract heat is compromised, leading to

  19. Interface and oxide traps in high-κ hafnium oxide films

    Wong, H.; Zhan, N.; Ng, K.L.; Poon, M.C.; Kok, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    The origins of the interface trap generation and the effects of thermal annealing on the interface and bulk trap distributions are studied in detail. We found that oxidation of the HfO 2 /Si interface, removal of deep trap centers, and crystallization of the as-deposited film will take place during the post-deposition annealing (PDA). These processes will result in the removal of interface traps and deep oxide traps and introduce a large amount of shallow oxide traps at the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline film. Thus, trade-off has to be made in considering the interface trap density and oxide trap density when conducting PDA. In addition, the high interface trap and oxide trap densities of the HfO 2 films suggest that we may have to use the SiO 2 /HfO 2 stack or hafnium silicate structure for better device performance

  20. High School Graduation Rates:Alternative Methods and Implications

    Jing Miao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The No Child Left Behind Act has brought great attention to the high school graduation rate as one of the mandatory accountability measures for public school systems. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate the high school graduation rate given the lack of longitudinal databases that track individual students. This study reviews literature on and practices in reporting high school graduation rates, compares graduation rate estimates yielded from alternative methods, and estimates discrepancies between alternative results at national, state, and state ethnic group levels. Despite the graduation rate method used, results indicate that high school graduation rates in the U.S. have been declining in recent years and that graduation rates for black and Hispanic students lag substantially behind those of white students. As to graduation rate method preferred, this study found no evidence that the conceptually more complex methods yield more accurate or valid graduation rate estimates than the simpler methods.

  1. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  2. Oxygen transfer rate estimation in oxidation ditches from clean water measurements.

    Abusam, A; Keesman, K J; Meinema, K; Van Straten, G

    2001-06-01

    Standard methods for the determination of oxygen transfer rate are based on assumptions that are not valid for oxidation ditches. This paper presents a realistic and simple new method to be used in the estimation of oxygen transfer rate in oxidation ditches from clean water measurements. The new method uses a loop-of-CSTRs model, which can be easily incorporated within control algorithms, for modelling oxidation ditches. Further, this method assumes zero oxygen transfer rates (KLa) in the unaerated CSTRs. Application of a formal estimation procedure to real data revealed that the aeration constant (k = KLaVA, where VA is the volume of the aerated CSTR) can be determined significantly more accurately than KLa and VA. Therefore, the new method estimates k instead of KLa. From application to real data, this method proved to be more accurate than the commonly used Dutch standard method (STORA, 1980).

  3. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  4. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. V. Oxidation of Zircaloy in high pressure steam

    Pawel, R.E.; Cathcart, J.V.; Campbell, J.J.; Jury, S.H.

    1977-12-01

    A series of scoping tests to determine the influence of steam pressure on the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 PWR tubing was undertaken. The oxidation experiments were conducted in flowing steam at 3.45, 6.90, and 10.34 MPa (500, 1000, and 1500 psi) at 905 0 C (1661 0 F), and at 3.45 and 6.90 MPa at 1101 0 C (2014 0 F). A comparison of the results of these experiments with those obtained for oxidation in steam at atmospheric pressure under similar conditions indicated that measurable enhancement of the oxidation rate occurred with increasing pressure at 905 0 C, but not at 1100 0 C

  5. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  6. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Vermisoglou, E.C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Lei, C.; Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide via microwave irradiation. • Effect of pristine graphite (type, flake size) on the microwave expanded material. • Effect of pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the produced expanded material. • Expanded graphene materials with high BET surface areas (940 m{sup 2}/g–2490 m{sup 2}/g). • Non-activated graphene based materials suitable for supercapacitors. - Abstract: Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m{sup 2}/g to 2490 m{sup 2}/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  7. Tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    Quanci, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The research encompasses the measurement of the tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from lithium oxide, a ceramic tritium-breeding material. A thermal extraction apparatus which allows the accurate measurement of the total tritium inventory and release rate from lithium oxide samples under different temperatures, pressures and carrier-gas compositions with an uncertainty not exceeding 3% was developed. The goal of the Lithium Blanket Module program was to determine if advanced computer codes could accurately predict the tritium production in the lithium oxide blanket of a fusion power plant. A fusion blanket module prototype, was built and irradiated with a deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron source. The tritium production throughout the module was modeled with the MCNP three dimensional Monte Carlo code and was compared to the assay of the tritium bred in the module. The MCNP code accurately predicted tritium-breeding trends but underestimated the overall tritium breeding by 30%. The release rate of tritium from small grain polycrystalline sintered lithium oxide with a helium carrier gas from 300 to 450 C was found to be controlled by the first order surface desorption of mono-tritiated water. When small amounts of hydrogen were added to the helium carrier gas, the first order rate constant increased from the isotopic exchange of hydrogen for tritium at the lithium oxide surface occurring in parallel with the first order desorption process. The isotopic-exchange first order rate constant temperature dependence and hydrogen partial pressure dependence were evaluated. Large single crystals of lithium oxide were fabricated by the vacuum fusion technique. The release rate of tritium from the large single crystals was found to be controlled by diffusion, and the mixed diffusion-desorption controlled release regime

  8. Oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617 in high temperature helium environments

    Lee, Ho Jung; Sah, Injin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617, which has an Al-rich surface layer, were evaluated in high temperature helium environments. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed in helium (99.999% purity) and VHTR-helium (helium of prototypical VHTR chemistry containing impurities like CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , and H 2 ) environments at 900 °C for up to 1000 h. The surface-treated Alloy 617 showed an initial transient oxidation stage followed by the steady-state oxidation in all test environments. In addition, the steady-state oxidation kinetics of the surface-treated Alloy 617 was 2-order of magnitude lower than that of the as-received Alloy 617 in both helium environments as well as in air. The improvement in oxidation resistance was primarily due to the formation of the protective Al 2 O 3 layer on the surface. The weight gain was larger in the order of air, helium, and VHTR-helium, while the parabolic rate constants (k p ) at steady-state were similar for all test environments. In both helium environments, the oxide structure consisted of the outer transition Al 2 O 3 with a small amount of Cr 2 O 3 and inner columnar structured Al 2 O 3 without an internal oxide. In the VHTR-helium environment, where the impurities were added to helium, the initial transient oxidation increased but the steady state kinetics was not affected

  9. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of T91 Steel in Dry and Humid Condition

    Yonghao Leong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature oxidation behavior of T91 ferritic/martensitic steel was examined over the temperature range of 500 to 700°C in dry and humid environments.  The weight gain result revealed that oxidation occurs at all range of temperatures and its rate is accelerated by increasing the temperature. The weight gain of the oxidized steel at 700°C in steam condition was six times bigger than the dry oxidation.. SEM/EDX of the cross-sectional image showed that under dry condition, a protective and steady growth of the chromium oxide (Cr2O3 layer was formed on the steel with the thickness of 2.39±0.34 µm. Meanwhile for the humid environment, it is found that the iron oxide layer, which consists of the hematite (Fe2O3 and magnetite (Fe3O4 was formed as the outer scale, and spinnel as inner scale. This result indicated that the oxidation behavior of T91 steel was affected by its oxidation environment. The existence of water vapor in steam condition may prevent the formation of chromium oxide as protective layer.

  10. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  11. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation experiments were conducted at high pressure (30 bar and 100 bar) under oxidizing and stoichiometric conditions, respectively, and temperatures ranging from 450 to 925 K. The oxidation of ammonia was slow under stoichiometric conditions in the temperature range investigated. Under...... oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  12. Effect of Time Lenght Fermentation to Katsuobushi Oxidation Rate As Fish Flavor Based

    Amalia, U.; Rianingsih, L.; Wijayanti, I.

    2018-02-01

    Katsuobushi or dried smoked skipjack had a distinctive flavor and widely used in traditional Japanese cuisine. This study aimed to evaluate the oxidation rate of Katsuobushi with different lenght fermentation. The processing treatment of the product were the differences of fish boiling time (30 min and 60 min) and the lenght of fermentation: 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks. The glutamic acid content, the oxidation rate (thiobarbituric acid and peroxide value) and Total Plate Count of katsuobushi were analyzed statistically using analysis of varians. Significant differences were found among 3 weeks of fermentation compare to 1 weeks fermentation (P fermentation was potential to be developed become basic ingredients for the fish flavor.

  13. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  14. The american high school graduation rate : trends and levels

    Heckman, James J.; LaFontaine, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses multiple data sources and a unified methodology to estimate the trends and levels of the U.S. high school graduation rate. Correcting for important biases that plague previous calculations, we establish that (a) the true high school graduation rate is substantially lower than the official rate issued by the National Center for Educational Statistics; (b) it has been declining over the past 40 years; (c) majority/minority graduation rate differentials are substantial and have n...

  15. Rate for energy transfer from excited cyclohexane to nitrous oxide in the liquid phase

    Wada, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Pure liquid cyclohexane and cyclohexane solutions of nitrous oxide have been photolyzed at 163 nm. The quantum yield of the product hydrogen in the photolysis of pure cyclohexane is found to be 1.0. The addition of nitrous oxide results in the reduction in the yield of hydrogen and in the formation of nitrogen. The decrement of the hydrogen yield is approximately equal to the increment of the nitrogen yield. About 40 percent of the hydrogen yield in pure cyclohexane is found to be produced through a path which is not affected by the addition of nitrous oxide. The effect of the addition of nitrous oxide is attributed to energy transfer from excited cyclohexane to nitrous oxide with the rate constant of k = 1.0 x 10 11 M -1 sec -1 (at 15 0 C). This value is about a factor of 10 larger than that expected as for diffusion-controlled rate. A contribution of the energy transfer process to the formation of nitrogen in the radiolysis of cyclohexane solutions of nitrous oxide has also been discussed. (auth)

  16. Fabrication processes of C/Sic composites for high temperature components in energy systems and investigation of their oxidation behavior

    El-Hakim, E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced ceramic matrix composite are promising candidate materials for high temperature applications such as structural components in energy systems, fusion reactors and advanced gas turbine engines. C/C composites has low oxidation resistance at temperatures above 500degree. To overcome this low oxidation resistance a coating should be applied. Tenax HTA 5131 carbon fibres impregnated with phenolic resin and reinforced silicon carbide were modified by the addition of a coating layer of boron oxide, (suspended in Dyansil-40) for improving anti-oxidation properties of the composites.The oxidation behavior of carbon-silicon carbide composites coated with B 2 O 3 , as an protective layer former, in dry air has been studied in the temperature range 800- 1000 degree for 8 hrs and 16 hrs. The results show that the oxidation rates of the uncoated composites samples are higher than those of the coated composites. The uncoated samples exhibit the highest oxidation rate during the initial stages of oxidation. The composite coated with B 2 O 3 had a significantly improved oxidation resistance due to the formation of a barrier layer for oxygen diffusion. This improvement in the oxidation resistance is attributed to the blocking of the active sites for oxygen diffusion. The oxidation resistance of the coated composite is highly improved; the weight loss percentage of casted samples is 4.5-16% after 16-hrs oxidation in air while the weight loss of uncoated samples is about 60%. The results are supported by scanning electron microscopy

  17. Temporal dynamics of high repetition rate pulsed single longitudinal ...

    ing (GIG) cavity, single-mode dye laser pumped by high repetition rate ... in a high loss cavity, a detailed theoretical study and optimization of cavity ..... rate for high conversion efficiency and longer pulse width of the single-mode dye laser.

  18. Evaluation of Capacity on a High Throughput Vol-oxidizer for Operability

    Kim, Young Hwan; Park, Geun Il; Lee, Jung Won; Jung, Jae Hoo; Kim, Ki Ho; Lee, Yong Soon; Lee, Do Youn; Kim, Su Sung

    2010-01-01

    KAERI is developing a pyro-process. As a piece of process equipment, a high throughput vol-oxidizer which can handle a several tens kg HM/batch was developed to supply U 3 O 8 powders to an electrolytic reduction(ER) reactor. To increase the reduction yield, UO 2 pellets should be converted into uniform powders. In this paper, we aim at the evaluation of a high throughput vol-oxidizer for operability. The evaluation consisted of 3 targets, a mechanical motion test, a heating test and hull separation test. In order to test a high throughput vol-oxidizer, By using a control system, mechanical motion tests of the vol-oxidizer were conducted, and heating rates were analyzed. Also the separation tests of hulls for recovery rate were conducted. The test results of the vol-oxidizer are going to be applied for operability. A study on the characteristics of the volatile gas produced during a vol-oxidation process is not included in this study

  19. Quantum data locking for high-rate private communication

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2015-01-01

    We show that, if the accessible information is used as a security quantifier, quantum channels with a certain symmetry can convey private messages at a tremendously high rate, as high as less than one bit below the rate of non-private classical communication. This result is obtained by exploiting the quantum data locking effect. The price to pay to achieve such a high private communication rate is that accessible information security is in general not composable. However, composable security ...

  20. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  1. EFFECT OF La2O3 ON HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION RESISTANCE OF ELECTROSPARK DEPOSITED Ni-BASED COATINGS

    YUXIN GAO; JIAN YI; ZHIGANG FANG; HU CHENG

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation tests of electrospark deposited Ni-based coatings without and with 2.5 wt.% La2O3 were conducted at 960°C in air for 100 h. The oxidation kinetic of the coatings was studied by testing the weight gain. The phase structures and morphologies of the oxidized coatings were investigated by XRD and SEM. The experimental results show that the coatings with 2.5 wt.% La2O3 exhibits excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance including low oxidation rate and improved spallation resist...

  2. Carbon nanotubes/cobalt sulfide composites as potential high-rate and high-efficiency supercapacitors

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Shih, Zih-Yu; Yang, Zusing; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-10-01

    We have prepared carbon nanotube (CNT)/cobalt sulfide (CoS) composites from cobalt nitrate, thioacetamide, and CNTs in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone). CNT/CoS composites are deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates and then subjected to simple annealing at 300 °C for 0.5 h to fabricate CNT/CoS electrodes. Data collected from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and d-spacing reveal the changes in the CoS structures and crystalline lattices after annealing. Cyclic voltammetry results reveal that the annealed CNT/CoS composite electrodes yield values of 2140 ± 90 and 1370 ± 50 F g-1 for specific capacitance at scan rates of 10 and 100 mV s-1, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the annealed CNT/CoS composite electrodes provide higher specific capacitance relative to other reported ones at a scan rate of 100 mV s-1. CNT/CoS composite electrodes yield a power density of 62.4 kW kg-1 at a constant discharge current density of 217.4 A g-1. With such a high-rate capacity and power density, CNT/CoS composite supercapacitors demonstrate great potential as efficient energy storage devices.

  3. Investigations into the effect of spinel oxide composition on rate of carbon deposition

    Allen, G.C.; Jutson, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    The deposition of carbon on fuel cladding and other steels results in a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Methane and carbon monoxide are added to the gaseous coolant in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) to reduce the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator and this is known to increase the rate of carbon deposition. However, the composition of oxides formed on steel surfaces within the reactor may also influence deposition. In this investigation carefully characterised spinel type oxides of varying composition have been subjected to γ radiation under conditions of temperature, pressure and atmosphere similar to those experienced in the reactor. The rate of carbon deposition has been studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX). (U.K.)

  4. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2016-02-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H2 atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s-1 and 0.005 K s-1, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U1-yPuyO2-x uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

  5. Room temperature plasma oxidation: A new process for preparation of ultrathin layers of silicon oxide, and high dielectric constant materials

    Tinoco, J.C.; Estrada, M.; Baez, H.; Cerdeira, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present basic features and oxidation law of the room temperature plasma oxidation (RTPO), as a new process for preparation of less than 2 nm thick layers of SiO 2 , and high-k layers of TiO 2 . We show that oxidation rate follows a potential law dependence on oxidation time. The proportionality constant is function of pressure, plasma power, reagent gas and plasma density, while the exponent depends only on the reactive gas. These parameters are related to the physical phenomena occurring inside the plasma, during oxidation. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated with these layers are characterized by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage and current-voltage-temperature measurements. Less than 2.5 nm SiO 2 layers with surface roughness similar to thermal oxide films, surface state density below 3 x 10 11 cm -2 and current density in the expected range for each corresponding thickness, were obtained by RTPO in a parallel-plate reactor, at 180 mW/cm 2 and pressure range between 9.33 and 66.5 Pa (0.07 and 0.5 Torr) using O 2 and N 2 O as reactive gases. MOS capacitors with TiO 2 layers formed by RTPO of sputtered Ti layers are also characterized. Finally, MOS capacitors with stacked layers of TiO 2 over SiO 2 , both layers obtained by RTPO, were prepared and evaluated to determine the feasibility of the use of TiO 2 as a candidate for next technology nodes

  6. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  7. Inhibition of acetaminophen oxidation by cimetidine and the effects on glutathione and activated sulphate synthesis rates

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E

    1993-01-01

    inhibition of cytochrome P-450 drug oxidation by cimetidine in isolated rat hepatocytes. The synthesis rates of glutathione and PAPS were determined simultaneously by an established method based on trapping of radioactivity (35S) in the prelabelled glutathione and PAPS pools. Preincubation of the hepatocytes...

  8. New Oxide Materials for an Ultra High Temperature Environment

    Perepezko, John H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-11-13

    In this project, a new oxide material, Hf6Ta2O17 has been successfully synthesized by the controlled oxidization of Hf-Ta alloys. This oxide exhibits good oxidation resistance, high temperature phase stability up to more than 2000°C, low thermal conductivity and thus could serve as a component or a coating material in an ultrahigh temperature environment. We have examined the microstructure evolution and phase formation sequence during the oxidation exposure of Hf-Ta alloys at 1500°C and identified that the oxidation of a Hf-26.7atomic %Ta alloy leads to the formation of a single phase adherent Hf6Ta2O17 with a complex atomic structure i.e. superstructure. The overall reactive diffusion pathway is consistent with the calculated Hf-Ta-O ternary phase diagram. Besides the synthesis of Hf6Ta2O17 superstructure by oxidizing Hf-Ta alloys, we have also developed a synthesis method based upon the reactive sintering of the correct ratios of mixed powders of HfO2 and Ta2O5 and verified the low thermal conductivity of Hf6Ta2O17 superstructure on these samples. We have completed a preliminary analysis of the oxidation kinetics for Hf6Ta2O17, which shows an initial parabolic oxidation kinetics.

  9. Evidence of highly oxidizing environment over the South Pole

    Davis, D.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered high levels of an air purifying chemical or oxidizing agent in the near-surface atmosphere over the South Pole. This research, funded by the National Science Foundation, has implications for interpreting historical global climate records stored in Antarctic ice cores. The hydroxyl (OH) radical is higher at the South Pole than that estimated from OH measurements recorded at the equator. The OH radical is vital to scrubbing pollution and naturally occurring chemicals from the air and prevents a buildup of toxic levels of chemicals. The near surface atmospheric zone is a highly oxidizing environment at the South Pole. There is evidence that oxidizing chemistry continues to occur in the buried snow. This active chemistry could modify chemical species before they are trapped in the ice in their final chemical forms. Therefore, glaciochemists who study climate change based on analysis of trace chemicals trapped in polar ice will have to be more careful in their interpretations of Antarctic ice cores. Any significant increase of nitric oxide levels in any snow-covered area should result in high OH levels. Scientists used the selected-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer technique to measure OH. To measure nitric oxide (NO), they used chemiluminescence with modifications to improve its sensitivity. Nitric oxide is also a radical and is a by-product of internal combustion engines. At the South Pole, it is formed when ultraviolet radiation interacts with nitrate ions. The source of NO is not clear, but it may originate from stratospheric denitrification and the long-range transport of nitric acid formed at low latitude during electrical storms. Scientists are also working to better understand the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under the cold conditions and high latitudes of Antarctica. This information will help glaciochemists to better interpret sulfate and methane sulfonate concentrations

  10. A field study on chemistry, S(IV) oxidation rates and vertical transport during fog conditions

    Joos, F.; Baltensperger, U.

    An extensive fog study was carried out in the central plateu of Switzerland. Ninety-seven fog samples were collected along with aerosol filter and cascade impactor samples, and measurements of O 3, SO 2, NO, NO x, PAN, temperature, and wind speed and direction. Maximum levels in fogwater were 4.3, 4.4., 0.033, 1.7, 0.5, 0.024 and 9.2 mmol ℓ -1 for Cl -, NO 3-, NO 2-, SO 42-, S(IV), oxalate and NH 4+, respectively. pH varied between 2.9 and 7.1. Sixteen additional elements were determined in the fog samples by ICP. The sum of the concentrations of SO 42- and S(IV) agreed very with the total sulfur concentration as determined by ICP. A substantial excess of S(IV) (up to 0.2 mmol ℓ -1) compared to Henry and acid-base equilibrium calculations was found, which can probably be attributed to complex formations with aldehydes. S(IV) oxidation rates of up to 650 nmol ℓ -1 s -1 with ozone and of up to 100 nmol ℓ -1 s -1 with NO 2 were calculated. S(IV) oxidation due to PAN, NO 2- and Fe(III) was of minor importance. A substantial fraction of the major ions was present in the intersitial aerosol (aerosol particles < 4 μm) even during fog conditions. High correlations were found for NH 4+, NO 32-. From their ratios in the fog water and the aerosol (< 4 μm) it could be concluded that at least 40% of NO 3- and 20% of NH 4+ in fog water was due to gas phase scavenging. Increasing concentrations in fog water were found during fog dissipation. Concentrations decreased with increasing height. A vertical transport model including turbulent diffusion and droplet sedimentation is introduced, which matches the experimental data of this vertical profile.

  11. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES FOR COMBIND SEWER OVERFLOW

    This paper presents high-rate disinfection technologies for combined sewer overflow (CSO). The high-rate disinfection technologies of interest are: chlorination/dechlorination, ultraviolet light irradiation (UV), chlorine dioxide (ClO2 ), ozone (O3), peracetic acid (CH3COOOH )...

  12. High Graduate Unemployment Rate and Taiwanese Undergraduate Education

    Wu, Chih-Chun

    2011-01-01

    An expansion in higher education in combination with the recent global economic recession has resulted in a high college graduate unemployment rate in Taiwan. This study investigates how the high unemployment rate and financial constraints caused by economic cutbacks have shaped undergraduates' class choices, job needs, and future income…

  13. Circuit and interconnect design for high bit-rate applications

    Veenstra, H.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents circuit and interconnect design techniques and design flows that address the most difficult and ill-defined aspects of the design of ICs for high bit-rate applications. Bottlenecks in interconnect design, circuit design and on-chip signal distribution for high bit-rate

  14. Dose-rate effects of ethylene oxide exposure on developmental toxicity.

    Weller, E; Long, N; Smith, A; Williams, P; Ravi, S; Gill, J; Henessey, R; Skornik, W; Brain, J; Kimmel, C; Kimmel, G; Holmes, L; Ryan, L

    1999-08-01

    In risk assessment, evaluating a health effect at a duration of exposure that is untested involves assuming that equivalent multiples of concentration (C) and duration (T) of exposure have the same effect. The limitations of this approach (attributed to F. Haber, Zur Geschichte des Gaskrieges [On the history of gas warfare], in Funf Vortrage aus den Jahren 1920-1923 [Five lectures from the years 1920-1923], 1924, Springer, Berlin, pp. 76-92), have been noted in several studies. The study presented in this paper was designed to specifically look at dose-rate (C x T) effects, and it forms an ideal case study to implement statistical models and to examine the statistical issues in risk assessment. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice were exposed, on gestational day 7, to ethylene oxide (EtO) via inhalation for 1.5, 3, or 6 h at exposures that result in C x T multiples of 2100 or 2700 ppm-h. EtO was selected because of its short half-life, documented developmental toxicity, and relevance to exposures that occur in occupational settings. Concurrent experiments were run with animals exposed to air for similar periods. Statistical analysis using models developed to assess dose-rate effects revealed significant effects with respect to fetal death and resorptions, malformations, crown-to-rump length, and fetal weight. Animals exposed to short, high exposures of EtO on day 7 of gestation were found to have more adverse effects than animals exposed to the same C x T multiple but at longer, lower exposures. The implication for risk assessment is that applying Haber's Law could potentially lead to an underestimation of risk at a shorter duration of exposure and an overestimation of risk at a longer duration of exposure. Further research, toxicological and statistical, are required to understand the mechanism of the dose-rate effects, and how to incorporate the mechanistic information into the risk assessment decision process.

