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Sample records for high mosquitocidal toxicity

  1. Mosquitocidal carbamates with low toxicity to agricultural pests: an advantageous property for insecticide resistance management.

    Swale, Daniel R; Carlier, Paul R; Hartsel, Joshua A; Ma, Ming; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-01

    Insecticide resistance in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae is well documented, and widespread agricultural use of pyrethroids may exacerbate development of resistance when pyrethroids are used in vector control. We have developed carbamate anticholinesterases that possess a high degree of An. gambiae:human selectivity for enzyme inhibition. The purpose of this study was to assess the spectrum of activity of these carbamates against other mosquitoes and agricultural pests. Experimental carbamates were potent inhibitors of mosquito acetylcholinesterases, with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Similar potencies were observed for Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster enzymes. Although meta-substituted carbamates were potent inhibitors, two ortho-substituted carbamates displayed poor enzyme inhibition (IC50 ≥ 10(-6)  M) in honey bee (Apis mellifera), Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and lepidopteran agricultural pests (Plutella xylostella and Ostrinia nubilalis). Enzyme inhibition results were confirmed by toxicity studies in caterpillars, where the new carbamates were 2-3-fold less toxic than propoxur and up to tenfold less active than bendiocarb, indicating little utility of these compounds for crop protection. The experimental carbamates were broadly active against mosquito species but not agricultural pests, which should mitigate selection for mosquito insecticide resistance by reducing agricultural uses of these compounds. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Coffee husk waste for fermentation production of mosquitocidal bacteria.

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Abidha, S

    2011-12-01

    Coffee husk waste (CHW) discarded as bio-organic waste, from coffee industries, is rich in carbohydrates. The current study emphasizes the management of solid waste from agro-industrial residues for the production of biopesticides (Bacillus sphaericus, and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis), to control disease transmitting mosquito vectors. An experimental culture medium was prepared by extracting the filtrates from coffee husk. A conventional culture medium (NYSM) also was prepared. The studies revealed that the quantity of mosquitocidal toxins produced from CHW is at par with NYSM. The bacteria produced in these media, were bioassayed against mosquito vectors (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti) and it was found that the toxic effect was statistically comparable. Cost-effective analysis have revealed that, production of biopesticides from CHW is highly economical. Therefore, the utilization of CHW provides dual benefits of effective utilization of environmental waste and efficient production of mosquitocidal toxins.

  3. The Cry Toxin Operon of Clostridium bifermentans subsp. malaysia Is Highly Toxic to Aedes Larval Mosquitoes

    Qureshi, Nadia; Chawla, Swati; Likitvivatanavong, Supaporn; Lee, Han Lim

    2014-01-01

    The management and control of mosquito vectors of human disease currently rely primarily on chemical insecticides. However, larvicidal treatments can be effective, and if based on biological insecticides, they can also ameliorate the risk posed to human health by chemical insecticides. The aerobic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and Lysinibacillus sphaericus have been used for vector control for a number of decades. But a more cost-effective use would be an anaerobic bacterium because of the ease with which these can be cultured. More recently, the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium bifermentans subsp. malaysia has been reported to have high mosquitocidal activity, and a number of proteins were identified as potentially mosquitocidal. However, the cloned proteins showed no mosquitocidal activity. We show here that four toxins encoded by the Cry operon, Cry16A, Cry17A, Cbm17.1, and Cbm17.2, are all required for toxicity, and these toxins collectively show remarkable selectivity for Aedes rather than Anopheles mosquitoes, even though C. bifermentans subsp. malaysia is more toxic to Anopheles. Hence, toxins that target Anopheles are different from those expressed by the Cry operon. PMID:25002432

  4. Efficient mosquitocidal toxin production by Bacillus sphaericus using cheese whey permeate under both submerged and solid state fermentations.

    El-Bendary, Magda A; Moharam, Maysa E; Foda, M S

    2008-05-01

    Whey permeate (WP) was used efficiently for production of mosquitocidal toxin by Bacillus sphaericus 2362 (B. sphaericus 2362) and the Egyptian isolate, B. sphaericus 14N1 (B. sphaericus 14N1) under both submerged and solid state fermentation conditions. Under submerged fermentation, high mosquitocidal activity was produced by B. sphaericus 2362 and B. sphaericus 14N1 at 50-100% and 25-70% WP, respectively. Initial pH of WP was a critical factor for toxin production by both tested organisms. The highest toxicity was obtained at initial pH 7. Egyptian isolate, B. sphaericus 14N1 was tested for growth and toxin production under solid state fermentation conditions (SSF) by using WP as moistening agent instead of distilled water. The optimum conditions for production of B. sphaericus 14N1 on wheat bran-WP medium were 10 g wheat bran/250 ml flask moistened with 10-70% WP at 50% moisture content, inoculum size ranged between 17.2x10(7) and 34.4x10(7) and 6 days incubation under static conditions at 30 degrees C. Preliminary pilot-scale production of B. sphaericus 14N1 under SSF conditions in trays proved that wheat bran-WP medium was efficient and economic for industrial production of mosquitocidal toxin by B. sphaericus.

  5. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal do...

  6. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner.

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2017-02-06

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae , are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC 50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti , fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD 50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality) values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti . These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl -1675 strains, with EC 50 (half maximal effective concentration) values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl , the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control.

  7. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    Shiyao Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti. These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl-1675 strains, with EC50 (half maximal effective concentration values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl, the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control.

  8. Some preliminary observations on the mosquitocidal potential of Mesostoma sp. (Turbellaria: Typhloplaniidae).

    Kaur, R

    2000-09-01

    Observations on the feeding and breeding behaviour of Mesostoma sp. from Delhi are presented. The species is comparable to the M. lingua (a species demonstrated to have high mosquitocidal potential) in predatory potential and may be playing an equally important role here.

  9. Mosquitocidal and water purification properties of Ocimum sanctum and Phyllanthus emblica

    Kadarkarai Murugan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ocimum sanctum was tested for its larvicidal and water sedimentation properties; the fruit ethanol and methanol extracts of Phyllanthus emblica were tested for phytochemical, larvicidal, oviposition-deterrent and ovicidal activities. Results emphasized that plant extracts have high toxicity against the egg and larvae of the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi and also have water sedimentation properties. LC50 of Phyllanthus emblica against Anopheles stephensi larvae ranged from 33.08 ppm to 81.26 ppm and from 23.44 to 54.19 ppm for ethanol and methanol extracts, respectively. Phyllanthus emblica also showed excellent ovipositional deterrent and ovicidal activities. The oviposition activity index value of ethanol and methanol extracts of Phyllanthus emblica at 500 ppm were -0.80 and -0.92, respectively. Ocimum sanctum includes both insecticidal secondary compounds, amino acids (glycine, lysine, vitamin C and other substances, that make treated water suitable for human consumption. Water quality parameters such as color, turbidity and pH were analyzed in the water samples (pre-treatment and post-treatment of plant extracts taken from the breeding sites of mosquitoes. Hence, the plant product can be used as both mosquitocidal and water purifier.

  10. Mosquitocidal and antibacterial activity of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles from Aloe vera extracts: towards an effective tool against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi?

    Dinesh, Devakumar; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Nicoletti, Marcello; Jiang, Wei; Benelli, Giovanni; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Suresh, Udaiyan

    2015-04-01

    Mosquitoes represent an important threat for lives of millions of people worldwide, acting as vectors for devastating pathogens, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue, and West Nile. In addition, pathogens and parasites polluting water also constitute a severe plague for populations of developing countries. Here, we investigated the mosquitocidal and antibacterial properties of Aloe vera leaf extract and silver nanoparticles synthesized using A. vera extract. Mosquitocidal properties were assessed in laboratory against larvae (I-IV instar) and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles were tested against An. stephensi also in field conditions. Antibacterial properties of nanoparticles were evaluated against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhi using the agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration protocol. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In laboratory conditions, the A. vera extract was toxic against An. stephensi larvae and pupae, even at low dosages. LC50 were 48.79 ppm (I instar), 59.09 ppm (II instar), 70.88 ppm (III instar), 83.58 ppm (IV instar), and 152.55 ppm (pupae). Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles were highly toxic against An. stephensi. LC50 were 3.825 ppm (I instar), 4.119 ppm (II instar), 4.982 ppm (III instar), 5.711 ppm (IV instar), and 6.113 ppm (pupae). In field conditions, the application of A. vera-synthesized silver nanoparticles (10 × LC50) leads to An. stephensi larval reduction of 74.5, 86.6, and 97.7%, after 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Nanoparticles also showed antibacterial properties, and the maximum concentration tested (150 mg/L) evoked an inhibition zone wider than 80 mm in all tested bacterium species. This study adds knowledge about the use of green synthesis of nanoparticles in

  11. Facile fabrication of eco-friendly nano-mosquitocides: Biophysical characterization and effectiveness on neglected tropical mosquito vectors.

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) vectors are solely responsible for transmitting important diseases such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis, lymphatic filariasis and Zika virus. Eco-friendly control tools of Culicidae vectors are a priority. In this study, we proposed a facile fabrication process of poly-disperse and stable silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using a cheap leaf extract of Ichnocarpus frutescens (Apocyanaceae). Bio-reduced Ag NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The acute toxicity of I. frutescens leaf extract and green-synthesized Ag NPs was evaluated against larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles subpictus, the dengue vector Aedes albopictus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. Compared to the leaf aqueous extract, Ag NPs showed higher toxicity against A. subpictus, A. albopictus, and C. tritaeniorhynchus with LC 50 values of 14.22, 15.84 and 17.26μg/mL, respectively. Ag NPs were found safer to non-target mosquito predators Anisops bouvieri, Diplonychus indicus and Gambusia affinis, with LC 50 values ranging from 636.61 to 2098.61μg/mL. Overall, this research firstly shed light on the mosquitocidal potential of I. frutescens, a potential bio-resource for rapid, cheap and effective synthesis of poly-disperse and highly stable silver nanocrystals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fern-synthesized nanoparticles in the fight against malaria: LC/MS analysis of Pteridium aquilinum leaf extract and biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles with high mosquitocidal and antiplasmodial activity.

    Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Roni, Mathath; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Suresh, Udaiyan; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nicoletti, Marcello; Higuchi, Akon; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh; Desneux, Nicolas; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Malaria remains a major public health problem due to the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum strains resistant to chloroquine. There is an urgent need to investigate new and effective sources of antimalarial drugs. This research proposed a novel method of fern-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using a cheap plant extract of Pteridium aquilinum, acting as a reducing and capping agent. AgNP were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Phytochemical analysis of P. aquilinum leaf extract revealed the presence of phenols, alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, proteins, carbohydrates, saponins, glycosides, steroids, and triterpenoids. LC/MS analysis identified at least 19 compounds, namely pterosin, hydroquinone, hydroxy-acetophenone, hydroxy-cinnamic acid, 5, 7-dihydroxy-4-methyl coumarin, trans-cinnamic acid, apiole, quercetin 3-glucoside, hydroxy-L-proline, hypaphorine, khellol glucoside, umbelliferose, violaxanthin, ergotamine tartrate, palmatine chloride, deacylgymnemic acid, methyl laurate, and palmitoyl acetate. In DPPH scavenging assays, the IC50 value of the P. aquilinum leaf extract was 10.04 μg/ml, while IC50 of BHT and rutin were 7.93 and 6.35 μg/ml. In mosquitocidal assays, LC50 of P. aquilinum leaf extract against Anopheles stephensi larvae and pupae were 220.44 ppm (larva I), 254.12 ppm (II), 302.32 ppm (III), 395.12 ppm (IV), and 502.20 ppm (pupa). LC50 of P. aquilinum-synthesized AgNP were 7.48 ppm (I), 10.68 ppm (II), 13.77 ppm (III), 18.45 ppm (IV), and 31.51 ppm (pupa). In the field, the application of P. aquilinum extract and AgNP (10 × LC50) led to 100 % larval reduction after 72 h. Both the P. aquilinum extract and AgNP reduced longevity and fecundity of An. stephensi adults. Smoke toxicity experiments conducted against An. stephensi adults showed that P. aquilinum leaf-, stem-, and root-based coils

  13. Extraction of mosquitocidals from Ocimum canum leaves for the control of dengue and malarial vectors

    Pari Madhiyazhagan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the potentiality of Ocimum canum (O. canum (Lamiaceae in larvicidal, pupicidal, adulticidal, and repellent activities against the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi and the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti. Methods: The mosquitocidal activity of methanol extracts from O. canum against immature and adult An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti (L. were studied. Standard WHO bioassays were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the plant extract against mosquitoes. Results: The methanol extract of O. canum was very effective against the immature stages of An. stephensi (LC50=193.280, 240.551, 303.409, 374.936 and pupa 469.547 mg/L and Ae. aegypti (LC 50=242.071, 287.277, 332.668, 394.061 and pupa 457.879 mg/L. Smoke toxicity assay showed significant mortality rate against adult An. stephensi (86.6% and Ae. aegypti (84.78%. The number of eggs laid by the females were strictly reduced after exposure to smoke. Conclusions: From the observed results we conclude that O. canum can be used as an effective larvicidal and repellent agent against the malarial and dengue vectors.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: mosquitocidal potential and anticancer activity on human breast cancer cells (MCF-7).

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Dinesh, Devakumar; Kavithaa, Krishnamoorthy; Paulpandi, Manickam; Ponraj, Thondhi; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Wei, Hui; Kumar, Suresh; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    a safe tool to build newer and safer mosquitocides and chemotherapeutic agents with little systemic toxicity.

  15. Evaluation of immature mosquitocidal properties of Xanthium strumarium Linn. plant extracts against Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae

    Kasim Roba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate immature mosquitocidal properties of Xanthium strumarium plant extracts against Culex mosquitoes at Entomology Laboratory, Maraki Campus, University of Gondar. Methods: The immature mosquitocidal activity of plant extracts was tested by following World Health Organization recommended protocol. Acetone, methanol and water extracts were prepared at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 mg/L concentrations and tested against third and fourth instar larvae and pupae of Culex mosquitoes. The mortality rate of immature mosquitoes was recorded after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure period continuously. Results: Third instar larvae after 24 h exposure period, maximum mortality of 77.80% was recorded at 250 mg/L concentration of acetone extract. After 48 h and 72 h exposure period, maximum mortality of 88.90% was recorded in acetone extract in all the tested concentration. The maximum mortality of fourth instar larvae was 88.90% in acetone extract at 200 and 250 mg/L concentrations. Pupal mortality was also greater in acetone extract. The percentage of mortality in all the stage of mosquitoes was higher in acetone extract followed by methanol and water extract. Conclusions: The percentage of mortality is associated with concentration of the extracts tested and exposure period. This laboratory study confirmed immature mosquitocidal activity of Xanthium strumarium leaf extracts against Culex mosquitoes. The aqueous leaf extract can be used by applying on small man-made breeding places to prevent adult emergence.

  16. Biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis A1 and Pseudomonas stutzeri NA3 reduce longevity and fecundity of Anopheles stephensi and show high toxicity against young instars.

    Parthipan, Punniyakotti; Sarankumar, Raja Kumaresan; Jaganathan, Anitha; Amuthavalli, Pandian; Babujanarthanam, Ranganathan; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Higuchi, Akon; Benelli, Giovanni; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2018-04-01

    Anopheles stephensi acts as vector of Plasmodium parasites, which are responsible for malaria in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide. Currently, malaria management is a big challenge due to the presence of insecticide-resistant strains as well as to the development of Plasmodium species highly resistant to major antimalarial drugs. Therefore, the present study focused on biosurfactant produced by two bacteria Bacillus subtilis A1 and Pseudomonas stutzeri NA3, evaluating them for insecticidal applications against malaria mosquitoes. The produced biosurfactants were characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which confirmed that biosurfactants had a lipopeptidic nature. Both biosurfactants were tested against larvae and pupae of A. stephensi. LC 50 values were 3.58 (larva I), 4.92 (II), 5.73 (III), 7.10 (IV), and 7.99 (pupae) and 2.61 (I), 3.68 (II), 4.48 (III), 5.55 (IV), and 6.99 (pupa) for biosurfactants produced by B. subtilis A1 and P. stutzeri NA3, respectively. Treatments with bacterial surfactants led to various physiological changes including longer pupal duration, shorter adult oviposition period, and reduced longevity and fecundity. To the best of our knowledge, there are really limited reports on the mosquitocidal and physiological effects due to biosurfactant produced by bacterial strains. Overall, the toxic activity of these biosurfactant on all young instars of A. stephensi, as well as their major impact on adult longevity and fecundity, allows their further consideration for the development of insecticides in the fight against malaria mosquitoes.

  17. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for High-throughput Toxicity Screening

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    High-throughput screening is extensively applied for identification of drug targets and drug discovery and recently it found entry into toxicity testing. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs) are used widespread for quantification of protein markers. We reasoned that RPPAs also can be utilized...... beneficially in automated high-throughput toxicity testing. An advantage of using RPPAs is that, in addition to the baseline toxicity readout, they allow testing of multiple markers of toxicity, such as inflammatory responses, which do not necessarily cumulate in cell death. We used transfection of si......RNAs with known killing effects as a model system to demonstrate that RPPA-based protein quantification can serve as substitute readout of cell viability, hereby reliably reflecting toxicity. In terms of automation, cell exposure, protein harvest, serial dilution and sample reformatting were performed using...

  18. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  19. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    Sah, Shweta; Vandenberg, Albert; Smits, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  20. The susceptibility of five African Anopheles species to Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis mosquitocidal cry genes

    Ketseoglou Irene

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, one of the leading causes of death in Africa, is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Problems associated with the development of resistance to chemical insecticides and concerns about the non-target effects and persistence of chemical insecticides have prompted the development of environmentally friendly mosquito control agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of a genetically engineered cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC 7120#11, against five African Anopheles species in laboratory bioassays. Findings There were significant differences in the susceptibility of the anopheline species to PCC 7120#11. The ranking of the larvicidal activity of PCC 7120#11 against species in the An. gambiae complex was: An. merus An. arabiensis An. gambiae An. quadriannulatus, where 50. The LC50 of PCC 7120#11 against the important malaria vectors An. gambiae and An. arabiensis was 12.3 × 105 cells/ml and 8.10 × 105 cells/ml, respectively. PCC 7120#11 was not effective against An. funestus, with less than 50% mortality obtained at concentrations as high as 3.20 × 107 cells/ml. Conclusions PCC 7120#11 exhibited good larvicidal activity against larvae of the An. gambiae complex, but relatively weak larvicidal activity against An. funestus. The study has highlighted the importance of evaluating a novel mosquitocidal agent against a range of malaria vectors so as to obtain a clear understanding of the agent’s spectrum of activity and potential as a vector control agent.

  1. Mosquitocidal toxins of spore forming bacteria: recent advancement ...

    Mosquito borne diseases form a major component of vector borne diseases from all over the world. Several control strategies have been adopted to control diseases transmitted by mosquitoes. The discovery of highly potential bacteriocides like Bacillus sphaericus (Bs) and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) have ...

  2. The reproductive and developmental toxicity of High Flash Aromatic Naphtha.

    McKee, R H; Wong, Z A; Schmitt, S; Beatty, P; Swanson, M; Schreiner, C A; Schardein, J L

    1990-01-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent--High Flash Aromatic Naphtha. A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of High Flash Aromatic Naphtha since there may be human exposure through inhalation or external body contact. The current study was conducted to assess the potential for developmental toxicity in the mouse and for reproductive toxicity in the rat. In the developmental toxicity study in CD-1 mice, exposure of dams by inhalation to near lethal levels (1500 ppm) resulted in fetal mortality, reduced weight, delayed ossification, and an increased incidence of cleft palate. At 500 ppm, a level at which maternal weight gain was slightly reduced, fetal weight gain was also reduced, but there was no other evidence of developmental effects. The lowest exposure level (100 ppm) did not cause any maternal or developmental toxicity. There was no consistent evidence of reproductive toxicity in rats, even at exposure levels which resulted in significantly reduced parental weight gain. In addition, when parental exposure was stopped on GD (gestation day) 20, birth weights as well as postnatal survival were generally similar to control values, even in the 1500 ppm exposure group. Postnatal weight gain was also similar to controls early in weaning, but, if maternal exposure was reinitiated, weight gain was reduced in the high exposure group. However, when exposure was continued until delivery, pups in the high exposure group exhibited reduced litter size, birth weight and poor survival. Thus it was likely that the reduction in fetal weight

  3. Development of an eco-friendly mosquitocidal agent from Alangium salvifolium against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and its biosafety on the aquatic predator.

    Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Edwin, Edward-Sam; Ponsankar, Athirstam; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Chellappandian, Muthiah; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    Plant extracts with their enriched chemical constituents have established potential alternative mosquito control agents. In this research, we developed an eco-friendly mosquitocidal agent from Alangium salvifolium leaves against the dengue and Zika virus vector Aedes aegypti and we investigated its biosafety on the mosquito aquatic predator Toxorhynchites splendens. Results showed that the methanolic extract of A. salvifolium leaves was composed by eight main compounds, with major peak area for hexadecenoic acid (21.74%). LC 50 and LC 90 values calculated on Ae. aegypti fourth instar larvae were 104.80 and 269.15 ppm respectively. The methanolic extract tested at 100 ppm decreased the α-β carboxylesterase and SOD ratio significantly and upregulated the GST and CYP450 level. The A. salvifolium methanolic extract displayed significant repellent and adulticidal activity at 100 and 400 ppm respectively. The treatment with 100 ppm of the methanolic extract led to 210 min of protection from Ae. aegypti bites. Four hundred parts per million of the extract showed 98% adult mortality within 30 min from the treatment. Lastly, biosafety assays on the mosquito aquatic predator Tx. splendens showed that the toxicity of the A. salvifolium extract was significantly lower if compared to the cypermethrin-based treatments. The methanolic extract of A. salvifolium showed a maximum of 47.3% mortality rate at the concentration of 1000 ppm, while 0.7 ppm of cypermethrin achieved 91.3% mortality rate on Tx. splendens. Overall, our study enhances basic knowledge on how to improve natural larvicidal agents against dengue and Zika virus mosquito vector with harmless responses on non-target aquatic predators.

  4. Characterization and mosquitocidal potential of neem cake-synthesized silver nanoparticles: genotoxicity and impact on predation efficiency of mosquito natural enemies.

    Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Chandirasekar, Ramachandran; Dinesh, Devakumar; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Suresh, Udaiyan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Syuhei, Ban; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Wei, Hui; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) serve as important vectors for a wide number of parasites and pathogens of huge medical and veterinary importance. Aedes aegypti is a primary dengue vector in tropical and subtropical urban areas. There is an urgent need to develop eco-friendly mosquitocides. In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were biosynthesized using neem cake, a by-product of the neem oil extraction from the seed kernels of Azadirachta indica. AgNP were characterized using a variety of biophysical methods, including UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, SEM, EDX, and XRD analyses. Furthermore, the neem cake extract and the biosynthesized AgNP were tested for acute toxicity against larvae and pupae of the dengue vector Ae. aegypti. LC50 values achieved by the neem cake extract ranged from 106.53 (larva I) to 235.36 ppm (pupa), while AgNP LC50 ranged from 3.969 (larva I) to 8.308 ppm (pupa). In standard laboratory conditions, the predation efficiency of a Carassius auratus per day was 7.9 (larva II) and 5.5 individuals (larva III). Post-treatment with sub-lethal doses of AgNP, the predation efficiency was boosted to 9.2 (larva II) and 8.1 individuals (larva III). The genotoxic effect of AgNP was studied on C. auratus using the comet assay and micronucleus frequency test. DNA damage was evaluated on peripheral erythrocytes sampled at different time intervals from the treatment; experiments showed no significant damages at doses below 12 ppm. Overall, this research pointed out that neem cake-fabricated AgNP are easy to produce, stable over time, and can be employed at low dosages to reduce populations of dengue vectors, with moderate detrimental effects on non-target mosquito natural enemies.

  5. Mosquitocidal activity of a naturally occurring isochroman and synthetic analogs from the plant pathogenic fungus, Diaporthe eres against Aedes aegypti ( Diptera: Culicidae)

    The culture filtrate of a plant pathogenic fungus that infects English ivy (Hegera helix) was investigated for mosquitocidal constituents by bioassay guided isolation. The fungus responsible for pathogenic effects on the plant Hegera helix has been identified as Diaporthe eres by molecular technique...

  6. Runaway chemical reaction exposes community to highly toxic chemicals

    Kaszniak, Mark; Vorderbrueggen, John

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) conducted a comprehensive investigation of a runaway chemical reaction at MFG Chemical (MFG) in Dalton, Georgia on April 12, 2004 that resulted in the uncontrolled release of a large quantity of highly toxic and flammable allyl alcohol and allyl chloride into the community. Five people were hospitalized and 154 people required decontamination and treatment for exposure to the chemicals. This included police officers attempting to evacuate the community and ambulance personnel who responded to 911 calls from residents exposed to the chemicals. This paper presents the findings of the CSB report (U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB), Investigation Report: Toxic Chemical Vapor Cloud Release, Report No. 2004-09-I-GA, Washington DC, April 2006) including a discussion on tolling practices; scale-up of batch reaction processes; Process Safety Management (PSM) and Risk Management Plan (RMP) implementation; emergency planning by the company, county and the city; and emergency response and mitigation actions taken during the incident. The reactive chemical testing and atmospheric dispersion modeling conducted by CSB after the incident and recommendations adopted by the Board are also discussed

  7. Dosimetric Factors and Toxicity in Highly Conformal Thoracic Reirradiation

    Binkley, Michael S.; Hiniker, Susan M.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shultz, David Benjamin, E-mail: David.Shultz@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    } range: 207.5-302.2 Gy), brachial plexopathy (n=1; D0.2 cm{sup 3} = 242.5 Gy), and Horner's syndrome (n=1; sympathetic trunk D0.2 cm{sup 3} = 130.8 Gy). No grade ≥4 toxicity was observed. Conclusions: Overlapping courses of reirradiation can be safely delivered with acceptable toxicity. Some toxicities occurred acutely at doses considered safe for a single course of therapy (esophagus). We observed rib fracture, brachial plexopathy, and Horner's syndrome for patients receiving high cumulative doses to corresponding critical structures.

  8. The persistence and ecological impacts of a cyanobacterium genetically engineered to express mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    Ketseoglou, Irene; Bouwer, Gustav

    2016-05-10

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120#11 has been genetically engineered to act as a delivery vehicle for Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis mosquitocidal toxins. To address ecological concerns about releasing this genetically engineered microorganism into the environment for mosquito larva control, the persistence and ecological impacts of PCC 7120#11 was evaluated using multi-species, standardized aquatic microcosms. The microcosms were set up as described in ASTM E1366-02 (Standard Practice for Standardized Aquatic Microcosms: Fresh Water), with a few modifications. The treatment group microcosms were inoculated with PCC 7120#11 and key water quality parameters and non-target effects were compared between the treatment and control groups over a period of 35 days. PCC 7120#11 decreased from a concentration of 4.50 × 10(6) cells/ml (at inoculation) to 1.32 × 10(3) cells/ml after 4 weeks and larvicidal activity against third instar larvae of Anopheles arabiensis was only evident for two weeks after treatment. Both treatment and the interaction of treatment and time had a significant effect on nitrate, phosphate and photosynthetic microorganism concentrations. Treatment with PCC 7120#11 caused a temporary spike in ammonia in the microcosms a week after treatment, but the concentrations were well below acute and chronic criteria values for ammonia in freshwater ecosystems. Cyprinotus vidua concentrations were not significantly different between PCC 7120#11 and control microcosms. In PCC 7120#11 microcosms, Daphnia pulex concentrations were significantly lower than control concentrations between days 18 and 25. By the end of the experiment, none of the measured variables were significantly different between the treatment groups. The standard aquatic microcosm experiments provided more data on the ecological impacts of PCC 7120#11 than single-organism assessments would have. On the basis of the relatively minor, short-term effects that PCC 7120

  9. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  10. Mosquitocidal and water purification properties of Cynodon dactylon, Aloe vera, Hemidesmus indicus and Coleus amboinicus leaf extracts against the mosquito vectors.

    Arjunan, Nareshkumar; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Prasannakumar, Kanagarajan; Thangamani, Sundaram; Barnard, Donald R

    2012-04-01

    Ethanolic extracts of Cynodon dactylon, Aloe vera, Hemidesmus indicus and Coleus amboinicus were tested for their toxicity effect on the third-instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. The leaves of C. dactylon, A. vera, H. indicus and C. amboinicus were collected from natural habitats (forests) in Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India. A total of 250 g of fresh, mature leaves were rinsed with distilled water and dried in shade. The dried leaves were put in Soxhlet apparatus and extract prepared using 100% ethanol for 72 h at 30-40°C. Dried residues were obtained from 100 g of extract evaporated to dryness in rotary vacuum evaporator. Larvicidal properties of ethanolic leaf extracts showed that the extracts are effective as mosquito control agents. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h exposure. No mortality was observed in the control. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) values observed for the larvicidal activities are 0.44%, 0.51%, 0.59% and 0.68% for extracts of C. dactylon, A. vera, H. indicus and C. amboinicus, respectively. The observed mortality were statistically significant at P < 0.05 level. C. dactylon showed the highest mortality rate against the three species of mosquito larvae in laboratory and field. The selected plants were shown to exhibit water purification properties. Water quality parameters such as turbidity, pH and water clarity were analyzed in the water samples (pre-treatment and post-treatment of plant extracts) taken from the different breeding sites of mosquitoes. Water colour, turbidity and pH were reduced significantly after treatment with C. dactylon (13 HU, 31.5 mg/l and 6.9), H. indicus (13.8 HU, 33 mg/l and 7.1), A. vera (16 HU, 33.8 mg/l and 7.4) and C. amboinicus (21 HU, 35 mg/l and 7.5) extracts. The study proved that the extracts of C. dactylon, A. vera, H. indicus and C. amboinicus have both mosquitocidal and water sedimentation properties.

  11. The neonicotinoid imidachloprid shows high chronic toxicity to mayfly nymphs

    Roessink, I.; Merga, L.B.; Zweers, A.J.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute and chronic toxicity of imidacloprid to a range of freshwater arthropods. Mayfly and caddisfly species were most sensitive to short-term imidacloprid exposures (10 tests), whereas the mayflies showed by far the most sensitive response to long-term exposure of

  12. Toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater and effects on constructed wetland plants

    Calheirosa, C.S.C.; Silva, G.; Quitério, P.V.B.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater produced after an activated sludge secondary treatment on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium pratense, a species used as indicator in toxicity tests, was evaluated. Growth was inhibited by wastewater concentrations >25% and undiluted ...

  13. Transformation of highly toxic chemicals factory for Fuqing nuclear power plant

    Wang Hongkai; Gao Yuan; Li Hua

    2014-01-01

    For the iodine adsorption tests of current M310 nuclear power plant, dimethyl sulfate is one of highly toxic chemical of national strict standard management, and the nation make strict control over toxic chemicals procurement, transportation, storage, management requirements. Since the appropriate toxic chemicals storage place was not considered in the design of M310 nuclear power plant, Fuqing nuclear power sites for storage of dimethyl sulfate implement technical transformation to meet and regulate the storage requirements for highly toxic chemical. This will lay the foundation for carrying out smoothly the relevant tests of nuclear power plant, and provide the reference for the use and construction of toxic chemicals reactor in the same type nuclear power plant. (authors)

  14. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher’s exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade ≥3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher’s exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade ≥3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm 3 (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm 3 (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm 3 (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm 3 . One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade ≥4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation recall reactions are

  15. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, Gregory A.; Vazquez, Marcelo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Slater, James M.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. METHODS: Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. ROTAROD TEST: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. OPEN FIELD TEST: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. MORRIS WATER MAZE: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the CNS. ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process.

  16. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, G.A.; Slater, J.M.; Pearlstein, R.D.; Laskowitz, D.T.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. Rotarod test: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. Open field test: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. Morris water maze: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the central nervous system (CNS). ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process. (author)

  17. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, G.A.; Slater, J.M.; Pearlstein, R.D. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center; Vazquez, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Laskowitz, D.T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center

    2002-12-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. Rotarod test: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. Open field test: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. Morris water maze: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the central nervous system (CNS). ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process. (author)

  18. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials under four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and UV irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  19. Alpha lipoic acid attenuates high-fructose-induced pancreatic toxicity.

    Topsakal, Senay; Ozmen, Ozlem; Cankara, Fatma Nihan; Yesilot, Sukriye; Bayram, Dilek; Genç Özdamar, Nilüfer; Kayan, Sümeyra

    2016-01-01

    Chronic consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) causes several problems such as insulin resistance. The goal of the study was to investigate pancreatic damage induced by chronic HFCS consumption and the protective effects of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) on pancreatic cells. Wistar Albino, 4-month-old, female rats weighing 250-300 g were randomly distributed into three groups, each containing eight rats. The study included an HFCS group, an HFCS + ALA-administered group and a control group (CON). The prepared 30% solution of HFCS (F30) (24% fructose, 28% dextrose) was added to the drinking water for 10 weeks. ALA treatment was begun 4 weeks after the first HFCS administration (100 mg/kg/oral, last 6 weeks). Rats were anaesthetised and euthanised by cervical dislocation 24 h after the last ALA administration. Blood samples for biochemical tests (amylase, lipase, malondialdehyde (MDA) and catalase (CAT)) and tissue samples for histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations (caspase-3, insulin and glucagon) were collected. Comparing the control and HFCS groups, serum glucose (150.92 ± 39.77 and 236.50 ± 18.28, respectively, p < 0.05), amylase (2165.00 ± 150.76 and 3027.66 ± 729.19, respectively, p < 0.01), lipase (5.58 ± 2.22 and 11.51 ± 2.74, respectively, p < 0.01) and pancreatic tissue MDA (0.0167 ± 0.004 and 0.0193 ± 0.006, respectively, p < 0.05) levels were increased, whereas tissue CAT (0.0924 ± 0.029 and 0.0359 ± 0.023, respectively, p < 0.05) activity decreased in the HFCS group significantly. Histopathological examination revealed degenerative and necrotic changes in Langerhans islet cells and slight inflammatory cell infiltration in pancreatic tissue in the HFCS group. Immunohistochemically there was a significant decrease in insulin (2.85 ± 0.37 and 0.87 ± 0.64, respectively, p < 0.001) and glucagon (2.71 ± 0.48 and 1.00 ± 0.75, respectively, p < 0.001) secreting cell scores, whereas a

  20. Evaluation of e-liquid toxicity using an open-source high-throughput screening assay

    Keating, James E.; Zorn, Bryan T.; Kochar, Tavleen K.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Glish, Gary L.; Tarran, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The e-liquids used in electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) consist of propylene glycol (PG), vegetable glycerin (VG), nicotine, and chemical additives for flavoring. There are currently over 7,700 e-liquid flavors available, and while some have been tested for toxicity in the laboratory, most have not. Here, we developed a 3-phase, 384-well, plate-based, high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to rapidly triage and validate the toxicity of multiple e-liquids. Our data demonstrated that the PG/VG vehicle adversely affected cell viability and that a large number of e-liquids were more toxic than PG/VG. We also performed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis on all tested e-liquids. Subsequent nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis revealed that e-liquids are an extremely heterogeneous group. Furthermore, these data indicated that (i) the more chemicals contained in an e-liquid, the more toxic it was likely to be and (ii) the presence of vanillin was associated with higher toxicity values. Further analysis of common constituents by electron ionization revealed that the concentration of cinnamaldehyde and vanillin, but not triacetin, correlated with toxicity. We have also developed a publicly available searchable website (www.eliquidinfo.org). Given the large numbers of available e-liquids, this website will serve as a resource to facilitate dissemination of this information. Our data suggest that an HTS approach to evaluate the toxicity of multiple e-liquids is feasible. Such an approach may serve as a roadmap to enable bodies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to better regulate e-liquid composition. PMID:29584716

  1. Near fatal 5-FU gut toxicity post surgery--remarkable effect of high-dose sucralfate.

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Morris, David; Chen, Zhuoran; Chen, Cindy

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this review article and case report was to investigate the effectiveness of high-dose sucralfate on severe life-threatening 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) gut toxicity, with reference to, but not limited to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. A search was conducted on PubMed from 1950 to July 2013 for original studies on 5-FU gut toxicity and sucralfate. Studies were limited to human trials and English language and all articles included in this study were assessed with the application of predetermined selection criteria. Each article was then reviewed independently by two reviewers. A case report from our own centre was included in this review. From 33 results, 6 manuscripts were identified including 4 randomized controlled trial. One trial evaluated the use of sucralfate to alleviate stomatitis in patients with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. The other three trials evaluated the role of sucralfate in radiation toxicity. There was one case report which showed gastroscopy confirmed normalization of severe dysplastic erosive gastroduodenitis attributed to hepatic arterial infusion of 5-FU following a 2-month course of sucralfate and cimetidine and one case series showing clinical and sigmoidoscopically demonstrated improvement in ulcerative colitis in majority of patients receiving sucralfate enemas. There was no current literature specifically focussed on the role of sucralfate in 5-FU gut toxicity. Our case report describes the clinical course and successful treatment with sucralfate of a patient with Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) who experienced 5-FU gut toxicity resulting in life-threatening bleeding due to presumed DPD deficiency post intraperitoneal 5-FU administration. This review article showed a lack of literature concerning the use of sucralfate in 5-FU gut toxicity. In our patient's case, sucralfate had a crucial role in the management of near fatal 5-FU gut toxicity, and further evaluation is required.

  2. Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children

    Stone, Alex; Delistraty, Damon

    2010-01-01

    Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was

  3. A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay

    Boyd, Windy A.; McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle ≤ 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected; however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC 50 values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 μM) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 μM). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms.

  4. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  5. Sanitary Assessment of Hazardous Materials Exposed To Highly Toxic Chemical Compounds

    Rembovskiy, V.; Ermolaeva, E.

    2007-01-01

    -and-plant microflora and hydrocoles. 4. Development of non-standard methodical approaches when determining and interpreting the hazard classes of the wastes, containing high toxic compounds such as nerve gases. In particular, disembodied methods applied for solving the tasks of assessment of chemical compounds toxicity were summarized, as well as a uniform scheme of experimental toxicological assessment of TC of a high risk is presented. A system of quantitative assessment of the TC risk is developed on the basis of integral coefficient of risk (KTC), thus simplifying decision making after toxicological testing. Calculation of the coefficient of the TC risk is based on logarithm of ratio of toxicometry parameters to the value of identical parameters determining affiliation of the TC to the 1st class of risk (extreme risk). Due to the methodology developed in our Institute, we have for the first time estimated the class of toxicity of a highly complicated industrial system. (author)

  6. A hypothetical model for predicting the toxicity of high aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN)

    Tran, C. L.; Tantra, R.; Donaldson, K.; Stone, V.; Hankin, S. M.; Ross, B.; Aitken, R. J.; Jones, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to predict nanoparticle (dimensional structures which are less than 100 nm in size) toxicity through the use of a suitable model is an important goal if nanoparticles are to be regulated in terms of exposures and toxicological effects. Recently, a model to predict toxicity of nanoparticles with high aspect ratio has been put forward by a consortium of scientists. The High aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN) model is a platform that relates the physical dimensions of HARN (specifically length and diameter ratio) and biopersistence to their toxicity in biological environments. Potentially, this model is of great public health and economic importance, as it can be used as a tool to not only predict toxicological activity but can be used to classify the toxicity of various fibrous nanoparticles, without the need to carry out time-consuming and expensive toxicology studies. However, this model of toxicity is currently hypothetical in nature and is based solely on drawing similarities in its dimensional geometry with that of asbestos and synthetic vitreous fibres. The aim of this review is two-fold: (a) to present findings from past literature, on the physicochemical property and pathogenicity bioassay testing of HARN (b) to identify some of the challenges and future research steps crucial before the HARN model can be accepted as a predictive model. By presenting what has been done, we are able to identify scientific challenges and research directions that are needed for the HARN model to gain public acceptance. Our recommendations for future research includes the need to: (a) accurately link physicochemical data with corresponding pathogenicity assay data, through the use of suitable reference standards and standardised protocols, (b) develop better tools/techniques for physicochemical characterisation, (c) to develop better ways of monitoring HARN in the workplace, (d) to reliably measure dose exposure levels, in order to support future epidemiological

  7. A hypothetical model for predicting the toxicity of high aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN)

    Tran, C. L.; Tantra, R.; Donaldson, K.; Stone, V.; Hankin, S. M.; Ross, B.; Aitken, R. J.; Jones, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to predict nanoparticle (dimensional structures which are less than 100 nm in size) toxicity through the use of a suitable model is an important goal if nanoparticles are to be regulated in terms of exposures and toxicological effects. Recently, a model to predict toxicity of nanoparticles with high aspect ratio has been put forward by a consortium of scientists. The High aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN) model is a platform that relates the physical dimensions of HARN (specifically length and diameter ratio) and biopersistence to their toxicity in biological environments. Potentially, this model is of great public health and economic importance, as it can be used as a tool to not only predict toxicological activity but can be used to classify the toxicity of various fibrous nanoparticles, without the need to carry out time-consuming and expensive toxicology studies. However, this model of toxicity is currently hypothetical in nature and is based solely on drawing similarities in its dimensional geometry with that of asbestos and synthetic vitreous fibres. The aim of this review is two-fold: (a) to present findings from past literature, on the physicochemical property and pathogenicity bioassay testing of HARN (b) to identify some of the challenges and future research steps crucial before the HARN model can be accepted as a predictive model. By presenting what has been done, we are able to identify scientific challenges and research directions that are needed for the HARN model to gain public acceptance. Our recommendations for future research includes the need to: (a) accurately link physicochemical data with corresponding pathogenicity assay data, through the use of suitable reference standards and standardised protocols, (b) develop better tools/techniques for physicochemical characterisation, (c) to develop better ways of monitoring HARN in the workplace, (d) to reliably measure dose exposure levels, in order to support future epidemiological

  8. [Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Excellent results at the expense of the high toxicity of the treatment].

    Baena-Gómez, M A; Mora Matilla, M; Lassaletta Atienza, A; Andión Catalán, M; Hernández Marqués, C; Madero López, L

    2015-06-01

    Lymphomas are the third malignancy in children, and within them non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for just 7% of cancers in children under 15 years old. Chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. The objective of this study is to analyze the toxicity caused by the treatment in pediatric patients diagnosed with NHL. A retrospective study was conducted on patients diagnosed with mature B-cell NHL, treated according to the LMB protocol 2001, from January 2007 to February 2014. Data concerning the diagnosis, treatment and toxicities that developed in the patients during the same period were collected. A total of 20 mature B-cell NHL cases were diagnosed: 16 Burkitt lymphomas, 2 diffuse large cell lymphomas and 2 mature leukemias. Almost two-thirds (65%) of patients were classified in a high grade stage (iii-iv) at diagnosis. Serious infectious processes, severe myelosuppression, liver abnormalities, and mucositis were the most frequent toxicities. Overall survival was 95% (19/20). One patient died of causes unrelated to the illness. Despite the excellent survival rate, most patients diagnosed with NHL mature B cells experience grade iii and iv toxicities during treatment. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid Onset of Retinal Toxicity From High-Dose Hydroxychloroquine Given for Cancer Therapy.

    Leung, Loh-Shan B; Neal, Joel W; Wakelee, Heather A; Sequist, Lecia V; Marmor, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    To report rapid onset of retinal toxicity in a series of patients followed on high-dose (1000 mg daily) hydroxychloroquine during an oncologic clinical trial studying hydroxychloroquine with erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer. Retrospective observational case series. Ophthalmic surveillance was performed on patients in a multicenter clinical trial testing high-dose (1000 mg daily) hydroxychloroquine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The US Food & Drug Administration-recommended screening protocol included only visual acuity testing, dilated fundus examination, Amsler grid testing, and color vision testing. In patients seen at Stanford, additional sensitive screening procedures were added at the discretion of the retinal physician: high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, Humphrey visual field (HVF) testing, and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Out of the 7 patients having exposure of at least 6 months, 2 developed retinal toxicity (at 11 and 17 months of exposure). Damage was identified by OCT imaging, mfERG testing, and, in 1 case, visual field testing. Fundus autofluorescence imaging remained normal. Neither patient had symptomatic visual acuity loss. These cases show that high doses of hydroxychloroquine can initiate the development of retinal toxicity within 1-2 years. Although synergy with erlotinib is theoretically possible, there are no prior reports of erlotinib-associated retinal toxicity despite over a decade of use in oncology. These results also suggest that sensitive retinal screening tests should be added to ongoing and future clinical trials involving high-dose hydroxychloroquine to improve safety monitoring and preservation of vision. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. High Efficiency InP Solar Cells from Low Toxicity Tertiarybutylphosphine

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p and n type respectively. 16 percent efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with Voc of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6 percent. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  11. Toxic Compounds Analysis With High Performance Liquid Chromatography Detected By Electro Chemical Detector (Ecd)

    Hideharu Shintaniq

    2014-01-01

    The principal area of application of high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD) has been in the analysis of naturally-occurring analytes, such as catecholamines, and pharmaceuticals in biological samples, HPLC-ECD has also applied to the analysis of pesticides and other analytes of interest to the toxicologist. In this paper, toxic area is described. In these, ammatoxins, aromatic amine, nitro-compounds, algal toxins, fungal toxins, pesticides, veterinary drug ...

  12. Building predictive in vitro pulmonary toxicity assays using high-throughput imaging and artificial intelligence.

    Lee, Jia-Ying Joey; Miller, James Alastair; Basu, Sreetama; Kee, Ting-Zhen Vanessa; Loo, Lit-Hsin

    2018-06-01

    Human lungs are susceptible to the toxicity induced by soluble xenobiotics. However, the direct cellular effects of many pulmonotoxic chemicals are not always clear, and thus, a general in vitro assay for testing pulmonotoxicity applicable to a wide variety of chemicals is not currently available. Here, we report a study that uses high-throughput imaging and artificial intelligence to build an in vitro pulmonotoxicity assay by automatically comparing and selecting human lung-cell lines and their associated quantitative phenotypic features most predictive of in vivo pulmonotoxicity. This approach is called "High-throughput In vitro Phenotypic Profiling for Toxicity Prediction" (HIPPTox). We found that the resulting assay based on two phenotypic features of a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, can accurately classify 33 reference chemicals with human pulmonotoxicity information (88.8% balance accuracy, 84.6% sensitivity, and 93.0% specificity). In comparison, the predictivity of a standard cell-viability assay on the same set of chemicals is much lower (77.1% balanced accuracy, 84.6% sensitivity, and 69.5% specificity). We also used the assay to evaluate 17 additional test chemicals with unknown/unclear human pulmonotoxicity, and experimentally confirmed that many of the pulmonotoxic reference and predicted-positive test chemicals induce DNA strand breaks and/or activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) pathway. Therefore, HIPPTox helps us to uncover these common modes-of-action of pulmonotoxic chemicals. HIPPTox may also be applied to other cell types or models, and accelerate the development of predictive in vitro assays for other cell-type- or organ-specific toxicities.

  13. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  14. Destruction of highly toxic chemical materials by using the energy of underground thermonuclear explosion

    Trutnev, Y.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main problems of modern technogenic civilisation is the evergrowing ecological crisis caused by the growth of industrial wastes harmful for biosphere. Among them the radioactive wastes of atomic energetics, worked out nuclear energy facilities and toxic wastes from various chemical plants begin to play a specific role. Traditional technologies of destruction and disposal of these wastes demand great investments up to many billions of dollars, enormous maintenance expenditures, occupation of substantial territories by new productions and security zones as well as many qualified specialists. On the other hand potential accidents during the conventional processes of waste reprocessing are fraught with the possibility of large ecological disasters, that are the reason of strong oppositions of population and 'green movement' to the foundation of such installations. So, rather progressive seem to be the technologies based on the utilisation of underground nuclear explosion energy for annihilations and disposal of high-level wastes of atomic energetics and nuclear facilities as well as for thermal decomposition of chemically toxic substances at extremely high temperatures. These technologies will be rather cheap, they will allow to process big amounts of materials in ecologically safe form far from the populated regions and will need a commercially beneficial if used for international purposes. The application of these technologies may be of great significance for realisation of disarmament process- destruction of chemical weapons and in future the nuclear warheads and some production components. (au)

  15. High pH ammonia toxicity, and the search for life on the Jovian planets.

    Deal, P H; Souza, K A; Mack, H M

    1975-10-01

    Jovian plants have enviroments apparently suitable for the evolution of life, but nevertheless, present severe challenges to organisms. One such challenge arises from the presence of ammonia. Ammonia is an efficient biocide, its effect being dependent on pH as well as on concentration. The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural enviornments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, survival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is, nevertheless, two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Our data support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  16. High Ph, Ammonia Toxicity, and the Search for Life on the Jovian Planets

    Deal, P. H.; Souza, K. A.; Mack, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural environments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, urvival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Results support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  17. Polychaete richness and abundance enhanced in anthropogenically modified estuaries despite high concentrations of toxic contaminants.

    Katherine A Dafforn

    Full Text Available Ecological communities are increasingly exposed to multiple chemical and physical stressors, but distinguishing anthropogenic impacts from other environmental drivers remains challenging. Rarely are multiple stressors investigated in replicated studies over large spatial scales (>1000 kms or supported with manipulations that are necessary to interpret ecological patterns. We measured the composition of sediment infaunal communities in relation to anthropogenic and natural stressors at multiple sites within seven estuaries. We observed increases in the richness and abundance of polychaete worms in heavily modified estuaries with severe metal contamination, but no changes in the diversity or abundance of other taxa. Estuaries in which toxic contaminants were elevated also showed evidence of organic enrichment. We hypothesised that the observed response of polychaetes was not a 'positive' response to toxic contamination or a reduction in biotic competition, but due to high levels of nutrients in heavily modified estuaries driving productivity in the water column and enriching the sediment over large spatial scales. We deployed defaunated field-collected sediments from the surveyed estuaries in a small scale experiment, but observed no effects of sediment characteristics (toxic or enriching. Furthermore, invertebrate recruitment instead reflected the low diversity and abundance observed during field surveys of this relatively 'pristine' estuary. This suggests that differences observed in the survey are not a direct consequence of sediment characteristics (even severe metal contamination but are related to parameters that covary with estuary modification such as enhanced productivity from nutrient inputs and the diversity of the local species pool. This has implications for the interpretation of diversity measures in large-scale monitoring studies in which the observed patterns may be strongly influenced by many factors that covary with anthropogenic

  18. Decontamination possibilities of high-toxic wastes by means of dense plasma generators

    Rutberg, P.G.; Kolikov, V.A.; Bogomaz, A.A.; Budin, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present time the idea of plasma generators application for the high-toxic agents and wastes decontamination has become very urgent. It is known that chemical bonds energy of some molecules being part of these substances is so high that it is impossible to destroy them using traditional methods. Taking into account the fact that the temperature of plasma generator's arc column may be of tens eV, and its energy of hundreds kJ, one may state that any known chemical substances taken in quite large amount, may be dissociated to the atoms. In this paper simplified construction of plasma generator and technological scheme of plasmachemical installation are presented. (author)

  19. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  20. Serum Creatinine Versus Plasma Methotrexate Levels to Predict Toxicities in Children Receiving High-dose Methotrexate.

    Tiwari, Priya; Thomas, M K; Pathania, Subha; Dhawan, Deepa; Gupta, Y K; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Facilities for measuring methotrexate (MTX) levels are not available everywhere, potentially limiting administration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX). We hypothesized that serum creatinine alteration after HDMTX administration predicts MTX clearance. Overall, 122 cycles in 50 patients of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged ≤18 years receiving HDMTX were enrolled prospectively. Plasma MTX levels were measured at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours; serum creatinine was measured at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Correlation of plasma MTX levels with creatinine levels and changes in creatinine from baseline (Δ creatinine) were evaluated. Plasma MTX levels at 72 hours showed positive correlation with serum creatinine at 48 hours (P = .011) and 72 hours (P = .013) as also Δ creatinine at 48 hours (P = .042) and 72 hours (P = .045). However, cut-off value of either creatinine or Δ creatinine could not be established to reliably predict delayed MTX clearance. Greater than 50% Δ creatinine at 48 and 72 hours significantly predicted grade 3/4 leucopenia (P = .036 and P = .001, respectively) and thrombocytopenia (P = .012 and P = .009, respectively) but not mucositis (P = .827 and P = .910, respectively). Delayed MTX elimination did not predict any grade 3/4 toxicity. In spite of demonstration of significant correlation between serum creatinine and Δ creatinine with plasma MTX levels at 72 hours, cut-off value of either variable to predict MTX delay could not be established. Thus, either of these cannot be used as a surrogate for plasma MTX estimation. Interestingly, Δ creatinine effectively predicted hematological toxicities, which were not predicted by delayed MTX clearance.