  15. High pressure phase transitions in Europous oxide

    Kremser, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    The pressure-volume relationship for EuO was investigated to 630 kilobars at room temperature with a diamond-anvil, high-pressure cell. Volumes were determined by x-ray diffraction; pressures were determined by the ruby R 1 fluorescence method. The preferred interpretation involves normal compression behavior for EuO, initially in the B1 (NaCl-type) structure, to about 280 kilobars. Between approx. =280 and approx. =350 kilobars a region of anomalous compressibility in which the volume drops continuously by approximately 2% is observed. A second-order electronic transition is proposed with the 6s band overlapping with the 4f levels, thereby reducing the volume of EuO without changing the structure. This is not a semiconductor-to-metal transition. In reflected light, this transition is correlated with a subtle and continuous change in color from brown-black to a light brown. The collapsed B1 phase (postelectronic transition) is stable between approx. =350 and approx. =400 kilobars. At about 400 kilobars the collapsed B1 structure transforms to the B2 (CsCl-type) structure, with a zero pressure-volume change of approximately 12 +/- 1.5%

  16. Powder processing of high Tc oxide superconductors and their properties

    Vajpei, A.C.; Upadhyaya, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    Powder processing of ceramics is an established technology and in the area of high T c superconductors, its importance is felt even more significantly. The present monograph is an attempt in this direction to explore the perspectives and practice of powder processing routes towards control and optimization of the microstructure and pertinent properties of high T c oxide superconductors. The monograph consists of 6 chapters. After a very brief introduction (Chapter 1), Chapter 2 describes various classes of high T c oxide superconductors and their phase equilibria. Chapter 3 highlights the preparation of oxide superconductor powders through various routes and details their subtle distinctions. Chapter 4 briefly covers characterisation of the oxide superconductors, laying emphasis on the process-analysis and microstructure. Chapter 5 describes in detail various fabrication techniques for bulk superconductors through the powder routes. The last Chapter (Chapter 6) describing properties of bulk oxide superconductors, discusses the role of subtituents, compositional variations and processing methods on such properties. References are given at the end of each chapter. (orig.)

  17. Some observations on the high temperature oxidation behaviour of plasma sprayed Ni3Al coatings

    Singh, H.; Prakash, S.; Puri, D.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance of the superalloys can be greatly enhanced by plasma sprayed coatings and this is a growing industry of considerable economic importance. The purpose of these coatings is to form long-lasting oxidation protective scales. In the current investigation, Ni 3 Al powder was prepared by mechanical mixing of pure nickel and aluminium powders in a ball mill. Subsequently Ni 3 Al powder was deposited on three Ni-base superalloys: Superni 600, Superni 601 and Superni 718 and, one Fe-base superalloy, Superfer 800H by shrouded plasma spray process. Oxidation studies were conducted on the coated superalloys in air at 900 deg. C under cyclic conditions for 50 cycles. Each cycle consisted of 1 h heating followed by 20 min of cooling in air. The thermogravimetric technique was used to approximate the kinetics of oxidation. All the coated superalloys nearly followed parabolic rate law of oxidation. X-ray diffraction, SEM/EDAX and EPMA techniques were used to analyse the oxidation products. The Ni 3 Al coating was found to be successful in maintaining its adherence to the superalloy substrates in all the cases. The oxide scales formed on the oxidised coated superalloys were found to be intact and spallation-free. XRD analysis revealed the presence of phases like NiO, Al 2 O 3 and NiAl 2 O 4 in the oxide scales, which are reported as protective oxides against high temperature oxidation. The XRD results were further supported by SEM/EDAX and EPMA

  18. Molybdenum Disilicide Oxidation Kinetics in High Temperature Steam

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Stephen Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at the development and qualification of ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. One route to enhance the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel is to replace the zirconium alloy cladding, which is prone to rapid oxidation in steam at elevated temperatures, with a more oxidation-resistant cladding. Several cladding replacement solutions have been envisaged. The cladding can be completely replaced with a more oxidation resistant alloy, a layered approach can be used to optimize the strength, creep resistance, and oxidation tolerance of various materials, or the existing zirconium alloy cladding can be coated with a more oxidation-resistant material. Molybdenum is one candidate cladding material favored due to its high temperature creep resistance. However, it performs poorly under autoclave testing and suffers degradation under high temperature steam oxidation exposure. Development of composite cladding architectures consisting of a molybdenum core shielded by a molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) coating is hypothesized to improve the performance of a Mo-based cladding system. MoSi2 was identified based on its high temperature oxidation resistance in O2 atmospheres (e.g. air and “wet air”). However, its behavior in H2O is less known. This report presents thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results for MoSi2 exposed to 670-1498 K water vapor. Synthetic air (80-20%, Ar-O2) exposures were also performed, and those results are presented here for a comparative analysis. It was determined that MoSi2 displays drastically different oxidation behavior in water vapor than in dry air. In the 670-1498 K temperature range, four distinct behaviors are observed. Parabolic oxidation is exhibited in only 670

  19. Thermocurrent dosimetry with high purity aluminum oxide

    Fullerton, G.D.; Cameron, J.R.; Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of thermocurrent (TC) to ionizing radiation dosimetry was studied. It was shown that TC in alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) has properties that are suited to personnel dosimetry and environmental monitoring. TC dosimeters were made from thin disks of alumina. Aluminum electrodes were evaporated on each side: on one face a high voltage electrode and on the opposite face a measuring electrode encircled by a guard ring. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in stored electrons and holes in metastable trapping sites. The signal was read-out by heating the dosimeter with a voltage source and picnometer connected in series between the opposite electrodes. The thermally remobilized charge caused a transient TC. The thermogram, TC versus time or temperature, is similar to a TL glow curve. Either the peak current or the integrated current is a measure of absorbed dose. Six grades of alumina were studied from a total of four commercial suppliers. All six materials displayed radiation induced TC signals. Sapphire of uv-grade quality from the Adolf Meller Co. (AM) had the best dosimetry properties of those investigated. Sources of interference were studied. Thermal fading, residual signal and radiation damage do not limit TC dosimetry. Ultraviolet light can induce a TC response but it is readily excluded with uv-opaque cladding. Improper surface preparation prior to electrode evaporation was shown to cause interference. A spurious TC signal resulted from polarization of surface contaminants. Spurious TC was reduced by improved cleaning prior to electrode application. Polished surfaces resulted in blocking electrodes and caused a sensitivity shift due to radiation induced thermally activated polarization. This was not observed with rough cut surfaces

  20. Thermocurrent dosimetry with high purity aluminum oxide

    Fullerton, G.D.; Cameron, J.R.; Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of thermocurrent (TC) to ionizing radiation dosimetry was studied. It was shown that TC in alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) has properties that are suited to personnel dosimetry and environmental monitoring. TC dosimeters were made from thin disks of alumina. Aluminum electrodes were evaporated on each side: on one face a high voltage electrode and on the opposite face a measuring electrode encircled by a guard ring. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in stored electrons and holes in metastable trapping sites. The signal was read-out by heating the dosimeter with a voltage source and picnometer connected in series between the opposite electrodes. The thermally remobilized charge caused a transient TC. The thermogram, TC versus time or temperature, is similar to a TL glow curve. Either the peak current or the integrated current is a measure of absorbed dose. Six grades of alumina were studied from a total of four commercial suppliers. All six materials displayed radiation induced TC signals. Sapphire of uv-grade quality from the Adolf Meller Co. (AM) had the best dosimetry properties of those investigated. Sources of interference were studied. Thermal fading, residual signal and radiation damage do not limit TC dosimetry. Ultraviolet light can induce a TC response but it is readily excluded with uv-opaque cladding. Improper surface preparation prior to electrode evaporation was shown to cause interference. A spurious TC signal resulted from polarization of surface contaminants. Spurious TC was reduced by improved cleaning prior to electrode application. Polished surfaces resulted in blocking electrodes and caused a sensitivity shift due to radiation induced thermally activated polarization. This was not observed with rough cut surfaces.

  1. Introduction to State Estimation of High-Rate System Dynamics.

    Hong, Jonathan; Laflamme, Simon; Dodson, Jacob; Joyce, Bryan

    2018-01-13

    Engineering systems experiencing high-rate dynamic events, including airbags, debris detection, and active blast protection systems, could benefit from real-time observability for enhanced performance. However, the task of high-rate state estimation is challenging, in particular for real-time applications where the rate of the observer's convergence needs to be in the microsecond range. This paper identifies the challenges of state estimation of high-rate systems and discusses the fundamental characteristics of high-rate systems. A survey of applications and methods for estimators that have the potential to produce accurate estimations for a complex system experiencing highly dynamic events is presented. It is argued that adaptive observers are important to this research. In particular, adaptive data-driven observers are advantageous due to their adaptability and lack of dependence on the system model.

  2. Asymptotic Slavery in the Copper Oxide High Temperature Superconductors

    Phillips, Philip

    2004-05-01

    Vast progress in theoretical solid state physics has been made by constructing models which mimic the low-energy properties of solids. Essential to the success of this program is the separability of the high and low energy degrees of freedom. While it is hoped that a high energy reduction can be made to solve the problem of high temperature superconductivity in the copper oxide materials, I will show that no consistent theory is possible if the high energy scale is removed. At the heart of the problem is the mixing of all energy scales (that is, UV-IR mixing) in the copper-oxide materials. Optical experiments demonstrate that the number of low-energy degrees of freedom is derived from a high energy scale. The implications of the inseparability of the high and low energy degrees of freedom on the phase diagram of the cuprates is discussed.

  3. Role of high-temperature creep stress in thermally grown oxide growth of thermal barrier coatings

    Ogawa, K.; Nakao, Y.; Seo, D.; Miura, H.; Shoji, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Thermally grown oxide (TGO) grows at the top / bond coating interface of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) in service. It is supposed that the failures of the TBC occur due to thermal stress and the decrease of adhesive strength caused by the TGO growth. Recently, large local stress has been found to change both the diffusion constant of oxygen through an existing oxide and the rate of chemical reaction at the oxide / oxidized material interface. Since high thermal stress occurs in the TBC, the volume expansion of the newly grown oxide, and centrifugal force, the growth rate of the TGO may change depending on not only temperature but also the stress. The aim of this study is to make clear the influence of stress on the growth rate of the TGO quantitatively. As a result, the thickness of the TGO clearly increases with increase of the amplitude of the applied stress and temperature. The increase rate of the TGO thickness is approximately 23% when the applied stress is increased from 0 to 205 MPa at 900 C, and approximately 29% when the stress is increased from 0 to 150 MPa at 950 C. (orig.)

  4. Processing of high-temperature superconductors at high strain rates

    Mamalis, A.G.; Pantazsopoulos, G.; Manolakos, D.E.; Szalay, A.

    2000-01-01

    This new book provides, for the first time, a systematic, unified presentation of all steps in the processing of high-temperature superconductor materials, ranging from synthesis of various systems to fabrication and industrial applications. Also covered are characterization techniques and current directions in research and development. The authors are leading specialists who bring to this new book their many years of experience in research, education and industrial engineering work in superconductor materials. This book is primarily focused on the bulk-fabrication techniques of high-temperature ceramic superconducting components, especially on the combination of dynamic powder-consolidation and subsequent deformation processing. The properties of these ceramics, which are difficult-to-form materials by applying conventional techniques, are combined for the net-shape manufacturing of such components for the construction of HTS deviceshor e llipsis. However, very important topics such as superconducting structures, chemical synthesis, film fabrication and characterization techniques are also reviewedhor e llipsis to provide a complete, comprehensive view of superconductors engineering

  5. High dose rate brachytherapy in treatment of high grade astrocytomas

    Garcia-Alejo, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Cerro, E. del; Torres, J.J.; Martinez, R.

    1996-01-01

    From May 1994 to June 1995, 18 patients with high grade astrocytomas were entered prospectively on a selective protocol combining surgery, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic interstitial implantation with HDR Iridium 192 and chemotherapy. Only those patients with tumor size 100cc or less average dimension, high grade astrocytoma, Karnofsky 70 or greater, unilateral, circumscribed, unifocal, tumor stable or responding to external radiation and supratentorial were included in the study. Ages ranged from 16 to 69 years. There were 13 males and 5 females. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 3 patients, subtotal resection in 11, and gross total resection in 4 patients. Focal external beam radiation portals included the contrast enhancing mass on CT scan plus a 3 cm margin. The protocol called for minimum tumor dose of 60 Gy to be given in 2 Gy daily fractions. An interstitial brachytherapy boost was to be performed two weeks after the conclusion of external beam radiation. The dose was 30 Gy in 4 fractions. The authors analyze on basis on their personal experience, the possibilities and the limits offered by this therapeutic procedure in neuro-oncology. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically possible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to be effective and may provide for an increase in tumor control in selected cases

  6. Oxidation of 304 stainless steel in high-temperature steam

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Harayama, Yasuo; Yaguchi, Sinnosuke

    1986-08-01

    An experiment on oxidation of 304 stainless steel was performed in steam between 900°C and 1350°C, using the spare cladding of the reactor of the nuclear-powered ship Mutsu. The temperature range was appropriate for a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis of a LWR. The oxidation kinetics were found to obey the parabolic law during the first period of 8 min. After the first period, the parabolic reaction rate constant decreased in the case of heating temperatures between 1100°C and 1250°C. At 1250°C, especially, a marked decrease was observed in the oxide scale-forming kinetics when the surface treated initially by mechanical polishing and given a residual stress. This enhanced oxidation resistance was attributed to the presence of a chromium-enriched layer which was detected by use of an X-ray microanalyzer. The oxidation kinetics equation obtained for the first 8 min is applicable to the model calculation of a hypothetical LOCA in a LWR, employing 304 stainless steel cladding.

  7. Optimized high temperature oxidation and cleaning at Bugey 3

    Ranchoux, Gilles; Wintergerst, Matthieu; Bachet, Martin; Leclercq, Stephanie; Duron, Jean-Daniel; Meunier, Jean-Pierre; Blond, Serge; Dacquait Frederic

    2012-09-01

    As a part of the EDF Source Term Reduction project, an experimental procedure was carried out at Bugey 3 further to the steam generator replacement. This innovative procedure consists in theory in two complementary phases /1/: - Phase 1: a SG tubes optimized oxidation performed during pre-critical hot functional tests (basic and reducing chemistry) aims to generate an as protective as possible inner oxide layer allowing to reduce the later nickel release, - Phase 2: a cleaning procedure of the primary circuit performed under acid and reducing chemical conditioning at 170 deg. C intends to dissolve and eliminate the outer oxide layer by a simultaneous purification. The objective of such a procedure is to reduce corrosion products inventory (mainly nickel) generated by the first SG tube oxidation during hot functional tests and first operation months by carrying out an appropriate cleaning procedure. Gains were expected not only on RCS and auxiliary systems contamination, dose rates and thus collective dose but also on next outages duration. The objective of this paper is to describe the process implementation at Bugey 3: effective procedure put in place, monitoring program (chemistry and dose rate measurements, EMECC campaign) and firsts results. (authors)

  8. Influence of air flow rate on structural and electrical properties of undoped indium oxide thin films

    Mirzapour, S.; Rozati, S.M.; Takwale, M.G.; Marathe, B.R.; Bhide, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    Using the spray pyrolysis technique thin films of indium oxide were prepared on Corning glass (7059) at a substrate temperature of 425 C at different flow rates. The electrical and structural properties of these films were studied. The Hall measurements at room temperature showed that the films prepared in an air flow rate of 7 litre min -1 have the highest mobility of 47 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and a minimum resistivity of 1.125 x 10 -3 Ω cm. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the films have a preferred orientation of [400] which peaks at the air flow rate of 7 litre min -1 . (orig.)

  9. High purity samarium oxide from mixed rare earth carbonates

    Queiroz, Carlos A. da S.; Seneda, Jose A.; Vasconcellos, Mari E. de; Pedreira Filho, Walter dos R.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and economical chemical process for the production of highly pure samarium oxides is discussed. The raw material, which was used in the form of rare earth carbonates was produced industrially from the chemical treatment of Brazilian monazite. Ion exchange chromatography was performed using a strong cationic resin that is typically employed in water treatment processes to fractionate rare earth elements (REE) without the use of retention ions. Under these conditions, 99.9% pure Sm 2 O 3 was eluted using the ammonium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at a controlled pH. The EDTA-samarium complex was separated from EDTA and then precipitated as oxalate and fired to samarium oxide. Molecular absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the samarium content during the proposed process, and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to certify the purity of the samarium oxide. Typical samarium oxide obtained from the proposed procedure contained the following contaminants in micrograms per gram: Sc (20.90); Y (11.80); La (8.4); Ce (4.3); Pr (2.5); Nd (5.1); Eu (94); Gd (114); Tb (3.6); Dy (2.5), Ho (2.3); Er (3.0); Tm (2.3); Yb (38,2); Lu (25.6). The high-purity samarium oxides produced in the present study can be used as an alternative to imported products in research and development applications. (author)

  10. Nickel oxide film with open macropores fabricated by surfactant-assisted anodic deposition for high capacitance supercapacitors.

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Wang, Min-Jyle

    2010-10-07

    Nickel oxide film with open macropores prepared by anodic deposition in the presence of surfactant shows a very high capacitance of 1110 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 10 mV s(-1), and the capacitance value reduces to 950 F g(-1) at a high scan rate of 200 mV s(-1).

  11. Thermal analysis of thermo-gravimetric measurements of spent nuclear fuel oxidation rates

    Cramer, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed thermal analysis was completed of the sample temperatures in the Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) system used to measure irradiated N Reactor fuel oxidation rates. Sample temperatures during the oxidation process did not show the increase which was postulated as a result of the exothermic reactions. The analysis shows the axial conduction of heat in the sample holder effectively removes the added heat and only a very small, i.e., <10 C, increase in temperature is calculated. A room temperature evaporation test with water showed the sample thermocouple sensitivity to be more than adequate to account for a temperature change of approximately 5 C. Therefore, measured temperatures in the TGA are within approximately 10 C of the actual sample temperatures and no adjustments to reported data to account for the heat input from the oxidation process are necessary

  12. High hardness and superlative oxidation resistance in a pseudo-icosahehdral Cr-Al binary

    Simonson, J. W.; Rosa, R.; Antonacci, A. K.; He, H.; Bender, A. D.; Pabla, J.; Adrip, W.; McNally, D. E.; Zebro, A.; Kamenov, P.; Geschwind, G.; Ghose, S.; Dooryhee, E.; Ibrahim, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    Improving the efficiency of fossil fuel plants is a practical option for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions from electrical power generation. Present limits on the operating temperatures of exposed steel components, however, restrict steam temperatures and therefore energy efficiency. Even as a new generation of creep-resistant, high strength steels retain long term structural stability to temperatures as high as ~ 973 K, the low Cr-content of these alloys hinders their oxidation resistance, necessitating the development of new corrosion resistant coatings. We report here the nearly ideal properties of potential coating material Cr55Al229, which exhibits high hardness at room temperature as well as low thermal conductivity and superlative oxidation resistance at 973 K, with an oxidation rate at least three times smaller than those of benchmark materials. These properties originate from a pseudo-icosahedral crystal structure, suggesting new criteria for future research.

  13. Manganese oxide/graphene oxide composites for high-energyaqueous asymmetric electrochemical capacitors

    Jafta, CJ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A high-energy aqueous asymmetric electrochemical capacitor was developed using manganese diox-ide ( -MnO2)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. The nanostructured -MnO2was prepared frommicron-sized commercial electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) via...

  14. Structure and high-piezoelectricity in lead oxide solid solutions

    Noheda, B.

    2002-01-01

    A review of the recent advances in the understanding of piezoelectricity in lead oxide solid solutions is presented, giving special attention to the structural aspects. It has now become clear that the very high electromechanical response in these materials is directly related to the existence of

  15. New perovskite-related oxides having high dielectric constant ...

    Unknown

    static and dynamic random access memories, the static dielectric constant of the material. ¶Dedicated to .... 1100°C. It is also observed from the SEM pictures that the materials are highly dense .... Both these oxides merit attention for their.

  16. High performance fuel electrode for a solid oxide electrochemical cell

    2013-01-01

    perovskite oxides selected from the group consisting of niobium-doped strontium titanate, vanadium-doped strontium titanate, tantalum-doped strontium titanate and mixtures thereof, thereby obtaining a porous anode backbone, (b) sintering the coated electrolyte at a high temperature, such as 1200 DEG C...

  17. Highly porous ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility are disclosed. Preferred embodiments exhibit high modulus and other strength properties despite their improved flexibility. The gels may be polymer cross-linked via organic polymer chains to further improve strength properties, without substantially detracting from the improved flexibility. Methods of making such aerogels are also disclosed.

  18. Oxidation Phenomena in Advanced High Strength Steels : Modelling and Experiment

    Mao, W.

    2018-01-01

    Galvanized advanced high strength steels (AHSS) will be the most competitive structural material for automotive applications in the next decade. Oxidation of AHSS during the recrystalization annealing process in a continuous galvanizing line to a large extent influences the quality of zinc coating

  19. High Temperature Oxidation of Ferritic Steels for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bentzen, Janet Jonna

    2013-01-01

    atmospheres at 800°C. Four commercially available alloys: Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, AL29-4, E-Brite were characterized in humidified hydrogen. One alloy, Crofer 22 APU was also characterized in pure oxygen both in the as-prepared state and after application of a protective coating. Best corrosion resistance......Oxidation rates of ferritic steels used as interconnector plates in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks are of concern as they may be determining for the life time of the technology. In this study oxidation experiments were carried out for up to 1000 hours in hydrogen-side and oxygen-side simulated...... in humidified hydrogen atmosphere was observed for Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22 H alloys. Corrosion rates for Crofer 22 APU measured in humidified hydrogen are similar to the corrosion rates measured in air. Both coatings of plasma sprayed LSM and dual layer coatings (Co3O4/LSM-Co3O4) applied by wet spraying...

  20. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  1. An electrochemical study of the flow rate effect on the oxide film of SA106 Gr.C piping

    Hong, S. M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    Effect of water flow rate on the oxide film of SA106 Gr.C piping was evaluated quantitatively through electrochemical method. It was carried out with weight change experiments, polarization tests, and EIS tests with rig that simulates water flow. Without water flow, the oxide film is so stable that it effectively blocks current exchange. With water flow, the oxide film was damaged and electrochemical current density and oxide film properties, C dl and R p were significantly changed

  2. Improved oxidation resistance of ferritic steels with LSM coating for high temperature electrochemical applications

    Palcut, Marián; Mikkelsen, Lars; Neufeld, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The effect of single layer La0.85Sr0.15MnO3−δ (LSM) coatings on high temperature oxidation behaviour of four commercial chromia-forming steels, Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, E-Brite and AL 29-4C, is studied. The samples were oxidized for 140–1000 h at 1123 K in flowing simulated ambient air (air + 1......% H2O) and oxygen and corrosion kinetics monitored by mass increase of the materials over time. The oxide scale microstructure and chemical composition are investigated by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The kinetic data obey a parabolic rate law. The results show...... that the LSM coating acts as an oxygen transport barrier that can significantly reduce the corrosion rate....

  3. Quantum data locking for high-rate private communication

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2015-01-01

    We show that, if the accessible information is used as a security quantifier, quantum channels with a certain symmetry can convey private messages at a tremendously high rate, as high as less than one bit below the rate of non-private classical communication. This result is obtained by exploiting the quantum data locking effect. The price to pay to achieve such a high private communication rate is that accessible information security is in general not composable. However, composable security holds against an eavesdropper who is forced to measure her share of the quantum system within a finite time after she gets it. (paper)

  4. High pressure structural studies on nanophase praseodymium oxide

    Saranya, L.; Chandra Shekar, N.V.; Amirthapandian, S.; Hussain, Shamima; Arulraj, A.; Sahu, P. Ch.

    2014-01-01

    The phase stability of nanocrystalline Pr 2 O 3 has been investigated under pressure by in-situ high pressure X-ray diffraction using Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell. The ambient structure and phase of the praseodymium oxide have been resolved unambiguously using x-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM techniques. Under the action of pressure the cubic phase of the system is retained up to 15 GPa. This is unusual as other isostructural rare earth oxides show structural transformations even at lower pressures. From the best fit to the P–V data with the Murnaghan equation of state yields a bulk modulus of 171 GPa

  5. High Performance Nano-Ceria Electrodes for Solid Oxide Cells

    Graves, Christopher R.; Martinez Aguilera, Lev; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    forming the active surfaces on a porous backbone with embedded electronic current collector material, yielding one of the highest performances reported for an electrode that operates either on fuel or oxidant. The second is a nano-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ thin film prepared by spin-coating, which provides......In solid oxide electrochemical cells, the conventional Ni-based fuel-electrodes provide high electrocatalytic activity but they are often a major source of long-term performance degradation due to carbon deposition, poisoning of reaction sites, Ni mobility, etc. Doped-ceria is a promising mixed...

  6. High mobility transparent conducting oxides for thin film solar cells

    Calnan, S.; Tiwari, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    A special class of transparent conducting oxides (TCO) with high mobility of > 65 cm 2 V -1 s -1 allows film resistivity in the low 10 -4 Ω cm range and a high transparency of > 80% over a wide spectrum, from 300 nm to beyond 1500 nm. This exceptional coincidence of desirable optical and electrical properties provides opportunities to improve the performance of opto-electronic devices and opens possibilities for new applications. Strategies to attain high mobility (HM) TCO materials as well as the current status of such materials based on indium and cadmium containing oxides are presented. Various concepts used to understand the underlying mechanisms for high mobility in HMTCO films are discussed. Examples of HMTCO layers used as transparent electrodes in thin film solar cells are used to illustrate possible improvements in solar cell performance. Finally, challenges and prospects for further development of HMTCO materials are discussed.

  7. Effectiveness of high interest rate policy on exchange rates: A reexamination of the Asian financial crisis

    Chin Diew Lai

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most controversial issues in the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis has been the appropriate response of monetary policy to a sharp decline in the value of some currencies. In this paper, we empirically examine the effects on Asian exchange rates of sharply higher interest rates during the Asian financial crisis. Taking account of the currency contagion effect, our results indicate that sharply higher interest rates helped to support the exchange rates of South Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. For Malaysia, no significant causal relation is found from the rate of interest to exchange rates, as the authorities in Malaysia did not actively adopt a high interest rate policy to defend the currency.

  8. Evolution of Near-Surface Internal and External Oxide Morphology During High-Temperature Selective Oxidation of Steels

    Story, Mary E.; Webler, Bryan A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work we examine some observations made using high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscopy (HT-CSLM) during selective oxidation experiments. A plain carbon steel and advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) were selectively oxidized at high temperature (850-900°C) in either low oxygen or water vapor atmospheres. Surface evolution, including thermal grooving along grain boundaries and oxide growth, was viewed in situ during heating. Experiments investigated the influence of the microstructure and oxidizing atmosphere on selective oxidation behavior. Sequences of CSLM still frames collected during the experiment were processed with ImageJ to obtain histograms that showed a general darkening trend indicative of oxidation over time with all samples. Additional ex situ scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis supported in situ observations. Distinct oxidation behavior was observed for each case. Segregation, grain orientation, and extent of internal oxidation were all found to strongly influence surface evolution.

  9. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  10. Oxide thickness measurement for monitoring fuel performance at high burnup

    Jaeger, M.A.; Van Swam, L.F.P.; Brueck-Neufeld, K.

    1991-01-01

    For on-site monitoring of the fuel performance at high burnup, Advanced Nuclear Fuels uses the linear scan eddy current method to determine the oxide thickness of irradiated Zircaloy fuel cans. Direct digital data acquisition methods are employed to collect the data on magnetic storage media. This field-proven methodology allows oxide thickness measurements and rapid interpretation of the data during the reactor outages and makes it possible to immediately reinsert the assemblies for the next operating cycle. The accuracy of the poolside measurements and data acquisition/interpretation techniques have been verified through hot cell metallographic measurements of rods previously measured in the fuel pool. The accumulated data provide a valuable database against which oxide growth models have been benchmarked and allow for effective monitoring of fuel performance. (orig.) [de

  11. Highly conducting and transparent sprayed indium tin oxide

    Rami, M.; Benamar, E.; Messaoudi, C.; Sayah, D.; Ennaoui, A. (Faculte des Sciences, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Physique des Materiaux)

    1998-03-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has a wide range of applications in solar cells (e.g. by controlling the resistivity, we can use low conductivity ITO as buffer layer and highly conducting ITO as front contact in thin films CuInS[sub 2] and CuInSe[sub 2] based solar cells) due to its wide band gap (sufficient to be transparent) in both visible and near infrared range, and high carrier concentrations with metallic conduction. A variety of deposition techniques such as reactive electron beam evaporation, DC magnetron sputtering, evaporation, reactive thermal deposition, and spray pyrolysis have been used for the preparation of undoped and tin doped indium oxide. This latter process which makes possible the preparation of large area coatings has attracted considerable attention due to its simplicity and large scale with low cost fabrication. It has been used here to deposit highly transparent and conducting films of tin doped indium oxide onto glass substrates. The electrical, optical and structural properties have been investigated as a function of various deposition parameters namely dopant concentrations, temperature and nature of substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns have shown that deposited films are polycrystalline without second phases and have preferred orientation [400]. INdium tin oxide layers with small resistivity value around 7.10[sup -5] [omega].cm and transmission coefficient in the visible and near IR range of about 85-90% have been easily obtained. (authors) 13 refs.

  12. Oxidation rates of carbon and nitrogen in char residues from solid fuels

    Karlstroem, O.

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is an important tool in designing new combustion systems. By using CFD modeling, entire combustion systems can be modeled and the emissions and the performance can be predicted. CFD modeling can also be used to develop new and better combustion systems from an economical and environmental point of view. In CFD modeling of solid fuel combustion, the combustible fuel is generally treated as single fuel particles. One of the limitations with the CFD modeling concerns the sub-models describing the combustion of single fuel particles. Available models in the scientific literature are in many cases not suitable as submodels for CFD modeling since they depend on a large number of input parameters and are computationally heavy. In this thesis CFD-applicable models are developed for the combustion of single fuel particles. The single particle models can be used to improve the combustion performance in various combustion devices or develop completely new technologies. The investigated fields are oxidation of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in char residues from solid fuels. Modeled char-C oxidation rates are compared to experimental oxidation rates for a large number of pulverized solid fuel chars under relevant combustion conditions. The experiments have been performed in an isothermal plug flow reactor operating at 1123-1673 K and 3-15 vol.% O{sub 2}. In the single particle model, the char oxidation is based on apparent kinetics and depends on three fuel specific parameters: apparent pre-exponential factor, apparent activation energy, and apparent reaction order. The single particle model can be incorporated as a sub-model into a CFD code. The results show that the modeled char oxidation rates are in good agreement with experimental char oxidation rates up to around 70% of burnout. Moreover, the results show that the activation energy and the reaction order can be assumed to be constant for a large number of bituminous coal chars

  13. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables

  14. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables.

  15. Patterning of high mobility electron gases at complex oxide interfaces

    Trier, Felix; Prawiroatmodjo, G. E. D. K.; von Soosten, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Oxide interfaces provide an opportunity for electronics. However, patterning of electron gases at complex oxide interfaces is challenging. In particular, patterning of complex oxides while preserving a high electron mobility remains underexplored and inhibits the study of quantum mechanical effects...... of amorphous-LSM (a-LSM) thin films, which acts as a hard mask during subsequent depositions. Strikingly, the patterned modulation-doped interface shows electron mobilities up to ∼8 700 cm2/V s at 2 K, which is among the highest reported values for patterned conducting complex oxide interfaces that usually...... where extended electron mean free paths are paramount. This letter presents an effective patterning strategy of both the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/STO) and modulation-doped amorphous-LaAlO3/La7/8Sr1/8MnO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/LSM/STO) oxide interfaces. Our patterning is based on selective wet etching...

  16. How Did Successful High Schools Improve Their Graduation Rates?

    Robertson, Janna Siegel; Smith, Robert W.; Rinka, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The researchers surveyed 23 North Carolina high schools that had markedly improved their graduation rates over the past five years. The administrators reported on the dropout prevention practices and programs to which they attributed their improved graduation rates. The majority of schools reported policy changes, especially with suspension. The…

  17. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into considera- ... does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride ... from titanium hydride in a sequence of steps.

  18. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  19. Assessing the High Temperature, High Pressure Subsurface for Anaerobic Methane Oxidation

    Harris, R. L.; Bartlett, D.; Byrnes, A. W.; Walsh, K. M.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Onstott, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink in the global methane (CH4) budget. ANMEs are known to oxidize CH4 either independently or in consortia with bacteria, coupling the reduction of electron acceptors such as, SO42-, NO2-, NO3-, Mn4+, or Fe3+. To further constrain the contribution of AOM to the global CH4 budget, it is important to assess unexplored environments where AOM is thermodynamically possible such as the high pressure, high temperature deep biosphere. Provided plausible electron acceptor availability, increased temperature and pCH4 yield favorable Gibbs free energies for AOM reactions and the production of ATP (Fig. 1). To date, only sulfate-dependent AOM metabolism has been documented under high temperature conditions (50-72˚C), and AOM has not been assessed above 10.1 MPa. Given that ANMEs share close phylogenetic and metabolic heritage with methanogens and that the most heat-tolerant microorganism known is a barophilic methanogen, there possibly exist thermophilic ANMEs. Here we describe preliminary results from high pressure, high temperature stable isotope tracer incubation experiments on deep biosphere samples. Deep sub-seafloor sediments collected by IODP 370 from the Nankai Trough (257 - 865 m below seafloor) and deep fracture fluid from South Africa (1339 m below land surface) were incubated anaerobically in hydrostatic pressure vessels at 40 MPa in simulated in situ temperatures (40˚ - 80˚C). Sediments and fracture fluid were incubated in sulfate-free artificial seawater, a 2:98 13CH4:N2 headspace, and treated with one of the potential electron acceptors listed above in addition to kill and endogenous activity (i.e. no added electron acceptor) controls. Stable isotope analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) suggests that AOM occurred within 60 days of incubation for all investigated electron acceptors and temperatures except 50˚C. Sulfate-dependent AOM rates are consistent with those previously reported in the

  20. Development of Kinetics for Soot Oxidation at High Pressures Under Fuel-Lean Conditions

    Lighty, JoAnn [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Vander Wal, Randy [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-04-21

    The focus of the proposed research was to develop kinetic models for soot oxidation with the hope of developing a validated, predictive, multi-­scale, combustion model to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The work focused on the relatively unstudied area of the fundamental mechanism for soot oxidation. The objectives include understanding of the kinetics of soot oxidation by O2 under high pressure which require: 1) development of intrinsic kinetics for the surface oxidation, which takes into account the dependence of reactivity upon nanostructure and 2) evolution of nanostructure and its impact upon oxidation rate and 3) inclusion of internal surface area development and possible fragmentation resulting from pore development and /or surface oxidation. These objectives were explored for a variety of pure fuel components and surrogate fuels. This project was a joint effort between the University of Utah (UU) and Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). The work at the UU focuses on experimental studies using a two-­stage burner and a high- pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Penn State provided HRTEM images and guidance in the fringe analysis algorithms and parameter quantification for the images. This report focuses on completion done under supplemental funding.

  1. Increased strength of concrete subject to high loading rates

    Curbach, M.

    1987-01-01

    Within the scope of this work various problems are discussed which occur in connection with concrete under high tensile loading rates (e.g. when a plane crashes on a nuclear power plant very high loads occur which act only for a very short time). Particularly the causes for the already frequently noticed increases in strength with increasing loading rates are investigated and also the question whether this increased strength can be taken into account when dimensioning a construction. (MM) [de

  2. Quantum Communication with a High-Rate Entangled Photon Source

    Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Lekki, John D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  3. High-rate capability of lithium-ion batteries after storing at elevated temperature

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Chiang, Pin-Chi Julia

    2007-01-01

    High-rate performances of a lithium-ion battery after storage at elevated temperature are investigated electrochemically by means of three-electrode system. The high-rate capability is decreased significantly after high-temperature storage. A 3 C discharge capacities after room-temperature storage and 60 o C storage are 650 and 20 mAh, respectively. Lithium-ion diffusion in lithium cobalt oxide cathode limits the battery's capacity and the results show that storage temperature changes this diffusion behavior. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that many defects are directly observed in the cathode after storage compared with the fresh cathode; the structural defects block the diffusion within the particles. Electrochemical impedance and polarization curve indicate that mass-transfer (diffusion) dominates the discharge capacity during high-rate discharge

  4. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    constant (except for the material with the lowest oxide content). The high temperature values of the modulus-corrected yield stresses are approximately two-thirds of the low temperature value. During high temperature creep, there is a definite indication of a threshold stress. This threshold stress......The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573......–873 K. The modulus-corrected yield stress (0.01 offset) is found to be temperature independent at low temperature (195–472 K). Between 473 and 573 K, the yield stress starts to decrease with increasing temperature. At high temperatures (573–873 K), the modulus-corrected yield stress is approximately...

  5. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon/carbon composites and their components in water vapour at high temperatures

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 4D-C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibre and coal tar pitch. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of fibres-H 2 O and matrix-H 2 O are obtained. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of C/C–H 2 O are obtained. • Oxidation rate of the fibre bundle is greater than the oxidation rate of the matrix. - Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrices) in a H 2 O–Ar atmosphere at high temperatures. The oxidation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The rate of mass loss was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components at high temperature. The pressure exponent for the reaction of the carbon/carbon composites with H 2 O was 0.59, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of H 2 O with the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrices were determined

  6. Surface coating of ceria nanostructures for high-temperature oxidation protection

    Aadhavan, R.; Bhanuchandar, S.; Babu, K. Suresh

    2018-04-01

    Stainless steels are used in high-temperature structural applications but suffer from degradation at an elevated temperature of operation due to thermal stress which leads to spallation. Ceria coating over chromium containing alloys induces protective chromia layer formation at alloy/ceria interface thereby preventing oxidative degradation. In the present work, three metals of differing elemental composition, namely, AISI 304, AISI 410, and Inconel 600 were tested for high-temperature stability in the presence and absence of ceria coating. Nanoceria was used as the target to deposit the coating through electron beam physical vapor deposition method. After isothermal oxidation at 1243 K for 24 h, Ceria coated AISI 304 and Inconel 600 exhibited a reduced rate of oxidation by 4 and 1 orders, respectively, in comparison with the base alloy. The formation of spinel structure was found to be lowered in the presence of ceria due to the reduced migration of cations from the alloy.

  7. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methanol Ignition and Oxidation at High Pressure

    Aranda, V.; Christensen, J. M.; Alzueta, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of CH3OH at high pressure and intermediate temperatures has been developed and validated experimentally. Ab initio calculations and Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/transition state theory (RRKM/TST) analysis were used to obtain rate coefficients for CH...... the conditions studied, the onset temperature for methanol oxidation was not dependent on the stoichiometry, whereas increasing pressure shifted the ignition temperature toward lower values. Model predictions of the present experimental results, as well as rapid compression machine data from the literature, were...

  8. High-Capacity, High-Voltage Composite Oxide Cathode Materials

    Hagh, Nader M.

    2015-01-01

    This SBIR project integrates theoretical and experimental work to enable a new generation of high-capacity, high-voltage cathode materials that will lead to high-performance, robust energy storage systems. At low operating temperatures, commercially available electrode materials for lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries do not meet energy and power requirements for NASA's planned exploration activities. NEI Corporation, in partnership with the University of California, San Diego, has developed layered composite cathode materials that increase power and energy densities at temperatures as low as 0 degC and considerably reduce the overall volume and weight of battery packs. In Phase I of the project, through innovations in the structure and morphology of composite electrode particles, the partners successfully demonstrated an energy density exceeding 1,000 Wh/kg at 4 V at room temperature. In Phase II, the team enhanced the kinetics of Li-ion transport and electronic conductivity at 0 degC. An important feature of the composite cathode is that it has at least two components that are structurally integrated. The layered material is electrochemically inactive; however, upon structural integration with a spinel material, the layered material can be electrochemically activated and deliver a large amount of energy with stable cycling.

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions and denitrification rates: A blueprint for smart management and remediation of agricultural landscapes.

    Tomasek, A.; Hondzo, M.; Kozarek, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    resulting in the release of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas with 300 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide. The investigation of nitrous oxide emissions and correlation to denitrification rates will facilitate smart management and remediation efforts of agricultural landscapes.

  10. Enhanced Oxidation of Isoprene and Monoterpenes in High and Low NOx Conditions

    Tokarek, T. W.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Taha, Y. M.; Osthoff, H. D.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the troposphere, the photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is primarily initiated by their reactions with the hydroxyl radical (OH) which yields peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2). Concentrations of OH and the rates of VOC oxidation depend on the efficiency of peroxy radical recycling to OH. Radical recycling mainly occurs through reaction of HO2 with NO to produce NO2 and, ultimately, ozone (O3). Hence, the rate of VOC oxidation is dependent on NOx (=NO+NO2) concentration. The Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) campaign was conducted from March 17 to April 29, 2015 with the main goal of identifying and quantifying industrial sources of pollutants throughout the United States, in particular those associated with the production of oil and natural gas. In this work, a case study of biogenic VOC oxidation within and outside a power plant plume in the Haynesville basin near the border of Texas and Louisiana is presented. Isoprene, monoterpenes and their oxides were measured by H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry (H3O+ CIMS) in high time resolution (1 s). Further, an improved Whole Air Sampler (iWAS) was used to collect samples for post-flight analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) and yielded speciated quantification of biogenic VOCs. The monoterpene oxide to monoterpene ratio follows the spatial extent of the plume as judged by another tracer (NOx), tracking the enhancement of oxidation rates by NOx. The observations are rationalized with the aid of box modeling using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM).

  11. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  12. Carotenoids, birdsong and oxidative status: administration of dietary lutein is associated with an increase in song rate and circulating antioxidants (albumin and cholesterol and a decrease in oxidative damage.

    Stefania Casagrande

    Full Text Available Despite the appealing hypothesis that carotenoid-based colouration signals oxidative status, evidence supporting the antioxidant function of these pigments is scarce. Recent studies have shown that lutein, the most common carotenoid used by birds, can enhance the expression of non-visual traits, such as birdsong. Nevertheless, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we hypothesized that male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris fed extra lutein increase their song rate as a consequence of an improved oxidative status. Although birdsong may be especially sensitive to the redox status, this has, to the best of our knowledge, never been tested. Together with the determination of circulating oxidative damage (ROMs, reactive oxygen metabolites, we quantified uric acid, albumin, total proteins, cholesterol, and testosterone, which are physiological parameters potentially sensitive to oxidation and/or related to both carotenoid functions and birdsong expression. We found that the birds fed extra lutein sang more frequently than control birds and showed an increase of albumin and cholesterol together with a decrease of oxidative damage. Moreover, we could show that song rate was associated with high levels of albumin and cholesterol and low levels of oxidative damage, independently from testosterone levels. Our study shows for the first time that song rate honestly signals the oxidative status of males and that dietary lutein is associated with the circulation of albumin and cholesterol in birds, providing a novel insight to the theoretical framework related to the honest signalling of carotenoid-based traits.

  13. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilizized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples. (orig.)

  14. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 hours. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples

  15. Stretching of red blood cells at high strain rates

    Mancuso, J. E.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in flow has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this Rapid Communication, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that both the Kelvin-Voigt and Skalak viscoelastic models capture the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 2000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  16. Effect of interval training intensity on fat oxidation, blood lactate and the rate of perceived exertion in obese men

    Alkahtani, Shaea A; King, Neil A; Hills, Andrew P; Byrne, Nuala M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of 4-week moderate- and high-intensity interval training (MIIT and HIIT) on fat oxidation and the responses of blood lactate (BLa) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Methods Ten overweight/obese men (age?=?29 ?3.7?years, BMI?=?30.7 ?3.4?kg/m2) participated in a cross-over study of 4-week MIIT and HIIT training. The MIIT training sessions consisted of 5-min cycling stages at mechanical workloads 20% above and 20% below 45%VO2...

  17. Zircaloy-4 and M5 high temperature oxidation and nitriding in air

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Dupont, T.; Schmet, B.; Enoch, F. [Universite Technologique de Troyes, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2008-10-15

    For the purpose of nuclear power plant severe accident analysis, degradation of Zircaloy-4 and M5 cladding tubes in air at high temperature was investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis, in isothermal conditions, in a 600-1200 deg. C temperature range. Alloys were investigated either in a 'as received' bare state, or after steam pre-oxidation at 500 {sup o}C to simulate in-reactor corrosion. At the beginning of air exposure, the oxidation rate obeys a parabolic law, characteristic of solid-state diffusion limited regime. Parabolic rate constants compare, for Zircaloy-4 as well as for M5, with recently assessed correlations for high temperature Zircaloy-4 steam-oxidation. A thick layer of dense protective zirconia having a columnar structure forms during this diffusion-limited regime. Then, a kinetic transition (breakaway type) occurs, due to radial cracking along the columnar grain boundaries of this protective dense oxide scale. The breakaway is observed for a scale thickness that strongly increases with temperature. At the lowest temperatures, the M5 alloy appears to be breakaway-resistant, showing a delayed transition compared to Zircaloy-4. However, for both alloys, a pre-existing corrosion scale favours the transition, which occurs much earlier. The post transition kinetic regime is linear only for the lowest temperatures investigated. From 800 deg. C, a continuously accelerated regime is observed and is associated with formation of a strongly porous non-protective oxide. A mechanism of nitrogen-assisted oxide growth, involving formation and re-oxidation of ZrN particles, as well as nitrogen associated zirconia phase transformations, is proposed to be responsible for this accelerated degradation.

  18. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    Meco, Halim [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  19. Pedalling rate affects endurance performance during high-intensity cycling

    Nielsen, Jens Steen; Hansen, Ernst Albin; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study into high-intensity cycling was to: (1) test the hypothesis that endurance time is longest at a freely chosen pedalling rate (FCPR), compared to pedalling rates 25% lower (FCPR-25) and higher (FCPR+25) than FCPR, and (2) investigate how physiological variables......, and endurance time at W90 with FCPR-25, FCPR, and FCPR+25. Power reserve was calculated as the difference between applied power output at a given pedalling rate and peak crank power at this same pedalling rate. W90 was 325 (47) W. FCPR at W90 was 78 (11) rpm, resulting in FCPR-25 being 59 (8) rpm and FCPR+25...... time was negatively related to VO(2max), W90 and % MHC I, while positively related to power reserve. In conclusion, at group level, endurance time was longer at FCPR and at a pedalling rate 25% lower compared to a pedalling rate 25% higher than FCPR. Further, inter-individual physiological variables...

  20. Achieving high mobility ZnO : Al at very high growth rates by dc filtered cathodic arc deposition

    Mendelsberg, R J; Lim, S H N; Wallig, J; Anders, A; Zhu, Y K; Milliron, D J

    2011-01-01

    Achieving a high growth rate is paramount for making large-area transparent conducting oxide coatings at a low cost. Unfortunately, the quality of thin films grown by most techniques degrades as the growth rate increases. Filtered dc cathodic arc is a lesser known technique which produces a stream of highly ionized plasma, in stark contrast to the neutral atoms produced by standard sputter sources. Ions bring a large amount of potential energy to the growing surface which is in the form of heat, not momentum. By minimizing the distance from cathode to substrate, the high ion flux gives a very high effective growth temperature near the film surface without causing damage from bombardment. The high surface temperature is a direct consequence of the high growth rate and allows for high-quality crystal growth. Using this technique, 500-1300 nm thick and highly transparent ZnO : Al films were grown on glass at rates exceeding 250 nm min -1 while maintaining resistivity below 5 x 10 -4 Ω cm with electron mobility as high as 60 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . (fast track communication)

  1. Ammonium supply rate influences archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a wetland soil vertical profile.

    Höfferle, Špela; Nicol, Graeme W; Pal, Levin; Hacin, Janez; Prosser, James I; Mandić-Mulec, Ines

    2010-11-01

    Oxidation of ammonia, the first step in nitrification, is carried out in soil by bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers and recent studies suggest possible selection for the latter in low-ammonium environments. In this study, we investigated the selection of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in wetland soil vertical profiles at two sites differing in terms of the ammonium supply rate, but not significantly in terms of the groundwater level. One site received ammonium through decomposition of organic matter, while the second, polluted site received a greater supply, through constant leakage of an underground septic tank. Soil nitrification potential was significantly greater at the polluted site. Quantification of amoA genes demonstrated greater abundance of bacterial than archaeal amoA genes throughout the soil profile at the polluted site, whereas bacterial amoA genes at the unpolluted site were below the detection limit. At both sites, archaeal, but not the bacterial community structure was clearly stratified with depth, with regard to the soil redox potential imposed by groundwater level. However, depth-related changes in the archaeal community structure may also be associated with physiological functions other than ammonia oxidation. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Decay rate of the false vacuum at high temperatures

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate, within the semiclassical approach, the high temperature behaviour of the decay rate (Γ) of the metastable vacuum in Field Theory. We exhibit some exactly soluble (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional examples and develop a formal expression for γ in the high temperature limit. (Author) [pt

  3. Authoritative School Climate and High School Dropout Rates

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R.; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high…

  4. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW.