  1. Individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine increments during high-dose methotrexate consolidation treatment of lower risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and toxicity of individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) dose increments during post-remission treatment with High-dose methotrexate (HDM) (5000 mg/m2, ×3) in 38 patients with Childhood (ALL). Patients were increased in steps of 25 mg 6MP/m2 per...... the remaining patients (P = 0·03). This study shows individualized toxicity-titrated 6MP dosing during consolidation is feasible without increased risk of toxicity....

  2. A simple approach for producing highly efficient DNA carriers with reduced toxicity based on modified polyallylamine

    Oskuee, Reza Kazemi [Neurogenic Inflammation Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dosti, Fatemeh [School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholami, Leila [Targeted Drug Delivery Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan, E-mail: malaekehb@mums.ac.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays gene delivery is a topic in many research studies. Non-viral vectors have many advantages over viral vectors in terms of safety, immunogenicity and gene carrying capacity but they suffer from low transfection efficiency and high toxicity. In this study, polyallylamine (PAA), the cationic polymer, has been modified with hydrophobic branches to increase the transfection efficiency of the polymer. Polyallylamine with molecular weights of 15 and 65 kDa was selected and grafted with butyl, hexyl and decyl acrylate at percentages of 10, 30 and 50. The ability of the modified polymer to condense DNA was examined by ethidium bromide test. The complex of modified polymer and DNA (polyplex) was characterized for size, zeta potential, transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity in Neuro2A cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide test showed that grafting of PAA decreased its ability for DNA condensation but vectors could still condense DNA at moderate and high carrier to DNA ratios. Most of polyplexes had particle size between 150 and 250 nm. The prepared vectors mainly showed positive zeta potential but carriers composed of PAA with high percentage of grafting had negative zeta potential. The best transfection activity was observed in vectors with hexyl acrylate chain. Grafting of polymer reduced its cytotoxicity especially at percentages of 30 and 50. The vectors based of PAA 15 kDa had better transfection efficiency than the vectors made of PAA 65 kDa. In conclusion, results of the present study indicated that grafting PAA 15 kDa with high percentages of hexyl acrylate can help to prepare vectors with better transfection efficiency and less cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • The modified polyallylamine was synthesized as a gene carrier. • Modification of polyallylamine (15 kDa) with high percentages of hexyl acrylate improved transfection activity remarkably. • Grafting of polymer with acrylate derivatives reduced polymer cytotoxicity especially at percentages of

  3. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  4. Mosquitocidal and water purification properties of Cynodon dactylon, Aloe vera, Hemidesmus indicus and Coleus amboinicus leaf extracts.

    Ethanolic extracts of Cynodon dactylon, Aloe vera, Hemidesmus indicus and Coleus amboinicus were tested for toxicity to 3rd instar Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Aedes aegypti. Median lethal concentrations (LC50) were, respectively, 0.44%, 0.51%, 0.59% and 0.68%. Cynodon dactylon...

  5. Metabolic enzyme microarray coupled with miniaturized cell-culture array technology for high-throughput toxicity screening.

    Lee, Moo-Yeal; Dordick, Jonathan S; Clark, Douglas S

    2010-01-01

    Due to poor drug candidate safety profiles that are often identified late in the drug development process, the clinical progression of new chemical entities to pharmaceuticals remains hindered, thus resulting in the high cost of drug discovery. To accelerate the identification of safer drug candidates and improve the clinical progression of drug candidates to pharmaceuticals, it is important to develop high-throughput tools that can provide early-stage predictive toxicology data. In particular, in vitro cell-based systems that can accurately mimic the human in vivo response and predict the impact of drug candidates on human toxicology are needed to accelerate the assessment of drug candidate toxicity and human metabolism earlier in the drug development process. The in vitro techniques that provide a high degree of human toxicity prediction will be perhaps more important in cosmetic and chemical industries in Europe, as animal toxicity testing is being phased out entirely in the immediate future.We have developed a metabolic enzyme microarray (the Metabolizing Enzyme Toxicology Assay Chip, or MetaChip) and a miniaturized three-dimensional (3D) cell-culture array (the Data Analysis Toxicology Assay Chip, or DataChip) for high-throughput toxicity screening of target compounds and their metabolic enzyme-generated products. The human or rat MetaChip contains an array of encapsulated metabolic enzymes that is designed to emulate the metabolic reactions in the human or rat liver. The human or rat DataChip contains an array of 3D human or rat cells encapsulated in alginate gels for cell-based toxicity screening. By combining the DataChip with the complementary MetaChip, in vitro toxicity results are obtained that correlate well with in vivo rat data.

  6. Late toxicity and five year outcomes after high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a monotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Oesch, Sebastian L; Rentsch, Cyrill A; Isaak, Bernhard; Cihoric, Nikola; Manser, Peter; Thalmann, George N; Aebersold, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    To determine the 5-year outcome after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a monotherapy. Between 10/2003 and 06/2006, 36 patients with low (28) and intermediate (8) risk prostate cancer were treated by HDR-BT monotherapy. All patients received one implant and 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy within 48 hours for a total prescribed dose (PD) of 38 Gy. Five patients received concomitant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Toxicity was scored according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) version 3.0. Biochemical recurrence was defined according to the Phoenix criteria and analyzed using the Kaplan Meier method. Predictors for late grade 3 GU toxicity were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 1.5-8.0 years). Late grade 2 and 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity was observed in 10 (28%) and 7 (19%) patients, respectively. The actuarial proportion of patients with late grade 3 GU toxicity at 5 years was 17.7%. Late grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were not observed. The crude erectile function preservation rate in patients without ADT was 75%. The 5 year biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) rate was 97%. Late grade 3 GU toxicity was associated with the urethral volume (p = 0.001) and the urethral V 120 (urethral volume receiving ≥120% of the PD; p = 0.0005) after multivariate Cox regression. After HDR-BT monotherapy late grade 3 GU was observed relatively frequently and was associated with the urethral V 120 . GI toxicity was negligible, the erectile function preservation rate and the bRFS rate was excellent

  7. Power increases the socially toxic component of narcissism among individuals with high baseline testosterone.

    Mead, Nicole L; Baumeister, Roy F; Stuppy, Anika; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2018-04-01

    The corrosive effects of power have been noted for centuries, but the self-related changes responsible for those effects have remained somewhat elusive. Narcissists tend to rise to-and abuse-positions of power, so we considered the possibility that positions of power may corrupt because they inflate narcissism. Two pathways were considered: Powerholders abuse their power because having power over others makes them feel superior (grandiosity pathway) or deserving of special treatment (entitlement pathway). Supporting the entitlement pathway, assigning participants to a position of power (vs. equal control) over a group task increased scores on the Exploitative/Entitlement component of narcissism among those with high baseline testosterone. What is more, heightened Exploitative/Entitlement scores among high-testosterone participants endowed with power (vs. equal control) statistically explained amplified self-reported willingness to misuse their power (e.g., taking fringe benefits as extra compensation). The grandiosity pathway was not well supported. The Superiority/Arrogance, Self-Absorption/Self-Admiration, and Leadership/Authority facets of narcissism did not change as a function of the power manipulation and testosterone levels. Taken together, these results suggest that people with high (but not low) testosterone may be inclined to misuse their power because having power over others makes them feel entitled to special treatment. This work identifies testosterone as a characteristic that contributes to the development of the socially toxic component of narcissism (Exploitative/Entitlement). It points to the possibility that structural positions of power and individual differences in narcissism may be mutually reinforcing, suggesting a vicious cycle with personal, relational, and societal implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. A highly efficient nonchemical method for isolating live nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) from soil during toxicity assays.

    Kim, Shin Woong; Moon, Jongmin; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The success of soil toxicity tests using Caenorhabditis elegans may depend in large part on recovering the organisms from the soil. However, it can be difficult to learn the International Organization for Standardization/ASTM International recovery process that uses the colloidal silica flotation method. The present study determined that a soil-agar isolation method provides a highly efficient and less technically demanding alternative to the colloidal silica flotation method. Test soil containing C. elegans was arranged on an agar plate in a donut shape, a linear shape, or a C curve; and microbial food was placed outside the soil to encourage the nematodes to leave the soil. The effects of ventilation and the presence of food on nematode recovery were tested to determine the optimal conditions for recovery. A linear arrangement of soil on an agar plate that was sprinkled with microbial food produced nearly 83% and 90% recovery of live nematodes over a 3-h and a 24-h period, respectively, without subjecting the nematodes to chemical stress. The method was tested using copper (II) chloride dihydrate, and the resulting recovery rate was comparable to that obtained using colloidal silica flotation. The soil-agar isolation method portrayed in the present study enables live nematodes to be isolated with minimal additional physicochemical stress, making it a valuable option for use in subsequent sublethal tests where live nematodes are required. © 2014 SETAC.

  9. High Time Resolution Measurements of VOCs from Vehicle Cold Starts: The Air Toxic Cold Start Pulse

    Jobson, B. T.; Huangfu, Y.; Vanderschelden, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    Pollutants emitted during motor vehicle cold starts, especially in winter in some climates, is a significant source of winter time air pollution. While data exist for CO, NO, and total hydrocarbon emissions from federal testing procedures for vehicle emission certification, little is known about the emission rates of individual volatile organic compounds, in particular the air toxics benzene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde. Little is known about the VOC speciation and temperature dependence for cold starts. The US EPA vehicle emission model MOVES assumes that cold start emissions have the same speciation profile as running emissions. We examined this assumption by measuring cold start exhaust composition for 4 vehicles fueled with E10 gasoline over a temperature range of -4°C to 10°C in winter of 2015. The extra cold start emissions were determined by comparison with emissions during engine idling. In addition to CO and NOx measurements a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer was used to measure formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and C2-alkylbenzenes at high time resolution to compare with the cold start emission speciation profiles used in the EPA MOVES2014 model. The results show that after the vehicle was started, CO mixing ratios can reach a few percent of the exhaust and then drop to several ppmv within 2 minutes of idling, while NOx showed different temporal behaviors among the four vehicles. VOCs displayed elevated levels during cold start and the peak mixing ratios can be two orders higher than idling phase levels. Molar emission ratios relative to toluene were used to compare with the emission ratio used in MOVES2014 and we found the formaldehyde-to-toluene emission ratio was about 0.19, which is 5 times higher than the emission ratio used in MOVES2014 and the acetaldehyde-to-toluene emission ratios were 0.86-0.89, which is 8 times higher than the ones in MOVES2014. The C2-alkylbenzene-to-toluene ratio agreed well with moves. Our results

  10. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Yamada, Yoshiya; Marion, Christine; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard; Venkatraman, E.S.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  11. Tolerance to various toxicants by marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Mesquita, A.; Verlecar, X.N.

    of growth in media containing 5 ppm mercury. Plasmid-curing assays done in this study ascertained that resistance to mercury antibiotics, and toxic xenobiotics is mediated by chromosomally borne genes and/or transposable elements rather than by plasmids...

  12. Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Dose on Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer: Principal Component Analysis on High Dimensional Data

    Yun Liang; Messer, Karen; Rose, Brent S.; Lewis, John H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of increasing pelvic bone marrow (BM) radiation dose on acute hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, using a novel modeling approach to preserve the local spatial dose information. Methods and Materials: The study included 37 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent weekly cisplatin and pelvic radiation therapy. The white blood cell count nadir during treatment was used as the indicator for acute hematologic toxicity. Pelvic BM radiation dose distributions were standardized across patients by registering the pelvic BM volumes to a common template, followed by dose remapping using deformable image registration, resulting in a dose array. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the dose array, and the significant eigenvectors were identified by linear regression on the PCs. The coefficients for PC regression and significant eigenvectors were represented in three dimensions to identify critical BM subregions where dose accumulation is associated with hematologic toxicity. Results: We identified five PCs associated with acute hematologic toxicity. PC analysis regression modeling explained a high proportion of the variation in acute hematologicity (adjusted R 2 , 0.49). Three-dimensional rendering of a linear combination of the significant eigenvectors revealed patterns consistent with anatomical distributions of hematopoietically active BM. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach that preserves spatial dose information to model effects of radiation dose on toxicity, which may be useful in optimizing radiation techniques to avoid critical subregions of normal tissues. Further validation of this approach in a large cohort is ongoing.

  13. Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Carcinoma of the Prostate: Outcome and Late Toxicity

    David Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Results. Median followup was 84 months. Five-year overall survival (OS was 83% and biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS was 50% for 57 Gy. Five-year OS was 75% and bPFS 58% for 60 Gy. At 7 years, toxicity by RTOG criteria was acceptable with no grade 3 or above toxicity. Compared with baseline, there was no significant change in urinary symptoms at 2 or 7 years. Bowel symptoms were stable between 2 and 7 years. All patients continued to have significant sexual dysfunction. Conclusion. In high-risk prostate cancer, dose-escalated hypofractionated radiotherapy using IMRT results in encouraging outcomes and acceptable late toxicity.

  14. Silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate induce high toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio

    Ribeiro, Fabianne; Gallego-Urrea, Julián Alberto; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Crossley, Alison; Hassellöv, Martin; Taylor, Cameron; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Loureiro, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have gained attention over the years due to the antimicrobial function of silver, which has been exploited industrially to produce consumer goods that vary in type and application. Undoubtedly the increase of production and consumption of these silver-containing products will lead to the entry of silver compounds into the environment. In this study we have used Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio as model organisms to investigate the toxicity of AgNP and AgNO 3 by assessing different biological endpoints and exposure periods. Organisms were exposed following specific and standardized protocols for each species/endpoints, with modifications when necessary. AgNP were characterized in each test-media by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and experiments were performed by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to investigate the aggregation and agglomeration behavior of AgNP under different media chemical composition and test-period. TEM images of AgNP in the different test-media showed dissimilar patterns of agglomeration, with some agglomerates inside an organic layer, some loosely associated particles and also the presence of some individual particles. The toxicity of both AgNO 3 and AgNP differ significantly based on the test species: we found no differences in toxicity for algae, a small difference for zebrafish and a major difference in toxicity for Daphnia magna. - Highlights: •Effects of silver nanoparticles and nitrate were compared in three aquatic species. •The presence of food on the immobilization assay for Daphnia magna significantly decreased AgNP toxicity. •AgNP and AgNO 3 differ in toxicity according to the test species and endpoint. •AgNP and AgNO 3 induced dissimilar abnormalities on zebrafish embryos' development. •AgNP behavior in the test media will rule its bioavailability and uptake and therefore toxicity

  15. Silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate induce high toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio

    Ribeiro, Fabianne, E-mail: ribeiro.f@ua.pt [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro. Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193. Aveiro (Portugal); Gallego-Urrea, Julián Alberto [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biologyx, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 4, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurkschat, Kerstin; Crossley, Alison [Department of Materials, Oxford University Begbroke Science Park OX5 1PF (United Kingdom); Hassellöv, Martin [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biologyx, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 4, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Taylor, Cameron [Department of Materials, Oxford University Begbroke Science Park OX5 1PF (United Kingdom); Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Loureiro, Susana [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro. Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193. Aveiro (Portugal)

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have gained attention over the years due to the antimicrobial function of silver, which has been exploited industrially to produce consumer goods that vary in type and application. Undoubtedly the increase of production and consumption of these silver-containing products will lead to the entry of silver compounds into the environment. In this study we have used Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Daphnia magna and Danio rerio as model organisms to investigate the toxicity of AgNP and AgNO{sub 3} by assessing different biological endpoints and exposure periods. Organisms were exposed following specific and standardized protocols for each species/endpoints, with modifications when necessary. AgNP were characterized in each test-media by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and experiments were performed by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to investigate the aggregation and agglomeration behavior of AgNP under different media chemical composition and test-period. TEM images of AgNP in the different test-media showed dissimilar patterns of agglomeration, with some agglomerates inside an organic layer, some loosely associated particles and also the presence of some individual particles. The toxicity of both AgNO{sub 3} and AgNP differ significantly based on the test species: we found no differences in toxicity for algae, a small difference for zebrafish and a major difference in toxicity for Daphnia magna. - Highlights: •Effects of silver nanoparticles and nitrate were compared in three aquatic species. •The presence of food on the immobilization assay for Daphnia magna significantly decreased AgNP toxicity. •AgNP and AgNO{sub 3} differ in toxicity according to the test species and endpoint. •AgNP and AgNO{sub 3} induced dissimilar abnormalities on zebrafish embryos' development. •AgNP behavior in the test media will rule its bioavailability and uptake and therefore toxicity.

  16. Acute Toxicity and Cytotoxicity of Pereskia aculeata, a Highly Nutritious Cactaceae Plant.

    Silva, Debora O; Seifert, Mauricio; Nora, Fabiana R; Bobrowski, Vera L; Freitag, Rogerio A; Kucera, Heidi R; Nora, Leonardo; Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2017-04-01

    Pereskia aculeata is a Cactaceae plant with valuable nutritional properties, including terrific amounts of protein, minerals, vitamins, and fiber. However, P. aculeata is reported to contain antinutrients and alkaloids in its leaves. In addition, in a study on growth and development, Wistar rats fed with P. aculeata and casein as protein source grew less than the control group (fed with casein only). Therefore, in this study, we evaluated, for the first time, the oral acute toxicity of P. aculeata in rats and also the cytotoxicity behavior of the plant on lettuce seeds. The acute toxicity research was carried out using dried P. aculeata ethanolic extract, in three different doses, administered by gavage to 24 female Wistar rats. The rats were then examined for signs of toxicity, food intake, body weight, and fecal excretion fluctuations, as well as histopathological alterations, using eight different body tissues. The acute toxicity study did not show any difference among the groups in either clinical evaluation or histopathological analyses. For the cytotoxicity study, dried P. aculeata ethanolic extract was applied on lettuce seeds in five different concentrations. These seeds were evaluated for germination, root and shoot length, and mitotic index. The results show that P. aculeata extract affects lettuce root and shoot growth, but not germination or mitotic index. In conclusion, the acute toxicity on rats and the cytogenotoxicity on lettuce of P. aculeata are neglectable, validating the potential of this plant to be used as a functional food.

  17. Ultra High Efficiency ESP for Fine Particulate and Air Toxics Control

    Srinivasachar, Srivats; Pease, Benjamin R.; Porle, Kjell; Mauritzson, Christer; Haythornthwaite, Sheila

    1997-01-01

    Nearly ninety percent of U.S. coal-fired utility boilers are equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Cost effective retrofittable ESP technologies are the only means to accomplish Department of Energy's (DOE) goal of a major reduction in fine particulate and air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants. Particles in the size range of 0.1 to 5 (micro)m typically escape ESPs. Metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, molybdenum and antimony, concentrate on these particles. This is the main driver for improved fine particulate control. Vapor phase emissions of mercury, selenium and arsenic are also of major concern. Current dry ESPs, which operate at temperatures greater than 280 F, provide little control for vapor phase toxics. The need for inherent improvement to ESPs has to be considered keeping in perspective the current trend towards the use of low sulfur coals. Switching to low sulfur coals is the dominant approach for SO 2 emission reduction in the utility industry. Low sulfur coals generate high resistivity ash, which can cause an undesirable phenomenon called ''back corona.'' Higher particulate emissions occur if there is back corona in the ESP. Results of the pilot-scale testing identified the ''low temperature ESP'' concept to have the biggest impact for the two low sulfur coals investigated. Lowering the flue gas temperature to 220 F provided the maximum impact in terms of decreased emissions. Intermediate operating temperatures (reduction from 340 to 270 F) also gave significant ESP performance improvement. A significant reduction in particulate emissions was also noted when the flue gas humidity was increased (temperature held constant) from the baseline condition for these moderately high resistivity ash coals. Independent control of flue gas humidity and temperature was an important and a notable element in this project. Mercury emissions were also measured as a function of flue gas temperature. Mercury emissions decreased as the flue gas

  18. Wet-chemical passivation of InAs: toward surfaces with high stability and low toxicity.

    Jewett, Scott A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-09-18

    In a variety of applications where the electronic and optical characteristics of traditional, siliconbased materials are inadequate, recently researchers have employed semiconductors made from combinations of group III and V elements such as InAs. InAs has a narrow band gap and very high electron mobility in the near-surface region, which makes it an attractive material for high performance transistors, optical applications, and chemical sensing. However, silicon-based materials remain the top semiconductors of choice for biological applications, in part because of their relatively low toxicity. In contrast to silicon, InAs forms an unstable oxide layer under ambient conditions, which can corrode over time and leach toxic indium and arsenic components. To make InAs more attractive for biological applications, researchers have investigated passivation, chemical and electronic stabilization, of the surface by adlayer adsorption. Because of the simplicity, low cost, and flexibility in the type of passivating molecule used, many researchers are currently exploring wet-chemical methods of passivation. This Account summarizes much of the recent work on the chemical passivation of InAs with a particular focus on the chemical stability of the surface and prevention of oxide regrowth. We review the various methods of surface preparation and discuss how crystal orientation affects the chemical properties of the surface. The correct etching of InAs is critical as researchers prepare the surface for subsequent adlayer adsorption. HCl etchants combined with a postetch annealing step allow the tuning of the chemical properties in the near-surface region to either arsenic- or indium-rich environments. Bromine etchants create indium-rich surfaces and do not require annealing after etching; however, bromine etchants are harsh and potentially destructive to the surface. The simultaneous use of NH(4)OH etchants with passivating molecules prevents contact with ambient air that can

  19. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

    Latifi Amel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There has been little investigation of the genomics of these cyanobacteria. Results Deciphering the 5,172,804 bp sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 has revealed the high plasticity of its genome: 11.7% DNA repeats containing more than 1,000 bases, 6.8% putative transposases and 21 putative restriction enzymes. Compared to the genomes of other cyanobacterial lineages, strain PCC 7806 contains a large number of atypical genes that may have been acquired by lateral transfers. Metabolic pathways, such as fermentation and a methionine salvage pathway, have been identified, as have genes for programmed cell death that may be related to the rapid disappearance of Microcystis blooms in nature. Analysis of the PCC 7806 genome also reveals striking novel biosynthetic features that might help to elucidate the ecological impact of secondary metabolites and lead to the discovery of novel metabolites for new biotechnological applications. M. aeruginosa and other large cyanobacterial genomes exhibit a rapid loss of synteny in contrast to other microbial genomes. Conclusion Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 appears to have adopted an evolutionary strategy relying on unusual genome plasticity to adapt to eutrophic freshwater ecosystems, a property shared by another strain of M. aeruginosa (NIES-843. Comparisons of the genomes of PCC 7806 and other cyanobacterial strains indicate that a similar strategy may have also been used by the marine strain Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 to adapt to other ecological niches, such as oligotrophic open oceans.

  20. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Stinckens, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity...... dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120 hpf was 310 μg/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72 mmol/kg fresh wt and La50...... for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals....

  1. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    Henríquez Hernández, Luis Alberto; Lara, Pedro Carlos; Pinar, Beatriz; Bordón, Elisa; Gallego, Carlos Rodríguez; Bilbao, Cristina; Pérez, Leandro Fernández; Morales, Amílcar Flores

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  2. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

    Frangeul, L.; Quillardet, P.; Castets, A.M.; Humbert, J.F.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Cortez, D.; Tolonen, A.; Zhang, C.C.; Gribaldo, S.; Kehr, J.C.; Zilliges, Y.; Ziemert, N.; Becker, S.; Talla, E.; Latifi, A.; Billault, A.; Lepelletier, A.; Dittmann, E.; Bouchier, C.; Tandeau de Marsac, N.

    2008-01-01

    Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There

  3. High Burden of Subclinical Lead Toxicity after Phase Out of Lead from Petroleum in Pakistan.

    Majid, Hafsa; Khan, Aysha Habib; Khan, Nadeem Ullah; Siddiqui, Imran; Ghani, Farooq; Jafri, Lena

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the frequency of subclinical lead toxicity. Cross-sectional study. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2011 to December 2014. Analysis of laboratory data for blood lead levels (BLL) was performed. Lead was tested by atomic absorption spectrometer. For all subjects, only initial test results were included while the results of repeated testing were excluded. Exemption was sought from institutional ethical review committee. BLL of 2-10 ug/dl and 10-70 ug/dl in children and adults, respectively were taken as subclinical lead toxicity. Amongst the total number of subjects tested (n=524), 26.5% (n=139) were children (lead level 16.9 ug/dl (36.1-4)] and lower level [4.2 ug/dl (6.8-2.6)] in children with lead levels while most had either subclinical (76%, n=106) or toxic lead levels (8%, n=11). In adults, (55%, n=212) subjects had desired lead levels, and 40% (n=154) and 4.99% (n=19) had subclinical and toxic lead levels. Presence of subclinical lead poisoning even after phasing out of lead petroleum in Pakistanis is alarming, especially in children. A national population-based study to determine the lead status and targeted intervention to identify potential sources is need of the time.

  4. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  5. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles.

    Hong Zhou

    Full Text Available Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN, preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR. The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased

  6. Postoperative high-dose pelvic radiotherapy for N+ prostate cancer: Toxicity and matched case comparison with postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy

    Van Praet, Charles; Ost, Piet; Lumen, Nicolaas; De Meerleer, Gert; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; Fonteyne, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity of postoperative high-dose whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) with androgen deprivation therapy for lymph node metastasized (N1) prostate cancer (PC). To perform a matched-case analysis to compare this toxicity profile to postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy (PBRT). Materials and methods: Forty-eight N1-PC patients were referred for WPRT and 239 node-negative patients for PBRT. Patients were matched 1:1 according to pre-treatment demographics, symptoms, treatment and tumor characteristics. Mean dose to the prostate bed was 75 Gy (WPRT–PBRT) and 54 Gy to the elective nodes (WPRT) in 36 or 37 fractions. End points are genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity. Results: After WPRT, 35% developed grade 2 (G2) and 4% G3 acute GU toxicity. Acute GI toxicity developed in 42% (G2). Late GU toxicity developed in 36% (G2) and 7% (G3). One patient had G4 incontinence. Recuperation occurred in 59%. Late GI toxicity developed in 25% (G2) with 100% recuperation. Incidence of acute and late GI toxicity was higher following WPRT compared to PBRT (p ⩽ 0.041). GU toxicity was similar. With WPRT mean dose to bladder and rectosigmoid were higher. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose WPRT comes at the cost of a temporary increase in G2. GI toxicity compared to PBRT because larger volumes of rectosigmoid are irradiated

  7. Defences against ammonia toxicity in tropical air-breathing fishes exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia: a review.

    Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Wilson, J M; Randall, D J

    2004-10-01

    In the tropics, air-breathing fishes can be exposed to environmental ammonia when stranded in puddles of water during the dry season, during a stay inside a burrow, or after agricultural fertilization. At low concentrations of environmental ammonia, NH(3) excretion is impeded, as in aerial exposure, leading to the accumulation of endogenous ammonia. At high concentrations of environmental ammonia, which results in a reversed NH(3) partial pressure gradient (DeltaP(NH3)), there is retention of endogenous ammonia and uptake of exogenous ammonia. In this review, several tropical air-breathing fishes (giant mudskipper, African catfish, oriental weatherloach, swamp eel, four-eyed sleeper, abehaze and slender African lungfish), which can tolerate high environmental ammonia exposure, are used as examples to demonstrate how eight different adaptations can be involved in defence against ammonia toxicity. Four of these adaptations deal with ammonia toxicity at branchial and/or epithelial surfaces: (1) active excretion of NH(4)(+); (2) lowering of environmental pH; (3) low NH(3) permeability of epithelial surfaces; and (4) volatilization of NH(3), while another four adaptations ameliorate ammonia toxicity at the cellular and subcellular levels: (5) high tolerance of ammonia at the cellular and subcellular levels; (6) reduction in ammonia production; (7) glutamine synthesis; and (8) urea synthesis. The responses of tropical air-breathing fishes to high environmental ammonia are determined apparently by behavioural adaptations and the nature of their natural environments.

  8. Migratory birds are the source of highly toxic organic pollutants for indigenous people in the Russian Arctic

    Pesiakova, A. A.; Gusakova, E. V.; Trofimova, A. N.; Sorokina, T. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are highly toxic organic contaminants. Due to their chemical properties they had wide application in industry and agriculture in the 20th century. In 2001 the production of PCBs has been prohibited almost worldwide. Environmental contamination has been found in soils, water, and air where there were PCB production sites. They have been detected in fish, birds and animals of migratory species, retaining transboarding transfer. Several migratory species of birds (Taiga bean goose, greater white-fronted goose, lesser white fronted goose and barnacle goose) are a diet for indigenous people. PCBs accumulating in the human body affect all systems and organs. This article reviews the contribution of migratory bird species in transboarding transfer of highly toxic contaminants in the Nenets Autonomous Area, Kolguev island (Russian Arctic).

  9. Biochemical criteria of toxicity of therapy with high doses of methotrexate in children with osteosarcoma

    A. M. Strizhevskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methotrexate (Mtx is a cytotoxic drug from the group of antimetabolites, folic acid antagonists. High-dose (HD Mtx in pediatric oncology are used for the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS, and other types of tumors. This therapy has allowed to achieve a five-year relapse-free survival rates up to 80 % in patients with OS. However, the high toxicity of Mtx is a serious constraint in achieving the maximum therapeutic effect, which in most cases poses the occurrence of side effects in patients on various organs and systems. Treatment should be under strict laboratory monitoring, primarily therapeutic drug monitoring the concentration of Mtx in serum.246 children (boys – 125, girls – 121 aged 5 to 16 years with osteosarcoma (mean age 12.2 years who were treated in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center from 2006 to 2013. Patients were conducted from 1 to 8 courses HD Mtx at a dose of 8 or 12 g/m2 , administered within 4 h of infusion on the background of alkaline prehydrate. Leucovorin was administered intravenously, every 6 hours, starting 24 h from the start of the Mtx infusion. 1137 courses of HD Mtx were conducted with FPIA method (analyzer TDx/Flx, Abbott, USA. The technique of monitoring of homocysteine (Hcy in the blood serum by analyzer Vitros 5/1FS (Johnson & Johnson, USA during the entire course of high-dose Mtx was tested. In groups calculated pharmacokinetic parameters Mtx were tested: area under the pharmacokinetic curve (MtxAUC, clearance of methotrexate (ClMtx, the elimination half-life (T1/2 and the total time of excretion (Ttotal. Normal excretion of Mtx was revealed at 1050 courses Mtx, corresponding to the following values: 4 h – 1109 ± 283 μmol/l; 24 h – 4,67 ± 0,95 μmol/l; 42 h – 0,38 ± 0.16 µmol/l; 48 h – less than 0,23 ± 0.04 µmol/l; 72 h of 0.07 ± 0,03 µmol/l; 96 h of 0.03 ± 0.01 µmol/l. At 87 courses identified delayed Mtx excretion, accounting for 7.6 % of all courses. In all measured parameters

  10. Characterization of marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury exhibiting multiple resistances to toxic chemicals

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.

    , GP15 and GP16) and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CH07) which showed comparatively higher resistance to toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics and were used in more detailed experiments. Antibiotic sensitivity of all three isolates after plasmid curing... using Nucleospin Plasmid isolation kit (Macherey Nagel, Germany) and agarose gel electrophoresis. To further confirm the presence/absence of plasmid, two different plasmid curing assays were performed to note the loss, if any, of mercury resistance...

  11. Automated high-content assay for compounds selectively toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a myoblastic cell line.

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease.Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6 and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs.We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite.

  12. Synthesis of non-toxic As and Cr nanoparticles through redox activity of highly flexible layered coordination polymer of Ni(II).

    Agarwal, Rashmi A

    2018-03-09

    A simple method for the sequestration of As(III) and Cr(VI) from water has been demonstrated by utilizing a highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) of Ni(II) in its as synthesized form or without solvent removal. This PCP reduces the high toxicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) ions into non-toxic As(0) and Cr/Cr 2 O 3 /CrO 2 (zero, tri and tetravalent) nanoparticles (NPs) within its pores, and this is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The high functionality of this polymer is due to the presence of monodentate carboxylate groups of a benzenetricarboxylate linker, which provide anchoring sites to the metal ions of the metal precursors. Due to the highly oxidising nature of these toxic ions, a redox reaction takes place between the framework metal ions and toxic metal ions, which is explained by an electron paramagnetic resonance study. This is the first report to synthesize non-toxic, as well as useful, NPs of As and Cr from their highly toxic ions within the cavities of a PCP for remediation of the toxic waste stream and contaminated waste water.

  13. Synthesis of non-toxic As and Cr nanoparticles through redox activity of highly flexible layered coordination polymer of Ni(II)

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.

    2018-03-01

    A simple method for the sequestration of As(III) and Cr(VI) from water has been demonstrated by utilizing a highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) of Ni(II) in its as synthesized form or without solvent removal. This PCP reduces the high toxicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) ions into non-toxic As(0) and Cr/Cr2O3/CrO2 (zero, tri and tetravalent) nanoparticles (NPs) within its pores, and this is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The high functionality of this polymer is due to the presence of monodentate carboxylate groups of a benzenetricarboxylate linker, which provide anchoring sites to the metal ions of the metal precursors. Due to the highly oxidising nature of these toxic ions, a redox reaction takes place between the framework metal ions and toxic metal ions, which is explained by an electron paramagnetic resonance study. This is the first report to synthesize non-toxic, as well as useful, NPs of As and Cr from their highly toxic ions within the cavities of a PCP for remediation of the toxic waste stream and contaminated waste water.

  14. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Graeber, Stefan; Graf, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting γH2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  15. Characterization of a highly toxic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki very similar to the HD-73 strain.

    Reinoso-Pozo, Yaritza; Del Rincón-Castro, Ma Cristina; Ibarra, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    The LBIT-1200 strain of Bacillus thuringiensis was recently isolated from soil, and showed a 6.4 and 9.5 increase in toxicity, against Manduca sexta and Trichoplusia ni, respectively, compared to HD-73. However, LBIT-1200 was still highly similar to HD-73, including the production of bipyramidal crystals containing only one protein of ∼130 000 kDa, its flagellin gene sequence related to the kurstaki serotype, plasmid and RepPCR patterns similar to HD-73, no production of β-exotoxin and no presence of VIP genes. Sequencing of its cry gene showed the presence of a cry1Ac-type gene with four amino acid differences, including two amino acid replacements in domain III, compared to Cry1Ac1, which may explain its higher toxicity. In conclusion, the LBIT-1200 strain is a variant of the HD-73 strain but shows a much higher toxicity, which makes this new strain an important candidate to be developed as a bioinsecticide, once it passes other tests, throughout its biotechnological development. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. High CO2 and silicate limitation synergistically increase the toxicity of Pseudo-nitzschia fraudulenta.

    Avery O Tatters

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic CO(2 is progressively acidifying the ocean, but the responses of harmful algal bloom species that produce toxins that can bioaccumulate remain virtually unknown. The neurotoxin domoic acid is produced by the globally-distributed diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia. This toxin is responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning, which can result in illness or death in humans and regularly causes mass mortalities of marine mammals and birds. Domoic acid production by Pseudo-nitzschia cells is known to be regulated by nutrient availability, but potential interactions with increasing seawater CO(2 concentrations are poorly understood. Here we present experiments measuring domoic acid production by acclimatized cultures of Pseudo-nitzschia fraudulenta that demonstrate a strong synergism between projected future CO(2 levels (765 ppm and silicate-limited growth, which greatly increases cellular toxicity relative to growth under modern atmospheric (360 ppm or pre-industrial (200 ppm CO(2 conditions. Cellular Si:C ratios decrease with increasing CO(2, in a trend opposite to that seen for domoic acid production. The coastal California upwelling system where this species was isolated currently exhibits rapidly increasing levels of anthropogenic acidification, as well as widespread episodic silicate limitation of diatom growth. Our results suggest that the current ecosystem and human health impacts of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms could be greatly exacerbated by future ocean acidification and 'carbon fertilization' of the coastal ocean.

  17. Comparison of pharmacokinetics and toxicity after high-dose methotrexate treatments in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Csordas, Katalin; Hegyi, Marta; Eipel, Oliver T; Muller, Judit; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2013-02-01

    We carried out a detailed comparative study of the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of methotrexate (MTX) and 7-hydroxy-methotrexate (7-OH-MTX) after high-dose intravenous methotrexate (HD-MTX) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Overall, 65 children were treated with 5 g/m2/24 h MTX and 88 children were treated with 2 g/m2/24 h MTX according to ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocols (mean age: 6.4 years, range 1.0-17.9 years). A total of 583 HD-MTX courses were analyzed. Serum MTX and 7-OH-MTX levels were measured at 24, 36, and 48 h, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MTX levels were determined 24 h after the initiation of the infusion. The area under the concentration-time curve was calculated. Hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and bone marrow toxicity were estimated by routine laboratory tests. We investigated pharmacokinetics and toxicity in distinct age groups ( 14 years). 5 g/m2/24 h treatments resulted in higher serum and CSF MTX and 7-OH-MTX levels (P treatments did not alter MTX or 7-OH-MTX levels. 7-OH-MTX levels were correlated with nephrotoxicity (r = 0.36, P children aged older than 14 years (P treatments. To predict the development of toxicity, monitoring of the level of the 7-OH-MTX is useful. Monitoring of pharmacokinetics is essential to prevent the development of severe adverse events in adolescents.

  18. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    Hogan, D.; Retallack, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  19. Association between SLC19A1 gene polymorphism and high dose methotrexate toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non Hodgkin malignant lymphoma: introducing a haplotype based approach

    Kotnik Barbara Faganel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the clinical relevance of SLC 19A1 genetic variability for high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX related toxicities in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL and non Hodgkin malignant lymphoma (NHML.

  20. Selectivity of Very High Dose Methotrexate in Mcf-7 and Normal Cells Using a Priming and Non-Toxic 5-Fluorouracil Dose

    Brown, Donnell

    1997-01-01

    ...) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells versus normal tissues and (b) provide one clear basis for intracellular rescue of only host cells from MTX toxicity when high dose MTX is used in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU...

  1. Potentially Toxic Elements and Health Risk Assessment in Farmland Systems around High-Concentrated Arsenic Coal Mining in Xingren, China

    Ying-ju Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The health risk of potentially toxic elements (PTEs via contamination of the food chain has attracted widespread concern. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of PTEs in environment and human body (fingernail, hair, and blood of people living in agricultural soil near arsenic coal mining areas in Xingren County (Guizhou, southwest China. 89 crop samples which included vegetables, rice, maize, and coix seed and their corresponding soils and 17 local surface water and biological tissue samples (41 × 3 in near arsenic coal mining areas were collected, and the concentrations of potentially toxic elements (As, Cd, Cu, Cr, and Pb in all the samples were determined. The health risk assessment methods developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency were employed to explore the potential health hazards of PTEs in soils growing crops. Results showed that 4 toxic elements, Cd, Cu, As, and Cr, were found to have different degrees of contamination in soils in the studied area. The total concentration of toxic elements (As, Cr, Cu, and Pb in fingernail, hair, and blood samples were 90.50, 69.31, and 6.90 mg·kg−1, respectively. Fingernail samples from females were more likely to show exposure to trace metals compared to males. As the age of the subject increased, the concentration of As also increased in all three biological samples. The risk assessment for the mean hazard index value from the consumption of local food crops was 14.81, indicating that consumers may experience adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects. The estimated mean total cancer risk value of was 5.3 × 10−3, which was approximately 10 to 1000 times higher than the acceptable range of 10−6–10−4, indicating serious carcinogenic risks for local people consuming crops from the area. This study provides evidence that local residents in this study area may be at a high risk of disease caused from toxic element exposure.

  2. Using high throughput experimental data and in silico models to discover alternatives to toxic chromate corrosion inhibitors

    Winkler, D.A.; Breedon, M.; White, P.; Hughes, A.E.; Sapper, E.D.; Cole, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We screened a large library of organic compounds as replacements for toxic chromates. • High throughput automated corrosion testing was used to assess inhibitor performance. • Robust, predictive machine learning models of corrosion inhibition were developed. • Models indicated molecular features contributing to performance of organic inhibitors. • We also showed that quantum chemistry descriptors do not correlate with performance. - Abstract: Restrictions on the use of toxic chromate-based corrosion inhibitors have created important issues for the aerospace and other industries. Benign alternatives that offer similar or superior performance are needed. We used high throughput experiments to assess 100 small organic molecules as potential inhibitors of corrosion in aerospace aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075. We generated robust, predictive, quantitative computational models of inhibitor efficiency at two pH values using these data. The models identified molecular features of inhibitor molecules that had the greatest impact on corrosion inhibition. Models can be used to discover better corrosion inhibitors by screening libraries of organic compounds for candidates with high corrosion inhibition.

  3. Evaluation of systems incorporating transmutation for the reduction of the long term toxicity of high-level waste

    Davidson, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    One of the alternative high-level nuclear waste (HLW) management/disposal concepts proposed involves the separation from HLW of the elements with isotopes which dominate the radiotoxicity and the transmutation of these nuclides to shortlived or stable products. The waste management system required for transmutation employs chemical processing of HLW to recover waste nuclides for irradiation with neutrons in a transmutation device. The transmuter periodically requires replenishment of the target nuclides and chemical processing to remove the transmutation products. The waste streams from HLW processing and product recovery together comprise the discharge from the system. An imploding liner fusion reactor (ILFR) is assumed for the transmuter with the waste nuclides dissolved in a molten lead-lithium alloy blanket. The potential transmutation candidates are defined as the elements with toxicities per unit volume (toxicity indexes) in solidified HLW at 1000 years which are greater than that for 0.2% uranium ore (carnotite). The candidates which require separation for transmutation are the actinides; Np, Pu, Am, and Cu and the fission products; I and Tc. Certain assumptions were made for the parameters for the ILFR and its operating conditions, and a system evaluation was done. System evaluations indicate that blanket waste loadings on the order of several percent of the total concentration result in attractive performance in terms of high transmutation capacities and low blanket processing requirments. It appears that transmutation system goals in terms of toxicity reduction are achievable with a modest number of transmuters. In addition, requirements for transmuter performance, chemical processing capacity and chemical separation efficiency appear to be within projected values for this technology

  4. High-grade acute organ toxicity as positive prognostic factor in primary radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Bosch, Jan; Hennies, Steffen; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Overbeck, Tobias [Dept. of Haematology and Oncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Matthias, Christoph; Roedel, Ralph M. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: to test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radio(chemo)therapy and treatment outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and methods: from 05/1994 to 01/2009, 216 HNSCC patients were treated with radio(chemo)therapy in primary approach. They received normofractionated (2 Gy/fraction) irradiation including associated nodal drainage sites to a cumulative dose of 70 Gy. 151 patients received additional concomitant chemotherapy (111 patients 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C, 40 patients cisplatin-based). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), and any toxicity grade CTC {>=} 3 of mucositis, dysphagia or skin reaction was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: a statistically significant coherency between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival as well as locoregional control was found: patients with CTC {>=} 3 acute organ toxicity had a 5-year overall survival rate of 4% compared to 8% in patients without (p < 0.01). Thereby, multivariate analyses revealed that the correlation was independent of other possible prognostic factors or factors that may influence treatment toxicity, especially concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy technique or treatment-planning procedure. Conclusion: these data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, as high-grade acute organ toxicity during radio(chemo)therapy showed to be an independent prognostic marker in the own patient population. However, the authors are aware of the fact that a multivariate analysis in a retrospective study generally has statistical limitations. Therefore, their hypothesis should be further analyzed on biomolecular and clinical levels and other tumor entities in prospective trials. (orig.)

  5. Effect and toxicity of endoluminal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in centrally located tumors of the upper respiratory tract

    Harms, W.; Wannenmacher, M.; Becker, H.; Herth, F.; Fritz, P.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To assess effect an toxicity of high-dose-rate afterloading (HDR) alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in centrally located tumors of the upper respiratory tract. Patients and Methods: From 1987 to 1996, 55 patients were treated. Twenty-one patients (group A1: 17 non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC], A2: 4 metastases from other malignancies) were treated using HDR alone due to a relapse after external beam irradiation. In 34 previously untreated and inoperable patients (group B1: 27 NSCLC, B2: 7 metastases from other malignancies) HDR was given as a boost after EBRT (30 to 60 Gy, median 50). HDR was carried out with a 192 Ir source (370 GBq). The brachytherapy dose (group A: 5 to 27 Gy, median 20; B: 10 to 20 Gy, median 15) was prescribed to 1 cm distance from the source axis. A distanciable applicator was used in 39/55 patients. Results: In group A1, a response rate (CR, PR) of 53% (group B1: 77%) was reached. The median survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 5 months in group A1 (B1: 20 months). The 1-, 3- and 5-year local progression free survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were 66% (15%), 52% (0%), and 37% (0%) in group B1 (group A1). Prognostic favorable factors in group B1 were a tumor diameter 70. Grade-1 or 2 toxicity (RTOG/EORTC) occurred in 0% in group A and in 6% in group B. We observed no Grad-3 or 4 toxicity. Complications caused by persistent or progressive local disease occurred in 3 patients in goup A (fatal hemorrhage, tracheomediastinal fistula, hemoptysis) and in 2 patients in group B (fatal hemorrhage, hemoptysis). Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy is an effective treatment with moderate side effects. In combination with external beam irradiation long-term remissions can be reached in one third of the patients. (orig.) [de

  6. High dietary quality of non-toxic cyanobacteria for a benthic grazer and its implications for the control of cyanobacterial biofilms.

    Groendahl, Sophie; Fink, Patrick

    2017-05-18

    Mass occurrences of cyanobacteria frequently cause detrimental effects to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Consequently, attempts haven been made to control cyanobacterial blooms through naturally co-occurring herbivores. Control of cyanobacteria through herbivores often appears to be constrained by their low dietary quality, rather than by the possession of toxins, as also non-toxic cyanobacteria are hardly consumed by many herbivores. It was thus hypothesized that the consumption of non-toxic cyanobacteria may be improved when complemented with other high quality prey. We conducted a laboratory experiment in which we fed the herbivorous freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis single non-toxic cyanobacterial and unialgal diets or a mixed diet to test if diet-mixing may enable these herbivores to control non-toxic cyanobacterial mass abundances. The treatments where L. stagnalis were fed non-toxic cyanobacteria and a mixed diet provided a significantly higher shell and soft-body growth rate than the average of all single algal, but not the non-toxic cyanobacterial diets. However, the increase in growth provided by the non-toxic cyanobacteria diets could not be related to typical determinants of dietary quality such as toxicity, nutrient stoichiometry or essential fatty acid content. These results strongly contradict previous research which describes non-toxic cyanobacteria as a low quality food resource for freshwater herbivores in general. Our findings thus have strong implications to gastropod-cyanobacteria relationships and suggest that freshwater gastropods may be able to control mass occurrences of benthic non-toxic cyanobacteria, frequently observed in eutrophied water bodies worldwide.

  7. Recombinant Cry1Ia protein is highly toxic to cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boheman) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda).

    Martins, E S; Aguiar, R W D S; Martins, N F; Melatti, V M; Falcão, R; Gomes, A C M M; Ribeiro, B M; Monnerat, R G

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the activity of cry1Ia gene against cotton pests, Spodoptera frugiperda and Anthonomus grandis. Had isolated and characterized a toxin gene from the Bacillus thuringiensis S1451 strain which have been previously shown to be toxic to S. frugiperda and A. grandis. The toxin gene (cry1Ia) was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and cloned into the genome of a baculovirus. The Cry1Ia protein was expressed in baculovirus infected insect cells, producing protein inclusions in infected cells. The Cry1Ia protein has used in bioassays against to S. frugiperda and A. grandis. Bioassays using the purified recombinant protein showed high toxicity to S. frugiperda and A. grandis larvae. Molecular modelling of the Cry1Ia protein translated from the DNA sequence obtained in this work, showed that this protein possibly posses a similar structure to the Cry3A protein. Ultrastructural analysis of midgut cells from A. grandis incubated with the Cry1Ia toxin, showed loss of microvilli integrity. The results indicate that the cry1Ia is a good candidate for the construction of transgenic plants resistant to these important cotton pests.

  8. Measurement of the Patulin toxicant using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC in apple juices supplied in Khorramabad City, Iran

    Elham Esmaeili Lashkarian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Making use of low quality moldy and worm-eaten fruits for juice production causes various irritations in human body due to its hazardous compounds. Today, Patulin toxicant is one of the most important compounds to be investigated in juices, particularly in apple juices. This research aims to measure the amount of Patulin toxicant and identify the molding factors in apple juices supplied in Khorramabad shops. After preparing a list of shops supplying and selling h\\juices in Khorramabad, 64 apple juices packs were collected at random. The Patulin measurement was accomplished using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and the molding factors identification also was performed using macroscopic, microscopic and other necessary tests after the sample were cultured in standard method. Out of 64 sample investigated from presence of lack of mold perspective, 61 (95.3% lacked mold and 1 (1.6% had Aspergillus terreus mold and 2 (3.1% had Penicillium mold. The Patulin level measured in 31 samples (48% was negative and in 33 ones (52% was positive in range 5.102-26.484 μg.l-1. The data obtained from samples was evaluated well in comparison to external standards and the correlation coefficient of 0.99 was indicated. The results obtained from this research indicated that the mean Patulin measured in apple juices studied was less than the EU and Iranian standards.

  9. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    Lips, Irene M; Dehnad, Homan; Gils, Carla H van; Boeken Kruger, Arto E; Heide, Uulke A van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment) and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity) were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4). In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used

  10. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    Boeken Kruger Arto E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC. The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4. In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used.

  11. Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination for toxic phenols based on coupled cMWCNT/cyclodextrin edge-functionalized graphene composite

    Gao, Juanjuan; Liu, Maoxiang [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Song, Haiou, E-mail: songhaiou2011@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Shupeng, E-mail: shupeng_2006@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Qian, Yueyue [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Li, Aimin, E-mail: liaimin@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Phenol detection based on coupled cMWCNT/CD edge-functionalized graphene composite. • Increased conductivity can inspire enhancement of electrocatalytic performance. • The synergistic combination of the trace amounts of CDs and cMWCNT is a pivotal. • GN-CD-cMWCNT shows an excellent electrocatalytic and anti-interference ability. - Abstract: Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination of toxic phenol compounds is of significance in environmental monitoring due to their low degradation and high toxicity to the environment and humans. In this paper, a rapid and sensitive electrochemical sensor based on coupled carboxyl-multi-walled carbon nanotube (cMWCNT) and cyclodextrin (CD) edge-functionalized graphene composite was successfully employed towards trace detection of three typical phenols (4-aminophenol, 4-AP; 4-chlorophenol, 4-CP; 4-nitrophenol, 4-NP). The morphology studies from scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that cMWCNTs as conductive bridges were successfully incorporated into CD edge-functionalized graphene layers. Further, The electrocatalytic detection performance of the 3D simultaneously reduced and self-assembled sensing architecture (GN-CD-cMWCNT) with trace amounts of CDs was evaluated. The electrochemical studies demonstrated that GN-CD-cMWCNT displays excellent electrocatalytic activity, high sensitivity and stability. Under optimal conditions, the current responses of 4-AP, 4-CP and 4-NP are linear to concentrations over two different ranges, with low detection limit of 0.019, 0.017 and 0.027 μM (S/N = 3), respectively. And, GN-CD-cMWCNT shows an excellent anti-interference ability against electroactive species and metal ions. In addition, validation of the applicability of the presented sensor was also performed for the determination of three phenols in tap water sample with satisfactory results.