  5. Relationships among oxidation-reduction and acid-base properties of the actinides in high oxidation states

    Morss, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The first chemical identification of plutonium, its subsequent isolation on the macroscopic scale, and more recent chemical separation schemes were achieved by taking advantage of the differences among the oxidation states of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Many acid-base properties modify the relative stabilities of oxidation states of the actinides. In the solid state, strongly basic compounds such as Cs 2 O yield complex oxides with oxidation states of Np(VII), Pu(VI), and Am(VI) whereas more acidic compounds such as CsF yield complex fluorides with lower oxidation states. In aqueous solution, high basicity and strongly covalent complexes favor high oxidation states. In nonaqueous solvent systems, high acidity generally favors low oxidation states. This paper elucidates and attempts to interpret the effects of these acid-base properties in a systematic fashion

  6. Oxidation Study of an Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Based on HfSiCN

    Sacksteder, Dagny; Waters, Deborah L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2018-01-01

    High temperature fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are important for aerospace applications because of their low density, high strength, and significantly higher-temperature capabilities compared to conventional metallic systems. The use of the SiCf/SiC and Cf/SiC CMCs allows the design of lighter-weight, more fuel efficient aircraft engines and also more advanced spacecraft airframe thermal protection systems. However, CMCs have to be protected with advanced environmental barrier coatings when they are incorporated into components for the harsh environments such as in aircraft engine or spacecraft applications. In this study, high temperature oxidation kinetics of an advanced HfSiCN coating on Cf/SiC CMC substrates were investigated at 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coating oxidation reaction parabolic rate constant and activation energy were estimated from the experimental results. The oxidation reaction studies showed that the coatings formed the most stable, predominant HfSiO4-HfO2 scales at 1400 C. A peroxidation test at 1400 C then followed by subsequent oxidation tests at various temperatures also showed more adherent scales and slower scale growth because of reduced the initial transient oxidation stage and increased HfSiO4-HfO2 content in the scales formed on the HfSiCN coatings.

  7. Authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates.

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-06-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high school dropout rates. Analyses controlled for school demographics of school enrollment size, percentage of low-income students, percentage of minority students, and urbanicity. Consistent with authoritative school climate theory, moderation analyses found that when students perceive their teachers as supportive, high academic expectations are associated with lower dropout rates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Native oxidation of ultra high purity Cu bulk and thin films

    Iijima, J.; Lim, J.-W.; Hong, S.-H.; Suzuki, S.; Mimura, K.; Isshiki, M.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of microstructure and purity on the native oxidation of Cu was studied by using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A high quality copper film prepared by ion beam deposition under a substrate bias voltage of -50 V (IBD Cu film at V s = -50 V) showed an oxidation resistance as high as an ultra high purity copper (UHP Cu) bulk, whereas a Cu film deposited without substrate bias voltage (IBD Cu film at V s = 0 V) showed lower oxidation resistance. The growth of Cu 2 O layer on the UHP Cu bulk and both types of the films obeyed in principle a logarithmic rate law. However, the growth of oxide layer on the IBD Cu films at V s = 0 and -50 V deviated upward from the logarithmic rate law after the exposure time of 320 and 800 h, respectively. The deviation from the logarithmic law is due to the formation of CuO on the Cu 2 O layer after a critical time

  9. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  10. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  11. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium–plutonium mixed oxides

    Vauchy, Romain, E-mail: romain.vauchy@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC, Marcoule, 30207, Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hodaj, Fiqiri [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000, Grenoble (France); CNRS, Grenoble INP, SIMAP, F-38000, Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-15

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium–plutonium mixed oxides U{sub 1−y}Pu{sub y}O{sub 2−x} with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H{sub 2} atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s{sup −1} and 0.005 K s{sup −1}, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U{sub 1−y}Pu{sub y}O{sub 2−x} uranium–plutonium mixed oxides.

  12. High rate dry etching of InGaZnO by BCl3/O2 plasma

    Park, Wanjae; Whang, Ki-Woong; Gwang Yoon, Young; Hwan Kim, Jeong; Rha, Sang-Ho; Seong Hwang, Cheol

    2011-08-01

    This paper reports the results of the high-rate dry etching of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) at room temperature using BCl3/O2 plasma. We achieved an etch rate of 250 nm/min. We inferred from the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis that BOx or BOClx radicals generated from BCl3/O2 plasma cause the etching of the IGZO material. O2 initiates the etching of IGZO, and Ar removes nonvolatile byproducts from the surface during the etching process. Consequently, a smooth etched surface results when these gases are added to the etch gas.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    Meublat, L.

    1989-10-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  14. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    Meublat, L.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), ClO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well idendified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  15. On the electronegativity of the high-Tc oxide superconductor

    Zhang Liyuan.

    1991-08-01

    We employ a very useful quantity, the electronegativity, to classify the superconductor. The value of the group average electronegativity to separate superconductor into two categories is 2. Each category has unique chemical bond features. The high-T c oxide superconductor belongs to the second category with group average electronegativity being larger than 2. Their unusual bond nature also gives new insight into some essential factors beneficial to enhance superconductivity. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs

  16. Raman scattering and luminescence of high-Tc superconducting oxides

    Eremenko, V.V.; Gnezdilov, V.P.; Fomin, V.I.; Fugol', I.Ya.; Samovarov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Raman and luminescence spectra of high-T c superconducting oxides are summarized, mainly YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ and partly La 2-x Ba x CuO 4-σ . In raman spectra we succeeded to distinguish electron scattering to define the energy gap Δ in the superconducting state. The luminescence spectra are due to the emission of oxygen and interaction with conduction electrons. 70 refs.; 13 figs

  17. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  18. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G. E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m2/g to 2490 m2/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  19. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering of transparent conducting oxides

    Sittinger, V.; Ruske, F.; Werner, W.; Jacobs, C.; Szyszka, B.; Christie, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) has been used in order to study the deposition of transparent conducting oxides. We summarize the studies carried out on different materials (indium tin oxide-ITO and aluminium-doped zinc oxide-AZO) using rather different technological approaches, namely sputtering of ceramic targets and reactive sputtering. For the deposition of AZO reactive HPPMS for metallic targets has been used. A feedback control loop has been implemented in order to stabilize the discharge at any given setpoint on the hysteresis curve. The hysteresis was also found to have a rather untypical form. Reactive HPPMS was found to be a promising tool for obtaining high quality films of low total thickness. In the case of ITO deposition a ceramic target has been used. The process has been characterized in terms of its plasma emission and increasing indium ionization was found for higher peak power densities. The properties of the deposited films were compared to DC sputtered films. While for DC sputtering the choice of oxygen addition and shieldings is crucial for determining surface morphology and resistivity, in HPPMS sputtering peak power density has been found to be a good parameter for influencing the crystal structure. The morphologies obtained differ strongly from those seen in DC sputtering. At high power densities films with low surface roughness and excellent resistivity could be deposited without the use of shieldings

  20. Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials

    2016-05-12

    Capt Todd D. Church APPROVED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials C~t) Kraig/[ Vandewalle Date...copyrighted material in the thesis/dissertation manuscript entitled: "Translucency arid Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials manufacturers have developed more translucent monolithic zirconium oxide

  1. High permittivity materials for oxide gate stack in Ge-based metal oxide semiconductor capacitors

    Molle, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.molle@mdm.infm.i [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM, CNR-INFM, via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milano (Italy); Baldovino, Silvia [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM, CNR-INFM, via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Spiga, Sabina [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM, CNR-INFM, via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milano (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM, CNR-INFM, via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    In the effort to ultimately shrink the size of logic devices towards a post-Si era, the integration of Ge as alternative channel material for high-speed p-MOSFET devices and the concomitant coupling with high permittivity dielectrics (high-k) as gate oxides is currently a key-challenge in microelectronics. However, the Ge option still suffers from a number of unresolved drawbacks and open issues mainly related to the thermodynamic and electrical compatibility of Ge substrates with high-k gate stack. Strictly speaking, two main concerns can be emphasized. On one side is the dilemma on which chemical/physical passivation is more suitable to minimize the unavoidable presence of electrically active defects at the oxide/semiconductor interface. On the other side, overcoming the SiO{sub 2} gate stack opens the route to a number of potentially outperforming high-k oxides. Two deposition approaches were here separately adopted to investigate the high-k oxide growth on Ge substrates, the molecular beam deposition (MBD) of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2}. In the MBD framework epitaxial and amorphous Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown onto GeO{sub 2}-passivated Ge substrates. In this case, Ge passivation was achieved by exploiting the Ge{sup 4+} bonding state in GeO{sub 2} ultra-thin interface layers intentionally deposited in between Ge and the high-k oxide by means of atomic oxygen exposure to Ge. The composition of the interface layer has been characterized as a function of the oxidation temperature and evidence of Ge dangling bonds at the GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface has been reported. Finally, the electrical response of MOS capacitors incorporating Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GeO{sub 2}-passivated Ge substrates has been checked by capacitance-voltage measurements. On the other hand, the structural and electrical properties of HfO{sub 2} films grown by ALD on Ge by using different oxygen precursors, i.e. H{sub 2}O, Hf(O{sup t}Bu){sub 2}(mmp

  2. Measurement of viscosity of slush at high shear rates

    小林, 俊一; 川村, 公之; 津川, 圭一; 和泉, 薫; Kobayashi, Shun'ichi; Kawamura, Kimiyuki; Tugawa, Keiichi; Izumi, Kaoru

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of viscosity of slush were carried out using a method of flow along an inclined smooth surface in a 0℃cold room. The method was used to get the values of viscosity under high shear rates (25 and 75s^). From our experiments two important results were obtained: 1) the viscosity of slush decreases with increasing shear rates; 2) The fluid behavior is pseudoplastic that the values of non-Newtonian index of viscosity were less than unity.

  3. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  4. Effect of pressure on the transient swelling rate of oxide fuel

    Gruber, E.E.

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of the transient swelling rate of oxide fuel, based on fission-gas bubble conditions calculated with the FRAS3 code, has been developed and implemented in the code. The need for this capability arises in the coupling of the FRAS3 fission-gas analysis code to the FPIN fuel-pin mechanics code. An efficient means of closely coupling the calculations of swelling strains and stresses between the modules is required. The present analysis provides parameters that allow the FPIN calculation to proceed through a fairly large time step, using estimated swelling rates, to calculate the stresses. These stress values can then be applied in the FRAS3 detailed calculation to refine the swelling calculation, and to provide new values for the parameters to estimate the swelling in the next time step. The swelling rates were calculated for two representative transients and used to estimate swelling over a short time period for various stress levels

  5. U.S. High School Graduation Rates: Patterns and Explanations

    Richard J. Murnane

    2013-01-01

    I survey the evidence on patterns in U.S. high school graduation rates over the period 1970–2010 and report the results of new research conducted to fill in holes in the evidence. I begin by pointing out the strengths and limitations of existing data sources. I then describe six striking patterns in graduation rates. They include stagnation over the last three decades of the twentieth century, significant race-, income-, and gender-based gaps, and significant increases in graduation rates o...

  6. THE AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE: TRENDS AND LEVELS*

    Heckman, James J.; LaFontaine, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a unified methodology to multiple data sets to estimate both the levels and trends in U.S. high school graduation rates. We establish that (a) the true rate is substantially lower than widely used measures; (b) it peaked in the early 1970s; (c) majority/minority differentials are substantial and have not converged for 35 years; (d) lower post-1970 rates are not solely due to increasing immigrant and minority populations; (e) our findings explain part of the slowdown in college attendance and rising college wage premiums; and (f) widening graduation differentials by gender help explain increasing male-female college attendance gaps. PMID:20625528

  7. THE AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE: TRENDS AND LEVELS.

    Heckman, James J; Lafontaine, Paul A

    2010-05-01

    This paper applies a unified methodology to multiple data sets to estimate both the levels and trends in U.S. high school graduation rates. We establish that (a) the true rate is substantially lower than widely used measures; (b) it peaked in the early 1970s; (c) majority/minority differentials are substantial and have not converged for 35 years; (d) lower post-1970 rates are not solely due to increasing immigrant and minority populations; (e) our findings explain part of the slowdown in college attendance and rising college wage premiums; and (f) widening graduation differentials by gender help explain increasing male-female college attendance gaps.

  8. A review of reaction rates in high temperature air

    Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The existing experimental data on the rate coefficients for the chemical reactions in nonequilibrium high temperature air are reviewed and collated, and a selected set of such values is recommended for use in hypersonic flow calculations. For the reactions of neutral species, the recommended values are chosen from the experimental data that existed mostly prior to 1970, and are slightly different from those used previously. For the reactions involving ions, the recommended rate coefficients are newly chosen from the experimental data obtained more recently. The reacting environment is assumed to lack thermal equilibrium, and the rate coefficients are expressed as a function of the controlling temperature, incorporating the recent multitemperature reaction concept.

  9. High rate tests of the LHCb RICH Upgrade system

    Blago, Michele Piero

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for the upgrade of the LHCb RICH detectors from 2020 is to readout the photon detectors at the full 40 MHz rate of the LHC proton-proton collisions. A test facility has been setup at CERN with the purpose to investigate the behaviour of the Multi Anode PMTs, which have been proposed for the upgrade, and their readout electronics at high trigger rates. The MaPMTs are illuminated with a monochromatic laser that can be triggered independently of the readout electronics. A first series of tests, including threshold scans, is performed at low trigger rates (20 kHz) for both the readout and the laser with the purpose to characterise the behaviour of the system under test. Then the trigger rate is increased in two separate steps. First the MaPMTs are exposed to high illumination by triggering the pulsed laser at a high (20 MHz) repetition rate while the DAQ is readout at the same low rate as before. In this way the performance of the MaPMTs and the attached electronics can be evaluated ...

  10. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2017-11-28

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode, a semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a liquid electrolyte, and an ion permeable membrane disposed between the anode and the cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness in the range of about 250 .mu.m-2,500 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least 5 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/2.

  11. Ectopic expression of a horseradish peroxidase enhances growth rate and increases oxidative stress resistance in hybrid aspen.

    Kawaoka, Akiyoshi; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Endo, Saori; Kondo, Shinkichi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu

    2003-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that overexpression of the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase prxC1a gene stimulated the growth rate of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S::prxC1a construct was introduced into hybrid aspen (Populus sieboldii x Populus grandidentata). The growth rate of these transformed hybrid aspen plants was substantially increased under greenhouse conditions. The average stem length of transformed plants was 25% greater than that of control plants. There was no other obvious phenotypic difference between the transformed and control plants. Fast-growing transformed hybrid aspen showed high levels of expression of prxC1a and had elevated peroxidase activities toward guaiacol and ascorbate. However, there was no increase of the endogenous class I ascorbate peroxidase activities in the transformed plants by separate assay and activity staining of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, calli derived from the transformed hybrid aspen grew faster than those from control plants and were resistant to the oxidative stress imposed by hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, enhanced peroxidase activity affects plant growth rate and oxidative stress resistance.

  12. High temperature oxidation and electrochemical investigations on nickel-base alloys

    Obigodi-Ndjeng, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined high-temperature oxidation behavior of different Ni-base alloys. In addition, electrochemical characterization of the alloy's corrosion behavior was carried out, including comparison of the properties of native passive films grown at room temperature and high temperature oxide scales. PWA 1483 (single-crystalline Ni-base superalloy) and model alloys Ni-Cr-X (where X is either Co or Al) were oxidized at 800 and 900 C in air for different time periods. The superalloy showed the best oxidation behavior at both temperatures, which might be due to the fact that the oxidation growth function is subparabolic for the model alloys and parabolic for the superalloy at 800 C. At higher temperatures, changes in the kinetics are induced, as the oxides grow faster, thus only PWA 1483 growth follows the parabolic law. Different scales in a typical sandwich form were detected, with the inner layer comprised of mostly Cr 2 O 3 , the middle layer was mixture of different oxides and spinels, depending on the alloying elements, and the oxide at the interface oxygen/oxide was found to be NiO. The influence of sample preparation could also be shown, as rougher surfaces change the oxidation kinetics from parabolic and subparabolic for polished samples to linear. The influence of moisture on the oxidation behavior of the 2 nd generation single crystal Ni-base superalloys (PWA 1484, PWA 1487, CMSX 4, Rene N5 and Rene N5+) was studied at 1000 C after 100 h oxidation period. It was found that the moisture increased the oxidation rate and mostly the transient oxides growth rate. The water vapor content in air also influenced the behavior of these alloys, as they showed a higher mass gain in air + 30% water vapor than in air + 10% water vapor. The alloys PWA 1484 and CMSX 4 showed respectively the worst and best behavior in all the studied atmospheres. The addition of reactive elements, such as Yttrium, Hafnium and Lanthanum is likely to enhance the oxidation behavior of PWA

  13. High-throughput technology for novel SO2 oxidation catalysts

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F

    2011-01-01

    We review the state of the art and explain the need for better SO 2 oxidation catalysts for the production of sulfuric acid. A high-throughput technology has been developed for the study of potential catalysts in the oxidation of SO 2 to SO 3 . High-throughput methods are reviewed and the problems encountered with their adaptation to the corrosive conditions of SO 2 oxidation are described. We show that while emissivity-corrected infrared thermography (ecIRT) can be used for primary screening, it is prone to errors because of the large variations in the emissivity of the catalyst surface. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry was selected instead as a reliable analysis method of monitoring the SO 2 conversion. Installing plain sugar absorbents at reactor outlets proved valuable for the detection and quantitative removal of SO 3 from the product gas before the UV-Vis analysis. We also overview some elements used for prescreening and those remaining after the screening of the first catalyst generations. (topical review)

  14. Segregation across the metal/oxide interface occurring during oxidation at high temperatures of diluted iron based alloys

    Geneve, D.; Rouxel, D.; Weber, B.; Confente, M.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial steels being elaborated in air at high temperature oxidize and cover with a complex oxide layer. The oxidation reaction drastically alters the surface composition. Such modifications have been investigated, in this work, by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) using an original method to characterize the composition of the metal/oxide interfaces. Analysis of the concentration gradients across the interfaces allows to better understand how the alloy elements contribute to the oxidation process. The development of new alloy phases, the interdependencies between elements and the diffusion of different species are discussed considering thermodynamic properties of each element

  15. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified.

  16. Materials for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Singhal, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells show great promise for economical production of electricity. These cells are based upon the ability of stabilized zirconia to operate as an oxygen ion conductor at elevated temperatures. The design of the tubular solid oxide fuel cell being pursued at Westinghouse is illustrated. The cell uses a calcia-stabilized zironcia porous support tube, which acts both as a structural member onto which the other cell components are fabricated in the form of thin layers, and as a functional member to allow the passage, via its porosity, of air (or oxygen) to the air electrode. This paper summarizes the materials and fabrication processes for the various cell components

  17. High pressure structural studies on nanophase praseodymium oxide

    Saranya, L. [Jamal Mohamed College, Tiruchirapalli 620020, Tamil Nadu (India); Chandra Shekar, N.V., E-mail: chandru@igcar.gov.in [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Amirthapandian, S. [Materials Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Hussain, Shamima [UGC-DAE-CSR node, Kokilamedu 603103, Tamil Nadu (India); Arulraj, A.; Sahu, P. Ch. [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-09-15

    The phase stability of nanocrystalline Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated under pressure by in-situ high pressure X-ray diffraction using Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell. The ambient structure and phase of the praseodymium oxide have been resolved unambiguously using x-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM techniques. Under the action of pressure the cubic phase of the system is retained up to 15 GPa. This is unusual as other isostructural rare earth oxides show structural transformations even at lower pressures. From the best fit to the P–V data with the Murnaghan equation of state yields a bulk modulus of 171 GPa.

  18. Effects of prior surface damage on high-temperature oxidation of Fe-, Ni-, and Co-based alloys

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Lowe, Tracie M [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Multi-component metallic alloys have been developed to withstand high-temperature service in corrosive environments. Some of these applications, like exhaust valve seats in internal combustion engines, must also resist sliding, impact, and abrasion. The conjoint effects of temperature, oxidation, and mechanical contact can result in accelerated wear and the formation of complex surface layers whose properties differ from those of the base metal and the oxide scale that forms in the absence of mechanical contact. The authors have investigated the effects of prior surface damage, produced by scratch tests, on the localized reformation of oxide layers. Three high-performance commercial alloys, based on iron, nickel, and cobalt, were used as model materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine their static oxidation rates at elevated temperature (850o C). A micro-abrasion, ball-cratering technique was used to measure oxide layer thickness and to compare it with TGA results. By using taper-sectioning techniques and energy-dispersive elemental mapping, a comparison was made between oxide compositions grown on non-damaged surfaces and oxides that formed on grooves produced by a diamond stylus. Microindentation and scratch hardness data revealed the effects of high temperature exposure on both the substrate hardness and the nature of oxide scale disruption. There were significant differences in elemental distribution between statically-formed oxides and those that formed on scratched regions

  19. Heat and mass transfer analysis for paraffin/nitrous oxide burning rate in hybrid propulsion

    Ben-Basat (Sisi), Shani; Gany, Alon

    2016-03-01

    This research presents a physical-mathematical model for the combustion of liquefying fuels in hybrid combustors, accounting for blowing effect on the heat transfer. A particular attention is given to a paraffin/nitrous oxide hybrid system. The use of a paraffin fuel in hybrid propulsion has been considered because of its much higher regression rate enabling significantly higher thrust compared to that of common polymeric fuels. The model predicts the overall regression rate (melting rate) of the fuel and the different mechanisms involved, including evaporation, entrainment of droplets of molten material, and mass loss due to melt flow on the condensed fuel surface. Prediction of the thickness and velocity of the liquid (melt) layer formed at the surface during combustion was done as well. Applying the model for an oxidizer mass flux of 45 kg/(s m2) as an example representing experimental range, it was found that 21% of the molten liquid undergoes evaporation, 30% enters the gas flow by the entrainment mechanism, and 49% reaches the end of the combustion chamber as a flowing liquid layer. When increasing the oxidizer mass flux in the port, the effect of entrainment increases while that of the flowing liquid layer along the surface shows a relatively lower contribution. Yet, the latter is predicted to have a significant contribution to the overall mass loss. In practical applications it may cause reduced combustion efficiency and should be taken into account in the motor design, e.g., by reinforcing the paraffin fuel with different additives. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results revealing good agreement.

  20. Microstructural characteristics of high-temperature oxidation in nickel-base superalloy

    Khalid, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    Superalloys are used for aerospace and nuclear applications where they can withstand high-temperature and severe oxidizing conditions. High-temperature oxidation behavior of a nickel-base superalloy is examined using optical and scanning electron microscopical techniques. The morphology of the oxide layers developed is examined, and EDX microanalysis reveals diffusion of the elements across the oxide-metal interface. Evidence of internal oxidation is presented, and the role of structural defects is considered. The morphology of the oxide-metal interface formed in the specimens exposed in steam and air is examined to elucidate the mechanism of high-temperature oxidation

  1. High-rate performance of muon drift tube detectors

    Schwegler, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are studied. The resolution and efficiency of sMDT chambers at high γ-ray and proton irradiation rates well beyond the ones expected at HL-LHC have been measured and the irradiation effects understood using detailed simulations. The sMDT chambers offer an about an order of magnitude better rate capability and are an ideal replacement for the MDT chambers because of compatibility of services and read-out. The limitations of the sMDT chambers are now in the read-out electronics, taken from the MDT chambers, to which improvements for even higher rate capability are proposed.

  2. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of Silver Nanowires: Rate-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition.

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Gao, Wei; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio

    2016-01-13

    The characterization of nanomaterials under high strain rates is critical to understand their suitability for dynamic applications such as nanoresonators and nanoswitches. It is also of great theoretical importance to explore nanomechanics with dynamic and rate effects. Here, we report in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) tensile testing of bicrystalline silver nanowires at strain rates up to 2/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in the literature. The experiments are enabled by a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) with fast response time. It was identified that the nanowire plastic deformation has a small activation volume (ductile failure mode transition was observed at a threshold strain rate of 0.2/s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that along the nanowire, dislocation density and spatial distribution of plastic regions increase with increasing strain rate. Furthermore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations show that deformation mechanisms such as grain boundary migration and dislocation interactions are responsible for such ductility. Finally, the MD and experimental results were interpreted using dislocation nucleation theory. The predicted yield stress values are in agreement with the experimental results for strain rates above 0.2/s when ductility is pronounced. At low strain rates, random imperfections on the nanowire surface trigger localized plasticity, leading to a brittle-like failure.

  3. Relationship between turnover rate and oxidation rate of alanine in the post-absorptive state and during parenteral nutrition before and after surgery

    Sauerwein, H. P.; Michels, R. P.; Cejka, V.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of total parenteral nutrition and stomach resection on alanine turnover rate and alanine oxidation rate was measured in ten patients after single injection of U-14 C-alanine. Sequential studies were done in three patients. During parenteral nutrition alanine turnover was significantly

  4. Oxidative stress at high altitude: genotype–phenotype correlations

    Pandey P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India; 2Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India Abstract: It has been well-documented that the hypobaric hypoxic environment at high altitude (HA causes stress to both the permanent residents of HA and the sojourners. This oxidative stress primarily disturbs the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways, thereby upsetting normal human physiology, especially in sojourners. These environmental challenges have caused dynamic evolutionary changes within natives of HA, allowing them to develop adaptive plasticity. This review focuses on the genomic and biochemical features of the molecules involved in the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways with respect to HA pulmonary edema (HAPE and adaptation. We review the role of genetic markers such as HIF-prolyl hydroxylase 2, endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, endothelin 1, cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide, and glutathione S-transferase pi 1, as well as three circulatory biomarkers (nitric oxide, endothelin 1, and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, by highlighting approaches such as candidate gene and genome-wide, adopted in deciphering the pathways. A disagreement between the two approaches has also been highlighted. In addition, we discuss that an overrepresentation of wild-type alleles in HA natives and mutant alleles of same polymorphisms in HAPE patients implies that the allelic variants at the same locus are involved in adaptation and HAPE, respectively. Moreover, healthy sojourners present a number of genomic features similar to HA natives, further strengthening the concept of genetic predisposition. A trend in correlation between protective and risk alleles and altered levels of circulatory markers clearly documents the phenomenon of genotype–phenotype correlations. We conclude that the genetic and biochemical

  5. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  6. Recombination rates of hydrogen and oxygen over pure and impure plutonium oxides

    Morales, L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term, safe storage of excess plutonium-bearing materials is required until stabilization and disposal methods are implemented or defined. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established a plan to address the stabilization, packing, and storage of plutonium-bearing materials from around the complex. The DOE's standard method, DOE-STD-3013-96 and its proposed revision, for stabilizing pure and impure actinide materials is by calcination in air followed by sealing the material in welded stainless steel containers. The 3013 standard contains and equation that predicts the total pressure buildup in the can over the anticipated storage time of 50 yr. This equation was meant to model a worst-case scenario to ensure that pressures would not exceed the strength of the container at the end of 50 yr. As a result, concerns about pressure generation in the storage cans, both absolute values and rates, have been raised with regard to rupture and dispersal of nuclear materials. Similar issues have been raised about the transportation of these materials around the complex. The purpose of this work is to provide a stronger technical basis for the 3013 standard by measuring the recombination rates of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures in contact with pure and impure plutonium oxides. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether the rate of recombination is faster than the rate of water radiolysis under controlled conditions. This was accomplished by using a calibrated pressure-volume-temperature apparatus to measure the recombination rates in a fixed volume as the gas mixture was brought into contact with oxide powders whose temperatures ranged from 50 to 300 C. These conditions were selected in order to bracket the temperature conditions expected in a typical storage can. In addition, a 2% H 2 /air mixture encompasses scenarios in which the cans are sealed in air, and over time various amounts of hydrogen are formed

  7. High data rate coding for the space station telemetry links.

    Lumb, D. R.; Viterbi, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Coding systems for high data rates were examined from the standpoint of potential application in space-station telemetry links. Approaches considered included convolutional codes with sequential, Viterbi, and cascaded-Viterbi decoding. It was concluded that a high-speed (40 Mbps) sequential decoding system best satisfies the requirements for the assumed growth potential and specified constraints. Trade-off studies leading to this conclusion are viewed, and some sequential (Fano) algorithm improvements are discussed, together with real-time simulation results.

  8. Predicting High Frequency Exchange Rates using Machine Learning

    Palikuca, Aleksandar; Seidl,, Timo

    2016-01-01

    This thesis applies a committee of Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines on high-dimensional, high-frequency EUR/USD exchange rate data in an effort to predict directional market movements on up to a 60 second prediction horizon. The study shows that combining multiple classifiers into a committee produces improved precision relative to the best individual committee members and outperforms previously reported results. A trading simulation implementing the committee classifier...

  9. Decay rate of the false vacuum at high tempratures

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Within the semiclassical approach, the high temperaure behaviour of the decay rate of the metastable vacuum in Field Theory is investigated. It is shown that, contrarily to what has been proposed in the literature, the pre-exponential factor exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the temperature. Furthermore, this dependence is such that at very high temperatures it is as important as the exponential factor and consequently it spoils many conclusions drawn up to now on Cosmological Phase Transitions. (Author) [pt

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition of Gallium with High Deposition Rate

    Hanfei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, electrophoretic deposition (EPD is reported to form gallium thin film with high deposition rate and low cost while avoiding the highly toxic chemicals typically used in electroplating. A maximum deposition rate of ~0.6 μm/min, almost one order of magnitude higher than the typical value reported for electroplating, is obtained when employing a set of proper deposition parameters. The thickness of the film is shown to increase with deposition time when sequential deposition is employed. The concentration of Mg(NO32, the charging salt, is also found to be a critical factor to control the deposition rate. Various gallium micropatterns are obtained by masking the substrate during the process, demonstrating process compatibility with microfabrication. The reported novel approach can potentially be employed in a broad range of applications with Ga as a raw material, including microelectronics, photovoltaic cells, and flexible liquid metal microelectrodes.

  11. READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR A HIGH-RATE CSC DETECTOR

    OCONNOR, P.; GRATCHEV, V.; KANDASAMY, A.; POLYCHRONAKOS, V.; TCHERNIATINE, V.; PARSONS, J.; SIPPACH, W.

    1999-01-01

    A readout system for a high-rate muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is described. The system, planned for use in the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, uses two custom CMOS integrated circuits to achieve good position resolution at a flux of up to 2,500 tracks/cm 2 /s

  12. Digital approach to high rate gamma-ray spectrometry

    Korolczuk, Stefan; Mianowski, Slawomir; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szewinski, Jaroslaw; Zychor, Izabella [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Basic concepts and preliminary results of creating high rate digital spectrometry system using efficient ADCs and latest FPGA are presented as well as a comparison with commercially available devices. The possibility to use such systems, coupled to scintillators, in plasma experiments is discussed. (authors)

  13. High rate of teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections ...

    There is increased in teenage pregnancy despite the presence of dual protection practice and health care awareness programmes related to health and sexuality education in South Africa. The present study explores the underlying causes of high teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases rates, including HIV ...

  14. Twinning in copper deformed at high strain rates

    Abstract. Copper samples having varying microstructures were deformed at high strain rates using a split-. Hopkinson pressure bar. Transmission electron microscopy results show deformation twins present in samples that were both annealed and strained, whereas samples that were annealed and left unstrained, as well ...

  15. High Frame Rate Synthetic Aperture 3D Vector Flow Imaging

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    , current volumetric ultrasonic flow methods are limited to one velocity component or restricted to a reduced field of view (FOV), e.g. fixed imaging planes, in exchange for higher temporal resolutions. To solve these problems, a previously proposed accurate 2-D high frame rate vector flow imaging (VFI...

  16. Sphaleron rate at high temperature in 1+1 dimensions

    Smit, Jan; Tang, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    We resolve the controversy in the high temperature behavior of the sphaleron rate in the abelian Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions. The T 2 behavior at intermediate lattice spacings is found to change into T ((2)/(3)) behavior in the continuum limit. The results are supported by analytic arguments that the classical approximation is good for this model

  17. Effects of adipose tissue distribution on maximum lipid oxidation rate during exercise in normal-weight women.

    Isacco, L; Thivel, D; Duclos, M; Aucouturier, J; Boisseau, N

    2014-06-01

    Fat mass localization affects lipid metabolism differently at rest and during exercise in overweight and normal-weight subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a low vs high ratio of abdominal to lower-body fat mass (index of adipose tissue distribution) on the exercise intensity (Lipox(max)) that elicits the maximum lipid oxidation rate in normal-weight women. Twenty-one normal-weight women (22.0 ± 0.6 years, 22.3 ± 0.1 kg.m(-2)) were separated into two groups of either a low or high abdominal to lower-body fat mass ratio [L-A/LB (n = 11) or H-A/LB (n = 10), respectively]. Lipox(max) and maximum lipid oxidation rate (MLOR) were determined during a submaximum incremental exercise test. Abdominal and lower-body fat mass were determined from DXA scans. The two groups did not differ in aerobic fitness, total fat mass, or total and localized fat-free mass. Lipox(max) and MLOR were significantly lower in H-A/LB vs L-A/LB women (43 ± 3% VO(2max) vs 54 ± 4% VO(2max), and 4.8 ± 0.6 mg min(-1)kg FFM(-1)vs 8.4 ± 0.9 mg min(-1)kg FFM(-1), respectively; P normal-weight women, a predominantly abdominal fat mass distribution compared with a predominantly peripheral fat mass distribution is associated with a lower capacity to maximize lipid oxidation during exercise, as evidenced by their lower Lipox(max) and MLOR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  19. High production rate of IBAD-MgO buffered substrate

    Yoshizumi, M., E-mail: myoshizumi@istec.or.j [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, Shinonome 1-10-13, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Fukushima, H.; Yamada, Y.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, Shinonome 1-10-13, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    The conventional IBAD (Ion Beam Assisted Deposition) process using fluorite materials yields low production rates, resulting in high production cost, which reduces the motivation for practical application in spite of its high quality. The IBAD process using rock salt materials, e.g. MgO, is well known as a strong candidate of practical application due to its potential of high production rate and high in-plane grain alignment. In this work, the IBAD-MgO process was investigated for a newly developed architecture of PLD (Pulsed Laser Deposition)-CeO{sub 2}/sputter-LMO (LaMnO{sub 3})/IBAD-MgO/sputter-GZO (Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7})/Hastelloy{sup TM} to make long buffered metal tapes with high properties and a high production rate. The 50 m-long IBAD-MgO substrates with about 4 deg. of DELTAphiCeO{sub 2} in an XRD phi scan could be fabricated repeatedly. A GdBCO (GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}) layer deposited on the buffered substrate showed the minimum I{sub c} value of 325 A/cm-w in a 41 m-long tape. Almost of the tape showed 500-600 A/cm-w of I{sub c} value. The deposition time for the IBAD-MgO layer was 60 s which was about 2 orders of magnitude shorter than the conventional IBAD process. The production rate of 24 m/h was realized at the IBAD-MgO process to fabricate the GdBCO coated conductor with high J{sub c} and I{sub c} properties.

  20. Potentiostatic activation of as-made graphene electrodes for high-rate performance in supercapacitors

    Senthilkumar, Krishnan; Jeong, Seok; Lah, Myoung Soo; Sohn, Kee-Sun; Pyo, Myoungho

    2016-10-01

    A thermally expanded graphene oxide (EGO) electrode is electrochemically activated to simultaneously introduce electrolyte-accessible mesopores and oxygen functional groups. The former is produced via O2 evolution and the latter is incorporated by the intermediate hydroxyl radicals generated during the potentiostatic oxidation of H2O in 1 M H2SO4 at 1.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). When applied as a supercapacitor, the potentiostatically treated EGO (EGO-PS) shows significant enhancement in an electric-double layer (EDL) process with a noticeable Faradaic reaction and delivers high capacitance at fast charge/discharge (C/D) rates (334 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and 230 F g-1 at 50 A g-1). In contrast to EGO-PS, EGO that is oxidized potentiodynamically (EGO-PD) shows negligible enhancement in EDL currents. EGO that is subjected to successive potential pulses also shows behaviors similar to EGO-PD, which indicates the importance of hydroxyl radical accumulation via a potentiostatic method for simultaneous functionalization and microstructural control of graphenes. The potentiostatic post-treatment presented here is a convenient post-treatment strategy that could be used to readily increase capacitance and simultaneously improve the high-rate performance of carbon-based electrodes.

  1. Physical nature of strain rate sensitivity of metals and alloys at high strain rates

    Borodin, E. N.; Gruzdkov, A. A.; Mayer, A. E.; Selyutina, N. S.

    2018-04-01

    The role of instabilities of plastic flow at plastic deformation of various materials is one of the important cross-disciplinary problems which is equally important in physics, mechanics and material science. The strain rate sensitivities under slow and high strain rate conditions of loading have different physical nature. In the case of low strain rate, the sensitivity arising from the inertness of the defect structures evolution can be expressed by a single parameter characterizing the plasticity mechanism. In our approach, this is the value of the characteristic relaxation time. In the dynamic case, there are additional effects of “high-speed sensitivity” associated with the micro-localization of the plastic flow near the stress concentrators. In the frames of mechanical description, this requires to introduce additional strain rate sensitivity parameters, which is realized in numerous modifications of Johnson–Cook and Zerilli–Armstrong models. The consideration of both these factors is fundamental for an adequate description of the problems of dynamic deformation of highly inhomogeneous metallic materials such as steels and alloys. The measurement of the dispersion of particle velocities on the free surface of a shock-loaded material can be regarded as an experimental expression of the effect of micro-localization. This is also confirmed by our results of numerical simulation of the propagation of shock waves in a two-dimensional formulation and analytical estimations.

  2. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  3. High strain-rate soft material characterization via inertial cavitation

    Estrada, Jonathan B.; Barajas, Carlos; Henann, David L.; Johnsen, Eric; Franck, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical characterization of soft materials at high strain-rates is challenging due to their high compliance, slow wave speeds, and non-linear viscoelasticity. Yet, knowledge of their material behavior is paramount across a spectrum of biological and engineering applications from minimizing tissue damage in ultrasound and laser surgeries to diagnosing and mitigating impact injuries. To address this significant experimental hurdle and the need to accurately measure the viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high strain-rates (103-108 s-1), we present a minimally invasive, local 3D microrheology technique based on inertial microcavitation. By combining high-speed time-lapse imaging with an appropriate theoretical cavitation framework, we demonstrate that this technique has the capability to accurately determine the general viscoelastic material properties of soft matter as compliant as a few kilopascals. Similar to commercial characterization algorithms, we provide the user with significant flexibility in evaluating several constitutive laws to determine the most appropriate physical model for the material under investigation. Given its straightforward implementation into most current microscopy setups, we anticipate that this technique can be easily adopted by anyone interested in characterizing soft material properties at high loading rates including hydrogels, tissues and various polymeric specimens.

  4. Miniaturized Stretchable and High-Rate Linear Supercapacitors

    Zhu, Wenjun; Zhang, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Zunfeng; Yuan, Ningyi; Ding, Jianning

    2017-07-01

    Linear stretchable supercapacitors have attracted much attention because they are well suited to applications in the rapidly expanding field of wearable electronics. However, poor conductivity of the electrode material, which limits the transfer of electrons in the axial direction of the linear supercapacitors, leads to a serious loss of capacity at high rates. To solve this problem, we use gold nanoparticles to decorate aligned multiwall carbon nanotube to fabricate stretchable linear electrodes. Furthermore, we have developed fine stretchable linear supercapacitors, which exhibited an extremely high elasticity up to 400% strain with a high capacitance of about 8.7 F g-1 at the discharge current of 1 A g-1.

  5. HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLIC WASTEWATERS

    Florencio L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment processes are rapidly becoming popular for industrial wastewater treatment. However, until recently stable process conditions could not be guaranteed for alcoholic wastewaters containing higher concentrations of methanol. Although methanol can be directly converted into methane by methanogens, under specific conditions it can also be converted into acetate and butyrate by acetogens. The accumulation of volatile fatty acids can lead to reactor instability in a weakly buffered reactor. Since this process was insufficiently understood, the application of high-rate anaerobic reactors was highly questionable. This research investigated the environmental factors that are of importance in the predominance of methylotrophic methanogens over acetogens in a natural mixed culture during anaerobic wastewater treatment in upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors. Technological and microbiological aspects were investigated. Additionally, the route by which methanol is converted into methane is also presented

  6. Novel iron oxide nanotube arrays as high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries

    Zhong, Yuan; Fan, Huiqing; Chang, Ling; Shao, Haibo; Wang, Jianming; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chu-nan

    2015-11-01

    Nanostructured iron oxides can be promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, improvement on the rate capability and/or electrochemical cycling stability of iron oxide anode materials remains a key challenge because of their poor electrical conductivities and large volume expansion during cycling. Herein, the vertically aligned arrays of one-dimensional (1D) iron oxide nanotubes with 5.8 wt% carbon have been fabricated by a novel surfactant-free self-corrosion process and subsequent thermal treatment. The as-fabricated nanotube array electrode delivers a reversible capacity of 932 mAh g-1 after 50 charge-discharge cycles at a current of 0.6 A g-1. The electrode still shows a reversible capacity of 610 mAh g-1 even at a very high rate (8.0 A g-1), demonstrating its prominent rate capability. Furthermore, the nanotube array electrode also exhibits the excellent electrochemical cycling stability with a reversible capacity of 880 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles at a current of 4 A g-1. The nanotube array electrode with superior lithium storage performance reveals the promising potential as a high-performance anode for LIBs.

  7. Amorphous carbon nanofibres inducing high specific capacitance of deposited hydrous ruthenium oxide

    Barranco, V.; Pico, F.; Ibanez, J.; Lillo-Rodenas, M.A.; Linares-Solano, A.; Kimura, M.; Oya, A.; Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M.; Rojo, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Composites consisting of ruthenium oxide particles deposited on amorphous carbon nanofibres are prepared by a repetitive impregnation procedure. The choice of amorphous carbon nanofibres as support of amorphous ruthenium oxide leads to composites in which the deposited oxide consists of aggregates of extremely small primary particles (1-1.5 nm-size) and showing high porosity (specific surface area of 450 m 2 g -1 ). This special deposition of the oxide seems to favour: (i) high oxide capacitance (1000 Fg -1 ) at high oxide loadings (up to 20 wt%) and (ii) high capacitance retention (ca. 80% from the initial oxide capacitance) at high current densities (200 mA cm -2 ). Amorphous carbon nanofibres are suitable supports for amorphous ruthenium oxide and perhaps for other amorphous oxides acting as active electrode materials.

  8. New Measurements of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) Photolysis Rates and Their Relevance to Global Oxidative Capacity

    Brewer, J.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Mellouki, A.; Fischer, E. V.; Kukui, A.; Véronique, D.; Ait-helal, W.; Leglise, J.; Ren, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is one of the most abundant ketones in the atmosphere. MEK can be emitted directly into the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources, and it is also formed during the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). MEK is lost via reaction with OH, photolysis and deposition to the surface. Similar to the other atmospheric ketones, the photolysis of MEK may represent a source of HOx (OH + HO2) radicals in the upper troposphere. The degradation of MEK also leads to the atmospheric formation of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. This work presents a new analysis of the temperature dependence of MEK photolysis cross-sections and a quantification of MEK photolysis rates under surface pressures using the CNRS HELIOS outdoor atmospheric chamber (Chambre de simulation atmosphérique à irradiation naturelle d'Orléans; http://www.era-orleans.org/ERA-TOOLS/helios-project.html). Additionally, we use the GEOS-Chem 3-D CTM (version 10-01, www.geos-chem.org) to investigate the impact of these newly measured rates and cross-sections on the global distribution and seasonality of MEK, as well as its importance to the tropospheric oxidative capacity.

  9. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  10. Nanostructured high valence silver oxide produced by pulsed laser deposition

    Dellasega, D.; Facibeni, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Russo, V.; Conti, C.; Ducati, C.; Casari, C.S.; Li Bassi, A.; Bottani, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Among silver oxides, Ag 4 O 4 , i.e. high valence Ag(I)Ag(III) oxide, is interesting for applications in high energy batteries and for the development of antimicrobial coatings. We here show that ns UV pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen containing atmosphere allows the synthesis of pure Ag 4 O 4 nanocrystalline thin films, permitting at the same time to control the morphology of the material at the sub-micrometer scale. Ag 4 O 4 films with a crystalline domain size of the order of tens of nm can be deposited provided the deposition pressure is above a threshold (roughly 4 Pa pure O 2 or 20 Pa synthetic air). The formation of this particular high valence silver oxide is explained in terms of the reactions occurring during the expansion of the ablated species in the reactive atmosphere. In particular, expansion of the PLD plasma plume is accompanied by formation of low stability Ag-O dimers and atomic oxygen, providing reactive species at the substrate where the film grows. Evidence of reactive collisions in the expanding ablation plume is obtained by analysis of the plume visible shape in inert and reactive atmospheres. In addition, we show how the dimensionless deposition parameter L, relating the target-to-substrate distance to the ablation plume maximum expansion length, can be used to classify different growth regimes. It is thus possible to vary the stoichiometry and the morphology of the films, from compact and columnar to foam-like, by controlling both the gas pressure and the target-to-substrate distance

  11. The reactive element effect of yttrium and yttrium silicon on high temperature oxidation of NiCrAl coating

    Ramandhany, S.; Sugiarti, E.; Desiati, R. D.; Martides, E.; Junianto, E.; Prawara, B.; Sukarto, A.; Tjahjono, A.

    2018-03-01

    The microstructure formed on the bond coat affects the oxidation resistance, particularly the formation of a protective oxide layer. The adhesion of bond coat and TGO increased significantly by addition of reactive element. In the present work, the effect of yttrium and yttrium silicon as reactive element (RE) on NiCrAl coating was investigated. The NiCrAl (without RE) and NiCrAlX (X:Y or YSi) bond coating were deposited on Hastelloy C-276 substrate by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) method. Isothermal oxidation was carried out at 1000 °C for 100 hours. The results showed that the addition of RE could prevent the breakaway oxidation. Therefore, the coating with reactive element were more protective against high temperature oxidation. Furthermore, the oxidation rate of NiCrAlY coating was lower than NiCrAlYSi coating with the total mass change was ±2.394 mg/cm2 after 100 hours of oxidation. The thickness of oxide scale was approximately 1.18 μm consisting of duplex oxide scale of spinel NiCr2O4 in outer scale and protective α-Al2O3 in inner scale.

  12. Spallation model for the high strain rates range

    Dekel, E.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Moshe, E.; Ludmirsky, A.; Goldberg, I. B.

    1998-11-01

    Measurements of the dynamic spall strength in aluminum and copper shocked by a high power laser to pressures of hundreds of kbars show a rapid increase in the spall strength with the strain rate at values of about 107 s-1. We suggest that this behavior is a result of a change in the spall mechanism. At low strain rates the spall is caused by the motion and coalescence of material's initial flaws. At high strain rates there is not enough time for the flaws to move and the spall is produced by the formation and coalescence of additional cavities where the interatomic forces become dominant. Material under tensile stress is in a metastable condition and cavities of a critical radius are formed in it due to thermal fluctuations. These cavities grow due to the tension. The total volume of the voids grow until the material disintegrates at the spall plane. Simplified calculations based on this model, describing the metal as a viscous liquid, give results in fairly good agreement with the experimental data and predict the increase in spall strength at high strain rates.

  13. Highly variable rates of genome rearrangements between hemiascomycetous yeast lineages.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage.

  14. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large Hadron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise measurement of trajectories of traversing muons. In order to determine the momentum of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the muon in a single tube has to be more accurate than {sigma}{<=}100 {mu}m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and the high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and {gamma}s in the muon spectrometer. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned, which will increase the background counting rates considerably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber technology to provide the required accuracy of the position measurement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the drift tube chambers are described: - In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more linear drift gas can provide precise position measurement without changing the existing hardware. - At very high background rates drift tube chambers consisting of tubes with a diameter of 15 mm are a valuable candidate to substitute the CSC muon chambers. The single tube resolution of the gas mixture Ar:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} in the ratio of 96:3:1 Vol %, which is more linear and faster as the currently used drift gas Ar:CO{sub 2} in the ratio of 97:3 Vol %, was determined at the Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility at Garching and at high {gamma}-background counting rates at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The alternative gas mixture shows similar resolution without background. At high background counting rates it shows better resolution as the standard gas. To analyse the data the various parts of the setup have to be aligned precisely to each other. The change to an alternative gas mixture allows the use of the existing hardware. The second approach are drift tubes

  15. Iodine laser of high efficiency and fast repetition rate

    Hohla, K; Witte, K J

    1976-07-01

    The scaling laws of an iodine laser of high efficiency and fast repetition rate are reported. The laser is pumped with a new kind of low pressure Hg-UV-lamps which convert 32% of the electrical input in UV-light in the absorption band of the iodine laser and which can be fired up to 100 Hz. Details of a 10 kJ/1 nsec system as dimensions, energy density, repetition rate, flow velocity, gas composition and gas pressure and the overall efficiency are given which is expected to be about 2%.