  12. Gender-specific reduction of hepatic Mrp2 expression by high-fat diet protects female mice from ANIT toxicity

    Kong, Bo; Csanaky, Iván L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Patni, Meghan; Chen, Qi; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Weir, Scott; Broward, Melinda; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Guo, Grace L.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) to rodents affects the expression of genes involved in drug transport. However, gender-specific effects of HFD on drug transport are not known. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2, Abcc2) is a transporter highly expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and is important for biliary excretion of glutathione-conjugated chemicals. The current study showed that hepatic Mrp2 expression was reduced by HFD feeding only in female, but not male, C57BL/6J mice. In order to determine whether down-regulation of Mrp2 in female mice altered chemical disposition and toxicity, the biliary excretion and hepatotoxicity of the Mrp2 substrate, α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), were assessed in male and female mice fed control diet or HFD for 4 weeks. ANIT-induced biliary injury is a commonly used model of experimental cholestasis and has been shown to be dependent upon Mrp2-mediated efflux of an ANIT glutathione conjugate that selectively injures biliary epithelial cells. Interestingly, HFD feeding significantly reduced early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice and largely protected against ANIT-induced liver injury. In summary, the current study showed that, at least in mice, HFD feeding can differentially regulate Mrp2 expression and function and depending upon the chemical exposure may enhance or reduce susceptibility to toxicity. Taken together, these data provide a novel interaction between diet and gender in regulating hepatobiliary excretion and susceptibility to injury. -- Highlights: ► High-fat diet decreases hepatic Mrp2 expression only in female but not in male mice. ► HFD significantly reduces early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice. ► HFD protects female mice against ANIT-induced liver injury.

  13. Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination for toxic phenols based on coupled cMWCNT/cyclodextrin edge-functionalized graphene composite

    Gao, Juanjuan; Liu, Maoxiang; Song, Haiou; Zhang, Shupeng; Qian, Yueyue; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Phenol detection based on coupled cMWCNT/CD edge-functionalized graphene composite. • Increased conductivity can inspire enhancement of electrocatalytic performance. • The synergistic combination of the trace amounts of CDs and cMWCNT is a pivotal. • GN-CD-cMWCNT shows an excellent electrocatalytic and anti-interference ability. - Abstract: Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination of toxic phenol compounds is of significance in environmental monitoring due to their low degradation and high toxicity to the environment and humans. In this paper, a rapid and sensitive electrochemical sensor based on coupled carboxyl-multi-walled carbon nanotube (cMWCNT) and cyclodextrin (CD) edge-functionalized graphene composite was successfully employed towards trace detection of three typical phenols (4-aminophenol, 4-AP; 4-chlorophenol, 4-CP; 4-nitrophenol, 4-NP). The morphology studies from scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that cMWCNTs as conductive bridges were successfully incorporated into CD edge-functionalized graphene layers. Further, The electrocatalytic detection performance of the 3D simultaneously reduced and self-assembled sensing architecture (GN-CD-cMWCNT) with trace amounts of CDs was evaluated. The electrochemical studies demonstrated that GN-CD-cMWCNT displays excellent electrocatalytic activity, high sensitivity and stability. Under optimal conditions, the current responses of 4-AP, 4-CP and 4-NP are linear to concentrations over two different ranges, with low detection limit of 0.019, 0.017 and 0.027 μM (S/N = 3), respectively. And, GN-CD-cMWCNT shows an excellent anti-interference ability against electroactive species and metal ions. In addition, validation of the applicability of the presented sensor was also performed for the determination of three phenols in tap water sample with satisfactory results.

  14. Actual directions in study of ecological consequences of a highly toxic 1,1-dimethylhydrazine-based rocket fuel spills

    Bulat Kenessov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents a review of the actual directions in study of ecological consequences of highly toxic 1,1-dimethylhydrazine-based rocket fuel spills. Recent results on study of processes of transformation of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, identification of its main metabolites and development of analytical methods for their determination are generalized. Modern analytical methods of determination of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine and its transformation products in environmental samples are characterized. It is shown that in recent years, through the use of most modern methods of physical chemical analysis and sample preparation, works in this direction made significant progress and contributed to the development of studies in adjacent areas. A character of distribution of transformation products in soils of fall places of first stages of rocket-carriers is described and the available methods for their remediation are characterized.

  15. High solids co-digestion of food and landscape waste and the potential for ammonia toxicity

    Drennan, Margaret F.; DiStefano, Thomas D., E-mail: thomas.distefano@bucknell.edu

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated co-digestion of food and landscape waste with a pilot-scale anaerobic dry digester. • We evaluated reactor performance at 35 °C under low and high organic loading rates. • Performance was stable under low organic loading rate, but declined under high organic loading rate. • Respirometry was employed to investigate potential inhibition due to ammonia. • Landscape waste was unsuitable in increasing the C:N ratio during codigestion. - Abstract: A pilot-scale study was completed to determine the feasibility of high-solids anaerobic digestion (HSAD) of a mixture of food and landscape wastes at a university in central Pennsylvania (USA). HSAD was stable at low loadings (2 g COD/L-day), but developed inhibitory ammonia concentrations at high loadings (15 g COD/L-day). At low loadings, methane yields were 232 L CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed and 229 L CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed, and at high loadings yields were 211 L CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed and 272 L CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed. Based on characterization and biodegradability studies, food waste appears to be a good candidate for HSAD at low organic loading rates; however, the development of ammonia inhibition at high loading rates suggests that the C:N ratio is too low for use as a single substrate. The relatively low biodegradability of landscape waste as reported herein made it an unsuitable substrate to increase the C:N ratio. Codigestion of food waste with a substrate high in bioavailable carbon is recommended to increase the C:N ratio sufficiently to allow HSAD at loading rates of 15 g COD/L-day.

  16. High solids co-digestion of food and landscape waste and the potential for ammonia toxicity.

    Drennan, Margaret F; DiStefano, Thomas D

    2014-07-01

    A pilot-scale study was completed to determine the feasibility of high-solids anaerobic digestion (HSAD) of a mixture of food and landscape wastes at a university in central Pennsylvania (USA). HSAD was stable at low loadings (2g COD/L-day), but developed inhibitory ammonia concentrations at high loadings (15 g COD/L-day). At low loadings, methane yields were 232 L CH4/kg COD fed and 229 L CH4/kg VS fed, and at high loadings yields were 211 L CH4/kg COD fed and 272 L CH4/kg VS fed. Based on characterization and biodegradability studies, food waste appears to be a good candidate for HSAD at low organic loading rates; however, the development of ammonia inhibition at high loading rates suggests that the C:N ratio is too low for use as a single substrate. The relatively low biodegradability of landscape waste as reported herein made it an unsuitable substrate to increase the C:N ratio. Codigestion of food waste with a substrate high in bioavailable carbon is recommended to increase the C:N ratio sufficiently to allow HSAD at loading rates of 15 g COD/L-day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. pH-Dependent Toxicity of High Aspect Ratio ZnO Nanowires in Macrophages Due to Intracellular Dissolution

    H. Müller, Karin

    2010-11-23

    High-aspect ratio ZnO nanowires have become one of the most promising products in the nanosciences within the past few years with a multitude of applications at the interface of optics and electronics. The interaction of zinc with cells and organisms is complex, with both deficiency and excess causing severe effects. The emerging significance of zinc for many cellular processes makes it imperative to investigate the biological safety of ZnO nanowires in order to guarantee their safe economic exploitation. In this study, ZnO nanowires were found to be toxic to human monocyte macrophages (HMMs) at similar concentrations as ZnCl2. Confocal microscopy on live cells confirmed a rise in intracellular Zn2+ concentrations prior to cell death. In vitro, ZnO nanowires dissolved very rapidly in a simulated body fluid of lysosomal pH, whereas they were comparatively stable at extracellular pH. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a rapid macrophage uptake of ZnO nanowire aggregates by phagocytosis. Nanowire dissolution occurred within membrane-bound compartments, triggered by the acidic pH of the lysosomes. ZnO nanowire dissolution was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Deposition of electron-dense material throughout the ZnO nanowire structures observed by TEM could indicate adsorption of cellular components onto the wires or localized zinc-induced protein precipitation. Our study demonstrates that ZnO nanowire toxicity in HMMs is due to pH-triggered, intracellular release of ionic Zn2+ rather than the high-aspect nature of the wires. Cell death had features of necrosis as well as apoptosis, with mitochondria displaying severe structural changes. The implications of these findings for the application of ZnO nanowires are discussed. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Introducing Toxics

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-01-01

    With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present ...

  19. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Using Non-Toxic Industry Compatible Solvent System

    Wang, J.; Giacomo, F. Di; Brüls, J.; Gorter, H.; Katsouras, I.; Groen, P.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Andriessen, R.; Galagan, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells attract a lot attention as alternative energy sources for the future energy market. With the remarkable lab-scale achievements, the investigations into a high-throughput large-scale production of perovskite devices are now on the agenda. The first step towards mass

  20. Highly efficient Perovskite solar cells using non-toxic industry compatible solvent system

    Wang, J.; Di Giacomo, F.; Bruls, J.; Gorter, H.H.; Katsouras, I.; Groen, W.A.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Andriessen, R.; Galagan, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells attract a lot attention as alternative energy sources for the future energy market. With the remarkable lab-scale achievements, the investigations into a high-throughput large-scale production of perovskite devices are now on the agenda. The first step towards mass

  1. New approach to modulate retinal cellular toxic effects of high glucose using marine epa and dha

    Fagon Roxane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids against cellular damages of high glucose were studied on retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells. Methods Retinal epithelial cells were incubated with omega-3 marine oils rich in EPA and DHA and then with high glucose (25 mM for 48 hours. Cellular responses were compared to normal glucose (5 mM: intracellular redox status, reactive oxygen species (ROS, mitochondrial succinate deshydrogenase activity, inflammatory cytokines release and caveolin-1 expression were evaluated using microplate cytometry, ELISA and flow cytometry techniques. Fatty acids incorporation in retinal cell membranes was analysed using chromatography. Results Preincubation of the cells with fish oil decreased ROS overproduction, mitochondrial alterations and TNFα release. These protective effects could be attributed to an increase in caveolin-1 expression induced by marine oil. Conclusion Marine formulations rich in omega-3 fatty acids represent a promising therapeutic approach for diabetic retinopathy.

  2. High salinity helps the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum in defense against Cd toxicity by maintaining redox balance and photosynthesis.

    Wali, Mariem; Gunsè, Benet; Llugany, Mercè; Corrales, Isabel; Abdelly, Chedly; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2016-08-01

    NaCl alleviates Cd toxicity in Sesvium portulacastrum by maintaining plant water status and redox balance, protecting chloroplasts structure and inducing some potential Cd (2+) chelators as GSH and proline. It has been demonstrated that NaCl alleviates Cd-induced growth inhibition in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum. However, the processes that mediate this effect are still unclear. In this work we combined physiological, biochemical and ultrastructural studies to highlight the effects of salt on the redox balance and photosynthesis in Cd-stressed plants. Seedlings were exposed to different Cd concentrations (0, 25 and 50 µM Cd) combined with low (0.09 mM) (LS), or high (200 mM) NaCl (HS) in hydroponic culture. Plant-water relations, photosynthesis rate, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, chloroplast ultrastructure, and proline and glutathione concentrations were analyzed after 1 month of treatment. In addition, the endogenous levels of stress-related hormones were determined in plants subjected to 25 µM Cd combined with both NaCl concentrations. In plants with low salt supply (LS), Cd reduced growth, induced plant dehydration, disrupted chloroplast structure and functioning, decreased net CO2 assimilation rate (A) and transpiration rate (E), inhibited the maximum potential quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) and the quantum yield efficiency (Φ PSII) of PSII, and enhanced the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). The addition of 200 mM NaCl (HS) to the Cd-containing medium culture significantly mitigated Cd phytotoxicity. Hence, even at similar internal Cd concentrations, HS-Cd plants were less affected by Cd than LS-Cd ones. Hence, 200 mM NaCl significantly alleviates Cd-induced toxicity symptoms, growth inhibition, and photosynthesis disturbances. The cell ultrastructure was better preserved in HS-Cd plants but affected in LS-Cd plants. The HS-Cd plants showed also higher concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH), proline and jasmonic acid (JA

  3. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicities of Intraoperative Radiotherapy for High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Gillis, Amy M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; DeWitt, Kelly D.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Fisch, Benjamin M.; Chan, Albert; Gooding, Charles; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Wara, William M.; Farmer, Diana L.; Harrison, Michael R.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To review a historical cohort of consecutively accrued patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to determine the therapeutic effect and late complications of this treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2002, 31 patients with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma were treated with IORT as part of multimodality therapy. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the outcome and complications. Kaplan-Meier probability estimates of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival at 36 months after diagnosis were recorded. Results: Intraoperative radiotherapy to the primary site and associated lymph nodes achieved excellent local control at a median follow-up of 44 months. The 3-year estimate of the local recurrence rate was 15%, less than that of most previously published series. Only 1 of 22 patients who had undergone gross total resection developed recurrence at the primary tumor site. The 3-year estimate of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 47%, and 60%, respectively. Side effects attributable to either the disease process or multimodality treatment were observed in 7 patients who developed either hypertension or vascular stenosis. These late complications resulted in the death of 2 patients. Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy at the time of primary resection offers effective local control in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Compared with historical controls, IORT achieved comparable control and survival rates while avoiding many side effects associated with external beam radiotherapy in young children. Although complications were observed, additional analysis is needed to determine the relative contributions of the disease process and specific components of the multimodality treatment to these adverse events

  4. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  5. Highly porous polytriazole ion exchange membranes cast from solutions in non-toxic cosolvents

    Chisca, Stefan

    2017-04-04

    The development of highly functionalized porous materials for protein separation is important for biotech processes. We report the preparation of highly porous polytriazole with sulfonic acid functionalization. The resulting ion exchange membranes are selective for protein adsorption. The starting material was a hydroxyl-functionalized polytriazole, which is an advantageous platform for further modification. The polymer was dissolved in a mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC), which can be both considered green solvents. The polymer solubilization was only possible due to an interesting effect of cosolvency, which is discussed, based in phase diagrams. Membranes were prepared by solution casting, followed by immersion in a non-solvent bath. We then grafted sulfone groups on the membranes, by reacting the hydroxyl groups with 1,3-propane sultone and 1,4-butane sultone. Lysozyme adsorption was successfully evaluated. Membranes modified with 1,4-butane sultone adsorbed more protein than those with 1,3-propane sultone.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly luminescent blue-emitting ZnSe(S) quantum dots exhibiting low toxicity

    Mirnajafizadeh, Fatemeh; Ramsey, Deborah; McAlpine, Shelli [School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Wang, Fan; Reece, Peter [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Stride, John Arron, E-mail: j.stride@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2016-07-01

    Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) that emit in the visible spectrum are of interest to a number of imaging technologies, not least that of biological samples. One issue that hinders the application of luminescent markers in biology is the potential toxicity of the fluorophore. Here we show that hydrothermally synthesized ZnSe(S) QDs have low cytotoxicity to both human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT-116) and human skin fibroblast cells (WS1). The QDs exhibited a high degree of crystallinity, with a strong blue photoluminescence at up to 29% quantum yield relative to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without post-synthetic UV-irradiation. Confocal microscopy images obtained of HCT-116 cells after incubation with the QDs highlighted the stability of the particles in cell media. Cytotoxicity studies showed that both HCT-116 and WS1 cells retain 100% viability after treatment with the QDs at concentrations up to 0.5 g/L, which makes them of potential use in biological imaging applications. - Highlights: • Highly luminescent ZnSe(S) QDs were synthesized using a simple, one-step hydrothermal method. • The as-synthesized QDs were found to be nontoxic in the presence of biological cells. • The QDs were stable in biological media with identical emission profile to that in water.

  7. Individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine increments during high-dose methotrexate consolidation treatment of lower risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. A Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) pilot study

    Frandsen, Thomas L; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Lausen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and toxicity of individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) dose increments during post-remission treatment with High-dose methotrexate (HDM) (5000 mg/m(2), ×3) in 38 patients with Childhood (ALL). Patients were increased in steps of 25 mg 6MP/m(2...... the remaining patients (P = 0·03). This study shows individualized toxicity-titrated 6MP dosing during consolidation is feasible without increased risk of toxicity....

  8. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals.

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12M in the composition of Na2SiO3 in 1:2vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes, E-mail: roosebs@gmail.com; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  10. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na 2 SiO 3 ). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na 2 SiO 3 in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  11. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    Taal, B.G.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Koning, C.C.E.; Boot, H.

    1996-01-01

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author)

  12. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    Taal, B.G.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Koning, C.C.E.; Boot, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author).

  13. Treatment of primary liver tumors with Yttrium-90 microspheres (TheraSphere) in high risk patients: analysis of survival and toxicities.

    Reardon, Kelli A; McIntosh, Alyson F; Shilling, A Tanner; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah; Berg, Carl; Caldwell, Stephen H; Northup, Patrick G; Angle, Fritz; Mulder, Robert; Rich, Tyvin A

    2009-02-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to obtain information regarding the survival and toxicities after Yttrium-90 microspheres treatment in patients with primary liver malignancies. Baseline, treatment, and follow-up data were collected and analyzed for 21 patients treated with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Survival analysis was then performed. The results of this study showed that median survival for all the patients was 120 days. Twenty of 21 patients were categorized as high-risk with a median survival of 114 days. It was also found that one high-risk patient has survived 858 days with no recurrence of disease. Acute grade 3-5 toxicities were recorded for nine patients and consisted of elevations in AST and bilirubin, thrombocytopenia, abdominal pain, ascites, nausea, fatigue, and death. This study concluded that Yttrium-90 is a low-toxicity, outpatient alternative for individuals with liver cancer and without many options. The maximal value, however, may lie in the treatment of low-risk patients.

  14. Small bowel toxicity after high dose spot scanning-based proton beam therapy for paraspinal/retroperitoneal neoplasms

    Schneider, R.A.; Albertini, F.; Koch, T.; Ares, C.; Lomax, A.; Goitein, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; Vitolo, V. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Hug, E.B. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; ProCure Proton Therapy Centers, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal tumours require high-dose radiation therapy (RT). Small bowel (SB) dose constraints have historically limited dose delivery to paraspinal and retroperitoneal targets. This retrospective study correlated SB dose-volume histograms with side-effects after proton radiation therapy (PT). Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 31 patients (mean age 52.1 years) underwent spot scanning-based PT for paraspinal/retroperitoneal chordomas (81 %), sarcomas (16 %) and meningiom (3 %). Mean total prescribed dose was 72.3 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness, RBE) delivered in 1.8-2 Gy (RBE) fractions. Mean follow-up was 3.8 years. Based on the pretreatment planning CT, SB dose distributions were reanalysed. Results: Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as gross tumour volume (GTV) plus 5-7 mm margins. Mean PTV was 560.22 cm{sup 3}. A mean of 93.2 % of the PTV was covered by at least 90 % of the prescribed dose. SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) receiving doses of 5, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 75 and 80 Gy (RBE) were calculated to give V5, V20, V30, V40, V50, V60, V70, V75 and V80 respectively. In 7/31 patients, PT was accomplished without any significant SB irradiation (V5 = 0). In 24/31 patients, mean maximum dose (Dmax) to SB was 64.1 Gy (RBE). Despite target doses of > 70 Gy (RBE), SB received > 50 and > 60 Gy (RBE) in only 61 and 54 % of patients, respectively. Mean SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) covered by different dose levels (Gy, RBE) were: V20 (n = 24): 45.1, V50 (n = 19): 17.7, V60 (n = 17): 7.6 and V70 (n = 12): 2.4. No acute toxicity {>=} grade 2 or late SB sequelae were observed. Conclusion: Small noncircumferential volumes of SB tolerated doses in excess of 60 Gy (RBE) without any clinically-significant late adverse effects. This small retrospective study has limited statistical power but encourages further efforts with higher patient numbers to define and establish high-dose threshold models for SB toxicity in modern radiation oncology. (orig.)

  15. Validation of visualized transgenic zebrafish as a high throughput model to assay bradycardia related cardio toxicity risk candidates.

    Wen, Dingsheng; Liu, Aiming; Chen, Feng; Yang, Julin; Dai, Renke

    2012-10-01

    Drug-induced QT prolongation usually leads to torsade de pointes (TdP), thus for drugs in the early phase of development this risk should be evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrated a visualized transgenic zebrafish as an in vivo high-throughput model to assay the risk of drug-induced QT prolongation. Zebrafish larvae 48 h post-fertilization expressing green fluorescent protein in myocardium were incubated with compounds reported to induce QT prolongation or block the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K⁺ current. The compounds sotalol, indapaminde, erythromycin, ofoxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin and roxithromycin were additionally administrated by microinjection into the larvae yolk sac. The ventricle heart rate was recorded using the automatic monitoring system after incubation or microinjection. As a result, 14 out of 16 compounds inducing dog QT prolongation caused bradycardia in zebrafish. A similar result was observed with 21 out of 26 compounds which block hERG current. Among the 30 compounds which induced human QT prolongation, 25 caused bradycardia in this model. Thus, the risk of compounds causing bradycardia in this transgenic zebrafish correlated with that causing QT prolongation and hERG K⁺ current blockage in established models. The tendency that high logP values lead to high risk of QT prolongation in this model was indicated, and non-sensitivity of this model to antibacterial agents was revealed. These data suggest application of this transgenic zebrafish as a high-throughput model to screen QT prolongation-related cardio toxicity of the drug candidates. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Novel high dose rate lip brachytherapy technique to improve dose homogeneity and reduce toxicity by customized mold

    Feldman, Jon; Appelbaum, Limor; Sela, Mordechay; Voskoboinik, Ninel; Kadouri, Sarit; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Orion, Itzhak; Meirovitz, Amichay

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a novel brachytherapy technique for lip Squamous Cell Carcinoma, utilizing a customized mold with embedded brachytherapy sleeves, which separates the lip from the mandible, and improves dose homogeneity. Seven patients with T2 lip cancer treated with a “sandwich” technique of High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy to the lip, consisting of interstitial catheters and a customized mold with embedded catheters, were reviewed for dosimetry and outcome using 3D planning. Dosimetric comparison was made between the “sandwich” technique to “classic” – interstitial catheters only plan. We compared dose volume histograms for Clinical Tumor Volume (CTV), normal tissue “hot spots” and mandible dose. We are reporting according to the ICRU 58 and calculated the Conformal Index (COIN) to show the advantage of our technique. The seven patients (ages 36–81 years, male) had median follow-up of 47 months. Four patients received Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy, 3 patients received brachytherapy alone. All achieved local control, with excellent esthetic and functional results. All patients are disease free. The Customized Mold Sandwich technique (CMS) reduced the high dose region receiving 150% (V150) by an average of 20% (range 1–47%), The low dose region (les then 90% of the prescribed dose) improved by 73% in average by using the CMS technique. The COIN value for the CMS was in average 0.92 as opposed to 0.88 for the interstitial catheter only. All differences (excluding the low dose region) were statistically significant. The CMS technique significantly reduces the high dose volume and increases treatment homogeneity. This may reduce the potential toxicity to the lip and adjacent mandible, and results in excellent tumor control, cosmetic and functionality

  17. High incidence of multinodular toxic goitre in the elderly population in a low iodine intake area vs. high incidence of Graves' disease in the young in a high iodine intake area

    Laurberg, P; Pedersen, K M; Vestergaard, H

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the optimum level of iodine intake for iodine supplementation programmes, or about the effects of the high levels of iodine intake that are found in some countries. We compared the incidence of different types of hyperthyroidism in East-Jutland Denmark with a low average...... that even mild iodine deficiency has a significant effect on population health, since it leads to a high incidence of autonomous thyroid nodules with hyperthyroidism in the elderly population. However, population iodine intake probably should not exceed a level much higher than that necessary to avoid...... iodine intake but no endemic goitre, and the incidence in Iceland with a relatively high iodine intake. Hyperthyroidism was more common in East-Jutland than in Iceland, due to a much higher incidence of multinodular toxic goitre and also of single toxic adenoma. Most of the patients with these diseases...

  18. Lithium Improves Survival of PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells in High-Density Cultures and after Exposure to Toxic Compounds

    Cinzia Fabrizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved mechanism that allows for the degradation of long-lived proteins and entire organelles which are driven to lysosomes for digestion. Different kinds of stressful conditions such as starvation are able to induce autophagy. Lithium and rapamycin are potent autophagy inducers with different molecular targets. Lithium stimulates autophagy by decreasing the intracellular myo-inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate levels, while rapamycin acts through the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. The correlation between autophagy and cell death is still a matter of debate especially in transformed cells. In fact, the execution of autophagy can protect cells from death by promptly removing damaged organelles such as mitochondria. Nevertheless, an excessive use of the autophagic machinery can drive cells to death via a sort of self-cannibalism. Our data show that lithium (used within its therapeutic window stimulates the overgrowth of the rat Pheochromocytoma cell line PC12. Besides, lithium and rapamycin protect PC12 cells from toxic compounds such as thapsigargin and trimethyltin. Taken together these data indicate that pharmacological activation of autophagy allows for the survival of Pheochromocytoma cells in stressful conditions such as high-density cultures and exposure to toxins.

  19. Assessing cellular toxicities in fibroblasts upon exposure to lipid-based nanoparticles: a high content analysis approach

    Solmesky, Leonardo J.; Shuman, Michal; Goldsmith, Meir; Weil, Miguel; Peer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely used for the delivery of drugs and nucleic acids. Although most of them are considered safe, there is confusing evidence in the literature regarding their potential cellular toxicities. Moreover, little is known about the recovery process cells undergo after a cytotoxic insult. We have previously studied the systemic effects of common LNPs with different surface charge (cationic, anionic, neutral) and revealed that positively charged LNPs ((+)LNPs) activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and induce interferon response by acting as an agonist of Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. In this study, we focused on the response of human fibroblasts exposed to LNPs and their cellular recovery process. To this end, we used image-based high content analysis (HCA). Using this strategy, we were able to show simultaneously, in several intracellular parameters, that fibroblasts can recover from the cytotoxic effects of (+)LNPs. The use of HCA opens new avenues in understanding cellular response and nanotoxicity and may become a valuable tool for screening safe materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. Assessing cellular toxicities in fibroblasts upon exposure to lipid-based nanoparticles: a high content analysis approach

    Solmesky, Leonardo J; Weil, Miguel; Shuman, Michal; Goldsmith, Meir; Peer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely used for the delivery of drugs and nucleic acids. Although most of them are considered safe, there is confusing evidence in the literature regarding their potential cellular toxicities. Moreover, little is known about the recovery process cells undergo after a cytotoxic insult. We have previously studied the systemic effects of common LNPs with different surface charge (cationic, anionic, neutral) and revealed that positively charged LNPs ((+)LNPs) activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and induce interferon response by acting as an agonist of Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. In this study, we focused on the response of human fibroblasts exposed to LNPs and their cellular recovery process. To this end, we used image-based high content analysis (HCA). Using this strategy, we were able to show simultaneously, in several intracellular parameters, that fibroblasts can recover from the cytotoxic effects of (+)LNPs. The use of HCA opens new avenues in understanding cellular response and nanotoxicity and may become a valuable tool for screening safe materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  1. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  2. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  3. In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte Toxicity and Bacteria Genotoxicity Evaluation of High Energy Chemicals for Replacement of Hydrazine

    Husain, S

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to develop methods to predict the toxicological response of newly synthesized chemicals that are of interest to the US Air Force, in vitro rat hepatocyte toxicity and bacteria (Salmonella...

  4. "Air Toxics under the Big Sky": Examining the Effectiveness of Authentic Scientific Research on High School Students' Science Skills and Interest

    Ward, Tony J.; Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    "Air Toxics Under the Big Sky" is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. This research explored: (1)…

  5. The influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexaterelated toxicity and survival in children with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma

    Erculj Nina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. We evaluated the influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX related toxicity in paediatric patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. Patients and methods. In total, 30 NHL patients were genotyped for selected folate pathway polymorphisms.

  6. Biosynthesis, mosquitocidal and antibacterial properties of Toddalia asiatica-synthesized silver nanoparticles: do they impact predation of guppy Poecilia reticulata against the filariasis mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus?

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Venus, Joseph Selvaraj Eugine; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Bedini, Stefano; Conti, Barbara; Nicoletti, Marcello; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. Furthermore, pathogens and parasites polluting water also constitute a severe plague for populations of developing countries. In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgN) were biosynthesized a cheap aqueous extract of T. asiatica leaves as reducing and stabilizing agent. The formation of nanoparticle was confirmed by surface Plasmon resonance band illustrated in UV-vis spectrophotometer. AgN were characterized by FTIR, SEM, EDX, and XRD analyses. AgN were mostly spherical in shape, crystalline in nature, with face-centered cubic geometry, and their mean size was 25-30 nm. T. asiatica aqueous extract and green-synthesized AgN showed excellent larvicidal and pupicidal toxicity against the filariasis vector Culex quinqufasciatus, both in laboratory and field experiments. AgN LC50 ranged from 16.48 (I instar larvae) to 31.83 ppm (pupae). T. asiatica-synthesized were also highly effective in inhibiting growth of Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhi using the agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration protocol. Lastly, we evaluated if sublethal doses of nanoparticles affect predation rates of fishes, Poecilia reticulata, against C. quinquefasciatus. In AgN-contaminated environment, predation of guppies against mosquito larvae was slightly higher over normal laboratory conditions. Overall, this study highlighted that T. asiatica-synthesized AgN are easy to produce, stable over time, and may be employed at low dosages to reduce populations of filariasis vectors, without detrimental effects on predation rates of mosquito natural enemies.

  7. Toxicity of seaweed-synthesized silver nanoparticles against the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus and its impact on predation efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops longisetus.

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Ayyappan, Suganya; Dinesh, Devakumar; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Suresh, Udaiyan

    2015-06-01

    Nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide are threatened by lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic infection that leads to a disease commonly known as elephantiasis. Filariasis is vectored by mosquitoes, with special reference to the genus Culex. The main control tool against mosquito larvae is represented by treatments with organophosphates and insect growth regulators, with negative effects on human health and the environment. Recently, green-synthesized nanoparticles have been proposed as highly effective larvicidals against mosquito vectors. In this research, we attempted a reply to the following question: do green-synthesized nanoparticles affect predation rates of copepods against mosquito larvae? We proposed a novel method of seaweed-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the frond extract of Caulerpa scalpelliformis. The toxicity of the seaweed extract and silver nanoparticles was assessed against the filarial vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Then, we evaluated the predatory efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops longisetus against larval instars of C. quinquefasciatus in a nanoparticle-contaminated water environment. Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In mosquitocidal assays, the LC₅₀ values of the C. scalpelliformis extract against C. quinquefasciatus were 31.38 ppm (I), 46.49 ppm (II), 75.79 ppm (III), 102.26 ppm (IV), and 138.89 ppm (pupa), while LC₅₀ of silver nanoparticles were 3.08 ppm, (I), 3.49 ppm (II), 4.64 ppm (III), 5.86 ppm (IV), and 7.33 ppm (pupa). The predatory efficiency of the copepod M. longisetus in the control treatment was 78 and 59% against I and II instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. In a nanoparticle-contaminated environment, predation efficiency was 84 and 63%, respectively. Predation was higher against first instar larvae over other instars

  8. The influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate-related toxicity and survival in children with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma

    Erculj, Nina; Kotnik, Barbara Faganel; Debeljak, Marusa; Jazbec, Janez; Dolzan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) related toxicity in paediatric patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods In total, 30 NHL patients were genotyped for selected folate pathway polymorphisms. Results Carriers of at least one MTHFR 677T allele had significantly higher MTX area under the time-concentration curve levels at third MTX cycle (P = 0.003). These patients were also at higher odds of leucopoenia (P = 0.006) or thrombocytopenia (P = 0.041) and had higher number of different HD-MTX-related toxicity (P = 0.035) compared to patients with wild-type genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest an important role of MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism in the development of HD-MTX-related toxicity in children with NHL. PMID:25177243

  9. The influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate-related toxicity and survival in children with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma

    Erculj, Nina; Kotnik, Barbara Faganel; Debeljak, Marusa; Jazbec, Janez; Dolzan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) related toxicity in paediatric patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In total, 30 NHL patients were genotyped for selected folate pathway polymorphisms. Carriers of at least one MTHFR 677T allele had significantly higher MTX area under the time-concentration curve levels at third MTX cycle (P = 0.003). These patients were also at higher odds of leucopoenia (P = 0.006) or thrombocytopenia (P = 0.041) and had higher number of different HD-MTX-related toxicity (P = 0.035) compared to patients with wild-type genotype. Our results suggest an important role of MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism in the development of HD-MTX-related toxicity in children with NHL

  10. Toxic Elements

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors to h...

  11. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  12. Geochemistry of Toxic Elements and Their Removal via the Preparation of High-Uranium Coal in Southwestern China

    Piaopiao Duan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High-uranium (U coal is the dominant form of coal in Southwestern China. However, directly utilizing this resource can also harm the environment because this element is radioactive; it is, therefore, necessary to clean this kind of coal before burning. This research studied the geochemistry of toxic elements and their partitioning during the preparation of high-U coal in China. The results show that high-U coals are mainly distributed in Southwestern China and are characterized by a high organic sulfur (S content and vanadium (V-chromium (Cr-molybdenum (Mo-U element assemblage. These elements are well-correlated with one another, but are all negatively related to ash yield, indicating that all four are syngenetic in origin and associated with organic materials. A mineralogical analysis shows that U in Ganhe and Rongyang coal occurs within fine-grained anatase, clay minerals, guadarramite, and pyrite, while V occurs in clay minerals, pyrite, and dolomite, and Cr occurs in dolomite. Other elements, such as fluorine (F, lead (Pb, selenium (Se, and mercury (Hg, mainly occur in pyrite. By applying a gravity separation method to separate minerals from coal, the content of the enrichment element assemblage of V-Cr-Mo-U in Rongyang coal is still shown to be higher than, or close to, that of the original feed because this element assemblage is derived from hydrothermal fluids during syngenetic or early diagenetic phases, but other elements (beryllium [Be], F, manganese [Mn], zinc [Zn], Pb, arsenic [As], Se, Hg can be efficiently removed. Once cleaned, the coal obtained by gravity separation was subject to a flotation test to separate minerals; these results indicate that while a portion of V and Cr can be removed, Mo and U remain difficult to extract. It is evident that the two most commonly utilized industrialized coal preparation methods, gravity separation and flotation, cannot effectively remove U from coal where this element occurs in large

  13. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy delivered in two fractions within one day for favorable/intermediate-risk prostate cancer: preliminary toxicity data.

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-07-01

    To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions

  14. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  15. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6–40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with

  16. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  17. Tackling the growing threat of dengue: Phyllanthus niruri-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their mosquitocidal properties against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Suresh, Udaiyan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Marcello; Barnard, Donald R; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandramohan, Balamurugan

    2015-04-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of devastating pathogens and parasites, causing millions of deaths every year. Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. Recently, transmission has strongly increased in urban and semiurban areas, becoming a major international public health concern. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of dengue. The use of synthetic insecticides to control Aedes mosquitoes lead to high operational costs and adverse nontarget effects. In this scenario, eco-friendly control tools are a priority. We proposed a novel method to synthesize silver nanoparticles using the aqueous leaf extract of Phyllanthus niruri, a cheap and nontoxic material. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver nanostructures showed a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the surface plasmon resonance band of nanoparticles. SEM analyses of the synthesized nanoparticles showed a mean size of 30-60 nm. EDX spectrum showed the chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles. XRD highlighted that the nanoparticles are crystalline in nature with face-centered cubic geometry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of nanoparticles exhibited prominent peaks 3,327.63, 2,125.87, 1,637.89, 644.35, 597.41, and 554.63 cm(-1). In laboratory assays, the aqueous extract of P. niruri was toxic against larval instars (I-IV) and pupae of A. aegypti. LC50 was 158.24 ppm (I), 183.20 ppm (II), 210.53 ppm (III), 210.53 ppm (IV), and 358.08 ppm (pupae). P. niruri-synthesized nanoparticles were highly effective against A. aegypti, with LC50 of 3.90 ppm (I), 5.01 ppm (II), 6.2 ppm (III), 8.9 ppm (IV), and 13.04 ppm (pupae). In the field, the application of silver nanoparticles (10 × LC50) lead to A. aegypti larval reduction of 47.6%, 76.7% and 100%, after 24, 48, and 72 h, while the P. niruri extract lead to 39.9%, 69.2 % and 100 % of reduction, respectively. In adulticidal experiments, P. niruri extract

  18. High-dose-rate stereotactic body radiation therapy for postradiation therapy locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma: Preliminary prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity assessment.

    Fuller, Donald B; Wurzer, James; Shirazi, Reza; Bridge, Stephen S; Law, Jonathan; Mardirossian, George

    2015-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate following radiation therapy (RT) present a challenging problem. We prospectively evaluated the use of "high-dose-rate-like" prostate stereotactic body RT (SBRT) salvage for this circumstance, evaluating prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity. Between February 2009 and March 2014, 29 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent locally prostate cancer >2 years post-RT were treated. Median prior RT dose was 73.8 Gy and median interval to SBRT salvage was 88 months. Median recurrence Gleason score was 7 (79% was ≥7). Pre-existing RT toxicity >grade 1 was a reason for exclusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-defined prostate volume including any suspected extraprostatic extension, comprising the planning target volume. A total of 34 Gy/5 fractions was given, delivering a heterogeneous, high-dose-rate-like dose-escalation pattern. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Twenty-nine treated patients had a median 24-month follow-up (range, 3-60 months). A median pre-SBRT salvage baseline prostate-specific antigen level of 3.1 ng/mL decreased to 0.65 ng/mL and 0.16 ng/mL at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Actuarial 2-year biochemical disease-free survival measured 82%, with no local failures. Toxicity >grade 1 was limited to the genitourinary domain, with 18% grade 2 or higher and 7% grade 3 or higher. No gastrointestinal toxicity >grade 1 occurred. Two-year disease-free survival is encouraging, and the prostate-specific antigen response kinetic appears comparable with that seen in de novo patients treated with SBRT, albeit still a preliminary finding. Grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity was occasionally seen with no obvious predictive factor. Noting that our only brachytherapy case was 1 of the 2 cases with ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, caution is recommended treating these patients. SBRT salvage of post-RT local recurrence

  19. Introducing Toxics

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present their work in as much detail as they wish. Toxics will publish original research papers, conventional reviews, meta-analyses, short communications, theoretical papers, case reports, commentaries and policy perspectives, and book reviews (Book reviews will be solicited and should not be submitted without invitation. Toxins and toxicants concern individuals from a wide range of disciplines, and Toxics is interested in receiving papers that represent the full range of approaches applied to their study, including in vitro studies, studies that use experimental animal or non-animal models, studies of humans or other biological populations, and mathematical modeling. We are excited to get underway and look forward to working with authors in the scientific and medical communities and providing them with a novel venue for sharing their work. [...

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus × giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.

    Firmin, Stéphane; Labidi, Sonia; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Tisserant, Benoit; Nsanganwimana, Florian; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dalpé, Yolande; Grandmougin, Anne; Douay, Francis; Shirali, Pirouz; Verdin, Anthony; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2015-09-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-assisted phytoremediation could constitute an ecological and economic method in polluted soil rehabilitation programs. The aim of this work was to characterize the trace element (TE) phytoremediation potential of mycorrhizal Miscanthus × giganteus. To understand the mechanisms involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis tolerance to TE toxicity, the fatty acid compositions and several stress oxidative biomarkers were compared in the roots and leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus cultivated under field conditions in either TE-contaminated or control soils. TEs were accumulated in greater amounts in roots, but the leaves were the organ most affected by TE contamination and were characterized by a strong decrease in fatty acid contents. TE-induced oxidative stress in leaves was confirmed by an increase in the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). TE contamination decreased the GSSG/GSH ratio in the leaves of exposed plants, while peroxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in leaves and in whole plants, respectively. AMF inoculation also increased root colonization in the presence of TE contamination. The mycorrhizal colonization determined a decrease in SOD activity in the whole plant and PO activities in leaves and induced a significant increase in the fatty acid content in leaves and a decrease in MDA formation in whole plants. These results suggested that mycorrhization is able to confer protection against oxidative stress induced by soil pollution. Our findings suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation could be used as a bioaugmentation technique, facilitating Miscanthus cultivation on highly TE-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with ≥70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  2. Raising awareness of new psychoactive substances: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity screening of 'legal high' packages containing synthetic cathinones.

    Araújo, Ana Margarida; Valente, Maria João; Carvalho, Márcia; Dias da Silva, Diana; Gaspar, Helena; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The world's status quo on recreational drugs has dramatically changed in recent years due to the rapid emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), represented by new narcotic or psychotropic drugs, in pure form or in preparation, which are not controlled by international conventions, but that may pose a public health threat comparable with that posed by substances listed in these conventions. These NPS, also known as 'legal highs' or 'smart drugs', are typically sold via Internet or 'smartshops' as legal alternatives to controlled substances, being announced as 'bath salts' and 'plant feeders' and is often sought after for consumption especially among young people. Although NPS have the biased reputation of being safe, the vast majority has hitherto not been tested and several fatal cases have been reported, namely for synthetic cathinones, with pathological patterns comparable with amphetamines. Additionally, the unprecedented speed of appearance and distribution of the NPS worldwide brings technical difficulties in the development of analytical procedures and risk assessment in real time. In this study, 27 products commercialized as 'plant feeders' were chemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was also evaluated, for the first time, the in vitro hepatotoxic effects of individual synthetic cathinones, namely methylone, pentedrone, 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Two commercial mixtures ('Bloom' and 'Blow') containing mainly cathinone derivatives were also tested, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was used as the reference drug. The study allowed the identification of 19 compounds, showing that synthetic cathinones are the main active compounds present in these products. Qualitative and quantitative variability was found in products sold with the same trade name in matching or different 'smartshops'. In the toxicity studies performed in

  3. Synthesis and characterization of nitrile functionalized silver(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: DNA binding, cleavage studies, antibacterial properties and mosquitocidal activity against the dengue vector, Aedes albopictus.

    Asekunowo, Patrick O; Haque, Rosenani A; Razali, Mohd R; Avicor, Silas W; Wajidi, Mustafa F F

    2018-04-25

    A series of four benzimidazolium based nitrile-functionalized mononuclear-Ag(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene and binuclear-Ag(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene (Ag(I)-NHC) hexafluorophosphate complexes (5b-8b) were synthesized by reacting the corresponding hexafluorophosphate salts (1b-4b) with Ag 2 O in acetonitrile, respectively. These compounds were characterized by 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, IR, UV-visible spectroscopic techniques, elemental analyses and molar conductivity. Additionally, 8b was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Preliminary in vitro antibacterial evaluation was conducted for all the compounds against two standard bacteria; gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains. Most of the Ag(I)-NHC complexes (5b-8b) showed moderate to good antibacterial activity with MIC values in the range of 12.5-100 μg/mL. Especially, compound 8b exhibited promising anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity with a low MIC value (12.5 μg/mL). However, all the hexafluorophosphate salts (1b-4b) were inactive against the bacteria strains. The preliminary interactive investigation revealed that the most active compound, 8b, could effectively intercalate into DNA to form 8b-DNA complex which shows a better binding ability for DNA (K b  = 3.627 × 10 6 ) than the complexes 5b-7b (2.177 × 10 6 , 8.672 × 10 5 and 6.665 × 10 5 , respectively). Nuclease activity of the complexes on plasmid DNA and Aedes albopictus genomic DNA was time-dependent, although minimal. The complexes were larvicidal to the mosquito, with 5b, 6b and 8b being highly active. Developmental progression from the larval to the adult stage was affected by the complexes, progressively being toxic to the insect's development with increasing concentration. These indicate the potential use of these complexes as control agents against bacteria and the dengue mosquito Ae. albopictus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  4. Critical analysis of 3-D organoid in vitro cell culture models for high-throughput drug candidate toxicity assessments.

    Astashkina, Anna; Grainger, David W

    2014-04-01

    Drug failure due to toxicity indicators remains among the primary reasons for staggering drug attrition rates during clinical studies and post-marketing surveillance. Broader validation and use of next-generation 3-D improved cell culture models are expected to improve predictive power and effectiveness of drug toxicological predictions. However, after decades of promising research significant gaps remain in our collective ability to extract quality human toxicity information from in vitro data using 3-D cell and tissue models. Issues, challenges and future directions for the field to improve drug assay predictive power and reliability of 3-D models are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial for high risk prostate cancer patients: interim analysis of acute toxicity and quality of life in 124 patients

    Norkus, Darius; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Karklelyte, Agata; Engels, Benedikt; Versmessen, Harijati; Griskevicius, Romas; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Janulionis, Ernestas

    2013-01-01

    The α/β ratio for prostate cancer is postulated being in the range of 0.8 to 2.2 Gy, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. To do so, we carried out a randomized trial comparing hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in high-risk prostate cancer. Here, we report on acute toxicity and quality of life (QOL) for the first 124 randomized patients. The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (5 fractions/week) (Arm 1) to 63 Gy in 20 fractions (4 fractions/week) (Arm 2) (IG-IMRT). Prophylactic pelvic lymph node irradiation with 46 Gy in 23 fractions sequentially (Arm 1) and 44 Gy in 20 fractions simultaneously (Arm 2) was applied. All patients had long term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started before RT. Both physician-rated acute toxicity and patient-reported QOL using EPIC questionnaire are described. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Compared to conventional fractionation (Arm 1), GI and GU toxicity both developed significantly earlier but also disappeared earlier in the Arm 2, reaching significant differences from Arm 1 at week 8 and 9. In multivariate analyses, only parameter shown to be related to increased acute Grade ≥1 GU toxicity was the study Arm 2 (p = 0.049). There were no statistically significant differences of mean EPIC scores in any domain and sub-scales. The clinically relevant decrease (CRD) in EPIC urinary domain was significantly higher in Arm 2 at month 1 with a faster recovery at month 3 as compared to Arm 1. Hypofractionation at 3.15 Gy per fraction to 63 Gy within 5 weeks was well tolerated. The GI and GU physician-rated acute toxicity both developed earlier but recovered faster using hypofractionation. There was a correlation between acute toxicity and bowel and urinary QOL outcomes. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the significance of these

  6. Antimony Toxicity

    Shyam Sundar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically.

  7. Antimony Toxicity

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The...

  8. Oxygen toxicity

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  9. Toxicity of (Burseraceae Leaf Fractions against Immature Stages of (Giles and (Say (Diptera: Culicidae

    Lame Younoussa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vectors of several human pathogens, and great attention has recently been placed on insecticides from plant-derived products, in search for mosquito control agents. This study, thus, investigated the potency of Boswellia dalzielii methanol leaf extract and its four fractions as mosquito ovicide, larvicide, and pupicide against Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus . The plant products were tested at the following concentrations: 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm on eggs and 312.5, 625, 1250, and 2500 ppm on the larvae and pupae of the mosquitoes. For results, hatchability of A. gambiae eggs was reduced to 5% with n -hexane fraction at 2000 ppm. Among the plant products tested, n -hexane fraction was most toxic against A. gambiae (LC 50 = 385.9 ppm and C. quinquefasciatus (LC 50 = 3394.9 ppm. The n -hexane fraction of B. dalzielii might be used as a mosquitocidal agent in the breeding sites of A. gambiae and C. quinquefasciatus .

  10. Experimental determinations of soil copper toxicity to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth in highly different copper spiked and aged soils

    Christiansen, Karen Søgaard; Borggaard, Ole K.; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge about factors and conditions determining copper (Cu) toxicity in soil is needed for predicting plant growth in various Cu-contaminated soils. Therefore, effects of Cu on growth (biomass production) of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were tested on seven selected, very different soils...

  11. pH-Dependent Toxicity of High Aspect Ratio ZnO Nanowires in Macrophages Due to Intracellular Dissolution

    H. Müller, Karin; Kulkarni, Jaideep; Motskin, Michael; Goode, Angela; Winship, Peter; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2010-01-01

    exploitation. In this study, ZnO nanowires were found to be toxic to human monocyte macrophages (HMMs) at similar concentrations as ZnCl2. Confocal microscopy on live cells confirmed a rise in intracellular Zn2+ concentrations prior to cell death. In vitro, Zn

  12. Stress Response Monitoring of Photoautotrophic Higher Plant Suspension Cultures by Fluorescence Imaging for High-Throughput Toxic Compound Screening

    Segečová, Anna; Červený, Jan; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2017), s. 678-692 ISSN 2152-2197 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17367S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Toxins * Toxicants * Ecotoxicology * PAM Chlorophyll Fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  13. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  14. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  15. Investigating the application of a nitroreductase-expressing transgenic zebrafish line for high-throughput toxicity testing

    Anna C. Chlebowski

    Full Text Available Nitroreductase enzymes are responsible for the reduction of nitro functional groups to amino functional groups, and are found in a range of animal models, zebrafish (Danio rerio excluded. Transgenic zebrafish models have been developed for tissue-specific cell ablation, which use nitroreductase to ablate specific tissues or cell types following exposure to the non-toxic pro-drug metronidazole (MTZ. When metabolized by nitroreductase, MTZ produces a potent cytotoxin, which specifically ablates the tissue in which metabolism occurs. Uses, beyond tissue-specific cell ablation, are possible for the hepatocyte-specific Tg(l-fabp:CFP-NTRs891 zebrafish line, including investigations of the role of nitroreductase in the toxicity of nitrated compounds. The hepatic ablation characteristics of this transgenic line were explored, in order to expand its potential uses. Embryos were exposed at 48, 72, or 96 h post fertilization (hpf to a range of MTZ concentrations, and the ablation profiles were compared. Ablation occurred at a 10-fold lower concentration than previously reported. Embryos were exposed to a selection of other compounds, with and without MTZ, in order to investigate alternative uses for this transgenic line. Test compounds were selected based on: their ability to undergo nitroreduction, known importance of hepatic metabolism to toxicity, and known pharmaceutical hepatotoxins. Selected compounds included nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs, the PAHs retene and benzo[a]pyrene, and the pharmaceuticals acetaminophen and flutamide. The results suggest a range of potential roles of the liver in the toxicity of these compounds, and highlight the additional uses of this transgenic model in toxicity testing. Keywords: Zebrafish, Transgenic, Nitroreductase, Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, Tissue ablation, Pharmaceuticals

  16. High-Density Real-Time PCR-Based in Vivo Toxicogenomic Screen to Predict Organ-Specific Toxicity

    Laszlo G. Puskas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxicogenomics, based on the temporal effects of drugs on gene expression, is able to predict toxic effects earlier than traditional technologies by analyzing changes in genomic biomarkers that could precede subsequent protein translation and initiation of histological organ damage. In the present study our objective was to extend in vivo toxicogenomic screening from analyzing one or a few tissues to multiple organs, including heart, kidney, brain, liver and spleen. Nanocapillary quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR was used in the study, due to its higher throughput, sensitivity and reproducibility, and larger dynamic range compared to DNA microarray technologies. Based on previous data, 56 gene markers were selected coding for proteins with different functions, such as proteins for acute phase response, inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic processes, heat-shock response, cell cycle/apoptosis regulation and enzymes which are involved in detoxification. Some of the marker genes are specific to certain organs, and some of them are general indicators of toxicity in multiple organs. Utility of the nanocapillary QRT-PCR platform was demonstrated by screening different references, as well as discovery of drug-like compounds for their gene expression profiles in different organs of treated mice in an acute experiment. For each compound, 896 QRT-PCR were done: four organs were used from each of the treated four animals to monitor the relative expression of 56 genes. Based on expression data of the discovery gene set of toxicology biomarkers the cardio- and nephrotoxicity of doxorubicin and sulfasalazin, the hepato- and nephrotoxicity of rotenone, dihydrocoumarin and aniline, and the liver toxicity of 2,4-diaminotoluene could be confirmed. The acute heart and kidney toxicity of the active metabolite SN-38 from its less toxic prodrug, irinotecan could be differentiated, and two novel gene markers for hormone replacement therapy were identified

  17. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner; Bruner, Deborah W.; Lin, Lilie L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients’ charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2–3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  18. Four common pesticides, their mixtures and a formulation solvent in the hive environment have high oral toxicity to honey bee larvae.

    Wanyi Zhu

    Full Text Available Recently, the widespread distribution of pesticides detected in the hive has raised serious concerns about pesticide exposure on honey bee (Apis mellifera L. health. A larval rearing method was adapted to assess the chronic oral toxicity to honey bee larvae of the four most common pesticides detected in pollen and wax--fluvalinate, coumaphos, chlorothalonil, and chloropyrifos--tested alone and in all combinations. All pesticides at hive-residue levels triggered a significant increase in larval mortality compared to untreated larvae by over two fold, with a strong increase after 3 days of exposure. Among these four pesticides, honey bee larvae were most sensitive to chlorothalonil compared to adults. Synergistic toxicity was observed in the binary mixture of chlorothalonil with fluvalinate at the concentrations of 34 mg/L and 3 mg/L, respectively; whereas, when diluted by 10 fold, the interaction switched to antagonism. Chlorothalonil at 34 mg/L was also found to synergize the miticide coumaphos at 8 mg/L. The addition of coumaphos significantly reduced the toxicity of the fluvalinate and chlorothalonil mixture, the only significant non-additive effect in all tested ternary mixtures. We also tested the common 'inert' ingredient N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone at seven concentrations, and documented its high toxicity to larval bees. We have shown that chronic dietary exposure to a fungicide, pesticide mixtures, and a formulation solvent have the potential to impact honey bee populations, and warrants further investigation. We suggest that pesticide mixtures in pollen be evaluated by adding their toxicities together, until complete data on interactions can be accumulated.