  16. Study of magnetorheological fluids at high shear rates

    Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz [University of Nevada, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Reno, NV (United States)

    2006-08-15

    The tunable rheological properties of magnetorheological (MR) materials at high shear rates are studied using a piston-driven flow-mode-type rheometer. The proposed method provides measurement of the apparent viscosity and yield stress of MR fluids for a shear rate range of 50 to 40,000 s{sup -1}. The rheological properties of a commercial MR fluid, as well as a newly developed MR polymeric gel, and a ferrofluid-based MR fluid are investigated. The results for apparent viscosity and dynamic and static shear stresses under different applied magnetic fields are reported. (orig.)

  17. Proceedings of damage and oxidation protection in high temperature composites

    Haritos, G.K.; Ochoa, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Damage and Oxidation Protection in High Temperature Composites. Topics covered include: current issues in the development of new materials and structural concepts for the aerospace structures of the future; transportation vehicles of the future; materials and structural concepts; fundamental understanding and quantitative descriptions of the physical processes and mechanisms controlling the behavior of emerging materials and structures; and the critical need for advances in our understanding of how the interaction of service loads and environment influences the lifecycle of emerging structures and materials

  18. Riboflavin enhanced fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide

    Iliut, Maria; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Leordean, Cosmin; Simon, Timea; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Astilean, Simion

    2013-10-01

    The improvement of graphene derivates' fluorescence properties is a challenging topic and very few ways were reported up to now. In this Letter we propose an easy method to enhance the fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through non-covalent binding to a molecular fluorophore, namely the riboflavin (Rb). While the fluorescence of Rb is quenched, the Rb - decorated rGO exhibits strong blue fluorescence and significantly increased fluorescence lifetime, as compared to its pristine form. The data reported here represent a promising start towards tailoring the optical properties of rGOs, having utmost importance in optical applications.

  19. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration is an economical way to treat anoxic groundwaters and involves aeration followed by particulate and soluble substrate removal via deep bed filtration. The anoxic source groundwater can contain several potential electron donors (CH4, Fe2+, Mn2+, NH4+ and assimilable organic...... of iron oxidizing bacterial in the highly oxic environments found in typical rapid sand filters. The neutrophilic FeOB were enriched by the Fe2+/O2 opposing gradient technique and quantified by MPN methodology. Diversity fingerprints of the enrichment cultures were obtained with a 16S rRNA targeted DGGE...

  20. Highly Confined Electronic and Ionic Conduction in Oxide Heterostructures

    Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    The conductance confined at the interface of complex oxide heterostructures provides new opportunities to explore nanoelectronic as well as nanoionic devices. In this talk I will present our recent results both on ionic and electronic conductivity at different heterostructures systems. In the first...... unattainable for Bi2O3-based materials, is achieved[1]. These confined heterostructures provide a playground not only for new high ionic conductivity phenomena that are sufficiently stable but also uncover a large variety of possible technological perspectives. At the second part, I will discuss and show our...

  1. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  2. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  3. Palaeohistological Evidence for Ancestral High Metabolic Rate in Archosaurs.

    Legendre, Lucas J; Guénard, Guillaume; Botha-Brink, Jennifer; Cubo, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic heat production in archosaurs has played an important role in their evolutionary radiation during the Mesozoic, and their ancestral metabolic condition has long been a matter of debate in systematics and palaeontology. The study of fossil bone histology provides crucial information on bone growth rate, which has been used to indirectly investigate the evolution of thermometabolism in archosaurs. However, no quantitative estimation of metabolic rate has ever been performed on fossils using bone histological features. Moreover, to date, no inference model has included phylogenetic information in the form of predictive variables. Here we performed statistical predictive modeling using the new method of phylogenetic eigenvector maps on a set of bone histological features for a sample of extant and extinct vertebrates, to estimate metabolic rates of fossil archosauromorphs. This modeling procedure serves as a case study for eigenvector-based predictive modeling in a phylogenetic context, as well as an investigation of the poorly known evolutionary patterns of metabolic rate in archosaurs. Our results show that Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs exhibit metabolic rates very close to those found in modern birds, that archosaurs share a higher ancestral metabolic rate than that of extant ectotherms, and that this derived high metabolic rate was acquired at a much more inclusive level of the phylogenetic tree, among non-archosaurian archosauromorphs. These results also highlight the difficulties of assigning a given heat production strategy (i.e., endothermy, ectothermy) to an estimated metabolic rate value, and confirm findings of previous studies that the definition of the endotherm/ectotherm dichotomy may be ambiguous. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Properties of indium tin oxide films deposited using High Target Utilisation Sputtering

    Calnan, S.; Upadhyaya, H.M.; Thwaites, M.J.; Tiwari, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited on soda lime glass and polyimide substrates using an innovative process known as High Target Utilisation Sputtering (HiTUS). The influence of the oxygen flow rate, substrate temperature and sputtering pressure, on the electrical, optical and thermal stability properties of the films was investigated. High substrate temperature, medium oxygen flow rate and moderate pressure gave the best compromise of low resistivity and high transmittance. The lowest resistivity was 1.6 x 10 -4 Ω cm on glass while that on the polyimide was 1.9 x 10 -4 Ω cm. Substrate temperatures above 100 deg. C were required to obtain visible light transmittance exceeding 85% for ITO films on glass. The thermal stability of the films was mainly influenced by the oxygen flow rate and thus the initial degree of oxidation. The film resistivity was either unaffected or reduced after heating in vacuum but generally increased for oxygen deficient films when heated in air. The greatest increase in transmittance of oxygen deficient films occurred for heat treatment in air while that of the highly oxidised films was largely unaffected by heating in both media. This study has demonstrated the potential of HiTUS as a favourable deposition method for high quality ITO suitable for use in thin film solar cells

  5. Performance characterization of solid oxide cells under high pressure

    Sun, Xiufu; Bonaccorso, Alfredo Damiano; Graves, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    in both fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode. In electrolysis mode at low current density, the performance improvement was counteracted by the increase in open circuit voltage, but it has to be born in mind that the pressurised gas contains higher molar free energy. Operating at high current density...... hydrocarbon fuels, which is normally performed at high pressure to achieve a high yield. Operation of SOECs at elevated pressure will therefore facilitate integration with the downstream fuel synthesis and is furthermore advantageous as it increases the cell performance. In this work, recent pressurised test...... results of a planar Ni-YSZ (YSZ: Yttria stabilized Zirconia) supported solid oxide cell are presented. The test was performed at 800 °C at pressures up to 15 bar. A comparison of the electrochemical performance of the cell at 1 and 3 bar shows a significant and equal performance gain at higher pressure...

  6. Optical measurements of atomic oxygen concentration, temperature and nitric oxide production rate in flames

    Myhr, Franklin Henry

    An optical method for measuring nitric oxide (NO) production rates in flames was developed and characterized in a series of steady, one-dimensional, atmospheric-pressure laminar flames of 0.700 Hsb2/0.199 Nsb2/0.101 COsb2 or 0.700 CHsb4/0.300 Nsb2 (by moles) with dry air, with equivalence ratios from 0.79 to 1.27. Oxygen atom concentration, (O), was measured by two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), temperature was measured by ultraviolet Rayleigh scattering, and nitrogen concentration was calculated from supplied reactant flows; together this information was used to calculate the NO production rate through the thermal (Zel'dovich) mechanism. Measurements by two other techniques were compared with results from the above method. In the first comparison, gas sampling was used to measure axial NO concentration profiles, the slopes of which were multiplied by velocity to obtain total NO production rates. In the second comparison, LIF measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH) were used with equilibrium water concentrations and a partial equilibrium assumption to find (O). Nitric oxide production rates from all three methods agreed reasonably well. Photolytic interference was observed during (O) LIF measurements in all of the flames; this is the major difficulty in applying the optical technique. Photolysis of molecular oxygen in lean flames has been well documented before, but the degree of interference observed in the rich flames suggests that some other molecule is also dissociating; the candidates are OH, CO, COsb2 and Hsb2O. An extrapolative technique for removing the effects of photolysis from (O) LIF measurements worked well in all flames where NO production was significant. Using the optical method to measure NO production rates in turbulent flames will involve a tradeoff among spatial resolution, systematic photolysis error, and random shot noise. With the conventional laser system used in this work, a single pulse with a resolution of 700 mum measured NO

  7. High Data Rate Optical Wireless Communications Based on Ultraviolet Band

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2017-10-01

    Optical wireless communication systems based on ultraviolet (UV)-band has a lot inherent advantages, such as low background solar radiation, low device dark noise. Besides, it also has small restrictive requirements for PAT (pointing, acquisition, and tracking) because of its high atmospheric scattering with molecules and aerosols. And these advantages are driving people to explore and utilize UV band for constructing and implementing a high-data-rate, less PAT communication links, such as diffuse-line-of-sight links (diffuse-LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS). The responsivity of the photodetector at UV range is far lower than that of visible range, high power UV transmitters which can be easily modulated are under investigation. These factors make it is hard to realize a high-data-rate diffuse-LOS or NLOS UV communication links. To achieve a UV link mentioned above with current devices and modulation schemes, this thesis presents some efficient modulation schemes and available devices for the time being. Besides, a demonstration of ultraviolet-B (UVB) communication link is implemented utilizing quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM). The demonstration is based on a 294-nm UVB-light-emitting-diode (UVB-LED) with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 9 nm, and according to the measured L-I-V curve, we set the bias voltage as 7V for maximum the ac amplitude and thus get a high signal-noise-ratio (SNR) channel, and the light output power is 190 μW with such bias voltage. Besides, there is a unique silica gel lens on top of the LED to concentrate the beam. A -3-dB bandwidth of 29 MHz was measured and a high-speed near-solar-blind communication link with a data rate of 71 Mbit/s was achieved using 8-QAM-OFDM at perfect alignment, and 23.6 Mbit/s using 2-QAM-OFDM when the angle subtended by the pointing direction of the UVB-LED and photodetector (PD) is 12 degrees, thus establishing a diffuse-line-of-sight (LOS) link

  8. Rapid startup and high rate nitrogen removal from anaerobic sludge digester liquor using a SNAP process.

    Qiao, Sen; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuo; Bhatti, Zafar; Furukawa, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    In this study, a single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor, packed with a novel acrylic fiber biomass carrier material (Biofix), was applied for nitrogen removal from sludge digester liquor. For rapid start-up, conventional activated sludge was added to the reactor soon after the attachment of anammox biomass on the Biofix carriers, which allowed conventional activated sludge to form a protective layer of biofilm around the anammox biomass. The Nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75% within 1 week at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.46 kg-N/m(3)/day for synthetic wastewater treatment. By the end of the synthetic wastewater treatment period, the maximum nitrogen removal rate had increased to 0.92 kg-N/m(3)/day at a nitrogen loading rate of 1.0 kg-N/m(3)/day. High nitrogen removal rate was also achieved during the actual raw digester liquor treatment with the highest nitrogen removal rate being 0.83 kg-N/m(3)/day at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.93 kg-N/m(3)/day. The thick biofilm on Biofix carriers allowed anammox bacteria to survive under high DO concentration of 5-6 mg/l resulting in stable and high nitrogen removal performance. FISH and CLSM analysis demonstrated that anammox bacteria coexisted and surrounded by ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

  9. Depleted Nanocrystal-Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection

    2015-08-28

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High...reviewed journals: Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection Report Title...PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: 1 1 Final Progress Report Project title: Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High

  10. High-Rate Performance of Muon Drift Tube Detectors

    Schwegler, Philipp

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are stud...

  11. The role of carbon in the breakaway oxidation of mild steel in high pressure carbon dioxide

    Surman, P.L.; Brown, A.M.

    1974-01-01

    The rate controlling step in the oxidation of iron and mild steel in CO 2 is the diffusion of iron across the inner of two layers of magnetite scale. Cation diffusion is directed towards available oxidant and hence tends to produce fresh oxide in freely available space. The initial oxidation process is thus protective and stress-free. As oxidation proceeds the gaseous reaction product, carbon monoxide, tends to accumulate at the oxide/metal interface. Eventually this leads to simultaneous carbon deposition and oxide formation. This carbon contamination allows oxidant access to oxide crystallite 'jacking points', and hence volume expansion and stressed breakaway corrosion can occur. Experiments designed to simulate the promotion, propagation and healing of breakaway oxidation and to define the conditions for carbon deposition are reported. (author)

  12. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  13. Mechanical characterization of rocks at high strain rate

    Konstantinov A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the dynamic characterization in tension and compression of three rocks, Carrara marble, Onsernone gneiss and Peccia Marble, at high strain-rates. Two versions of a Split Hopkinson Bar have been used. The version for direct tension tests is installed at the DynaMat Laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, while the traditional version in compression is installed at the Laboratory of Dynamic Investigation of Materials of Lobachevsky State University. Results of the tests show a significantly strain-rate sensitive behaviour, exhibiting dynamic strength increasing with strain-rate. The experimental research has been developed in the frame of the Swiss-Russian Joint Research Program.

  14. Electro-oxidation of methanol diffused through proton exchange membrane on Pt surface: crossover rate of methanol

    Jung, Inhwa; Kim, Doyeon; Yun, Yongsik; Chung, Suengyoung; Lee, Jaeyoung; Tak, Yongsug

    2004-01-01

    Methanol crossover rate through proton exchange membrane (Nafion 117) was investigated with a newly designed electrochemical stripping cell. Nanosize Pt electrode was prepared by the electroless deposition. Distinct electrocatalytic oxidation behaviors of methanol inside membrane were similar to the methanol oxidation in aqueous electrolyte, except adsorption/desorption of hydrogen. The amount of methanol diffused through membrane was calculated from the charge of methanol oxidation during repetitive cyclic voltammetry (CV) and methanol crossover rate was estimated to be 0.69 nmol/s

  15. High freight rates hinder oil markets' return to equilibrium

    Anon

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane damage to refineries in the US has created shortages of refined products there, boosting imports and sending freight rates across the Atlantic to record levels. The situation was made worse for a time by a strike at France's main oil terminals in the Mediterranean, which prevented some oil tankers from being rapidly redeployed to routes across the Atlantic. Worldscale (WS) rates for routes from the UK and Europe to the US Atlantic and Gulf Coasts rose well above WS500 for clean tonnage during October. High rates were nevertheless not simply confined to product tankers crossing the Atlantic. Rates for crude tankers to the US have also risen, and tightness has begun to appear in some other markets as well. The net result has been to slow down the movement of oil from regions of surplus to those of scarcity, depressing prices in the former and keeping them at high levels in the latter. Atlantic tanker markets look like remaining tight for the rest of the year and perhaps beyond. (author)

  16. Investigation of high-rate lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Hayes, Catherine A.; Gust, Steven; Farrington, Michael D.; Lockwood, Judith A.; Donaldson, George J.

    Chemical analysis of a commercially produced high-rate D-size lithium-thionyl cell was carried out, as a function of rate of discharge (1 ohm and 5 ohms), depth of discharge, and temperature (25 C and -40 C), using specially developed methods for identifying suspected minor cell products or impurities which may effect cell performance. These methods include a product-retrieval system which involves solvent extraction to enhance the recovery of suspected semivolatile minor chemicals, and methods of quantitative GC analysis of volatile and semivolatile products. The nonvolatile products were analyzed by wet chemical methods. The results of the analyses indicate that the predominant discharge reaction in this cell is 4Li + 2SOCl2 going to 4LiCl + S + SO2, with SO2 formation decreasing towards the end of cell life (7 to 12 Ah). The rate of discharge had no effect on the product distribution. Upon discharge of the high-rate cell at -40 C, one cell exploded, and all others exhibited overheating and rapid internal pressure rise when allowed to warm up to room temperature.

  17. Development of amplifier and shaper for high-rate MWPC

    Kamiji, Ichinori; Nanjo, Hajime; Kawasaki, Naoki; Maeda, Yosuke; Naito, Daichi; Seki, Shigeto; Nakagiri, Kota; Sasao, Noboru; Nomura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) will be used as an in-beam charged particle detector for the J-PARC E14 (KOTO) experiment. The maximum counting rate of the MWPC is expected to be up to 1 MHz per channel due to the high neutron and photon flux, expected to be 1 GHz for the 30 x 30 cm"2 area. An amplifier to cope with such high counting-rate is required. We developed a prototype of such amplifier, which has a charge preamplifier with the integration time of 3 ns and a pulse shaping part with three pole-zero cancellation networks. The shaper reduced the characteristic long tail lasting tens of microseconds in the signal of MWPC to 150 ns. Its performance has been tested by using a single-channel MWPC which has almost the same geometrical parameters as the MWPC to be installed in the KOTO experiment. (author)

  18. Characteristics of Multiplexed Grooved Nozzles for High Flow Rate Electrospray

    Kim, Kyoung Tae; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2007-01-01

    The electrospray operated in the cone-jet mode can generate highly charged micro droplets in an almost uniform size at flow rates. Therefore, the multiplexing system which can retain the characteristics of the cone-jet mode is inevitable for the electrospray application. This experiment reports the multiplexed grooved nozzle system with the extractor. The effects of the grooves and the extractor on the performance of the electrospray were evaluated through experiments. Using the grooved nozzle, the stable cone-jet mode can be achieved at the each groove in the grooved mode. Furthermore, the number of nozzles per unit area is increased by the extractor. The multiplexing density is 12 jets per cm 2 at 30 mm distance from the nozzle tip to the ground plate. The multiplexing system for the high flow rate electrospray is realized with the extractor which can diminish the space charge effect without sacrificing characteristics of the cone-jet mode

  19. Unchanged cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism after acclimatization to high altitude

    Møller, Kirsten; Paulson, Olaf B; Hornbein, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of acclimatization to high altitude on cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism at rest and during exercise. Nine healthy, native sea-level residents were studied 3 weeks after arrival at Chacaltaya, Bolivia (5,260 m) and after reacclimatization to sea level....... At high altitude at rest, arterial carbon dioxide tension, oxygen saturation, and oxygen tension were significantly reduced, and arterial oxygen content was increased because of an increase in hemoglobin concentration. Global cerebral blood flow was similar in the four conditions. Cerebral oxygen delivery...... and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose also remained unchanged, whereas cerebral metabolic rates of lactate increased slightly but nonsignificantly at high altitude during exercise compared with high altitude at rest. Reaction time was unchanged. The data indicate that cerebral blood flow...

  20. Miniaturized Stretchable and High-Rate Linear Supercapacitors

    Zhu, Wenjun; Zhang, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Zunfeng; Yuan, Ningyi; Ding, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    Linear stretchable supercapacitors have attracted much attention because they are well suited to applications in the rapidly expanding field of wearable electronics. However, poor conductivity of the electrode material, which limits the transfer of electrons in the axial direction of the linear supercapacitors, leads to a serious loss of capacity at high rates. To solve this problem, we use gold nanoparticles to decorate aligned multiwall carbon nanotube to fabricate stretchable linear electr...

  1. High repetition rate burst-mode spark gap

    Faltens, A.; Reginato, L.; Hester, R.; Chesterman, A.; Cook, E.; Yokota, T.; Dexter, W.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented on the design and testing of a pressurized gas blown spark gap switch capable of high repetition rates in a burst mode of operation. The switch parameters which have been achieved are as follows: 220-kV, 42-kA, a five pulse burst at 1-kHz, 12-ns risetime, 2-ns jitter at a pulse width of 50-ns

  2. High rate multiplicity detector for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, L.; Hayano, R.S.; Hallman, T.J.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, B.S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W.

    1995-01-01

    We have constructed and operated a detector to measure the multiplicity of secondary particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the E878 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS facility. We describe the operation and performance of the detector in a high rate Au beam environment, and interpret the multiplicity data in terms of the impact parameters of the nucleus-nucleus collisions. ((orig.))

  3. High rate multiplicity detector for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Beavis, D [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bennett, M J [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Carroll, J B [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chiba, J [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Chikanian, A [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Crawford, H J [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cronqvist, M [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dardenne, Y [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Debbe, R [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Doke, T [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Engelage, J [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Flores, I [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greiner, L [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hayano, R S [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Hallman, T J [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Heckman, H H [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kashiwagi, T [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Kikuchi, J [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Kumar, B S [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kuo, C [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lindstrom, P J [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, J W [Universities Space Research Association/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Nagamiya, S; E878 Collaboration

    1995-04-21

    We have constructed and operated a detector to measure the multiplicity of secondary particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the E878 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS facility. We describe the operation and performance of the detector in a high rate Au beam environment, and interpret the multiplicity data in terms of the impact parameters of the nucleus-nucleus collisions. ((orig.)).

  4. MDT Performance in a High Rate Background Environment

    Aleksa, Martin; Hessey, N P; Riegler, W

    1998-01-01

    A Cs137 gamma source with different lead filters in the SPS beam-line X5 has been used to simulate the ATLAS background radiation. This note shows the impact of high background rates on the MDT efficiency and resolution for three kinds of pulse shaping and compares the results with GARFIELD simulations. Furthermore it explains how the performance can be improved by time slewing corrections and double track separation.

  5. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  6. Iron oxide nanoparticle agglomeration influences dose rates and modulates oxidative stress-mediated dose–response profiles in vitro

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi; Gaffrey, Matthew; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm–1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  7. Halogen effect for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al by anodization

    Mo, Min-Hua; Wu, Lian-Kui; Cao, Hua-Zhen; Lin, Jun-Pin; Zheng, Guo-Qu

    2017-06-01

    The high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al was significantly improved via halogen effect which was achieved by anodizing in an ethylene glycol solution containing with fluorine ion. The anodized Ti-50Al with holes and micro-cracks could be self-repaired during oxidation at 1000 °C. The thickness of the oxide scale increases with the prolonging of oxidation time. On the basis of halogen effect for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al by anodization, only fluorine addition into the electrolyte can effectively improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-50Al.

  8. High rate amplifier-digitizer system for liquid argon calorimeters

    Droege, T.F.; Lobkowicz, F.; Fukushima, Y.

    1978-01-01

    A low-cost charge amplifier for a liquid argon photon detector and a new method for pulse height analysis are described. This scheme is suitable for high-energy photon detection with high counting rate. Samples of preamplifer output are taken just before and just after the arrival of the charge from the detector. The difference of these samples provides a stable pedestal and rejects low frequency noise. Short two-pulse resolving time (approximately equal to 200ns) is achieved. 6 refs

  9. Abuse resistant high rate lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    Surprenant, J.; Snuggerud, D.

    1982-08-01

    A compact, disc shaped lithium/thionyl chloride cell has been developed by Altus Corporation. The cell has a 6 Amphr capacity and is capable of high rate discharge at high voltage. Discharge data is presented over the range of 0.07 to 1.1 Amperes. The cell is operable over the temperature range of -40/sup 0/C to +70/sup 0/C, and has a 10 year shelf life at 20/sup 0/C. Safety features allow the cells to withstand fire, puncture, shock, spin, forced discharge or forced charge without dangerous reactions.

  10. Abuse resistant high rate lithium/thionyl chloride cells

    Surprenant, J.; Snuggerud, D.

    A compact, disk shaped lithium/thionyl chloride cell has been developed. The cell has a 6 Amphr capacity and is capable of high rate discharge at high voltage. Discharge data are presented over the range of 0.07 to 1.1 amperes. The cell is operable over the temperature range of -40 C to +70 C, and has a 10 year shelf life at 20 C. Safety features allow the cells to withstand fire, puncture, shock, spin, forced discharge or forced charge without dangerous reactions.

  11. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2017-11-28

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode and a semi-solid cathode. The semi-solid cathode includes a suspension of an active material of about 35% to about 75% by volume of an active material and about 0.5% to about 8% by volume of a conductive material in a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte. An ion-permeable membrane is disposed between the anode and the semi-solid cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness of about 250 .mu.m to about 2,000 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least about 7 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/4. In some embodiments, the semi-solid cathode slurry has a mixing index of at least about 0.9.

  12. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  13. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  14. Metal release behavior of surface oxidized stainless steels into flowing high temperature pure water

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Nakayama, Takenori; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Fujita, Norihiko; Ono, Shoichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of oxidation treatment of Type 304 SS on the inhibition of metal release into high temperature pure water, metal release rate of individual alloying element into flowing deionized water containing 50 ppb dissolved oxygen was measured as the function of exposure time on representative specimens oxidized in air and steam. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the structure of surface films. Among the alloying elements the amount of Fe ion, Cr ion and Fe crud in high temperature pure water tended to saturate with the exposure time and that of Ni ion and Co ion tended to increase monotonously with the exposure time for all specimens tested. And the treatment of steam-oxidation was the most effective to decrease the metal release of alloying elements and the treatment by air-oxidation also decreased the metal release. These tendencies were confirmed to correlate well with the structure of the surface films as it was in the results in the static autoclave test. (author)

  15. Graphene hydrogels deposited in nickel foams for high-rate electrochemical capacitors.

    Chen, Ji; Sheng, Kaixuan; Luo, Peihui; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2012-08-28

    Graphene hydrogel/nickel foam composite electrodes for high-rate electrochemical capacitors are produced by reduction of an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide in a nickel foam (upper half of figure). The micropores of the hydrogel are exposed to the electrolyte so that ions can enter and form electrochemical double-layers. The nickel framework shortens the distances of charge transfer. Therefore, the electrochemical capacitor exhibits highrate performance (see plots). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe 2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe 2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  17. Liquid crystallinity driven highly aligned large graphene oxide composites

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Ouk, E-mail: sangouk.kim@kaist.ac.kr [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Graphene is an emerging graphitic carbon materials, consisting of sp{sup 2} hybridized two dimensinal honeycomb structure. It has been widely studied to incorporate graphene with polymer to utilize unique property of graphene and reinforce electrical, mechanical and thermal property of polymer. In composite materials, orientation control of graphene significantly influences the property of composite. Until now, a few method has been developed for orientation control of graphene within polymer matrix. Here, we demonstrate facile fabrication of high aligned large graphene oxide (LGO) composites in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix exploiting liquid crystallinity. Liquid crystalline aqueous dispersion of LGO is parallel oriented within flat confinement geometry. Freeze-drying of the aligned LGO dispersion and subsequent infiltration with PDMS produce highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites. Owing to the large shape anisotropy of LGO, liquid crystalline alignment occurred at low concentration of 2 mg/ml in aqueous dispersion, which leads to the 0.2 wt% LGO loaded composites. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystalline LGO aqueous dispersions are spontaneous parallel aligned between geometric confinement for highly aligned LGO/polymer composite fabrication. - Highlights: • A simple fabrication method for highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites is proposed. • LGO aqueous dispersion shows nematic liquid crystalline phase at 0.8 mg/ml. • In nematic phase, LGO flakes are highly aligned by geometric confinement. • Infiltration of PDMS into freeze-dried LGO allows highly aligned LGO/PDMS composites.

  18. Mottness in high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors

    Phillips, Philip; Choy, T.-P.; Leigh, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    The standard theory of metals, Fermi liquid theory, hinges on the key assumption that although the electrons interact, the low-energy excitation spectrum stands in a one-to-one correspondence with that of a non-interacting system. In the normal state of the copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors, drastic deviations from the Fermi liquid picture are obtained, highlighted by a pseudogap, broad spectral features and T-linear resistivity. A successful theory in this context must confront the highly constraining scaling argument which establishes that all 4-Fermi interactions are irrelevant (except for pairing) at a Fermi surface. This argument lays plain that new low-energy degrees of freedom are necessary. This paper focuses on the series of experiments on copper-oxide superconductors which reveal that the number of low-energy addition states per electron per spin exceeds unity, in direct violation of the key Fermi liquid tenet. These experiments point to new degrees of freedom, not made out of the elemental excitations, as the key mechanism by which Fermi liquid theory breaks down in the cuprates. A recent theoretical advance which permits an explicit integration of the high-energy scale in the standard model for the cuprates reveals the source of the new dynamical degrees of freedom at low energies, a charge 2e bosonic field which has nothing to do with pairing but rather represents the mixing with the high-energy scales. We demonstrate explicitly that at half-filling, this new degree of freedom provides a dynamical mechanism for the generation of the charge gap and antiferromagnetism in the insulating phase. At finite doping, many of the anomalies of the normal state of the cuprates including the pseudogap, T-linear resistivity and the mid-infrared band are reproduced. A possible route to superconductivity is explored

  19. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification

    Sudhakaran, Sairam

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (kOH and kO3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O3 and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, kOH and kO3, were predicted based on target compound properties. The kO3 and kOH values ranged from 5 * 10-4 to 105 M-1s-1 and 0.04 to 18 * (109) M-1 s-1, respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O3 and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r2 (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature.

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-19

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4 · 7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  1. High Strain Rate and Shock-Induced Deformation in Metals

    Ravelo, Ramon

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale non-equilibrium molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are now commonly used to study material deformation at high strain rates (10^9-10^12 s-1). They can provide detailed information-- such as defect morphology, dislocation densities, and temperature and stress profiles, unavailable or hard to measure experimentally. Computational studies of shock-induced plasticity and melting in fcc and bcc single, mono-crystal metals, exhibit generic characteristics: high elastic limits, large directional anisotropies in the yield stress and pre-melting much below the equilibrium melt temperature for shock wave propagation along specific crystallographic directions. These generic features in the response of single crystals subjected to high strain rates of deformation can be explained from the changes in the energy landscape of the uniaxially compressed crystal lattice. For time scales relevant to dynamic shock loading, the directional-dependence of the yield strength in single crystals is shown to be due to the onset of instabilities in elastic-wave propagation velocities. The elastic-plastic transition threshold can accurately be predicted by a wave-propagation stability analysis. These strain-induced instabilities create incipient defect structures, which can be quite different from the ones, which characterize the long-time, asymptotic state of the compressed solid. With increase compression and strain rate, plastic deformation via extended defects gives way to amorphization associated with the loss in shear rigidity along specific deformation paths. The hot amorphous or (super-cooled liquid) metal re-crystallizes at rates, which depend on the temperature difference between the amorphous solid and the equilibrium melt line. This plastic-amorphous transition threshold can be computed from shear-waves stability analyses. Examples from selected fcc and bcc metals will be presented employing semi-empirical potentials of the embedded atom method (EAM) type as well as

  2. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  3. Isotopic exchange rate of cobalt ions between hydrous tin(IV) oxide and aqueous solutions

    Inoue, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Itami, Akira

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic exchange rate of cobalt ions between hydrous tin(IV) oxide ion exchanger and aqueous solutions was radiochemically measured to obtain fundamental data which are useful for elucidating the ion-exchange kinetics of the material for the transition metal elements. The rate can be understood by considering that the cobalt ions were present in the exchanger as three kinds of species: (A 1 ) Free ions which can diffuse in the exchanger particles, (A 2 ) Weakly bound ions to the exchange sites which exchange rapidly with A 1 , and (B) Covalently fixed ions to the exchange sites which exchange very slowly with A 1 . At low fraction of B, the rate is controlled by the diffusion of A 1 with the effective diffusion coefficient, D eff , the values of which depend on the concentration ratios of A 2 to A 1 . When B predominates over the A species, the concentration ratios of B to A 1 affect greatly D eff . The values of D eff and their activation energy(20 kJ/mol) were also estimated

  4. In situ oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys with high compressive strength and high strain-to-failure

    Huang, Lin; Jiang, Lin; Topping, Troy D.; Dai, Chen; Wang, Xin; Carpenter, Ryan; Haines, Christopher; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work a novel process methodology to concurrently improve the compressive strength (2078 MPa at a strain rate of 5 × 10"−"4 s"−"1) and strain-to-failure (over 40%) of bulk tungsten materials has been described. The process involves the in situ formation of intragranular tungsten oxide nanoparticles, facilitated by the application of a pressure of 1 GPa at a low sintering temperature of 1200 °C during spark plasma sintering (SPS). The results show that the application of a high pressure of 1 GPa during SPS significantly accelerates the densification process. Concurrently, the second phase oxide nanoparticles with an average grain size of 108 nm, which are distributed within the interiors of the W grains, simultaneously provide strengthening and plasticity by inhibiting grain growth, and generating, blocking, and storing dislocations. - Graphical abstract: In this work a novel process methodology to concurrently improve the compressive strength (2078 MPa at a strain rate of 5 × 10"−"4 s"−"1) and strain-to-failure (over 40%) of bulk W materials has been described. The process involves the in situ formation of intragranular tungsten oxide nanoparticles, facilitated by the application of a pressure of 1 GPa at a low sintering temperature of 1200 °C during spark plasma sintering (SPS).

  5. A new high rate positron lifetime measurement system

    Bedwell, M.O.; Paulus, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Positron lifetime measuring system, a technique to perform non-destructive studies on the internal structure of materials, has many components common to those used for nuclear time spectroscopy systems. In each case, a timing coincidence curve is measured for the energy range of interest, and this is accomplished in a typical timing coincidence system. The paper first describes the conventional timing coincidence system, then a new fast timing system is introduced. Comparing to the conventional fast/slow timing system, the fast timing technique offers reduced complexity, lower system cost, and improved high data rate capability. Experimental results show that the FWHM timing resolution ranges from 190 ps for a 1.1 : 1 dynamic range to 337 ps for a 100 : 1 dynamic range of signals with 60 Co. As for the timing resolution as a function of energy, the FWHM resolution for each channel ranges from 124 ps at 1 MeV to 400 ps at 100 keV. Since the excellent timing performance is maintained even at very high input rate, the experimenters can use much more active sources to increase the true coincidence rate and reduce data accumulation time. This method has the added advantage of minimizing long term drift effects since the experiments can be conducted in less time. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Miniaturized Stretchable and High-Rate Linear Supercapacitors.

    Zhu, Wenjun; Zhang, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Zunfeng; Yuan, Ningyi; Ding, Jianning

    2017-12-01

    Linear stretchable supercapacitors have attracted much attention because they are well suited to applications in the rapidly expanding field of wearable electronics. However, poor conductivity of the electrode material, which limits the transfer of electrons in the axial direction of the linear supercapacitors, leads to a serious loss of capacity at high rates. To solve this problem, we use gold nanoparticles to decorate aligned multiwall carbon nanotube to fabricate stretchable linear electrodes. Furthermore, we have developed fine stretchable linear supercapacitors, which exhibited an extremely high elasticity up to 400% strain with a high capacitance of about 8.7 F g -1 at the discharge current of 1 A g -1 .

  7. Biochemical basis of the high resistance to oxidative stress in ...

    Unknown

    581. Keywords. Apoptosis; D. discoideum; oxidative stress; antioxidant enzymes; lipid peroxidation ..... multiple toxic effects of oxidative stress that is related to several pathological conditions ... culture. This work was supported by a grant to RB.

  8. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Brömme, Jens O.; Geretschläger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3–23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  9. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  10. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  11. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsueh, Tzu-Wei; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yan, Yuan-Horng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO 4 ; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO 4 exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO 4 -exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO 4 -exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO 4 . Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO 4 -induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and celecoxib mitigated the Ni

  12. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi, E-mail: r92841005@ntu.edu.tw [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Tzu-Wei, E-mail: r95841015@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuen-Chau, E-mail: nekota@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anaesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jing-Shiang, E-mail: jshwang@stat.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Kai-Jen, E-mail: kjc@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yan, Yuan-Horng, E-mail: d97841006@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  13. Methodological aspects of crossover and maximum fat-oxidation rate point determination.

    Michallet, A-S; Tonini, J; Regnier, J; Guinot, M; Favre-Juvin, A; Bricout, V; Halimi, S; Wuyam, B; Flore, P

    2008-11-01

    Indirect calorimetry during exercise provides two metabolic indices of substrate oxidation balance: the crossover point (COP) and maximum fat oxidation rate (LIPOXmax). We aimed to study the effects of the analytical device, protocol type and ventilatory response on variability of these indices, and the relationship with lactate and ventilation thresholds. After maximum exercise testing, 14 relatively fit subjects (aged 32+/-10 years; nine men, five women) performed three submaximum graded tests: one was based on a theoretical maximum power (tMAP) reference; and two were based on the true maximum aerobic power (MAP). Gas exchange was measured concomitantly using a Douglas bag (D) and an ergospirometer (E). All metabolic indices were interpretable only when obtained by the D reference method and MAP protocol. Bland and Altman analysis showed overestimation of both indices with E versus D. Despite no mean differences between COP and LIPOXmax whether tMAP or MAP was used, the individual data clearly showed disagreement between the two protocols. Ventilation explained 10-16% of the metabolic index variations. COP was correlated with ventilation (r=0.96, P<0.01) and the rate of increase in blood lactate (r=0.79, P<0.01), and LIPOXmax correlated with the ventilation threshold (r=0.95, P<0.01). This study shows that, in fit healthy subjects, the analytical device, reference used to build the protocol and ventilation responses affect metabolic indices. In this population, and particularly to obtain interpretable metabolic indices, we recommend a protocol based on the true MAP or one adapted to include the transition from fat to carbohydrate. The correlation between metabolic indices and lactate/ventilation thresholds suggests that shorter, classical maximum progressive exercise testing may be an alternative means of estimating these indices in relatively fit subjects. However, this needs to be confirmed in patients who have metabolic defects.

  14. MIS High-Purity Plutonium Oxide Metal Oxidation Product TS707001 (SSR123): Final Report

    Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Max A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carillo, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-09

    A high-purity plutonium dioxide material from the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program inventory has been studied with regard to gas generation and corrosion in a storage environment. Sample TS707001 represents process plutonium oxides from several metal oxidation operations as well as impure and scrap plutonium from Hanford that are currently stored in 3013 containers. After calcination to 950°C, the material contained 86.98% plutonium with no major impurities. This study followed over time, the gas pressure of a sample with nominally 0.5 wt% water in a sealed container with an internal volume scaled to 1/500th of the volume of a 3013 container. Gas compositions were measured periodically over a six year period. The maximum observed gas pressure was 138 kPa. The increase over the initial pressure of 80 kPa was primarily due to generation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas in the first six months. Hydrogen and oxygen were minor components of the headspace gas. At the completion of the study, the internal components of the sealed container showed signs of corrosion, including pitting.

  15. High pressure oxidation of C2H4/NO mixtures

    Giménez-López, J.; Alzueta, M.U.; Rasmussen, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study of the interaction between C2H4 and NO has been performed under flow reactor conditions in the intermediate temperature range (600–900K), high pressure (60bar), and for stoichiometries ranging from reducing to oxidizing conditions. The main reaction...... pathways of the C2H4/O2/NOx conversion, the capacity of C2H4 to remove NO, and the influence of the presence of NOx on the C2H4 oxidation are analyzed. Compared to the C2H4/O2 system, the presence of NOx shifts the onset of reaction 75–150K to lower temperatures. The mechanism of sensitization involves...... the reaction HOCH2CH2OO+NO→CH2OH+CH2O+NO2, which pushes a complex system of partial equilibria towards products. This is a confirmation of the findings of Doughty et al. [3] for a similar system at atmospheric pressure. Under reducing conditions and temperatures above 700K, a significant fraction of the NOx...

  16. Morphology engineering of high performance binary oxide electrodes.

    Chen, Kunfeng; Sun, Congting; Xue, Dongfeng

    2015-01-14

    Advances in materials have preceded almost every major technological leap since the beginning of civilization. On the nanoscale and microscale, mastery over the morphology, size, and structure of a material enables control of its properties and enhancement of its usefulness for a given application, such as energy storage. In this review paper, our aim is to present a review of morphology engineering of high performance oxide electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage. We begin with the chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth to direct the growth of morphology-controllable materials. We then focus on the growth of various morphologies of binary oxides and their electrochemical performances for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors. The morphology-performance relationships are elaborated by selecting examples in which there is already reasonable understanding for this relationship. Based on these comprehensive analyses, we proposed colloidal supercapacitor systems beyond morphology control on the basis of system- and ion-level design. We conclude this article with personal perspectives on the directions toward which future research in this field might take.

  17. Considerations in Execution of High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at development and qualification of so-called ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. Numerous criteria have been developed by which proposed systems will be investigated; foremost among these will be their resistance to oxidation at high temperatures by steamdominated atmospheres. Experimental characterization of the various proposed systems is currently ongoing at numerous national laboratories as well as at industrial and university partners using a wide range of different laboratory equipment and techniques. This requires consideration of differences that may develop among test protocols due to both intrinsic (e.g. differences between experimental capabilities) and extrinsic (e.g. methodology of test execution) factors. These are essential to understand to provide confidence across institutions in the data collected if it is used to justify resources for further investigation. The focus of this document is to provide an initial discussion of factors that may play a role in governing the observed oxidation of a test sample. It will remain up to the principle investigator to judge whether a specific factor discussed is directly applicable to the system under investigation. The purpose of the specific experiment must also guide determination of whether a given factor requires careful consideration or not.

  18. Impact of doped boron concentration in emitter on high- and low-dose-rate damage in lateral PNP transistors

    Zheng Yuzhan; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Wang Yiyuan; Wang Zhikuan; Yang Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation damage under a high or low dose rate in lateral PNP transistors with a heavily or lightly doped emitter is investigated. Experimental results show that as the total dose increases, the base current of transistors would increase and the current gain decreases. Furthermore, more degradation has been found in lightly-doped PNP transistors, and an abnormal effect is observed in heavily doped transistors. The role of radiation defects, especially the double effects of oxide trapped charge, is discussed in heavily or lightly doped transistors. Finally, through comparison between the high- and low-dose-rate response of the collector current in heavily doped lateral PNP transistors, the abnormal effect can be attributed to the annealing of the oxide trapped charge. The response of the collector current, in heavily doped PNP transistors under high- and low-dose-rate irradiation is described in detail. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  19. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  20. High rate 4π β-γ coincidence counting system

    Johnson, L.O.; Gehrke, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A high count rate 4π β-γ coincidence counting system for the determination of absolute disintegration rates of short half-life radionuclides is described. With this system the dead time per pulse is minimized by not stretching any pulses beyond the width necessary to satisfy overlap coincidence requirements. The equations used to correct for the β, γ, and coincidence channel dead times and for accidental coincidences are presented but not rigorously developed. Experimental results are presented for a decaying source of 56 Mn initially at 2 x 10 6 d/s and a set of 60 Co sources of accurately known source strengths varying from 10 3 to 2 x 10 6 d/s. A check of the accidental coincidence equation for the case of two independent sources with varying source strengths is presented

  1. Miniaturized star tracker for micro spacecraft with high angular rate

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Zhifeng; Niu, Zhenhong; Liu, Jiaqi

    2017-10-01

    There is a clear need for miniaturized, lightweight, accurate and inexpensive star tracker for spacecraft with large anglar rate. To face these new constraints, the Beijing Institute of Space Long March Vehicle has designed, built and flown a low cost miniaturized star tracker that provides autonomous ("Lost in Space") inertial attitude determination, 2 Hz 3-axis star tracking, and digital imaging with embedded compression. Detector with high sensitivity is adopted to meet the dynamic and miniature requirement. A Sun and Moon avoiding method based on the calculation of Sun and Moon's vector by astronomical theory is proposed. The produced prototype weight 0.84kg, and can be used for a spacecraft with 6°/s anglar rate. The average angle measure error is less than 43 arc second. The ground verification and application of the star tracker during the pick-up flight test showed that the capability of the product meet the requirement.

  2. Development of miniature γ dose rate monitor with high sensitivity

    Shi Huilu; Tuo Xianguo; Xi Dashun; Tang Rong; Mu Keliang; Yang Jianbo

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a miniature γ dose rate monitor with high sensitivity which design based on single chip microcomputer, it can continue monitoring γ dose rate and then choose wire or wireless communications to sent the monitoring data to host according to the actual conditions. It has two kinds of power supply system, AC power supply system and battery which can be chose by concrete circumstances. The design idea and implementation technology of hardware and software and the system structure of the monitor are detailed illustrated in this paper. The experimental results show that measurable range is 0.1 mR/h-200 mR/h, the sensitivity of γ is 90 cps/mR/h, dead time below 200 us, error of stability below ±10%. (authors)

  3. Low resistance bakelite RPC study for high rate working capability

    Dai, T.; Han, L.; Hou, S.; Liu, M.; Li, Q.; Song, H.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents series efforts to lower resistance of bakelite electrode plate to improve the RPC capability under high rate working condition. New bakelite material with alkali metallic ion doping has been manufactured and tested. This bakelite is found unstable under large charge flux and need further investigation. A new structure of carbon-embedded bakelite RPC has been developed, which can reduce the effective resistance of electrode by a factor of 10. The prototype of the carbon-embedded chamber could function well under gamma radiation source at event rate higher than 10 kHz/cm 2 . The preliminary tests show that this kind of new structure performs as efficiently as traditional RPCs

  4. High and low dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma

    Orton, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    For the brachytherapy component of the r[iation treatment of cervical carcinoma, high dose rate (HDR) is slowly replacing conventional low dose rate (LDR) due primarily to r[iation safety and other physical benefits attributed to the HDR modality. Many r[iation oncologists are reluctant to make this change because of perceived r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR. However, in clinical practice HDR appears to be as effective as LDR but with a lower risk of late complications, as demonstrated by one randomized clinical trial and two comprehensive literature and practice surveys. The reason for this appears to be that the r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR are outweighed by the physical [vantages. (orig.)

  5. Biochemical basis of the high resistance to oxidative stress

    Aerobic organisms experience oxidative stress due to generation of reactive oxygen species during normal aerobic metabolism. In addition, several chemicals also generate reactive oxygen species which induce oxidative stress. Thus oxidative stress constitutes a major threat to organisms living in aerobic environments.

  6. Zirconium oxide nanotube-Nafion composite as high performance membrane for all vanadium redox flow battery

    Aziz, Md. Abdul; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2017-01-01

    A high-performance composite membrane for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) consisting of ZrO2 nanotubes (ZrNT) and perfluorosulfonic acid (Nafion) was fabricated. The VRB operated with a composite (Nafion-ZrNT) membrane showed the improved ion-selectivity (ratio of proton conductivity to permeability), low self-discharge rate, high discharge capacity and high energy efficiency in comparison with a pristine commercial Nafion-117 membrane. The incorporation of zirconium oxide nanotubes in the Nafion matrix exhibits high proton conductivity (95.2 mS cm-1) and high oxidative stability (99.9%). The Nafion-ZrNT composite membrane exhibited low vanadium ion permeability (3.2 × 10-9 cm2 min-1) and superior ion selectivity (2.95 × 107 S min cm-3). The VRB constructed with a Nafion-ZrNT composite membrane has lower self-discharge rate maintaining an open-circuit voltage of 1.3 V for 330 h relative to a pristine Nafion membrane (29 h). The discharge capacity of Nafion-ZrNT membrane (987 mAh) was 3.5-times higher than Nafion-117 membrane (280 mAh) after 100 charge-discharge cycles. These superior properties resulted in higher coulombic and voltage efficiencies with Nafion-ZrNT membranes compared to VRB with Nafion-117 membrane at a 40 mA cm-2 current density.

  7. Amorphous Zinc Oxide Integrated Wavy Channel Thin Film Transistor Based High Performance Digital Circuits

    Hanna, Amir; Hussain, Aftab M.; Omran, Hesham; Alshareef, Sarah; Salama, Khaled N.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    High performance thin film transistor (TFT) can be a great driving force for display, sensor/actuator, integrated electronics, and distributed computation for Internet of Everything applications. While semiconducting oxides like zinc oxide (Zn

  8. Handling high data rate detectors at Diamond Light Source

    Pedersen, U. K.; Rees, N.; Basham, M.; Ferner, F. J. K.

    2013-03-01

    An increasing number of area detectors, in use at Diamond Light Source, produce high rates of data. In order to capture, store and process this data High Performance Computing (HPC) systems have been implemented. This paper will present the architecture and usage for handling high rate data: detector data capture, large volume storage and parallel processing. The EPICS area Detector frame work has been adopted to abstract the detectors for common tasks including live processing, file format and storage. The chosen data format is HDF5 which provides multidimensional data storage and NeXuS compatibility. The storage system and related computing infrastructure include: a centralised Lustre based parallel file system, a dedicated network and a HPC cluster. A well defined roadmap is in place for the evolution of this to meet demand as the requirements and technology advances. For processing the science data the HPC cluster allow efficient parallel computing, on a mixture of ×86 and GPU processing units. The nature of the Lustre storage system in combination with the parallel HDF5 library allow efficient disk I/O during computation jobs. Software developments, which include utilising optimised parallel file reading for a variety of post processing techniques, are being developed in collaboration as part of the Pan-Data EU Project (www.pan-data.eu). These are particularly applicable to tomographic reconstruction and processing of non crystalline diffraction data.

  9. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Engl, Albert; Dünnweber, Wolfgang

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large H adron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise m easurement of trajec- tories of traversing muons. In order to determine the moment um of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the m uon in a single tube has to be more accurate than σ ≤ 100 m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and th e high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and γ s in the muon spectrome- ter. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade [1] to 5 10 34 cm − 2 s − 1 is planned, which will increase the background counting rates consider ably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber tech- nology to provide the required accuracy of the position meas urement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the dri ft tube chambers are described: • In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more lin ear ...