  19. Four common pesticides, their mixtures and a formulation solvent in the hive environment have high oral toxicity to honey bee larvae.

    Zhu, Wanyi; Schmehl, Daniel R; Mullin, Christopher A; Frazier, James L

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the widespread distribution of pesticides detected in the hive has raised serious concerns about pesticide exposure on honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health. A larval rearing method was adapted to assess the chronic oral toxicity to honey bee larvae of the four most common pesticides detected in pollen and wax--fluvalinate, coumaphos, chlorothalonil, and chloropyrifos--tested alone and in all combinations. All pesticides at hive-residue levels triggered a significant increase in larval mortality compared to untreated larvae by over two fold, with a strong increase after 3 days of exposure. Among these four pesticides, honey bee larvae were most sensitive to chlorothalonil compared to adults. Synergistic toxicity was observed in the binary mixture of chlorothalonil with fluvalinate at the concentrations of 34 mg/L and 3 mg/L, respectively; whereas, when diluted by 10 fold, the interaction switched to antagonism. Chlorothalonil at 34 mg/L was also found to synergize the miticide coumaphos at 8 mg/L. The addition of coumaphos significantly reduced the toxicity of the fluvalinate and chlorothalonil mixture, the only significant non-additive effect in all tested ternary mixtures. We also tested the common 'inert' ingredient N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone at seven concentrations, and documented its high toxicity to larval bees. We have shown that chronic dietary exposure to a fungicide, pesticide mixtures, and a formulation solvent have the potential to impact honey bee populations, and warrants further investigation. We suggest that pesticide mixtures in pollen be evaluated by adding their toxicities together, until complete data on interactions can be accumulated.

  20. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  1. Comparison of patient-reported acute urinary and sexual toxicity scores in a 6- versus 2-fraction course of high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy monotherapy

    Ragab, Omar; Park, Sang-June; Zhang, Mingle; Wang, Jason; Velez, Maria; Demanes, David J.; Banerjee, Robyn; Patel, Shyamal; Kamrave, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    To identify differences in acute urinary and sexual toxicity between a 6-fraction and 2-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy monotherapy regimen and correlate dosimetric constraints to short-term toxicity. A single institution retrospective study of 116 men with prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy from 2010 to 2015 was conducted. Eighty-one men had 7.25 Gy × 6-fractions and 35 men had 13.5 Gy × 2-fractions. Patients had two CT-planned implants spaced 1–2 weeks apart. Patient baseline characteristics, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) scores were collected pre-treatment and 3, 6 and 12 months post-implantation. Mixed effect modelling was undertaken to compare baseline, 1–6 month and 7–12 month scores between groups. Poisson regression analysis was performed to correlate dosimetric constraints with acute toxicity. There was no difference between baseline and post-implantation IPSS scores between 6-fraction and 2-fraction groups. SHIM scores for men treated with 6-fractions had a steeper decline at 1–6 months, but resolved at 7–12 months. Pre-treatment alpha-blocker use correlated with worse short-term acute urinary toxicity. Worsened SHIM score correlated with increasing age, diabetes mellitus and androgen-deprivation therapy. In a dosimetric analysis of outcomes, prostate V150 dose and bladder wall (D01.cc, D1cc, D2cc) dose correlated with increased IPSS score. No increased acute genitourinary or sexual dysfunction has been observed in men when transitioning from 6-fraction to 2-fraction HDR monotherapy. A dosimetric correlation was found between the V150 and bladder wall doses for acute urinary toxicity. Future research should continue to standardize and validate dose constraints for prostate HDR monotherapy patients.

  2. E-cigarette puffing patterns associated with high and low nicotine e-liquid strength: effects on toxicant and carcinogen exposure.

    Cox, Sharon; Kośmider, Leon; McRobbie, Hayden; Goniewicz, Maciej; Kimber, Catherine; Doig, Mira; Dawkins, Lynne

    2016-09-20

    Contrary to intuition, use of lower strength nicotine e-liquids might not offer reduced health risk if compensatory puffing behaviour occurs. Compensatory puffing (e.g. more frequent, longer puffs) or user behaviour (increasing the wattage) can lead to higher temperatures at which glycerine and propylene glycol (solvents used in e-liquids) undergo decomposition to carbonyl compounds, including the carcinogens formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. This study aims to document puffing patterns and user behaviour associated with using high and low strength nicotine e-liquid and associated toxicant/carcinogen exposure in experienced e-cigarette users (known as vapers herein). A counterbalanced repeated measures design. Non-tobacco smoking vapers; have used an e-cigarette for ≥3 months; currently using nicotine strength e-liquid ≥12mg/mL and a second or third generation device. This study will measure puffing patterns in vapers whilst they use high and low strength nicotine e-liquid under fixed and user-defined settings, each for a week. The 4 counterbalanced conditions are: i) low strength (6mg/mL), fixed settings; ii) low strength user-defined settings; iii) high strength (18mg/mL) fixed settings; iv) high strength user-defined settings. Biomarkers of exposure to toxicants and carcinogens will be measured in urine. In the second phase of this study, toxicant yields will be measured in aerosol generated using a smoking machine operated to replicate the puffing behaviours of each participant. i) Puffing patterns (mean puff number, puff duration, inter-puff interval and mL of liquid consumed) and user behaviour (changes to device settings: voltage and air-flow) associated with using high and low strength nicotine e-liquid. ii) Toxicant/carcinogen exposure associated with the puffing patterns/device settings used by our participants. i) Subjective effects. ii) comparisons with toxicant exposure from tobacco smoke (using documented evidence) and with recommended safety limits

  3. E-cigarette puffing patterns associated with high and low nicotine e-liquid strength: effects on toxicant and carcinogen exposure

    Sharon Cox

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrary to intuition, use of lower strength nicotine e-liquids might not offer reduced health risk if compensatory puffing behaviour occurs. Compensatory puffing (e.g. more frequent, longer puffs or user behaviour (increasing the wattage can lead to higher temperatures at which glycerine and propylene glycol (solvents used in e-liquids undergo decomposition to carbonyl compounds, including the carcinogens formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. This study aims to document puffing patterns and user behaviour associated with using high and low strength nicotine e-liquid and associated toxicant/carcinogen exposure in experienced e-cigarette users (known as vapers herein. Methods/design A counterbalanced repeated measures design. Participants: Non-tobacco smoking vapers; have used an e-cigarette for ≥3 months; currently using nicotine strength e-liquid ≥12mg/mL and a second or third generation device. Intervention: This study will measure puffing patterns in vapers whilst they use high and low strength nicotine e-liquid under fixed and user-defined settings, each for a week. The 4 counterbalanced conditions are: i low strength (6mg/mL, fixed settings; ii low strength user-defined settings; iii high strength (18mg/mL fixed settings; iv high strength user-defined settings. Biomarkers of exposure to toxicants and carcinogens will be measured in urine. In the second phase of this study, toxicant yields will be measured in aerosol generated using a smoking machine operated to replicate the puffing behaviours of each participant. Primary outcomes: i Puffing patterns (mean puff number, puff duration, inter-puff interval and mL of liquid consumed and user behaviour (changes to device settings: voltage and air-flow associated with using high and low strength nicotine e-liquid. ii Toxicant/carcinogen exposure associated with the puffing patterns/device settings used by our participants. Secondary outcomes: i Subjective effects. ii comparisons

  4. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  5. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  6. Radionuclide toxicity

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  7. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    Sveistrup, Joen; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  8. Mosquitocidal and antiplasmodial activity of Senna occidentalis (Cassiae) and Ocimum basilicum (Lamiaceae) from Maruthamalai hills against Anopheles stephensi and Plasmodium falciparum.

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Aarthi, Narayanan; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Paulpandi, Manickam; Chandirasekar, Ramachandran; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Higuchi, Akon; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Nicoletti, Marcello; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Each year, mosquito-borne diseases infect nearly 700 million people, resulting to more than 1 million deaths. In this study, we evaluated the larvicidal, pupicidal, and smoke toxicity of Senna occidentalis and Ocimum basilicum leaf extracts against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. Furthermore, the antiplasmodial activity of plant extracts was evaluated against chloroquine (CQ)-resistant (CQ-r) and CQ-sensitive (CQ-s) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In larvicidal and pupicidal experiments, S. occidentalis LC50 ranged from 31.05 (I instar larvae) to 75.15 ppm (pupae), and O. basilicum LC50 ranged from 29.69 (I instar larvae) to 69 ppm (pupae). Smoke toxicity experiments conducted against adults showed that S. occidentalis and O. basilicum coils evoked mortality rates comparable to the pyrethrin-based positive control (38, 52, and 42%, respectively). In antiplasmodial assays, Senna occidentalis 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) were 48.80 μg/ml (CQ-s) and 54.28 μg/ml (CQ-r), while O. basilicum IC50 were 68.14 μg/ml (CQ-s) and 67.27 μg/ml (CQ-r). Overall, these botanicals could be considered as potential sources of metabolites to build newer and safer malaria control tools.

  9. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance.

    Sveistrup, Joen; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-02-04

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1-2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5-7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction.

  10. The effects of sequential versus concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy on survival and toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytoma

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Grossman, Stuart A.; Piantadosi, Steven; Zeltzman, Michel; Wharam, Moody

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of sequential versus concurrent administration of cranial radiotherapy and cisplatin/carmustine (BCNU) chemotherapy on survival and toxicity in newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytomas. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, 101 patients were treated on 2 therapeutic protocols for malignant glioma that used the identical chemotherapy regimen but differed in the timing of cranial radiotherapy. The eligibility criteria for the 2 protocols were identical. In the first protocol (1988-1991, 52 patients), cisplatin 120 mg/BCNU 120 mg i.v. over 72 h, was given for 3 monthly cycles prior to cranial radiotherapy. After a response rate of 42%, with a median survival of 13 months was achieved with this sequential regimen, a successor protocol (1992-1996, 49 patients) was developed in which cranial radiotherapy began concurrently with the start of the identical chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy was delayed but not discontinued if prolonged grade III/IV hematologic toxicity was experienced, but protocol therapy was discontinued if disease progression or thromboembolic events occurred. Survival outcome and hematologic toxicity were compared for the patients treated on these protocols. Results: Seventy-seven percent of sequentially-treated patients and 68% of concurrently-treated patients completed all planned therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival was similar to concurrent or sequential administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (median 12.8 months vs. 13.8 months, respectively). Hematologic toxicity was significantly less in sequentially- versus concurrently-treated patients, with median nadir per cycle (2.9 vs. 1.8 x 10 3 /mm 3 ) (p < 0.001), and incidence of grade 3/4 leukopenia 40% versus 77% (p = 0.002). There was also an increase in platelet transfusion requirements in concurrently-treated patients, but no significant worsening of anemia. We postulate that the worsened leukopenia results from the effects of concurrent radiotherapy on

  11. High-efficiency liposomal encapsulation of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor leads to improved in vivo toxicity and tumor response profile

    Mukthavaram R

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rajesh Mukthavaram,1 Pengfei Jiang,1 Rohit Saklecha,1 Dmitri Simberg,3,4 Ila Sri Bharati,1 Natsuko Nomura,1 Ying Chao,1 Sandra Pastorino,1 Sandeep C Pingle,1 Valentina Fogal,1 Wolf Wrasidlo,1,2 Milan Makale,1,2 Santosh Kesari1,21Translational Neuro-Oncology Laboratories, 2Department of Neurosciences, 3Solid Tumor Therapeutics Program, Moores Cancer Center, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 4Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Staurosporine (STS is a potent pan-kinase inhibitor with marked activity against several chemotherapy-resistant tumor types in vitro. The translational progress of this compound has been hindered by poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. We sought to determine whether liposomal encapsulation of STS would enhance antitumor efficacy and reduce toxicity, thereby supporting the feasibility of further preclinical development. We developed a novel reverse pH gradient liposomal loading method for STS, with an optimal buffer type and drug-to-lipid ratio. Our approach produced 70% loading efficiency with good retention, and we provide, for the first time, an assessment of the in vivo antitumor activity of STS. A low intravenous dose (0.8 mg/kg inhibited U87 tumors in a murine flank model. Biodistribution showed preferential tumor accumulation, and body weight data, a sensitive index of STS toxicity, was unaffected by liposomal STS, but did decline with the free compound. In vitro experiments revealed that liposomal STS blocked Akt phosphorylation, induced poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage, and produced cell death via apoptosis. This study provides a basis to explore further the feasibility of liposomally encapsulated STS, and potentially related compounds for the management of resistant solid tumors.Keywords: liposomes, staurosporine, glioblastoma, biodistribution, efficacy

  12. Experimental determinations of soil copper toxicity to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth in highly different copper spiked and aged soils.

    Christiansen, Karen S; Borggaard, Ole K; Holm, Peter E; Vijver, Martina G; Hauschild, Michael Z; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge about factors and conditions determining copper (Cu) toxicity in soil is needed for predicting plant growth in various Cu-contaminated soils. Therefore, effects of Cu on growth (biomass production) of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were tested on seven selected, very different soils spiked with Cu and aged for 2 months at 35 °C. Cu toxicity was expressed as pEC50(Cu(2+)), i.e., the negative logarithm of the EC50(Cu(2+)) activity to plant growth. The determined pEC50(Cu(2+)) was significantly and positively correlated with both the analytically readily available soil pH and concentration of dissolved organic carbon [DOC] which together could explain 87% of the pEC50(Cu(2+)) variation according to the simple equation: pEC50(Cu(2+)) = 0.98 × pH + 345 × [DOC] - 0.27. Other soil characteristics, including the base cation concentrations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)), the cation exchange capacity at soil pH (ECEC), and at pH 7 (CEC7), soil organic carbon, clay content, and electric conductivity as well as the distribution coefficient (Kd) calculated as the ratio between total soil Cu and water-extractable Cu did not correlate significantly with pEC50(Cu(2+)). Consequently, Cu toxicity, expressed as the negative log of the Cu(2+) activity, to plant growth increases at increasing pH and DOC, which needs to be considered in future management of plant growth on Cu-contaminated soils. The developed regression equation allows identification of soil types in which the phytotoxicity potential of Cu is highest.

  13. Neoadjuvant Interdigitated Chemoradiotherapy Using Mesna, Doxorubicin, and Ifosfamide for Large, High-grade, Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: Improved Efficacy and Reduced Toxicity.

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Sen, Neilayan; Jeans, Elizabeth B; Miller, Luke; Batus, Marta; Gitelis, Steven; Wang, Dian; Abrams, Ross A

    2018-05-18

    Patients with large, high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) are at high risk for both local and distant recurrence. RTOG 95-14, using a regimen of neoadjuvant interdigitated chemoradiotherapy with mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine followed by surgery and 3 cycles of adjuvant mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine, demonstrated high rates of disease control at the cost of significant toxicity (83% grade 4, 5% grade 5). As such, this regimen has not been widely adopted. Herein, we report our institutional outcomes utilizing a modified interdigitated chemoradiotherapy regimen, without dacarbazine, and current radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques for high-risk STS. Adults with large (≥5 cm; median, 12.9 cm), grade 3 extremity STS who were prospectively treated as part of our institutional standard of care from 2008 to 2016 are included. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of mesna, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide (MAI) and 44 Gy (22 Gy in 11 fractions between cycles of MAI) after which patients underwent surgical resection and received 3 additional cycles of MAI. Twenty-six patients received the MAI treatment protocol. At a median follow-up of 47.3 months, 23 (88.5%) patients are still alive. Three year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival are 95.0%, 64.0%, and 95.0%, respectively. There have been no therapy-related deaths or secondary malignancies. The nonhematologic grade 4 toxicity rate was 7.7%. Neoadjuvant interdigitated MAI radiotherapy followed by resection and 3 cycles of adjuvant MAI has resulted in acceptable and manageable toxicity and highly favorable survival in patients at greatest risk for treatment failure.

  14. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    Wazer, David E.; Kaufman, Seth; Cuttino, Laurie; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 (≤3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively

  15. Corneal protection with high-molecular-weight hyaluronan against in vitro and in vivo sodium lauryl sulfate-induced toxic effects.

    Pauloin, Thierry; Dutot, Mélody; Liang, Hong; Chavinier, Emilie; Warnet, Jean-Michel; Rat, Patrice

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (HA-HMW) corneal protection against sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)-induced toxic effects with in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. In vitro experiments consisted of a human corneal epithelial cell line incubated with HA-HMW, rinsed, and incubated with SLS. Cell viability, oxidative stress, chromatin condensation, caspase-3, -8, -9, and P2X7 cell death receptor activation, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 production were investigated. In vivo experiments consisted of 36 New Zealand white rabbits treated for 3 days, 3 times per day, with HA-HMW or phosphate-buffered salt solution. At day 4, eyes were treated with SLS. Clinical observation and in vivo confocal microscopy using the Rostock Cornea Module of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph-II were performed to evaluate and to compare SLS-induced toxicity between eyes treated with HA-HMW and eyes treated with phosphate-buffered salt solution. In vitro data indicate that exposure of human corneal epithelial cells to HA-HMW significantly decreased SLS-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation cytokine production. In vivo data indicate that SLS cornea injuries, characterized by damaged corneal epithelium, damaged anterior stroma, and inflammatory infiltrations, were attenuated with HA-HMW treatment. A good correlation was seen between in vitro and in vivo findings showing that HA-HMW decreases SLS-induced toxic effects and protects cornea.

  16. High-throughput sequencing reveals microbial communities in drinking water treatment sludge from six geographically distributed plants, including potentially toxic cyanobacteria and pathogens.

    Xu, Hangzhou; Pei, Haiyan; Jin, Yan; Ma, Chunxia; Wang, Yuting; Sun, Jiongming; Li, Hongmin

    2018-04-10

    The microbial community structures of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) generated for raw water (RW) from different locations and with different source types - including river water, lake water and reservoir water -were investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Because the unit operations in the six DWTPs were similar, community composition in fresh sludge may be determined by microbial community in the corresponding RW. Although Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes were the dominant phyla among the six DWTS samples, no single phylum exhibited similar abundance across all the samples, owing to differences in total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, Al, Fe, and chloride in RW. Three genera of potentially toxic cyanobacteria (Planktothrix, Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis), and four potential pathogens (Escherichia coli, Bacteroides ovatus, Prevotella copri and Rickettsia) were found in sludge samples. Because proliferation of potentially toxic cyanobacteria and Rickettsia in RW was mainly affected by nutrients, while growth of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides ovatus and Prevotella copri in RW may be influenced by Fe, control of nutrients and Fe in RW is essential to decrease toxic cyanobacteria and pathogens in DWTS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are highly toxic to Culex quinquefasciatus with little non-target effects on larvivorous fishes.

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nataraj, Devaraj; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Madhavan, Jagannathan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Rajan, Mariappan; Thiruppathi, Kulandhaivel Palani; Kumar, Suresh; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    The control of filariasis vectors has been enhanced in several areas, but there are main challenges, including increasing resistance to insecticides and lack of cheap and eco-friendly products. The toxicity of iron (Fe 0 ) and iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated yet. We studied the larvicidal and pupicidal activity of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles against Culex quinquefasciatus. Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles produced by green (using a Ficus natalensis aqueous extract) and chemical nanosynthesis, respectively, were analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, FT-IR spectroscopy, XRD analysis, SEM, and EDX assays. In larvicidal and pupicidal experiments on Cx. quinquefasciatus, LC 50 of Fe 0 nanoparticles ranged from 20.9 (I instar larvae) to 43.7 ppm (pupae) and from 4.5 (I) to 22.1 ppm (pupae) for Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles synthesized chemically. Furthermore, the predation efficiency of the guppy fish, Poecilia reticulata, after a single treatment with sub-lethal doses of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles was magnified. Overall, this work provides new insights about the toxicity of Fe 0 and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles against mosquito vectors; we suggested that green and chemical fabricated nano-iron may be considered to develop novel and effective pesticides.

  18. Toxicity of a glufosinate- and several glyphosate-based herbicides to juvenile amphibians from the Southern High Plains, USA.

    Dinehart, Simon K; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Haukos, David A

    2009-01-15

    Pesticide toxicity is often proposed as a contributing factor to the world-wide decline of amphibian populations. We assessed acute toxicity (48 h) of a glufosinate-based herbicide (Ignite 280 SL) and several glyphosate-based herbicide formulations (Roundup WeatherMAX, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate, Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on two species of amphibians housed on soil or moist paper towels. Survival of juvenile Great Plains toads (Bufo cognatus) and New Mexico spadefoots (Spea multiplicata) was reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Ready-To-Use Plus on both substrates. Great Plains toad survival was also reduced by exposure to Roundup Weed and Grass Killer Super Concentrate on paper towels. New Mexico spadefoot and Great Plains toad survival was not affected by exposure to the two agricultural herbicides (Roundup WeatherMAX and Ignite 280 SL) on either substrate, suggesting that these herbicides likely do not pose an immediate risk to these species under field conditions.

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Bueren, Andre O. von; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M.; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H.; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [de

  20. High rates of regimen change due to drug toxicity among a cohort of South Indian adults with HIV infection initiated on generic, first-line antiretroviral treatment.

    Sivadasan, Ajith; Abraham, O C; Rupali, Priscilla; Pulimood, Susanne A; Rajan, Joyce; Rajkumar, S; Zachariah, Anand; Kannangai, Rajesh; Kandathil, Abraham Joseph; Sridharan, G; Mathai, Dilip

    2009-05-01

    To determine the rates, reasons and predictors of treatment change of the initial antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimen in HIV-infected south Indian adults. In this prospective cohort study, ART-naive adults initiated on generic, fixed dose combination ART as per the National AIDS Control Organization guidelines were followed up at an academic medical center. Treatment change was defined as any event which necessitated a change in or discontinuation of the initial ART regimen. Two hundred and thirty persons with HIV infection (males 74.8% and median age 37 years) were followed up for median duration of 48 weeks. The majority (98.7%) had acquired HIV infection through the heterosexual route. Most (70.4%) had advanced IV infection (WHO clinical stage 3 or 4) and 78% had CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts below 200 cells/microL. The initial ART regimens used were: Lamivudine (3TC) with Stavudine (d4T) (in 76%) or Azidothymidine (AZT) and Nevirapine (NVP) (in 86%) or Efavirenz (EFV). The cumulative incidence of treatment change was 39.6% (91 patients). Drug toxicity (WHO grade 3 or 4) was the reason for treatment change among 62 (27%) (incidence rate 35.9/100 person-years). The most common toxicities were attributable to the thymidine analogue nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), d4T and AZT [lactic acidosis (8.7%), anemia (7%) and peripheral neuropathy (5.2%)]. The other toxicities were rash (3.9%) and hepatitis (1.3%) due to NVP. The mortality (4.6/100 person-years) and disease progression rates (4.1/100 person-years) were low. The ART regimens used in this study were effective in decreasing disease progression and death. However, they were associated with high rates of drug toxicities, particularly those attributable to thymidine analogue NRTI. As efforts are made to improve access to ART, treatment regimens chosen should not only be potent, but also safe.

  1. Gulf of Mexico mud toxicity limitations

    Dunn, H.E.; Beardmore, D.H. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (USA)); Stewart, W.S. (Drilling Specialties Co. (US))

    1989-10-01

    Because of the Environmental Protection Agency's recent toxicity limits on drilling mud discharges for offshore Gulf of Mexico, Phillips Petroleum conducted a mud toxicity study based on both field and lab tests. The study, discussed in this article, found the polyanionic cellulose-sulfomethylated quebracho-chrome lignosulfonate mud Phillips had been using would comfortably pass the toxicity limitations. The study also found barite and thinners were of low toxicity, and hydrocarbons and surfactants were highly toxic.

  2. A high throughput live transparent animal bioassay to identify non-toxic small molecules or genes that regulate vertebrate fat metabolism for obesity drug development

    Woollett Laura A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alarming rise in the obesity epidemic and growing concern for the pathologic consequences of the metabolic syndrome warrant great need for development of obesity-related pharmacotherapeutics. The search for such therapeutics is severely limited by the slow throughput of animal models of obesity. Amenable to placement into a 96 well plate, zebrafish larvae have emerged as one of the highest throughput vertebrate model organisms for performing small molecule screens. A method for visually identifying non-toxic molecular effectors of fat metabolism using a live transparent vertebrate was developed. Given that increased levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD via deletion of CD38 have been shown to prevent high fat diet induced obesity in mice in a SIRT-1 dependent fashion we explored the possibility of directly applying NAD to zebrafish. Methods Zebrafish larvae were incubated with daily refreshing of nile red containing media starting from a developmental stage of equivalent fat content among siblings (3 days post-fertilization, dpf and continuing with daily refreshing until 7 dpf. Results PPAR activators, beta-adrenergic agonists, SIRT-1 activators, and nicotinic acid treatment all caused predicted changes in fat, cholesterol, and gene expression consistent with a high degree of evolutionary conservation of fat metabolism signal transduction extending from man to zebrafish larvae. All changes in fat content were visually quantifiable in a relative fashion using live zebrafish larvae nile red fluorescence microscopy. Resveratrol treatment caused the greatest and most consistent loss of fat content. The resveratrol tetramer Vaticanol B caused loss of fat equivalent in potency to resveratrol alone. Significantly, the direct administration of NAD decreased fat content in zebrafish. Results from knockdown of a zebrafish G-PCR ortholog previously determined to decrease fat content in C. elegans support that future GPR

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles are highly toxic to chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, dengue virus (DEN-2), and their mosquito vectors.

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Wei, Jiang; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Nicoletti, Marcello; Paulpandi, Manickam; Samidoss, Christina Mary; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Paneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Wei, Hui; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Jaganathan, Anitha; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, Suresh; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Nataraj, Devaraj; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    A main challenge in parasitology is the development of reliable tools to prevent or treat mosquito-borne diseases. We investigated the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) produced by Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense (strain MSR-1) on chloroquine-resistant (CQ-r) and sensitive (CQ-s) Plasmodium falciparum, dengue virus (DEN-2), and two of their main vectors, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti, respectively. MNP were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. They were toxic to larvae and pupae of An. stephensi, LC 50 ranged from 2.563 ppm (1st instar larva) to 6.430 ppm (pupa), and Ae. aegypti, LC 50 ranged from 3.231 ppm (1st instar larva) to 7.545 ppm (pupa). MNP IC 50 on P. falciparum were 83.32 μg ml -1 (CQ-s) and 87.47 μg ml -1 (CQ-r). However, the in vivo efficacy of MNP on Plasmodium berghei was low if compared to CQ-based treatments. Moderate cytotoxicity was detected on Vero cells post-treatment with MNP doses lower than 4 μg ml -1 . MNP evaluated at 2-8 μg ml -1 inhibited DEN-2 replication inhibiting the expression of the envelope (E) protein. In conclusion, our findings represent the first report about the use of MNP in medical and veterinary entomology, proposing them as suitable materials to develop reliable tools to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

  4. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  5. Toxicity of Boswellia dalzielii (Burseraceae) Leaf Fractions Against Immature Stages of Anopheles gambiae (Giles) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Younoussa, Lame; Nukenine, Elias Nchiwan; Esimone, Charles Okechukwu

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of several human pathogens, and great attention has recently been placed on insecticides from plant-derived products, in search for mosquito control agents. This study, thus, investigated the potency of Boswellia dalzielii methanol leaf extract and its four fractions as mosquito ovicide, larvicide, and pupicide against Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. The plant products were tested at the following concentrations: 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm on eggs and 312.5, 625, 1250, and 2500 ppm on the larvae and pupae of the mosquitoes. For results, hatchability of A. gambiae eggs was reduced to 5% with n-hexane fraction at 2000 ppm. Among the plant products tested, n-hexane fraction was most toxic against A. gambiae (LC50 = 385.9 ppm) and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50 = 3394.9 ppm). The n-hexane fraction of B. dalzielii might be used as a mosquitocidal agent in the breeding sites of A. gambiae and C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:27279752

  6. Essential and toxic element concentrations in blood and urine and their associations with diet: results from a Norwegian population study including high-consumers of seafood and game.

    Birgisdottir, B E; Knutsen, H K; Haugen, M; Gjelstad, I M; Jenssen, M T S; Ellingsen, D G; Thomassen, Y; Alexander, J; Meltzer, H M; Brantsæter, A L

    2013-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to evaluate calculated dietary intake and concentrations measured in blood or urine of essential and toxic elements in relation to nutritional and toxicological reference values. The second aim was to identify patterns of the element concentrations in blood and urine and to identify possible dietary determinants of the concentrations of these elements. Adults with a known high consumption of environmental contaminants (n=111), and a random sample of controls (n=76) answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Complete data on biological measures were available for 179 individuals. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for selenium, iodine, arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead. Principal component analysis was used to identify underlying patterns of correlated blood and urine concentrations. The calculated intakes of selenium, iodine, inorganic arsenic and mercury were within guideline levels. For cadmium 24% of the high consumer group and 8% of the control group had intakes above the tolerable weekly intake. Concentrations of lead in blood exceeded the bench-mark dose lower confidence limits for some participants. However, overall, the examined exposures did not give rise to nutritional or toxicological concerns. Game consumption was associated with lead in blood (B(ln) 0.021; 95%CI:0.010, 0.031) and wine consumption. Seafood consumption was associated with urinary cadmium in non-smokers (B(ln) 0.009; 95%CI:0.003, 0.015). A novel finding was a distinct pattern of positively associated biological markers, comprising iodine, selenium, arsenic and mercury (eigenvalue 3.8), reflecting seafood intake (B 0.007; 95%CI:0.004, 0.010). The study clearly demonstrates the significance of seafood as a source of both essential nutrients and toxic elements simultaneously and shows that exposure to various essential and toxic elements can be intertwined. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction and characterization of the interdomain chimeras using Cry11Aa and Cry11Ba from Bacillus thuringiensis and identification of a possible novel toxic chimera.

    Sun, Yunjun; Zhao, Qiang; Zheng, Dasheng; Ding, Xuezhi; Wang, Jingfang; Hu, Quanfang; Yuan, Zhiming; Park, Hyun-Woo; Xia, Liqiu

    2014-01-01

    Three structural domains of mosquitocidal Cry11Aa and Cry11Ba from Bacillus thuringiensis were exchanged to produce interdomain chimeras [BAA (11Ba/11Aa/11Aa), ABA (11Aa/11Ba/11Aa), AAB (11Aa/11Aa/11Ba), ABB (11Aa/11Ba/11Ba), BAB (11Ba/11Aa/11Ba), BBA (11Ba/11Ba/11Aa]. Chimeras BAB, BAA, BBA, and AAB formed inclusion bodies in the crystal-negative B. thuringiensis host and produced expected protein bands on SDS-PAGE gel. However, no inclusion body or target protein could be found for chimeras ABA and ABB. In bioassays using the fourth-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti, AAB had ~50 % lethal concentrations of 4.8 and 2.2 μg ml(-1), respectively; however, the rest of chimeras were not toxic. This study thus helps to understand the domain-function relationships of the Cry11Aa and Cry11Ba toxins. The toxic chimera, AAB, might be a candidate for mosquito control as its amino acid sequence is different from the two parental toxins.

  8. Toxic shock syndrome

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  9. Human Toxicity

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    all chemicals and impact pathways characterizes the contribution of each factor to the total variation of 10–12 orders of magnitude in impacts per kg across all chemicals. This large variation between characterisation factors for different chemicals as well as the 3 orders of magnitude uncertainty....... As a whole, the assessment of toxicity in LCA has progressed on a very sharp learning curve during the past 20 years. This rapid progression is expected to continue in the coming years, focusing more on direct exposure of workers to chemicals during manufacturing and of consumers during product use...

  10. [Uncertainty evaluation of the determination of toxic equivalent quantity of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in soil by isotope dilution high resolution gas chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry].

    Du, Bing; Liu Aimin; Huang, Yeru

    2014-09-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in soil samples were analyzed by isotope dilution method with high resolution gas chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry (ID-HRGC/HRMS), and the toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) were calculated. The impacts of major source of measurement uncertainty are discussed, and the combined relative standard uncertainties were calculated for each 2, 3, 7, 8 substituted con- gener. Furthermore, the concentration, combined uncertainty and expanded uncertainty for TEQ of PCDD/Fs in a soil sample in I-TEF, WHO-1998-TEF and WHO-2005-TEF schemes are provided as an example. I-TEF, WHO-1998-TEF and WHO-2005-TEF are the evaluation schemes of toxic equivalent factor (TEF), and are all currently used to describe 2,3,7,8 sub- stituted relative potencies.

  11. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism and toxicity.

    Lipscomb, John C; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2009-01-01

    bioactivation process, depending on the particular HAN and the enzyme involved. HANs can inhibit CYP2E1-mediated metabolism, an effect which may be dependent on a covalent interaction with the enzyme. In addition, HAN compounds inhibit GST-mediated conjugation, but this effect is reversible upon dialysis, indicating that the interaction does not represent covalent binding. No subchronic studies of HAN toxicity are available in the literature. However, studies show that HANs produce developmental toxicity in experimental animals. The nature of developmental toxicity is affected by the type of administration vehicle, which renders interpretation of results more difficult. Skin tumors have been found following dermal application of HANs, but oral studies for carcinogenicity are negative. Pulmonary adenomas were increased following oral administration of HANs, but the A/J strain of mice employed has a characteristically high background rate of such tumors. HANs interact with DNA to produce unscheduled DNA repair, SCE and reverse mutations in Salmonella. HANs did not induce micronuclei or cause alterations in sperm head morphology in mice, but did induce micronuclei in newts. Thus, there is concern for the potential carcinogenicity of HANs. It would be valuable to delineate any relationship between the apparent threshold for micronuclei formation in newts and the potential mechanism of toxicity involving HAN-induced oxidative stress. Dose-response studies in rodents may provide useful information on toxicity mechanisms and dose selection for longer term toxicity studies. Additional studies are warranted before drawing firm conclusions on the hazards of HAN exposure. Moreover, additional studies on HAN-DNA and HAN-protein interaction mechanisms, are needed. Such studies can better characterize the role of metabolism in toxicity of individual HANs, and delineate the role of oxidative stress, both of which enhance the capacity to predict risk. Most needed, now, are new subchronic (and

  12. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  13. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen : Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients.

    Seidel, Clemens; von Bueren, André O; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Kortmann, Rolf-D; Kramm, Christof M

    2018-03-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used.

  14. Early and late toxicity of involved-field radiation therapy in conjunction with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue

    Lubich, L.; Mundt, A.; Sibley, G.; Hallahan, D.; Nautiyal, J.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Recent reports have demonstrated a benefit to involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) in patients with relapsed/metastatic disease undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell rescue (SCR). We evaluate here the early and late toxicity of this approach. Methods: Eighty-five patients with either metastatic breast cancer (MBC) (31) or relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) (54) underwent HDCT/SCR. HDCT in the MBC patients consisted of cytoxan, thiotepa +/- carmustine and VP-16, cytoxan, BCNU +/- thiotepa in the HD patients. Thirty-four patients (40%) received IFRT either prior to (14) or following (20) HDCT to sites of disease involvement. A total of 18 patients received chest wall/mediastinal (CWMED) RT. Median followup for the MBC and HD patients were 21.3 months and 41 months, respectively. Results: Acute sequelae were similar in the 2 groups. Only one patient (5%) treated with IFRT (HD with 5 nodal sites) required a break from therapy due to low blood counts. Seven patients (0 MBC, 7 HD) (8.2%) suffered a toxic death (TD). No difference in was seen in the rate of TD in the patients as a whole ((1(14)) vs. (6(71))) (p =0.87) nor in the HD patients alone ((1(7)) vs. (6(47))) (p =0.91) with the use of IFRT prior to HDCT. Eleven patients (12.9%) developed late toxicity: 3 myelodysplasia/acute leukemia (MAL), 2 persistent low blood counts (requiring transfusions), 4 pulmonary toxicity (PT) and 2 hypothyroidism. All 4 cases of PT occurred in the HD group of which 3 received CWMED RT. The Table below shows the 5-yr actuarial risk of PT with and without CWMED RT as well as the 5-yr actuarial risk of MAL and any hematologic sequelae with and without RT. Multivariate analysis in the HD patients demonstrated that CWMED RT was the most significant factor for PT (p =0.09). All 3 cases of MAL and the 2 cases of persistent low blood counts occurred in the HD group. The use of IFRT did not increase the incidence of MAL or of any hematologic sequelae

  15. Sensors for Highly Toxic Gases: Methylamine and Hydrogen Chloride Detection at Low Concentrations in an Ionic Liquid on Pt Screen Printed Electrodes

    Krishnan Murugappan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available Pt screen printed electrodes (SPEs have been employed as possible electrode materials for methylamine (MA and hydrogen chloride (HCl gas detection. The room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide ([C2mim][NTf2] was used as a solvent and the electrochemical behaviour of both gases was first examined using cyclic voltammetry. The reaction mechanism appears to be the same on Pt SPEs as on Pt microelectrodes. Furthermore, the analytical utility was studied to understand the behaviour of these highly toxic gases at low concentrations on SPEs, with calibration graphs obtained from 10 to 80 ppm. Three different electrochemical techniques were employed: linear sweep voltammetry (LSV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV and square wave voltammetry (SWV, with no significant differences in the limits of detection (LODs between the techniques (LODs were between 1.4 to 3.6 ppm for all three techniques for both gases. The LODs achieved on Pt SPEs were lower than the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit (OSHA PEL limits of the two gases (5 ppm for HCl and 10 ppm for MA, suggesting that Pt SPEs can successfully be combined with RTILs to be used as cheap alternatives for amperometric gas sensing in applications where these toxic gases may be released.

  16. Association between SLC19A1 Gene Polymorphism and High Dose Methotrexate Toxicity in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia and Non Hodgkin Malignant Lymphoma: Introducing a Haplotype based Approach

    Kotnik, Barbara Faganel; Jazbec, Janez; Grabar, Petra Bohanec; Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated the clinical relevance of SLC 19A1 genetic variability for high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) related toxicities in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non Hodgkin malignant lymphoma (NHML). Patients and methods Eighty-eight children and adolescents with ALL/NHML were investigated for the influence of SLC 19A1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes on HD-MTX induced toxicities. Results Patients with rs2838958 TT genotype had higher probability for mucositis development as compared to carriers of at least one rs2838958 C allele (OR 0.226 (0.071–0.725), p < 0.009). Haplotype TGTTCCG (H4) statistically significantly reduced the risk for the occurrence of adverse events during treatment with HD-MTX (OR 0.143 (0.023–0.852), p = 0.030). Conclusions SLC 19A1 SNP and haplotype analysis could provide additional information in a personalized HD-MTX therapy for children with ALL/NHML in order to achieve better treatment outcome. However further studies are needed to validate the results. PMID:29333125

  17. Tackling the growing threat of dengue: Phyllanthus niruri-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their mosquitocidal properties against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Mosquitoes transmit pathogens that cause millions of human deaths each year. Dengue virus is transmitted to humans in tropical and subtropical areas by Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). The use of synthetic insecticides to control this mosquito is accompanied by high operational costs and adverse...

  18. Gene-carried hepatoma targeting complex induced high gene transfection efficiency with low toxicity and significant antitumor activity

    Zhao QQ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing-Qing Zhao,1,2 Yu-Lan Hu,1 Yang Zhou,3 Ni Li,1 Min Han,1 Gu-Ping Tang,4 Feng Qiu,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Jian-Qing Gao,11Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 3Institute of Biochemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Institute of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 5Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The success of gene transfection is largely dependent on the development of a vehicle or vector that can efficiently deliver a gene to cells with minimal toxicity.Methods: A liver cancer-targeted specific peptide (FQHPSF sequence was successfully synthesized and linked with chitosan-linked polyethylenimine (CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT (CP/peptide. The structure of CPT was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size of CPT/DNA complexes was measured using laser diffraction spectrometry and the cytotoxicity of the copolymer was evaluated by methylthiazol tetrazolium method. The transfection efficiency evaluation of the CP copolymer was performed using luciferase activity assay. Cellular internalization of the CP/DNA complex was observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The targeting specificity of the polymer coupled to peptide was measured by competitive inhibition transfection study. The liver targeting specificity of the CPT copolymer in vivo was demonstrated by combining the copolymer with a therapeutic gene, interleukin-12, and assessed by its abilities in suppressing the growth of ascites tumor in mouse model.Results: The results showed that the liver cancer-targeted specific peptide was successfully synthesized and linked with CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT. The composition of CPT

  19. Building a developmental toxicity ontology.

    Baker, Nancy; Boobis, Alan; Burgoon, Lyle; Carney, Edward; Currie, Richard; Fritsche, Ellen; Knudsen, Thomas; Laffont, Madeleine; Piersma, Aldert H; Poole, Alan; Schneider, Steffen; Daston, George

    2018-04-03

    As more information is generated about modes of action for developmental toxicity and more data are generated using high-throughput and high-content technologies, it is becoming necessary to organize that information. This report discussed the need for a systematic representation of knowledge about developmental toxicity (i.e., an ontology) and proposes a method to build one based on knowledge of developmental biology and mode of action/ adverse outcome pathways in developmental toxicity. This report is the result of a consensus working group developing a plan to create an ontology for developmental toxicity that spans multiple levels of biological organization. This report provide a description of some of the challenges in building a developmental toxicity ontology and outlines a proposed methodology to meet those challenges. As the ontology is built on currently available web-based resources, a review of these resources is provided. Case studies on one of the most well-understood morphogens and developmental toxicants, retinoic acid, are presented as examples of how such an ontology might be developed. This report outlines an approach to construct a developmental toxicity ontology. Such an ontology will facilitate computer-based prediction of substances likely to induce human developmental toxicity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ENALAPRIL AND RANITIDINE CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/HIGH-RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY AND THEIR TOXICITY EVALUATION

    Frederico Jehár Oliveira Quintão

    Full Text Available Due to its low cost, its capability for disinfection and oxidation, chlorination using gaseous chlorine or hypochlorite salts, has also been commonly applied in water treatment plants for oxidation and disinfection purposes. Little is known about the identity and toxicity of by-products resulting from the chlorination of pharmaceutical micropollutants, such as enalapril (ENA and ranitidine (RAN. ENA and RAN chlorination by-products were characterized in this study by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC/HRMS and their toxicity were assessed by MTT assay. Chlorination experiments with ENA and RAN solutions (10 mg L-1 indicate degradation efficiencies of 100% for both compounds after only 5 min of exposure to chlorine at concentration of 9.53 mg Cl2 L-1. On the other hand mineralization rates were lower than 3%, thereby indicating there was accumulation of degradation by-products in all experiments. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed, at all times of reaction after the addition of hypochlorite, the presence of 1-(2-((4-(chlorophenyl-1-ethoxy-1-oxobutan-2-ylaminopropanoylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (enalapril by-product and N-chloro-N-(2-(((chloro-5-((dimethylaminomethylfuran-2-ylmethylsulfinylethyl-N-methyl-2-nitroethene 1,1-diamine (ranitidine by-product. Despite the formation of oxidized chlorinated by-products in all chlorination assays, the treated solutions were nontoxic to HepG2 cells by the MTT assay. It has been observed that chlorination (10 mg L-1, 5 min of ENA and RAN solutions exhibited high degradation efficiencies of the target compounds and low mineralization rates. Based on the mass spectrometry data, the routes for ENA and RAN successive oxidation by chlorine has been proposed.

  1. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) for High Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Ecke, Thorsten H; Huang-Tiel, Hui-Juan; Golka, Klaus; Selinski, Silvia; Geis, Berit Christine; Koswig, Stephan; Bathe, Katrin; Hallmann, Steffen; Gerullis, Holger

    2016-11-10

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79) with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval) with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index), Gleason score, D'Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA value after one/three/five year(s) follow-up (FU), time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis ( p = 0.009), PSA on date of first HDR-BT ( p = 0.033), and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year ( p = 0.025) have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  2. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  3. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of complex or toxicant wastewater

    Wills Betancur, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    As a first approximation to wastewater classification in susceptibility terms to treatment by anaerobic biological system, anaerobic biodegradability trials are accomplished to leached of sanitary landfill, to wastewater of coffee grain wet treatment plant and to wastewater of fumaric acid recuperation plant. In the last Plant, anaerobic toxicity trials and lethal toxicity on the Daphnia pulex micro-crustacean are made too. Anaerobic biological trials are made continuing the Wageningen University (Holland) Methodology (1.987). Lethal toxicity biological trials are made following the Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater(18th edition, 1992). In development of this investigation project is found that fumaric acid recuperation plant leached it has a low anaerobic biodegradability, a high anaerobic toxicity and a high lethal toxicity over Daphnia pulex, for such reasons this leached is cataloged as complex and toxic wastewater. The other hand, wastewater of coffee grain wet treatment plant and wastewater of sanitary landfill they are both highly biodegradability and not-toxic, for such reasons these wastewaters are cataloged as susceptible to treatment by anaerobic biological system

  4. Including Bioconcentration Kinetics for the Prioritization and Interpretation of Regulatory Aquatic Toxicity Tests of Highly Hydrophobic Chemicals

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, So-Young; Kang, Hyun-Joong

    2016-01-01

    experiments. In this work, internal concentrations of highly hydrophobic chemicals were predicted for standard acute ecotoxicity tests at three trophic levels, algae, invertebrate, and fish. As demonstrated by comparison with maximum aqueous concentrations at water solubility, chemicals with an octanol...

  5. Acute and late vaginal toxicity after adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy in patients with intermediate risk endometrial cancer: is local therapy with hyaluronic acid of clinical benefit?

    Delishaj, Durim; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gonnelli, Alessandra; Morganti, Riccardo; Perrone, Franco; Tana, Roberta; Paiar, Fabiola; Gadducci, Angiolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the prevention of acute and late vaginal toxicities after high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy (BT). Material and methods Between January 2011 and January 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 126 patients with endometrial cancer who underwent extrafascial hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT +/– adjuvant chemotherapy. The total dose prescription was 21 Gy in 3 fractions (one fraction for week). Vaginal ovules containing 5 mg of HA were given for whole duration of vaginal BT and for the two following weeks. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE vs 4.02. Results According to the revised FIGO 2009 classification, most tumors were in stage IA (30.9%) and in stage IB (57.9%). Thirty-three patients (26.2%) received adjuvant chemotherapy before vaginal BT. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and five-year overall survival (OS) were 88% and 93%, respectively. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities were vaginal inflammation (18 patients, 14.3%) and dyspareunia (7 patients, 5.5%). Two patients (1.6%) had more than one toxicity. Late toxicity occurred in 20 patients (15.9%). Grade 1-2 late toxicities were fibrosis (14 patients, 11.1%) and telangiectasias (7 patients, 5.5%). Six patients (4.8%) had more than one late toxicity. No grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities were observed. Conclusions These results appear to suggest that the local therapy with HA is of clinical benefit for intermediate risk endometrial cancer patients who receive adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT after surgery. A randomized trial comparing HA treatment vs. no local treatment in this clinical setting is warranted to further evaluate the efficacy of HA in preventing vaginal BT-related vaginal toxicity. PMID:28115957

  6. Essential and toxic element concentrations in blood and urine and their associations with diet: Results from a Norwegian population study including high-consumers of seafood and game

    Birgisdottir, B.E.; Knutsen, H.K.; Haugen, M.; Gjelstad, I.M.; Jenssen, M.T.S.; Ellingsen, D.G.; Thomassen, Y.; Alexander, J.; Meltzer, H.M.; Brantsæter, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    The first aim of the study was to evaluate calculated dietary intake and concentrations measured in blood or urine of essential and toxic elements in relation to nutritional and toxicological reference values. The second aim was to identify patterns of the element concentrations in blood and urine and to identify possible dietary determinants of the concentrations of these elements. Adults with a known high consumption of environmental contaminants (n = 111), and a random sample of controls (n = 76) answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Complete data on biological measures were available for 179 individuals. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for selenium, iodine, arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead. Principal component analysis was used to identify underlying patterns of correlated blood and urine concentrations. The calculated intakes of selenium, iodine, inorganic arsenic and mercury were within guideline levels. For cadmium 24% of the high consumer group and 8% of the control group had intakes above the tolerable weekly intake. Concentrations of lead in blood exceeded the bench-mark dose lower confidence limits for some participants. However, overall, the examined exposures did not give rise to nutritional or toxicological concerns. Game consumption was associated with lead in blood (B ln 0.021; 95%CI:0.010, 0.031) and wine consumption. Seafood consumption was associated with urinary cadmium in non-smokers (B ln 0.009; 95%CI:0.003, 0.015). A novel finding was a distinct pattern of positively associated biological markers, comprising iodine, selenium, arsenic and mercury (eigenvalue 3.8), reflecting seafood intake (B 0.007; 95%CI:0.004, 0.010). The study clearly demonstrates the significance of seafood as a source of both essential nutrients and toxic elements simultaneously and shows that exposure to various essential and toxic elements can be intertwined. - Highlights: • A study on interplay and sources of six different elements • The

  7. Essential and toxic element concentrations in blood and urine and their associations with diet: Results from a Norwegian population study including high-consumers of seafood and game

    Birgisdottir, B.E.; Knutsen, H.K.; Haugen, M.; Gjelstad, I.M. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway); Jenssen, M.T.S. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo (Norway); Ellingsen, D.G.; Thomassen, Y. [National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo (Norway); Alexander, J. [Office of the Director-General, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway); Meltzer, H.M. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway); Brantsæter, A.L., E-mail: Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to evaluate calculated dietary intake and concentrations measured in blood or urine of essential and toxic elements in relation to nutritional and toxicological reference values. The second aim was to identify patterns of the element concentrations in blood and urine and to identify possible dietary determinants of the concentrations of these elements. Adults with a known high consumption of environmental contaminants (n = 111), and a random sample of controls (n = 76) answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Complete data on biological measures were available for 179 individuals. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for selenium, iodine, arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead. Principal component analysis was used to identify underlying patterns of correlated blood and urine concentrations. The calculated intakes of selenium, iodine, inorganic arsenic and mercury were within guideline levels. For cadmium 24% of the high consumer group and 8% of the control group had intakes above the tolerable weekly intake. Concentrations of lead in blood exceeded the bench-mark dose lower confidence limits for some participants. However, overall, the examined exposures did not give rise to nutritional or toxicological concerns. Game consumption was associated with lead in blood (B{sub ln} 0.021; 95%CI:0.010, 0.031) and wine consumption. Seafood consumption was associated with urinary cadmium in non-smokers (B{sub ln} 0.009; 95%CI:0.003, 0.015). A novel finding was a distinct pattern of positively associated biological markers, comprising iodine, selenium, arsenic and mercury (eigenvalue 3.8), reflecting seafood intake (B 0.007; 95%CI:0.004, 0.010). The study clearly demonstrates the significance of seafood as a source of both essential nutrients and toxic elements simultaneously and shows that exposure to various essential and toxic elements can be intertwined. - Highlights: • A study on interplay and sources of six different

  8. Mercaptopurine metabolite levels are predictors of bone marrow toxicity following high-dose methotrexate therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Vang, Sophia Ingeborg; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) courses with concurrent oral low-dose MTX/6-mercaptopurine (6MP) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are often followed by neutro- and thrombocytopenia necessitating treatment interruptions. Plasma MTX during HD-MTX therapy guides folinic acid rescue ...

  9. Grappling the High Altitude for Safe Edible Bamboo Shoots with Rich Nutritional Attributes and Escaping Cyanogenic Toxicity

    Sayanika Devi Waikhom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of bamboo species with high level of total cyanogenic content (TCC in Asia by many ethnic groups is significantly associated with food poisoning and occasionally Konzo (a neurological disorder. Adequate characterization of edible bamboo species with low level of TCC and high nutritious attributes is required for consumer’s safety as well as for the conservation of the gene pool. Here, we employed morphological descriptors, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, RAPD, and trnL-F intergenic spacer to characterize 15 indigenous edible bamboo species of north-east India. The study indicates that morphologically and genetically evolved edible bamboo species having large and robust bamboo-shoot texture and growing at low altitude contain high level of TCC, low antioxidant properties, and low levels of beneficial macronutrients and micronutrients. Importantly, Dendrocalamus species are shown to be rich in TCC irrespective of the growing altitude while Bambusa species are found to have moderate level of TCC. The findings clearly demonstrated that Chimonobambusa callosa growing at high altitude represents safe edible bamboo species with nutritious attributes.

  10. Acute toxicity of high doses of the glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, in the Syrian Golden hamster

    Langkilde, Søren; Schrøder, Malene; Stewart, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Sprouted, stressed, or spoiled potato tubers have reportedly led to human acute intoxication, coma, and death when consumed in high amounts. These effects have been attributed to glycoalkaloids (GAs), primarily alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, naturally present in all potatoes. The level of GAs...

  11. Development of a quantitative morphological assessment of toxicant-treated zebrafish larvae using brightfield imaging and high-content analysis.

    Deal, Samantha; Wambaugh, John; Judson, Richard; Mosher, Shad; Radio, Nick; Houck, Keith; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    One of the rate-limiting procedures in a developmental zebrafish screen is the morphological assessment of each larva. Most researchers opt for a time-consuming, structured visual assessment by trained human observer(s). The present studies were designed to develop a more objective, accurate and rapid method for screening zebrafish for dysmorphology. Instead of the very detailed human assessment, we have developed the computational malformation index, which combines the use of high-content imaging with a very brief human visual assessment. Each larva was quickly assessed by a human observer (basic visual assessment), killed, fixed and assessed for dysmorphology with the Zebratox V4 BioApplication using the Cellomics® ArrayScan® V(TI) high-content image analysis platform. The basic visual assessment adds in-life parameters, and the high-content analysis assesses each individual larva for various features (total area, width, spine length, head-tail length, length-width ratio, perimeter-area ratio). In developing the computational malformation index, a training set of hundreds of embryos treated with hundreds of chemicals were visually assessed using the basic or detailed method. In the second phase, we assessed both the stability of these high-content measurements and its performance using a test set of zebrafish treated with a dose range of two reference chemicals (trans-retinoic acid or cadmium). We found the measures were stable for at least 1 week and comparison of these automated measures to detailed visual inspection of the larvae showed excellent congruence. Our computational malformation index provides an objective manner for rapid phenotypic brightfield assessment of individual larva in a developmental zebrafish assay. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Green-synthesized CdS nano-pesticides: Toxicity on young instars of malaria vectors and impact on enzymatic activities of the non-target mud crab Scylla serrata.

    Sujitha, Vasu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Dinesh, Devakumar; Pandiyan, Amuthvalli; Aruliah, Rajasekar; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Kalimuthu, Kandasamy; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Higuchi, Akon; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Kumar, Suresh; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Currently, nano-formulated mosquito larvicides have been widely proposed to control young instars of malaria vector populations. However, the fate of nanoparticles in the aquatic environment is scarcely known, with special reference to the impact of nanoparticles on enzymatic activity of non-target aquatic invertebrates. In this study, we synthesized CdS nanoparticles using a green protocol relying on the cheap extract of Valoniopsis pachynema algae. CdS nanoparticles showed high toxicity on young instars of the malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi and A. sundaicus. The antimalarial activity of the nano-synthesized product against chloroquine-resistant (CQ-r) Plasmodium falciparum parasites was investigated. From a non-target perspective, we focused on the impact of this novel nano-pesticide on antioxidant enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities of the mud crab Scylla serrata. The characterization of nanomaterials was carried out by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as SEM and XRD analyses. In mosquitocidal assays, LC 50 of V. pachynema-synthesized CdS nanoparticles on A. stephensi ranged from 16.856 (larva I), to 30.301μg/ml (pupa), while for An. sundaicus they ranged from 13.584 to 22.496μg/ml. The antiplasmodial activity of V. pachynema extract and CdS nanoparticles was evaluated against CQ-r and CQ-sensitive (CQ-s) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. IC 50 of V. pachynema extract was 58.1μg/ml (CQ-s) and 71.46μg/ml (CQ-r), while nano-CdS IC 50 was 76.14μg/ml (CQ-s) and 89.21μg/ml (CQ-r). In enzymatic assays, S. serrata crabs were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations, i.e. 4, 6 and 8μg/ml of CdS nanoparticles, assessing changes in GST and AChE activity after 16days. We observed significantly higher activity of GST, if compared to the control, during the whole experiment period. In addition, a single treatment with CdS nanoparticles led to a significant decrease in AChE activity over time. The toxicity of Cd

  13. Bioavailability and risk assessment of potentially toxic elements in garden edible vegetables and soils around a highly contaminated former mining area in Germany.

    Antoniadis, Vasileios; Shaheen, Sabry M; Boersch, Judith; Frohne, Tina; Du Laing, Gijs; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-01-15

    Although soil contamination by potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in Europe has a history of many centuries, related problems are often considered as having been dealt with due to the enforcement of tight legislations. However, there are many unsolved issues. We aimed to assess PTE levels in highly contaminated soils and in garden edible vegetables using human health risk indices in order to evaluate the availability and mobilization of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). In four gardens in Germany, situated on, or in the vicinity of, a mine dump area, we planted beans (Phaseolus vulgaris ssp. nanus), carrots (Daucus sativus) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa ssp. capitata). We examined soil-to-plant mobilization of elements using transfer coefficient (TC), as well as soil contamination using contamination factor (CF), enrichment factor (EF), and bioaccumulation index (I geo ). In addition, we tested two human health risk assessment indices: Soil-induced hazard quotient (HQ S ) (representing the "direct soil ingestion" pathway), and vegetable-induced hazard quotient (HQ V ) (representing the "vegetable intake" pathway). The studied elements were highly elevated in the soils. The values in garden 2 were especially high (e.g., Pb: 13789.0 and Hg: 36.8 mg kg -1 ) and largely exceeded the reported regulation limits of 50 (for As), 40 (Cu), 400 (Pb), 150 (Zn), and 5 (Hg) mg kg -1 . Similarly, element concentrations were very high in the grown vegetables. The indices of CF, EF and I geo were enhanced even to levels that are rarely reported in the literature. Specifically, garden 2 indicated severe contamination due to multi-element deposition. The contribution of each PTE to the total of measured HQ S revealed that Pb was the single most important element causing health risk (contributing up to 77% to total HQ S ). Lead also posed the highest risk concerning vegetable consumption, contributing up to 77% to total HQ V . The

  14. Attractive toxic sugar baits for controlling mosquitoes: a qualitative study in Bagamoyo, Tanzania.

    Maia, Marta Ferreira; Tenywa, Frank Chelestino; Nelson, Hannah; Kambagha, Athumani; Ashura, Abigail; Bakari, Ibrahim; Mruah, Deogratis; Simba, Aziza; Bedford, Ally

    2018-01-10

    Malaria elimination is unlikely to be achieved without the implementation of new vector control interventions capable of complementing insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying. Attractive-toxic sugar baits (ATSBs) are considered a new vector control paradigm. They are technologically appropriate as they are simple and affordable to produce. ATSBs kill both female and male mosquitoes attracted to sugar feed on a sugary solution containing a mosquitocidal agent and may be used indoors or outdoors. This study explored the views and perceptions on ATSBs of community members from three Coastal Tanzanian communities. Three communities were chosen to represent coastal urban, peri-urban and rural areas. Sensitization meetings were held with a total of sixty community members where ATSBs were presented and explained their mode of action. At the end of the meeting, one ATSB was given to each participant for a period of 2 weeks, after which they were invited to participate in focus group discussions (FGDs) to provide feedback on their experience. Over 50% of the participants preferred to use the bait indoors although they had been instructed to place it outdoors. Participants who used the ATSBs indoors reported fewer mosquitoes inside their homes, but were disappointed not to find the dead mosquitoes in the baits, although they had been informed that this was unlikely to happen. Most participants disliked the appearance of the bait and some thought it to be reminiscent of witchcraft. Neighbours that did not participate in the FGDs or sensitizations were sceptical of the baits. This study delivers insight on how communities in Coastal Tanzania are likely to perceive ATSBs and provides important information for future trials investigating the efficacy of ATSBs against malaria. This new vector control tool will require sensitization at community level regarding its mode of action in order to increase the acceptance and confidence in ATSBs for mosquito control given

  15. Toxicity of Beauveria bassiana-28 Mycelial Extracts on Larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Vivekanandhan, Perumal; Kavitha, Thangaraj; Karthi, Sengodan; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Shivakumar, Muthugoundar Subramanian

    2018-03-03

    Microbial-based pest control is an attractive alternative to chemical insecticides. The present study sought to evaluate the toxicity of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana -28 ethyl acetate extracts on different larval stages and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. B. bassiana -28 ethyl acetate mycelial extracts produced mosquitocidal activity against larvae and pupae which was comparable to that of the commercial insecticide B. bassiana -22 extract. The LC 50 (lethal concentration that kills 50% of the exposed larvae) values of B. bassiana -28 extracts for 1st to 4th instar larvae and pupae were 11.538, 6.953, 5.841, 3.581 and 9.041 mg/L respectively. Our results show that B. bassiana -28 ethyl acetate mycelial extract has strong insecticidal activity against larval and pupal stages of Cx. quinquefasciatus . Fourier transform infrared spectrum study of B. bassiana -28 extract shows peaks at 3226.91; 2927.94; 1593.13; 1404.18; 1224.18; 1247.94; 1078.21; 1018.41; 229.69; and 871.82 cm -1 . Major spectral peaks were observed at 3226.91 cm -1, assigned to N-H stretching, 2927.94 cm -1 assigned to C-H bonding and 1595.13 cm -1 assigned to C-O stretching. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry studies of B. bassiana -28 ethyl acetate crude extract showed presence of six major compounds viz. N -hexadecanoic acids (13.6040%); Z,Z -9,12 octadecadienic acid (33.74%); 9-eicosyne (10.832%); heptacosane (5.148%); tetrateracontane (5.801%); and 7 hexyleicosane (5.723%). Histology of mosquito midgut tissue shows tissue lysis as a result of B.bassiana -28 extract exposure. The study shows that bioactive molecules obtained from B. bassiana -28 mycelial extract has insecticidal properties and can be used as alternative for mosquito control.

  16. Toxicity of Beauveria bassiana-28 Mycelial Extracts on Larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae

    Perumal Vivekanandhan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-based pest control is an attractive alternative to chemical insecticides. The present study sought to evaluate the toxicity of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana-28 ethyl acetate extracts on different larval stages and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. B. bassiana-28 ethyl acetate mycelial extracts produced mosquitocidal activity against larvae and pupae which was comparable to that of the commercial insecticide B. bassiana-22 extract. The LC50 (lethal concentration that kills 50% of the exposed larvae values of B. bassiana-28 extracts for 1st to 4th instar larvae and pupae were 11.538, 6.953, 5.841, 3.581 and 9.041 mg/L respectively. Our results show that B. bassiana-28 ethyl acetate mycelial extract has strong insecticidal activity against larval and pupal stages of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Fourier transform infrared spectrum study of B. bassiana-28 extract shows peaks at 3226.91; 2927.94; 1593.13; 1404.18; 1224.18; 1247.94; 1078.21; 1018.41; 229.69; and 871.82 cm−1. Major spectral peaks were observed at 3226.91 cm−1, assigned to N–H stretching, 2927.94 cm−1 assigned to C–H bonding and 1595.13 cm−1 assigned to C–O stretching. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry studies of B. bassiana-28 ethyl acetate crude extract showed presence of six major compounds viz. N-hexadecanoic acids (13.6040%; Z,Z-9,12 octadecadienic acid (33.74%; 9-eicosyne (10.832%; heptacosane (5.148%; tetrateracontane (5.801%; and 7 hexyleicosane (5.723%. Histology of mosquito midgut tissue shows tissue lysis as a result of B.bassiana-28 extract exposure. The study shows that bioactive molecules obtained from B. bassiana-28 mycelial extract has insecticidal properties and can be used as alternative for mosquito control.

  17. Combined adjuvant radiation and interferon-alpha 2B therapy in high-risk melanoma patients: the potential for increased radiation toxicity

    Hazard, Lisa J.; Sause, William T.; Noyes, R. Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Surgically resected melanoma patients with high-risk features commonly receive adjuvant therapy with interferon-alpha 2b combined with radiation therapy; the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential enhancement of radiation toxicity by interferon. Methods and Materials: Patients at LDS Hospital and the University of Utah Medical Center in Salt Lake City treated with interferon during radiotherapy or within 1 month of its completion were retrospectively identified, and their charts were reviewed. If possible, the patients were asked to return to the LDS Hospital radiation therapy department for follow-up. Results: Five of 10 patients receiving interferon-alpha 2b therapy during radiation therapy or within 1 month of its completion experienced severe subacute/late complications of therapy. Severe subacute/late complications included two patients with peripheral neuropathy, one patient with radiation necrosis in the brain, and two patients with radiation necrosis in the s.c. tissue. One patient with peripheral neuropathy and one patient with radiation necrosis also developed lymphedema. Conclusions: In vitro studies have identified a radiosensitizing effect by interferon-alpha on certain cell lines, which suggests the possibility that patients treated with interferon and radiation therapy may experience more severe radiation toxicities. We have observed severe subacute/late complications in five of 10 patients treated with interferon-alpha 2b during radiation therapy or within 1 month of its completion. Although an observational study of 10 patients lacks the statistic power to reach conclusions regarding the safety and complication rates of combined interferon and radiation therapy, it is sufficient to raise concerns and suggest the need for prospective studies

  18. Simultaneous adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy in high-risk breast cancer--toxicity and dose modification: a trans-tasman radiation oncology group multi-institution study

    Denham, James W.; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Christie, David; O'Brien, Maree; Bonaventura, Antonino; Stewart, John F.; Ackland, Stephen P.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Dady, Peter; Atkinson, Christopher H.; Wynne, Christopher; Joseph, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the toxicity profile of simultaneously administered postoperative radiation therapy and CMF chemotherapy as a prelude to a randomized controlled study addressing the sequencing of the two modalities. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty eight breast cancer patients at high risk of locoregional, as well as systemic relapse, who were referred to three centers in Australia and New Zealand were treated with postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy simultaneously. Acute toxicity and dose modifications in these patients were compared with 83 patients treated over the same time frame with chemotherapy alone. In a separate study the long-term radiation and surgical effects in 24 patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy at Newcastle (Australia) following conservative surgery were compared with 23 matched patients treated at Newcastle with radiation therapy alone. Results: Myelotoxicity was increased in patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The effect was not great, but may have contributed to chemotherapy dose reductions. Lymphopenia was observed to be the largest factor in total white cell depressions caused by the simultaneous administration of radiation therapy. Postsurgical appearances were found to so dominate long-term treatment effects on the treated breast that the effect of radiation therapy dose and additional chemotherapy was difficult to detect. Conclusion: Studies addressing the sequencing of radiation therapy and chemotherapy will necessarily be large because adverse effects from administering the two modalities simultaneously are not great. The present study has endorsed the importance in future studies of stratification according to the extent and type of surgery and adherence to a single strict policy of chemotherapy dose modification

  19. Recycling Gene Carrier with High Efficiency and Low Toxicity Mediated by L-Cystine-Bridged Bis(β-cyclodextrin)s

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Constructing safe and effective gene delivery carriers is becoming highly desirable for gene therapy. Herein, a series of supramolecular crosslinking system were prepared through host-guest binding of adamantyl-modified low molecular weight of polyethyleneimine with L-cystine-bridged bis(β-cyclodextrin)s and characterized by 1H NMR titration, electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light-scattering, gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that these nanometersized supramolecular crosslinking systems exhibited higher DNA transfection efficiencies and lower cytotoxicity than the commercial DNA carrier gold standard (25 kDa bPEI) for both normal cells and cancer cells, giving a very high DNA transfection efficiency up to 54% for 293T cells. Significantly, this type of supramolecular crosslinking system possesses a number of enzyme-responsive disulfide bonds, which can be cleaved by reductive enzyme to promote the DNA release but recovered by oxidative enzyme to make the carrier renewable. These results demonstrate that these supramolecular crosslinking systems can be used as promising gene carriers.

  20. GSH-targeted nanosponges increase doxorubicin-induced toxicity "in vitro" and "in vivo" in cancer cells with high antioxidant defenses.

    Daga, Martina; Ullio, Chiara; Argenziano, Monica; Dianzani, Chiara; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Ferretti, Carlo; Zara, Gian Paolo; Gigliotti, Casimiro L; Ciamporcero, Eric S; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Corti, Denise; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2016-08-01

    Several reports indicate that chemo-resistant cancer cells become highly adapted to intrinsic oxidative stress by up-regulating their antioxidant systems, which causes an increase of intracellular GSH content. Doxorubicin is one of the most widely used drugs for tumor treatment, able to kill cancer cells through several mechanisms. However, doxorubicin use is limited by its toxicity and cancer resistance. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies able to reduce doses and to overcome chemo-resistance are needed. A new class of glutathione-responsive cyclodextrin nanosponges (GSH-NS), is able to release anticancer drugs preferentially in cells having high GSH content. Doxorubicin-loaded GSH-NS, in the cancer cells with high GSH content, inhibited clonogenic growth, cell viability, topoisomerase II activity and induced DNA damage with higher effectiveness than free drug. Moreover, GSH-NS reduced the development of human tumor in xenograft models more than free drug. These characteristics indicate that GSH-NS can be a suitable drug delivery carrier for future applications in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-Term Results of Fixed High-Dose I-131 Treatment for Toxic Nodular Goiter: Higher Euthyroidism Rates in Geriatric Patients

    Gül Ege Aktaş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Geriatric patient population has special importance due to particular challenges. In addition to the increase in incidence of toxic nodular goiter (TNG with age, it has a high incidence in the regions of low-medium iodine intake such as in our country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall outcome of high fixed dose radioiodine (RAI therapy, and investigate the particular differences in the geriatric patient population. Methods: One hundred and three TNG patients treated with high dose I-131 (370-740 MBq were retrospectively reviewed. The baseline characteristics; age, gender, scintigraphic patterns and thyroid function tests before and after treatment, as well as follow-up, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD medication and achievement of euthyroid or hypothyroid state were evaluated. The patient population was divided into two groups as those=>65 years and those who were younger, in order to assess the effect of age. Results: Treatment success was 90% with single dose RAI therapy. Hyperthyroidism was treated in 7±7, 2 months after RAI administration. At the end of the first year, overall hypothyroidism rate was 30% and euthyroid state was achieved in 70% of patients. Age was found to be the only statistically significant variable effecting outcome. A higher ratio of euthyroidism was achieved in the geriatric patient population. Conclusion: High fixed dose I-131 treatment should be preferred in geriatric TNG patients in order to treat persistent hyperthyroidism rapidly. The result of this study suggests that high fixed dose RAI therapy is a successful modality in treating TNG, and high rates of euthyroidism can be achieved in geriatric patients.

  2. Ten-year outcome including patterns of failure and toxicity for adjuvant whole abdominopelvic irradiation in high-risk and poor histologic feature patients with endometrial carcinoma

    Stewart, Kimberly D.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Weiner, Sheldon; Podratz, Karl; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Schray, Mark; Mitchell, Christina; Sherman, Alfred; Chen, Peter; Brabbins, Donald A.

    2002-01-01

    failures for either histologic group occurred within the abdominopelvic region. However, one-third of the adenocarcinoma recurrences were in the lung. Multivariate regression analysis (age, surgical stage, grade, myometrial invasion, histologic type, lymph node status, and peritoneal cytology) demonstrated age (p=0.019) and surgical stage (p=0.036) to be of prognostic significance for CSS; age (p=0.036) was the only significant prognostic factor for DFS. Grade 1-2 gastrointestinal and hematologic acute toxicities were common. Asymptomatic bibasilar scarring on chest X-ray and mild elevation of liver enzymes were seen in almost 50% of the patients. Even though chronic toxicities were less frequent, 12% developed Grade 3-4 gastrointestinal and 2% Grade 3 renal toxicities. Conclusion: Adjuvant WAPI is very effective treatment with excellent 10-year results for Stage I-III endometrial carcinoma with risk factors for intra-abdominopelvic recurrence, including SP or CC histologic variants, deep myometrial invasion, high grade, nodal involvement, and positive peritoneal cytology. The low long-term complication rate with high CSS rate makes WAPI the treatment of choice for these patients with significant comorbidities

  3. Skeletal Muscle TRIB3 Mediates Glucose Toxicity in Diabetes and High- Fat Diet–Induced Insulin Resistance

    Wu, Mengrui; Kim, Teayoun; Jariwala, Ravi H.; Garvey, W. John; Luo, Nanlan; Kang, Minsung; Ma, Elizabeth; Tian, Ling; Steverson, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we used muscle-specific TRIB3 overexpressing (MOE) and knockout (MKO) mice to determine whether TRIB3 mediates glucose-induced insulin resistance in diabetes and whether alterations in TRIB3 expression as a function of nutrient availability have a regulatory role in metabolism. In streptozotocin diabetic mice, TRIB3 MOE exacerbated, whereas MKO prevented, glucose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose oxidation and defects in insulin signal transduction compared with wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that glucose-induced insulin resistance was dependent on TRIB3. In response to a high-fat diet, TRIB3 MOE mice exhibited greater weight gain and worse insulin resistance in vivo compared with WT mice, coupled with decreased AKT phosphorylation, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, and upregulation of lipid metabolic genes coupled with downregulation of glucose metabolic genes in skeletal muscle. These effects were prevented in the TRIB3 MKO mice relative to WT mice. In conclusion, TRIB3 has a pathophysiological role in diabetes and a physiological role in metabolism. Glucose-induced insulin resistance and insulin resistance due to diet-induced obesity both depend on muscle TRIB3. Under physiological conditions, muscle TRIB3 also influences energy expenditure and substrate metabolism, indicating that the decrease and increase in muscle TRIB3 under fasting and nutrient excess, respectively, are critical for metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27207527

  4. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112-113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets not only peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, but also other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in contributing to the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  5. Engineering sodium alginate-based cross-linked beads with high removal ability of toxic metal ions and cationic dyes.

    Shao, Zi-Jian; Huang, Xue-Lian; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Xin-Zhi; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) beads with ultrahigh adsorption capacity were prepared via hydrogen bonds between SA and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropa-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS), and the AMPS was then post-cross-linked to manufacture SA/PAMPS beads. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of methylene blue (MB) and Pb 2+ for the SA/PAMPS10 beads were 2977 and 2042 mg/g, respectively. Although the SA beads exhibited higher equilibrium adsorption capacities of MB and Pb 2+ than those of the SA/PAMPS10 beads, the SA/PAMPS10 beads had better mechanical property and higher stability. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm described the adsorption processes of the SA/PAMPS10 beads for MB well. In addition, the SA/PAMPS10 beads could be reused with stable adsorption capacity for at least three cycles. The beads also had excellent performances on absorbing methylene violet and other heavy metal ions (Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ and Ni 2+ ). Therefore, the SA-based beads with high adsorption capacity might be good candidates for industrial pollutant treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  7. Ni0 encapsulated in N-doped carbon nanotubes for catalytic reduction of highly toxic hexavalent chromium

    Yao, Yunjin; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hao; Yu, Maojing; Gao, Mengxue; Hu, Yi; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-05-01

    N-doped carbon nanotubes encapsulating Ni0 nanoparticles (Ni@N-C) were fabricated via thermal reduction of dicyandiamide and NiCl2·6H2O, and used to remove CrVI in polluted water. The resultant products present an excellent catalytic activity for CrVI reduction using formic acid under relatively mild conditions. The CrVI reduction efficiency of Ni@N-C was significantly affected by the preparation conditions including the mass of nickel salt and synthesis temperatures. The impacts of several reaction parameters, such as initial concentrations of CrVI and formic acid, solution pH and temperatures, as well as inorganic anions in solution on CrVI reduction efficiency were also evaluated in view of scalable industrial applications. Owing to the synergistic effects amongst tubes-coated Ni0, doped nitrogen, oxygen containing groups, and the configuration of carbon nanotubes, Ni@N-C catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and recyclable capability for CrVI reduction. Carbon shell can efficiently protect inner Ni0 core and N species from corrosion and subsequent leaching, while Ni0 endows the Ni@N-C catalysts with ferromagnetism, so that the composites can be easily separated via a permanent magnet. This study opens up an avenue for design of N-doped carbon nanotubes encapsulating Ni0 nanoparticles with high CrVI removal efficiency and magnetic recyclability as low-cost catalysts for industrial applications.

  8. An innovative, simple, fast, and less toxic high-performance liquid chromatographic method for determination of prednisone in capsules

    Pedro Henrique Reis da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Prednisone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug widely used in clinical practice. However, no high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method has been described in the literature for the determination of prednisone in capsules until now. Thus, an HPLC method was developed using a C18 (250x4.0, 5 µm column, with methanol:water (70:30 as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and detection at 240 nm. The developed method was validated following current Brazilian legislation. Additionally, linearity was assessed by evaluating the assumptions of normality, homoscedasticity, and independency of residuals, and the fit to the linear model. The method showed linearity (r2>0.99 over the range of 14.0-26.0 µg/mL, selectivity, precision (RSD<2.0%, robustness, and accuracy (average recovery of 100.05%. The chromatographic procedure was applied for assay and uniformity content determination of three different batches of prednisone capsules, showing to be suitable for their quality control.

  9. Chemotherapy-Related Toxicity, Nutritional Status and Quality of Life in Precachectic Oncologic Patients with, or without, High Protein Nutritional Support. A Prospective, Randomized Study.

    Ziętarska, Monika; Krawczyk-Lipiec, Joanna; Kraj, Leszek; Zaucha, Renata; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2017-10-11

    Cancer disease is usually associated with impaired nutritional status, which is one of the factors contributing to deterioration of the results of surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The aim of the study was to determine whether nutritional support with high protein (ONS) in adult oncologic patients in the first step of cancer cachexia-asymptomatic precachexia, has an influence on the toxicity of systemic therapy. However, secondary endpoints were established: to determine whether high protein ONS influences the nutritional status, the quality of life, and the performance status. A total of 114 persons aged 40-84 years old with colorectal cancer were examined. Based on the randomization, 47 patients were qualified to the interventional group (ONS group) and 48 to Control group. To evaluate the nutritional status NRS-2002 (Nutritional Risk Screening), SGA (Subjective Global Assessment), SCRINIO (SCReenIng the Nutritional status In Oncology) Working Group classification, VAS (Visual Analog Scale) for appetite was used. FAACT (Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy) questionnaire was used for assessment of the quality of life. The health status of patients was evaluated based on the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Anthropometric measurements were done. Severe complications of chemotherapy, which caused the end of treatment, a slight complication of the gastrointestinal tract such as diarrhea grade 2 according to ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) score regardless of the studied group, were observed. There were no statistical differences in the number and severity of the observed complications, i.e., neutropenia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea. During the follow-up the significant changes of SGA, VAS, albumin and prealbumin were observed between groups. In the ONS group an improvement in nutritional status was noticed (increased appetite VAS, p = 0.05; increased points in SGA, p = 0.015, and

  10. Chemotherapy-Related Toxicity, Nutritional Status and Quality of Life in Precachectic Oncologic Patients with, or without, High Protein Nutritional Support. A Prospective, Randomized Study

    Monika Ziętarska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer disease is usually associated with impaired nutritional status, which is one of the factors contributing to deterioration of the results of surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine whether nutritional support with high protein (ONS in adult oncologic patients in the first step of cancer cachexia—asymptomatic precachexia, has an influence on the toxicity of systemic therapy. However, secondary endpoints were established: to determine whether high protein ONS influences the nutritional status, the quality of life, and the performance status. Materials and Methods: A total of 114 persons aged 40–84 years old with colorectal cancer were examined. Based on the randomization, 47 patients were qualified to the interventional group (ONS group and 48 to Control group. To evaluate the nutritional status NRS-2002 (Nutritional Risk Screening, SGA (Subjective Global Assessment, SCRINIO (SCReenIng the Nutritional status In Oncology Working Group classification, VAS (Visual Analog Scale for appetite was used. FAACT (Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire was used for assessment of the quality of life. The health status of patients was evaluated based on the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Anthropometric measurements were done. Results: Severe complications of chemotherapy, which caused the end of treatment, a slight complication of the gastrointestinal tract such as diarrhea grade 2 according to ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score regardless of the studied group, were observed. There were no statistical differences in the number and severity of the observed complications, i.e., neutropenia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea. During the follow-up the significant changes of SGA, VAS, albumin and prealbumin were observed between groups. In the ONS group an improvement in nutritional status was noticed

  11. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  12. Low toxic and high soluble camptothecin derivative 2–47 effectively induces apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Jiang, Du; Wang, Lu-Yao; Xiang, Cen; Wen, Shao-Peng [Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Sino-French Joint Laboratory of Food Nutrition, Safety and Medicinal Chemistry, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Fan, Zhen-Chuan [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin, 300457 (China); Obesita & Algaegen LLC, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Zhang, Yong-Min [Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire UMR CNRS 8232, 4 place Jussieu, 75005, Paris (France); Guo, Na [Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Sino-French Joint Laboratory of Food Nutrition, Safety and Medicinal Chemistry, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Teng, Yu-Ou, E-mail: tyo201485@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Sino-French Joint Laboratory of Food Nutrition, Safety and Medicinal Chemistry, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Yu, Peng, E-mail: yupeng@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Sino-French Joint Laboratory of Food Nutrition, Safety and Medicinal Chemistry, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2016-04-08

    The cytotoxic activity of camptothecin derivatives is so high that these compounds need to be further modified before their successful application as anti-cancer agents clinically. In this study, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel camptothecin derivative called compound 2–47. The changes in structure did not reduce its activity to inhibit DNA topoisomerase I. Compound 2–47 induced apoptosis of many tumor cells including leukemia cells K562, Jurkat, HL-60, breast cancer cell BT-549, colon cancer cell HT-29 and liver cancer cell HepG2 with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 2- to 3-fold lower than HCPT as a control. In particular, 2–47 inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells with an IC{sub 50} of as low as 40 nM. By making use of Jurkat cell as a model, following treatment of Jurkat cells, compound 2–47 activated caspase-3 and PARP, resulting in a decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These data showed that compound 2–47 induces Jurkat cell death through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, compound 2–47 showed a decreased cytotoxic activity against normal cells and an improved solubility in low-polar solvent. For example, compound 2–47 solutes in CHCl{sub 3} 130-fold higher than HCPT. Taken together, our data demonstrated that camptothecin derivative 2–47 notably inhibits the tumor cell proliferation through mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in vitro. - Highlights: • Compound 2–47 showed a wide inhibitory effect on the tested tumor cell lines with an IC{sub 50} of 3 times lower than that of HCPT in general. • Compound 2–47 inhibited the proliferation of the human leukemia cell Jurkat at an IC{sub 50} of as low as 40 nM. • As compared to HCPT, compound 2–47 showed much reduced cytotoxicity on normal human cells. • As compared to others, compound 2–47 showed a hundreds-fold higher solubility in non-polar organic solution.

  13. Low toxic and high soluble camptothecin derivative 2–47 effectively induces apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Jiang, Du; Wang, Lu-Yao; Xiang, Cen; Wen, Shao-Peng; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Min; Guo, Na; Teng, Yu-Ou; Yu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of camptothecin derivatives is so high that these compounds need to be further modified before their successful application as anti-cancer agents clinically. In this study, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel camptothecin derivative called compound 2–47. The changes in structure did not reduce its activity to inhibit DNA topoisomerase I. Compound 2–47 induced apoptosis of many tumor cells including leukemia cells K562, Jurkat, HL-60, breast cancer cell BT-549, colon cancer cell HT-29 and liver cancer cell HepG2 with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 2- to 3-fold lower than HCPT as a control. In particular, 2–47 inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells with an IC 50 of as low as 40 nM. By making use of Jurkat cell as a model, following treatment of Jurkat cells, compound 2–47 activated caspase-3 and PARP, resulting in a decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These data showed that compound 2–47 induces Jurkat cell death through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, compound 2–47 showed a decreased cytotoxic activity against normal cells and an improved solubility in low-polar solvent. For example, compound 2–47 solutes in CHCl 3 130-fold higher than HCPT. Taken together, our data demonstrated that camptothecin derivative 2–47 notably inhibits the tumor cell proliferation through mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in vitro. - Highlights: • Compound 2–47 showed a wide inhibitory effect on the tested tumor cell lines with an IC 50 of 3 times lower than that of HCPT in general. • Compound 2–47 inhibited the proliferation of the human leukemia cell Jurkat at an IC 50 of as low as 40 nM. • As compared to HCPT, compound 2–47 showed much reduced cytotoxicity on normal human cells. • As compared to others, compound 2–47 showed a hundreds-fold higher solubility in non-polar organic solution.

  14. Enhancement of Toxic Substances Clearance from Blood Equvalent Solution and Human Whole Blood through High Flux Dialyzer by 1 MHz Ultrasound

    Shiran M. B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodialysis is a process of removing waste and excess fluid from blood when kidneys cannot function efficiently. It often involves diverting blood to the filter of the dialysis machin to be cleared of toxic substances. Fouling of pores in dialysis membrane caused by adhesion of plasma protein and other toxins will reduce the efficacy of the filtre. Objective: In This study, the influence of pulsed ultrasound waves on diffusion and the prevention of fouling in the filter membrane were investigated. Material and Methods: Pulsed ultrasound waves with frequency of 1 MHz at an intensity of 1 W/cm2 was applied to the high flux (PES 130 filter. Blood and blood equivalent solutions were passed through the filter in separate experimental setups. The amount of Creatinine, Urea and Inulin cleared from both blood equvalent solution and human whole blood passed through High Flux (PES 130 filter were measured in the presence and absence of ultrasound irradiation. Samples were taken from the outlet of the dialyzer every five minutes and the clearance of each constituent was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis of the blood equvalent solution and whole blood indicated the clearance of Urea and Inulin in the presence of ultrasound increased (p<0.05, while no significant effects were observed for Creatinine. Conclusion: It may be concluded that ultrasound, as a mechanical force, can increase the rate of clearance of some toxins (such as middle and large molecules in the hemodialysis process.

  15. Modified high-density lipoproteins by artificial sweetener, aspartame, and saccharin, showed loss of anti-atherosclerotic activity and toxicity in zebrafish.

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Park, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Jihoe; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns have been raised regarding the association of chronic consumption of artificial sweeteners (ASs) with metabolic disorders, especially in the heart and brain. There has been no information on the in vivo physiological effects of AS consumption in lipoprotein metabolism. High-dosage treatment (final 25, 50, and 100 mM) with AS (aspartame, acesulfame K, and saccharin) to human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) induced loss of antioxidant ability along with elevated atherogenic effects. Aspartame-treated HDL3 (final 100 mM) almost all disappeared due to putative proteolytic degradation. Aspartame- and saccharin-treated HDL3 showed more enhanced cholesteryl ester transfer activity, while their antioxidant ability was disappeared. Microinjection of the modified HDL3 exacerbated the inflammatory death in zebrafish embryos in the presence of oxLDL. These results show that AS treatment impaired the beneficial functions of HDL, resulting in loss of antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities. These results suggest that aspartame and saccharin could be toxic to the human circulation system as well as embryonic development via impairment of lipoprotein function.

  16. Enhancement of Toxic Substances Clearance from Blood Equvalent Solution and Human Whole Blood through High Flux Dialyzer by 1 MHz Ultrasound

    Shiran, M.B.; Barzegar Marvasti, M.; Shakeri-Zadeh, A.; Shahidi, M.; Tabkhi, N.; Farkhondeh, F.; Kalantar, E.; Asadinejad, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemodialysis is a process of removing waste and excess fluid from blood when kidneys cannot function efficiently. It often involves diverting blood to the filter of the dialysis machin to be cleared of toxic substances. Fouling of pores in dialysis membrane caused by adhesion of plasma protein and other toxins will reduce the efficacy of the filtre. Objective: In This study, the influence of pulsed ultrasound waves on diffusion and the prevention of fouling in the filter membrane were investigated. Material and Methods: Pulsed ultrasound waves with frequency of 1 MHz at an intensity of 1 W/cm2 was applied to the high flux (PES 130) filter. Blood and blood equivalent solutions were passed through the filter in separate experimental setups. The amount of Creatinine, Urea and Inulin cleared from both blood equvalent solution and human whole blood passed through High Flux (PES 130) filter were measured in the presence and absence of ultrasound irradiation. Samples were taken from the outlet of the dialyzer every five minutes and the clearance of each constituent was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis of the blood equvalent solution and whole blood indicated the clearance of Urea and Inulin in the presence of ultrasound increased (p<0.05), while no significant effects were observed for Creatinine. Conclusion: It may be concluded that ultrasound, as a mechanical force, can increase the rate of clearance of some toxins (such as middle and large molecules) in the hemodialysis process. PMID:28580332

  17. Efficacy and toxicity of conventionally fractionated pelvic radiation with a hypo fractionated simultaneous versus conventionally fractionated sequential boost for patients with high-risk prostate cancer

    McDonald, Andrew M.; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C.; Kim, Robert Y.; Fiveash, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-risk prostate cancer responds differently to hypo fractionation. Material and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven men with NCCN high-risk (T3, PSA 20, or Gleason 8) clinically localized prostate cancer treated between 1998 and 2010 met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Eighty-two were treated with conventional WPRT with a conventionally fractionated sequential boost to the prostate (cRT), with the prostate receiving 75-77 Gy in 1.8 - 2.0 Gy fractions. Seventy-five were treated with pelvic IMRT with a hypo fractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate (hRT), with the prostate receiving 70 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions. The dose to the pelvic lymph nodes was 45 Gy in the cRT group and 50.4 Gy in the hRT group, both at 1.8 Gy per fraction. Ninety-two percent received neoadjuvant hormonal ablation therapy, typically beginning two months prior to the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 6.5 years for men receiving cRT and 3.7 years for those receiving hRT. The actuarial rate of biochemical control at four years was 88% for cRT and 94% for hRT (p=0.82). The rates of early rectal and urinary grade ≥2 toxicities were 35% (29 of 82) and 49% (40 of 82) for the cRT group and 36% (27 of 75) and 44% (33 of 75) for the hRT group. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 rectal toxicity at four years was 25% for the cRT group and 13% for the hRT group (p=0.037). The rate of late grade 3 rectal complications was 4% (3 of 82) for patients receiving cRT and 1% (1 of 75) for patients receiving hRT. Conclusion: Initial follow-up indicates equivalent biochemical control between regimens. Patients receiving hRT experienced fewer late rectal complications

  18. Three Toxic Heavy Metals in Open-Angle Glaucoma with Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Study from South Korea.

    Si Hyung Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between heavy metal levels and open-angle glaucoma (OAG with low- and high-teen baseline intraocular pressure (IOP using a population-based study design.This cross-sectional study included 5,198 participants older than 19 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES from 2008 to 2012 and had blood heavy metal levels available. The OAG with normal baseline IOP (IOP ≤ 21 mmHg subjects were stratified into low-teen OAG (baseline IOP ≤ 15 mmHg and high-teen OAG (15 mmHg < baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg, and the association between blood lead, mercury, and cadmium levels and glaucoma prevalence was assessed for low- and high-teen OAG.The adjusted geometric mean of blood cadmium levels was significantly higher in subjects with low-teen OAG than that of the non-glaucomatous group (P = 0.028, whereas there were no significant differences in blood lead and mercury levels. After adjusting for potential confounders, the low-teen OAG was positively associated with log-transformed blood cadmium levels (OR, 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.03-1.93; P = 0.026. For high-teen OAG, log-transformed blood levels of the three heavy metals were not associated with disease prevalence. The association between log-transformed blood cadmium levels and low-teen OAG was significant only in men (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10-2.48; P = 0.016, and not in women (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.66-1.85; P = 0.709.The results of this study suggest that cadmium toxicity could play a role in glaucoma pathogenesis, particularly in men and in OAG with low-teen baseline IOP.

  19. Determination of leachate toxicity through acute toxicity using Daphnia pulex and anaerobic toxicity assays

    Carabalí-Rivera, Y. S; Barba-Ho, L. E; Torres-Lozada, P

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The municipal solid waste (MSW) of large cities, in particular the ones of developing countries, is mainly disposed in landfills (LFs), whose inadequate management generates the emission of greenhouse gases and the production of leachates with high concentrations of organic and inorganic matter and, occasionally heavy metals. In this study, the toxicity of the leachates from an intermediate-age municipal landfill was evaluated by ecotoxicity and anaerobic toxicity tests. The acute to...

  20. Fostering efficacy and toxicity evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine and natural products: Chick embryo as a high throughput model bridging in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Wu, Tong; Yu, Gui-Yuan; Xiao, Jia; Yan, Chang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Li, Yi-Fang; So, Kwok-Fai; He, Rong-Rong

    2018-04-19

    Efficacy and safety assessments are essential thresholds for drug candidates from preclinical to clinical research. Conventional mammalian in vivo models cannot offer rapid pharmacological and toxicological screening, whereas cell-based or cell-free in vitro systems often lead to inaccurate results because of the lack of physiological environment. Within the avian species, gallus gallus is the first bird to have its genome sequencing. Meantime, chick embryo is an easily operating, relatively transparent and extensively accessible model, whose physiological and pathological alterations can be visualized by egg candler, staining and image technologies. These features facilitate chick embryo as a high-throughput screening platform bridging in vivo and in vitro gaps in the pharmaceutical research. Due to the complicated ingredients and multiple-targets natures of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), testing the efficacy and safety of TCM by in vitro methods are laborious and inaccurate, while testing in mammalian models consume massive cost and time. As such, the productive living organism chick embryo serves as an ideal biological system for pharmacodynamics studies of TCM. Herein, we comprehensively update recent progresses on the specialty of chick embryo in evaluation of efficacy and toxicity of drugs, with special concerns of TCM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Air Toxics Under the Big Sky: examining the effectiveness of authentic scientific research on high school students' science skills and interest

    Ward, Tony J.; Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-04-01

    Air Toxics Under the Big Sky is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. This research explored: (1) how the program affects student understanding of scientific inquiry and research and (2) how the open-inquiry learning opportunities provided by the program increase student interest in science as a career path. Treatment students received instruction related to air pollution (airborne particulate matter), associated health concerns, and training on how to operate air quality testing equipment. They then participated in a yearlong scientific research project in which they developed and tested hypotheses through research of their own design regarding the sources and concentrations of air pollution in their homes and communities. Results from an external evaluation revealed that treatment students developed a deeper understanding of scientific research than did comparison students, as measured by their ability to generate good hypotheses and research designs, and equally expressed an increased interest in pursuing a career in science. These results emphasize the value of and need for authentic science learning opportunities in the modern science classroom.

  2. Air Toxics Under the Big Sky: Examining the Effectiveness of Authentic Scientific Research on High School Students’ Science Skills and Interest

    Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    Air Toxics Under the Big Sky is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. A quasi-experimental design was used in order to understand: 1) how the program affects student understanding of scientific inquiry and research and 2) how the open inquiry learning opportunities provided by the program increase student interest in science as a career path. Treatment students received instruction related to air pollution (airborne particulate matter), associated health concerns, and training on how to operate air quality testing equipment. They then participated in a yearlong scientific research project in which they developed and tested hypotheses through research of their own design regarding the sources and concentrations of air pollution in their homes and communities. Results from an external evaluation revealed that treatment students developed a deeper understanding of scientific research than did comparison students, as measured by their ability to generate good hypotheses and research designs, and equally expressed an increased interest in pursuing a career in science. These results emphasize the value of and need for authentic science learning opportunities in the modern science classroom. PMID:28286375

  3. Highly efficient micellar extraction of toxic picric acid into novel ionic liquid: Effect of parameters, solubilization isotherm, evaluation of thermodynamics and design parameters

    Bhatt, Darshak R.; Maheria, Kalpana C. [Applied Chemistry Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat 395007, Gujarat (India); Parikh, Jigisha K., E-mail: jk_parikh@yahoo.co.in [Chemical Engineering Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat 395007, Gujarat (India)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Picric acid is a toxic compound. • DIL significantly improves CPE efficiency of PA. • Higher extraction efficiency obtained in both nearly neutral and acidic condition. • The extraction process – spontaneous and endothermic in nature. - Abstract: A simple and new approach in cloud point extraction (CPE) method was developed for removal of picric acid (PA) by the addition of N,N,N,N’,N’,N’-hexaethyl-ethane-1,2-diammonium dibromide ionic liquid (IL) in non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 (TX-114). A significant increase in extraction efficiency was found upon the addition of dicationic ionic liquid (DIL) at both nearly neutral and high acidic pH. The effects of different operating parameters such as pH, temperature, time, concentration of surfactant, PA and DIL on extraction of PA were investigated and optimum conditions were established. The extraction mechanism was also proposed. A developed Langmuir isotherm was used to compute the feed surfactant concentration required for the removal of PA up to an extraction efficiency of 90%. The effects of temperature and concentration of surfactant on various thermodynamic parameters were examined. It was found that the values of ΔG° increased with temperature and decreased with surfactant concentration. The values of ΔH° and ΔS° increased with surfactant concentration. The developed approach for DIL mediated CPE has proved to be an efficient and green route for extraction of PA from water sample.

  4. Adenosine monophosphate is elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice with acute respiratory toxicity induced by nanoparticles with high surface hydrophobicity.

    Dailey, Lea Ann; Hernández-Prieto, Raquel; Casas-Ferreira, Ana Maria; Jones, Marie-Christine; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, Encarnación; Spina, Domenico; Jones, Stuart A; Smith, Norman W; Forbes, Ben; Page, Clive; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Inhaled nanomaterials present a challenge to traditional methods and understanding of respiratory toxicology. In this study, a non-targeted metabolomics approach was used to investigate relationships between nanoparticle hydrophobicity, inflammatory outcomes and the metabolic fingerprint in bronchoalveolar fluid. Measures of acute lung toxicity were assessed following single-dose intratracheal administration of nanoparticles with varying surface hydrophobicity (i.e. pegylated lipid nanocapsules, polyvinyl acetate nanoparticles and polystyrene beads; listed in order of increasing hydrophobicity). Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected from mice exposed to nanoparticles at a surface area dose of 220 cm(2) and metabolite fingerprints were acquired via ultra pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Particles with high surface hydrophobicity were pro-inflammatory. Multivariate analysis of the resultant small molecule fingerprints revealed clear discrimination between the vehicle control and polystyrene beads (p < 0.05), as well as between nanoparticles of different surface hydrophobicity (p < 0.0001). Further investigation of the metabolic fingerprints revealed that adenosine monophosphate (AMP) concentration in BAL correlated with neutrophilia (p < 0.01), CXCL1 levels (p < 0.05) and nanoparticle surface hydrophobicity (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that extracellular AMP is an intermediary metabolite involved in adenine nucleotide-regulated neutrophilic inflammation as well as tissue damage, and could potentially be used to monitor nanoparticle-induced responses in the lung following pulmonary administration.

  5. Air Toxics Under the Big Sky: Examining the Effectiveness of Authentic Scientific Research on High School Students' Science Skills and Interest.

    Ward, Tony J; Delaloye, Naomi; Adams, Earle Raymond; Ware, Desirae; Vanek, Diana; Knuth, Randy; Hester, Carolyn Laurie; Marra, Nancy Noel; Holian, Andrij

    2016-01-01

    Air Toxics Under the Big Sky is an environmental science outreach/education program that incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 8 Practices with the goal of promoting knowledge and understanding of authentic scientific research in high school classrooms through air quality research. A quasi-experimental design was used in order to understand: 1) how the program affects student understanding of scientific inquiry and research and 2) how the open inquiry learning opportunities provided by the program increase student interest in science as a career path . Treatment students received instruction related to air pollution (airborne particulate matter), associated health concerns, and training on how to operate air quality testing equipment. They then participated in a yearlong scientific research project in which they developed and tested hypotheses through research of their own design regarding the sources and concentrations of air pollution in their homes and communities. Results from an external evaluation revealed that treatment students developed a deeper understanding of scientific research than did comparison students, as measured by their ability to generate good hypotheses and research designs, and equally expressed an increased interest in pursuing a career in science. These results emphasize the value of and need for authentic science learning opportunities in the modern science classroom.

  6. The effect of high and low dissolved oxygen on the toxicity of oil sands coke and its leachate to Chironomus tentans

    Squires, A.J.; Liber, K.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of low dissolved oxygen on the long-term leaching potential of the toxic constituents found in coke. Coke is one of the waste products produced during the oil sand upgrading process used at Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Suncor Energy Inc. Coke is contaminated by metals and organic compounds which can leach into the environment. In this study, coke from both companies was exposed to reconstituted water and high dissolved oxygen for a period of 30 days, during which time the overlying water containing the leachate and the coke pore-water was chemically analyzed. The benthic macroinvertebrate, Chironomus tentans, was exposed to the aged coke and the overlying leachate after the 30 day period. The study did not reveal any major difference in the survival or growth between the dissolved oxygen treatments or any of the leachate treatments. The macroinvertebrate in the aged Syncrude grew significantly while the Suncor coke strongly inhibited both survival and growth of the macroinvertebrate. The study demonstrates that coke has the potential to negatively affect benthic organisms if it is used uncovered in an aquatic reclamation effort

  7. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    .1-3.5) and the median overall survival was 7.0 months (95%CI: 3.5-10.5). Early side effects were mild and included headache and fatigue. Seven patients were progression-free beyond 10 weeks and were evaluable for late toxicity. Among these patients, three (43%) suffered late adverse events which included radionecrosis......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...

  8. Properties of light absorption in a highly coloured estuarine system in south-east Australia which is prone to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum

    Clementson, Lesley A.; Parslow, John S.; Turnbull, Alison R.; Bonham, Pru I.

    2004-05-01

    The Huon Estuary in south-east Tasmania is an important site in Australia's aquaculture and finfish industries. Atlantic salmon and shellfish are farmed in the Huon River Estuary, which drains a catchment that includes both areas of pristine wilderness and agriculture. The estuary experiences algal blooms, including blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum, which can cause considerable problems for the aquaculture industry. The freshwater input is highly coloured due to high levels of humic material and this combined with intrusions of clearer oceanic water and the occurrence of algal blooms makes this estuary optically complex. Between November 1996 and September 1998 samples for pigment and optical analyses were collected weekly from five sites within the mid to lower regions of the estuary. In addition, every three months (beginning July 1996), samples were collected from 30 sites within the full river/estuary system. Early in December 1997 a bloom of Gymnodinium catenatum occurred throughout the estuary and persisted until June 1998. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was found to dominate the total absorption of the water throughout the entire estuary and over the two-year duration of the study. The occurrence of algal blooms showed no correlation with the optical characteristics of the estuary, suggesting that optical parameters cannot be used to predict the occurrence of algal blooms in this estuary. Blooms of different algal species, such as diatoms and dinoflagellates, may be able to be distinguished by their absorption spectra in the UV region rather than the visible region. To date, this study is the most detailed spatial and temporal study of the characteristics of light absorption in an estuarine system within Australia.

  9. Practice insights on patient care-management overview for chemoradiation toxic mucositis-guidelines, guideline-supported therapies and high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate (ProThelial).

    McCullough, Ricky W

    2018-01-01

    Aim To offer a practice insight for the management of chemoradiation toxic mucositis. Method Review chemoradiation toxic mucositis, its pathobiology and breadth of symptom presentation. Review mucositis guidelines and guideline-supported anti-mucositis therapies. Offer guidance on guidelines and an abbreviated review of high potency cross-linked sucralfate for management of chemoradiation toxic mucositis. Result There are six major mucositis guidelines but only one that is current and regularly updated. Guidelines from the Multinational Association Supportive Cancer Care suggest 14 interventions gleaned from controlled trials, 12 of which are off-label uses of therapies that offer statistically significant but incrementally beneficial outcomes. Several evidence-based limitations of guidelines are discussed. Data on high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate confirming complete prevention and rapid (2-3 days) elimination, sustained throughout cancer treatment is verified as high quality evidence in accordance to standards adopted by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. A 96-97% reduction in mucositis duration qualifies as a positive Glasziou treatment effect, which is discussed as an additional measure of evidence-based medicine. Conclusion Statistically significant but fractional treatment effects of guideline-supported interventions are not likely to substantially alter the course of mucositis when it occurs nor completely prevent its onset. Complete prevention and rapid sustained elimination should be the goal, therefore high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate may be useful. Where guidelines fail, institution-based protocols led by oncology pharmacists could succeed. In an effort to eliminate toxic mucositis, enhance compliance to chemoradiation regimens, and improve survival, such protocols for practice may verify pharmacoeconomic benefits, if any, in using high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate to manage toxic mucositis.

  10. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D. [University of Leipzig Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Bueren, Andre O. von [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics, CANSEARCH Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Brain Tumor Reference Center of the DGNN, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [German] Die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Protokolle zur Radiochemotherapie bei Kindern mit hochmalignen Gliomen (''high-grade glioma'', HGG) ist aehnlich und leider noch enttaeuschend. Es

  11. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick; Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan; Meyer, Almuth; Gerlach, Ruediger; Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus; Lammering, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [de

  13. Risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy in a pooled series of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. High local control and low toxicity

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick; Meyer, Almuth; Pintea, Bogdan; Gerlach, Ruediger; Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus; Lammering, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted single-fraction (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with nonsecretory pituitary adenomas (NSA). A total of 73 NSA patients (39 men/34 women) with a median age of 62 years were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk) in two Novalis registered centers. Mean tumor volume was 7.02 ccm (range 0.58-57.29 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 5 patients were treated with SRS and 68 patients with SRT. Median follow-up (FU) reached 5 years with 5-year overall survival (OS) of 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %) and 5-year local control and progression-free survival rates of 100 % (CI 93.3-100 %) and 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %), respectively. A post-SRS/SRT new visual disorder occurred in 2 patients (2.7 %), a new oculomotor nerve palsy in one pre-irradiated patient, in 3 patients (4.1 %) a pre-existing visual disorder improved. New complete hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients (13.8 %) and in 3 patients (25 %) with pre-existing partial hypopituitarism. Pituitary function in 26 % of patients retained normal. Patients with tumor shrinkage (65.75 %) had a significantly longer FU (p = 0.0093). Multivariate analysis confirmed correlation of new hypopituitarism with duration of FU (p = 0.008) and correlation of new hypopituitarism and tumor volume (p = 0.023). No significant influence factors for occurrence of visual disorders were found. Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system, especially for large tumors located close to optic pathways. (orig.) [de

  14. Adsorption and dissociation of sulfur-based toxic gas molecules on silicene nanoribbons: a quest for high-performance gas sensors and catalysts.

    Walia, Gurleen Kaur; Randhawa, Deep Kamal Kaur

    2018-03-16

    The adsorption behavior of sulfur-based toxic gases (H 2 S and SO 2 ) on armchair silicene nanoribbons (ASiNRs) was investigated using first-principles density functional theory (DFT). Being a zero band gap material, application of bulk silicene is limited in nanoelectronics, despite its high carrier mobility. By restricting its dimensions into one dimension, construction of nanoribbons, and by introduction of a defect, its band gap can be tuned. Pristine armchair silicene nanoribbons (P-ASiNRs) have a very low sensitivity to gas molecules. Therefore, a defect was introduced by removal of one Si atom, leading to increased sensitivity. To deeply understand the impact of the aforementioned gases on silicene nanoribbons, electronic band structures, density of states, charge transfers, adsorption energies, electron densities, current-voltage characteristics and most stable adsorption configurations were calculated. H 2 S is dissociated completely into HS and H species when adsorbed onto defective armchair silicene nanoribbons (D-ASiNRs). Thus, D-ASiNR is a likely catalyst for dissociation of the H 2 S gas molecule. Conversely, upon SO 2 adsorption, P-ASiNR acts as a suitable sensor, whereas D-ASiNR provides enhanced sensitivity compared with P-ASiNR. On the basis of these results, D-ASiNR can be expected to be a disposable sensor for SO 2 detection as well as a catalyst for H 2 S reduction. Graphical abstract Comparison of I-V characteristics of pristine and defective armchair silicene nanoribbons with H 2 S and SO 2 adsorbed on them.

  15. Toxic substances handbook

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  16. Risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy in a pooled series of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. High local control and low toxicity

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted single-fraction (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with nonsecretory pituitary adenomas (NSA). A total of 73 NSA patients (39 men/34 women) with a median age of 62 years were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk) in two Novalis registered centers. Mean tumor volume was 7.02 ccm (range 0.58-57.29 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 5 patients were treated with SRS and 68 patients with SRT. Median follow-up (FU) reached 5 years with 5-year overall survival (OS) of 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %) and 5-year local control and progression-free survival rates of 100 % (CI 93.3-100 %) and 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %), respectively. A post-SRS/SRT new visual disorder occurred in 2 patients (2.7 %), a new oculomotor nerve palsy in one pre-irradiated patient, in 3 patients (4.1 %) a pre-existing visual disorder improved. New complete hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients (13.8 %) and in 3 patients (25 %) with pre-existing partial hypopituitarism. Pituitary function in 26 % of patients retained normal. Patients with tumor shrinkage (65.75 %) had a significantly longer FU (p = 0.0093). Multivariate analysis confirmed correlation of new hypopituitarism with duration of FU (p = 0.008) and correlation of new hypopituitarism and tumor volume (p = 0.023). No significant influence factors for occurrence of visual disorders were found. Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system, especially for large tumors located close to optic pathways. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit hormoninaktiven Hypophysenadenomen

  17. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist die Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit Akromegalie aus 2 Zentren. Insgesamt 35 Patienten (16

  18. Acute and chronic toxicity of Roundup Weathermax and Ignite 280 SL to larval Spea multiplicata and S. bombifrons from the Southern High Plains, USA

    Dinehart, Simon K., E-mail: simon.dinehart@okstate.ed [Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Smith, Loren M.; McMurry, Scott T. [Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Smith, Philip N.; Anderson, Todd A. [Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Box 41163, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Haukos, David A. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS 2125, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Pesticides have been implicated in widespread amphibian declines. We assessed acute and chronic toxicity of two widely used herbicides to larval New Mexico (Spea multiplicata) and Plains (S. bombifrons) spadefoots from cropland and native grassland playas. Roundup WeatherMAX (WM) toxicity estimates (48- and 216-h LC{sub 50}; 48-h LC{sub 1}) for both species were similar to environmental concentrations expected from accidental overspray. Chronic (30-day) exposure to WM at predicted environmental concentrations (2.0 and 2.8 mg glyphosate acid equivalents/L) reduced survival of both species. Ignite 280 SL (IG) toxicity estimates (48-h LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 1}) for both species were above predicted environmental concentrations of 1.0 mg glufosinate/L. Chronic exposure to predicted environmental concentrations of IG did not reduce survival of either species. Toxicity test results suggest that at predicted environmental concentrations IG would not cause extensive mortalities among larval New Mexico and Plains spadefoots. However, WM may cause extensive mortality among larvae of these species. - Roundup WeatherMAX may cause extensive mortality among larval New Mexico and Plains spadefoots; it is unlikely that exposure to Ignite 280 SL would result in extensive mortalities.

  19. High-performance towards removal of toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using graphene oxide-alpha cyclodextrin-polypyrrole nanocomposites

    Chauke, VP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available toxic Cr(VI) from water. The prepared GO-aCD-PPY NCs were successfully characterised with AT-FTIR, FE-SEM, HR-TEM, BET and XRD techniques. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch mode to determine optimum conditions that include temperature, p...

  20. Acute and chronic toxicity of Roundup Weathermax and Ignite 280 SL to larval Spea multiplicata and S. bombifrons from the Southern High Plains, USA

    Dinehart, Simon K.; Smith, Loren M.; McMurry, Scott T.; Smith, Philip N.; Anderson, Todd A.; Haukos, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Pesticides have been implicated in widespread amphibian declines. We assessed acute and chronic toxicity of two widely used herbicides to larval New Mexico (Spea multiplicata) and Plains (S. bombifrons) spadefoots from cropland and native grassland playas. Roundup WeatherMAX (WM) toxicity estimates (48- and 216-h LC 50 ; 48-h LC 1 ) for both species were similar to environmental concentrations expected from accidental overspray. Chronic (30-day) exposure to WM at predicted environmental concentrations (2.0 and 2.8 mg glyphosate acid equivalents/L) reduced survival of both species. Ignite 280 SL (IG) toxicity estimates (48-h LC 50 and LC 1 ) for both species were above predicted environmental concentrations of 1.0 mg glufosinate/L. Chronic exposure to predicted environmental concentrations of IG did not reduce survival of either species. Toxicity test results suggest that at predicted environmental concentrations IG would not cause extensive mortalities among larval New Mexico and Plains spadefoots. However, WM may cause extensive mortality among larvae of these species. - Roundup WeatherMAX may cause extensive mortality among larval New Mexico and Plains spadefoots; it is unlikely that exposure to Ignite 280 SL would result in extensive mortalities.

  1. Thallium toxicity in humans.

    Cvjetko, Petra; Cvjetko, Ivan; Pavlica, Mirjana

    2010-03-01

    Thallium is a naturally occurring trace element, widely distributed in the earth's crust, but at very low concentrations. It does not have a known biological use and does not appear to be an essential element for life. It has been considered one of the most toxic heavy metals.Occasionally, there are reports on thallium poisoning as results of suicide or murder attempt or accident. The main threat to humans is through occupational exposure, environmental contamination, and accumulation in food, mainly in vegetables grown on contaminated soil. Increasing use in emerging new technologies and demanding high-tech industry constantly raise concern about exposure risk to all living organisms. Thallium is considered a cumulative poison that can cause adverse health effects and degenerative changes in many organs. The effects are the most severe in the nervous system. The exact mechanism of thallium toxicity still remains unknown, although impaired glutathione metabolism, oxidative stress, and disruption of potassium-regulated homeostasis may play a role. The lack of data about mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic effects of thallium compounds in humans calls for further research.

  2. Toxic stress and child refugees.

    Murray, John S

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the phenomenon of toxic stress and its impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees. Almost two decades ago, researchers found that recurring adverse childhood events (ACEs; e.g., physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction such as substance abuse, mental illness, and criminal behavior) were associated with a significant increase in serious illnesses during adulthood. Illnesses include heart, lung, and liver disease, cancer, and bone fractures. The scientists reported that experiencing four or more ACEs during childhood significantly increases the risk for toxic stress. Toxic stress is defined as the exposure to extreme, frequent, and persistent adverse events without the presence of a supportive caretaker. There is a paucity of literature related to toxic stress and child refugees. However, it has been clearly established that the prolonged brutal and traumatizing war in Syria is having a profound impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees at a distressing rate. Prevention of toxic stress should be a primary goal of all pediatric healthcare professionals working with child refugees. While this seems daunting given the population, and the seemingly insurmountable stressors they experience, some basic interventions should be considered. Providing basic anticipatory guidance to parents and caregivers of child refugees, to encourage positive parenting and strengthening support networks, will be highly effective in developing the requisite buffers that mitigate the effects of stress and avoid toxic stress. Efforts should also be focused on addressing caregiver stress and improving their ability to provide safe, reliable, and nurturing care that will help to mitigate any stress response experienced by a child. It is critical that greater awareness be placed on the effects of toxic stress on child refugees who are exposed to significant adverse events early in life

  3. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  4. Assessment of the Toxicity of Sub-chronic Low and High Doses of the Bio-insecticide Spinosad on the Liver, Kidney and the Cerebellum in Male Albino Mice

    Sabry A El-Naggar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Spinosad (SPD is a highly selective insect control product. However, it was reported that SPD has toxicity toward other non-target organisms. This study was conducted to address the toxic effect of two sub-chronic low and high doses; 35 and 350 mg/kg SPD on some biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical parameters of the liver, kidney and cerebellum. Thirty-six male Swiss mice were divided into three groups of 12 mice each; first group (G1 served as a control, second group (G2 received a low sub-chronic dose of SPD that is equal to 35 mg/kg, and third group (G3 received a high sub-chronic dose of SPD that is equal to 350 mg/kg. The results showed that mice which were received 350 mg/kg SPD showed a significant decrease in the body weight and a significant increase in their relative kidney and spleen weights. They also showed a significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT, triglycerides and urea levels. Histopathological examination showed cytoplasmic degeneration and cell necrosis in the liver and kidney. Immunohistochemical examination showed that cerebellum illustrated several neurodegenerative changes and a down-regulation of synaptophysin-Syp. In conclusion, exposure to a high dose of SPD that is equal to 350 mg/kg could cause a marked toxicity on the liver, kidney and cerebellum in male albino mice.

  5. Studies on the toxicity of RSU-1069

    Whitmore, G.F.; Gulyas, S.

    1986-01-01

    RSU-1069 combines an aziridine function with a 2-nitroimidazole and has been reported to exhibit extraordinary radiosensitization both in vitro and in vivo. Such sensitization appears to be at variance with the electron affinity of the compound. In addition, recent experiments suggest that the compound is highly toxic to hypoxic tumor cells in vivo. On the assumption that the observed radiosensitizing ability may be a manifestation of toxicity and because of the high in vivo toxicity, we have investigated aerobic and hypoxic toxicity, both in wild type CHO cells and in mutants sensitive to a variety of DNA damaging agents. With wild type cells under aerobic conditions, the compound is approximately 50 times as toxic as misonidazole and under hypoxic conditions, approximately 250 times as toxic. The ratio of hypoxic to aerobic toxicity is approximately 80 times. Under aerobic conditions, repair-deficient mutants are 10 times as sensitive to RSU-1069 as wild type cells and approximately 100 times as sensitive under hypoxic conditions. The ratio of hypoxic to aerobic toxicity for the mutant cells is approximately 900. Based on these observations, we suggest that under aerobic conditions the aziridine function is primarily responsible for toxicity, whereas, under hypoxic conditions, the aziridine moiety combined with a reduced 2-nitroimidazole moiety produces a bifunctional agent

  6. High dietary quality of non-toxic cyanobacteria for a benthic grazer and its implications for the control of cyanobacterial biofilms

    Groendahl, Sophie; Fink, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background Mass occurrences of cyanobacteria frequently cause detrimental effects to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Consequently, attempts haven been made to control cyanobacterial blooms through naturally co-occurring herbivores. Control of cyanobacteria through herbivores often appears to be constrained by their low dietary quality, rather than by the possession of toxins, as also non-toxic cyanobacteria are hardly consumed by many herbivores. It was thus hypothesized that the consu...

  7. How do plants manage to survive on toxic spoil-mining sites? Physiological and structural properties of plants on substrates with high As and Hg contents

    Kovářová, Monika

    2010-01-01

    The heavy metals contamination of environment represents a worldwide problem lately. Heavy metals cause harmful effects not only to plants, but also to other organisms. Throught their acumulation in plant biomass, heavy metals enter a food chain and could negatively influence the human health. The impact of heavy metals on plants and their defence mechanisms against toxicity of heavy metals have been in focus of plant physiology and ecology research for decades. Importance of this topic arise...

  8. Melatonin and resveratrol reverse the toxic effect of high boron (B) and modulate biochemical parameters in pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Sarafi, Eleana; Tsouvaltzis, Pavlos; Chatzissavvidis, Christos; Siomos, Anastasios; Therios, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this research were to test a possible involvement of melatonin (MEL) and resveratrol (RES) in restoring growth and to control boron (B) toxicity in peppers. The plants were subjected to four different nutrient solution treatments as following: 1) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution (Control), 2) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM B (100 μMB), 3) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM boron+100 μMresveratrol (100 μMRES), and 4) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM B+1 μMmelatonin (1 μM MEL). Pepper plants subjected to B excess (100 μM) for 68 days (d) exhibited visible B toxicity symptoms, reduced rate of photosynthesis (Pn) and reduced dry weight (DW), while their leaf and fruit had the greatest increase of B concentration. The reduction of photosynthesis was restored, the reduction of DW was prevented, while the B leaf and fruit accumulation was moderated with the application of both 100 μMresveratrol (RES) and 1 μMmelatonin (MEL). Moreover, plants exposed to MEL and/or RES displayed no visible B toxicity symptoms. The present study revealed a novel role of MEL and/or RES in the adaptation of pepper plants to B excess based on plant growth, physiological and biochemical criteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxic substances alert program

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  10. Trichothecenes: structure-toxic activity relationships.

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Kuca, Kamil; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-07-01

    Trichothecenes comprise a large family of structurally related toxins mainly produced by fungi belonging to the genus Fusarium. Among trichothecenes, type A and type B are of the most concern due to their broad and highly toxic nature. In order to address structure-activity relationships (SAR) of trichothecenes, relationships between structural features and biological effects of trichothecene mycotoxins in mammalian systems are summarized in this paper. The double bond between C-9-C-10 and the 12,13-epoxide ring are essential structural features for trichothecene toxicity. Removal of these groups results in a complete loss of toxicity. A hydroxyl group at C-3 enhances trichothecene toxicity, while this activity decreases gradually when C-3 is substituted with either hydrogen or an acetoxy group. The presence of a hydroxyl group at C-4 promotes slightly lower toxicity than an acetoxy group at the same position. The toxicity for type B trichothecenes decreases if the substituent at C-4 is changed from acetoxy to hydroxyl or hydrogen at C-4 position. The presence of hydroxyl and hydrogen groups on C-15 decreases the trichothecene toxicity in comparison with an acetoxy group attached to this carbon. Trichothecenes toxicity increases when a macrocyclic ring exists between the C-4 and C-15. At C-8 position, an oxygenated substitution at C-8 is essential for trichothecene toxicity, indicating a decrease in the toxicity if substituent change from isovaleryloxy through hydrogen to the hydroxyl group. The presence of a second epoxy ring at C-7-C-8 reduces the toxicity, whereas epoxidation at C-9-C-10 of some macrocyclic trichothecenes increases the activity. Conjugated trichothecenes could release their toxic precursors after hydrolysis in animals, and present an additional potential risk. The SAR study of trichothecenes should provide some crucial information for a better understanding of trichothecene chemical and biological properties in food contamination.

  11. Short-term toxicity assessments of an antibiotic metabolite in Wistar rats and its metabonomics analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Han, Hongxing; Xiao, Hailong; Lu, Zhenmei

    2016-02-15

    4-Epi-oxytetracycline (4-EOTC), one of main oxytetracycline (OTC) metabolites, can be commonly detected in food and environment. The toxicity and effects of OTC on animals have been well characterized; however, its metabolites have never been studied systemically. This study aims to investigate 15-day oral dose toxicity and urine metabonomics changes of 4-EOTC after repeated administration in Wistar rats at daily doses of 0.5, 5.0 and 50.0mg/kg bw (bodyweight). Hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, including white blood cell count, red blood cell count, total protein, globulin and albumin/globulin, were obviously altered in rats of 5.0 and 50.0mg/kg bw. Histopathology changes of kidney and liver tissues were also observed in high-dose groups. Urinary metabolites from all groups were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Seventeen metabolites contributing to the clusters were identified as potential biomarkers from multivariate analysis, including aminoadipic acid, 6-phosphogluconate, sebacic acid, pipecolic acid, etc. The significant changes of these biomarkers demonstrated metabonomic variations in treated rats, especially lysine and purine metabolism. For the first time in this paper, we combined the results of toxicity and metabonomics induced by 4-EOTC for the serious reconsideration of the safety and potential risks of antibiotics and its degradation metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution magic angle spinning 1H-NMR spectroscopy studies on the renal biochemistry in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) and the effects of arsenic (As3+) toxicity.

    Griffin, J L; Walker, L; Shore, R F; Nicholson, J K

    2001-06-01

    1. High-resolution magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H-NMR spectroscopy was used to study renal metabolism and the toxicity of As3+, a common environmental contaminant, in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus), a wild species of rodent. 2. Following a 14-day exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of As2O3 (28 mg kg(-1) feed), voles displayed tissue damage at autopsy. MAS 1H spectra indicated abnormal lipid profiles in these samples. 3. Tissue necrosis was also evident from measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient of water in the intact tissue using MAS 1H diffusion-weighted spectroscopy, its first application to toxicology. 4. Comparison of renal tissue from the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) exposed to identical exposure levels of As3+ suggested that the bank vole is particularly vulnerable to As3+ toxicity.

  13. Toxicity identification evaluation of cosmetics industry wastewater.

    de Melo, Elisa Dias; Mounteer, Ann H; Leão, Lucas Henrique de Souza; Bahia, Renata Cibele Barros; Campos, Izabella Maria Ferreira

    2013-01-15

    The cosmetics industry has shown steady growth in many developing countries over the past several years, yet little research exists on toxicity of wastewaters it generates. This study describes a toxicity identification evaluation conducted on wastewater from a small Brazilian hair care products manufacturing plant. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological analyses of three wastewater treatment plant inlet and outlet samples collected over a six month period revealed inefficient operation of the treatment system and thus treated wastewater organic matter, suspended solids and surfactants contents consistently exceeded discharge limits. Treated wastewater also presented high acute toxicity to Daphnia similis and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. This toxicity was associated with suspended solids, volatile or sublatable and non-polar to moderately polar organic compounds that could be recovered in filtration and aeration residues. Seven surfactants used in the largest quantities in the production process were highly toxic to P. subcapitata and D. similis. These results indicated that surfactants, important production raw materials, are a probable source of toxicity, although other possible sources, such as fragrances, should not be discarded. Improved treatment plant operational control may reduce toxicity and lower impact of wastewater discharge to receiving waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxic clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers plus radiation-induced toxicity

    Richmond, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The operational definition espoused twelve years ago that clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers should be nontoxic interferes with the recognition and research of useful radiation sensitizers. Eight years ago the toxic antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was reported to be a hypoxic radiation sensitizer and the selective antitumor action of this drug was stressed as potentially creating tumor-targeted radiation sensitization. This rationale of oxidative antitumor drugs as toxic and targeted clinical sensitizers is useful, and has led to the study reported here. The antitumor drug cis-(1,1-cyclobutane-dicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II), or JM-8, is being tested in clinical trials. Cells of S. typhimurium in PBS in the presence of 0.2mM JM-8 are found to be sensitized to irradiation under hypoxic, but not oxic, conditions. JM-8 is nontoxic to bacteria at this concentration, but upon irradiation the JM-8 solution becomes highly toxic. This radiation induced toxicity of JM-8 preferentially develops from hypoxic solution, and thus contributes to the rationale of hypoxic tumor cell destruction

  15. The toxicity of plutonium

    Ramsden, D.; Johns, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to recent publications concerned with the radiotoxicity of inhaled insoluble Pu compounds. The publications are a paper by Thorne and Vennart (Nature 263:555 (1976)), a report entitled 'The Toxicity of Plutonium', (London (HMSO), 1975), and the 'Sixth Report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution', (Cmnd. 6618, London (HMSO), 1976). Thorne and Vennart concluded that the previously accepted value for the maximum permissible annual intake (MPAI) of such compounds may be too high by a factor of about five, and a similar conclusion was reached in the other two publications. It is thought by the present authors that the methods which have been used to suggest new values for the MPAI are unduly pessimistic for high-fired PuO 2 ; calculations have been based on the lung model of ICRP Publication 19 'The Metabolism of Compounds of Plutonium and the Other Actinides', (International Commission of Radiological Protection, 1972). This involves concluding that the risks to bone and liver are comparable to those for lung. This is discussed and it is thought that the previously established idea that the lung is the critical organ remains substantially correct for the case of high-fired PuO 2 . (U.K.)

  16. N-Acetyl Cysteine does not prevent liver toxicity from chronic low dose plus sub-acute high dose paracetamol exposure in young or old mice

    Kane, Alice-Elizabeth; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Mach, John; McKenzie, Catriona; Mitchell, Sarah-Jayne; de Cabo, Rafael; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah-Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Paracetamol is an analgesic commonly used by people of all ages, which is well documented to cause severe hepatotoxicity with acute over-exposures. The risk of hepatotoxicity from non-acute paracetamol exposures is less extensively studied, and this is the exposure most common in older adults. Evidence on the effectiveness of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) for non-acute paracetamol exposures, in any age group, is lacking. This study aimed to examine the effect of long-term exposure to therapeutic doses of paracetamol and sub-acute paracetamol over-exposure, in young and old mice, and to investigate whether NAC was effective at preventing paracetamol hepatotoxicity induced by these exposures. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a paracetamol-containing (1.33g/kg food) or control diet for 6 weeks. Mice were then dosed orally 8 times over 3 days with additional paracetamol (250mg/kg) or saline, followed by either one or two doses of oral NAC (1200mg/kg) or saline. Chronic low-dose paracetamol exposure did not cause hepatotoxicity in young or old mice, measured by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, and confirmed by histology and a DNA fragmentation assay. Sub-acute paracetamol exposure caused significant hepatotoxicity in young and old mice, measured by biochemistry (ALT) and histology. Neither a single nor double dose of NAC protected against this toxicity from sub-acute paracetamol in young or old mice. This finding has important clinical implications for treating toxicity due to different paracetamol exposure types in patients of all ages, and implies a need to develop new treatments for sub-acute paracetamol toxicity. PMID:26821200

  17. High-dose, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy using a concurrent boost for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer: unusual toxicity and promising early results

    King, Stephen C.; Acker, Jeffrey C.; Kussin, Peter S.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Weeks, Kenneth J.; Leopold, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with conventional radiotherapy (RT) results in inadequate local tumor control and survival. We report results of a Phase II trial designed to treat patients with a significantly increased total dose administered in a reduced overall treatment time using a hyperfractionated, accelerated treatment schedule with a concurrent boost technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/IIIB (38 patients) or medically inoperable Stage I/II (11 patients) NSCLC were prospectively enrolled in this protocol. Radiation therapy was administered twice daily, 5 days/week with > 6 h between each treatment. The primary tumor and adjacent enlarged lymph nodes were treated to a total dose of 73.6 Gy in 46 fractions of 1.6 Gy each. Using a concurrent boost technique, electively irradiated nodal regions were simultaneously treated with a dose of 1.25 Gy/fraction for the first 36 fractions to a total dose of 45 Gy. Results: Median survival for the entire group of 49 patients is 15.3 months. Actuarial survival at 2 years is 46%: 60% for 11 Stage I/II patients, 55% for 21 Stage IIIA patients, and 26% for 17 Stage IIIB patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression at 2 years is 64% for the entire group of 49 patients: 62% for Stage I/II patients, 70% for Stage IIIA patients, and 55% for Stage IIIB patients. Patients who underwent serial bronchoscopic reevaluation (4 Stage I/II, 8 Stage IIIA, and 6 Stage IIIB) have an actuarial rate of local control of 71% at 2 years. The median total treatment time was 32 days. Nine of 49 patients (18%) experienced Grade III acute esophageal toxicity. The 2-year actuarial risk of Grade III or greater late toxicity is 30%. The 2-year actuarial rate of severe-late pulmonary and skin-subcutaneous toxicity is 20% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion: This treatment regimen administers a substantially higher biologically effective dose compared with

  18. Females and Toxic Leadership

    2012-12-14

    labeled as toxic, can he or she be rehabilitated?; Are there leadership styles that can be promoted to combat toxic leadership?; and Are the senior...examines leadership styles that are favorable for female leaders, and offers Transformational/Adaptive leadership as a style promising rehabilitative tools

  19. In vitro evidence of glucose-induced toxicity in GnRH secreting neurons: high glucose concentrations influence GnRH secretion, impair cell viability, and induce apoptosis in the GT1-1 neuronal cell line.

    Pal, Lubna; Chu, Hsiao-Pai; Shu, Jun; Topalli, Ilir; Santoro, Nanette; Karkanias, George

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate for direct toxic effects of high glucose concentrations on cellular physiology in GnRH secreting immortalized GT1-1 neurons. Prospective experimental design. In vitro experimental model using a cell culture system. GT1-1 cells were cultured in replicates in media with two different glucose concentrations (450 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL, respectively) for varying time intervals (24, 48, and 72 hours). Effects of glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion by the GT1-1 neurons were evaluated using a static culture model. Cell viability, cellular apoptosis, and cell cycle events in GT1-1 neurons maintained in two different glucose concentrations were assessed by flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) using Annexin V-PI staining. Adverse influences of high glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion and cell viability were noted in cultures maintained in high glucose concentration (450 mg/dL) culture medium for varying time intervals. A significantly higher percentage of cells maintained in high glucose concentration medium demonstrated evidence of apoptosis by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. We provide in vitro evidence of glucose-induced cellular toxicity in GnRH secreting GT1-1 neurons. Significant alterations in GnRH secretion, reduced cell viability, and a higher percentage of apoptotic cells were observed in GT1-1 cells maintained in high (450 mg/dL) compared with low (100 mg/dL) glucose concentration culture medium.

  20. Anatomy-based inverse optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of incidence of acute genitourinary toxicity between anatomy-based inverse optimization and geometric optimization

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Shioya, Mariko; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the advantages of anatomy-based inverse optimization (IO) in planning high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 patients who received HDR brachytherapy (9 Gy in two fractions) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The dose distributions of HDR brachytherapy were optimized using geometric optimization (GO) in 70 patients and by anatomy-based IO in the remaining 44 patients. The correlation between the dose-volume histogram parameters, including the urethral dose and the incidence of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, was evaluated. Results: The averaged values of the percentage of volume receiving 80-150% of the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (V 8 -V 15 ) of the urethra generated by anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than the corresponding values generated by GO. Similarly, the averaged values of the minimal dose received by 5-50% of the target volume (D 5 -D 5 ) obtained using anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than those obtained using GO. Regarding acute toxicity, Grade 2 or worse acute GU toxicity developed in 23% of all patients, but was significantly lower in patients for whom anatomy-based IO (16%) was used than in those for whom GO was used (37%), consistent with the reduced urethral dose (p <0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that anatomy-based IO is superior to GO for dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer

  1. Gossypol Toxicity from Cottonseed Products

    Ivana Cristina N. Gadelha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gossypol is a phenolic compound produced by pigment glands in cotton stems, leaves, seeds, and flower buds (Gossypium spp.. Cottonseed meal is a by-product of cotton that is used for animal feeding because it is rich in oil and proteins. However, gossypol toxicity limits cottonseed use in animal feed. High concentrations of free gossypol may be responsible for acute clinical signs of gossypol poisoning which include respiratory distress, impaired body weight gain, anorexia, weakness, apathy, and death after several days. However, the most common toxic effects is the impairment of male and female reproduction. Another important toxic effect of gossypol is its interference with immune function, reducing an animal’s resistance to infections and impairing the efficiency of vaccines. Preventive procedures to limit gossypol toxicity involve treatment of the cottonseed product to reduce the concentration of free gossypol with the most common treatment being exposure to heat. However, free gossypol can be released from the bound form during digestion. Agronomic selection has produced cotton varieties devoid of glands producing gossypol, but these varieties are not normally grown because they are less productive and are more vulnerable to attacks by insects.

  2. Identification of Albizia lebbeck seed coat chitin-binding vicilins (7S globulins) with high toxicity to the larvae of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus

    Souza, A.J. [Laboratório de Química e Função de Proteínas e Peptídeos, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, A.T.S.; Perales, J.; Beghini, D.G. [Laboratório de Toxinologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, K.V.S.; Xavier-Filho, J.; Venancio, T.M.; Oliveira, A.E.A. [Laboratório de Química e Função de Proteínas e Peptídeos, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-01-27

    Seed coat is a specialized maternal tissue that interfaces the embryo and the external environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination. In addition, it is the first defensive barrier against penetration by pathogens and herbivores. Here we show that Albizia lebbeck seed coat dramatically compromises the oviposition, eclosion and development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Dietary supplementation of bruchid larvae with A. lebbeck seed coat flour causes severe weight loss and reduces survival. By means of protein purification, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, we show that chitinbinding vicilins are the main source of A. lebbeck tegumental toxicity to C. maculatus. At concentrations as low as 0.1%, A. lebbeck vicilins reduce larval mass from 8.1 ± 1.7 (mass of control larvae) to 1.8 ± 0.5 mg, which corresponds to a decrease of 78%. Seed coat toxicity constitutes an efficient defense mechanism, hindering insect predation and preventing embryo damage. We hypothesize that A. lebbeck vicilins are good candidates for the genetic transformation of crop legumes to enhance resistance to bruchid predation.

  3. Identification of Albizia lebbeck seed coat chitin-binding vicilins (7S globulins) with high toxicity to the larvae of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus

    Souza, A.J.; Ferreira, A.T.S.; Perales, J.; Beghini, D.G.; Fernandes, K.V.S.; Xavier-Filho, J.; Venancio, T.M.; Oliveira, A.E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seed coat is a specialized maternal tissue that interfaces the embryo and the external environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination. In addition, it is the first defensive barrier against penetration by pathogens and herbivores. Here we show that Albizia lebbeck seed coat dramatically compromises the oviposition, eclosion and development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Dietary supplementation of bruchid larvae with A. lebbeck seed coat flour causes severe weight loss and reduces survival. By means of protein purification, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, we show that chitinbinding vicilins are the main source of A. lebbeck tegumental toxicity to C. maculatus. At concentrations as low as 0.1%, A. lebbeck vicilins reduce larval mass from 8.1 ± 1.7 (mass of control larvae) to 1.8 ± 0.5 mg, which corresponds to a decrease of 78%. Seed coat toxicity constitutes an efficient defense mechanism, hindering insect predation and preventing embryo damage. We hypothesize that A. lebbeck vicilins are good candidates for the genetic transformation of crop legumes to enhance resistance to bruchid predation

  4. Identification of Albizia lebbeck seed coat chitin-binding vicilins (7S globulins) with high toxicity to the larvae of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus.

    Souza, A J; Ferreira, A T S; Perales, J; Beghini, D G; Fernandes, K V S; Xavier-Filho, J; Venancio, T M; Oliveira, A E A

    2012-02-01

    Seed coat is a specialized maternal tissue that interfaces the embryo and the external environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination. In addition, it is the first defensive barrier against penetration by pathogens and herbivores. Here we show that Albizia lebbeck seed coat dramatically compromises the oviposition, eclosion and development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Dietary supplementation of bruchid larvae with A. lebbeck seed coat flour causes severe weight loss and reduces survival. By means of protein purification, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, we show that chitin-binding vicilins are the main source of A. lebbeck tegumental toxicity to C. maculatus. At concentrations as low as 0.1%, A. lebbeck vicilins reduce larval mass from 8.1 ± 1.7 (mass of control larvae) to 1.8 ± 0.5 mg, which corresponds to a decrease of 78%. Seed coat toxicity constitutes an efficient defense mechanism, hindering insect predation and preventing embryo damage. We hypothesize that A. lebbeck vicilins are good candidates for the genetic transformation of crop legumes to enhance resistance to bruchid predation.

  5. Identification of Albizia lebbeck seed coat chitin-binding vicilins (7S globulins with high toxicity to the larvae of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus

    A.J. Souza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed coat is a specialized maternal tissue that interfaces the embryo and the external environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination. In addition, it is the first defensive barrier against penetration by pathogens and herbivores. Here we show that Albizia lebbeck seed coat dramatically compromises the oviposition, eclosion and development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. Dietary supplementation of bruchid larvae with A. lebbeck seed coat flour causes severe weight loss and reduces survival. By means of protein purification, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, we show that chitin-binding vicilins are the main source of A. lebbeck tegumental toxicity to C. maculatus. At concentrations as low as 0.1%, A. lebbeck vicilins reduce larval mass from 8.1 ± 1.7 (mass of control larvae to 1.8 ± 0.5 mg, which corresponds to a decrease of 78%. Seed coat toxicity constitutes an efficient defense mechanism, hindering insect predation and preventing embryo damage. We hypothesize that A. lebbeck vicilins are good candidates for the genetic transformation of crop legumes to enhance resistance to bruchid predation.

  6. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase pharmacogenetics for predicting fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity in the randomised, phase III adjuvant TOSCA trial in high-risk colon cancer patients.

    Ruzzo, A; Graziano, F; Galli, Fabio; Galli, Francesca; Rulli, E; Lonardi, S; Ronzoni, M; Massidda, B; Zagonel, V; Pella, N; Mucciarini, C; Labianca, R; Ionta, M T; Bagaloni, I; Veltri, E; Sozzi, P; Barni, S; Ricci, V; Foltran, L; Nicolini, M; Biondi, E; Bramati, A; Turci, D; Lazzarelli, S; Verusio, C; Bergamo, F; Sobrero, A; Frontini, L; Menghi, M; Magnani, M

    2017-10-24

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) catabolises ∼85% of the administered dose of fluoropyrimidines. Functional DPYD gene variants cause reduced/abrogated DPD activity. DPYD variants analysis may help for defining individual patients' risk of fluoropyrimidine-related severe toxicity. The TOSCA Italian randomised trial enrolled colon cancer patients for 3 or 6 months of either FOLFOX-4 or XELOX adjuvant chemotherapy. In an ancillary pharmacogenetic study, 10 DPYD variants (*2A rs3918290 G>A, *13 rs55886062 T>G, rs67376798 A>T, *4 rs1801158 G>A, *5 rs1801159 A>G, *6 rs1801160 G>A, *9A rs1801265 T>C, rs2297595 A>G, rs17376848 T>C, and rs75017182 C>G), were retrospectively tested for associations with ⩾grade 3 fluoropyrimidine-related adverse events (FAEs). An association analysis and a time-to-toxicity (TTT) analysis were planned. To adjust for multiple testing, the Benjamini and Hochberg's False Discovery Rate (FDR) procedure was used. FAEs occurred in 194 out of 508 assessable patients (38.2%). In the association analysis, FAEs occurred more frequently in *6 rs1801160 A allele carriers (FDR=0.0083). At multivariate TTT analysis, significant associations were found for *6 rs1801160 A allele carriers (FDRpharmacogenetics for safety of patients undergoing fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy.

  7. Harmonizing human exposure and toxicity characterization

    Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, O.; McKone, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    The UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative has launched a project to provide global guidance and build consensus on environmental life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) indicators. Human health effects from exposure to toxic chemicals was selected as impact category due to high relevance of human toxicity...... and harmonizing human toxicity characterization in LCIA. Building on initial work for the far-field and indoor air environments, and combining it with latest work on near-field consumer and occupational exposure assessment, dose-response and severity data, we aim at providing revised guidance on the development...... and use of impact factors for toxic chemicals. We propose to couple fate processes in consumer and occupational environments with existing environmental compartments and processes via a consistent and mass balance-based set of transfer fractions to quantify overall aggregated exposure to toxic substances...

  8. Salicylate toxicity model of tinnitus

    Daniel eStolzberg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Salicylate, the active component of the common drug aspirin, has mild analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects at moderate doses. At higher doses, however, salicylate temporarily induces moderate hearing loss and the perception of a high-pitch ringing in humans and animals. This phantom perception of sound known as tinnitus is qualitatively similar to the persistent subjective tinnitus induced by high-level noise exposure, ototoxic drugs or aging which affects ~14% of the general population. For over a quarter century, auditory scientists have used the salicylate toxicity model to investigate candidate biochemical and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying phantom sound perception. In this review, we summarize some of the intriguing biochemical and physiological effects associated with salicylate-induced tinnitus, some of which occur in the periphery and others in the central nervous system. The relevance and general utility of the salicylate toxicity model in understanding phantom sound perception in general are discussed.

  9. CMCTS stabilized Fe3O4 particles with extremely low toxicity as highly efficient near-infrared photothermal agents for in vivo tumor ablation

    Shen, Song; Kong, Fenfen; Guo, Xiaomeng; Wu, Lin; Shen, Haijun; Xie, Meng; Wang, Xinshi; Jin, Yi; Ge, Yanru

    2013-08-01

    With the potential uses of photothermal therapy (PTT) in cancer treatment with excellent efficacy, and the growing concerns about the nanotoxicity of hyperthermia agents such as carbon nanotubes and gold-based nanomaterials, the importance of searching for a biocompatible hyperthermia agent cannot be emphasized too much. In this work, a novel promising hyperthermia agent employing magnetic Fe3O4 particles with fairly low toxicity was proposed. This hyperthermia agent showed rapid heat generation under NIR irradiation. After modification with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCTS), the obtained Fe3O4@CMCTS particles could disperse stably in PBS and serum without any aggregation. The modification of CMCTS could decrease the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and improve the cellular uptake. In a comparative study with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), Fe3O4@CMCTS particles exhibited a comparable photothermal effect and fairly low cytotoxicity. The in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) images of mice revealed that by attaching a magnet to the tumor, Fe3O4@CMCTS particles accumulated in the tumor after intravenous injection and showed a low distribution in the liver. After being exposed to a 808 nm laser for 5 min at a low power density of 1.5 W cm-2, the tumors on Fe3O4@CMCTS-injected mice reached a temperature of ~52 °C and were completely destroyed. Thus, a kind of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticle with extremely low toxicity and a simple structure for simultaneous MR imaging, targeted drug delivery and photothermal therapy can be easily fabricated.With the potential uses of photothermal therapy (PTT) in cancer treatment with excellent efficacy, and the growing concerns about the nanotoxicity of hyperthermia agents such as carbon nanotubes and gold-based nanomaterials, the importance of searching for a biocompatible hyperthermia agent cannot be emphasized too much. In this work, a novel promising hyperthermia agent employing magnetic Fe3O4 particles with fairly low

  10. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement.

  11. Electronic Cigarette Toxicity.

    Payne, J Drew; Michaels, David; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often advertised as a healthier product when compared with traditional cigarettes. Currently, there are limited data to support this and only a threat of federal regulation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette toxicity, especially in children, and case reports of toxic exposures have increased over the past 3 years. This research letter reports the frequency of hazardous exposures to e-cigarettes and characterizes the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarette toxicity.

  12. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  13. Toxicity Reference Database

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  14. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  15. Short-term toxicity assessments of an antibiotic metabolite in Wistar rats and its metabonomics analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Han, Hongxing; Xiao, Hailong; Lu, Zhenmei

    2016-01-01

    4-Epi-oxytetracycline (4-EOTC), one of main oxytetracycline (OTC) metabolites, can be commonly detected in food and environment. The toxicity and effects of OTC on animals have been well characterized; however, its metabolites have never been studied systemically. This study aims to investigate 15-day oral dose toxicity and urine metabonomics changes of 4-EOTC after repeated administration in Wistar rats at daily doses of 0.5, 5.0 and 50.0 mg/kg bw (bodyweight). Hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, including white blood cell count, red blood cell count, total protein, globulin and albumin/globulin, were obviously altered in rats of 5.0 and 50.0 mg/kg bw. Histopathology changes of kidney and liver tissues were also observed in high-dose groups. Urinary metabolites from all groups were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Seventeen metabolites contributing to the clusters were identified as potential biomarkers from multivariate analysis, including aminoadipic acid, 6-phosphogluconate, sebacic acid, pipecolic acid, etc. The significant changes of these biomarkers demonstrated metabonomic variations in treated rats, especially lysine and purine metabolism. For the first time in this paper, we combined the results of toxicity and metabonomics induced by 4-EOTC for the serious reconsideration of the safety and potential risks of antibiotics and its degradation metabolites. - Highlights: • 4-Epioxytetracycline (4-EOTC) induced damages in liver and kidney. • Metabonomics changes especially amino acid and purine metabolism were observed. • Security of OTC metabolite 4-EOTC should be taken into serious reconsideration.

  16. Short-term toxicity assessments of an antibiotic metabolite in Wistar rats and its metabonomics analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Han, Hongxing [College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xiao, Hailong [Hangzhou Institute for Food and Drug Control, Hangzhou 310004 (China); Lu, Zhenmei, E-mail: lzhenmei@zju.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-02-15

    4-Epi-oxytetracycline (4-EOTC), one of main oxytetracycline (OTC) metabolites, can be commonly detected in food and environment. The toxicity and effects of OTC on animals have been well characterized; however, its metabolites have never been studied systemically. This study aims to investigate 15-day oral dose toxicity and urine metabonomics changes of 4-EOTC after repeated administration in Wistar rats at daily doses of 0.5, 5.0 and 50.0 mg/kg bw (bodyweight). Hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, including white blood cell count, red blood cell count, total protein, globulin and albumin/globulin, were obviously altered in rats of 5.0 and 50.0 mg/kg bw. Histopathology changes of kidney and liver tissues were also observed in high-dose groups. Urinary metabolites from all groups were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Seventeen metabolites contributing to the clusters were identified as potential biomarkers from multivariate analysis, including aminoadipic acid, 6-phosphogluconate, sebacic acid, pipecolic acid, etc. The significant changes of these biomarkers demonstrated metabonomic variations in treated rats, especially lysine and purine metabolism. For the first time in this paper, we combined the results of toxicity and metabonomics induced by 4-EOTC for the serious reconsideration of the safety and potential risks of antibiotics and its degradation metabolites. - Highlights: • 4-Epioxytetracycline (4-EOTC) induced damages in liver and kidney. • Metabonomics changes especially amino acid and purine metabolism were observed. • Security of OTC metabolite 4-EOTC should be taken into serious reconsideration.

  17. Characterization of efficacy and toxicity after high-dose pelvic reirradiation with palliative intent for genitourinary second malignant neoplasms or local recurrences after full-dose radiation therapy in the pelvis: A high-volume cancer center experience

    Sophia C. Kamran, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: This small series suggests that aggressive re-RT of inoperable and symptomatic GU malignancies that is undertaken with meticulous treatment planning is well tolerated and provides excellent, durable relief without undue short-term toxicity. Validation in a larger prospective cohort is required.

  18. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxicity of nonylphenol diethoxylate in lab-scale anaerobic digesters

    Bozkurt, Hande; Sanin, F. Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol compounds have high commercial, industrial and domestic uses owing to their surface active properties. In addition to their toxic, carcinogenic and persistent characteristics; they have drawn the attention of scientists lately due to their endocrine disrupting properties....... Their widespread use and disposal cause them to enter wastewater treatment systems at high concentrations. Since they are highly persistent and hydrophobic, they accumulate mostly on sludge.In this study using Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA) tests, the toxicity of a model nonylphenol compound, nonylphenol...

  20. Dietary zinc and its toxicity

    Lantzsch, H J

    1973-01-01

    First signs of Zn-toxicity in rats appeared at 1000 to 2000 ppm Zn in food. They were characterized by growth inhibition by the appearance of a microcytic hypochromic anemia by a reversible impairment of the ability to reproduce by disturbances in fat metabolism and by Zn-accumulation especially in the liver and the skeleton. Available results in the literature concerning alimentary Zn-toxicity in horses are few. At a daily doses of 8000 mg Zn during gestation there were no noticeable adverse effects either in the mare or the foal. While with young lambs addition of Zn of up to 1000 ppm enhanced growth, food intake and feed efficiency, with older lambs it gave rise to depressions. Available results of experiments with milk cows are equally insufficient. At Zn-concentration of 40 to 80 ppm, which may be reached in normal foodstuff, there appears to be a disturbance in the metabolism of cellulose in the rumen. In spite of this fact and notwithstanding the insufficiently examined influence of high Zn-concentrations in food on the Cu-metabolism, the limit of Zn-tolerance can be given at 1000 mg per kg of food. If dissolved, Zn is far more toxic. With calves there wre no signs of clinical toxicity up to Zn-concentrations in the food of 3000 ppm. Above 900 ppm there appeared depression in growth and deterioration in the feed efficiency. Ae 1700 ppm there was a decrease infood intake. Increased Zn-intake lead to a growing Zn-accumulation in several organs and tissues, with the accumulation in the liver, bones, kidneys, pancreas and the gastrointestinal tract being of special significance. With cessation of Zn-intake in food, Zn-accumulation slowly disappeared. As a result of high Zn-intake there appears to be synergistic and antagonistic interdependent effects with the metabolism of other trace elements (Cu, Fe) and minerals (Ca, Na, P).

  1. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to st...

  2. Copper toxicity in housed lambs

    Adamson, A H; Valks, D A; Appleton, M A; Shaw, W B

    1969-09-27

    Copper toxicity among 170 lambs artificially reared indoors at High Mowthorpe NAAS Experimental Husbandry Farm is reported. Although only three lambs were lost it is not unreasonable to suggest that the liver copper levels of the lambs which were slaughtered would have been high and losses could have been much heavier had there been any further copper supplementation. Even a copper level of 20 ppm in lamb concentrates given to lambs reared artificially indoors is dangerous, and intakes of much less than 38 mg per lamb per day can be fatal if given of a prolonged period. 5 references, 1 table.

  3. A practical approach to the disposal of highly toxic and long-lived spent nuclear fuel waste between Venus and Earth

    Ehricke, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extraterrestrial disposal, while not the only alternative, nevertheless assures definite and irreversible removal of the most toxic and long-lived waste from the biosphere. The disposal 'site' should lie at minimum safe transfer energy level. Primary candidate is the space between Venus and Earth. The number of propulsion phases should be a minimum, preferably only one. Lunar gravity assist can be helpful to achieve higher inclination of the heliocentric orbit relative to the ecliptic. Solidified spent fuel isotopes and actinides, sufficient to reduce the residual terrestrial waste to the radiation level of natural uranium deposits after 30 to 40 yr instead of 1000 to 1500 yr, is deposited into heliocentric orbits. Transportation systems, requirements, costs and the associated socio-economic benefit potentials of an environmentally more benign and a more vigorous nuclear power generation program are presented. Prior to solidification, an interim storage of 10 yr, following removal from the reactor, may be required. The Shuttle, with one Orbiter modified as Nuclear Waste Carrying Orbiter and an out of near-Earth orbit booster, provides a safe and economic transportation system at disposal mission costs from surface to disposal orbit of less than 0.5 cents/kWhe or <= 0.1 cent/kWhe depending on level of orbital operations. Details are discussed. (author)

  4. Paraquat: model for oxidant-initiated toxicity

    Bus, J.S.; Gibson, J.E.

    1984-04-01

    Paraquat, a quaternary ammonium bipyridyl herbicide, produces degenerative lesions in the lung after systemic administration to man and animals. The pulmonary toxicity of paraquat resembles in several ways the toxicity of several other lung toxins, including oxygen, nitrofurantoin and bleomycin. Although a definitive mechanism of toxicity of parquat has not been delineated, a cyclic single electron reduction/oxidation of the parent molecule is a critical mechanistic event. The redox cycling of paraquat has two potentially important consequences relevant to the development of toxicity: generation of activated oxygen (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen perioxide, hydroxyl radical) which is highly reactive to cellular macromolecules; and/or oxidation of reducing equivalents (e.g., NADPH, reduced glutathione) necessary for normal cell function. Paraquat-induced pulmonary toxicity, therefore, is a potentially useful model for evaluation of oxidant mechanisms of toxicity. Furthermore, characterization of the consequences of intracellular redox cycling of xenobiotics will no doubt provide basic information regarding the role of this phenomena in the development of chemical toxicity. 105 references, 2 figures.

  5. High incidence of multinodular toxic goitre in the elderly population in a low iodine intake area vs. high incidence of Graves' disease in the young in a high iodine intake area

    Laurberg, P; Pedersen, K M; Vestergaard, H

    1991-01-01

    that even mild iodine deficiency has a significant effect on population health, since it leads to a high incidence of autonomous thyroid nodules with hyperthyroidism in the elderly population. However, population iodine intake probably should not exceed a level much higher than that necessary to avoid...... iodine deficiency, otherwise Graves' disease may be induced in the young population.......Little is known about the optimum level of iodine intake for iodine supplementation programmes, or about the effects of the high levels of iodine intake that are found in some countries. We compared the incidence of different types of hyperthyroidism in East-Jutland Denmark with a low average...

  6. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16INK4A expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan; Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Burfeind, Peter; Reichardt, Holger M.; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16 INK4A expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16 INK4A expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16 INK4A expression only, and patients without p16 INK4A expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16 INK4A expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16 INK4A expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16 INK4A expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [de

  7. Phytotoxkit® and Ostracodtoxkit® tests for assessing the toxicity of sediment samples with high concentration of heavy metals

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Molina, Jose; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the risk of contaminants, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Ecotoxicological testing may be a useful approach for assessing the toxicity as a complement to chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and applicability of two bioassays representing multiple trophic levels, for the preliminary ecotoxicological screening of sediments from sites contaminated by mining activities: a chronic toxicity test with the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and a phytotoxicity test using Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba seeds. For this study, 30 soils samples were collected from the Sierra Minera (Murcia, SE Spain) for general analytical determinations and the total metal content (Pb, Zn, Cd and As) was determined. The Phytotoxkit® test measures the decrease in (or the absence of) seed germination and of the growth of the young roots after 3 days of exposure of seeds of selected higher plants to a contaminated matrix compared with the controls germinated in a reference soil. The plants selected for the Phytotoxkit® microbiotest were: the monocotyl Sorghum saccharatum (Sorgho) and the dicotyls Lepidium sativum (Garden cress) and Sinapis alba (mustard) (Phytotoxkit®, 2004). The percent inhibition of seed germination (SG) and root growth inhibition (RI) for each plant were calculated. Ostracodtoxkit® test consists of placing freshly hatched ostracod neonates in multiwell cups in 2 ml synthetic freshwater, with 300 µl sediment and 3x107 algal cells (Selenastrum capricornutum). After 6 days, incubation at 25 °C in darkness, the mortality of test organisms was determined (Ostracodtoxkit® FTM, 2001) and growth inhibition was calculated. Soil samples showed a mean pH value of 6.0 in water and 5.7 in KCl. The EC varied from 1.0 dS m-1 to 56.2 dS m-1, with a mean value of 17.7 dS m-1. The mean value for Pb was 0.84 mg kg-1, 10593 mg kg-1 for Zn, 23.18 mg kg-1 for Cd and 0.16 mg kg-1 for As

  8. Definitive Reirradiation for Locoregionally Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Proton Beam Therapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Predictors of High-Grade Toxicity and Survival Outcomes

    McAvoy, Sarah; Ciura, Katherine; Wei, Caimiao; Rineer, Justin; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: DGomez@mdanderson.org

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation of 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of

  9. Prostate cancer treated with image-guided helical TomoTherapy {sup registered} and image-guided LINAC-IMRT. Correlation between high-dose bladder volume, margin reduction, and genitourinary toxicity

    Drozdz, Sonia; Wendt, Thomas G. [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Schwedas, Michael; Salz, Henning [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Section of Medical Physics, Jena (Germany); Foller, Susan [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Urology, Jena (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    We compared different image-guidance (IG) strategies for prostate cancer with high-precision IG intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using TomoTherapy {sup registered} (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-IMRT and their impact on planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction. Follow-up data showed reduced bladder toxicity in TomoTherapy patients compared to LINAC-IMRT. The purpose of this study was to quantify whether the treatment delivery technique and decreased margins affect reductions in bladder toxicity. Setup corrections from 30 patients treated with helical TomoTherapy and 30 treated with a LINAC were analyzed. These data were used to simulate three IG protocols based on setup error correction and a limited number of imaging sessions. For all patients, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was documented and correlated with the treatment delivery technique. For fiducial marker (FM)-based RT, a margin reduction of up to 3.1, 3.0, and 4.8 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, could be achieved with calculation of a setup correction from the first three fractions and IG every second day. Although the bladder volume was treated with mean doses of 35 Gy in the TomoTherapy group vs. 22 Gy in the LINAC group, we observed less GU toxicity after TomoTherapy. Intraprostate FMs allow for small safety margins, help decrease imaging frequency after setup correction, and minimize the dose to bladder and rectum, resulting in lower GU toxicity. In addition, IMRT delivered with TomoTherapy helps to avoid hotspots in the bladder neck, a critical anatomic structure associated with post-RT urinary toxicity. (orig.) [German] Wir haben im Rahmen der Prostatakarzinombehandlung verschiedene bildgefuehrte (IG) Strategien der hochpraezisen intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) unter Einsatz der Tomotherapie (TomoTherapy {sup registered}, Accuray Inc., Madison

  10. Developmental toxicity of organotin compounds in animals

    Lijiao eWu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organotin compounds (OTs have been used as biocides in antifouling paints and agriculture. The IMO introduced a global ban on the use of OTs in antifouling systems in 2001 due to their high toxicity. However, OTs have still been detected in the environment and pose a threat to the ecosystem. Several research groups have summarized the analytical methods, environmental fate, biochemistry, reproductive toxicity and mechanisms of actions of OTs. Here, we reviewed the developmental toxicity of OTs in various organisms such as sea urchin, ascidian, mussel and fish. The differences in sensitivity to OT exposure exist not only in different species but also at different stages in the same species. Though some hypotheses have been proposed to explain the developmental toxicity of OTs, the solid evidences are greatly in need.

  11. The toxicity of plutonium

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  12. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  13. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rosen, Gerald M. [University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  14. Fabrication of gold nanoparticles-decorated reduced graphene oxide as a high performance electrochemical sensing platform for the detection of toxicant Sudan I

    Li, Junhua; Feng, Haibo; Li, Jun; Feng, Yonglan; Zhang, Yaqian; Jiang, Jianbo; Qian, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •A well-dispersed AuNPs/RGO nanocomposite was fabricated via a green and in situ reduction method. •This nanocomposite displays excellent electro-catalysis activity for the oxidation of Sudan I. •The AuNPs/RGO/GCE exhibits superior comprehensive properties for the detection of Sudan I. •This proposed method was successfully applied to detect Sudan I in chilli powder and ketchup sauce. -- Abstract: In this paper, we are presenting a facile, green and in situ synthesis strategy for the convenient preparation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO) without the use of any template molecules and poisonous reductant. The as-synthesized nanocomposite has been detailedly characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis as well as electrochemical technologies. The morphological and structural characterizations illustrate that AuNPs can be efficiently decorated on RGO with the Au content of 20.33 wt% in the matrix and the size of the embedded AuNPs vary between 25 and 40 nm. The electrochemical investigations confirm that the small-sized AuNPs on the RGO film can remarkably boost the electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of Sudan I, which can be used as an enhanced electrochemical sensing platform for the sensitively detection of the toxicant Sudan I. Moreover, the kinetic parameter studies demonstrate that the Sudan I electro-oxidation at the AuNPs/RGO electrode is a diffusion-controlled process which involves two-electron and two-proton transfer. Under the optimal conditions, a wide linear range of Sudan I detection from 0.01 to 70 μmol L −1 with good linearity (R 2 = 0.9965, 0.9942) and a low detection limit (1.0 nmol L −1 , S/N = 3) were obtained. In comparison with the existing analogues ever reported

  15. Environmental Risk Assessment Based on High-Resolution Spatial Maps of Potentially Toxic Elements Sampled on Stream Sediments of Santiago, Cape Verde

    Marina M. S. Cabral Pinto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical mapping is the base knowledge to identify the regions of the planet with critical contents of potentially toxic elements from either natural or anthropogenic sources. Sediments, soils and waters are the vehicles which link the inorganic environment to life through the supply of essential macro and micro nutrients. The chemical composition of surface geological materials may cause metabolic changes which may favor the occurrence of endemic diseases in humans. In order to better understand the relationships between environmental geochemistry and public health, we present environmental risk maps of some harmful elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn in the stream sediments of Santiago, Cape Verde, identifying the potentially harmful areas in this island. The Estimated Background Values (EBV of Cd, Co, Cr, Ni and V were found to be above the Canadian guidelines for any type of use of stream sediments and also above the target values of the Dutch and United States guidelines. The Probably Effect Concentrations (PEC, above which harmful effects are likely in sediment dwelling organisms, were found for Cr and Ni. Some associations between the geological formations of the island and the composition of stream sediments were identified and confirmed by descriptive statistics and by Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The EBV spatial distribution of the metals and the results of PCA allowed us to establish relationships between the EBV maps and the geological formations. The first two PCA modes indicate that heavy metals in Santiago stream sediments are mainly originated from weathering of underlying bedrocks. The first metal association (Co, V, Cr, and Mn; first PCA mode consists of elements enriched in basic rocks and compatible elements. The second association of variables (Zn and Cd as opposed to Ni; second PCA mode appears to be strongly controlled by the composition of alkaline volcanic rocks and pyroclastic rocks. So, the

  16. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J.; Schneider, Erika; Rosen, Gerald M.; Winalski, Carl S.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  17. The Effects of Temperature and Hydrostatic Pressure on Metal Toxicity: Insights into Toxicity in the Deep Sea.

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven; Hauton, Chris

    2017-09-05

    Mineral prospecting in the deep sea is increasing, promoting concern regarding potential ecotoxicological impacts on deep-sea fauna. Technological difficulties in assessing toxicity in deep-sea species has promoted interest in developing shallow-water ecotoxicological proxy species. However, it is unclear how the low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure prevalent in the deep sea affect toxicity, and whether adaptation to deep-sea environmental conditions moderates any effects of these factors. To address these uncertainties we assessed the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on lethal and sublethal (respiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activity) toxicity in acute (96 h) copper and cadmium exposures, using the shallow-water ecophysiological model organism Palaemon varians. Low temperature reduced toxicity in both metals, but reduced cadmium toxicity significantly more. In contrast, elevated hydrostatic pressure increased copper toxicity, but did not affect cadmium toxicity. The synergistic interaction between copper and cadmium was not affected by low temperature, but high hydrostatic pressure significantly enhanced the synergism. Differential environmental effects on toxicity suggest different mechanisms of action for copper and cadmium, and highlight that mechanistic understanding of toxicity is fundamental to predicting environmental effects on toxicity. Although results infer that sensitivity to toxicants differs across biogeographic ranges, shallow-water species may be suitable ecotoxicological proxies for deep-sea species, dependent on adaptation to habitats with similar environmental variability.

  18. Metabolism and toxicity of neptunium

    Nenot, J.C.

    1983-08-01

    The biological behaviour and toxicity of neptunium were studied. Neptunium was administered either intravenously or intramuscularly in rats. In contrast to other transuranium elements the distribution patterns of neptunium in the case of intravenous injection is not dependent on the physico-chemical state. Urinary excretion is high. The distribution after intramuscular injection showed a rather fast migration from the injection site. 237 Neptonium in urine was approximately equal to bone deposit. Neptunium behaviour followed that of alkaline earths rather than that of transplutonium elements

  19. A review of acrylamide toxicity and its mechanism

    Ehsan Zamani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acrylamide (AA is an important industrial chemical agent that is mainly used in the production of polymers and copolymers. Recently it has been attention because of its production in the diet at high-temperature (>120 ºC processes such as cooking, frying, toasting, roasting or baking of high carbohydrate foods. According to high exposure to acrylamide, recognition of its toxic effect is necessary. Neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity and immunotoxicity of AA were observed in several studies. There isn’t a clear mechanism that justifies this toxicity. In this study we reviewed the mechanisms of AA toxicity especially oxidative stress and apoptosis. AA can cause neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity and genotoxicity on animal models. It showed neurotoxicity in human. We suggested the oxidative stress is the main factor for inducing of acrylamide toxicities. We advised that modifying of food processing methods can be as a good way for decreasing of AA production in foods.

  20. External radiation toxicity

    Fritz, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The section contains summaries of research on neutron and gamma-ray toxicity in rodents, late effects of low-dose rate, whole-body, protracted exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on young adult beagles, and the effects of protracted, low-dose rate exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on preclinical leukemic phase-related changes in the granulopoietic system of beagles

  1. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    Local anaesthetic toxicity has been known since the introduction of local anaesthetic drugs into anaesthetic practice more than a hundred ... was the first to think of cocaine as a narcotic. ..... anaesthetics act as Na+ channel-blocking agents, they slow down .... all neurons, leading to global CNS depression, slowing and.

  2. Toxicity of lunar dust

    Linnarsson, D.; Carpenter, J.; Fubini, B.; Gerde, P.; Loftus, D.; Prisk, K.; Staufer, U.; Tranfield, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of

  3. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  4. How toxic is ibogaine?

    Litjens, Ruud P. W.; Brunt, Tibor M.

    2016-01-01

    Ibogaine is a psychoactive indole alkaloid found in the African rainforest shrub Tabernanthe Iboga. It is unlicensed but used in the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction. However, reports of ibogaine's toxicity are cause for concern. To review ibogaine's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics,

  5. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    Dr Olaleye

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic .... wherein the right hemisphere, was preserved for histology and fixed in 10% ... Biochemical Assays: The left hemisphere of the brain samples was ...... development in male and female rats. Exp Physiol.

  6. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  7. Toxic Hazards in Aviation.

    1981-04-01

    Pasteur, Lillm,FRANCE. (2) CONISH H.H., EARTH M.L.& IANNi F.L, "Comparative Toxicology of Platics during Thar-modecoqiorition Intsw-re8posium on...Pyrolysnis and Combustion of Materials" Firm and Materials (1976).1, 29-35 (8) ALAAIE Y."Toxicity of Platic dacomposition ProductsŖd Annu~al Progress

  8. Glycopyrrolate in toxic exposure to ammonia gas

    Bhalla A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH 3 is a highly water-soluble, colorless, irritant gas with a unique pungent odor. Liquid ammonia stored under high pressure is still widely used for refrigeration in cold stores used for storing grains. Severe toxicity may occur following accidental exposure. We report an interesting case of accidental exposure to ammonia treated with glycopyrrolate along with other supportive measures.

  9. Thermoregulatory responses to environmental toxicants: The interaction of thermal stress and toxicant exposure

    Leon, Lisa R.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stress can have a profound impact on the physiological responses that are elicited following environmental toxicant exposure. The efficacy by which toxicants enter the body is directly influenced by thermoregulatory effector responses that are evoked in response to high ambient temperatures. In mammals, the thermoregulatory response to heat stress consists of an increase in skin blood flow and moistening of the skin surface to dissipate core heat to the environment. These physiological responses may exacerbate chemical toxicity due to increased permeability of the skin, which facilitates the cutaneous absorption of many environmental toxicants. The core temperature responses that are elicited in response to high ambient temperatures, toxicant exposure or both can also have a profound impact on the ability of an organism to survive the insult. In small rodents, the thermoregulatory response to thermal stress and many environmental toxicants (such as organophosphate compounds) is often biphasic in nature, consisting initially of a regulated reduction in core temperature (i.e., hypothermia) followed by fever. Hypothermia is an important thermoregulatory survival strategy that is used by small rodents to diminish the effect of severe environmental insults on tissue homeostasis. The protective effect of hypothermia is realized by its effects on chemical toxicity as molecular and cellular processes, such as lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, are minimized at reduced core temperatures. The beneficial effects of fever are unknown under these conditions. Perspective is provided on the applicability of data obtained in rodent models to the human condition

  10. Fluoroacetate-mediated toxicity of fluorinated ethanes.

    Keller, D A; Roe, D C; Lieder, P H

    1996-04-01

    A series of 1-(di)halo-2-fluoroethanes reported in the literature to be nontoxic or of low toxicity were found to be highly toxic by the inhalation route. Experiments were performed that showed the compounds, 1,2-difluoroethane, 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane, 1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethane, and 1-bromo-2-fluoroethane to be highly toxic to rats upon inhalation for 4 hr. All four compounds had 4-hr approximate lethal concentrations of difluoroethane (commonly referred to as HFC-152a) has very low acute toxicity with a 4-hr LC50 of > 400,000 ppm in rats. Rats exposed to the selected toxic fluoroethanes showed clinical signs of fluoroacetate toxicity (lethargy, hunched posture, convulsions). 1,2-Difluoroethane, 1-chloro-2-fluoroethane, 1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethane, and 1-bromo-2-fluoroethane were shown to increase concentrations of citrate in serum and heart tissue, a hallmark of fluoroacetate intoxication. 19F NMR analysis confirmed that fluoroacetate was present in the urine of rats exposed to each toxic compound. Fluorocitrate, a condensation product of fluoroacetate and oxaloacetate, was identified in the kidney of rats exposed to 1,2-difluoroethane. There was a concentration-related elevation of serum and heart citrate in rats exposed to 0-1000 ppm 1,2-fluoroethane. Serum citrate was increased up to 5-fold and heart citrate was increased up to 11-fold over control citrate levels. Metabolism of 1,2-difluoroethane by cytochrome P450 (most likely CYP2E1) is suspected because pretreatment of rats or mice with SKF-525F, disulfiram, or dimethyl sulfoxide prevented or delayed the toxicity observed in rats not pretreated. Experimental evidence indicates that the metabolism of the toxic fluoroethanes is initiated at the carbon-hydrogen bond, with metabolism to fluoroacetate via an aldehyde or an acyl fluoride. The results of these studies show that 1-(di)halo-2-fluoroethanes are highly toxic to rats and should be considered a hazard to humans unless demonstrated otherwise.

  11. Dithiobiuret toxicity in the rat

    Williams, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Raising the daily dose of dithiobiuret (DTB) in male rats from 0.5 to 1 to 5 mg/kg shortened the latency to the onset of flaccid muscle tone and associated diminished performance in a treadmill test from 7 to 5 to 3 days, respectively. Concomitant with the development of flaccid muscle tone gastrocnemius muscle contractions elicited by high frequency motor nerve stimulation were lower in peak tension and tended to fade more rapidly in DTB-treated rats than in control rats. Remarkably, rats treated with highly daily doses (10-16 mg/kg) of DTB were resistant to the expected development of DTB-induced flaccid muscle tone, and tetanic contractile abnormalities but a corresponding refractoriness to body weight loss, decreased fed and water intake, diuresis, and depression in water balance was not present. This nonselectivity of the refractory responses supported the results of a histopathological study indicating that DTB-induced neuromuscular toxicity was unlikely to be secondary to effect on other organ systems. It is not known whether the ultimate neurotoxin is DTB or a metabolite. In this regard, two pathways for the metabolism of DTB were proposed based on the results of thin-layer chromatography of urine samples from rats treated with either 14 C- or 35 S-DTB. One pathway involved the reversible oxidation of DTB to the disulfide-containing compound thiuret, and the other involved the replacement of a sulfur atom with oxygen to form monothiobiuret. Thiuret, but not monothiobiuret, possessed comparable toxicity to STB. This further suggested that redox cycling between DTB and thiuret could be an important contributing factor to the toxicity of DTB

  12. Una variedad genética de la UDP-glucuronosil transferasa asociada a toxicidad gastrointestinal por irinotecan A prevalent genetic variety of UDP-glycuronosyl transferase predicts high risk of irinotecan toxicity

    Matías Valsecchi

    2007-02-01

    of the UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase 1A1 enzime (TA indel proved to be capable of predicting severe neutropenia in patients exposed to intermediate or high doses of irinotecan. Herein we report a case of a patient with small cell lung cancer who suffered severe hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity after being treated with relatively low doses (65 mg/m² of irinotecan and whose leucocyte DNA analysis showed the presence of seven TA repetitions in both alleles. This case is an example of the clinical applicability and the utility of the test as a toxicity predictor. We also discuss the clinical decisions that may be taken with these patients.

  13. Report of a Phase II Study of Clofarabine and Cytarabine in De Novo and Relapsed and Refractory AML Patients and in Selected Elderly Patients at High Risk for Anthracycline Toxicity

    Cooper, Barry; Holmes, Houston; Vance, Estil; Berryman, Robert Brian; Maisel, Christopher; Li, Sandy; Saracino, Giovanna; Tadic-Ovcina, Mirjana; Fay, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy and safety of clofarabine and cytarabine (Ara-C) in adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in elderly patients with untreated AML and heart disease. Patients and Methods. Patients with relapsed/refractory AML and older patients for whom there was a concern over toxicity from additional anthracyclines received 5 days of clofarabine, 40 mg/m2 per day i.v. over 1 hour, followed 4 hours later by Ara-C, 1,000 mg/m2 per day i.v. over 2 hours. Results. Thirty patients were enrolled. The median age was 67 years (range, 38–82 years) and 18 (60%) had received at least one prior therapy. Eleven (37%) patients had a history of cardiovascular disease and were considered to be at high risk for anthracycline toxicity. High-risk cytogenetic abnormalities were present in 14 (47%) patients. The overall response rate (complete remission [CR] plus partial remission) was 53%, including a CR in 14 patients (47%). Responses were observed in all cytogenetic risk groups and in patients who had received up to five prior therapies. The median disease-free survival interval was 9.5 months. The 30-day mortality rate was 20% (de novo AML, 8%; relapsed/refractory AML, 28%). Of the 14 patients achieving a CR, half were able to proceed to curative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusions. Clofarabine in combination with Ara-C is effective in both untreated and previously treated patients with AML. In addition, it represents a useful remission induction strategy to serve as a bridge to transplantation in older patients with AML. PMID:21273514

  14. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  15. High adsorptive γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO2/Fe3O4 porous magnetic microspheres for detection of toxic metal ions in drinking water.

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2011-10-21

    γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4) porous magnetic microspheres with high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions were found to be useful for the simultaneous and selective electrochemical detection of five metal ions, such as ultratrace zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II), copper(II), and mercury(II), in drinking water.

  16. Differentiating pathway-specific from nonspecific effects in high-throughput toxicity data: A foundation for prioritizing adverse outcome pathway development

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program has screened thousands of chemicals for biological activity, primarily using high-throughput in vitro bioassays. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) offer a means to link pathway-specific biological activities with potential ...

  17. Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of ...

    Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of copper sulphate and lead nitrate against Oreochromis niloticus. KA Bawa-Allah, F Osuala, J Effiong. Abstract. This study investigated the salinity-tolerance of Oreochromis niloticus and the influence of salinity changes on the acute toxicities of copper sulphate ...

  18. Heavy metals, PAHs and toxicity in stormwater wet detention ponds

    Wium-Andersen, Tove; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of 6 different heavy metals and total Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) were determined in stormwater runoff and in the pond water of two Danish wet detention ponds. The pond water samples were analyzed for toxic effects, using the algae Selenastrum capricornutum as a test...... organism. Stormwater and pond water from a catchment with light industry showed high levels of heavy metals, especially zinc and copper. The pond water showed high toxic effects and copper were found to be the main toxicant. Additionally, a large part of the copper was suspected to be complex bound......, reducing the potential toxicity of the metal. Another catchment (residential) produced stormwater and pond water with moderate concentration of heavy metals. The pond water occasionally showed toxic effects but no correlation between heavy metals and toxicity was identified. PAHs concentrations were...

  19.  Risk of discontinuation of nevirapine due to toxicities in antiretroviral naive and experienced HIV-infected patients with high and low CD4 counts

    Mocroft, A; Staszewski, S; Weber, R

    2007-01-01

    AND METHODS: 1,571 EuroSIDA patients started NVPc after 1/1/1999, with CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load measured in the 6 months before starting treatment, and were stratified into four groups based on CD4+ T-cell counts at initiation of NVPc (high [H], > 400/mm3 or > 250/mm3 for male or female, respectively...

  20. A tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução na avaliação da toxicidade pulmonar por amiodarona High-resolution computed tomography of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity

    Daniela Peixoto Consídera

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as principais alterações identificadas na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução do tórax em pacientes com toxicidade pulmonar pela amiodarona. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas dez tomografias computadorizadas de alta resolução de tórax de pacientes com pneumonite pela amiodarona, seis desses pacientes do sexo masculino e quatro do sexo feminino, com idade média de 73,5 anos. RESULTADOS: Os achados tomográficos mais relevantes foram opacidades lineares ou reticulares em seis casos (60%, pequenos nódulos com densidade elevada em seis casos (60%, consolidações densas em três casos (30% e aumento da densidade do parênquima hepático em cinco de oito casos em que havia estudo tomográfico do abdome superior (62,5%. CONCLUSÃO: A tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução é um exame importante na avaliação de pacientes com toxicidade pulmonar pela amiodarona, devendo ser realizada sempre que houver suspeita deste diagnóstico. O achado de espessamento de septos interlobulares associado a lesões com aumento de densidade é altamente sugestivo deste diagnóstico.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the main findings of chest high-resolution computed tomography in patients with amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients - six male and four female, average age of 73.5 years - with amiodarone-induced pneumonitis have undergone chest high-resolution computed tomography. RESULTS: The most relevant tomographic findings were linear or reticular opacities in six cases (60%, small high density nodules in six cases (60%, dense consolidations in three cases (30% and increased density in the hepatic parenchyma in five of eight cases in which there was a superior abdomen CT scan (62.5%. CONCLUSION: The high-resolution computed tomography is a valuable non-invasive test for evaluating patients with amiodarone pulmonary toxicity and should always be performed when one suspects of the presence of this

  1. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteri

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available . Ecotoxicity studies: is toxicity reduced? (Testing on daphnids, fish and human cell lines) Resulting impacts on cyanotoxins (Toxin conformation changes, ELISA detection) Competition assays against toxic cyanobacteria (Can Bacillus etc. outcompete...

  2. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  3. Toxic waste liquor disposal

    Burton, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Toxic waste liquors, especially radio active liquors, are disposed in a sub-zone by feeding down a bore hole a first liquid, then a buffer liquid (e.g. water), then the toxic liquors. Pressure variations are applied to the sub-zone to mix the first liquid and liquors to form gels or solids which inhibit further mixing and form a barrier between the sub-zone and the natural waters in the environment of the sub-zone. In another example the location of the sub-zone is selected so that the environement reacts with the liquors to produce a barrier around the zone. Blind bore holes are used to monitor the sub-zone profile. Materials may be added to the liquor to enhance barrier formation. (author)

  4. "Legal highs"--toxicity in the clinical and medico-legal aspect as exemplified by suicide with bk-MBDB administration.

    Rojek, Sebastian; Kłys, Małgorzata; Strona, Marcin; Maciów, Martyna; Kula, Karol

    2012-10-10

    The easily available "legal highs", which are products containing psychoactive substances, such as cathinones, piperazines and synthetic cannabinoids, are abused by adolescents in Poland and in the world as alternatives to classic drugs, such as amphetamines or marijuana. The majority of these potentially dangerous substances are still legal and they are associated with a risk of severe poisoning or even death, and provide new challenges in clinical and forensic toxicological practice. Investigations in the field of "designer drugs" may be well illustrated by the case of a suicide of a 21-year old male who ingested a specified dose of a preparation called "Amphi-bi-a" that contains bk-MBDB, chemically 2-methylamino-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl) butan-1-one, which belongs to the cathinone group, as a synthetic euphoric empathogen and psychoactive stimulant that is chemically similar to MDMA. It is one of more common components of "legal highs" examined in Poland and other countries. The documentation of the case includes a clinical assessment of the patient's health status performed during his almost 4-h hospitalization before death, autopsy and histological examinations supported by toxicological findings revealing bk-MBDB at extremely high concentrations (at 20 mg/l in the blood and 33 mg/kg in the liver); hence, this body of evidence contributes to knowledge in the field of "designer drugs". Inventions of designers of new psychoactive xenobiotics, which are much in demand, especially in view of the dynamic Internet marketing, which drums up narcobusiness, must be balanced by a national strategy developed by medical, legal and educational circles in the modern civilized world in order to prevent the spreading of the phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Portable, accurate toxicity testing

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.; Hinds, A.A.; Vieaux, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever tightening environmental regulations, severe penalties for non-compliance, and expensive remediation costs have stimulated development of methods to detect and measure toxins. Most of these methods are bioassays that must be performed in the laboratory; none previously devised has been truly portable. The US Army, through the Small Business Innovative Research program, has developed a hand-held, field deployable unit for testing toxicity of battlefield water supplies. This patented system employs the measurable quenching, in the presence of toxins, of the natural bioluminescence produced by the marine dinoflagellate alga Pyrocystis lunula. The procedure's inventor used it for years to measure toxicity concentrations of chemical warfare agents actually, their simulants, primarily in the form of pesticides and herbicides plus assorted toxic reagents, waterbottom samples, drilling fluids, even blood. While the procedure is more precise, cheaper, and faster than most bioassays, until recently it was immobile. Now it is deployable in the field. The laboratory apparatus has been proven to be sensitive to toxins in concentrations as low as a few parts per billion, repeatable within a variation of 10% or less, and unlike some other bioassays effective in turbid or colored media. The laboratory apparatus and the hand-held tester have been calibrated with the EPA protocol that uses the shrimplike Mysidopsis bahia. The test organism tolerates transportation well, but must be rested a few hours at the test site for regeneration of its light-producing powers. Toxicity now can be measured confidently in soils, water columns, discharge points, and many other media in situ. Most significant to the oil industry is that drilling fluids can be monitored continuously on the rig

  6. Lead toxicity: current concerns.

    Goyer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has be...

  7. Toxic Substances Control Act

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  8. Kombucha--toxicity alert.

    The Kombucha mushroom, also known as Manchurian mushroom, is a mail-order product touted to lower blood pressure and raise T-cell counts. No controlled trials have been conducted to test these claims. Aspergillus, a mold that may grow on the Kombucha mushroom, attacks the brain and may be fatal to persons with weakened immune systems. Reported toxicity reactions have included stomach problems and yeast infections. Taking Kombucha in combination with other drugs may affect the drugs potency.

  9. Toxicity of nitrogen pentoxide

    Diggle, W M; Gage, J C

    1954-01-01

    Two ppM N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ for 4 h or 1 ppM, 4 h/day for 12 days produced acute pulmonary edema in rats. Ten daily 4-h exposures to 0.5 ppM produced no edema but respiratory distress. NO/sub 2/ produced no edema (some hemorrhage) at 80 mg/m/sup 3/. Nitric acid vapor (63 mg/m/sup 3/) had no obvious toxic effect.

  10. Three Toxic Heavy Metals in Open-Angle Glaucoma with Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Study from South Korea

    Lee, Si Hyung; Kang, Eun Min; Kim, Gyu Ah; Kwak, Seung Woo; Kim, Joon Mo; Bae, Hyoung Won; Seong, Gong Je; Kim, Chan Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between heavy metal levels and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with low- and high-teen baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) using a population-based study design. Methods This cross-sectional study included 5,198 participants older than 19 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 to 2012 and had blood heavy metal levels available. The OAG with normal baseline IOP (IOP ? 21 mmHg) subjects...

  11. Molecular basis of cadmium toxicity

    Nath, R; Prasad, R; Palinal, V K; Chopra, R K

    1984-01-01

    Cadmium has been shown to manifest its toxicity in human and animals by mainly accumulating in almost all of the organs. The kidney is the main target organ where it is concentrated mainly in the cortex. Environmental exposure of cadmium occurs via food, occupational industries, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. At molecular level, cadmium interferes with the utilization of essential metals e.g. Ca, Zn, Se, Cr and Fe and deficiencies of these essential metals including protein and vitamins, exaggerate cadmium toxicity, due to its increased absorption through the gut and greater retention in different organs as metallothionein (Cd-Mt). Cadmium transport, across the intestinal and renal brush border membrane vesicles, is carrier mediated and it competes with zinc and calcium. It has been postulated that cadmium shares the same transport system. Cadmium inhibits protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and drug metabolizing enzymes in liver of animals. Chronic environmental exposure of cadmium produces hypertension in experimental animals. Functional changes accompanying cadmium nephropathy include low molecular weight proteinuria which is of tubular origin associated with excess excretion of proteins such as beta 2 microglobulin, metallothionein and high molecular weight proteinuria of glomerular origin (excretion of proteins such as albumin IgG, transferrin etc.). Recent data has shown that metallothionein is more nephrotoxic to animals. Cadmium is also toxic to central nervous system. It causes an alterations of cellular functions in lungs. Cadmium affects both humoral and cell mediated immune response in animals. Cadmium induces metallothionein in liver and kidney but under certain nutritional deficiencies like protein-calorie malnutrition and calcium deficiency, enhanced induction and greater accumulation of cadmium metallothionein has been observed.

  12. Analyzing the capacity of the Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata bioavailability models to predict chronic zinc toxicity at high pH and low calcium concentrations and formulation of a generalized bioavailability model for D. magna.

    Van Regenmortel, Tina; Berteloot, Olivier; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2017-10-01

    Risk assessment in the European Union implements Zn bioavailability models to derive predicted-no-effect concentrations for Zn. These models are validated within certain boundaries (i.e., pH ≤ 8 and Ca concentrations ≥ 5mg/L), but a substantial fraction of the European surface waters falls outside these boundaries. Therefore, we evaluated whether the chronic Zn biotic ligand model (BLM) for Daphnia magna and the chronic bioavailability model for Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata could be extrapolated to pH > 8 and Ca concentrations model can accurately predict Zn toxicity for Ca concentrations down to 0.8 mg/L and pH values up to 8.5. Because the chronic Zn BLM for D. magna could not be extrapolated beyond its validity boundaries for pH, a generalized bioavailability model (gBAM) was developed. Of 4 gBAMs developed, we recommend the use of gBAM-D, which combines a log-linear relation between the 21-d median effective concentrations (expressed as free Zn 2+ ion activity) and pH, with more conventional BLM-type competition constants for Na, Ca, and Mg. This model is a first step in further improving the accuracy of chronic toxicity predictions of Zn as a function of water chemistry, which can decrease the uncertainty in implementing the bioavailability-based predicted-no-effect concentration in the risk assessment of high-pH and low-Ca concentration regions in Europe. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2781-2798. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Ecotoxicogenomic assessment of diclofenac toxicity in soil

    Chen, Guangquan; Braver, Michiel W. den; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Straalen, Nico M. van; Roelofs, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Diclofenac is widely used as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug leaving residues in the environment. To investigate effects on terrestrial ecosystems, we measured dissipation rate in soil and investigated ecotoxicological and transcriptome-wide responses in Folsomia candida. Exposure for 4 weeks to diclofenac reduced both survival and reproduction of F. candida in a dose-dependent manner. At concentrations ≥200 mg/kg soil diclofenac remained stable in the soil during a 21-day incubation period. Microarrays examined transcriptional changes at low and high diclofenac exposure concentrations. The results indicated that development and growth were severely hampered and immunity-related genes, mainly directed against bacteria and fungi, were significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, neural metabolic processes were significantly affected only at the high concentration. We conclude that diclofenac is toxic to non-target soil invertebrates, although its mode of action is different from the mammalian toxicity. The genetic markers proposed in this study may be promising early markers for diclofenac ecotoxicity. - Highlights: • Diclofenac is toxic to the non-target soil invertebrate Folsomia candida. • Diclofenac mainly caused mortality and thus only indirectly affected reproduction. • Diclofenac mode of action in F. candida was checked with gene expression profiling. • Diclofenac significantly affected development, growth and immune related processes. • Diclofenac nervous system activity in F. candida was different from that in mammals. - Diclofenac is toxic to non-target soil invertebrates with a mode of action clearly different from mammalian toxicity

  14. Virgin coconut oil (VCO) by normalizing NLRP3 inflammasome showed potential neuroprotective effects in Amyloid-β induced toxicity and high-fat diet fed rat.

    Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Khazaei, Mozafar; Komaki, Alireza; Amiri, Iraj; Jalili, Cyrus

    2018-05-02

    Both dyslipidemia and Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with aging. In this study, the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) on inflammasome and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's model (receiving Amyloid-β (Aβ)) and high-fat diet (HFD) model were determined. A total of 120 male Wistar rats, were divided into 12 groups (n = 10), including; healthy control, sham surgery, sham surgery receiving normal saline, HFD, HFD + 8% VCO, HFD + 10% VCO, Aβ received rats, Aβ + 8%VCO, Aβ + 10%VCO, HFD + Aβ, HFD + Aβ+8%VCO, and HFD + Aβ + 10%VCO. Following memory and learning tests, blood sample prepared from the heart and hippocampus of rats in each group was kept at -70 °C for genes expression, oxidative stress, and biochemical tests. Aβ and HFD significantly impaired memory and learning by activating of both NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and oxidative stress (p<0.05), while treatment with both 8 and 10% VCO normalized inflammasome genes expression and oxidative stress (p<0.05). The Congo Red, Cresyl Violet staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) test revealed that VCO improved hippocampus histological changes, reduced Aβ plaques and phosphorylated Tau. High-fat diet has exacerbated the effects of Aβ, while VCO showed potential neuroprotective effect. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Separations chemistry of toxic metals

    Smith, P.; Barr, M.; Barrans, R.

    1996-01-01

    Sequestering and removing toxic metal ions from their surroundings is an increasingly active area of research and is gaining importance in light of current environmental contamination problems both within the DOE complex and externally. One method of separating metal ions is to complex them to a molecule (a ligand or chelator) which exhibits specific binding affinity for a toxic metal, even in the presence of other more benign metals. This approach makes use of the sometimes subtle differences between toxic and non-toxic metals resulting from variations in size, charge and shape. For example, toxic metals such as chromium, arsenic, and technetium exist in the environment as oxyanions, negatively charged species with a characteristic tetrahedral shape. Other toxic metals such as actinides and heavy metals are positively charged spheres with specific affinities for particular donor atoms such as oxygen (for actinides) and nitrogen (for heavy metals). In most cases the toxic metals are found in the presence of much larger quantities of less toxic metals such as sodium, calcium and iron. The selectivity of the chelators is critical to the goal of removing the toxic metals from their less toxic counterparts. The approach was to build a ligand framework that complements the unique characteristics of the toxic metal (size, charge and shape) while minimizing interactions with non-toxic metals. The authors have designed ligands exhibiting specificity for the target metals; they have synthesized, characterized and tested these ligands; and they have shown that they exhibit the proposed selectivity and cooperative binding effects

  16. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  17. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  18. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    Dhar Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  19. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride.

    Dhar, Vineet; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  20. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  1. Toxicity research of boron-nitrogen modifiers of wooden surface

    Klyachenkova Ol'ga Aleksandrovna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Boron-nitrogen compounds (BNC have been successfully used to create bio- and fire-protective compositions for wood. Within the framework of this study, our aim was to assess the toxicity of the boron-nitrogen compounds by bioluminescent method with the use of environmental control device "Biotox-10M" and highly sensitive biosensor "Ecolum". We also defined toxicological parameters EC20 and EC50 and concluded, that all the wood preservation compounds are highly toxic, whereby, it is advisable to use them for external protection of wooden structures. As a result of BNC toxicity assessment, it is necessary to consider that any effective bio- and fireprotectives, will be highly toxic. Our researches stated, that BNC protective compositions are highly toxic and, therefore, it is possible to conclude their applicability for external wood processing.

  2. Thyroid cancer in toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter

    Cerci C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many authors have claimed that hyperthyroidism protects against thyroid cancer and believed that the incidence of malignancy is lower in patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG than in those with non-toxic multinodular goiter. But in recent studies, it was reported that the incidence of malignancy with TMG is not as low as previously thought. Aim : To compare the thyroid cancer incidence in patients with toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. Settings and Design : Histology reports of patients treated surgically with a preoperative diagnosis of toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter were reviewed to identify the thyroid cancer incidence. Patients having a history of neck irradiation or radioactive iodine therapy were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 294 patients operated between 2001-2005 from toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. One hundred and twenty-four of them were toxic and 170 were non-toxic. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed by elevated tri-iodothyroinine / thyroxine ratios and low thyroid-stimulating hormone with clinical signs and symptoms. All patients were evaluated with ultrasonography and scintigraphy and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used : Significance of the various parameters was calculated by using ANOVA test. Results : The incidence of malignancy was 9% in the toxic and 10.58% in the non-toxic multinodular goiter group. Any significant difference in the incidence of cancer and tumor size between the two groups could not be detected. Conclusions : The incidence of malignancy in toxic multinodular goiter is not very low as thought earlier and is nearly the same in non-toxic multinodular goiter.

  3. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16{sup INK4A} expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim [University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Burfeind, Peter [University Medical Center, Institute for Human Genetics, Goettingen (Germany); Reichardt, Holger M. [University Medical Center, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, Martin [Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16{sup INK4A} expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16{sup INK4A} expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16{sup INK4A} expression only, and patients without p16{sup INK4A} expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16{sup INK4A} expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16{sup INK4A} expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16{sup INK4A} expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [German] Ein besseres Therapieansprechen von humanen Papillomavirus (HPV)-positiven Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist durch Studien belegt. Weniger Beachtung hat bisher die Relevanz unerwuenschter

  4. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity.

  5. Compatibility of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin with algal toxicity bioassays

    Fai, Patricia Bi; Grant, Alastair; Reid, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous reports have indicated that hydrophobic organic compound bioaccessibility in sediment and soil can be determined by extraction using aqueous hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) solutions. This study establishes the compatibility of HPCD with Selenastrum capricornutum and assesses whether its presence influences the toxicity of reference toxicants. Algal growth inhibition (72 h) showed no significant (P > 0.05) difference at HPCD concentrations up to and including 20 mM. HPCD presence did not influence the toxicity of the inorganic reference toxicant (ZnSO 4 ), with IC50 values of 0.82 μM and 0.85 μM, in the presence and absence of HPCD (20 mM), respectively. However, HPCD presence (20 mM) reduced the toxicity of 2,4-dichlorophenol and the herbicides diuron and isoproturon. These reductions were attributed to inclusion complex formation between the toxicants and the HPCD cavity. Liberation of complexed toxicants, by sample manipulation prior to toxicity assessment, is proposed to provide a sensitive, high throughput, bioassay that reflects compound bioaccessibility. - Compatibility of the biomimetic HPCD extraction method with algal cell growth inhibition bioassays to assess toxicity of reference toxicants and environmental relevant herbicides

  6. Compatibility of hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin with algal toxicity bioassays

    Fai, Patricia Bi; Grant, Alastair [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Reid, Brian J. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: b.reid@uea.ac.uk

    2009-01-15

    Numerous reports have indicated that hydrophobic organic compound bioaccessibility in sediment and soil can be determined by extraction using aqueous hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (HPCD) solutions. This study establishes the compatibility of HPCD with Selenastrum capricornutum and assesses whether its presence influences the toxicity of reference toxicants. Algal growth inhibition (72 h) showed no significant (P > 0.05) difference at HPCD concentrations up to and including 20 mM. HPCD presence did not influence the toxicity of the inorganic reference toxicant (ZnSO{sub 4}), with IC50 values of 0.82 {mu}M and 0.85 {mu}M, in the presence and absence of HPCD (20 mM), respectively. However, HPCD presence (20 mM) reduced the toxicity of 2,4-dichlorophenol and the herbicides diuron and isoproturon. These reductions were attributed to inclusion complex formation between the toxicants and the HPCD cavity. Liberation of complexed toxicants, by sample manipulation prior to toxicity assessment, is proposed to provide a sensitive, high throughput, bioassay that reflects compound bioaccessibility. - Compatibility of the biomimetic HPCD extraction method with algal cell growth inhibition bioassays to assess toxicity of reference toxicants and environmental relevant herbicides.

  7. Bacterial removal of toxic phenols from an industrial effluent

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... Chlorinated phenols, widely used in industries, are of growing concern owing to their high toxicity, .... phenol-degradation ability of bacterial isolate at the high phenol .... ed virtually no decrease in the respiratory response over.

  8. Fast Determination of Toxic Arsenic Species in Food Samples Using Narrow-bore High-Performance Liquid-Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Terol, Amanda; Marcinkowska, Monika; Ardini, Francisco; Grotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the speciation analysis of arsenic in food using narrow-bore high-performance liquid-chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) has been developed. Fast separation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid was carried out in 7 min using an anion-exchange narrow-bore Nucleosil 100 SB column and 12 mM ammonium dihydrogen phosphate of pH 5.2 as the mobile phase, at a flow rate of 0.3 mL min(-1). A PFA-ST micronebulizer jointed to a cyclonic spray chamber was used for HPLC-ICP-MS coupling. Compared with standard-bore HPLC-ICP-MS, the new method has provided higher sensitivity, reduced mobile-phase consumption, a lower matrix plasma load and a shorter analysis time. The achieved instrumental limits of detection were in the 0.3 - 0.4 ng As mL(-1) range, and the precision was better than 3%. The arsenic compounds were efficiently (>80%) extracted from various food samples using a 1:5 methanol/water solution, with additional ultrasonic treatment for rice products. The applicability of this method was demonstrated by the analysis of several samples, such as seafood (fish, mussels, shrimps, edible algae) and rice-based products (Jasmine and Arborio rice, spaghetti, flour, crackers), including three certified reference materials.

  9. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    Mao, Huihui, E-mail: maohuihui_beijing@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Zhu, Kongnan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Li, Baoshan, E-mail: bsli@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO{sub 2} particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) and endothermic (ΔH° > 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  10. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    Mao, Huihui; Zhu, Kongnan; Li, Baoshan; Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO 2 particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  11. Optical coherence tomography findings in methanol toxicity.

    Klein, Kendra A; Warren, Alexis K; Baumal, Caroline R; Hedges, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    Methanol toxicity poses a significant public health problem in developing countries, and in Southeast Asia, where the most common source of poisoning is via adulterated liquor in local drinks. Methanol toxicity can have devastating visual consequences and retinal specialists should be aware of the features of this toxic optic neuropathy. The authors report a case of severe systemic methanol toxicity and relatively mild optic neuropathy demonstrating unique retinal changes on optical coherence tomography (OCT). A previously healthy student developed ataxia, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness hours after drinking homemade alcohol while traveling in Indonesia. She was found to have a serum pH of 6.79 and elevated methanol levels. She was treated with intravenous ethanol, methylprednisolone and sodium bicarbonate. When she awoke she had bilateral central scotomas. At presentation, she had central depression on visual field testing. OCT of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) was normal but ganglion cell layer analysis (GCL) showed highly selective loss of the nasal fibers in both eyes. Further, OCT of the macula demonstrated inner nuclear layer (INL) microcysts in the corresponding area of selective GCL loss in both eyes. The selective involvement of the papillomacular bundle fibers is common in toxic optic neuropathies and represents damage to the small caliber axons rich in mitochondria. Despite severe systemic toxicity, the relative sparing of the optic nerve in this case enabled characterization of the evolution of methanol toxicity with segmental GCL involvement and preservation of the RNFL, corresponding to the papillomacular bundle. This is the first reported case of INL microcysts in methanol optic neuropathy and supports that they are a non-specific finding, and may represent preferential damage to the papillomacular bundle.

  12. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-01-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag"+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L"−"1, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L"−"1 as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag"+. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L"−"1 as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L"−"1), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  13. Intraspecies variation in the venom of the rattlesnake Crotalus simus from Mexico: different expression of crotoxin results in highly variable toxicity in the venoms of three subspecies.

    Castro, Edgar Neri; Lomonte, Bruno; del Carmen Gutiérrez, María; Alagón, Alejandro; Gutiérrez, José María

    2013-07-11

    The composition and toxicological profile of the venom of the rattlesnake Crotalus simus in Mexico was analyzed at the subspecies and individual levels. Venoms of the subspecies C. s. simus, C. s. culminatus and C. s. tzabcan greatly differ in the expression of the heterodimeric neurotoxin complex 'crotoxin', with highest concentrations in C. s. simus, followed by C. s. tzabcan, whereas the venom of C. s. culminatus is almost devoid of this neurotoxic PLA2. This explains the large variation in lethality (highest in C. s. simus, which also exerts higher myotoxicity). Coagulant activity on plasma and fibrinogen occurs with the venoms of C. s. simus and C. s. tzabcan, being absent in C. s. culminatus which, in turn, presents higher crotamine-like activity. Proteomic analysis closely correlates with toxicological profiles, since the venom of C. s. simus has high amounts of crotoxin and of serine proteinases, whereas the venom of C. s. culminatus presents higher amounts of metalloproteinases and crotamine. This complex pattern of intraspecies venom variation provides valuable information for the diagnosis and clinical management of envenoming by this species in Mexico, as well as for the preparation of venom pools for the production and quality control of antivenoms. This study describes the variation in venom composition and activities of the three subspecies of Crotalus simus from Mexico. Results demonstrate that there is a notorious difference in these venoms, particularly regarding the content of the potent neurotoxic phospholipase A2 complex 'crotoxin'. In addition, other differences were observed regarding myotoxic and coagulant activities, and expression of the myotoxin 'crotamine'. These findings have implications in, at least, three levels: (a) the adaptive role of variations in venom composition; (b) the possible differences in the clinical manifestations of envenomings by these subspecies in Mexico; and (c) the design of venom mixtures for the preparation of

  14. Acute larvicidal toxicity of five essential oils (Pinus nigra, Hyssopus officinalis, Satureja montana, Aloysia citrodora and Pelargonium graveolens) against the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus: Synergistic and antagonistic effects.

    Benelli, Giovanni; Pavela, Roman; Canale, Angelo; Cianfaglione, Kevin; Ciaschetti, Giampiero; Conti, Fabio; Nicoletti, Marcello; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-04-01

    Mosquito vector control is facing a number of important and timely challenges, mainly due to the rapid development of pesticide resistance and environmental concerns. In this scenario, screening of botanical resources for their mosquitocidal activity may offer effective and eco-friendly tools against Culicidae vectors. Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) is a vector of lymphatic filariasis and of dangerous arboviral diseases, such as West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis. In this study, the chemical composition of five essential oils obtained from different plants, namely Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold var. italica (Pinaceae), Hyssopus officinalis L. subsp. aristatus (Lamiaceae), Satureja montana L. subsp. montana (Lamiaceae), Aloysia citriodora Palau (Verbenaceae) and Pelargonium graveolens L'Hér (Geraniaceae), was investigated by GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, it was evaluated their acute toxicity on larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. Then, the most effective oils were selected, in order to focus on the potential synergistic and antagonistic effects, testing them in binary mixtures on C. quinquefasciatus larvae. Results showed that the higher effectiveness was obtained by S. montana subsp. montana essential oil (LC 50 =25.6μL·L -1 ), followed by P. nigra var. italica (LC 50 =49.8μL·L -1 ) and A. citriodora (LC 50 =65.6μL·L -1 ), while the other essential oils showed LC 50 values higher than 90μL·L -1 . The larvicidal effectiveness can be enhanced by preparing simple binary mixtures of essential oils, such as S. montana+A. citriodora (ratio 1:1), which showed higher larvicidal toxicity (LC 50 =18.3μL·L -1 ). On the other hand, testing S. montana+P. nigra (1:1) an antagonistic effect was detected, leading to a LC 50 (72.5μL·L -1 ) higher than the LC 50 values calculated for the two oils tested separately. Overall, our results add useful knowledge to allow the employ of synergistic essential oil blends as effective, cheap and eco-friendly mosquito

  15. The global variability of diatomaceous earth toxicity

    Nattrass, C; Horwell, C J; Damby, D E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diatomaceous earth (DE) is mined globally and is potentially of occupational respiratory health concern due to the high crystalline silica content in processed material. DE toxicity, in terms of variability related to global source and processing technique, is poorly understood...

  16. Defining Moments in MMWR History: Toxic-Shock Syndrome -- 1980

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, an outbreak of a disease called Toxic Shock Syndrome made healthy women sick. CDC's disease detectives helped unravel the link between Toxic Shock Syndrome and high-absorbency tampons. MMWR was the first scientific publication to break the news of these cases. In this podcast, Dr. Kathy Shands, former chief of CDC's Toxic Shock Syndrome Task Force, recalls her experience working with state epidemiologists to identify the link between toxic shock syndrome and tampon use.

  17. Defining Moments in MMWR History: Toxic-Shock Syndrome -- 1980

    2017-11-03

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, an outbreak of a disease called Toxic Shock Syndrome made healthy women sick. CDC’s disease detectives helped unravel the link between Toxic Shock Syndrome and high-absorbency tampons. MMWR was the first scientific publication to break the news of these cases. In this podcast, Dr. Kathy Shands, former chief of CDC’s Toxic Shock Syndrome Task Force, recalls her experience working with state epidemiologists to identify the link between toxic shock syndrome and tampon use.  Created: 11/3/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/3/2017.

  18. Ultrasound/microwave-assisted extraction and comparative analysis of bioactive/toxic indole alkaloids in different medicinal parts of Gelsemium elegans Benth by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with MS/MS.

    Li, Yu; Zeng, Rong-Jie; Lu, Qing; Wu, Shui-Sheng; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2014-02-01

    Indole alkaloids are the main bioactive/toxic components in Gelsemium elegans Benth. To determine the distribution and contents of indole alkaloids in its different medicinal parts, a novel and rapid method using ultra-high performance LC (UPLC) with MS/MS has been established and validated with an optimized ultrasound/microwave-assisted extraction method. Four constituents, namely, humantenidine, humantenmine, gelsemine, and koumine, were simultaneously determined in 6 min. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an ultra-high performance LC BEH C18 column with a gradient mobile phase consisting of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid both in methanol and water) at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole electrospray MS/MS by positive ion multiple-reaction monitoring mode. All the analytes showed good linearity (r ≥ 0.9934) within a concentration range from 0.1-25 μg/mL with a LOQ of 25-50 ng/mL. The overall intra- and intervariations of four components were <4.7% with an accuracy of 97.3-101.3%. The analysis results showed that there were remarkable differences in the distribution and contents of four chemical markers in the roots, stems, and leaves of G. elegans Benth. The findings can provide necessary and meaningful information for the rational utilization of its resources. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A rare presentation of methanol toxicity

    Nikhil Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is a highly toxic alcohol resembling ethanol in smell and taste. Methanol poisoning is a lethal form of poisoning that can cause severe metabolic acidosis, visual disturbances, and neurological deficit. Brain lesions typically described in methanol toxicity are in the form of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic necrosis of the basal ganglia and sub-cortical white matter. To our knowledge, lesions in the parietal, temporal, or frontal areas of cerebrum and cerebellar hemispheres have been rarely reported so far. We herewith report this rare presentation.

  20. Detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis using a novel PCR-RFLP method Detección de genes que codifican proteínas mosquitocidas Cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis mediante un método de PCR-RFLP novedoso

    D. H. Sauka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method for detection of cry11 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis was established. Based on the analysis of conserved regions of the cry11 genes, 2 oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 1459-bp fragment of the cry11Aa gene, and a 1471-bp of the cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes. The amplification products were digested with restriction endonuclease HinfI. Exotic B. thuringiensis strains and native isolates collected from soils, leaves and stored product dust of Argentina were analyzed to study the distribution of cry11 genes. The PCR-RFLP patterns revealed the detection of cry11 genes in 3 of 64 exotic strains and in 10 of 107 native B. thuringiensis isolates tested. Just the cry11Aa gene subclass was detected among these bacteria. Since the methodology was also developed to detect cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes, an experimental future confirmation will be required. Based on the results obtained, the PCR-RFLP method presented may be a valuable tool for specific detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from B. thuringiensis.En el presente estudio se estableció una estrategia basada en la amplificación génica (PCR y el posterior análisis de restricción (RFLP para detectar todos los genes cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis informados hasta ahora. De acuerdo con el análisis de las regiones conservadas en los genes cry11, se diseñaron dos cebadores para amplificar un fragmento de 1459 pb de los genes cry11Aa y un fragmento de 1471 pb de los genes cry11Ba y cry11Bb. Los productos de la amplificación fueron digeridos con la enzima de restricción HinfI. Se analizaron cepas exóticas de B. thuringiensis y aislamientos nativos de Argentina obtenidos a partir de muestras de suelos, hojas y polvillo de silos, para estudiar la distribución de los genes cry11. Los patrones de PCR-RFLP revelaron la presencia de genes cry11 en 3 de las 64 cepas ex

  1. Is LSD toxic?

    Nichols, David E; Grob, Charles S

    2018-03-01

    LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) was discovered almost 75 years ago, and has been the object of episodic controversy since then. While initially explored as an adjunctive psychiatric treatment, its recreational use by the general public has persisted and on occasion has been associated with adverse outcomes, particularly when the drug is taken under suboptimal conditions. LSD's potential to cause psychological disturbance (bad trips) has been long understood, and has rarely been associated with accidental deaths and suicide. From a physiological perspective, however, LSD is known to be non-toxic and medically safe when taken at standard dosages (50-200μg). The scientific literature, along with recent media reports, have unfortunately implicated "LSD toxicity" in five cases of sudden death. On close examination, however, two of these fatalities were associated with ingestion of massive overdoses, two were evidently in individuals with psychological agitation after taking standard doses of LSD who were then placed in maximal physical restraint positions (hogtied) by police, following which they suffered fatal cardiovascular collapse, and one case of extreme hyperthermia leading to death that was likely caused by a drug substituted for LSD with strong effects on central nervous system temperature regulation (e.g. 25i-NBOMe). Given the renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of LSD and other psychedelic drugs, it is important that an accurate understanding be established of the true causes of such fatalities that had been erroneously attributed to LSD toxicity, including massive overdoses, excessive physical restraints, and psychoactive drugs other than LSD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxic potential of palytoxin.

    Patocka, Jiří; Gupta, Ramesh C; Wu, Qing-hua; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-10-01

    This review briefly describes the origin, chemistry, molecular mechanism of action, pharmacology, toxicology, and ecotoxicology of palytoxin and its analogues. Palytoxin and its analogues are produced by marine dinoflagellates. Palytoxin is also produced by Zoanthids (i.e. Palythoa), and Cyanobacteria (Trichodesmium). Palytoxin is a very large, non-proteinaceous molecule with a complex chemical structure having both lipophilic and hydrophilic moieties. Palytoxin is one of the most potent marine toxins with an LD50 of 150 ng/kg body weight in mice exposed intravenously. Pharmacological and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that palytoxin acts as a hemolysin and alters the function of excitable cells through multiple mechanisms of action. Palytoxin selectively binds to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with a Kd of 20 pM and transforms the pump into a channel permeable to monovalent cations with a single-channel conductance of 10 pS. This mechanism of action could have multiple effects on cells. Evaluation of palytoxin toxicity using various animal models revealed that palytoxin is an extremely potent neurotoxin following an intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular, subcutaneous or intratracheal route of exposure. Palytoxin also causes non-lethal, yet serious toxic effects following dermal or ocular exposure. Most incidents of palytoxin poisoning have manifested after oral intake of contaminated seafood. Poisonings in humans have also been noted after inhalation, cutaneous/systemic exposures with direct contact of aerosolized seawater during Ostreopsis blooms and/or through maintaining aquaria containing Cnidarian zoanthids. Palytoxin has a strong potential for toxicity in humans and animals, and currently this toxin is of great concern worldwide.

  3. Oil sands tailings leachability and toxicity evaluation

    Gulley, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fine tailings disposal and reclamation is a major issue facing the oil sands mining and extraction industry. Government regulations dictate that reclamation must return the site to a level of self-sustaining biological capability which approximates the natural condition. A two-phase laboratory program has been completed to investigate the suitability of alternative reclamation materials. For the first phase of the study, chemical and toxicological analyses were carried out on 13 different reclamation and reference materials (solid phase and extractions). Seedling emergence, nematode maturation, algal growth and bacterial luminescence for leachate samples showed a range of sensitivities in response to the tested materials, although phytotoxicity tests were generally the most sensitive. With the exception of one test material, high toxicity ratings were consistent with that expected from the chemical data. The second phase of the study focused on the evaluation of chemical and toxicological conditions in leachate water generated using bench-scale column percolation tests. Leachate water equivalent to 10 pore volume replacements was generated and temporal variations in toxicity and chemistry monitored. Similar to phase 1 findings, phytotoxicity tests were the most sensitive tests to leachate waters. For most materials tested, most toxicity was removed after 2--3 porewater replacements. More persistent toxicity was noted for samples containing bitumen (e.g., fine tails and oil sands). No clear correspondence was noted between chemical concentrations and toxicity in leachate waters

  4. Mixture toxicity of PBT-like chemicals

    Syberg, Kristian; Dai, Lina; Ramskov, Tina

    addition is a suitable model for default estimations of mixture effects. One of the major challenges is therefore how to select specific chemicals for actual mixture toxicity assessments. Persistant chemicals are likely to be present in the environment for an extended period of time, thus increasing...... the likelihood of them being present in environmentally found mixtures. Persistant, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals are therefore a highly relevant group of chemicals to consider for mixture toxicity regulation. The present study evaluates to what extent a number of PBT-like chemicals posess concern...... beyond that of the individual components. Firstly, the effects of three chemicals with PBT-like properties (acetyl cedrene, pyrene and triclosan) was examined on the freshwater snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum. Secondly, mixture bioaccumulation of the same three chemicals were assessed experimentally...

  5. LCIA selection methods for assessing toxic releases

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2002-01-01

    the inventory that contribute significantly to the impact categories on ecotoxicity and human toxicity to focus the characterisation work. The reason why the selection methods are more important for the chemical-related impact categories than for other impact categories is the extremely high number......Characterization of toxic emissions in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is in many cases severely limited by the lack of characterization factors for the emissions mapped in the inventory. The number of substances assigned characterization factors for (eco)toxicity included in the dominating LCA....... The methods are evaluated against a set of pre-defined criteria (comprising consistency with characterization and data requirement) and applied to case studies and a test set of chemicals. The reported work is part of the EU-project OMNIITOX....

  6. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  7. Control of air toxics

    Livengood, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  8. Brine Shrimp Toxicity Evaluation Of Some Tanzanian Plants Used ...

    Plants which are used by traditional healers in Tanzania have been evaluated to obtain preliminary data of their toxicity using the brine shrimps test. The results indicate that 9 out of 44 plant species whose extracts were tested exhibited high toxicity with LC50 values below 20μg/ml. These include Aloe lateritia Engl.

  9. Unusual complication of toxic megacolon in typhoid colitis.

    Arun Babu, Thirunavukkarasu; Ananthakrishnan, Shanthi; Jayakumar, P; Kullu, Poonam

    2014-05-01

    Colitis is a rare manifestation of enteric fever in children. Toxic megacolon complicating typhoid colitis is even rarer and requires early recognition and aggressive management due to the high mortality associated with this condition. The authors report a rare case of Toxic megacolon secondary to typhoid colitis in a seven-year-old girl.

  10. Acute Toxicity of a Recently Identified Phenol-based Synthetic ...

    This paper reports on the acute toxicity of a new phenol based synthetic tsetse fly repellent recently identified at the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (patent No. ... The repellent can be classified as being highly toxic with central nervous system (CNS) involvement and a mild skin and eye irritant.

  11. Cytosolic distributions of highly toxic metals Cd and Tl and several essential elements in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) analyzed by size exclusion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Dragun, Zrinka; Krasnići, Nesrete; Kolar, Nicol; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Ivanković, Dušica; Erk, Marijana

    2018-05-15

    Cytosolic distributions of nonessential metals Cd and Tl and seven essential elements among compounds of different molecular masses were studied in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta) from the karstic Krka River in Croatia. Analyses were done by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Common feature of Cd and Tl, as highly toxic elements, was their distribution within only two narrow peaks. The increase of cytosolic Cd concentrations was reflected in marked increase of Cd elution within low molecular mass peak (maximum at ∼15 kDa), presumably containing metallothioneins (MTs), which indicated successful Cd detoxification in brown trout liver under studied exposure conditions. Contrary, the increase of cytosolic Tl concentrations was reflected in marked increase of Tl elution within high molecular mass peak (maximum at 140 kDa), which probably indicated incomplete Tl detoxification. Common feature of the majority of studied essential elements was their distribution within more peaks, often broad and not well resolved, which is consistent with their numerous physiological functions. Among observed associations of essential metals/nonmetal to proteins, the following could be singled out: Cu and Zn association to MTs, Fe association to storage protein ferritin, and Se association to compounds of very low molecular masses (<5 kDa). The obtained results present the first step towards identification of metal-binding compounds in hepatic cytosol of brown trout, and thus a significant contribution to better understanding of metal fate in the liver of that important bioindicator species. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxicity of tritium

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, 3 H has relatively low toxicity. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to 3 HOH, and mice were exposed also to 60 Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where 3 H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells, and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the fetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts

  13. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  15. Acute toxicity and effect of some petroleum hydrocarbon on the metabolic index in Etroplus suratensis

    Ansari, Z.A; Farshchi, P.

    lowest for naphthalene, suggesting that this hydrocarbon is most toxic. The oxygen consumption reduced significantly after 6 hours in all the cases. The reduction in oxygen consumption was maximum in naphthalene, reaffirming its high toxic nature...

  16. Studies on the toxic interaction between monensin and tiamulin in rats: toxicity and pathology.

    Szücs, G; Bajnógel, J; Varga, A; Móra, Z; Laczay, P

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the toxic interaction between monensin and tiamulin were investigated in rats. A three-day comparative oral repeated-dose toxicity study was performed in Phase I, when the effects of monensin and tiamulin were studied separately (monensin 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg or tiamulin 40, 120, and 200 mg/kg body weight, respectively). In Phase II, the two compounds were administered simultaneously to study the toxic interaction (monensin 10 mg/kg and tiamulin 40 mg/kg b.w., respectively). Monensin proved to be toxic to rats at doses of 30 and 50 mg/kg. Tiamulin was well tolerated up to the dose of 200 mg/kg. After combined administration, signs of toxicity were seen (including lethality in females). Monensin caused a dose-dependent cardiotoxic effect and vacuolar degeneration of the skeletal muscles in the animals given 50 mg/kg. Both compounds exerted a toxic effect on the liver in high doses. After simultaneous administration of the two compounds, there was a mild effect on the liver (females only), hydropic degeneration of the myocardium and vacuolar degeneration of the skeletal muscles. The alteration seen in the skeletal muscles was more marked than that seen after the administration of 50 mg/kg monensin alone.

  17. Organophosphorus insecticides: Toxic effects and bioanalytical tests for evaluating toxicity during degradation processes

    Čolović Mirjana B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus insecticides have been the most applied group of insecticides for the last two decades. Their main toxic effects are related to irreversible inactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Actually, they covalently bind to serine OH group in the enzyme active site forming phosphorylated enzyme that cannot hydrolyze acetylcholine. Organophosphorus insecticides in the environment undergo the natural degradation pathway including mainly homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis (especially at high pH generating non-inhibiting products. Additionally, thio organophosphates are easily oxidized by naturally present oxidants and UV light, forming more toxic and stable oxons. Thus, oxidative degradation procedures, generally referred as advanced oxidation processes (AOP, have been applied for their efficient removal from contaminated waters. The most applied bioassays to monitor the organophosphate toxicity i.e. the detoxification degree during AOP are Vibrio fischeri and AChE bioassays. Vibrio fischeri toxicity test exploits bioluminescence as the measure of luciferase activity of this marine bacterium, whereas AChE bioassay is based on AChE activity inhibition. Both bioanalytical techniques are rapid (several minutes, simple, sensitive and reproducible. Vibrio fischeri test seems to be a versatile indicator of toxic compounds generated in AOP for organophosphorus insecticides degradation. However, detection of neurotoxic AChE inhibitors, which can be formed in AOP of some organophosphates, requires AChE bioassays. Therefore, AChE toxicity test is more appropriate for monitoring the degradation processes of thio organophosphates, because more toxic oxo organophosphates might be formed and overlooked by Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition. In addition, during organophosphates removal by AOP, compounds with strong genotoxic potential may be formed, which cannot be detected by standard toxicity tests. For this reason, determination of

  18. Wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) toxicity

    Besharat, Sima; Besharat, Mahsa; Jabbari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) can cause toxic effects when eaten. Wild lettuce grows in the north of Iran and some natives consume it unaware of its adverse side effects. We describe eight patients with manifestations of wild lettuce toxicity, admitted to a general hospital affiliated to the Golestan University of Medical Sciences. All the patients recovered (although one had to spend 48 h in the intensive care unit) and no chronic complications were reported. A clinical suspicion of toxicity...

  19. Cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary toxicity

    Siemann, D.W.; Macler, L.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Unlike radiation effects, pulmonary toxicity following drug treatments may develop soon after exposure. The dose-response relationship between Cyclophosphamide and lung toxicity was investigated using increased breathing frequency assays used successfully for radiation induced injury. The data indicate that release of protein into the alveolus may play a significant role in Cy induced pulmonary toxicity. Although the mechanism responsible for the increased alveolar protein is as yet not identified, the present findings suggest that therapeutic intervention to inhibit protein release may be an approach to protect the lungs from toxic effects. (UK)

  20. E-Cigarette Toxicity?

    Tegin, Gulay; Mekala, Hema Madhuri; Sarai, Simrat Kaur; Lippmann, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. In just a few short years, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have become increasingly popular, especially for younger individuals. Many people believe that e-cigarettes are safe. The inhaled aerosols of e-cigarettes contain numerous potential toxicities, some of which could be dangerous for health with long-term use. The safety of prolonged aerosol exposure is not known. The use of e-cigarettes as a harm-reduction tool at stopping tobacco smoking is not uniformly successful. E-cigarettes may be safer than tobacco products, but repeated prolonged exposure to their aerosols has its own considerable potential risk. The long-term health consequences of their use remain to be established. Physicians should vigorously discourage the use of e-cigarettes and tobacco products, with special emphasis on abstinence for younger people and during pregnancy or lactation.

  1. Tracking pyrethroid toxicity in surface water samples: Exposure dynamics and toxicity identification tools for laboratory tests with Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda).

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2018-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging as a result of their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the analytical methods detection limits (MDLs). Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod Hyalella azteca and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In the present study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and presented a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) cubitainers (Fisher Scientific) at 4 °C of 5 pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, and esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:462-472. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  2. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  3. High risk of adrenal toxicity of N1-desoxy quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives and the protection of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) in the inhibition of the expression of aldosterone synthetase in H295R cells

    Wang, Xu; Yang, Chunhui; Ihsan, Awais; Luo, Xun; Guo, Pu; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • N1-QCT, N1-MEQ and N1-CYA showed more adrenal toxicity than other metabolites. • N1-desoxy QdNOs reduced expression of CYP11B1, CYP11B2 and transcription factors. • OPC increased expression of transcription factors, including CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. • OPC reduced adrenal toxicity induced by N1-desoxy QdNOs. • The results provided a mechanism of adrenal damage caused by QdNO metabolites. - Abstract: Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives (QdNOs) with a wide range of biological activities are used in animal husbandry worldwide. It was found that QdNOs significantly inhibited the gene expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, the key aldosterone synthases, and thus reduced aldosterone levels. However, whether the metabolites of QdNOs have potential adrenal toxicity and the role of oxidative stress in the adrenal toxicity of QdNOs remains unclear. The relatively new QdNOs, cyadox (CYA), mequindox (MEQ), quinocetone (QCT) and their metabolites, were selected for elucidation of their toxic mechanisms in H295R cells. Interestingly, the results showed that the main toxic metabolites of QCT, MEQ, and CYA were their N1-desoxy metabolites, which were more harmful than other metabolites and evoked dose and time-dependent cell damage on adrenal cells and inhibited aldosterone production. Gene and protein expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 and mRNA expression of transcription factors, such as NURR1, NGFIB, CREB, SF-1, and ATF-1, were down regulated by N1-desoxy QdNOs. The natural inhibitors of oxidant stress, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC), could upregulate the expression of diverse transcription factors, including CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and elevated aldosterone levels to reduce adrenal toxicity. This study demonstrated for the first time that N1-desoxy QdNOs have the potential to be the major toxic metabolites in adrenal toxicity, which may shed new light on the adrenal toxicity of these fascinating compounds and help to provide a basic foundation for the

  4. Addition of contaminant bioavailability and species susceptibility to a sediment toxicity assessment: Application in an urban stream in China

    Li, Huizhen; Sun, Baoquan; Chen, Xin; Lydy, Michael J.; You, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Sediments collected from an urban creek in China exhibited high acute toxicity to Hyalella azteca with 81.3% of sediments being toxic. A toxic unit (TU) estimation demonstrated that the pyrethroid, cypermethrin, was the major contributor to toxicity. The traditional TU approach, however, overestimated the toxicity. Reduced bioavailability of sediment-associated cypermethrin due to sequestration explained the overestimation. Additionally, antagonism among multiple contaminants and species susceptibility to various contaminants also contributed to the unexpectedly low toxicity to H. azteca. Bioavailable TUs derived from the bioavailability-based approaches, Tenax extraction and matrix-solid phase microextraction (matrix-SPME), showed better correlations with the noted toxicity compared to traditional TUs. As the first successful attempt to use matrix-SPME for estimating toxicity caused by emerging insecticides in field sediment, the present study found freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations significantly improved the prediction of sediment toxicity to H. azteca compared to organic carbon normalized and Tenax extractable concentrations. Highlights: •Over 80% sediments from an urban stream in China were acutely toxic to H. azteca. •Toxic unit analysis showed cypermethrin was the major contributor to toxicity. •The traditional toxic unit approach overestimated sediment toxicity. •Reduced bioavailability was the reason for overestimating sediment toxicity. •Freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations greatly improved toxicity prediction. -- Field sediment toxicity caused by current-use pesticides could be more accurately evaluated by incorporating bioavailability measurements into the toxic unit analysis

  5. Acute and Subacute Toxicity Evaluation of Corn Silk Extract.

    Ha, Ae Wha; Kang, Hyeon Jung; Kim, Sun Lim; Kim, Myung Hwan; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have reported therapeutic efficacy of corn silk extract. However, research on its toxicity and safe dose range is limited. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the acute and subacute toxicity of corn silk extract in ICR mice. To determine acute toxicity, corn silk extract containing high levels of maysin was orally administered to mice at a dose of 0 or 2,000 mg/kg. Clinical symptoms, mortality, and body weight changes were recorded for 14 days. To determine subacute toxicity, corn silk extract was orally administered to mice over a 4-week period, and then body weight, water and food consumption, and organ weight were determined. In addition, urine and serum analyses were performed. In the acute toxicity study, no death or abnormal symptoms was observed in all treatment groups during the study period. Body weights did not show any significant change compared to those of the control group. Lethal dose of corn silk extract was estimated to be more than 2,000 mg/kg. In the 4-week subacute toxicity study, there was no corn silk extract related toxic effect on body weight, water intake, food consumption, urine parameters, clinical chemistry, or organ weight. Histopathological examination showed no abnormality related to the administration of corn silk extract at 500 mg/kg. The maximum non-toxic dose of corn silk extract containing high levels of maysin was found to be more than 500 mg/kg.

  6. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a promising mosquitocidal gene

    Zhang, L.; Huang, E.; Gelbič, Ivan; Guan, Ch.; Guan, Y.; Guan, X.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 10 (2009), s. 799-803 ISSN 0019-5189 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08003 Grant - others:United Fujian Provincial Health and Education Project for Tackling Key Research(CN) WKJ2008-2-44; Talented Youth Project of Fujian Province(CN) 2008F3012; Science and Technology Project of the Educational Department of Fujian Province(CN) JA08080; Key Talented Youth Project of Science and Technology of the Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University(CN) 08A01; Key Project of the Fujian Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs(CN) SZ2007035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Bacillus thuringiensis * cyt1Aa6 * expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2009

  7. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    hanumantp

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Jan-Feb 2014 | Vol 4 ... supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The ... Keywords: Hydroxycut, Liver toxicity, Nutritional supplements ... Caffeine anhydrous: 200 mg* ... series and review of liver toxicity from herbal weight loss.

  8. One Health and Toxic Cyanobacteria

    One Health and toxic cyanobacteria Blooms of toxic freshwater blue-green algae or cyanobacteria (HABs) have been in the news after HABs associated with human and animal health problems have been reported in Florida, California and Utah during 2016. HABs occur in warm, slow moving...

  9. Toxic Leadership in Educational Organizations

    Green, James E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on the traits and skills of effective leaders is plentiful, only recently has the phenomenon of toxic leadership begun to be investigated. This research report focuses on toxic leadership in educational organizations--its prevalence, as well as the characteristics and early indicators. Using mixed methods, the study found four…

  10. Polish Toxic Currency Options

    Waldemar Gontarski

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic currency options are defined on the basis of the opposition to the nature (essence of an option contract, which is justified in terms of norms founded on the general law clause of characteristics (nature of a relation (which represents an independent premise for imposing restrictions on the freedom of contracts. So-understood toxic currency options are unlawful. Indeed they contravene iuris cogentis regulations. These include for instance option contracts, which are concluded with a bank, if the bank has not informed about option risk before concluding the contract; or the barrier options, which focus only on the protection of bank’s interests. Therefore, such options may appear to be invalid. Therefore, performing contracts for toxic currency options may be qualified as a criminal mismanagement. For the sake of security, the manager should then take into consideration filing a claim for stating invalidity (which can be made in a court verdict. At the same time, if the supervisory board member in a commercial company, who can also be a subject to mismanagement offences, commits an omission involving lack of reaction (for example, if he/she fails to notify of the suspected offence committed by the management board members acting to the company’s detriment when the management board makes the company conclude option contracts which are charged with absolute invalidity the supervisory board member so acting may be considered to act to the company’s detriment. In the most recent Polish jurisprudence and judicature the standard of a “good host” is treated to be the last resort for determining whether the manager’s powers resulting from criminal regulations were performed. The manager of the exporter should not, as a rule, issue any options. Issuing options always means assuming an obligation. In the case of currency put options it is an absolute obligation to purchase a given amount in euro at exchange rate set in advance. On the

  11. Addressing the selectivity and toxicity of antiviral nucleosides.

    Feng, Joy Y

    2018-01-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide analogs have played significant roles in antiviral therapies and are valued for their impressive potency and high barrier to resistance. They have been approved for treatment of herpes simplex virus-1, HIV, HBV, HCV, and influenza, and new drugs are being developed for the treatment of RSV, Ebola, coronavirus MERS, and other emerging viruses. However, this class of compounds has also experienced a high attrition rate in clinical trials due to toxicity. In this review, we discuss the utility of different biochemical and cell-based assays and provide recommendations for assessing toxicity liability before entering animal toxicity studies.

  12. Toxic releases from power plants

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  13. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  14. Marine Biotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity, and Detection Methods

    Asakawa, M.

    2017-04-01

    This review summarizes the role of marine organisms as vectors of marine biotoxins, and discusses the need for surveillance to protect public health and ensure the quality of seafood. I Paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) and PSP-bearing organisms-PSP is produced by toxic dinoflagellates species belonging to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium, and Pyrodinium. Traditionally, PSP monitoring programs have only considered filter-feeding molluscs that concentrate these toxic algae, however, increasing attention is now being paid to higher-order predators that carry PSP, such as carnivorous gastropods and crustaceans. II. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and TTX-bearing organisms - TTX is the most common natural marine toxin that causes food poisonings in Japan, and poses a serious public health risk. TTX was long believed to be present only in pufferfish. However, TTX was detected in the eggs of California newt Taricha torosa in 1964, and since then it has been detected in a wide variety of species belonging to several different phyla. In this study, the main toxic components in the highly toxic ribbon worm Cephalothrix simula and the greater blue-ringed octopus Hapalochlaena lunulata from Japan were purified and analysed.

  15. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Major ion toxicity in effluents: A review with permitting recommendations

    Goodfellow, W.L.; Ausley, L.W.; Burton, D.T.; Denton, D.L.; Dorn, P.B.; Grothe, D.R.; Heber, M.A.; Norberg-King, T.J.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Effluent toxicity testing methods have been well defined, but for the most part, these methods do not attempt to segregate the effects of active ionic concentrations and ion imbalances upon test and species performances. The role of various total dissolved solids in effluents on regulatory compliance has emerged during the last few years and has caused confusion in technical assessment and in permitting and compliance issues. This paper assesses the issue of ionic strength and ion imbalance, provides a brief summary of applicable data, presents several case studies demonstrating successful tools to address toxicity resulting from salinity and ion imbalance, and provides recommendations for regulatory and compliance options to manage discharges with salinity/ion imbalance issues. Effluent toxicity resulting from inorganic ion imbalance and the ion concentration of the effluent is pervasive in permitted discharge from many industrial process and municipal discharges where process streams are concentrated, adjusted, or modified. This paper discusses procedures that use weight-of-evidence approaches to identify ion imbalance toxicity, including direct measurement, predictive toxicity models for freshwater, exchange resins, mock effluents, and ion imbalance toxicity with tolerant/susceptible test species. Cost-effective waste treatment control options for a facility whose effluent is toxic because of total dissolved solids (TDS) or because of specific ion(s) are scarce at best. Depending on the discharge situation, TDS toxicity may not be viewed with the same level of concern as other, more traditional, toxicants. These discharge situations often do not require the conservative safety factors required by other toxicants. Selection of the alternative regulatory solutions discussed in this paper may be beneficial, especially because they do not require potentially expensive or high-energy-using treatment options that may be ineffective control options. The information

  17. Analytical methods for toxic gases from thermal degradation of polymers

    Hsu, M.-T. S.

    1977-01-01

    Toxic gases evolved from the thermal oxidative degradation of synthetic or natural polymers in small laboratory chambers or in large scale fire tests are measured by several different analytical methods. Gas detector tubes are used for fast on-site detection of suspect toxic gases. The infrared spectroscopic method is an excellent qualitative and quantitative analysis for some toxic gases. Permanent gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and ethylene, can be quantitatively determined by gas chromatography. Highly toxic and corrosive gases such as nitrogen oxides, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide should be passed into a scrubbing solution for subsequent analysis by either specific ion electrodes or spectrophotometric methods. Low-concentration toxic organic vapors can be concentrated in a cold trap and then analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The limitations of different methods are discussed.

  18. Oxygen Toxicity and Special Operations Forces Diving: Hidden and Dangerous

    Thijs T. Wingelaar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In Special Operations Forces (SOF closed-circuit rebreathers with 100% oxygen are commonly utilized for covert diving operations. Exposure to high partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 could cause damage to the central nervous system (CNS and pulmonary system. Longer exposure time and higher PO2 leads to faster development of more serious pathology. Exposure to a PO2 above 1.4 ATA can cause CNS toxicity, leading to a wide range of neurologic complaints including convulsions. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity develops over time when exposed to a PO2 above 0.5 ATA and can lead to inflammation and fibrosis of lung tissue. Oxygen can also be toxic for the ocular system and may have systemic effects on the inflammatory system. Moreover, some of the effects of oxygen toxicity are irreversible. This paper describes the pathophysiology, epidemiology, signs and symptoms, risk factors and prediction models of oxygen toxicity, and their limitations on SOF diving.

  19. Screening approach by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the blood quantification of thirty-four toxic principles of plant origin. Application to forensic toxicology.

    Carlier, Jérémy; Guitton, Jérôme; Romeuf, Ludovic; Bévalot, Fabien; Boyer, Baptiste; Fanton, Laurent; Gaillard, Yvan

    2015-01-15

    Plant poisonings have left their mark on history and still cause many deaths, whether intentional or accidental. The means to show toxicological evidence of such poisonings should be implemented with great care. This article presents a technique for measuring thirty-nine toxic principles of plant origin in the blood, covering a large amount of toxins from local or exotic plants: α-lobeline, α-solanine, aconitine, ajmaline, atropine, brucine, cephalomannine, colchicine, convallatoxin, cymarine, cytisine, digitoxin, digoxin, emetine, gelsemine, ibogaine, jervine, kavain, lanatoside C, lupanine, mitragynine, neriifolin, oleandrin, ouabain, paclitaxel, physostigmine, pilocarpine, podophyllotoxin, proscillaridin A, reserpine, retrorsine, ricinine, scopolamine, senecionine, sparteine, strophanthidin, strychnine, veratridine and yohimbine. Analysis was carried out using an original ultra-high performance liquid chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection. Extraction was a standard solid phase extraction performed on Oasis(®) HLB cartridge. Thirty-four of the thirty-nine compounds were put through a validation procedure. The assay was linear in the calibration curve range from 0.5 or 5 μg/L to 1000 μg/L according to the compounds. The method is sensitive (LOD from 0.1 to 1.6 μg/L). The within-day precision of the assay was less than 22.5% at the LLOQ, and the between-day precision was less than 21.5% for 10 μg/L for all the compounds included. The assay accuracy was in the range of 87.4 to 119.8% for the LLOQ. The extraction recovery and matrix effect ranged from 30 to 106% and from -30 to 14%, respectively. It has proven useful and effective in several difficult forensic cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Pereira, Frederick A; Mudgil, Adarsh Vijay; Rosmarin, David M

    2007-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an unpredictable, life-threatening drug reaction associated with a 30% mortality. Massive keratinocyte apoptosis is the hallmark of TEN. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes appear to be the main effector cells and there is experimental evidence for involvement of both the Fas-Fas ligand and perforin/granzyme pathways. Optimal treatment for these patients remains to be clarified. Discontinuation of the offending drug and prompt referral to a burn unit are generally agreed upon steps. Beyond that, however, considerable controversy exists. Evidence both pro and con exists for the use of IVIG, systemic corticosteroid, and other measures. There is also evidence suggesting that combination therapies may be of value. All the clinical data, however, is anecdotal or based on observational or retrospective studies. Definitive answers are not yet available. Given the rarity of TEN and the large number of patients required for a study to be statistically meaningful, placebo controlled trials are logistically difficult to accomplish. The absence of an animal model further hampers research into this condition. This article reviews recent data concerning clinical presentation, pathogenesis and treatment of TEN. At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should have acquired a more comprehensive knowledge of our current understanding of the classification, clinical presentation, etiology, pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of TEN.

  1. Acute toxicity and associated mechanisms of four strobilurins in algae.

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Junli; Wang, Chengju; Li, Xuefeng; Pang, Sen

    2018-04-03

    Strobilurins have been reported highly toxic to non-target aquatic organisms but few illustrated how they cause toxic effects on algae. This study investigated the acute toxicity of Kresoxim-methy (KRE), Pyraclostrobin (PYR), Trifloxystrobin (TRI) and Picoxystrobin (PIC) on two algae and their toxicity mechanisms. Four strobilurins showed lower toxic effects on Chlorella pyrenoidsa but higher on Chlorella vulgaris. bc1 complex activities in C. vulgaris were significantly inhibited by all strobilurins, suggesting bc 1 complex might be the target of strobilurin toxicity in algae. Moreover, SOD, CAT and POD activities were significantly up-regulated by all doses of KRE, PYR and PIC. In contrast, low concentrations of TRI stimulated SOD and POD activities but highest concentration significantly inhibited those activities. Comet assays showed damaged DNA in C. vulgaris by four strobulirins, suggesting their potential genotoxic threats to algae. The results illustrated acute toxicity by strobulirins on algae and their possible toxicity mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Military Dog Training Aids: Toxicity and Treatment

    1989-11-10

    therapy should be considered. Sunportive therapy, including high levels of broad-spectrum vitamins and a bland diet , should be given. Patients should be...Median lethal dose 11,000 mg/min/m 3 Median incapacitating 3 dose Approx. 80 mg/min/m Rate of detox . Rapid; effects disappear in a few hours 20 3...Dog Training Aids: Toxicity and Treatment," Technical Report, Air Force Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory (1975) 2. Sporting Arms and

  3. Molecular toxicity mechanism of nanosilver

    Danielle McShan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver is an ancient antibiotic that has found many new uses due to its unique properties on the nanoscale. Due to its presence in many consumer products, the toxicity of nanosilver has become a hot topic. This review summarizes recent advances, particularly the molecular mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. The surface of nanosilver can easily be oxidized by O2 and other molecules in the environmental and biological systems leading to the release of Ag+, a known toxic ion. Therefore, nanosilver toxicity is closely related to the release of Ag+. In fact, it is difficult to determine what portion of the toxicity is from the nano-form and what is from the ionic form. The surface oxidation rate is closely related to the nanosilver surface coating, coexisting molecules, especially thiol-containing compounds, lighting conditions, and the interaction of nanosilver with nucleic acids, lipid molecules, and proteins in a biological system. Nanosilver has been shown to penetrate the cell and become internalized. Thus, nanosilver often acts as a source of Ag+ inside the cell. One of the main mechanisms of toxicity is that it causes oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species and causes damage to cellular components including DNA damage, activation of antioxidant enzymes, depletion of antioxidant molecules (e.g., glutathione, binding and disabling of proteins, and damage to the cell membrane. Several major questions remain to be answered: (1 the toxic contribution from the ionic form versus the nano-form; (2 key enzymes and signaling pathways responsible for the toxicity; and (3 effect of coexisting molecules on the toxicity and its relationship to surface coating.

  4. Priorities for toxic wastewater management in Pakistan

    Rahman, A. [Sustainable Development Policy Institute, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    This study assesses the number of industries in Pakistan, the total discharge of wastewater, the biological oxygen demand (BOD) load, and the toxicity of the wastewater. The industrial sector is a major contributor to water pollution, with high levels of BOD, heavy metals, and toxic compounds. Only 30 industries have installed water pollution control equipment, and most are working at a very low operational level. Priority industrial sectors for pollution control are medium- to large-scale textile industries and small-scale tanneries and electroplating industries. Each day the textile industries discharge about 85,000 m{sup 3} of wastewater with a high BOD, while the electroplating industries discharge about 23,000 m{sup 3} of highly toxic and hazardous wastewater. Various in-plant modifications can reduce wastewater discharges. Economic incentives, like tax rebates, subsidies, and soft loans, could be an option for motivating medium- to large-scale industries to control water pollution. Central treatment plants may be constructed for treating wastewater generated by small-scale industries. The estimated costs for the treatment of textile and electroplating wastewater are given. The legislative structure in Pakistan is insufficient for control of industrial pollution; not only do existing laws need revision, but more laws and regulations are needed to improve the state of affairs, and enforcement agencies need to be strengthened. 15 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of genetic diversity between toxic and non toxic Jatropha ...

    Massimo

    Indian varieties and a non-toxic variety of Mexican origin by means of about 400 RAPD ... evaluate the level of polymorphism and the capacity to discriminate between the ..... Population genetic software for teaching and research. Mol. Ecol.

  6. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  7. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  8. A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF TOXIC LEADERSHIP

    2016-02-05

    characteristics of a toxic leader , but labels the characteristics - leader types.  Deceptive  Autocratic  Egotistic  Incompetent  Ignorant...3 Characteristics of a Toxic Leader ...5 Table 2: Toxic Leader Characteristics

  9. National Air Toxic Assessments (NATA) Results

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Air Toxics Assessment was conducted by EPA in 2002 to assess air toxics emissions in order to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types...

  10. Photosynthetic and cellular toxicity of cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Ou-Yang, Hui-Ling; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Lavoie, Michel; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2013-12-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) on the green alga Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by following the response to Cd of various toxicity endpoints (cell growth, cell size, photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light or Φ(PSII), maximal photochemical efficiency or Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a fluorescence, esterase activity, and cell viability). These toxicity endpoints were studied in laboratory batch cultures of C. vulgaris over a long-term 96-h exposure to different Cd concentrations using flow cytometry and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry. The sequence of sensitivity of these toxicity endpoints was: cell yield > Φ(PSII) ≈ esterase activity > Fv/Fm > chlorophyll a fluorescence ≈ cell viability. It is shown that cell apoptosis or cell death only accounted for a minor part of the reduction in cell yield even at very high algistatic free Cd²⁺ concentrations, and other mechanisms such as blocked cell divisions are major contributors to cell yield inhibition. Furthermore, cadmium may affect both the electron donors and acceptors of the electron transport chain at high free Cd²⁺ concentration. Finally, the resistance of cells to cell death was size-dependent; medium-sized cells had the highest toxicity threshold. The present study brings new insights into the toxicity mechanisms of Cd in C. vulgaris and provides a detailed comparison of the sensitivity of various Cd toxicity endpoints. © 2013 SETAC.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Barbier, Olivier; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Del Razo, Luz María

    2010-11-05

    Halfway through the twentieth century, fluoride piqued the interest of toxicologists due to its deleterious effects at high concentrations in human populations suffering from fluorosis and in in vivo experimental models. Until the 1990s, the toxicity of fluoride was largely ignored due to its "good reputation" for preventing caries via topical application and in dental toothpastes. However, in the last decade, interest in its undesirable effects has resurfaced due to the awareness that this element interacts with cellular systems even at low doses. In recent years, several investigations demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress and modulate intracellular redox homeostasis, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content, as well as alter gene expression and cause apoptosis. Genes modulated by fluoride include those related to the stress response, metabolic enzymes, the cell cycle, cell-cell communications and signal transduction. The primary purpose of this review is to examine recent findings from our group and others that focus on the molecular mechanisms of the action of inorganic fluoride in several cellular processes with respect to potential physiological and toxicological implications. This review presents an overview of the current research on the molecular aspects of fluoride exposure with emphasis on biological targets and their possible mechanisms of involvement in fluoride cytotoxicity. The goal of this review is to enhance understanding of the mechanisms by which fluoride affects cells, with an emphasis on tissue-specific events in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxicity formation and distribution in activated sludge during treatment of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) wastewater

    Yang, Na; Chen, Xiurong, E-mail: xrchen@ecust.edu.cn; Lin, Fengkai; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Jianguo; Chen, Shanjia

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We studied mechanism of sludge organic toxicity formation in wastewater treatment. • The organic toxicity distributed mainly in the inner section of sludge flocs. • The organic toxicity of sludge increased with DMF initial concentrations increments. • The property of bacteria community correlates significantly with sludge toxicity. -- Abstract: The organic toxicity of sludge in land applications is a critical issue; however, minimal attention has been given to the mechanism of toxicity formation during high-strength wastewater treatment. To investigate the relevant factors that contribute to sludge toxicity, synthetic wastewater with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was treated in a sequential aerobic activated sludge reactor. The acute toxicity of sludge, which is characterised by the inhibition rate of luminous bacteria T3, is the focus of this study. Using an operational time of 28 days and a hydraulic retention time of 12 h, the study demonstrated a positive relationship between the acute toxicity of sludge and the influent DMF concentration; the toxicity centralised in the intracellular and inner sections of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in sludge flocs. Due to increased concentrations of DMF, which ranged from 40 to 200 mg L{sup −1}, the sludge toxicity increased from 25 to 45%. The organic toxicity in sludge flocs was primarily contributed by the biodegradation of DMF rather than adsorption of DMF. Additional investigation revealed a significant correlation between the properties of the bacterial community and sludge toxicity.

  13. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  14. The toxic effects of chlorophenols and associated mechanisms in fish

    Ge, Tingting; Han, Jiangyuan; Qi, Yongmei; Gu, Xueyan; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Chen; Naeem, Sajid; Huang, Dejun

    2017-01-01

    studies on the alteration of DNA methylation by CPs through high-throughput DNA sequencing analysis provide new insights into our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying CPs toxicity.

  15. The toxic effects of chlorophenols and associated mechanisms in fish

    Ge, Tingting; Han, Jiangyuan; Qi, Yongmei; Gu, Xueyan; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Chen; Naeem, Sajid; Huang, Dejun, E-mail: huangdj@lzu.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    studies on the alteration of DNA methylation by CPs through high-throughput DNA sequencing analysis provide new insights into our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying CPs toxicity.

  16. Toxicity of heavy metals in the environment

    Oehme, F.W

    1978-01-01

    ... as the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity resulting from heavy metal chemicals. The more common toxic heavy metals, along with their biochemistry and associated clinical syndromes, are then described...

  17. Toxicity of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine in Northern Peru.

    Bussmann, R W; Malca, G; Glenn, A; Sharon, D; Nilsen, B; Parris, B; Dubose, D; Ruiz, D; Saleda, J; Martinez, M; Carillo, L; Walker, K; Kuhlman, A; Townesmith, A

    2011-09-01

    The plant species reported here are traditionally used in Northern Peru for a wide range of illnesses. Most remedies are prepared as ethanol or aqueous extracts and then ingested. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of these extracts. The toxicity of ethanolic and water extracts of 341 plant species was determined using a brine-shrimp assay. Overall 24% of the species in water extract and 76% of the species in alcoholic extract showed elevated toxicity levels to brine-shrimp. Although in most cases multiple extracts of the same species showed very similar toxicity values, in some cases the toxicity of different extracts of the same species varied from non-toxic to highly toxic. Traditional preparation methods take different toxicity levels in aqueous and ethanol extracts into account when choosing the appropriate solvent for the preparation of a remedy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 2011 NATA - Air Toxics Monitors

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes annual (2005 - 2013) statistics of measured ambient air toxics concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) and associated risk estimates for...

  19. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) toxicity issues

    LaHann, T.

    1995-01-01

    ISU's Center for Toxicology Research has been conducting toxicity testing of borocaptate sodium (BSH) to aid in assessing if proposed human studies of BSH are likely to be acceptably safe. This report describes BSH interactions with other biological agents

  20. Quantal health effects of three toxic agents combined

    Seiler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Quantal health effects such as cancer, correlated with the combined action of three toxic agents, are considered. Data on the combined effects of two agents are scarce and no such data exist for three toxicants, yet concerns have arisen about simultaneous exposure of radiation workers to three different agents. Using models developed from the analysis of health effects involving two toxicants, equations for the combined effects of three agents are derived from a more general formalism. An application of practical interest is the incidence of cancer of the esophagus and its correlation with concurrent exposures to alcohol, tobacco, and either low- or high-LET radiation. (author)

  1. How Saccharomyces cerevisiae copes with toxic metals and metalloids.

    Wysocki, Robert; Tamás, Markus J

    2010-11-01

    Toxic metals and metalloids are widespread in nature and can locally reach fairly high concentrations. To ensure cellular protection and survival in such environments, all organisms possess systems to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. This review provides an overview of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to metal toxicity, detoxification and tolerance acquisition in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We mainly focus on the metals/metalloids arsenic, cadmium, antimony, mercury, chromium and selenium, and emphasize recent findings on sensing and signalling mechanisms and on the regulation of tolerance and detoxification systems that safeguard cellular and genetic integrity.

  2. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  3. Protection against Radiotherapy-Induced Toxicity

    Susan Hall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a highly utilized therapy in the treatment of malignancies with up to 60% of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their treatment regimen. Radiation therapy does, however, cause a wide range of adverse effects that can be severe and cause permanent damage to the patient. In an attempt to minimize these effects, a small number of compounds have been identified and are in use clinically for the prevention and treatment of radiation associated toxicities. Furthermore, there are a number of emerging therapies being developed for use as agents that protect against radiation-induced toxicities. The aim of this review was to evaluate and summarise the evidence that exists for both the known radioprotectant agents and the agents that show promise as future radioprotectant agents.

  4. A Study on the D. magna and V. fischeri Toxicity Relationship of Industrial Wastewater from Korea

    Pyo, S.; Lee, S.; Chun Sang, H.; Park, T. J.; Kim, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that high concentration of TDS (total dissolved solid) in industrial effluent gives rise to the toxicity to the Daphnia magna toxicity test. D. magna is vulnerable to relatively low TDS concentration showing the 24-hr EC50 of Salinity 0.6% (as the sea salt concentration). Recently, standard mandatory toxicity testing using Daphnia magna has been used to monitor industrial effluent toxicity according to Korea standard method (Acute Toxicity Test Method of the Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera, Crustacea), ES 04704. 1a) under regulation. Since only one acute toxicity testing is applied in the present, we are trying to introduce microbial battery for more complete toxicity assessment. In this study, the acute toxicities between daphnids and microbes were compared. The results of D. magna and Vibrio fischeri toxicity test from 165 industrial wastewater effluents showed high positive correlation. In addition, the possibility of predicting daphnia toxicity from the bacterial toxicity data amounts to 92.6% if we consider salinity effect (>5ppt) together. From this study, we found that the V. fischeri toxicity test is a powerful battery tool to assess the industrial wastewater toxicity. Here, we suggest that luminescent bacteria toxicity test be useful not only for complete toxicity assessment which can't be obtained by daphnia toxicity testing only but also for the reduction cost, time, and labor in the Korean society. Keywords : D. magna, V. fischeri, Industrial waste water, battery test Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  5. Metal and pharmaceutical mixtures: Is ion loss the mechanism underlying acute toxicity and widespread additive toxicity in zebrafish?

    Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Zebrafish larvae were used to test the acute toxicity of contaminant mixtures. •Interactions were observed between metals, ammonia and pharmaceuticals. •Larval Na + loss was observed with exposure to all acutely toxic contaminants tested. •Water quality criteria should recognize the toxic interactions between contaminants. -- Abstract: The acute toxicities and mechanisms of action of a variety of environmental contaminants were examined using zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio; 4–8 days post fertilization). Toxic interactions were observed between metals. For example, the addition of a sublethal level of nickel (15% of the LC 50 , one third of the LC 01 ) to all copper treatments decreased the copper 96 h LC 50 by 58%, while sublethal copper exposure (6% of the copper LC 50 , 13% of the LC 01 ) decreased the cadmium 96 h LC 50 by 47%. Two predictive models were assessed, the concentration addition (CA) model, which assumes similar mechanisms of action, and the independent action (IA) model, which assumes different mechanisms of action. Quantitative comparisons indicated the CA model performed better than the IA model; the latter tended to underestimate combined toxicity to a greater extent. The effects of mixtures with nickel or ammonia were typically additive, while mixtures with copper or cadmium were typically greater than additive. Larvae exposed to cadmium, copper or nickel experienced whole body ion loss. Decreases were greatest for Na + followed by K + (as high as 19% and 9%, respectively, in 24 h). Additive toxicity between copper and other pharmaceutical compounds such as fluoxetine (Prozac™), β-naphthoflavone, estrogen and 17α-ethinylestradiol were also observed. Similar to metals, acutely toxic concentrations of fluoxetine, β-naphthoflavone and ammonia all decreased whole body Na + and K + . Overall, whole body Na + loss showed the greatest correlation with mortality across a variety of toxicants. We theorize that a disruption of

  6. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy); Cingolani, R. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Central Research Laboratories (Italy); Pompa, P. P., E-mail: pierpaolo.pompa@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  7. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  8. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community

  9. Less-Toxic Coatings for Inhibiting Corrosion of Aluminum

    Minevski, Zoran; Clarke, Eric; Eylem, Cahit; Maxey, Jason; Nelson, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Two recently invented families of conversion- coating processes have been found to be effective in reducing or preventing corrosion of aluminum alloys. These processes offer less-toxic alternatives to prior conversion-coating processes that are highly effective but have fallen out of favor because they generate chromate wastes, which are toxic and carcinogenic. Specimens subjected to these processes were found to perform well in standard salt-fog corrosion tests.

  10. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  11. Toxicity and repellency to rats of actidione

    Traub, R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Newman, D.

    1950-01-01

    The antibiotic actidione was found to be highly repellent to laboratory rats and to significantly reduce gnawing attacks upon treated paperboards. Rats refused to accept food or water containing this material even under conditions of acute starvation and died of starvation and thirst,rather than accept water containing l.0 mg. of actidione per liter. The compound is highly toxic to .rats with the minimum .lethal dose by oral administration being approximately l.0 mg./Kg body weight. Paperboard treated with the compound resisted gnawing attacks by specially trained and motivated rats for periods of two hundred hours, although similar .untreated boards were pierced within thirty-to sixty minutes.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF ENGINE EMISSION SAMPLES

    (1)Mauderly, J; Seagrave, J; McDonald; J (2)Eide,I (3)Zielinska, B (4)Lawson, D

    2003-08-24

    Differences in the lung toxicity and bacterial mutagenicity of seven samples from gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions were reported previously [1]. Filter and vapor-phase semivolatile organic samples were collected from normal and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers on the Unified Driving Cycle, and the compositions of the samples were measured in detail. The two fractions of each sample were combined in their original mass collection ratios, and the toxicity of the seven samples was compared by measuring inflammation and tissue damage in rat lungs and mutagenicity in bacteria. There was good agreement among the toxicity response variables in ranking the samples and demonstrating a five-fold range of toxicity. The relationship between chemical composition and toxicity was analyzed by a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS, also known as projection to latent surfaces). The PCA /PLS analysis revealed the chemical constituents co-varying most strongly with toxicity and produced models predicting the relative toxicity of the samples with good accuracy. The results demonstrated the utility of the PCA/PLS approach, which is now being applied to additional samples, and it also provided a starting point for confirming the compounds that actually cause the effects.

  13. Toxicity of middle distillates from dermal exposure.

    Koschier, F J

    1999-02-01

    This report focuses on recent studies that investigated the effects of kerosine dermal exposure on neurotoxicity and reproductive/developmental toxicity. Background toxicity information will also be reviewed for kerosine range mid distillates. The kerosine range mid distillates have a carbon range of C9-C16 and have a boiling range of 302-554 degrees F (150-290 degrees C). This category includes kerosine, aviation fuels (e.g., Jet A, JP-5 and JP-8), no. 1 fuel oil and diesel fuel oil. In general, the kerosine range mid distillates demonstrate relatively low acute toxicity by any route of exposure. High inhalation exposures can induce central nervous system depression characterized by ataxia, hypoactivity and prostration. Kerosines are known to cause skin irritation and inflammation under conditions of acute and repeated exposure in animals and humans, but are only slightly irritating to the eye and are not skin sensitizers. In addition, the absorption of kerosine range mid distillates through the skin has been demonstrated to be fairly rapid, but limited to approximately 10-15% of the applied dose after 24 hours. The kerosine range mid distillates are generally inactive in genetic toxicity tests although positive studies have been reported. Positive results, while at times equivocal, have been reported for straight run kerosine and jet fuel A in the mouse lymphoma assay with metabolic activation, and hydrodesulfurized kerosine (mouse) and jet fuel A (rat) in the bone marrow cytogenetic assay. Effects on the nervous and reproductive systems have been reported in humans and experimental animals under conditions where inhalation and dermal exposure to specific kerosine type fuels are sometimes difficult to separate. Recent laboratory studies have addressed this point and examined the effects of dermal exposure. In these studies, rats were exposed to hydrodesulfurized kerosine by skin application to determine the potential of dermal contact to cause reproductive

  14. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We review methods for testing toxicity of sediments affected by metals. • Toxicity testing provides site-specific assessment of impacts on resident biota. • Goals are to document exten