  10. Proportional chambers and multiwire drift chambers at high rates

    Walenta, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The high event and particle rates expected for ISABELLE intersecting storage rings raise the question whether PWC's and drift chambers, now widely in use in experiments, still can operate under such conditions. Various effects depend on the number of avalanches produced per length of wire N and the size of the avalanche Q, i.e., on the number of positive ions created in an avalanche. Therefore the important parameter for the following discussion is the product QN. The minimum Q is determined by the type and noise level of preamplifiers used. Examples are given for a typical low noise amplifier as well as for a typical integrated ''cheap'' amplifier. The rate/wire length N depends on the chamber arrangement, wire spacing, etc. In multiwire drift chambers, a single wire shows space-charge effects reducing the pulse height by 1% at a rate of N = 7 x 10 3 mm -1 sec -1 . At a rate of N approximately equal to 10 5 mm -1 sec -1 an efficiency loss of the order of 1% was noticed. The aging effect due to deposits on the anode wire can be reduced using low noise amplifiers and low gas gain to such an extent that a lifetime of about half a year at ISABELLE can be expected. The use of conventional cheap preamplifiers will result in a typical lifetime of about 30 days. Improvements are probable. The time resolution of Δt/sub r/ = 4 nsec fwhm seems adequate for event rates of 10 7 sec -1 . The memory time Δt/sub m/ greater than or equal to 100 nsec may cause serious problems for pattern recognition depending on layout and readout. The use of induced signals on cathode pads, thus reading out shorter parts of the wire, can solve the problem

  11. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  12. Improvement in high-voltage and high rate cycling performance of nickel-rich layered cathode materials via facile chemical vapor deposition with methane

    Hyuk Son, In; Park, Kwangjin; Hwan Park, Jong

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-rich layered-oxide materials are considered promising candidates for application as cathode material in high-energy lithium ion batteries. However, their cycling performance at high voltages and rate conditions require further improvement for the purpose of commercialization. Here, we report on the facile surface modification of nickel-rich layered oxide by chemical vapor deposition with methane which yields a conductive and protective artificial solid electrolyte interphase layer consisting of amorphous carbon, alkyl lithium carbonate, and lithium carbonate. We examine the mechanism of the protective layer formation and structural deformation of the nickel-rich layered oxide during chemical vapor deposition with methane. Via optimizing the reaction conditions, we improve the electrical conductivity as well as the interfacial stability of the nickel-rich layered oxide without inducing structural deformation. The surface-modified nickel-rich layered oxide exhibits an improved performance due to the resulting enhanced rate capability, high initial efficiency, and long cycle life at high voltage (>4.5 V).

  13. Accuracy assessment of high-rate GPS measurements for seismology

    Elosegui, P.; Davis, J. L.; Ekström, G.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of GPS measurements with a controlled laboratory system, built to simulate the ground motions caused by tectonic earthquakes and other transient geophysical signals such as glacial earthquakes, enables us to assess the technique of high-rate GPS. The root-mean-square (rms) position error of this system when undergoing realistic simulated seismic motions is 0.05~mm, with maximum position errors of 0.1~mm, thus providing "ground truth" GPS displacements. We have acquired an extensive set of high-rate GPS measurements while inducing seismic motions on a GPS antenna mounted on this system with a temporal spectrum similar to real seismic events. We found that, for a particular 15-min-long test event, the rms error of the 1-Hz GPS position estimates was 2.5~mm, with maximum position errors of 10~mm, and the error spectrum of the GPS estimates was approximately flicker noise. These results may however represent a best-case scenario since they were obtained over a short (~10~m) baseline, thereby greatly mitigating baseline-dependent errors, and when the number and distribution of satellites on the sky was good. For example, we have determined that the rms error can increase by a factor of 2--3 as the GPS constellation changes throughout the day, with an average value of 3.5~mm for eight identical, hourly-spaced, consecutive test events. The rms error also increases with increasing baseline, as one would expect, with an average rms error for a ~1400~km baseline of 9~mm. We will present an assessment of the accuracy of high-rate GPS based on these measurements, discuss the implications of this study for seismology, and describe new applications in glaciology.

  14. Australian high-dose-rate brachytherapy protocols for gynaecological malignancy

    MacLeod, C.; Dally, M.; Stevens, M.; Thornton, D.; Carruthers, S.; Jeal, P.

    2001-01-01

    There is no consensus over the optimal dose fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used for gynaecological malignancy. In Australian public hospital departments of radiation oncology, HDR brachytherapy for gynaecological cancer is being more commonly used. A survey of public departments that are using this technology, or that plan to introduce this technology, was performed. Their current protocols are presented. In general, protocols are similar biologically; however, the practical aspects such as the number of fractions given do vary and may reflect resource restrictions or, alternatively, differences in interpretations of the literature and of the best protocols by clinicians. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Fabrication of high quality ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Liu Kai; Du Kai; Chen Jing; Zhou Lan; Zhang Lin; Fang Yu

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates has been studied with oxalic acid as electrolyte. The morphology of the as-prepared templates has been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The pores distributed orderly and uniformly with the diameter ranging from 40 nm to 70 nm. The experimental results indicate that electrolyte concentration, oxidation voltage, oxidation temperature and oxidation time affect the structure of AAO templates. Ordered porous AAO templates can be derived without annealing and finishing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the aluminum oxide film is mainly composed of amorphous Al 2 O 3 . (authors)

  16. Atmospheric fate of a series of carbonyl nitrates: photolysis frequencies and OH-oxidation rate constants.

    Suarez-Bertoa, R; Picquet-Varrault, B; Tamas, W; Pangui, E; Doussin, J-F

    2012-11-20

    Multifunctional organic nitrates are potential NO(x) reservoirs whose atmospheric chemistry is somewhat little known. They could play an important role in the spatial distribution of reactive nitrogen species and consequently in ozone formation and distribution in remote areas. In this work, the rate constants for the reaction with OH radical and the photolysis frequencies of α-nitrooxyacetone, 3-nitrooxy-2-butanone, and 3-methyl-3-nitrooxy-2-butanone have been determined at room temperature at 1000 mbar total pressure of synthetic air. The rate constants for the OH oxidation were measured using the relative rate technique, with methanol as reference compound. The following rate constants were obtained for the reaction with OH: k(OH) = (6.7 ± 2.5) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for α-nitrooxyacetone, (10.6 ± 4.1) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for 3-nitrooxy-2-butanone, and (2.6 ± 0.9) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for 3-methyl-3-nitrooxy-2-butanone. The corresponding photolysis frequencies extrapolated to typical atmospheric conditions for July first at noon at 40° latitude North were (4.8 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1), (5.7 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1), and (7.4 ± 0.2) × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. The data show that photolysis is a major atmospheric sink for these organic nitrates.

  17. Densification of Highly Defective Ceria by High Temperature Controlled Re-Oxidation

    Ni, De Wei; Glasscock, Julie; Pons, Aénor

    2014-01-01

    Highly enhanced densification and grain growth of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95-δ (CGO, gadolinium-doped ceria, with 10 mol% Gd) is achieved in low oxygen activity atmospheres. However, the material can suffer mechanical failures during cooling when the re-oxidation process is not controlled due to the large...... volume changes. In this work, the redox process of CGO is investigated using dilatometry, microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis. In addition, the conditions allowing controlled re-oxidation and cooling in order to preserve the mechanical integrity of the CGO...... component are defined: this can be achieved over a wide temperature range (800−1200◦C) by gradually increasing the oxygen content of the atmosphere. It is found that the electrical conductivity of the CGO, particularly at low temperature (oxidation...

  18. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  20. Template-free synthesis of mesoporous nanoring-like Zn-Co mixed oxides with high lithium storage performance

    Lu, Lun; Gao, Yan-Li; Yang, Zhi-Zheng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Guo; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2018-04-01

    Mesoporous nanoring-like Zn-Co mixed oxides are synthesized via a simple template-free solvothermal method with a subsequent annealing process. The ring-like nanostructures with hollow interiors are formed under the complexing effects of potassium sodium tartrate. Numerous mesopores are generated after the precursor is annealed at 500 °C. When applied as anode materials, the mesoporous nanoring-like Zn-Co mixed oxides can deliver a high discharge capacity of 1102 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at 500 mA g-1. Even when the current density is increased to 2 A g-1, the mixed oxides can still retain a reversible capacity of 761 mAh g-1. Such high cycling stability and rate capability are mainly derived from the unique mesoporous ring-like nanostructures and the synergistic effects between Zn and Co based oxides.

  1. Development of ultra high speed photographic system using high repetition rate visible laser

    Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Byung Hun; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Bog; Lim, Chang Hwan; Cha, Hyung Ki; Song, Kyu Seok; Lee, Byung Deok; Rhi, Jong Hoon; Baik, Dae Hyun; Han, Jae Min; Rho, Si Pyo; Lee, Byung Cheol; Jeong, Do Yung; Choi, An Seong; Jeong, Chan Ik; Park, Dae Ung; Jeong, Sung Min; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Heon Jun; Jang, Rae gak; Jo, Do Hun; Park, Min Young

    1992-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and commercialize a high speed photographic system equipped with a high repetition rate visible laser. The developed system provides the characteristics of high time resolution and large number of frames. The system consists of 10 W air cooled CVL or a 30 W water cooled CVL, a rotating drum-type high speed camera with the framing rate of 35,000 fps, and a automatic control device. The system has the performance of 10 nsec time resolution, 35,000 fps framing rate, and 250 picture frames. The high speed photographic systems are widely applied to the fields such as high-efficient engine development, high-speed vibration analysis, shock wave propagation study, flow visualization analysis, weapon development, etc. (Author)

  2. High dose rate versus low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the floor of mouth

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Ken; Shiomi, Hiroya; Imai, Atsushi; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Tanaka, Eichii; Nose, Takayuki; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of the floor of mouth are treated with radiation because of functional and cosmetic reasons. We evaluate the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation for cancer of the floor of mouth. Methods and Materials: From January 1980 through March 1996, 41 patients with cancer of the floor of mouth were treated with LDR interstitial radiation using 198 Au grains, and from April 1992 through March 1996 16 patients with HDR interstitial radiation. There were 26 T1 tumors, 30 T2 tumors, and 1 T3 tumor. For 21 patients treated with interstitial radiation alone, a total radiation dose of interstitial therapy was 60 Gy/10 fractions/6-7 days in HDR and 85 Gy within 1 week in LDR. For 36 patients treated with a combination therapy, a total dose of 30 to 40 Gy of external radiation and a total dose of 48 Gy/8 fractions/5-6 days in HDR or 65 Gy within 1 week in LDR were delivered. Results: Two- and 5-year local control rates of patients treated with HDR interstitial radiation were 94% and 94%, and those with LDR were 75% and 69%, respectively. Local control rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was slightly higher than that with 198 Au grains (p = 0.113). For late complication, bone exposure or ulcer occurred in 6 of 16 (38%) patients treated with HDR and 13 of 41 (32%) patients treated with LDR. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to LDR brachytherapy for cancer of the floor of mouth and eliminate radiation exposure for the medical staff

  3. High temperature oxidation behaviour of nanostructured cermet coatings in a mixed CO2 - O2 environment

    Farrokhzad, M. A.; Khan, T. I.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ceramic-metallic (cermet) coatings composed of nanosized ceramic particles (α-Al2O3 and TiO2) dispersed in a nickel matrix were co-electrodeposited and then oxidized at 500°C, 600°C and 700°C in a mixed gas using a Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA) apparatus. The mixed gas was composed of 15% CO2, 10% O2 and 75% N2. This research investigates the effects of CO2 and O2 partial pressures on time-depended oxidation rates for coatings and compared them to the results from atmospheric oxidation under similar temperatures. The increase in partial pressure of oxygen due to the presence of CO2 at each tested temperature was calculated and correlated to the oxidation rate of the coatings. The results showed that the presence of CO2 in the system increased the oxidation rate of cermet coatings when compared to atmospheric oxidation at the same temperature. It was also shown that the increase in the oxidation rate is not the result of CO2 acting as the primary oxidant but as a secondary oxidant which results in an increase of the total partial pressure of oxygen and consequently higher oxidation rates. The WDS and XRD analyses results showed that the presence of nanosized TiO2 particles in a nickel matrix can improve oxidation behaviour of the coatings by formation of Ni-Ti compounds on oxidizing surface of the coating which was found beneficiary in reducing the oxidation rates for cermet coatings.

  4. Automated Production of High Rep Rate Foam Targets

    Hall, F.; Spindloe, C.; Haddock, D.; Tolley, M.; Nazarov, W.

    2016-04-01

    Manufacturing low density targets in the numbers needed for high rep rate experiments is highly challenging. This report summarises advances from manual production to semiautomated and the improvements that follow both in terms of production time and target uniformity. The production process is described and shown to be improved by the integration of an xyz robot with dispensing capabilities. Results are obtained from manual and semiautomated production runs and compared. The variance in the foam thickness is reduced significantly which should decrease experimental variation due to target parameters and could allow for whole batches to be characterised by the measurement of a few samples. The work applies to both foil backed and free standing foam targets.

  5. New Approach to reduce High School Dropout Rates

    Mauricio Cristhian Portillo-Torres

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available From 2006 to 2014, the Ministry of Public Education of Costa Rica implemented four strategic actions to reduce high school dropout rates. The main purpose of these actions was to promote student participation and student identification with their school. Studies prepared by the Ministry of Education and the Comptroller of the Republic were revised to assess the impact of these actions. The result of these actions does not show an actual decrease in the number of students who leave high school. Therefore, a more holistic view is necessary to ensure the students’ stay. This review suggests using use the concept of student engagement and applying a three tier system-wide dropout preventive actions: universal, targeted and intensive.

  6. High repetition rate driver circuit for modulation of injection lasers

    Dornan, B.R.; Goel, J.; Wolkstein, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    An injection laser modulator comprises a self-biased field effect transistor (FET) and an injection laser to provide a quiescent state during which lasing of the injection laser occurs in response to a high repetition rate signal of pulse coded modulation (pcm). The modulator is d.c. coupled to an input pulse source of pcm rendering it compatible with an input pulse referenced to ground and not being subject to voltage level shifting of the input pulse. The modulator circuit in its preferred and alternate embodiments provides various arrangements for high impedance input and low impedance output matching. In addition, means are provided for adjusting the bias of the FET as well as the bias of the injection laser

  7. High-rate lithium thionyl-chloride battery development

    Cieslak, W.R.; Weigand, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    We have developed a lithium thionyl-chloride cell for use in a high rate battery application to provide power for a missile computer and stage separation detonators. The battery pack contains 20 high surface area ``DD`` cells wired in a series-parallel configuration to supply a nominal 28 volts with a continuous draw of 20 amperes. The load profile also requires six squib firing pulses of one second duration at a 20 ampere peak. Performance and safety of the cells were optimized in a ``D`` cell configuration before progressing to the longer ``DD` cell. Active surface area in the ``D`` cell is 735 cm{sup 2}, and 1650 cm{sup 2} in the ``DD`` cell. The design includes 1.5M LiAlCl{sub 4}/SOCl{sub 2} electrolyte, a cathode blend of Shawinigan Acetylene Black and Cabot Black Pearls 2000 carbons, Scimat ETFE separator, and photoetched current collectors.

  8. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg (University of Texas-Austin)

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  9. Low power ion spectrometer for high counting rates

    Klein, J.W.; Dullenkopf, P.; Glasmachers, A.; Melbert, J.; Winkelnkemper, W.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes in detail the electronic concept for a time-of-flight (TOF) ion spectrometer for high counting rates and high dynamic range which can be used as a satellite instrument. The detection principle of the spectrometer is based on a time-of-flight and energy measurement for each incident ion. The ionmass is related to these two quantities by a simple equation. The described approach for the mass identification systems is using an analog fast-slow concept: The fast TOF-signal preselects the gainstep in the much slower energy channel. The conversion time of the mass identifier is approximately 10 -6 s and the dynamic range of the energy channel is better than 10 3 (20 keV to 25 MeV). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a TOF-spectrometer capable to measure the ion composition in planetary magnetospheres. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  11. Heat treatable indium tin oxide films deposited with high power pulse magnetron sputtering

    Horstmann, F.; Sittinger, V.; Szyszka, B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared by high power pulse magnetron sputtering [D. J. Christie, F. Tomasel, W. D. Sproul, D. C. Carter, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, 22 (2004) 1415. ] without substrate heating. The ITO films were deposited from a ceramic target at a deposition rate of approx. 5.5 nm*m/min kW. Afterwards, the ITO films were covered with a siliconoxynitride film sputtered from a silicon alloy target in order to prevent oxidation of the ITO film during annealing at 650 deg. C for 10 min in air. The optical and electrical properties as well as the texture and morphology of these films were investigated before and after annealing. Mechanical durability of the annealed films was evaluated at different test conditions. The results were compared with state-of-the art ITO films which were obtained at optimized direct current magnetron sputtering conditions

  12. Selective tuning of high-Q silicon photonic crystal nanocavities via laser-assisted local oxidation.

    Chen, Charlton J; Zheng, Jiangjun; Gu, Tingyi; McMillan, James F; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2011-06-20

    We examine the cavity resonance tuning of high-Q silicon photonic crystal heterostructures by localized laser-assisted thermal oxidation using a 532 nm continuous wave laser focused to a 2.5 μm radius spot-size. The total shift is consistent with the parabolic rate law. A tuning range of up to 8.7 nm is achieved with ∼ 30 mW laser powers. Over this tuning range, the cavity Qs decreases from 3.2×10(5) to 1.2×10(5). Numerical simulations model the temperature distributions in the silicon photonic crystal membrane and the cavity resonance shift from oxidation.

  13. High-temperature Raman spectroscopy of solid oxide fuel cell materials and processes.

    Pomfret, Michael B; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C; Walker, Robert A

    2006-09-07

    Chemical and material processes occurring in high temperature environments are difficult to quantify due to a lack of experimental methods that can probe directly the species present. In this letter, Raman spectroscopy is shown to be capable of identifying in-situ and noninvasively changes in material properties as well as the formation and disappearance of molecular species on surfaces at temperatures of 715 degrees C. The material, yttria-stabilized zirconia or YSZ, and the molecular species, Ni/NiO and nanocrystalline graphite, factor prominently in the chemistry of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Experiments demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to follow reversible oxidation/reduction kinetics of Ni/NiO as well as the rate of carbon disappearance when graphite, formed in-situ, is exposed to a weakly oxidizing atmosphere. In addition, the Raman active phonon mode of YSZ shows a temperature dependent shift that correlates closely with the expansion of the lattice parameter, thus providing a convenient internal diagnostic for identifying thermal gradients in high temperature systems. These findings provide direct insight into processes likely to occur in operational SOFCs and motivate the use of in-situ Raman spectroscopy to follow chemical processes in these high-temperature, electrochemically active environments.

  14. Graphene oxide as efficient high-concentration formaldehyde scavenger and reutilization in supercapacitor.

    Liang, Hongyu; Bu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yutian; Zhang, Junyan

    2015-04-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was investigated as a low-cost and high-efficient scavenger for high-concentration formaldehyde in alkali media. It showed very high removal capacity, 411 mg of formaldehyde per milligram of GO, and strong resistant to temperature changes. Additionally, the used GO can be easily renewed by a simple electrochemical method. By analyzing the componential and electrochemical characterizations of GO before and after use, the results showed that the degradation mechanism of formaldehyde is a collaborative process of chemical oxidation and physical adsorption, and the former dominates the degradation process. With the aid of oxygen-containing groups in GO, most formaldehyde can be easily oxidized by GO in alkaline media (this is equivalent to GO was reduced by formaldehyde). On the other hand, the used GO (reduced GO, noted as rGO) exhibits more ideal electronic double-layer capacitor (EDLC) feature than GO, along with higher rate capacitance (up to 136 F g(-1) at 50 A g(-1)). In short, GO is not only an efficient formaldehyde scavenger, but the used GO (rGO) can serve as promising electrical energy storage material. This study provides new insights for us to reutilize the discarded adsorbents generated from the environmental protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Supporting information for the estimation of plutonium oxide leak rates through very small apertures

    Schwendiman, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Information is presented from which an estimate can be made of the release of plutonium oxide from shipping containers. The leak diameter is estimated from gas leak tests of the container and an estimate is made of gas leak rate as a function of pressure over the time of interest in the accident. These calculations are limited in accuracy because of assumptions regarding leak geometry and the basic formulations of hydrodynamic flow for the assumed conditions. Sonic flow is assumed to be the limiting gas flow rate. Particles leaking from the air space above the powder will be limited by the low availability of particles due to rapid settling, the very limited driving force (pressure buildup) during the first minute, and the deposition in the leak channel. Equations are given to estimate deposition losses. Leaks of particles occurring below the level of the bulk powder will be limited by mechanical interference when leaks are of dimension smaller than particle sizes present. Some limiting cases can be calculated. When the leak dimension is large compared to the particle sizes present, maximum particle releases can be estimated, but will be very conservative

  16. Effect of ion exchange on the rate of aerobic microbial oxidation of ammonium in hyporheic zone sediments.

    Yan, Ailan; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Fen

    2018-03-01

    Microbially mediated ammonium oxidation is a major process affecting nitrogen transformation and cycling in natural environments. This study investigated whether ion exchange process can affect microbially mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonium in a hyporheic zone (HZ) sediments from the Columbia River at US Department of Energy's Hanford site, Washington State. Experiments were conducted using synthetic groundwater and river water to investigate their effect on ammonium oxidation. Results indicated that ammonium sorption through ion exchange reactions decreased the rate of ammonium oxidation, apparently resulting from the influence of the ion exchange on dissolved ammonium concentration, thus decreasing the bioavailability of ammonium for microbial oxidation. However, with the decrease in dissolved ammonium concentration, the sorbed ammonium released back to aqueous phase, and became bioavailable so that all the ammonium in the suspensions were oxidized. Our results implied a dynamic change in ammonium oxidation rates in an environment such as at HZ where river water and groundwater with different chemical compositions exchange frequently that can affect ammonium sorption and desorption through ion exchange reactions.

  17. High-rep-rate Thomson scattering for LHD

    den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Holly, D. J.; Schmitz, O.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Osakabe, M.; Morisaki, T.

    2017-10-01

    A high-rep-rate pulse-burst laser system is being built for the LHD Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. This laser will have two operating scenarios, a fast-burst sequence of 15 kHz rep rate for at least 15 ms, and a slow-burst sequence of 1 kHz for at least 50 ms. There will be substantial flexibility in burst sequences for tailoring to experimental requirements. This new laser system will operate alongside the existing lasers in the LHD TS diagnostic, and will use the same beamline. This increase in temporal resolution capability complements the high spatial resolution (144 points) of the LHD TS diagnostic, providing unique measurement capability unmatched on any other fusion experiment. The new pulse-burst laser is a straightforward application of technology developed at UW-Madison, consisting of a Nd:YAG laser head with modular flashlamp drive units and a customized control system. Variable pulse-width drive of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, producing >1.5 J q-switched pulses with 20 ns FWHM. Burst operation of this laser system will be used to capture fast time evolution of the electron temperature and density profiles during events such as ELMs, RMP perturbations, and various MHD modes. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy and the National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan).

  18. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  19. Portable radiation meters evaluation in high rates of air kerma

    Damatto, Willian B.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established, specifying their sensitivities and operating characteristics. Applied tests were: reading equipment variation with battery voltage, geotropism effect, energy dependence, the angular dependence and overload. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs). The behavior of 17 portable meters was analyzed and in this study, 10 of them have been tested. It was performed to characterize the gamma irradiating system (radiation dosimetry field) that possesses higher activity in teletectors for testing of larger measuring range. New calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. Therefore, it was made the improvement of the quality control programme of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma calibration laboratory, benefiting the users of such equipment with better consistent calibration measurements. (author)

  20. Audits in high dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    Marechal, M.H.; Rosa, L.A.; Velasco, A.; Paiva, E. de; Goncalves, M.; Castelo, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The lack of well established dosimetry protocols for HDR sources is a point of great concern regarding the uniformity of procedures within a particular country. The main objective of this paper is to report the results of an implementation of the audit program in dosimetry of high dose rate brachytherapy sources used by the radiation therapy centers in Brazil. In Brazil, among 169 radiotherapy centers, 35 have HDR brachytherapy systems. This program started in August 2001 and until now eight radiotherapy services were audited. The audit program consists of the visit in loco to each center and the evaluation of the intensity of the source with a well type chamber specially design for HDR 192 Ir sources. The measurements was carried out with a HDR1000PLUS Brachytherapy Well Type Chamber and a MAX 4000 Electrometer, both manufactured by Standard Imaging Inc. The chamber was calibrated in air kerma strength by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin in the USA. The same chamber was calibrated in Brazil using a 192 lr high dose rate source whose intensity was determined by 60 Co gamma rays and 250 kV x rays interpolation methodology. The Nk of 60 Co and 250 kV x rays were provided by the Brazilian National Standard Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI)