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Sample records for high modulus graphite

  1. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  2. High Strength and High Modulus Electrospun Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Yao; Cees W. M. Bastiaansen; Ton Peijs

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning is a rapidly growing polymer processing technology as it provides a viable and simple method to create ultra-fine continuous fibers. This paper presents an in-depth review of the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers and particularly focuses on methodologies to generate high strength and high modulus nanofibers. As such, it aims to provide some guidance to future research activities in the area of high performance electrospun fibers.

  3. Effects of graphite porosity and anisotropy on measurements of elastic modulus using laser untrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James B [Johns Hopkins University; Zeng, Fan W [Johns Hopkins University; Han, Karen [Johns Hopkins University; Olasov, Lauren R [Johns Hopkins University; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques can be used to study the ultrasonic properties of nuclear graphites and can serve as tools in establishing relationships between materials microstructure and the macroscopic stiffnesses of graphite. Establishing structure-property relationships permits improved ultrasonic sensing of graphite microstructural changes related to service-induced degradation. Laser ultrasonic measurements were made using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser source and detection was performed using a Michelson-type interferometer. This source-receiver combination provides for non-contacting, highly linear transduction of broadbanded, ultrasonic pulses permitting simultaneous determination of longitudinal and shear stiffnesses. Measurements show that among the graphites examined, a change in density of 0.26 g/cm3 (average 1.8 g/cm3) results in a change in the longitudinal elastic stiffness of 9.2 GPa (average 11.3 GPa) and 3.2 GPa (average 4.3 GPa) for the shear stiffness. Larger variations in density were produced by controlled oxidation of IG-110 and NBG-18. Shear wave birefringence measurements using laser line sources in IG-110 and PCEA indicate that IG-110 behaves isotropically while PCEA displays texture characteristic of transversely isotropic materials.

  4. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  5. Effects of specimen size on the flexural strength and Weibull modulus of nuclear graphite IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Changes in flexural strength and Weibull modulus due to specimen size were investigated for three nuclear graphite grades, IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA, using four-point-1/3 point (4-1/3) loading with specimens of three different sizes: 3.18 (Thickness) × 6.35 (Width) × 50.8 (Length), 6.50 (T) × 12.0 (W) × 52.0 (L), 18.0 (T) × 16.0 (W) × 64 (L) (mm) (total: 210 specimens). Results showed some specimen size effects were grade dependent: While NBG-18 (a) showed rather significant specimen size effects (37% difference between the 3 T and 18 T), the differences in IG-110 and PCEA were 7.6-15%. The maximum differences in flexural strength due to specimen size were larger in the PCEA and NBG-18 having larger sized coke particles (medium grain size: >300 μm) than the IG-110 with super fine coke particle size (25 μm). The Weibull modulus showed a data population dependency, in that it decreased with increasing numbers of data used for modulus determination. A good correlation between the fracture surface roughness and the flexural strength was confirmed.

  6. Effects of specimen size on the flexural strength and Weibull modulus of nuclear graphite IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se-Hwan, E-mail: shchi@kaeri.re.kr

    2015-09-15

    Changes in flexural strength and Weibull modulus due to specimen size were investigated for three nuclear graphite grades, IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA, using four-point-1/3 point (4-1/3) loading with specimens of three different sizes: 3.18 (Thickness) × 6.35 (Width) × 50.8 (Length), 6.50 (T) × 12.0 (W) × 52.0 (L), 18.0 (T) × 16.0 (W) × 64 (L) (mm) (total: 210 specimens). Results showed some specimen size effects were grade dependent: While NBG-18 (a) showed rather significant specimen size effects (37% difference between the 3 T and 18 T), the differences in IG-110 and PCEA were 7.6–15%. The maximum differences in flexural strength due to specimen size were larger in the PCEA and NBG-18 having larger sized coke particles (medium grain size: >300 μm) than the IG-110 with super fine coke particle size (25 μm). The Weibull modulus showed a data population dependency, in that it decreased with increasing numbers of data used for modulus determination. A good correlation between the fracture surface roughness and the flexural strength was confirmed.

  7. Ultra-High-Modulus Graphite/Epoxy Conical Shell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    34,350 lb. The failure mode was localized buckling at the potted end of the specimen with localized delamination occurring within the laminate in...contain any evidence of foreign matter, fiber deterioration, discontinuity, loops, entrapped ends, fuzz balls , or excessive sizing which could cause... wrinkles , and an excessive number of splices and gaps. If, within a given roll of material, there arc areas not conforming to this specification

  8. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  9. The effect of resin toughness and modulus on compressive failure modes of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H. Thomas; Williams, Jerry G.; Sohi, Ohsen M.

    1987-01-01

    Compressive failure mechanisms in quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates were characterized for both unnotched and notched specimens and also following damage by impact. Two types of fibers (Thornel 300 and 700) and four resin systems (Narmco 5208, American Cyanamid BP907, and Union Carbide 4901/MDA and 4901/mPDA) were studied. For all material combinations, failure of unnotched specimens was initiated by kinking of fibers in the 0-degree plies. A major difference was observed, however, in the mode of failure propagation after the 0-degree ply failure. The strength of quasi-isotropic laminates in general increased with increasing resin tensile modulus. The laminates made with Thornel 700 fibers exhibited slightly lower compressive strengths than did the laminates made with Thornel 300 fibers. The notch sensitivity as measured by the hole strength was lowest for the BP907 resin and highest for the 5208 resin. For the materials studied, however, the type of fiber had no effect on the notch sensitivity.

  10. London forces in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Poperenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with terrace steps was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy with high spatial resolution. Spots with positive and negative charges were found in the vicinity of the steps. Values of the charges depended both on the microscope needle scan velocity and on its motion direction. The observed effect was theoretically explained with account of London forces that arise between the needle tip and the graphite surface. In this scheme, a terrace step works as a nanoscale diode for surface electric currents.

  11. Ancestrally high elastic modulus of gecko setal beta-keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peattie, Anne M; Majidi, Carmel; Corder, Andrew; Full, Robert J

    2007-12-22

    Typical bulk adhesives are characterized by soft, tacky materials with elastic moduli well below 1MPa. Geckos possess subdigital adhesives composed mostly of beta-keratin, a relatively stiff material. Biological adhesives like those of geckos have inspired empirical and modelling research which predicts that even stiff materials can be effective adhesives if they take on a fibrillar form. The molecular structure of beta-keratin is highly conserved across birds and reptiles, suggesting that material properties of gecko setae should be similar to that of beta-keratin previously measured in birds, but this has yet to be established. We used a resonance technique to measure elastic bending modulus in two species of gecko from disparate habitats. We found no significant difference in elastic modulus between Gekko gecko (1.6 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae) and Ptyodactylus hasselquistii (1.4 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae). If the elastic modulus of setal keratin is conserved across species, it would suggest a design constraint that must be compensated for structurally, and possibly explain the remarkable variation in gecko adhesive morphology.

  12. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  13. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  14. Specimen size effects on the compressive strength and Weibull modulus of nuclear graphite of different coke particle size: IG-110 and NBG-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan

    2013-05-01

    The effects of specimen size on the compressive strength and Weibull modulus were investigated for nuclear graphite of different coke particle sizes: IG-110 and NBG-18 (average coke particle size for IG-110: 25 μm, NBG-18: 300 μm). Two types of cylindrical specimens, i.e., where the diameter to length ratio was 1:2 (ASTM C 695-91 type specimen, 1:2 specimen) or 1:1 (1:1 specimen), were prepared for six diameters (3, 4, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm) and tested at room temperature (compressive strain rate: 2.08 × 10-4 s-1). Anisotropy was considered during specimen preparation for NBG-18. The results showed that the effects of specimen size appeared negligible for the compressive strength, but grade-dependent for the Weibull modulus. In view of specimen miniaturization, deviations from the ASTM C 695-91 specimen size requirements require an investigation into the effects of size for the grade of graphite of interest, and the specimen size effects should be considered for Weibull modulus determination.

  15. Highly Conducting Graphite Epoxy Composite Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Weight savings as high as 80 percent could be achieved if graphite polymer composites could replace aluminum in structures such as electromagnetic interference shielding covers and grounding planes. This could result in significant cost savings, especially for the mobile electronics found in spacecraft, aircraft, automobiles, and hand-held consumer electronics. However, such composites had not yet been fabricated with conductivity sufficient to enable these applications. To address this lack, a partnership of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Manchester College, and Applied Sciences, Inc., fabricated nonmetallic composites with unprecedented electrical conductivity. For these composites, heat-treated, vapor-grown graphite fibers were selected which have a resistivity of about 80 mW-cm, more than 20 times more conductive than typical carbon fibers. These fibers were then intercalated with iodine bromide (IBr). Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules between the carbon planes of the graphite fibers. Since the carbon planes are not highly distorted in the process, intercalation has little effect on mechanical and thermal properties. Intercalation does, however, lower the carbon fiber resistivity to less than 10 mW-cm, which is comparable to that of metal fibers. Scaleup of the reaction was required since the initial intercalation experiments would be carried out on 20-mg quantities of fibers, and tens of grams of intercalated fibers would be needed to fabricate even small demonstration composites. The reaction was first optimized through a time and temperature study that yielded fibers with a resistivity of 8.7 2 mW-cm when exposed to IBr vapor at 114 C for 24 hours. Stability studies indicated that the intercalated fibers rapidly lost their conductivity when exposed to temperatures as low as 40 C in air. They were not, however, susceptible to degradation by water vapor in the manner of most graphite intercalation compounds. The 1000-fold scaleup

  16. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghee; Lombardo, Antonio; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kono, Junichiro; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Smirnov, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to electron-phonon coupling in graphene. In particular, significant re-normalization and broadening of long-wavelength optical phonons are predicted to occur through resonant interaction with Landau-quantized Dirac fermions. We report here on a high-field magneto-Raman spectroscopy study of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and natural graphite at temperatures down to 5 K and in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The E2 g graphite phonon line exhibits anticrossing-like behavior at approximately 30 T, which we attribute to the magneto-phonon resonance (MPR) of graphite's massless holes at the H-point. Additionally, we observed features related to inter-Landau-level transitions at the K-point of graphite. We also observed weak graphene-like signatures of MPR, indicating the existence of graphene flakes on the graphite surface.

  17. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete Modified with Different Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate comprehensive performance of high modulus asphalt concrete (HMAC and propose common values for establishing evaluation system. Three gradations with different modifiers were conducted to study the high and low temperature performance, shearing behavior, and water stability. The laboratory tests for HMAC included static and dynamic modulus tests, rutting test, uniaxial penetration test, bending test, and immersion Marshall test. Dynamic modulus test results showed that modifier can improve the static modulus and the improvements were remarkable at higher temperature. Moreover, modulus of HMAC-20 was better than those of HMAC-16 and HMAC-25. The results of performance test indicated that HMAC has good performance to resist high temperature rutting, and the resistances of the HMAC-20 and HMAC-25 against rutting were better than that of HMAC-16. Then, the common values of dynamic stability were recommended. Furthermore, common values of HMAC performance were established based on pavement performance tests.

  18. A highly aromatic and sulfonated ionomer for high elastic modulus ionic polymer membrane micro-actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Gokhan; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ran; Yoonessi, Mitra; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-05-01

    A high modulus, sulfonated ionomer synthesized from 4,6-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N,N-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine and 4,4‧-biphenol with bis(4-fluorophenyl)sulfone (DPA-PS:BP) is investigated for ionic polymer actuators. The uniqueness of DPA-PS:BP is that it can have a high ionic liquid (IL) uptake and consequently generates a high intrinsic strain response, which is >1.1% under 1.6 V while maintaining a high elastic modulus (i.e. 600 MPa for 65 vol% IL uptake). Moreover, such a high modulus of the active ionomer, originating from the highly aromatic backbone and side-chain-free structure, allows for the fabrication of free-standing thin film micro-actuators (down to 5 µm thickness) via the solution cast method and focused-ion-beam milling, which exhibits a much higher bending actuation, i.e. 43 µm tip displacement and 180 kPa blocking stress for a 200 µm long and 5 µm thick cantilever actuator, compared with the ionic actuators based on traditional ionomers such as Nafion, which has a much lower elastic modulus (50 MPa) and actuation strain.

  19. TENSILE DEFORMATION OF HIGH-STRENGTH AND HIGH MODULUS POLYETHYLENE FIBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERFF, H; PENNINGS, AJ

    The influence of tensile deformation on gel-spun and hot-drawn ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fibers has been investigated. In high modulus polyethylene fibers no deformation energy is used to break chemical bonds during deformation, and flow is predominantly present next to elastic

  20. Exfoliation approach for preparing high conductive reduced graphite oxide and its application in natural rubber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipatkrut, Pattharaporn [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Poompradub, Sirilux, E-mail: sirilux.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center for Petroleum, Petrochemical and Advanced Material, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite waste was exfoliated by oxidation and chemical and thermal reduction. • The obtained graphene-T was a single layer sheet with a high electrical conductivity. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5 phr improved the electrical conductivity of NR. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5–25 phr improved the mechanical properties of NR. - Abstract: High conductivity reduced graphite oxide (RGO) was prepared by exfoliation of graphite waste from the metal smelting industry. To improve the surface properties of the RGO, the graphite oxide obtained based on Hummers’ method was reduced by L-ascorbic acid to give RGOV, which was then subjected to thermal reduction to obtain RGOT. The residual oxygen-containing groups in RGOV were almost completely removed by the thermal reduction and the conjugated graphene networks were restored in RGOT. The effect of the RGOT content in natural rubber (NR) on the cure, electrical and mechanical properties of the NR-RGOT (NG) composites was evaluated. The electrical conductivity of NR was increased by the inclusion of RGOT at a percolation threshold of 5 phr, with an electrical conductivity of 8.71 × 10{sup −6} S/m. The mechanical properties, i.e., the modulus, tensile strength and hardness, of NG were comparable with those of conductive carbon black filled NR ones.

  1. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  2. Study of high resistance inorganic coatings on graphite fibers. [for graphite-epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, F. S.; Veltri, R. D.; Scola, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings made of boron, silicon carbide, silica, and silica-like materials were studied to determine their ability to increase resistance of graphite fibers. The most promising results were attained by chemical vapor depositing silicon carbide on graphite fiber followed by oxidation, and drawing graphite fiber through ethyl silicate followed by appropriate heat treatments. In the silicon carbide coating studies, no degradation of the graphite fibers was observed and resistance values as high as three orders of magnitude higher than that of the uncoated fiber was attained. The strength of a composite fabricated from the coated fiber had a strength which compared favorably with those of composites prepared from uncoated fiber. For the silica-like coated fiber prepared by drawing the graphite fiber through an ethyl silicate solution followed by heating, coated fiber resistances about an order of magnitude greater than that of the uncoated fiber were attained. Composites prepared using these fibers had flexural strengths comparable with those prepared using uncoated fibers, but the shear strengths were lower.

  3. Specific heat of pristine and brominated graphite fibers, composites and HOPG. [Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Maciag, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to obtain specific heat values of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers and brominated P-100/epoxy composite as well as pristine and brominated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for comparison. Based on the experimental results obtained, specific heat values are calculated for several different temperatures, with a standard deviation estimated at 1.4 percent of the average values. The data presented here are useful in designing heat transfer devices (such as airplane de-icing heaters) from bromine fibers.

  4. Simulation of Permanent Deformation in High-Modulus Asphalt Pavement with Sloped and Horizontally Curved Alignment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulian Zheng; Lili Han; Chongtao Wang; Zhanlei Xu; Hongyin Li; Qinglei Ma

    2017-01-01

    .... Based on the creep test, the Prony series representation of Burgers model parameters for different asphalt mixtures were obtained and used in the deformation simulation of a high-modulus asphalt...

  5. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  6. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  7. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted.

  8. Low modulus biomimetic microgel particles with high loading of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E; Luft, J Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2012-09-10

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates) technique. Low cross-linking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained without a significant effect on particle stability and shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen, as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with a Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood.

  9. Full deflection profile calculation and Young’s modulus optimisation for engineered high performance materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, A.; Pullen, A. D.; Latham, J. P.; Bowen, J.; Carlsson, M.; Stitt, E. H.; Marigo, M.

    2017-04-01

    New engineered materials have critical applications in different fields in medicine, engineering and technology but their enhanced mechanical performances are significantly affected by the microstructural design and the sintering process used in their manufacture. This work introduces (i) a methodology for the calculation of the full deflection profile from video recordings of bending tests, (ii) an optimisation algorithm for the characterisation of Young’s modulus, (iii) a quantification of the effects of optical distortions and (iv) a comparison with other standard tests. The results presented in this paper show the capabilities of this procedure to evaluate the Young’s modulus of highly stiff materials with greater accuracy than previously possible with bending tests, by employing all the available information from the video recording of the tests. This methodology extends to this class of materials the possibility to evaluate both the elastic modulus and the tensile strength with a single mechanical test, without the need for other experimental tools.

  10. Effects of SBS Configuration on Performance of High Modulus Bitumen Based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High modulus bitumens modified by polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS with different molecular structure were investigated on dynamic shear rheometer and fluorescence microscopy to evaluate viscoelastic properties and morphology of binders. The results shows that storage modulus (G’ is obviously less than loss modulus (G”, which means viscous behaviour of bitumen is dominant, and anti-rutting factor (G* ⁄ sin δ is markedly enhanced by star SBS than by linear SBS. The morphology indicated that star SBS improved the softening point more obviously, tending to form a cross-linked network in bitumen. As for linear SBS, it is dispersed in bitumen in the form of globules and enhances the ductility of binder.

  11. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  12. High modulus asphalt (EME) technology transfer to South Africa and Australia: shared experiences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes experiences with the implementation of French enrobés à module élevé (EME) (high modulus asphalt) technology in South Africa and Australia. Tentative performance specifications for EME mixes were set in the two countries based...

  13. Highly conductive bridges between graphite spheres to improve the cycle performance of a graphite anode in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Umeno, Tatsuo; Mizuma, Koutarou [Research Center, Mitsui Mining Co. Ltd., Hibiki-machi 1-3, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu 808-0021 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-01-10

    Spherical carbon-coated natural graphite (SCCNG) is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries, but the smooth surface of graphite spheres is difficult to wet with an aqueous binder solution, and lacks electrical contacts. As a result, the cycle performance of such a graphite anode material is not satisfactory. An effective method has been introduced to tightly connect adjacent SCCNG particles by a highly conductive binder, viz. acetylene black bridges. The effect of the conductive bridges on the cyclability of SCCNG electrode has been investigated. (author)

  14. Fast, High Resolution, and Wide Modulus Range Nanomechanical Mapping with Bimodal Tapping Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Meinhold, Waiman; Revenko, Irène; Proksch, Roger

    2017-10-24

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), also known as amplitude modulated (AM) or AC mode, is a proven, reliable, and gentle imaging mode with widespread applications. Over the several decades that tapping mode has been in use, quantification of tip-sample mechanical properties such as stiffness has remained elusive. Bimodal tapping mode keeps the advantages of single-frequency tapping mode while extending the technique by driving and measuring an additional resonant mode of the cantilever. The simultaneously measured observables of this additional resonance provide the additional information necessary to extract quantitative nanomechanical information about the tip-sample mechanics. Specifically, driving the higher cantilever resonance in a frequency modulated (FM) mode allows direct measurement of the tip-sample interaction stiffness and, with appropriate modeling, the set point-independent local elastic modulus. Here we discuss the advantages of bimodal tapping, coined AM-FM imaging, for modulus mapping. Results are presented for samples over a wide modulus range, from a compliant gel (∼100 MPa) to stiff materials (∼100 GPa), with the same type of cantilever. We also show high-resolution (subnanometer) stiffness mapping of individual molecules in semicrystalline polymers and of DNA in fluid. Combined with the ability to remain quantitative even at line scan rates of nearly 40 Hz, the results demonstrate the versatility of AM-FM imaging for nanomechanical characterization in a wide range of applications.

  15. Transient Thermal Tensile Behaviour of Novel Pitch-Based Ultra-High Modulus CFRP Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pietro Terrasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultra-high modulus carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP prestressing tendon made from coal tar pitch-based carbon fibres was characterized in terms of high temperature tensile strength (up to 570 °C with a series of transient thermal and steady state temperature tensile tests. Digital image correlation was used to capture the high temperature strain development during thermal and mechanical loading. Complementary thermogravimetric (TGA and dynamic mechanical thermal (DMTA experiments were performed on the tendons to elucidate their high temperature thermal and mechanical behaviour. The novel CFRP tendons investigated in the present study showed an ambient temperature design tensile strength of 1400 MPa. Their failure temperature at a sustained prestress level of 50% of the design tensile strength was 409 °C, which is higher than the failure temperature of most fibre reinforced polymer rebars used in civil engineering applications at similar utilisation levels. This high-temperature tensile strength shows that there is potential to use the novel high modulus CFRP tendons in CFRP pretensioned concrete elements for building applications that fulfill the fire resistance criteria typically applied within the construction industry.

  16. The thermal conductivity of high modulus Zylon fibers between 400 mK and 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikus, Patrick; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectalí; Hertel, Scott A.; Leman, Steven W.; McCarthy, Kevin A.; Rutherford, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Zylon is a synthetic polyurethane polymer fiber featuring very high mechanical strength. Measurements of the thermal conductivity λZ(T) of high modulus Zylon fibers at temperatures between 400 mK and 4 K were performed to assess if they can be successfully employed in the design of high performance suspension systems for cold stages of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. The linear mass density of the yarn used in these measurements amounts to 3270 dtex, which is also a measure for the yarn's cross section. The experimental data for the thermal conductivity was fitted to a function of the form λZ=(1010±30)·TpWmmdtexK. This result was normalized to the breaking strength of the fibers and compared with Kevlar. It shows that Kevlar outperforms Zylon in the investigated temperature range. At 1.5 K, the thermal conductivity integral of Zylon yarn is twice as high as the thermal conductivity integral of Kevlar yarn with the same breaking strength. A linear mass density of 1 tex is equivalent to a yarn mass of 1 g/km. High modulus Zylon has a density of 1.56 g/cm 3.

  17. Microstructures, textures and geothermometry of graphitic carbon in low- to high-grade mylonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Lv, Meixia; Li, Junyu; Dong, Yanlong

    2017-04-01

    Graphitization differs from most mineral transformations occurring during diagenesis and metamorphism in that is an irreversible process. Graphitic carbon exhibits a large range of structures and chemical compositions, ranging from amorphous-like compounds (e.g. soot, low-grade coal), through a myriad of turbostratic structures (e.g. carbonaceous materials in metamorphic rocks), to rather rare crystalline flaky graphite. Graphitic material has a number of properties and the most significant one is the structural change of the graphitic materials with increase of temperature in the fault zones as well as in very low-grade to high-grade metamorphic terrains. During metamorphic processes, organic matter is progressively transformed into graphite and the degree of maturation or graphitization of graphitic materials is a potential tool, therefore, considered as a reliable indicator of peak conditions of the metamorphic grade in metamorphic petrology. In mylonites and brittle fault zones, graphitic material is rheologically very weak, a phenomenon, which results in shear concentration along zones rich in graphitic material. The characteristics and metamorphic peak conditions of graphitic material-bearing mylonites from fault zones are studied using optical microscopy, SEM, Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Raman microspectroscopy and carbon isotopic analysis. The graphite grains are distributed parallel to the mylonitic foliation and present coarse to very fine-grained microstructures. The deformation includes dislocation glide. The deformed graphite lattice-preferred orientation by EBSD measured records presents intracrystalline slip system, which is easy in the direction of the -axes and, in fact, nearly in any direction within the basal planes. The thermometry of graphitic material by Raman spectroscopy was calibrated for the temperature range from 360 to 650 °C. These structural analyses of graphitic material in mylonitic rocks allow unraveling the

  18. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  19. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  20. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2014-04-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

  1. (HBCU) Doped Graphene and Graphite as a Potential High Temperature Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0420 (HBCU) DOPED GRAPHENE AND GRAPHITE AS A POTENTIAL HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTOR Grover L. Larkins Jr...NUMBER (Include area code) Final Performance Report for FA9550-10-1-0134 to: Dr. Harold Weinstock (HBCU) DOPED GRAPHENE AND GRAPHITE AS A...23 July 2013 I. Results on doped Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite: In our first year we observed possible superconductivity using

  2. The mid-infrared biconical reflectance of thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the biconical reflectance of pyrolytic graphite in the spectral region between 4000 and 600/cm. The measurements are conducted with an FTIR spctrometer with the beam focused to a 1-mm-diam focal point on the sample surface. The highly oriented pyrolytic graphite has a high biconical reflectance as compared to other graphitic materials and does not cause significant beam scattering.

  3. Background data for modulus mapping high-performance polyethylene fiber morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth E. Strawhecker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data included here provides a basis for understanding “Interior morphology of high-performance polyethylene fibers revealed by modulus mapping” (K.E. Strawhecker, E.J. Sandoz-Rosado, T.A. Stockdale, E.D. Laird, 2016 [1], in specific: the multi-frequency (AMFM atomic force microscopy technique and its application to ultra-high-molecular-weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE fibers. Furthermore, the data suggests why the Hertzian contact mechanics model can be used within the framework of AMFM theory, simple harmonic oscillator theory, and contact mechanics. The framework is first laid out followed by data showing cantilever dynamics, force-distance spectra in AC mode, and force-distance in contact mode using Polystyrene reference and UHMWPE. Finally topography and frequency shift (stiffness maps are presented to show the cases where elastic versus plastic deformation may have occurred.

  4. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  5. High efficiency of CO2-activated graphite felt as electrode for vanadium redox flow battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Chen, Jian-Yu; Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Lin, Guan-Yi; Hsu, Ning-Yih; Chou, Yi-Sin; Wei, Hwa-Jou; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-10-01

    A simple method for preparing CO2-activated graphite felt as an electrode in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was employed by the direct treatment in a CO2 atmosphere at a high temperature for a short period. The CO2-activated graphite felt demonstrates excellent electrochemical activity and reversibility. The VRFB using the CO2-activated graphite felts in the electrodes has coulombic, voltage, and energy efficiencies of 94.52%, 88.97%, and 84.15%, respectively, which is much higher than VRFBs using the electrodes of untreated graphite felt and N2-activated graphite felt. The efficiency enhancement was attributed to the higher number of oxygen-containing functional groups on the graphite felt that are formed during the CO2-activation, leading to improving the electrochemical behaviour of the resultant VRFB.

  6. Deuterium retention in graphite exposed to high flux plasma at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusinov, A., E-mail: rusinov.aleksandr@gmail.com [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Trifonov, N.; Gasparyan, Yu. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Khripunov, B., E-mail: boris@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Academic Kurchatov sq., 1, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayer, M.; Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstr.2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pisarev, A. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-01

    Deuterium trapping in graphite under high flux plasma exposure at high temperatures was studied. A target of MPG-8 fine grain graphite was exposed to plasma beam in LENTA device at zero potential. The average ion flux was of about 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} s with a maximum in the center. The temperature was 1473 K in the center and 873 K outside the beam spot. After irradiation, the target was sectioned along and across the surface and studied by SEM, NRA, and TDS. Deuterium profiles measured by NRA showed a peak close to the surface and long tails in the bulk. TDS of samples taken for the front and back sides of the target were very similar. It is suggested, that D retention at the plasma irradiation is mainly controlled by trapping from the gas phase, locally created in the graphite pores by plasma ions injection and subsequent flow of gas to the back side through internal porosity.

  7. Graphene/graphite sheet assisted growth of high-areal-density horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huanhuan; Zhang, Rufan; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Wenlin; Jian, Muqiang; Wang, Chunya; Wang, Qi; Wei, Fei

    2014-10-04

    We report a facile graphene/graphite sheet assisted CVD process for the synthesis of high-areal-density HACNT arrays. Besides, some metal nanoparticles could eat the graphene/graphite sheets, forming serpentine holes on the sheets in the early stage, and finally leading to the precipitation of CNTs without an additional carbon source.

  8. The Origin of High Thermal Conductivity and Ultralow Thermal Expansion in Copper-Graphite Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkowska, Izabela; Boden, André; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2015-07-08

    We developed a nanocomposite with highly aligned graphite platelets in a copper matrix. Spark plasma sintering ensured an excellent copper-graphite interface for transmitting heat and stress. The resulting composite has superior thermal conductivity (500 W m(-1) K(-1), 140% of copper), which is in excellent agreement with modeling based on the effective medium approximation. The thermal expansion perpendicular to the graphite platelets drops dramatically from ∼20 ppm K(-1) for graphite and copper separately to 2 ppm K(-1) for the combined structure. We show that this originates from the layered, highly anisotropic structure of graphite combined with residual stress under ambient conditions, that is, strain-engineering of the thermal expansion. Combining excellent thermal conductivity with ultralow thermal expansion results in ideal materials for heat sinks and other devices for thermal management.

  9. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Origin of high strength, low modulus superelasticity in nanowire-shape memory alloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Fan, Xueling; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun

    2017-04-01

    An open question is the underlying mechanisms for a recent discovered nanocomposite, which composed of shape memory alloy (SMA) matrix with embedded metallic nanowires (NWs), demonstrating novel mechanical properties, such as large quasi-linear elastic strain, low Young’s modulus and high yield strength. We use finite element simulations to investigate the interplay between the superelasticity of SMA matrix and the elastic-plastic deformation of embedded NWs. Our results show that stress transfer plays a dominated role in determining the quasi-linear behavior of the nanocomposite. The corresponding microstructure evolution indicate that the transfer is due to the coupling between plastic deformation within the NWs and martensitic transformation in the matrix, i.e., the martensitic transformation of the SMA matrix promotes local plastic deformation nearby, and the high plastic strain region of NWs retains considerable martensite in the surrounding SMA matrix, thus facilitating continues martensitic transformation in subsequent loading. Based on these findings, we propose a general criterion for achieving quasi-linear elasticity.

  11. High Bulk Modulus of Ionic Liquid and Effects on Performance of Hydraulic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Kambic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years ionic liquids have gained in importance, causing a growing number of scientists and engineers to investigate possible applications for these liquids because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Their outstanding advantages such as nonflammable liquid within a broad liquid range, high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stabilities, low solubility for gases, attractive tribological properties (lubrication, and very low compressibility, and so forth, make them more interesting for applications in mechanical engineering, offering great potential for new innovative processes, and also as a novel hydraulic fluid. This paper focuses on the outstanding compressibility properties of ionic liquid EMIM-EtSO4, a very important physical chemically property when IL is used as a hydraulic fluid. This very low compressibility (respectively, very high Bulk modulus, compared to the classical hydraulic mineral oils or the non-flammable HFDU type of hydraulic fluids, opens up new possibilities regarding its usage within hydraulic systems with increased dynamics, respectively, systems’ dynamic responses.

  12. Fatigue Life Prediction of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete Based on the Local Stress-Strain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulian Zheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously published studies have proposed fatigue life prediction models for dense graded asphalt pavement based on flexural fatigue test. This study focused on the fatigue life prediction of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete (HMAC pavement using the local strain-stress method and direct tension fatigue test. First, the direct tension fatigue test at various strain levels was conducted on HMAC prism samples cut from plate specimens. Afterwards, their true stress-strain loop curves were obtained and modified to develop the strain-fatigue life equation. Then the nominal strain of HMAC course determined using finite element method was converted into local strain using the Neuber method. Finally, based on the established fatigue equation and converted local strain, a method to predict the pavement fatigue crack initiation life was proposed and the fatigue life of a typical HMAC overlay pavement which runs a risk of bottom-up cracking was predicted and validated. Results show that the proposed method was able to produce satisfactory crack initiation life.

  13. Improving the Transparency of Ultra-Drawn Melt-Crystallized Polyethylenes: Toward High-Modulus/High-Strength Window Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lihua; Nickmans, Koen; Severn, John; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-13

    Highly transparent, ultradrawn high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films were successfully prepared using compression molding and solid-state drawing techniques. The low optical transmittance (HDPE films can be drastically improved (>90%) by incorporating a small amount (>1 wt %/wt) of specific additives to HDPE materials prior to drawing. It is shown that additives with relatively high refractive index result in an increased optical transmittance in the visible light wavelength which illustrates that the improvement in optical characteristics probably originates from refractive index matching between the crystalline and noncrystalline regions in the drawn films. Moreover, the optically transparent drawn HDPE films containing additives maintain their physical and mechanical properties, especially their high modulus and high strength, which make these films potentially useful in a variety of applications, such as high-impact windows.

  14. Microhardness and Young's modulus of high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappia, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Technische Universität München, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Pizzocri, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, 20156, Milano (Italy); Marchetti, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Université Montpellier 2, Institut d’Electronique du Sud UMR CNRS 5214, 34095, Montpellier (France); Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzzi, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, 20156, Milano (Italy); Papaioannou, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Macián-Juan, R. [Technische Universität München, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Rondinella, V.V., E-mail: Vincenzo.RONDINELLA@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Vickers microhardness (HV{sub 0.1}) and Young's modulus (E) measurements of LWR UO{sub 2} fuel at burn-up ≥60 GWd/tHM are presented. Their ratio HV{sub 0.1}/E was found constant in the range 60–110 GWd/tHM. From the ratio and the microhardness values vs porosity, the Young's modulus dependence on porosity was derived and extended to the full radial profile, including the high burn-up structure (HBS). The dependence is well represented by a linear correlation. The data were compared to fuel performance codes correlations. A burn-up dependent factor was introduced in the Young's modulus expression. The modifications extend the experimental validation range of the TRANSURANUS correlation from un-irradiated to irradiated UO{sub 2} and up to 20% porosity. First simulations of LWR fuel rod irradiations were performed in order to illustrate the impact on fuel performance. In the specific cases selected, the simulations suggest a limited effect of the Young's modulus decrease due to burn-up on integral fuel performance. - Highlights: • Vickers microhardness and Young's modulus data of high burnup fuels are presented. • The data are compared to fuel performance codes' correlations. • A burn-up dependent factor is introduced for the Young's modulus of irradiated fuel. • The modification extends ranges of experimental validation of the code correlation. • The new burn-up dependent factor has limited effect on integral fuel performance.

  15. A new biomedical polyurethane with a high modulus based on 1,4-butanediisocyanate and epsilon-caprolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, CJ; De Groot, JH; Belgraver, VW; Pennings, AJ

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to the synthesis of biomedical polyurethanes based on epsilon-caprolactone and 1,4-butanediisocyanate with a high modulus, has been developed. By chain extending an epsilon-caprolactone prepolymer with a long uniform-size diisocyanate block, a segmented polyurethane with uniform-size

  16. Long-term pavement performance monitoring and the revision of performance criteria for high modulus asphalt in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Komba, Julius

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Enrobé à Module Élevé (EME) technology, a High Modulus Asphalt (HiMA), was originally developed in France. The technology is primarily suitable for construction of heavily trafficked routes, airports and container terminals. The key performance...

  17. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao, E-mail: yumiao@cqu.edu.cn; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi [Key Lab for Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  18. Evaluation of the use of polymer modified bitumen in the production of high modulus asphalt for heavily-trafficked roads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Komba, Julius J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enrobé à Module Élevé (EME) technology, a High Modulus Asphalt (HiMA), has been introduced to South Africa to provide an optimum solution for the design and construction of heavily trafficked roads. Implementation of EME technology in South Africa...

  19. A Fluorinated Ether Electrolyte Enabled High Performance Prelithiated Graphite/Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuru; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Yi, Ran; Song, Jiangxuan; Wang, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    Lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries have attracted great attention as a promising energy storage technology, but so far their practical applications are greatly hindered by issues of polysulfide shuttling and unstable lithium/electrolyte interface. To address these issues, a feasible strategy is to construct a rechargeable prelithiated graphite/sulfur batteries. In this work, a fluorinated ether of bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) ether (BTFE) was reported to blend with 1,3-dioxolane (DOL) for making a multifunctional electrolyte of 1.0 M LiTFSI DOL/BTFE (1:1, v/v) to enable high performance prelithiated graphite/S batteries. First, the electrolyte significantly reduces polysulfide solubility to suppress the deleterious polysulfide shuttling and thus improves capacity retention of sulfur cathodes. Second, thanks to the low viscosity and good wettability, the fluorinated electrolyte dramatically enhances the reaction kinetics and sulfur utilization of high-areal-loading sulfur cathodes. More importantly, this electrolyte forms a stable solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer on graphite surface and thus enables remarkable cyclability of graphite anodes. By coupling prelithiated graphite anodes with sulfur cathodes with high areal capacity of ∼3 mAh cm-2, we demonstrate prelithiated graphite/sulfur batteries that show high sulfur-specific capacity of ∼1000 mAh g-1 and an excellent capacity retention of >65% after 450 cycles at C/10.

  20. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  1. Young modulus variation of a brickwork masonry element submitted to high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciá, M. E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the thermal behavior of the masonry elements submitted to high temperatures we need to know the variation of their thermal properties with regard to the temperature. Submitted to high temperatures clay brick masonry presents thermomechanical effects (as the variation of Young's modulus, the thermal expansion of the unit and the mortar, spalling, losses of resistance … as well as variation of the properties of the material as result of its degradation. In this article the variation of the module of elasticity of the unit and the mortar is described with regard to high temperatures according to the state of the knowledge. In this article is also exposed the results obtained from the experimental program carried out on elements of clay brick masonry submitted to high temperatures in order to observe the variation of Young's module related to temperature.

    La definición del comportamiento térmico de los elementos de fábrica sometidos a la acción del fuego requiere del conocimiento de la variación de sus propiedades termomecánicas con respecto a la temperatura. Ante las altas temperaturas la fábrica cerámica presenta efectos termomecánicos, como la variación del módulo de Young entre otros, así como la variación de las propiedades del material debidas a la degradación del mismo. En este artículo se describe la variación del módulo de elasticidad de la pieza y el mortero con respecto a altas temperaturas según el estado del conocimiento y se exponen los resultados obtenidos del programa experimental llevado a cabo sobre elementos de fábrica sometidos a altas temperaturas con el fin de observar la variación del módulo de Young con respecto a la temperatura.

  2. From spent graphite to amorphous sp2+sp3 carbon-coated sp2 graphite for high-performance lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Zhuang, Yuchan; Deng, Yaoming; Song, Xiaona; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Xiao, Xin; Nan, Junmin

    2018-02-01

    Today, with the massive application of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in the portable devices and electric vehicles, to supply the active materials with high-performances and then to recycle their wastes are two core issues for the development of LIBs. In this paper, the spent graphite (SG) in LIBs is used as raw materials to fabricate two comparative high-capacity graphite anode materials. Based on a microsurgery-like physical reconstruction, the reconstructed graphite (RG) with a sp2+sp3 carbon surface is prepared through a microwave exfoliation and subsequent spray drying process. In contrast, the neural-network-like amorphous sp2+sp3 carbon-coated graphite (AC@G) is synthesized using a self-reconfigurable chemical reaction strategy. Compared with SG and commercial graphite (CG), both RG and AC@G have enhanced specific capacities, from 311.2 mAh g-1 and 360.7 mAh g-1 to 409.7 mAh g-1 and 420.0 mAh g-1, at 0.1C after 100 cycles. In addition, they exhibit comparable cycling stability, rate capability, and voltage plateau with CG. Because the synthesis of RG and AC@G represents two typical physical and chemical methods for the recycling of SG, these results on the sp2+sp3 carbon layer coating bulk graphite also reveal an approach for the preparation of high-performance graphite anode materials derived from SG.

  3. Effect of friction on oxidative graphite intercalation and high-quality graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Steffen; Halbig, Christian E; Grote, Fabian; Rietsch, Philipp; Börrnert, Felix; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Bernd; Eigler, Siegfried

    2018-02-26

    Oxidative wet-chemical delamination of graphene from graphite is expected to become a scalable production method. However, the formation process of the intermediate stage-1 graphite sulfate by sulfuric acid intercalation and its subsequent oxidation are poorly understood and lattice defect formation must be avoided. Here, we demonstrate film formation of micrometer-sized graphene flakes with lattice defects down to 0.02% and visualize the carbon lattice by transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. Interestingly, we find that only well-ordered, highly crystalline graphite delaminates into oxo-functionalized graphene, whereas other graphite grades do not form a proper stage-1 intercalate and revert back to graphite upon hydrolysis. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that ideal stacking and electronic oxidation of the graphite layers significantly reduce the friction of the moving sulfuric acid molecules, thereby facilitating intercalation. Furthermore, the evaluation of the stability of oxo-species in graphite sulfate supports an oxidation mechanism that obviates intercalation of the oxidant.

  4. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study; Nouveaux materiaux graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature. Etude des proprietes de changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J

    2007-07-15

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage ({>=}200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed ({approx} 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect ({approx} 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  5. High speed turning of compacted graphite iron using controlled modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalbaum, Tyler Paul

    Compacted graphite iron (CGI) is a material which emerged as a candidate material to replace cast iron (CI) in the automotive industry for engine block castings. Its thermal and mechanical properties allow the CGI-based engines to operate at higher cylinder pressures and temperatures than CI-based engines, allowing for lower fuel emissions and increased fuel economy. However, these same properties together with the thermomechanical wear mode in the CGI-CBN system result in poor machinability and inhibit CGI from seeing wide spread use in the automotive industry. In industry, machining of CGI is done only at low speeds, less than V = 200 m/min, to avoid encountering rapid wear of the cutting tools during cutting. Studies have suggested intermittent cutting operations such as milling suffer less severe tool wear than continuous cutting. Furthermore, evidence that a hard sulfide layer which forms over the cutting edge in machining CI at high speeds is absent during machining CGI is a major factor in the difference in machinability of these material systems. The present study addresses both of these issues by modification to the conventional machining process to allow intermittent continuous cutting. The application of controlled modulation superimposed onto the cutting process -- modulation-assisted machining (MAM) -- is shown to be quite effective in reducing the wear of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools when machining CGI at high machining speeds (> 500 m/min). The tool life is at least 20 times greater than found in conventional machining of CGI. This significant reduction in wear is a consequence of reduction in the severity of the tool-work contact conditions with MAM. The propensity for thermochemical wear of CBN is thus reduced. It is found that higher cutting speed (> 700 m/min) leads to lower tool wear with MAM. The MAM configuration employing feed-direction modulation appears feasible for implementation at high speeds and offers a solution to this challenging

  6. High-Thermal-Conductivity Densified Graphitic Foams as Novel Bearing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The high-thermal-conductivity graphitic foams (foam-reinforced carbon-carbon composites) developed at ORNL have been mainly used for thermal management, as in heat sinks for electronic circuit boards and highly-efficient automotive radiators. However, recent studies in our laboratory have rather unexpectedly revealed their potential as novel bearing materials. In addition to their low density and potential for weight savings, there are three primary tribological advantages of the graphitic foam materials: (1) their graphitic structures provide self-lubricating qualities, (2) their extraordinarily high thermal conductivity aids in the efficient removal of frictionally-generated heat, and (3) the pores in the foam serve both as wear debris traps and lubricant reservoirs. Previous studies on the densified graphitic foam (DGF) sliding against steel and alumina at relatively low speed (1 m/s) and low load (10 N), revealed their encouraging self-lubricating behavior, comparable to solid graphite while much better than bronze and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{trademark}). In this study, pin-on-disk tests with higher speeds (2, 6, and 10 m/s) and higher loads (322 N) were conducted on DGF and graphite disks sliding against a DGF pin. The surface temperature on the graphite disk increased rapidly due to frictional heating and the friction coefficient increased proportionally with surface temperature when it was higher than 40 C. The DGF disk, however, ran much cooler due to the higher thermal conductivity, and more impressively, the friction coefficient remained low and constant even at elevated disk temperatures. This suggests high potential for the graphitic foam material in weight-sensitive, high-speed, and elevated temperature bearing applications.

  7. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermisoglou, E.C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Lei, C.; Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide via microwave irradiation. • Effect of pristine graphite (type, flake size) on the microwave expanded material. • Effect of pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the produced expanded material. • Expanded graphene materials with high BET surface areas (940 m{sup 2}/g–2490 m{sup 2}/g). • Non-activated graphene based materials suitable for supercapacitors. - Abstract: Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m{sup 2}/g to 2490 m{sup 2}/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  8. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, Alessandro; Tagliaferri, Vincenzo; Ucciardello, Nadia

    2017-10-25

    Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m -1 ·K -1 (+57% of copper) obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA) model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  9. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Simoncini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m−1·K−1 (+57% of copper obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  10. Brazing graphite to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  11. Assessment of dynamic modulus of high density polypropylene waste fiber reinforcement in asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan S. OTUOZE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional asphalt tests like Hveem and Marshall tests are at best mere characterization than effective test of pavement field performance because of complex viscoelastic behavior of asphalt. Mechanical properties otherwise called simple performance tests (SPT are performance criteria of asphalt. Dynamic modulus among other SPT’s like permanent deformation, fatigue cracking, thermal cracking, moisture susceptibility, shear and friction properties; determines stress-strain to time-temperature relationships that imparts on strength, service life and durability. The test followed the recommendations of NCHRP 1-37a (2004 and mixes were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% HDPP contents. The parameters tested for dynamic modulus, /E*/, are stiffness, recoverable strain (ε, and phase angle (ξ. Time – temperature superposition (TTS called master curve was fitted using sigmoidal curve to interpolate the parameters beyond measured data set so as to observe the viscoelastic behavior outside the physical properties. The performance of 0.5% HDPP asphalt is better enhanced than the conventional asphalt to improve upon strength, service and durability.

  12. Development of a Highly Portable Plate Loading Device and In Situ Modulus Measurements in Weak Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallu, Raj R.; Keffeler, Evan R.; Watters, Robert J.; Warren, Sean N.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, underground mines in Nevada are increasingly exploiting in weak mineralized zones at greater depths that are intensely fractured and highly altered. The mechanical behavior of these rock masses ranges between weak rock and very stiff soil. A common limitation for design of underground mining excavations in these types of rock masses is absence of in situ geotechnical data. This limitation is generally overcome by estimating in situ mechanical behavior from empirical relationships so that the continuum-based numerical methods can be used to evaluate ground support designs. Because of the cost, time, and specialized equipment involved, historically in situ tests have not been performed in these underground mines. Predictive rock mass modulus relationships that are currently available in the literature are derived from field testing of predominantly good-quality rock masses. Consequently, there is limited confidence in using these models for rock masses with Rock Mass Ratings less than 45. In order to overcome some of these limitations, a portable plate loading device (PPLD) was designed and fabricated. The PPLD allows one to perform low cost and relatively quick in situ deformability tests to be performed on weak rock masses in underground mines. Test procedures and data reduction methods were developed to limit potential sources of error associated with the PPLD test. A total of fourteen plate loading tests were performed in weak rock masses at two different active underground mines in Nevada, USA. The resulting the test data were compared to eight published empirical rock mass modulus relationships to determine which, if any, of these relationships are sufficiently accurate for estimating modulus in similar geotechnical conditions. Only two of these relationships were found to be sufficient for first-order estimations of in situ modulus.

  13. Field investigation of low-temperature cracking and stiffness moduli on selected roads with conventional and high modulus asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judycki, Józef; Jaczewski, Mariusz; Ryś, Dawid; Pszczoła, Marek; Jaskuła, Piotr; Glinicki, Adam

    2017-09-01

    High Modulus Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) was introduced in Poland as a one of the solutions to the problem of rutting, type of deterioration common in the 1990s. After first encouraging trials in 2002 HMAC was widely used for heavily loaded national roads and motorways. However some concerns were raised about low-temperature cracking of HMAC. This was the main reason of the studies presented in this article were started. The article presents the comparison of performance of pavements constructed in typical contract conditions with the road bases made of HMAC and conventional asphalt concrete (AC). The field investigation was focused on the number of low-temperature cracks, bearing capacity (based on FWD test) of road sections localized in coldest region of Poland. Also load transfer efficiency of selected low-temperature cracks was assessed. FWD test confirmed lower deflections of pavements with HMAC and two times higher stiffness modulus of asphalt courses in comparison to pavements constructed with conventional AC mixtures. Relation of stiffness of asphalt layers and amount of low-temperature cracks showed that the higher stiffness modulus of asphalt layers could lead to increase of the number of low-temperature cracks. FWD test results showed that the load transfer efficiency of low-temperature cracks on pavements with HMAC presents very low values, very close to lack of load transfer. It was surprising as section with HMAC road base were aged from 2 to 5 years and presented very good bearing capacity.

  14. High-pressure Synthesis and Bulk Modulus of Non-centrosymmetric Superconductor Mo3Al2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, C.; Sai, U.; Hayashi, J.; Kawamura, Y.; Bauer, E.

    2017-10-01

    Mo3Al2C is a superconductor without inversion symmetry (the transition temperature T C ∼ 9K). We have succeeded in preparing high-quality samples of Mo3Al2C using the high-pressure synthesis technique. The samples were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Furthermore, powder XRD patterns for the samples with synchrotron radiation have been studied under high pressures up to around 10 GPa and the volume versus pressure curve for the compound has been investigated. A bulk modulus was estimated to be 221 GPa.

  15. Bulk retention of deuterium in graphites exposed to deuterium plasma at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, I.I. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii; Gorodetsky, A.E. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii; Zakharov, A.P. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii; Khripunov, B.I. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC `Kurchatov Institute`, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shapkin, V.V. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC `Kurchatov Institute`, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.B. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC `Kurchatov Institute`, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pistunovich, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC `Kurchatov Institute`, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Negodaev, M.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr. 53, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bagulya, A.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr. 53, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    A highly ionized deuterium plasma with a low residual gas pressure and a high intensity D{sub 2}{sup +}-ion beam were used for the study of deuterium retention in RG-Ti-91 and POCO AXF-5Q graphites. Deuterium retention in the samples was estimated by TDS during heating to 2000 K. Mechanical removal of a surface layer 100 {mu}m thick was used to distinguish bulk and surface fractions of retained deuterium. The samples of RG-Ti and POCO graphites were exposed to a plasma with an ion flux of 3 x 10{sup 17} D/cm{sup 2}.s in the `Lenta` plasma device for 10 to 10{sup 4} s at residual deuterium pressure of 0.04 Pa at 1400 K. Under plasma exposure deuterium capture in RG-Ti graphite reached the saturation level at a fluence of 4 x 10{sup 20} D/cm{sup 2} while the bulk inventory was negligible. As for POCO graphite, deuterium retention increased with fluence and was equal to 18 appm in the bulk for a fluence of 7 x 10{sup 21} D/cm{sup 2}. The same amount of deuterium in the bulk was obtained after gas exposure of POCO at an effective pressure of 0.8 Pa (1400 K, 6 h). With this result, the tritium concentration in the plasma-facing graphite materials can reach 1500 appm or 380 grams of tritium per ton of graphite. To understand the role of ion flux in generation of effective pressure, POCO was irradiated with 16 keV D{sub 2}{sup +}-ions at 1400 K for 4 h to 8 x 10{sup 20} D/cm{sup 2} (ion flux was 6 x 10{sup 16} D/cm{sup 2}.s, residual deuterium pressure was 0.004 Pa). The results are discussed on the basis of structural differences for POCO and RG-Ti graphites. (orig.).

  16. Scalable synthesis of silicon-nanolayer-embedded graphite for high-energy lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Minseong; Chae, Sujong; Ma, Jiyoung; Kim, Namhyung; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Cui, Yi; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-09-01

    Existing anode technologies are approaching their limits, and silicon is recognized as a potential alternative due to its high specific capacity and abundance. However, to date the commercial use of silicon has not satisfied electrode calendering with limited binder content comparable to commercial graphite anodes for high energy density. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a next-generation hybrid anode using silicon-nanolayer-embedded graphite/carbon. This architecture allows compatibility between silicon and natural graphite and addresses the issues of severe side reactions caused by structural failure of crumbled graphite dust and uncombined residue of silicon particles by conventional mechanical milling. This structure shows a high first-cycle Coulombic efficiency (92%) and a rapid increase of the Coulombic efficiency to 99.5% after only 6 cycles with a capacity retention of 96% after 100 cycles, with an industrial electrode density of >1.6 g cm-3, areal capacity loading of >3.3 mAh cm-2, and <4 wt% binding materials in a slurry. As a result, a full cell using LiCoO2 has demonstrated a higher energy density (1,043 Wh l-1) than with standard commercial graphite electrodes.

  17. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  18. New family of graphite fluoroxides -- sources for the generation of highly porous, thermally expanded graphites for lithium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkin, V. N.; Yudanov, N. F.; Moukhin, V. V. [A. V. Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Rozhkov, V. V. [Joint Stock Novosibirsk Chemical Concentrates Plant Inc., Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2003-04-01

    Types and properties of graphite fluoroxide (FOG) materials are reviewed by way of comparing physical and chemical properties of a number of oxidized FOG materials, and by briefly describing their application effects in cathodic composites for the generation of novel lithium chemical sources. Physical examination results indicate that graphite fluoroxides are new oxidized graphite compounds consisting of micro and/or nano phases of graphite oxide and fluorinated graphite. They have the unique property of being excellent precursors for use in thermally expanded graphite. Used as pore-forming additives, in combination with modern electro-active materials, FOGs contribute significantly to increasing the energy carrying efficiency of cathode materials used in lithium coin cylinder cells. To date, the most promising use for porous cathodes have been found in the low-current memory protection of computers, in security signalling systems, in aero-space systems and also as implantation cells in cardio-vascular defibrillators and pace-makers. 33 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs.

  19. In situ polymerization of highly dispersed polypyrrole on reduced graphite oxide for dopamine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tao; Yu, Chenfei; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2013-12-15

    A composite consisting of reduced graphite oxide and highly dispersed polypyrrole nanospheres was synthesized by a straightforward technique, by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization. The novel polypyrrole nanospheres can prevent the aggregation of reduced graphite oxide sheets by electrostatic repulsive interaction, and enhance their electrochemical properties in the nano-molar measurement of dopamine in biological systems with a linear range of 1-8000 nM and a detection limit as low as 0.3 nM. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Secondary electron emission characteristics of ion-textured copper and high-purity isotropic graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, A. N.; Jensen, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally determined values of true secondary electron emission and relative values of reflected primary electron yield for untreated and ion textured oxygen free high conductivity copper and untreated and ion textured high purity isotropic graphite surfaces are presented for a range of primary electron beam energies and beam impingement angles. This investigation was conducted to provide information that would improve the efficiency of multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) for microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes in space communications and aircraft applications. For high efficiency, MDC electrode surfaces must have low secondary electron emission characteristics. Although copper is a commonly used material for MDC electrodes, it exhibits relatively high levels of secondary electron emission if its surface is not treated for emission control. Recent studies demonstrated that high purity isotropic graphite is a promising material for MDC electrodes, particularly with ion textured surfaces. The materials were tested at primary electron beam energies of 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to near grazing (85 deg) beam impingement angles. True secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield characteristics of the ion textured surfaces were compared with each other and with those of untreated surfaces of the same materials. Both the untreated and ion textured graphite surfaces and the ion treated copper surface exhibited sharply reduced secondary electron emission characteristics relative to those of untreated copper. The ion treated graphite surface yielded the lowest emission levels.

  1. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14Å tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2012-02-01

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 Å tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 Å tobermorite was calculated, K o = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 Å tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 Å tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 Å tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A β-type TiNbZr alloy with low modulus and high strength for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkun Meng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on the mechanical properties of a novel β-type Ti–36Nb–5Zr (wt% alloy has been investigated. The solution treated alloy consists of β and α″ phases and exhibits a two-stage yielding with a low yield stress (around 100 MPa. After cold rolling at a reduction of 87.5% and subsequent annealing treatment at 698 K for 25 min, a fine microstructure with nanosized α precipitates distributed in small β grains as well as high density of dislocations was obtained to achieve a yield strength of 720 MPa and a ultimate tensile strength of 860 MPa. In spite of the formation of α precipitates, the β-stabilizers are not enriched in the parent β matrix due to the short duration and low temperature of the thermal treatment, resulting in a low chemical stability of β phase. The low stability of β phase and the small volume fraction of α precipitates produce a low Young׳s modulus of 48 GPa. Such an excellent combination of low elastic modulus and high strength in mechanical properties indicates great potential for biomedical applications.

  3. Optimum design of swept-forward high-aspect-ration graphite-epoxy wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Campbell, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation of a swept-forward high-aspect-ratio graphite-epoxy transport wing is described. The objectives of this investigation are to illustrate an effective usage of the unique properties of composite materials by exploiting material tailoring and to demonstrate an integrated multidisciplinary approach for conducting this investigation.

  4. Reorganization of graphite surfaces into carbon micro- and nanoparticles under high flux hydrogen plasma bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; van der Vegt, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-grain graphite samples were exposed to high density low temperature (n(e) similar to 10(20)m(-3), T-e similar to 1 eV) hydrogen plasmas in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. Redeposition of eroded carbon is so strong that no external precursor gas injection is necessary for deposits to form

  5. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  6. Evaluation of cutting force and surface roughness in high-speed milling of compacted graphite iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Suhaimi Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compacted Graphite Iron, (CGI is known to have outstanding mechanical strength and weight-to-strength ratio as compared to conventional grey cast iron, (CI. The outstanding characteristics of CGI is due to its graphite particle shape, which is presented as compacted vermicular particle. The graphite is interconnected with random orientation and round edges, which results in higher mechanical strength. Whereas, graphite in the CI consists of a smooth-surfaced flakes that easily propagates cracks which results in weaker and brittle properties as compared to CGI. Owing to its improved properties, CGI is considered as the best candidate material in substituting grey cast iron that has been used in engine block applications for years. However, the smooth implementation of replacing CI with CGI has been hindered due to the poor machinability of CGI especially at high cutting speed. The tool life is decreased by 20 times when comparing CGI with CI under the same cutting condition. This study investigates the effect of using cryogenic cooling and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL during high-speed milling of CGI (grade 450. Results showed that, the combination of internal cryogenic cooling and enhanced MQL improved the tool life, cutting force and surface quality as compared to the conventional flood coolant strategy during high-speed milling of CGI.

  7. Fe-Catalyzed Synthesis of Porous Carbons Spheres with High Graphitization Degree for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Shi, Hongwei; Zhuo, Xin; Hu, Yalin

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a facile and efficient Fe-catalyzed method for fabrication of porous carbons spheres with high graphitization degree (GNPCs) using glucose as carbon precursor at relatively low carbonization temperature. GNPCs not only have relatively large accessible ion surface area to accommodate greater capacity but also high graphitization degree to accelerate ion diffusion. As a typical application, we demonstrate that GNPCs exhibit excellent electrochemical performance for use in supercapacitors, with high specific capacity of 150.6 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 and good rate capability and superior cycling stability over 10,000 cycles, confirming their potential application for energy storage. Moreover, it is believed that this method offers a new strategy for synthesis of porous carbons with high graphitization degree.

  8. Carbon Nanofibers Modified Graphite Felt for High Performance Anode in High Substrate Concentration Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youliang; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Shuiliang; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Suqi; Hou, Haoqing

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF) composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm−2 at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm−2, was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration. PMID:24883348

  9. Carbon nanofibers modified graphite felt for high performance anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youliang; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Shuiliang; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Suqi; Hou, Haoqing

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF) composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm(-2) at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm(-2), was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration.

  10. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High-volumetric performance aligned nano-porous microwave exfoliated graphite oxide-based electrochemical capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Mehdi; Zhou, Yue; Xu, Haiping; Lin, Minren; Kim, Tae Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Zhang, Q M

    2013-09-20

    Ultra-high volumetric performance electrochemical double layer capacitors based on high density aligned nano-porous microwave exfoliated graphite oxide have been studied. Elimination of macro-, meso-, and larger micro-pores from electrodes and controlling the nano-morphology results in very high volumetric capacitance, energy, and power density values. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. High-pressure high-temperature equation of state of graphite from Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, F.; Fasolino, A.; Meijer, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    The thermoelastic behavior of graphite is experimentally accessible in a limited range of pressures and temperatures. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations based on the accurate long range carbon bond-order potential (LCBOPII) in order to study graphite in a wider range of thermodynamic

  13. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  14. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  15. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Rossomme, S.; Renaud, J.; Kanai, T.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, {{k}\\text{fl}} , needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm2, without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The {{k}\\text{fl}} term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the {{k}\\text{fl}} due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  16. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A; Thomas, R; Homer, M; Bouchard, H; Rossomme, S; Renaud, J; Kanai, T; Royle, G; Palmans, H

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, [Formula: see text], needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm(2), without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The [Formula: see text] term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the [Formula: see text] due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  17. Development of reactor graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, G.; Mindermann, D.; Wilhelmi, G.; Persicke, H.; Ulsamer, W.

    1990-04-01

    The German graphite development programme for High Temperature Reactors has been based on the assumption that reactor graphite for core components with lifetime fluences of up to 4 × 10 22 neutrons per cm 2 (EDN) at 400°C can be manufactured from regular pitch coke. The use of secondary coke and vibrational moulding techniques have allowed production of materials with very small anisotropy, high strength, and high purity which are the most important properties of reactor graphite. A variety of graphite grades has been tested in fast neutron irradiation experiments. The results show that suitable graphites for modern High Temperature Reactors with spherical fuel elements are available.

  18. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Lv

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ∼2200 m2/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li+ ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  19. Elastic modulus and flexural strength comparisons of high-impact and traditional denture base acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour M. Ajaj-ALKordy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the high-impact acrylic resin is a suitable denture base material for patients with clinical fracture of the acrylic denture.

  20. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  1. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  2. Laser-induced versus shock wave induced transformation of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril, T.; Bulou, A.; Veysset, David Georges; Kooi, Steven E.; Nelson, Keith Adam

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that in-plane 2D propagation and focusing of a laser-induced shock wave result in enhanced nano-crystallization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Throughout the 2D shock focusing technique, which enables to clearly distinguish between the laser-induced and the shock-induced transformation/transition, our findings establish the role of the shock wave during the transformation/transition process. This configuration could open the way to an alternative path for laser shock fab...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY OF THE HIGH-QUALITY CAST IRONS PRODUCTION BY MEANS OF GRAPHITIZING MODIFICATION BY THE HIGH-POLYMERIC AMALGAMATION WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Garost

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The variant of graphitizing modification of gray cast irons by means of application of non-classic methods of processing, when unusable for regeneration high-polymeric compounds are uses as additives. There is noted the improvement of the cast iron structure: form of graphite impurities is varying from PGd 180 up to PGD 45, the character of graphite impurities from PGr up to PGr 3, perlitization of metallic base is observed.

  4. High spectral resolution x-ray optics with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legall, H; Stiel, H; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A A

    2006-05-15

    Thin films of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) give the opportunity to realize crystal optics with arbitrary geometry by mounting it on a mould of any shape. A specific feature of HOPG is its mosaicity accompanied by a high integral reflectivity, which is by an order of magnitude higher than that of all other known crystals in an energy range between 2 keV up to several 10 keV. These characteristics make it possible to realize highly efficient collecting optics, which could be also relevant for compact x-ray diagnostic tools and spectrometers. For these applications the achievable spectral resolution of the crystal optics is of interest. In this article measurements with a spectral resolution of E/DeltaE=2900 in the second order reflection and E/DeltaE=1800 in the first order reflection obtained with HOPG crystals are presented. These are by far the highest spectral resolutions reported for HOPG crystals. The integral reflectivity of these very thin films is still comparable with that of ideal Ge crystals. The trade-off between energy resolution and high integral reflectivity for HOPG is demonstrated by determining these parameters for HOPG films of different thickness.

  5. Charge Modulation in Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Switchable Approach to High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-11-01

    Electrical charging of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C4 N3 and g-C3 N4 ) is proposed as a strategy for high-capacity and electrocatalytically switchable hydrogen storage. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets is dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At full hydrogen coverage, the negatively charged graphitic carbon nitride achieves storage capacities up to 6-7 wt %. In contrast to other hydrogen storage approaches, the storage/release occurs spontaneously once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charging voltage. Therefore, this approach promises both facile reversibility and tunable kinetics without the need of specific catalysts. Importantly, g-C4 N3 has good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility, which can be a very good candidate for electron injection/release. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanically Induced Graphite-Nanodiamonds-Phase Transformations During High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eskandarany, M. Sherif

    2017-05-01

    Due to their unusual mechanical, chemical, physical, optical, and biological properties, nearly spherical-like nanodiamonds have received much attention as desirable advanced nanomaterials for use in a wide spectrum of applications. Although, nanodiamonds can be successfully synthesized by several approaches, applications of high temperature and/or high pressure may restrict the real applications of such strategic nanomaterials. Distinct from the current preparation approaches used for nanodiamonds preparation, here we show a new process for preparing ultrafine nanodiamonds (3-5 nm) embedded in a homogeneous amorphous-carbon matrix. Our process started from high-energy ball milling of commercial graphite powders at ambient temperature under normal atmospheric helium gas pressure. The results have demonstrated graphite-single wall carbon nanotubes-amorphous-carbon-nanodiamonds phase transformations carried out through three subsequent stages of ball milling. Based on XRD and RAMAN analyses, the percentage of nanodiamond phase + C60 (crystalline phase) produced by ball milling was approximately 81%, while the amorphous phase amount was 19%. The pressure generated on the powder together the with temperature increase upon the ball-powder-ball collision is responsible for the phase transformations occurring in graphite powders.

  7. Preparation of High Modulus Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate: Influence of Molecular Weight, Extrusion, and Drawing Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Min Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET which is one of the most commercially important polymers, has for many years been an interesting candidate for the production of high performance fibres and tapes. In current study, we focus on investigating the effects of the various processing variables on the mechanical properties of PET produced by a distinctive process of melt spinning and uniaxial two-stage solid-state drawing (SSD. These processing variables include screw rotation speed during extrusion, fibre take-up speed, molecular weight, draw-ratio, and drawing temperature. As-spun PET production using a single-screw extrusion process was first optimized to induce an optimal polymer microstructure for subsequent drawing processes. It was found that less crystallization which occurred during this process would lead to better drawability, higher draw-ratio, and mechanical properties in the subsequent SSD process. Then the effect of drawing temperature (DT in uniaxial two-stage SSD process was studied to understand how DT (

  8. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  9. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M.A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie, 2 Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used. (author)

  10. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine and melamine as precursors. The obtained photocatalysts display high and stable activity for photocatalytic generation of hydrogen through water splitting. - Highlights: • Cobalt-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts were prepared. • High and stable visible light photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution. • Efficient separation and transfer of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and abundant Co-N{sub x} active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Co−CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h{sup −1}) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  11. PEM fuel cells with injection moulded bipolar plates of highly filled graphite compounds; PEM-Brennstoffzellen mit spritzgegossenen Bipolarplatten aus hochgefuelltem Graphit-Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuz, Can

    2008-04-11

    This work concerns with the injection moulding of highly filled graphite compounds to bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells in a power output range between 100 - 500 Watts. A particular focus is laid on the combination of the three multidisciplinary scopes like material development, production technology and component development / design. The results of the work are specified by the process-oriented characterisation of the developed and manufactured bipolar plates as well as their application in a functioning fuel cell. (orig.)

  12. Sound velocities in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite shocked to 18 GPa: Orientational order dependence and elastic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marcel; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports of rapid phase transformation above 18 GPa [Erskine and Nellis, Nature 349, 317 (1991)] and large elastic waves below 18 GPa [Lucas et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 093515 (2013)] for shock-compressed ZYB-grade highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), but not for less oriented ZYH-grade HOPG, indicated a link between the orientational order dependence of the HOPG response above and below the phase transformation stress. To gain insight into this link and into the mechanical response of HOPG shocked to peak stresses approaching the phase transformation onset, the compressibility of ZYB- and ZYH-grade HOPG in the shocked state was examined using front surface impact experiments. Particle velocity histories and sound velocities were measured for peak stresses reaching 18 GPa. Although the locus of the measured peak stress-particle velocity states is indistinguishable for the two grades of HOPG, the measured sound velocities in the peak state reveal significant differences between the two grades. Specifically (1) the measured sound velocities are somewhat higher for ZYH-grade HOPG compared with ZYB-grade HOPG; (2) the measured sound velocities for ZYH-grade HOPG increase smoothly with compression, whereas those for ZYB-grade HOPG exhibit a significant reduction in the compression dependence from 12 GPa to 17 GPa and an abrupt increase from 17 GPa to 18 GPa; and (3) the longitudinal moduli, determined from the measured sound velocities, are smaller than the calculated bulk moduli for ZYB-grade HOPG shocked to peak stresses above 15 GPa, indicating the onset of an elastic instability. The present findings demonstrate that the softening of the longitudinal modulus (or elastic instability) presented here is linked to the large elastic waves and the rapid phase transformation reported previously—all observed only for shocked ZYB-grade HOPG. The elastic instability in shocked ZYB-grade HOPG is likely a precursor to the rapid phase transformation observed

  13. Graphite-high density polyethylene laminated composites with high thermal conductivity made by filament winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lv

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The low thermal conductivity of polymers limits their use in numerous applications, where heat transfer is important. The two primary approaches to overcome this limitation, are to mix in other materials with high thermal conductivity, or mechanically stretch the polymers to increase their intrinsic thermal conductivity. Progress along both of these pathways has been stifled by issues associated with thermal interface resistance and manufacturing scalability respectively. Here, we report a novel polymer composite architecture that is enabled by employing typical composites manufacturing method such as filament winding with the twist that the polymer is in fiber form and the filler in form of sheets. The resulting novel architecture enables accession of the idealized effective medium composite behavior as it minimizes the interfacial resistance. The process results in neat polymer and 50 vol% graphite/polymer plates with thermal conductivity of 42 W·m–1·K–1 (similar to steel and 130 W·m–1·K–1 respectively.

  14. Construction of a high modulus asphalt (HiMA) trial section Ethekwini: South Africa's first practical experience with design, manufacturing and paving of HiMA

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkgapele, M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A trial section was paved with the recently introduced High Modulus Asphalt (HiMA) technology on South Coast road in eThekwini (Durban). The trial section forms part of an effort to transfer HiMA technology to South Africa, in an initiative aimed...

  15. Porous mesocarbon microbeads with graphitic shells: constructing a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Ying; Shen, Wanci; Zheng, Yongping; Sun, Hongyu; Kang, Feiyu

    2013-01-01

    Li4Ti5O12/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor can combine the advantages of both lithium-ion battery and supercapacitor, which may meet the requirements for developing high-performance hybrid electric vehicles. Here we proposed a novel “core-shell” porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to replace conventional activated carbon for achieving excellent cell performance. In this PGC structure made from mesocarbon microbead (MCMB), the inner core is composed of porous amorphous carbon, while the outer shell is graphitic carbon. The abundant porosity and the high surface area not only offer sufficient reaction sites to store electrical charge physically, but also can accelerate the liquid electrolyte to penetrate the electrode and the ions to reach the reacting sites. Meanwhile, the outer graphitic shells of the porous carbon microbeads contribute to a conductive network which will remarkably facilitate the electron transportation, and thus can be used to construct a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor, especially at high current densities. PMID:23963328

  16. Improved Li(+) Storage through Homogeneous N-Doping within Highly Branched Tubular Graphitic Foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinyang; Xue, Yanming; Zhang, Chao; Weng, Qunhong; Dai, Pengcheng; Yang, Yijun; Zhou, Min; Li, Cuiling; Cui, Qiuhong; Kang, Xiaohong; Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Wang, Xi

    2017-02-01

    A novel carbon structure, highly branched homogeneous-N-doped graphitic (BNG) tubular foam, is designed via a novel N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF)-mediated chemical vapor deposition method. More structural defects are found at the branched portions as compared with the flat tube domains providing abundant active sites and spacious reservoirs for Li(+) storage. An individual BNG branch nanobattery is constructed and tested using in situ transmission electron microscopy and the lithiation process is directly visualized in real time. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Three-dimensional graphitized carbon nanovesicles for high-performance supercapacitors based on ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chengxin; Wen, Zubiao; Qin, Yao; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Li, Chongzhong; Yang, Shihe; Shi, Donglu; Yang, Jinhu

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional nanoporous carbon with interconnected vesicle-like pores (1.5-4.2 nm) has been prepared through a low-cost, template-free approach from petroleum coke precursor by KOH activation. It is found that the thin pore walls are highly graphitized and consist of only three to four layers of graphene, which endows the material with an unusually high specific surface area (2933 m(2)  g(-1) ) and good conductivity. With such unique structural characteristics, if used as supercapacitor electrodes in ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes, the graphitized carbon nanovesicle (GCNV) material displays superior performance, such as high energy densities up to 145.9 Wh kg(-1) and a high combined energy-power delivery, and an energy density of 97.6 Wh kg(-1) can be charged in 47 s at 60 °C. This demonstrates that the energy output of the GCNV-based supercapacitors is comparable to that of batteries, and the power output is one order of magnitude higher. Moreover, the synergistic effect of the GCNVs and the IL electrolyte on the extraordinary performance of the GCNV supercapacitors has been analyzed and discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The kinetics of crystallization of molten binary and ternary oxide systems and their application to the origination of high modulus glass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis on the consideration of glass formation on a kinetic process made it possible to think of glass compositions different from those normally employed in the manufacture of glass fibers. Approximately 450 new glass compositions were prepared and three dozen of these compositions have values for Young's modulus measured on bulk specimens greater than nineteen million pounds per square inch. Of the new glasses about a hundred could be drawn into fibers by mechanical methods at high speeds. The fiber which has a Young's modulus measured on the fiber of 18.6 million pounds per square inch and has been prepared in quantity as a monofilament (to date more than 150 million lineal feet of 0.2 to 0.4 mil fiber have been produced). This fiber has also been successfully incorporated both in epoxy and polyimide matrices. The epoxy resin composite has shown a modulus forty percent better than that achievable using the most common grade of competitive glass fiber, and twenty percent better than that obtainable with the best available grade of competitive glass fiber. Other glass fibers of even higher modulus have been developed.

  19. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Highly hydrogenated graphene through microwave exfoliation of graphite oxide in hydrogen plasma: towards electrochemical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Sofer, Zdenek; Šimek, Petr; Kosina, Jiri; Pumera, Martin

    2013-11-11

    Hydrogenated graphenes exhibit a variety of properties with potential applications in devices, ranging from a tunable band gap to fluorescence, ferromagnetism, and the storage of hydrogen. We utilize a one-step microwave-irradiation process in hydrogen plasma to create highly hydrogenated graphene from graphite oxides. The procedure serves the dual purposes of deoxygenation and concurrent hydrogenation of the carbon backbone. The effectiveness of the hydrogenation process is investigated on three different graphite oxides (GOs), which are synthesized by using the Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods. A systematic characterization of our hydrogenated graphenes is performed using UV/Vis spectroscopy, SEM, AFM, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), combustible elemental analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. The highest hydrogenation extent is observed in hydrogenated graphene produced from the Hummers-method GO, with a hydrogen content of 19 atomic % in the final product. In terms of the removal of oxygen groups, microwave exfoliation yields graphenes with very similar oxygen contents despite differences in their parent GOs. In addition, we examine the prospective application of hydrogenated graphenes as electrochemical transducers through a cyclic voltammetry (CV) study. The highly hydrogenated graphenes exhibit fast heterogeneous electron-transfer rates, suggestive of their suitability for electrochemical applications in electrodes, supercapacitors, batteries, and sensors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Boron-Doped Graphite for High Work Function Carbon Electrode in Printable Hole-Conductor-Free Mesoscopic Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Miao; Tian, Chengbo; Hu, Yue; Mei, Anyi; Rong, Yaoguang; Xiong, Yuli; Xu, Mi; Sheng, Yusong; Jiang, Pei; Hou, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Xiaotong; Qin, Fei; Han, Hongwei

    2017-09-20

    Work function of carbon electrodes is critical in obtaining high open-circuit voltage as well as high device performance for carbon-based perovskite solar cells. Herein, we propose a novel strategy to upshift work function of carbon electrode by incorporating boron atom into graphite lattice and employ it in printable hole-conductor-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells. The high-work-function boron-doped carbon electrode facilitates hole extraction from perovskite as verified by photoluminescence. Meanwhile, the carbon electrode is endowed with an improved conductivity because of a higher graphitization carbon of boron-doped graphite. These advantages of the boron-doped carbon electrode result in a low charge transfer resistance at carbon/perovskite interface and an extended carrier recombination lifetime. Together with the merit of both high work function and conductivity, the power conversion efficiency of hole-conductor-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells is increased from 12.4% for the pristine graphite electrode-based cells to 13.6% for the boron-doped graphite electrode-based cells with an enhanced open-circuit voltage and fill factor.

  2. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  3. Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, G.V. [Amoco Performance Products, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    1996-12-27

    Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

  4. Ultrafast Delamination of Graphite into High-Quality Graphene Using Alternating Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Ricciardulli, Antonio Gaetano; Liu, Shaohua; Dong, Renhao; Lohe, Martin R; Becker, Alfons; Squillaci, Marco A; Samorì, Paolo; Müllen, Klaus; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-06-01

    To bridge the gap between laboratory-scale studies and commercial applications, mass production of high quality graphene is essential. A scalable exfoliation strategy towards the production of graphene sheets is presented that has excellent yield (ca. 75 %, 1-3 layers), low defect density (a C/O ratio of 21.2), great solution-processability, and outstanding electronic properties (a hole mobility of 430 cm 2  V -1  s -1 ). By applying alternating currents, dual exfoliation at both graphite electrodes enables a high production rate exceeding 20 g h -1 in laboratory tests. As a cathode material for lithium storage, graphene-wrapped LiFePO 4 particles deliver a high capacity of 167 mAh g -1 at 1 C rate after 500 cycles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. High Temperature Vacuum Annealing and Hydrogenation Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly active defect sites on the edges of graphene automatically capture oxygen from air to form various oxygen groups. A two-step procedure to remove various oxygen functional groups from the defect sites of exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs has been developed to reduce the atomic oxygen concentration from 9.5% to 4.8%. This two-step approach involves high temperature vacuum annealing followed by hydrogenation to protect the reduced edge carbon atoms from recombining with the atmospheric oxygen. The reduced GNPs exhibit decreased surface resistance and graphitic potential-dependent capacitance characteristics compared to the complex potential-dependent capacitance characteristics exhibited by the unreduced GNPs as a result of the removal of the oxygen functional groups present primarily at the edges. These reduced GNPs also exhibit high electrochemical cyclic stability for electrochemical energy storage applications.

  6. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  7. Adsorption behavior of perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer on highly graphitized carbon nanofibers and their thermal stabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2014-01-01

    isotherm), the ionomer has varying affinities for CNFs (Keq. = between 5 and 22) as compared to Vulcan (Keq. = 18), depending on surface treatments. However, the interactions are most likely governed by different adsorption mechanisms depending on hydrophilicity / hydrophobicity of the adsorbent carbon......A systematic adsorption study of perfluorinated sulfonic acid Nafion® ionomer on ribbon type highly graphitized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was carried out using 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Based on the values obtained for the equilibrium constant (Keq., derived from Langmuir....... The ionomer is probably adsorbed via the polar sulfonic group on hydrophilic Vulcan, whereas, it is adsorbed primarily via hydrophobic -CF2- backbone on the highly hydrophobic pristine CNFs. Ionomer adsorption behavior is gradually altered from apolar to polar group adsorption for the acid modified CNFs...

  8. High frequency ultrasound measurements on a translucent thin bioglass, based on Si, Ca, Na: Study of the distribution of elastic modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Ahmed; Nassar, Georges; Mercier, Cyrille; Bouchart, Franck; Follet, Claudine; Amrousse, Rachid; Kazan, Michel

    2013-11-01

    In this work, an ultrasonic high frequency focused sensor (100 MHz) has been used to study the variation of the elastic modulus of a thin bioglass element, based on Si, Ca, Na. In fact, physical functionalization of materials may play a role in defining the properties of interfaces of the surface depending of the physico-chemical characteristics of the materials used. The study is restricted to the characterization by an ultrasonic method of the elastic modulus profile of the bioglass element during the final phase of processing: before and after thermal treatment. The initial objective is to produce an ultrasonic map of the element under investigation, such as a substrate, prior to further tests involving adhesion of biological cells in order to try to understand the relationship between the distribution of the measured mechanical properties and the adhesion phenomenon.

  9. Determination of the bulk modulus of hydroxycancrinite, a possible zeolitic precursor in geopolymers, by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2011-11-01

    Crystalline zeolitic materials, such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite, herschelite and nepheline, are often synthesized from geopolymerization using fly-ash and solutions of NaOH at high temperatures. Comprised mainly of 6-membered aluminosilicate rings that act as basic building units, their crystal structures may provide insight into the reaction products formed in NaOH-activated fly ash-based geopolymers. Recent research indicates that the hydroxycancrinite and hydroxysodalite may play an important role as possible analogues of zeolitic precursor in geopolymers. Herein is reported a high pressure synchrotron study of the behavior of hydroxycancrinite exposed to pressures up to 6.1 GPa in order to obtain its bulk modulus. A refined equation of state for hydroxycancrinite yielded a bulk modulus of Ko = 46 ± 5 GPa (assuming Ko′ = 4.0) for a broad range of applied pressure. When low pressure values are excluded from the fit and only the range of 2.5 and 6.1 GPa is considered, the bulk modulus of hydroxycancrinite was found to be Ko = 46.9 ± 0.9 GPa (Ko′ = 4.0 ± 0.4, calculated). Comparison with the literature shows that all zeolitic materials possessing single 6-membered rings (i.e., hydroxycancrinite, sodalite and nepheline) have similar bulk moduli. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  11. Linear Correlation Between Binding Energy and Young’s Modulus in Graphene Nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D.; Christofides, Constantinos

    2009-09-15

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) have been suggested as a promising material for its use as nanoelectromechanical reasonators for highly sensitive force, mass, and charge detection. Therefore the accurate determination of the size-dependent elastic properties of GNRs is desirable for the design of graphene-based nanoelectromechanical devices. In this study we determine the size-dependent Young’s modulus and carbon-carbon binding energy in a homologous series of GNRs, C4n2+6n+2H6n+4 (n=2–12), with the use of all electron first principles computations. An unexpected linearity between the binding energy and Young’s modulus is observed, making possible the prediction of the size-dependent Young’s modulus of GNRs through a single point energy calculation of the GNR ground state. A quantitative-structure-property relationship is derived, which correlates Young’s modulus to the total energy and the number of carbon atoms within the ribbon. In the limit of extended graphene sheets we determine the value of Young’s modulus to be 1.09 TPa, in excellent agreement with experimental estimates derived for graphite and suspended grapheme sheets.

  12. Facilely prepared polypyrrole-reduced graphite oxide core-shell microspheres with high dispersibility for electrochemical detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tao; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2013-05-21

    Polypyrrole-reduced graphite oxide core-shell microspheres with high dispersibility were facilely fabricated and were demonstrated to be excellently sensitive for electrochemical detection of nanomolar concentrations of dopamine in the presence of a large excess of uric acid and ascorbic acid.

  13. Characterization of High Temperature Modulus of Elasticity of Lightweight Foamed Concrete under Static Flexural and Compression: An Experimental Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on an experimental works that have been performed to examine the young’s modulus of foamed concrete at elevated temperatures up to 600°C. Foamed concrete of 650 and 1000 kg/m3 density were cast and tested under compression and bending. The experimental results of this study consistently demonstrated that the loss in stiffness for cement based material like foamed concrete at elevated temperatures occurs predominantly after about 95°C, regardless of density. This indicates that the primary mechanism causing stiffness degradation is microcracking, which occurs as water expands and evaporates from the porous body. As expected, reducing the density of LFC reduces its strength and stiffness. However, for LFC of different densities, the normalised strength-temperature and stiffness-temperature relationships are very similar.

  14. Graphitized Carbon Fibers as Multifunctional 3D Current Collectors for High Areal Capacity Li Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tong-Tong; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Yang, Chun-Peng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Ye, Huan; Li, Nian-Wu; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-08-01

    The Li metal anode has long been considered as one of the most ideal anodes due to its high energy density. However, safety concerns, low efficiency, and huge volume change are severe hurdles to the practical application of Li metal anodes, especially in the case of high areal capacity. Here it is shown that that graphitized carbon fibers (GCF) electrode can serve as a multifunctional 3D current collector to enhance the Li storage capacity. The GCF electrode can store a huge amount of Li via intercalation and electrodeposition reactions. The as-obtained anode can deliver an areal capacity as high as 8 mA h cm(-2) and exhibits no obvious dendritic formation. In addition, the enlarged surface area and porous framework of the GCF electrode result in lower local current density and mitigate high volume change during cycling. Thus, the Li composite anode displays low voltage hysteresis, high plating/stripping efficiency, and long lifespan. The multifunctional 3D current collector promisingly provides a new strategy for promoting the cycling lifespan of high areal capacity Li anodes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Highly Stretchable Conductors Based on Expanded Graphite Macroconfined in Tubular Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Wu, Tongfei; Chen, Biqiong; Liang, Mei; Zou, Huawei

    2017-12-13

    Highly stretchable and durable conductors are significant to the development of wearable devices, robots, human-machine interfaces, and other artificial intelligence products. Although many respectable methods have been reported, it is still a challenge to fabricate stretchable conductors with a large elastic limit, high conductivity, and excellent reliability in rapid, effective, and economic ways. Herein, a facile method is offered to fabricate high-performance stretchable tubular conductors (TCs) based on a macroconfined structure of expanded graphite (EG) in rubber tubing by simply physical packing. The maximum original electrical conductivity of TCs reached a high value of 160.6 S/cm. Meanwhile, TCs showed more insensitive response of conductivity to increasing tensile strain compared to the TCs encapsulated with liquid metal or ionic liquid. The conductivity and effective stretchability of TCs can be adjusted by varying the packing density of EG. A low gauge factor below 3 was reached even under 400% stretching for TCs with a packing density of 1.233 g/cm3. The excellent resilience and good stability of conductivity of TCs during dynamic stretching-releasing cycles are attributed to the stable and rapid reconstruction of the percolation network of EG particles. The combination of high conductivity, tunable stretchability, and good reliability renders potential applications to TCs, such as highly stretchable interconnects or strain sensors, in human motion detection.

  16. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ∼50 and ∼120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors. PMID:24399158

  17. Carbon Papers and Aerogels Based on Graphene Layers and Chitosan: Direct Preparation from High Surface Area Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Vincenzina; Guerra, Silvia; Brambilla, Luigi; Maggio, Mario; Serafini, Andrea; Conzatti, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandra; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2017-12-11

    In this work, carbon papers and aerogels based on graphene layers and chitosan were prepared. They were obtained by mixing chitosan (CS) and a high surface area nanosized graphite (HSAG) in water in the presence of acetic acid. HSAG/CS water dispersions were stable for months. High resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of few graphene layers in water suspensions. Casting or lyophilization of such suspensions led to the preparation of carbon paper and aerogel, respectively. In X-ray spectra of both aerogels and carbon paper, peaks due to regular stacks of graphene layers were not detected: graphene with unaltered sp 2 structure was obtained directly from graphite without the use of any chemical reaction. The composites were demonstrated to be electrically conductive thanks to the graphene. Chitosan thus makes it possible to obtain monolithic carbon aerogels and flexible and free-standing graphene papers directly from a nanosized graphite by avoiding oxidation to graphite oxide and successive reduction. Strong interaction between polycationic chitosan and the aromatic substrate appears to be at the origin of the stability of HSAG/CS adducts. Cation-π interaction is hypothesized, also on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy findings. This work paves the way for the easy large-scale preparation of carbon papers through a method that has a low environmental impact and is based on a biosourced polymer, graphene, and water.

  18. CoSn-graphite electrode material prepared by using the polyol method and high-intensity ultrasonication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Jose R. [Laboratorio de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio C3, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Alcantara, Ricardo, E-mail: iq2alror@uco.es [Laboratorio de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio C3, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Nacimiento, Francisco; Tirado, Jose L. [Laboratorio de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cordoba, Edificio C3, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > New anode materials are prepared by combined polyol and ultrasonication methods. > Highly-dispersed, amorphous nano-CoSn/ultrathin graphite composites can be obtained. > Ultrasonication under Ar-flow and LiPAA-binder leads to high Coulombic efficiency. - Abstract: Composite electrode materials containing nanoparticles of nearly amorphous CoSn and ultrathin layers of graphite are prepared here. For this purpose, Sn(II) and Co(II) ions in tetraethyleneglycol are reduced with NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of ball-milled graphite while high-intensity ultrasonication is continuously applied. The followed preparative route is a combination of the polyol and sonochemical methods. The observed capacity value for CoSn-ball milled graphite is over 400 mAh/g after 40 cycles (this is superior to graphite). The good electrochemical cycling behavior is connected to the small particle size of CoSn, the low crystallinity of CoSn and the dispersion of the CoSn particles in an optimized carbon matrix. The selected binder (polyvinylidene fluoride or lithium polyacrylate) also can contribute to improve the cycling behavior. The low electrochemical efficiency, particularly in the first cycles, may be related to the spontaneous oxidation of the metallic particles surface and irreversible electrolyte consumption. The use of inert atmosphere (Ar-flow) results in a decrease of the tin oxide content, as determined by using {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy, an increase of the initial electrochemical efficiency up to a maximum of 90.4%, and higher capacities (507 mAh/g after 40 cycles).

  19. High-performance wearable supercapacitors fabricated with surface activated continuous filament graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dedong; Yu, Xin; Chen, Tinghan; Wang, Shu; Tan, Hua; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Li, Linlin

    2017-08-01

    Generally, carbon or graphite fibers (GFs) are used as the supporting materials for the preparation of flexible supercapacitors (SCs) by assembling various electrochemically active nanomaterials on them. A facile and rapid electrochemical oxidation method with a voltage of 3 V in a mixed H2SO4-HNO3 solution for 2-15 min is proposed to active continuous filament GFs. Detailed structural characterization, SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman and XPS demonstrate that the GFs-8 (oxidized for 8 min) possessing high specific surface area which provided numerous electrochemical sites and a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups producing pseudocapacitance. Cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are conducted to test the capacitive of GFs and activated GFs. The capacitance of GFs-8 reaches as high as 570 mF cm-1 at the current density of 1 mA cm-1 in LiCl electrolyte, a 1965-fold enhancement with respect to the pristine GFs (0.29 mF cm-1). The fabricated fiber solid-state supercapacitors (SSCs) provide high energy density of 0.68 mWh cm-3 at the power density 3.3 W cm-3 and have excellent durability with 90% capacitance retention after 10000 cycles. In addition, such fiber SSCs features flexibility and mechanical stability, which may have wide applications in wearable electronic devices.

  20. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  1. Finite element based stress analysis of graphite component in high temperature gas cooled reactor core using linear and nonlinear irradiation creep models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • High temperature gas cooled reactor. • Finite element based stress analysis. • H-451 graphite. • Irradiation creep model. • Graphite reflector stress analysis. - Abstract: Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  2. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  3. High Areal Capacity and Lithium Utilization in Anodes Made of Covalently Connected Graphite Microtubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song; Sun, Zhaowei; Guo, Yali; Qi, Zhikai; Guo, Chengkun; Kong, Xianghua; Zhu, Yanwu; Ji, Hengxing

    2017-10-01

    Lithium metal is an attractive anode material for rechargeable batteries because of its high theoretical specific capacity of 3860 mA h g(-1) and the lowest negative electrochemical potential of -3.040 V versus standard hydrogen electrode. Despite extensive research efforts on tackling the safety concern raised by Li dendrites, inhibited Li dendrite growth is accompanied with decreased areal capacity and Li utilization, which are still lower than expectation for practical use. A scaffold made of covalently connected graphite microtubes is reported, which provides a firm and conductive framework with moderate specific surface area to accommodate Li metal for anodes of Li batteries. The anode presents an areal capacity of 10 mA h cm(-2) (practical gravimetric capacity of 913 mA h g(-1) ) at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) , with Li utilization of 91%, Coulombic efficiencies of ≈97%, and long lifespan of up to 3000 h. The analysis of structure evolution during charge/discharge shows inhibited lithium dendrite growth and a reversible electrode volume change of ≈9%. It is suggested that an optimized microstructure with moderate electrode/electrolyte interface area is critical to accommodate volume change and inhibit the risks of irreversible Li consumption by side reactions and Li dendrite growth for high-performance Li-metal anodes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Self-assembly of thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: hydrogen bond effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Shuqi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Wen, Yongqiang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, to elucidate the hydrogen bond effect on the assembly behavior, we studied the assembly structures of two carboxylic substituted thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Here thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (TCA) and thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (TDA) were employed. TDA molecules spontaneously adsorb on the HOPG surface and self-organize into a two-dimensional (2D) assembly with well-defined structure. Two types of domain could be observed. Each TDA molecule appears as a round circle with two small faint dots and forms hydrogen bonds with neighbours. Besides monolayer structure, a bilayer structure of TDA adlayer on HOPG was also observed in this research. Remnant TDA molecules adsorb on the monolayer of TDA and bilayer structure is formed. In contrast to TDA, no ordered structure of TCA on HOPG can be observed. TCA molecules have high propensity to form dimers through H-bond between carboxylic groups. But TCA dimer is not stable enough for either adsorption or imaging. Our result provides a new example for understanding hydrogen effect on stabilizing and controlling two-dimensional assembly structure and is helpful for surface nanofabrication and development of electric nanodevices.

  5. Highly sensitive hydrogen sensor based on graphite-InP or graphite-GaN Schottky barrier with electrophoretically deposited Pd nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdansky Karel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Depositions on surfaces of semiconductor wafers of InP and GaN were performed from isooctane colloid solutions of palladium (Pd nanoparticles (NPs in AOT reverse micelles. Pd NPs in evaporated colloid and in layers deposited electrophoretically were monitored by SEM. Diodes were prepared by making Schottky contacts with colloidal graphite on semiconductor surfaces previously deposited with Pd NPs and ohmic contacts on blank surfaces. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics of the diodes showed high rectification ratio and high Schottky barrier heights, giving evidence of very small Fermi level pinning. A large increase of current was observed after exposing diodes to flow of gas blend hydrogen in nitrogen. Current change ratio about 700,000 with 0.1% hydrogen blend was achieved, which is more than two orders-of-magnitude improvement over the best result reported previously. Hydrogen detection limit of the diodes was estimated at 1 ppm H2/N2. The diodes, besides this extremely high sensitivity, have been temporally stable and of inexpensive production. Relatively more expensive GaN diodes have potential for functionality at high temperatures.

  6. Nanocrystalline β-Ti alloy with high hardness, low Young's modulus and excellent in vitro biocompatibility for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Kelvin Y. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wang, Yanbo, E-mail: yanbo.wang@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zhao, Yonghao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chang, Li; Wang, Guocheng; Chen, Zibin; Cao, Yang [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Liao, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lavernia, Enrique J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Valiev, Ruslan Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, K. Marksa 12, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Sarrafpour, Babak; Zoellner, Hans [The Cellular and Molecular Pathology Research Unit, Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Sydney, Westmead Centre for Oral Health, Westmead Hospital, NSW 2145 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-08-01

    High strength, low Young's modulus and good biocompatibility are desirable but difficult to simultaneously achieve in metallic implant materials for load bearing applications, and these impose significant challenges in material design. Here we report that a nano-grained β-Ti alloy prepared by high-pressure torsion exhibits remarkable mechanical and biological properties. The hardness and modulus of the nano-grained Ti alloy were respectively 23% higher and 34% lower than those of its coarse-grained counterpart. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced, demonstrating good in vitro biocompatibility of the nano-grained Ti alloy, consistent with demonstrated increased nano-roughness on the nano-grained Ti alloy. Results suggest that the nano-grained β-Ti alloy may have significant application as an implant material in dental and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • A bulk nanocrystalline β-Ti alloy was produced by high-pressure torsion processing. • Excellent mechanical properties for biomedical implants were obtained. • Enhanced in vitro biocompatibility was also demonstrated.

  7. SWCNT/graphite nanoplatelet hybrid thin films for self-temperature-compensated, highly sensitive, and extensible piezoresistive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sida; Liu, Tao

    2013-10-18

    Highly sensitive single-wall carbon nanotube/graphite nanoplatelet (SWCNT/GNP) hybrid thin-film sensors are developed, which possess the unique capability for self-temperature compensation. This unique property in combination with their high gauge sensitivity and large reversible extensibility promises the SWCNT/GNP hybrid thin film piezoresistive sensors for a wide range applications, such as in man-machine interaction and body monitoring. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Graphitization of unburned carbon from oil-fired fly ash applied for anode materials of high power lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Tzoo-Shing [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} From TEM observations, the graphitization treatment samples had annular microstructure. {center_dot} Sample with heat treatment at 2300 deg. C is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region. {center_dot} Sample with heat treatment at 2700 deg. C yields the first columbic efficiency of about 93.6%. - Abstract: Unburned carbon is an industrial waste product of oil-fired fly ash. From the viewpoint of waste recycling, using ground unburned carbon with an average size of 6 {mu}m heat treatment at 2700 deg. C, and both charge and discharge at 0.1 C, yields the first columbic efficiency of about 93.6%. Moreover, after 50 cycles, the discharge capacity is 325.5 mAh g{sup -1}, and the capacity retention is about 97.5%. The two conditions tested for rate capability are as follows: First, a charge at 0.2 C rate and discharge at variable C-rates in which the unburned carbon after heat treatment at higher temperature exhibits a higher capacity in the 0.2-3 C region. However, unburned carbon with heat treatment at 2300 deg. C is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region (5-10 C). Second, for both charge and discharge at the same C-rate, the unburned carbon after heat treatment at higher temperature exhibits a higher capacity in the 0.2-0.5 C region; however, unburned carbon without graphitization treatment is a suitable material for the higher C-rate region (3-10 C). Based on TEM observations, the graphitization treatment samples had annular microstructure which has many active sites, improving the intercalation/deintercalation of lithium ions. Therefore, these results show that compared to natural graphite, graphitization of unburned carbon is more suitable for the anode materials of a high power battery.

  9. Electrochemical formation and characterization of Au nanostructures on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Gómez, José J. [Instituto de Ingeniería Electroquímica y Corrosión (INIEC ), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Zubieta, Carolina; Ferullo, Ricardo M. [INQUISUR , Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); García, Silvana G., E-mail: sgarcia@criba.edu.ar [Instituto de Ingeniería Electroquímica y Corrosión (INIEC ), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The electrodeposition of Au on HOPG tends to follow the response predicted for a 3D instantaneous nucleation mechanism in the potential range considered. • By choosing suitable nucleation and growth pulses, one-dimensional deposits were possible, preferentially located on step edges of the HOPG substrate. • Quantum-mechanical calculations confirmed the tendency of Au atoms to join selectively on the HOPG step edges, at the early stages of Au electrodeposition. - Abstract: The electrochemical formation of Au nanoparticles on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate using conventional electrochemical techniques and ex-situ AFM is reported. From the potentiostatic current transients studies, the Au electrodeposition process on HOPG surfaces was described, within the potential range considered, by a model involving instantaneous nucleation and diffusion controlled 3D growth, which was corroborated by the microscopic analysis. Initially, three-dimensional (3D) hemispherical nanoparticles distributed on surface defects (step edges) of the substrate were observed, with increasing particle size at more negative potentials. The double potential pulse technique allowed the formation of rounded deposits at low deposition potentials, which tend to form lines of nuclei aligned in defined directions leading to 3D ordered structures. By choosing suitable nucleation and growth pulses, one-dimensional (1D) deposits were possible, preferentially located on step edges of the HOPG substrate. Quantum-mechanical calculations confirmed the tendency of Au atoms to join selectively on surface defects, such as the HOPG step edges, at the early stages of Au electrodeposition.

  10. Formation of Nanocones on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite by Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in hemocompatibility of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG by formation of nanostructured surface by oxygen plasma treatment is reported. We have showed that by appropriate fine tuning of plasma and discharge parameters we are able to create nanostructured surface which is densely covered with nanocones. The size of the nanocones strongly depended on treatment time. The optimal results in terms of material hemocompatibility were obtained after treatment with oxygen plasma for 15 s, when both the nanotopography and wettability were the most favorable, since marked reduction in adhesion and activation of platelets was observed on this surface. At prolonged treatment times, the rich surface topography was lost and thus also its antithrombogenic properties. Chemical composition of the surface was always more or less the same, regardless of its morphology and height of the nanocones. Namely, on all plasma treated samples, only a few atomic percent of oxygen was found, meaning that plasma caused mostly etching, leading to changes in the surface morphology. This indicates that the main preventing mechanism against platelets adhesion was the right surface morphology.

  11. Electronic Transport and Raman Spectroscopy Characterization in Ion-Implanted Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, R. F.; Turatti, A. M.; Camargo, B. C.; da Silva, R. R.; Kopelevich, Y.; Behar, M.; Balzaretti, N. M.; Gusmão, M. A.; Pureur, P.

    2017-10-01

    We report on Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity, and in-plane magnetoresistance experiments in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) implanted with As and Mn. A pristine sample was also studied for comparison. Two different fluences were applied, φ = 0.5× 10^{16} ions/cm2 and φ = 1.0× 10^{16} ions/cm2 . The implantations were carried out with 20 keV ion energy at room temperature. The Raman spectroscopy results reveal the occurrence of drastic changes of the HOPG surface as a consequence of the damage caused by ionic implantation. For the higher dose, the complete amorphization limit is attained. The resistivity and magnetoresistance results were obtained placing electrical contacts on the irradiated sample surface. Owing to the strong anisotropy of HOPG, the electrical current propagates mostly near the implanted surface. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in the magnetoresistance at low temperatures. These results allow the extraction of the fundamental SdH frequencies and the carriers' effective masses. In general, the resistivity and magnetoresistance results are consistent with those obtained from Raman measurements. However, one must consider that the electrical conduction in our samples occurs as in a parallel association of a largely resistive thin sheet at the surface strongly modified by disorder with a thicker layer where damage produced by implantation is less severe. The SdH oscillations do not hint to significant changes in the carrier density of HOPG.

  12. Phenol-degrading anode biofilm with high coulombic efficiency in graphite electrodes microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Zhiling; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhou, Xue; Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Katayama, Arata

    2017-03-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC), with graphite electrodes as both the anode and cathode, was operated with a soil-free anaerobic consortium for phenol degradation. This phenol-degrading MFC showed high efficiency with a current density of 120 mA/m2 and a coulombic efficiency of 22.7%, despite the lack of a platinum catalyst cathode and inoculation of sediment/soil. Removal of planktonic bacteria by renewing the anaerobic medium did not decrease the performance, suggesting that the phenol-degrading MFC was not maintained by the planktonic bacteria but by the microorganisms in the anode biofilm. Cyclic voltammetry analysis of the anode biofilm showed distinct oxidation and reduction peaks. Analysis of the microbial community structure of the anode biofilm and the planktonic bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that Geobacter sp. was the phenol degrader in the anode biofilm and was responsible for current generation. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Facile Synthesis of High Quality Graphene Oxide from Graphite Flakes Using Improved Hummer's Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Foo Wah; Lai, Chin Wei; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2015-09-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for making next-generation nanotechnology devices due to its outstanding properties in terms of physical, chemical, mechanical aspects. Based on the theoretical point of view, graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) crystal structure with sp2 hybridized carbon atoms arrangement and has attracted extensive attention in a considerable number of applications such as solar energy, sensor and energy storage, naming a few. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) is synthesized from graphite flakes using the Improved Hummer's method. The results demonstrated the comparison of synthesized GO samples based on stirred duration of 6 h and 72 h. The FTIR results proved that the 72 h GO sample was well-bonded with the C-O functional group, signifying the successful synthesis of GO under an extended stirred duration. The FESEM images showed that the synthesized GO was well-arranged in crystal lattice of graphene sheets whereas the EDX result showed that higher atomic % of Oxygen, O2 was obtained with a longer stirred duration due to the high opportunity for oxygenated bonded to occur on the C-C functional group.

  14. In Situ Study of Li Intercalation into Highly Crystalline Graphitic Flakes of Varying Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianli; Sole, Christopher; Drewett, Nicholas E; Velický, Matěj; Hardwick, Laurence J

    2016-11-03

    An in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of Li intercalation into graphite flakes with different thicknesses ranging from 1.7 nm (3 graphene layers) to 61 nm (ca. 178 layers) is presented. The lithiation behavior of these flakes was compared to commercial microcrystalline graphite with a typical flake thickness of ∼100 nm. Li intercalation into the graphitic flakes was observed under potential control via in situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. As graphite flakes decreased in thickness, a Raman response indicative of increased tensile strain along the graphene sheet was observed during the early stages of intercalation. A progressively negative wavenumber shift of the interior and bounding modes of the split G band (E2g2(i) and E2g2(b)) is interpreted as a weakening of the C-C bonding. Raman spectra of Li intercalation into thin graphitic flakes are presented and discussed in the context of implications for Li ion battery applications, given that intercalation induced strain may accelerate carbon negative electrode aging and reduce long-term cycle life.

  15. High purity polyimide analysis by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael F.; Carvalho, Gabriel S.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Bolzan, Rodrigo C.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni were determined in high purity polyimides (99.5%) by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) using Zeeman effect background correction system with variable magnetic field, making possible the simultaneous measurement at high or low sensitivity. The following analytical parameters were evaluated: pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, feasibility of calibration with aqueous solution, linear calibration range, sample mass range and the use of chemical modifier. Calibration with aqueous standard solutions was feasible for all analytes. No under or overestimated results were observed and up to 10 mg sample could be introduced on the platform for the determination of Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 20%. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved using the high sensitivity mode were as low as 7.0, 2.5, 1.7, 17 and 0.12 ng g- 1 for Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni, respectively. No addition of chemical modifier was necessary, except for Mn determination where Pd was required. The accuracy was evaluated by analyte spike and by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion in a single reaction chamber system and also by neutron activation analysis. No difference among the results obtained by SS-GFAAS and those obtained by alternative analytical methods using independent techniques. SS-GFAAS method showed some advantages, such as the determination of metallic contaminants in high purity polyimides with practically no sample preparation, very low LODs, calibration with aqueous standards and determination in a wide range of concentration.

  16. Large and flat graphene flakes produced by epoxy bonding and reverse exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, Vincent [ICMMO-CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bendiab, Nedjma [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite Joseph Fourier, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Rosman, Noel [LEPMI, ENSEEG, INPG, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Ebbesen, Thomas [ISIS, Universite Louis Pasteur, 8, Allee Gaspard Monge, BP 70028, F-67083 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Delacour, Cecile; Bouchiat, Vincent [Institut Neel, CNRS-Grenoble, 25 avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2008-11-12

    We present a fabrication method producing large and flat graphene flakes that have a few layers down to a single layer based on substrate bonding of a thick sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), followed by its controlled exfoliation down to the few to single graphene atomic layers. As the graphite underlayer is intimately bonded to the substrate during the exfoliation process, the obtained graphene flakes are remarkably large and flat and present very few folds and pleats. The high occurrence of single-layered graphene sheets being tens of microns wide in lateral dimensions is assessed by complementary probes including spatially resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrostatic force microscopy. This versatile method opens the way for deposition of graphene on any substrates, including flexible ones.

  17. Large and flat graphene flakes produced by epoxy bonding and reverse exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Vincent; Bendiab, Nedjma; Rosman, Noël; Ebbesen, Thomas; Delacour, Cécile; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2008-11-01

    We present a fabrication method producing large and flat graphene flakes that have a few layers down to a single layer based on substrate bonding of a thick sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), followed by its controlled exfoliation down to the few to single graphene atomic layers. As the graphite underlayer is intimately bonded to the substrate during the exfoliation process, the obtained graphene flakes are remarkably large and flat and present very few folds and pleats. The high occurrence of single-layered graphene sheets being tens of microns wide in lateral dimensions is assessed by complementary probes including spatially resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrostatic force microscopy. This versatile method opens the way for deposition of graphene on any substrates, including flexible ones.

  18. Large and flat graphene flakes produced by epoxy bonding and reverse exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Vincent; Bendiab, Nedjma; Rosman, Noël; Ebbesen, Thomas; Delacour, Cécile; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2008-11-12

    We present a fabrication method producing large and flat graphene flakes that have a few layers down to a single layer based on substrate bonding of a thick sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), followed by its controlled exfoliation down to the few to single graphene atomic layers. As the graphite underlayer is intimately bonded to the substrate during the exfoliation process, the obtained graphene flakes are remarkably large and flat and present very few folds and pleats. The high occurrence of single-layered graphene sheets being tens of microns wide in lateral dimensions is assessed by complementary probes including spatially resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrostatic force microscopy. This versatile method opens the way for deposition of graphene on any substrates, including flexible ones.

  19. submitter Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sugano, Michinaka; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2015-01-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young's modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young's moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young's modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb–Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young's moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76–97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  20. Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

  1. Brominated graphitized carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Low cost, high break elongation graphitized carbon fibers having low degree of graphitization are inert to bromine at room or higher temperatures, but are brominated at -7 to 20 C, and then debrominated at ambient. Repetition of this bromination-debromination process can bring the bromine content to 18 percent. Electrical conductivity of the brominated fibers is three times of the before-bromination value.

  2. Graphitized Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, G. I.; Makarenko, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    An analytical review of data on general-purpose grayed cast iron with different forms of graphite (lamellar, vermicular, globular, flaked) is presented. Grades of cast iron, their compositions, special features of structure of the graphite, and properties of gray, high-strength and malleable irons are described. The data on the kinds of iron considered are compared with those stipulated in international and some national standards.

  3. Effective post treatment for preparing highly conductive carbon nanotube/reduced graphite oxide hybrid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ranran; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian; Xu, Chaohe; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangqiao

    2011-03-01

    SWCNT-reduced graphite oxide hybrid films were prepared by a filtration method. An efficient post-treatment procedure was designed to reduce GO and remove dispersants simultaneously. The sheet resistance decreased significantly after treatment, by a factor of 4-13 times. Films with excellent performance (95.6%, 655 Ω per square) were obtained and had great potential applications.

  4. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masudur; Neff, David; Green, Nathaniel; Norton, Michael L

    2016-10-31

    Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  5. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  6. A high-rate aqueous symmetric pseudocapacitor based on highly graphitized onion-like carbon/birnessite-type manganese oxide nanohybrids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgopa, K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the pseudocapacitive properties of birnessite-type MnO(sub2) grafted on highly graphitized onion-like carbon (OLC/MnO(sub2)). In a three-electrode setup, we evaluated two different substrates, namely a platinum disc and nickel...

  7. The effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on the properties of a fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, S.; Burchell, T. D.; Strizak, J. P.; Eto, M.

    1996-05-01

    A fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite (IG-110), manufactured from a petroleum coke, was irradiated to a total neutron dose of 3.8 × 10 26 n/m 2 or 25 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600°C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge: National Laboratory (ORNL). The effect of irradiation and the influence of post-irradiation thermal annealing on the properties of the graphite were evaluated. Volume change turnaround was clearly observed at 15—20 dpa and the return to original volume ( {ΔV}/{V 0} = 0 ) can be estimated to occur at ˜ 30 dpa. Strength and elastic moduli of the irradiated graphite increased by a factor of 2-3, and maximums in the {δ}/{δ 0}, and {E}/{E o} curves were at ˜20 dpa at 600°C. Recovery of volume, fracture strength and thermal conductivity by thermal annealing were found., and thermal conductivity returned to better than about 30% of the unirradiated value after 1200°C thermal annealing.

  8. Electronic transport in composites of graphite oxide with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Skakalova, Viera; Vretenar, Viliam; Kopera, Lubontir; Kotrusz, Peter; Mangler, Clemens; Mesko, Marcel; Meyer, Jannik C.; Hulman, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We show that the presence of electrically insulating graphite oxide (GO) within a single wall carbon nanotube network strongly enhances electrical conductivity, whereas reduced graphite oxide, even though electrically conductive, suppresses electrical conductivity within a composite network with single wall carbon nanotubes. Measurements of Young modulus and of Raman spectra strongly support our interpretation of the indirect role of the oxide groups, present in graphite oxide within the sing...

  9. Graphite oxide: a selective and highly efficient oxidant of thiols and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Daniel R; Jia, Hong-Peng; Todd, Alexander D; Geng, Jianxin; Bielawski, Christopher W

    2011-11-07

    The selective oxidation of thiols to disulfides and sulfides to sulfoxides using graphite oxide (GO), a heterogeneous carbocatalyst obtained from low cost, commercial starting materials is described. The aforementioned oxidation reactions were found to proceed rapidly (as short as 10 min in some cases) and in good yield (51-100%) (19 examples). No over-oxidation of the substrates was observed, and GO's heterogeneous nature facilitated isolation and purification of the target products.

  10. Structural and High-Temperature Tensile Properties of Special Pitch-Coke Graphites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlensky, W. V.; Martens, H. E.

    1961-01-01

    The room-temperature structural properties and the tensile properties up to 5000 F (275O C) were determined for ten grades of specially prepared petroleum-coke coal-tar-pitch graphites which were graphitized at 5430 F (3000 C). One impregnation with coal-tar pitch increased the bulk density from 1.41 to 1.57 g/cm3 and the maximum strength at 4500 F (2500 C) from 4000 to 5700 psi. None of the processing parameters studied had a marked effect on the closed porosity or the X-ray structure or the per cent graphitization. The coarse-particle filler resulted in the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion and the fine-particle filler in the highest coefficient. A marked improvement in uniformity of tensile strength was observed. A standard-deviation analysis gave a one-sigma value of approximately 150 psi for one of these special grades and values of 340-420 psi for three commercial grades.

  11. A β-type TiNbZr alloy with low modulus and high strength for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Qingkun; Guo, Shun; Liu, Qing; Hu, Liang; Zhao, Xinqing

    2014-01-01

    The effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on the mechanical properties of a novel β-type Ti–36Nb–5Zr (wt%) alloy has been investigated. The solution treated alloy consists of β and α″ phases and exhibits a two-stage yielding with a low yield stress (around 100 MPa). After cold rolling at a reduction of 87.5% and subsequent annealing treatment at 698 K for 25 min, a fine microstructure with nanosized α precipitates distributed in small β grains as well as high density of dislocations was obtai...

  12. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuera, J M; Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Ayán-Varela, M; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2016-02-07

    Electrolytic--usually referred to as electrochemical--exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.

  13. Aligned nano-porous microwave exfoliated graphite oxide ionic actuators with high strain and elastic energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, M; Kinsman, W; Zhou, Y; Murali, S; Burlingame, Q; Lin, M; Ruoff, R S; Zhang, Q M

    2013-11-20

    A high-density aligned nanoporous activated microwave exfoliated graphite oxide (aMEGO) ionic actuator is studied. Before applying an external electric field, the cations and anions are randomly distributed in the composite. After applying the electric field, ions ingress in between the aligned aMEGO sheets through the nanopores to compensate the charges on the electrodes, resulting in the separation of neighboring sheets and unidirectional electro actuation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2009-07-12

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  15. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuera, J. M.; Paredes, J. I.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Ayán-Varela, M.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise

  16. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, Helena, E-mail: hpardo@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Divine Khan, Ngwashi [Mantfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Faccio, Ricardo [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araujo-Moreira, F.M. [Grupo de Materiais e Dispositivos-CMDMC, Departamento de Fisica e Engenharia Fisica, UFSCar, Caixa Postal 676, 13565-905, Sao Carlos SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Werner, Luciana [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-08-15

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm{sup -1} showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  17. Interaction of the high energy deuterons with the graphite target in the plasma focus devices based on Lee model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akel, M., E-mail: pscientific2@aec.org.sy; Alsheikh Salo, S.; Ismael, Sh. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P. O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone VIC 3148 (Australia); Lee, S. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone VIC 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-07-15

    Numerical experiments are systematically carried out using the Lee model code extended to compute the ion beams on various plasma focus devices operated with Deuterium gas. The deuteron beam properties of the plasma focus are studied for low and high energy plasma focus device. The energy spectral distribution for deuteron ions ejected from the pinch plasma is calculated and the ion numbers with energy around 1 MeV is then determined. The deuteron–graphite target interaction is studied for different conditions. The yield of the reaction {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and the induced radioactivity for one and multi shots plasma focus devices in the graphite solid target is investigated. Our results present the optimized high energy repetitive plasma focus devices as an alternative to accelerators for the production of {sup 13}N short lived radioisotopes. However, technical challenges await solutions on two fronts: (a) operation of plasma focus machines at high rep rates for a sufficient period of time (b) design of durable targets that can take the thermal load.

  18. In operando visualization of hydride-graphite composites during cyclic hydrogenation by high-resolution neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Carsten; Herbrig, Kai; Gondek, Łukasz; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Figiel, Henryk; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Manke, Ingo; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen solid-state storage in metal hydrides has attracted remarkable attention within the past decades due to their high volumetric storage densities at low operating pressures. In particular, recently emerged hydride-graphite composites (HGC) can enable a safe, reliable and very compact hydrogen storage solution for various applications. In this regard, only little is known about the activation behavior of such HGC, their cycle stability and degradation effects. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, neutron imaging offers a distinctive approach to examine in operando reaction fronts, swelling effects and microstructural changes of hydrogen absorbing materials with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this contribution, a comprehensive analysis of various phenomena during activation and cycling of HGC based on a Ti-Mn hydrogen absorbing alloy and expanded natural graphite is reported for the first time. A neutron radiography and tomography set-up with a spatial resolution down to 7 μm was utilized allowing highest detection precision. During initial hydrogenation, regions with enhanced reactivity are observed which contradicts a theoretically expected homogeneous reactivity inside the HGC. These active regions grow with the number of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles until the whole HGC volume uniformly participates in the hydrogen sorption reaction. With regard to long-term hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycling, inhomogeneous swelling effects were observed from which essential conclusions for technical HGC-based tank systems can be derived.

  19. Enabling steady graphite anode cycling with high voltage, additive-free, sulfolane-based electrolyte: Role of the binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; de Meatza, Iratxe; Qi, Xin; Paillard, Elie

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate here the possibility of operating both high voltage spinel and high mass loading graphite electrodes in a 1 M LiPF6 in SL/DMC (1/1, wt/wt) electrolyte without the use of additive. A crucial point for practical graphite electrode operation is the use of the cheaper and environmentally friendly carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) combination instead of the PVDF-based electrodes used in most laboratory studies. With this type of anode we also show the operation of a full Li-ion cell operating at 4.5 V without any additive and show that most of the Li+ transport limitation observed in half-cells are in fact due to the Li metal counter electrode. The anode binder influence is to be considered for the development of high voltage electrolytes lacking good intrinsic SEI building properties, as the anode binder does not affect cathode performance, contrary to most additives. It opens the route for further improvement by use of SEI forming additives (molecular and salts), keeping in mind the requirement for the cathode.

  20. Impact of high energy ball milling on the nanostructure of magnetite–graphite and magnetite–graphite–molybdenum disulphide blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Österle, W., E-mail: Werner.oesterle@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Orts-Gil, G.; Gross, T.; Deutsch, C. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Hinrichs, R. [Instituto de Geociências, UFRGS, P.O. Box 15001, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, P.O. Box 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Zoz, H.; Yigit, D.; Sun, X. [Zoz Group, 57482 Wenden (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Different, partly complementary and partly redundant characterization methods were applied to study the transition of magnetite, graphite and MoS{sub 2} powders to mechanically alloyed nanostructures. The applied methods were: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The main objective was to prepare a model material providing the essential features of a typical tribofilm forming during automotive braking, and to assess the impact of different constituents on sliding behaviour and friction level. Irrespective of the initial grain size, the raw materials were transferred to a nanocrystalline structure and mixed on a nanoscopic scale during high energy ball milling. Whereas magnetite remained almost unchanged, graphite and molybdenum disulphide were transformed to a nanocrystalline and highly disordered structure. The observed increase of the coefficient of friction was attributed to a loss of lubricity of the latter ingredient due to this transformation and subsequent oxidation. - Highlights: • Characterization of microstructural changes induced by high energy ball milling • Assessment of the potential of different characterization methods • Impact of mechanical alloying on tribological performance revealed by tests • Preparation of an artificial third body resembling the one formed during braking.

  1. Failure Predictions for Graphite Reflector Bricks in the Very High Temperature Reactor with the Prismatic Core Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gyanender, E-mail: sing0550@umn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Fok, Alex [Minnesota Dental Research in Biomaterials and Biomechanics, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, 515, Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mantell, Susan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111, Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Failure probability of VHTR reflector bricks predicted though crack modeling. • Criterion chosen for defining failure strongly affects the predictions. • Breaching of the CRC could be significantly delayed through crack arrest. • Capability to predict crack initiation and propagation demonstrated. - Abstract: Graphite is used in nuclear reactor cores as a neutron moderator, reflector and structural material. The dimensions and physical properties of graphite change when it is exposed to neutron irradiation. The non-uniform changes in the dimensions and physical properties lead to the build-up of stresses over the course of time in the core components. When the stresses reach the critical limit, i.e. the strength of the material, cracking occurs and ultimately the components fail. In this paper, an explicit crack modeling approach to predict the probability of failure of a VHTR prismatic reactor core reflector brick is presented. Firstly, a constitutive model for graphite is constructed and used to predict the stress distribution in the reflector brick under in-reactor conditions of high temperature and irradiation. Fracture simulations are performed as part of a Monte Carlo analysis to predict the probability of failure. Failure probability is determined based on two different criteria for defining failure time: A) crack initiation and B) crack extension to near control rod channel. A significant difference is found between the failure probabilities based on the two criteria. It is predicted that the reflector bricks will start cracking during the time range of 5–9 years, while breaching of the control rod channels will occur during the period of 11–16 years. The results show that, due to crack arrest, there is a significantly delay between crack initiation and breaching of the control rod channel.

  2. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Carbon-oxygen reaction efficiency in air gap switch with graphite electrodes under high current pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongyu; Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Xiong, Jiaming; Wu, Haibo; Yu, Bin

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the effect of residual carbon on the insulation performance, after the GW-hundreds kiloampere graphite-electrode switch turning on, the chemical kinetics of the carbon-oxygen reaction is analyzed. The capacitive pulsed experimental circuit is used to reconstruct the actual condition of high power and high current discharge. The carbon-oxygen reaction efficiency is analyzed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a flue gas analyzer. The research shows that the gas products include NOX, O3, CH4, and COX. Through the quantitative analysis, the conversion efficiency of COX increases with the augment of the accumulated transferred charge, and the change law of the CO generation efficiency has an extreme value. With the corresponding calculation and the observation of the scanning electron microscope, it is found that most of the carbon consumed from the graphite electrodes is converted to amorphous elemental carbon, and the insufficiency of the carbon-oxygen reaction leads to the problem of carbon residue, for 20%-45% of elemental carbon is not oxidized. The size of amorphous elemental carbon is about several micrometers to tens micrometers by the analysis of metallographic microscope. In the condition of compressed air, changing the amount of transferred charge is helpful to improve the carbon-oxygen reaction efficiency and inhibit the problem of carbon residue.

  4. Searching for magnetism in hydrogenated graphene: using highly hydrogenated graphene prepared via Birch reduction of graphite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Poh, Hwee Ling; Šaněk, Filip; Maryško, Miroslav; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Fully hydrogenated graphene (graphane) and partially hydrogenated graphene materials are expected to possess various fundamentally different properties from graphene. We have prepared highly hydrogenated graphene containing 5% wt of hydrogen via Birch reduction of graphite oxide using elemental sodium in liquid NH3 as electron donor and methanol as proton donor in the reduction. We also investigate the influence of preparation method of graphite oxide, such as the Staudenmaier, Hofmann or Hummers methods on the hydrogenation rate. A control experiment involving NaNH2 instead of elemental Na was also performed. The materials were characterized in detail by electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy both at room and low temperatures, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis and electrical resistivity measurements. Magnetic measurements are provided of bulk quantities of highly hydrogenated graphene. In the whole temperature range up to room temperature, the hydrogenated graphene exhibits a weak ferromagnetism in addition to a contribution proportional to field that is caused not only by diamagnetism but also likely by an antiferromagnetic influence. The origin of the magnetism is also determined to arise from the hydrogenated graphene itself, and not as a result of any metallic impurities.

  5. A fluorescent graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet biosensor for highly sensitive, label-free detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mei-Hao; Liu, Jin-Wen; Li, Na; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-28

    Graphitic C3N4 (g-C3N4) nanosheets provide an attractive option for bioprobes and bioimaging applications. Utilizing highly fluorescent and water-dispersible ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets, a highly sensitive, selective and label-free biosensor has been developed for ALP detection for the first time. The developed approach utilizes a natural substrate of ALP in biological systems and thus affords very high catalytic efficiency. This novel biosensor is demonstrated to enable quantitative analysis of ALP in a wide range from 0.1 to 1000 U L(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.08 U L(-1), which is among the most sensitive assays for ALP. It is expected that the developed method may provide a low-cost, convenient, rapid and highly sensitive platform for ALP-based clinical diagnostics and biomedical applications.

  6. High-temperature tensile cell for in situ real-time investigation of carbon fibre carbonization and graphitization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, Michael; Rix, James; Landes, Brian; Barton, Bryan; Billovits, Gerry; Hukkanen, Eric; Patton, Jasson; Wang, Weijun; Keane, Denis; Weigand, Steven (Dow); (NWU)

    2016-10-17

    A new high-temperature fibre tensile cell is described, developed for use at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to enable the investigation of the carbonization and graphitization processes during carbon fibre production. This cell is used to heat precursor fibre bundles to temperatures up to ~2300°C in a controlled inert atmosphere, while applying tensile stress to facilitate formation of highly oriented graphitic microstructure; evolution of the microstructure as a function of temperature and time during the carbonization and higher-temperature graphitization processes can then be monitored by collecting real-time wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. As an example, the carbonization and graphitization behaviour of an oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibre was studied up to a temperature of ~1750°C. Real-time WAXD revealed the gradual increase in microstructure alignment with the fibre axis with increasing temperature over the temperature range 600–1100°C. Above 1100°C, no further changes in orientation were observed. The overall magnitude of change increased with increasing applied tensile stress during carbonization. As a second example, the high-temperature graphitizability of PAN- and pitch-derived commercial carbon fibres was studied. Here, the magnitude of graphitic microstructure evolution of the pitch-derived fibre far exceeded that of the PAN-derived fibres at temperatures up to ~2300°C, indicating its facile graphitizability.

  7. In-situ synthesis of Co3O4/graphite nanocomposite for high-performance supercapacitor electrode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, M.; Srikesh, G.; Mohan, A.; Arivazhagan, V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a low cost and pollution free in-situ synthesis of phase pure Co3O4 nanoparticles and Co3O4/graphite nanocomposite have been successfully developed via co-precipitation method followed by the thermal treatment process. The prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. Electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were carried out in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytic solution. The results show the excellent maximum specific capacitive behavior of 239.5 F g-1 for pure and 395.04 F g-1 for Co3O4/graphite nanocomposite at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. This composite exhibits a good cyclic stability, with a small loss of 2.68% of maximum capacitance over a consecutive 1000 cycles. The investigation indicates that the prepared electrode material could be a potential and promising candidate for electrochemical supercapacitors.

  8. Controlled modification of carbon nanotubes and polyaniline on macroporous graphite felt for high-performance microbial fuel cell anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui-Fang; Du, Lin; Guo, Peng-Bo; Zhu, Bao; Luong, John H. T.

    2015-06-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) was electropolymerized on the surface of macroporous graphite felt (GF) followed by the electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The as-prepared macroporous material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle goniometry and electrochemical techniques. Upon the modification of PANI, a rough and nano-cilia containing film is coated on the surface of the graphite fibers, transforming the surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The subsequent modification by CNTs increases the effective surface area and electrical conductivity of the resulting material. The power output of a mediator-free dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) constructed from the GF anode and an exoelectrogen Shewanella putrefaciens increases drastically with the CNT modification. The CNT/PANI/GF MFC attains an output voltage of 342 mV across an external resistor of 1.96 kΩ constant load, and a maximum power density of 257 mW m-2, increased by 343% and 186%, compared to that of the pristine GF MFC and the PANI/GF MFC, respectively. More bacteria are attached on the CNT/PANI/GF anode than on the PANI/GF anode during the working of the MFC. This strategy provides an easy scale-up, simple and controllable method for the preparation of high-performance and low-cost MFC anodes.

  9. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-09

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (flakes enables them to disperse effectively, which contributes to the film-forming characteristics of the FLG flakes. These electrochemically exfoliated FLG flakes are integrated into several kinds of macroscopic graphene structures. Flexible and freestanding graphene papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  11. Heavily Graphitic-Nitrogen Self-doped High-porosity Carbon for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tong; Liao, Wenli; Li, Zhongbin; Sun, Lingtao; Shi, Dongping; Guo, Chaozhong; Huang, Yu; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Jing; Li, Yanrong; Diao, Qizhi

    2017-11-01

    Large-scale production of active and stable porous carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) from protein-rich biomass became a hot topic in fuel cell technology. Here, we report a facile strategy for synthesis of nitrogen-doped porous nanocarbons by means of a simple two-step pyrolysis process combined with the activation of zinc chloride and acid-treatment process, in which kidney bean via low-temperature carbonization was preferentially adopted as the only carbon-nitrogen sources. The results show that this carbon material exhibits excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity, and higher durability and methanol-tolerant property compared to the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst for the ORR, which can be mainly attributed to high graphitic-nitrogen content, high specific surface area, and porous characteristics. Our results can encourage the synthesis of high-performance carbon-based ORR electrocatalysts derived from widely-existed natural biomass.

  12. Poly(hydridocarbyne as Highly Processable Insulating Polymer Precursor to Micro/Nanostructures and Graphite Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Katzenmeyer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-based electronic materials have received much attention since the discovery and elucidation of the properties of the nanotube, fullerene allotropes, and conducting polymers. Amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene, and diamond have also been the topics of intensive research. In accordance with this interest, we herein provide the details of a novel and facile method for synthesis of poly(hydridocarbyne (PHC, a preceramic carbon polymer reported to undergo a conversion to diamond-like carbon (DLC upon pyrolysis and also provide electrical characterization after low-temperature processing and pyrolysis of this material. The results indicate that the strongly insulating polymer becomes notably conductive in bulk form upon heating and contains interspersed micro- and nanostructures, which are the subject of ongoing research.

  13. High contrast ultrasonic imaging of resin-rich regions in graphite/epoxy composites using entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael S.; McCarthy, John E.; Bruillard, Paul. J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2016-02-01

    This study compares different approaches for imaging a near-surface resin-rich defect in a thin graphite/epoxy plate using backscattered ultrasound. The specimen was created by cutting a circular hole in the second ply; this region filled with excess resin from the graphite/epoxy sheets during the curing process. Backscat-tered waveforms were acquired using a 4 in. focal length, 5MHz center frequency broadband transducer, scanned on a 100 × 100 grid of points that were 0.03 × 0.03 in. apart. The specimen was scanned with the defect side closest to the transducer. Consequently, the reflection from the resin-rich region cannot be gated from the large front-wall echo. At each point in the grid 256 waveforms were averaged together and subsequently used to produce peak-to-peak, Signal Energy (sum of squared digitized waveform values), as well as entropy images of two different types (a Renyi entropy, and a joint entropy). As the figure shows, all of the entropy images exhibit better border delineation and defect contrast than the either the peak-to-peak or Signal Energy. The best results are obtained using the joint entropy of the backscattered waveforms with a reference function. Two different references are examined. The first is a reflection of the insonifying pulse from a stainless steel reflector. The second is an approximate optimum obtained from an iterative parametric search. The joint entropy images produced using this reference exhibit three times the contrast obtained in previous studies.

  14. Preparations and characterizations of novel graphite-like materials and some high oxidation state fluorine chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ciping [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Novel graphite-like materials, BCx (6>x≥}3), have been prepared using BCl3 and C6H6 at 800--1000C, and CxN (14>x≥5) have been synthesized using C5H5N and Cl2 at 680C--986C. Bulk and thin film characterization were used to study the structure and bonding in these solids. C8K(NH3)1.1 was prepared by reacting C8K with gaseous NH3. The carbon sub-lattice is hexagonal: a = 2.47 Å, c = 6.47 Å. The smaller a parameter and lower conductivity are attributed to smaller electron transfer from K to the conduction band solvation of K by NH3. A simplified liquid phase method for synthesizing Li-graphite intercalation compounds has been developed; synthesis of a lamellar mixed conductor, Cx+Li2N-, has been attempted. Stability and conductivity of (BN)3SO3F have been studied; it was shown to be metallic with a specific conductivity of 1.5 S•cm-1. Its low conductivity is attributed to the low mobility of holes in BN sheets.

  15. A novel route to graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} with high electron transfer and photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianjie; Liu, Fenglin; Liu, Bing [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Tian, Lihong, E-mail: tian7978@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Wei; Xia, Qinghua [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Mesoporous nanocomposites that graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} are prepared by solvothermal method combined with a post- calcination. • The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization but also provides the carbon source in the process. • The graphite-like carbon hinders the recombination of photogenerated electron and holes efficiently. • The mesoporous carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite shows high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight. - Abstract: Mesoporous graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} (carbon–SnO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were prepared by a modified solvothermal method combined with a post-calcination at 500 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization, but also provides the carbon source in the process. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show a uniform distribution of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the graphite- like carbon surface. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate the presence of strong C–Sn interaction between SnO{sub 2} and graphite-like carbon. Photoelectrochemical measurements confirm that the effective separation of electron–hole pairs on the carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite leads to a high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight irradiation. The nanocomposite materials show a potential application in dealing with the environmental and industrial contaminants under sunlight irradiation.

  16. Web-structured graphitic carbon fiber felt as an interlayer for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries with highly improved cycling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Ahn, Chi Won; Jeon, Hwan-Jin

    2017-08-01

    Graphitic carbon fiber felt (GCFF) with a crystalline graphitic carbon structure was facilely prepared by a combination of electrospinning and graphitization (2800 °C heat treatment) and was used as an interlayer between the cathode and separator in Li-S batteries. This GCFF interlayer trapped the polysulfides on the cathode side and increased the utilization of sulfur by suppressing the shuttle phenomenon. Also, the GCFF was shown to be able to act as an upper current collector to reduce the charge-transfer resistance owing to the high crystallinity of the graphitic carbon fibers. The sulfur cathode with the GCFF interlayer showed a high specific initial discharge capacity of 1280.14 mAh g-1 and excellent cycling stability (1004.62 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles) at 0.2 C. Also, an image of the glass fiber (GF) separator on the anode side confirmed the presence of an SEI after 200 cycles, which apparently resulted from stable Li deposition on the Li metal because of the low or medium concentration of sulfur in the electrolyte solution. Our observations should contribute to elucidating the key features of complex three-dimensional carbon fabrics with crystalline graphitic structures that allow them, when inserted as interlayers, to markedly improve the performance of rechargeable batteries.

  17. Improved mechanical and functional properties of elastomer/graphite nanocomposites prepared by latex compounding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jian [Key Laboratory for Nano-materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tian Ming [Key Laboratory for Nano-materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100029 (China); Jia Qingxiu [Key Laboratory on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi Junhong [Key Laboratory for Nano-materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang Liqun [Key Laboratory for Nano-materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100029 (China); Key Laboratory on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)], E-mail: zhanglq@mail.buct.edu.cn; Lim Szuhui; Yu Zhongzhen [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (J07), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mai Yiuwing [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (J07), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: y.mai@usyd.edu.au

    2007-10-15

    The facile latex approach has been adopted to finely incorporate graphite nanosheets into elastomeric polymer matrix to obtain high-performance elastomeric nanocomposites with improved mechanical properties and functional properties. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments show that the nanostructures of the final nanocomposites exhibit a high degree of exfoliation and intercalation of graphite in the nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) matrix. Mechanical and dynamic-mechanical tests demonstrate that the NBR/graphite nanocomposites possess greatly increased elastic modulus and tensile strength, and desirably strong interfaces. The unexpected self-crosslinking of elastomer/graphite nanocomposites was discovered and then verified by oscillating disc rheometry and equilibrium swelling experiments. After critically examining various polymer types by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a radical initiation mechanism was proposed to explain the self-crosslinking reaction. These NBR/graphite nanocomposites possess significantly improved wear resistance and gas barrier properties, and superior electrical/thermal conductivity. Such versatile functional properties make NBR nanocomposites a promising new class of advanced materials.

  18. Multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films and nanodots grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Wook; Son, Jong Yeog

    2017-12-01

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films and nanodots are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates via a pulsed laser deposition technique, where the HOPG surface has a honeycomb lattice structure made of carbon atoms, similar to graphene. A graphene/BFO/HOPG capacitor exhibited multiferroic properties, namely ferroelectricity (a residual polarization of 26.8 μC/cm2) and ferromagnetism (a residual magnetization of 1.1 × 10-5 emu). The BFO thin film had high domain wall energies and demonstrated switching time of approximately 82 ns. An 8-nm BFO nanodot showed a typical piezoelectric hysteresis loop with an effective residual piezoelectric constant of approximately 110 pm/V and exhibited two clearly separated current curves depending on the ferroelectric polarization direction.

  19. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  20. Identification of nano-sized holes by TEM in the graphene layer of graphite and the high rate discharge capability of Li-ion battery anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Tsutomu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Endo, Koji [Department of Chemistry, Rikkyo University, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Fu, Lijun; Wu, Yuping [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Lee, Kyeong Jik [SODIFF Advanced Material Co. Ltd., Yeongju, Geongbuk 750-080 (Korea); Matsumoto, Takatoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2007-12-20

    SEM images of round-shaped natural graphite, currently widely used as the anode active material of Li-ion batteries, show that the surface mainly consists of the basal plane, which suggests that the Li insertion/extraction reaction rate is quite limited. In contrast to this suggestion, however, the anode of commercial Li-ion batteries is capable of high rate charging/discharging. In order to explain this inconsistency, we propose that there are nano-holes in the graphene layers of the graphite allowing Li to be very easily inserted and extracted via the holes. Prior to the measurements a quantum chemical investigation was performed on the energy required for Li to pass through the hole in a graphene layer (E{sub act}). The results showed that the E{sub act} value is too high when the size is smaller than pyrene, but is fairly low for holes of the size of coronene, implying that Li can pass through the basal plane layer if there is a hole larger than coronene. Characterization of the rounded graphite sample and flaky natural graphite was conducted by constant-current charge/discharge cycle tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD revealed no appreciable difference between the rounded graphite and flaky natural graphite, in agreement with Raman data. A detailed analysis of the HRTEM results revealed the presence of a number of variously sized circular images. We believe that these are holes in the graphene layer through which Li can pass. The mechanism of formation of the holes is discussed. (author)

  1. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  2. Structural benefits of bisphenol S and its analogs resulting in their high sorption on carbon nanotubes and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiying; Li, Hao; Liang, Ni; Chen, Fangyuan; Liao, Shaohua; Zhang, Di; Wu, Min; Pan, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenol S (BPS), a new bisphenol analog, is considered to be a potential replacement for bisphenol A (BPA), which has gained concern because of its potentially adverse health impacts. Therefore, studies are needed to investigate the environmental fate and risks of this compound. In this study, the adsorption of BPS and four structural analogs on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite (GP) were investigated. When solid-phase concentrations were normalized by the surface areas, oxygen-containing functional groups on the absorbents showed a positive impact on phenol sorption but inhibited the sorption of chemicals with two benzene rings. Among BPS analogs, diphenyl sulfone showed the lowest sorption when hydrophobic effects were ruled out. Chemicals with a butterfly structure, formed between the two benzene rings, showed consistently high sorption on MWCNTs, independent of the substituted electron-donating or accepting functional groups. This study emphasizes the importance of chemical conformation on organic, contaminant sorption on engineered, carbonaceous materials.

  3. Covalent Modification of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite with a Stable Organic Free Radical by Using Diazonium Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seber, Gonca; Rudnev, Alexander V; Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan; Veciana, Jaume; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepció; Crivillers, Núria

    2017-01-26

    A novel, persistent, electrochemically active perchlorinated triphenylmethyl (PTM) radical with a diazonium functionality has been covalently attached to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by electrografting in a single-step process. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM) and Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that PTM molecules had a higher tendency to covalently react at the HOPG step edges. The cross-section profiles from EC-STM images showed that there was current enhancement at the functionalized areas, which could be explained by redox-mediated electron tunneling through surface-confined redox-active molecules. Cyclic voltammetry clearly demonstrated that the intrinsic properties of the organic radical were preserved upon grafting and DFT calculations also revealed that the magnetic character of the PTM radical was preserved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Polytypes and twins in the diamond-lonsdaleite system formed by high-pressure and high-temperature treatment of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnitskiy, Boris; Perezhogin, Igor; Dubitsky, Gennady; Blank, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    As a result of the high-temperature and high-pressure treatment of graphite we obtained a powder containing diamond and lonsdaleite. The structure and properties of the powder were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the synthesized material contains not only diamond nanoparticles, but also some relatively large (up to several nanometers) fragments of lonsdaleite. 4H and 6H polytypes were found in some of the diamond particles. Incoherent twin boundaries were observed in the diamond particle containing fragments of lonsdaleite.

  5. Standardized hydrogen storage module with high utilization factor based on metal hydride-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Inga; Dieterich, Mila; Pohlmann, Carsten; Röntzsch, Lars; Linder, Marc

    2017-02-01

    In view of hydrogen based backup power systems or small-scale power2gas units, hydrogen storages based on metal hydrides offer a safe and reliable solution. By using Hydralloy C5 as suitable hydride forming alloy, the present tank design guarantees very simple operating conditions: pressures between 4 bar and 30 bar, temperatures between 15 °C and 40 °C and minimal efforts for thermal management in combination with fast and constant charging and discharging capabilities. The modular tank consists of 4 layers with 5 reactor tubes each that are filled with metal hydride-graphite composites of a diameter of 21 mm. Experiments show that each layer of this tank is able to desorb the desired amount of hydrogen for a fuel cell operation at electrical power of 160 Wel for 100 min reaching a utilization factor of 93% of the stored hydrogen at RC. Furthermore, the experimental results of modularity, increasing loads and the electric air ventilation are presented.

  6. Facile synthesis of graphite/PEDOT/MnO2 composites on commercial supercapacitor separator membranes as flexible and high-performance supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pengyi; Han, Lijuan; Zhang, Li

    2014-07-09

    A facile and low-cost method is presented to synthesize graphite/PEDOT/MnO2 composites with controlled network structures on commercial supercapacitor separator (CSS) membranes for high-performance supercapacitors, in which pencil lead and a cellulose-based commercial supercapacitor separator membrane were applied as the graphite source and the flexible substrate, respectively. The dependence of PEDOT and MnO2 loading on the structural formation, the electrochemical performance of the hybrid electrode, and the formation mechanism of MnO2 nanowires are systematically investigated. The optimized electrode possesses a high areal capacitance of 316.4 mF/cm(2) at a scan rate of 10 mV/s and specific capacitance of 195.7 F/g at 0.5 A/g. The asymmetric supercapacitor device assembled using optimized CSS/Graphite/PEDOT/MnO2 electrode and activated carbon electrode exhibits a high energy density of 31.4 Wh/kg at a power density of 90 W/kg and maintains 1 Wh/kg at 4500 W/kg. After 2000 cycles, the device retains 81.1% of initial specific capacitance, and can drive a mini DC-motor for ca. 10 s. The enhanced capability of the CSS-based graphite/PEDOT/MnO2 network electrode has high potential for low-cost, high-performance, and flexible supercapacitors.

  7. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  8. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Chenfeng [Civil and Computational Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10{sup 22}n cm{sup −2} (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected

  9. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Deconstructing graphite: graphenide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2013-01-15

    Growing interest in graphene over past few years has prompted researchers to find new routes for producing this material other than mechanical exfoliation or growth from silicon carbide. Chemical vapor deposition on metallic substrates now allows researchers to produce continuous graphene films over large areas. In parallel, researchers will need liquid, large scale, formulations of graphene to produce functional graphene materials that take advantage of graphene's mechanical, electrical, and barrier properties. In this Account, we describe methods for creating graphene solutions from graphite. Graphite provides a cheap source of carbon, but graphite is insoluble. With extensive sonication, it can be dispersed in organic solvents or water with adequate additives. Nevertheless, this process usually creates cracks and defects in the graphite. On the other hand, graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) provide a means to dissolve rather than disperse graphite. GICS can be obtained through the reaction of alkali metals with graphite. These compounds are a source of graphenide salts and also serve as an excellent electronic model of graphene due to the decoupling between graphene layers. The graphenide macroions, negatively charged graphene sheets, form supple two-dimensional polyelectrolytes that spontaneously dissolve in some organic solvents. The entropic gain from the dissolution of counterions and the increased degrees of freedom of graphene in solution drives this process. Notably, we can obtain graphenide solutions in easily processable solvents with low boiling points such as tetrahydrofuran or cyclopentylmethylether. We performed a statistical analysis of high resolution transmission electronic micrographs of graphene sheets deposited on grids from GICs solution to show that the dissolved material has been fully exfoliated. The thickness distribution peaks with single layers and includes a few double- or triple-layer objects. Light scattering analysis of the

  11. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  12. Comparison of The Thermal Conductivity of selected Nuclear Graphite Grades for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is well known that the thermal conductivity of nuclear graphite is influenced by factors such as phonon boundary scattering processes, Umklapp processes, electron-phonon scattering etc, and a lot of studies have been performed to investigate the neutron-irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity of graphite. However, no studies have been reported yet for the overall differences in the thermal conductivity of the nuclear graphite grades for HTGR differing in coke source (petroleum, coal), forming method and particle size. In the present study, the thermal conductivities of seven candidate nuclear graphite grades for HTGR were determined and compared based on the microstructure of the grades. The thermal conductivity is an important material input data during the design, construction and operation of HTGR. The thermal conductivities of seven nuclear graphite grades for HTGR were determined by laser flash method from room temperature to 1,100 .deg. C and compared based on the microstructure of the grade. Conclusions obtained from the study are as follow. (1) The thermal conductivity of seven nuclear graphite grades appeared to be strongly influenced by the grain size at low temperature below about 500 .deg. C and by the phonon-phonon scattering at above 800 .deg. C. (2) All the grades show a decrease in TC of 55-60 % from their room temperature TCs with increasing temperature to 1,100 .deg. C.

  13. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, S. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T.; Dong, C.

    2013-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC1-x, Co3W9C4, Co3W3C phases and graphite precipitate domains ˜50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ˜0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10-5 mm3/min to 6.3 × 10-6 mm3/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  14. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, S.Z., E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Xu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin 123000 (China); Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T. [Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Dong, C. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2013-11-15

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC{sub 1−x}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 9}C{sub 4}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 3}C phases and graphite precipitate domains ∼50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ∼0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/min to 6.3 × 10{sup −6} mm{sup 3}/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  15. Elastic moduli, damping and modulus of rupture changes in a high alumina refractory castable due to different types of thermal shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, A. H. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The work herein verifies the changes of the elastic moduli, damping and modulus of rupture (MOR of a high alumina refractory castable due to heating, cooling and heating-cooling thermal shock damage. Twelve prismatic specimens were prepared for the tests and divided into four groups. The thermal shocks were performed on three groups, each containing three specimens having abrupt temperature changes of 1100°C during heating in the first group, during cooling in the second and during heating followed by cooling in the third group. The fourth group, which was taken as a reference did not receive any thermal shock. The elastic moduli were measured after each thermal shock cycle. After 10 cycles, the MOR, the damping and the damping dependence on excitation amplitude were measured at room temperature for all specimens. The elastic moduli showed a similar decrease and the damping a similar increase due to the cooling and heating-cooling thermal shocks. The heating thermal shocks caused no significant changes on the elastic moduli and damping. However, the MOR appeared to be sensitive to the heating thermal shock. This work also shows that the damping for the studied refractory castable is non-linear (i.e., amplitude of excitation sensitive and that this non-linearity increases when the damage level rises.

    En este trabajo se investigaron las alteraciones de los módulos elásticos dinámicos, del amortiguamiento y del módulo de rotura (MOR de un material refractario moldeable de alta alúmina después de recibir choques térmicos de calentamiento, enfriamiento y calentamiento seguido de enfriamiento (calentamiento-enfriamiento. Para ello se prepararon doce cuerpos prismáticos dividiéndolos en cuatro grupos. Los choques térmicos se le aplicaron a sólo tres grupos, cada uno con tres muestras. Al primer grupo se le aplicó un cambio brusco de temperatura de 1100 °C en calentamiento, en enfriamiento al segundo grupo y calentamiento seguido

  16. Standard test method for Young's modulus, tangent modulus, and chord modulus

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of Young's modulus, tangent modulus, and chord modulus of structural materials. This test method is limited to materials in which and to temperatures and stresses at which creep is negligible compared to the strain produced immediately upon loading and to elastic behavior. 1.2 Because of experimental problems associated with the establishment of the origin of the stress-strain curve described in 8.1, the determination of the initial tangent modulus (that is, the slope of the stress-strain curve at the origin) and the secant modulus are outside the scope of this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory require...

  17. The Erosion of Diamond and Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2018-01-01

    Polymers and other oxidizable materials on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded due to reaction with atomic oxygen (AO). Therefore, in order to design durable spacecraft, it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of materials susceptible to AO reaction. The Polymers Experiment was developed to determine the AO Ey of various polymers and other materials flown in ram and wake orientations in LEO. The experiment was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7) mission for 1.5 years on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). As part of the experiment, a sample containing Class 2A diamond (100 plane) and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, basal and edge planes) was exposed to ram AO and characterized for erosion. The materials were salt-sprayed prior to flight to provide isolated sites of AO protection. The Ey of the samples was determined through post-flight electron microscopy recession depth measurements. The experiment also included a Kapton H witness sample for AO fluence determination. This paper provides an overview of the MISSE 7 mission, a description of the flight experiment, the characterization techniques used, the mission AO fluence, and the LEO Ey results for diamond and HOPG (basal and edge planes). The data is compared to the Ey of pyrolytic graphite exposed to four years of space exposure as part of the MISSE 2 mission. The results indicate that diamond erodes, but with a very low Ey of 1.58 +/- 0.04 x 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3)/atom. The different HOPG planes displayed significantly different amounts of erosion from each other. The HOPG basal plane had an Ey of 1.05 +/- 0.08 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp 3)/atom while the edge plane had a lower Ey of only 5.38 +/- 0.90 x 10(exp -25) -cm(exp 3)/atom. The Ey data from this ISS spaceflight experiment provides valuable information for understanding of chemistry

  18. APPLICATION OF MODIFYING ALLOYING ALLOY CONTAINING NANOSIZED POWDERS OF ACTIVE ELEMENTS IN PRODUCTION OF HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON WITH GLOBULAR GRAPHITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalinichenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and practical interest is the application of alloying alloy-modifiers for secondary treatment of high-strength cast iron to stabilize the process of spheroidization graphite and achieving higher physical-mechanical properties of castings. The peculiarity of the high-strength cast irons manufacturing technology is their tendency to supercooling during solidification in the mold. This leads to the formation of shrinkage defects and structurally free cementite, especially in thin-walled sections of the finished castings. To minimize these effects in foundry practice during production of ductile iron the secondary inoculation is widely used. In this regard, the question of the choice of the additives with effective impact not only on the graphitization process but also on the formation of the metallic base of ductile iron is relevant. The aim of the present work is to study the peculiarities of structure formation in cast iron with nodular graphite when alloying alloy-modifier based on tin with additions of nanoparticles of titanium carbide, yttrium oxide and graphite nano-pipes is used for secondary treatment. Melting of iron in laboratory conditions was performed in crucible induction furnace IST-006 with an acid lining held. Spheroidizing treatment of melt was realized with magnesium containing alloying alloy FeSiMg7 by means of ladle method. Secondary treatment of high strength cast iron was carried out by addition of alloying alloy-modifier in an amount of 0.1% to the bottom of the pouring ladle. Cast samples for chemical composition analysis, study of microstructure, technological and mechanical properties of the resultant alloy were made. Studies have shown that the secondary treatment of high strength cast iron with developed modifier-alloying alloy results in formation of the perlite metallic base due to the tin impact and nodular graphite with regular shape under the influence of titanium carbide, yttrium oxide and graphite nano

  19. Self-Supporting GaN Nanowires/Graphite Paper: Novel High-Performance Flexible Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2017-02-01

    Flexible supercapacitors have attracted great interest as energy storage devices because of their promise in applications such as wearable and smart electronic devices. Herein, a novel flexible supercapacitor electrode based on gallium nitride nanowire (GaN NW)/graphite paper (GP) nanocomposites is reported. The outstanding electrical conductivities of the GaN NW (6.36 × 102 S m-1 ) and GP (7.5 × 104 S m-1 ) deliver a synergistically enhanced electrochemical performance that cannot be achieved by either of the components alone. The composite electrode exhibits excellent specific capacitance (237 mF cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2 ) and outstanding cycling performance (98% capacitance retention after 10 000 cycles). The flexible symmetric supercapacitor also manifests high energy and power densities (0.30 mW h cm-3 and 1000 mW cm-3 ). These findings demonstrate that the GaN/GP composite electrode has significant potential as a candidate for the flexible energy storage devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. On the isosteric heat of adsorption of non-polar and polar fluids on highly graphitized carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Toshihide; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Sotowa, Ken-Ichiro; Alcántara Avila, Jesús Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Isosteric heat of adsorption is indispensable in probing the energetic behavior of interaction between adsorbate and solid, and it can shed insight into how molecules interact with a solid by studying the dependence of isosteric heat on loading. In this study, we illustrated how this can be used to explain the difference between adsorption of non-polar (and weakly polar) fluids and strong polar fluids on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F. This carbon black has a very small quantity of functional group, and interestingly we showed that no matter how small it is the analysis of the isosteric heat versus loading can identify its presence and how it affects the way polar molecules adsorb. We used argon and nitrogen as representatives of non-polar fluid and weakly polar fluid, and methanol and water for strong polar fluid. The pattern of the isosteric heat versus loading can be regarded as a fingerprint to determine the mechanism of adsorption for strong polar fluids, which is very distinct from that for non-polar fluids. This also allows us to estimate the interplay between the various interactions: fluid-fluid, fluid-basal plane and fluid-functional group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Macroporous graphitic carbon foam decorated with polydopamine as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji

    2017-09-01

    Herein, a macroporous graphitic carbon foam (MGCF) electrode decorated with polydopamine (PDA) is used as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell (MFC) applications. The MGCF is facilely prepared by pyrolysis of a powder mixture comprising maltose, nickel nitrate, and ammonia chloride, without using solid porous template. The MGCF is coated with PDA by self-polymerization of dopamine in a basic solution. The MGCF can provide a large surface area for bacterial attachment, and PDA coated on the MGCF electrode can further promote bacterial adhesion resulting from the improved hydrophility, so the MGCF-PDA electrode as an anode in a MFC can show ultrahigh bacterial loading capacity. Moreover, the electrochemical oxidation of flavins at the MGCF-PDA electrode is greatly accelerated, so the extracellular electron transfer mediated by flavins is improved. As a result, the MFC equipped with a MGCF-PDA anode can show a maximum power density of 1735 mW cm-2, which is 6.7 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon felt anode, indicating a promising anode for MFC applications.

  2. Determination of boron isotope ratios by high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry using graphite furnace vaporizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Carlos; Florek, Stefan; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Huang, Mao-Dong; Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Recknagel, Sebastian; Vogl, Jochen; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2017-10-01

    Boron isotope amount ratios n(10B)/n(11B) have been determined by monitoring the absorption spectrum of boron monohydride (BH) in a graphite furnace using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-MAS). Bands (0 → 0) and (1 → 1) for the electronic transition X1Σ+ → A1Π were evaluated around wavelengths 433.1 nm and 437.1 nm respectively. Clean and free of memory effect molecular spectra of BH were recorded. In order to eliminate the memory effect of boron, a combination of 2% (v/v) hydrogen gas in argon and 1% trifluoromethane in argon, an acid solution of calcium chloride and mannitol as chemical modifiers was used. Partial least square regression (PLS) for analysis of samples and reference materials were applied. For this, a spectral library with different isotopes ratios for PLS regression was built. Results obtained around the 433.1 nm and 437.1 nm spectral regions are metrologically compatible with those reported by mass spectrometric methods. Moreover, for the evaluated region of 437 nm, an accuracy of 0.15‰ is obtained as the average deviation from the isotope reference materials. Expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of k = 2 range between 0.15 and 0.44‰. This accuracy and precision are compatible with those obtained by mass spectrometry for boron isotope ratio measurements.

  3. Nitrogen–doped graphitized carbon shell encapsulated NiFe nanoparticles: A highly durable oxygen evolution catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lei; Luo, Langli; Feng, Zhenxing; Engelhard, Mark; Xie, Xiaohong; Han, Binghong; Sun, Junming; Zhang, Jianghao; Yin, Geping; Wang, Chongmin; Wang, Yong; Shao, Yuyan

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a crucial role in various energy conversion devices such as water electrolyzers and metal–air batteries. Precious metal catalysts such as Ir, Ru and their oxides are usually used for enhancing reaction kinetics but are limited by their scarce resource. The challenges associated with alternative non–precious metal catalysts such as transition metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides etc. are their low electronic conductivity and durability. Herein, we report a highly active (360 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm–2GEO) and durable (no degradation after 20000 cycles) OER catalyst derived from bimetallic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) precursors. This catalyst consists of NiFe nanoparticles encapsulated by nitrogen–doped graphitized carbon shells. The electron-donation/deviation from Fe and tuned electronic structure of metal cores by Ni are revealed to be primary contributors to the enhanced OER activity, whereas N concentration contributes negligibly. We further demonstrated that the structure and morphology of encapsulating carbon shells, which are the key factors influencing the durability, are facilely controlled by the chemical state of precursors.

  4. Hydrogen bonds induced supramolecular self-assembly of azobenzene derivatives on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinrui; Cheng, Zhiyu; Ren, Biye; Deng, Wenli

    2012-08-01

    The self-assembly of azobenzene derivatives (CnAzCOOH) with various lengths of peripheral alkyl chains (with carbon number of n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16) were observed by scanning tunneling microscopy on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. The effect of van der Waals interactions and the intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the two-dimensional self-assembly was systematically studied. No alkyl-chain length effect was observed according to the STM images. All kinds of CnAzCOOH adopting the same pattern self-assembled on the HOPG surface, suggesting the formation of the two-dimensional structures was dominated by the hydrogen bonding of the functional groups. It could be found that two CnAzCOOH molecules formed a hydrogen-bonded dimer with “head-to-head” fashion as expected; however, the dimers organized themselves in the form of relative complex lamellae. Three dimers as a group arranged side by side and formed a well-defined stripe with periodic dislocations due to the registry mechanism of the alkyl chain with the underlying HOPG surface. The hydrogen bonds between the adjacent dimers in one lamella were formed and dominated the self-assembled pattern.

  5. Highly efficient hydrogen release from formic acid using a graphitic carbon nitride-supported AgPd nanoparticle catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; Li, Xiao; Wan, Chao; Xu, Lixin; An, Yue; Ye, Mingfu; Lei, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Bimetallic AgPd nanoparticles with various molar ratios immobilized on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) were successfully synthesized via a facile co-reduction approach. The powder XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, ICP-AES and BET were employed to characterize the structure, size, composition and loading metal electronic states of the AgPd/g-C3N4 catalysts. The catalytic property of as-prepared catalysts for the dehydrogenation of formic acid (FA) with sodium formate (SF) as the additive was investigated. The performance of these catalysts, as indicated by the turnover frequency (TOF), depended on the composition of the prepared catalysts. Among all the AgPd/g-C3N4 catalysts tested, Ag9Pd91/g-C3N4 was found to be an exceedingly high activity for decomposing FA into H2 with TOF up to 480 h-1 at 323 K. The prepared catalyst is thus a potential candidate for triggering the widespread use of FA for H2 storage.

  6. Disentangled solid state and metastable polymer melt; a solvent free route to high-modulus high-strength tapes and films of UHMWPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) having average molar mass greater than a million g/mol is an engineering polymer. Due to its light-weight, high abrasion resistance and biocompatibility it is used for demanding applications such as body armour, prostheses etc. At present, because of its high melt viscosity to achieve the uniaxial/biaxial properties in the form of fibers/films the polymer is processed via solution route where nearly 95wt% of the solvent is used to process 5wt% of the polymer. In past several attempts have been made to process the polymer without using any solvent. However, compared to the solvent processing route the achieved mechanical properties were rather poor. Here we show that by controlled synthesis it is feasible to obtain UHMWPE that could be processed free of solvent to make uniaxial tapes and biaxial films, having unprecedented mechanical properties, exceeding that of the solution spun fibers. We address some of the fundamental aspects of chemistry, physics, rheology and processing for the development of desired morphological features to achieve the ultimate mechanical properties in tapes and films. The paper will also address the metastable melt state obtained on melting of the disentangled crystals and its implication on rheology in linear and nonlinear viscoelastic region. Solid state NMR studies will be applied to establish disentangled state in solid state to the polymerisation conditions. References: Macromolecules 2011, 44(14), 5558-5568; Nature Materials 2005, 4, 635-641; Phys Rev Lett 2006, 96(21), 218303-218205. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Dutch Polymer Institute.

  7. Modulus optimum for digital controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víteèek Antonín

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the popular modulus optimum with the original approach for the conventional digital controllers. The use of the D-transform allows obtaining the uniform computing formulas for the values of the digital and analog controller tuning parameters. The use is shown on an example.

  8. Nanostructured Phosphorus Doped Silicon/Graphite Composite as Anode for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiqiang; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Wang, Deyu; Shen, Cai

    2017-07-19

    Silicon as the potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries suffers from huge volume change (up to 400%) during charging/discharging processes. Poor electrical conductivity of silicon also hinders its long-term cycling performance. Herein, we report a two-step ball milling method to prepare nanostructured P-doped Si/graphite composite. Both P-doped Si and coated graphite improved the conductivity by providing significant transport channels for lithium ions and electrons. The graphite skin is able to depress the volume expansion of Si by forming a stable SEI film. The as-prepared composite anode having 50% P-doped Si and 50% graphite exhibits outstanding cyclability with a specific capacity of 883.4 mAh/g after 200 cycles at the current density of 200 mA/g. The cost-effective materials and scalable preparation method make it feasible for large-scale application of the P-doped Si/graphite composite as anode for Li-ion batteries.

  9. Large scale production of highly-qualified graphene by ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunwei; Tong, Xili; Guo, Xiaoning; Wang, Yingyong; Jin, Guoqiang; Guo, Xiangyun

    2013-11-29

    Highly-qualified graphene was prepared by the ultrasonic exfoliation of commercial expanded graphite (EG) under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition. The yield of graphene from the first exfoliation is 7 wt%, and it can be increased to more than 65 wt% by repeated exfoliations. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analysis show that the as-prepared graphene only has a few defects or oxides, and more than 95% of the graphene flakes have a thickness of ~1 nm. The electrochemical performance of the as-prepared graphene is comparable to reduced graphene oxide in the determination of dopamine (DA) from the mixed solution of ascorbic acid, uric acid and DA. These results show that the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3 molecules in the EG layers under ultrasonication promotes the exfoliation of graphite and provides a low-priced route for large scale production of highly-quality graphene.

  10. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  11. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Highly Sensitive Detection of H2O2 and Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Wen; Luo, Ying; Wang, Yu-Min; Duan, Lu-Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-12-14

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets, an emerging graphene-like carbon-based nanomaterial with high fluorescence and large specific surface areas, hold great potential for biosensor applications. Current g-C3N4 nanosheets based fluorescent biosensors majorly rely on single fluorescent intensity reading through fluorescence quenching interactions between the nanosheets and metal ions. Here we report for the first time the development of a novel g-C3N4 nanosheets-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing strategy for highly sensitive detection of H2O2 and glucose. With o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidized by H2O2 in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the oxidization product can assemble on the g-C3N4 nanosheets through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking, which effectively quenches the fluorescence of g-C3N4 while delivering a new emission peak. The ratiometric signal variations enable robust and sensitive detection of H2O2. On the basis of the glucose converting into H2O2 through the catalysis of glucose oxidase, the g-C3N4-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing platform is also exploited for glucose assay. The developed strategy is demonstrated to give a detection limit of 50 nM for H2O2 and 0.4 μM for glucose, at the same time, it has been successfully used for glucose levels detection in human serum. This strategy may provide a cost-efficient, robust, and high-throughput platform for detecting various species involving H2O2-generation reactions for biomedical applications.

  12. Observation of Compressive Deformation Behavior of Nuclear Graphite by Digital Image Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Eungseon; Kim, Minhwan; Kim, Yongwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Polycrystalline nuclear graphite has been proposed as a fuel element, moderator and reflector blocks, and core support structures in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor. During reactor operation, graphite core components and core support structures are subjected to various stresses. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of deformation and fracture of nuclear graphites, and their significance to structural integrity assessment methods. Digital image correlation (DIC) is a powerful tool to measure the full field displacement distribution on the surface of the specimens. In this study, to gain an understanding of compressive deformation characteristic, the formation of strain field during a compression test was examined using a commercial DIC system. An examination was made to characterize the compressive deformation behavior of nuclear graphite by a digital image correlation. The non-linear load-displacement characteristic prior to the peak load was shown to be mainly dominated by the presence of localized strains, which resulted in a permanent displacement. Young's modulus was properly calculated from the measured strain.

  13. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    To use graphite/PEEK material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. The mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results are presented for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber interleaved with PEEK film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 98 pct. of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape materials. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 pct. of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of the fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 pct. of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate.

  14. In-situ synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/graphite nanocomposite for high-performance supercapacitor electrode applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M, Gopalakrishnan, E-mail: gopalkphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Vivekanandha College of Arts and Science for Women, Tiruchengode, Namakkal, 637205, Tamilnadu (India); G, Srikesh [Department of Chemistry, Material Electrochemistry Lab, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamilnadu (India); A, Mohan [Department of Physics, Thin Film Laboratory, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamilnadu (India); V, Arivazhagan [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • High surface area, which governs the specific capacitance. • High chemical and thermal stability. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/graphite nanocomposite electrode shows lower resistance. - Abstract: In this work, a low cost and pollution free in-situ synthesis of phase pure Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/graphite nanocomposite have been successfully developed via co-precipitation method followed by the thermal treatment process. The prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. Electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were carried out in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytic solution. The results show the excellent maximum specific capacitive behavior of 239.5 F g{sup −1} for pure and 395.04 F g{sup −1} for Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/graphite nanocomposite at a current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. This composite exhibits a good cyclic stability, with a small loss of 2.68% of maximum capacitance over a consecutive 1000 cycles. The investigation indicates that the prepared electrode material could be a potential and promising candidate for electrochemical supercapacitors.

  15. Stable aqueous dispersions of noncovalently functionalized graphene from graphite and their multifunctional high-performance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiaohong; Simmons, Trevor; Shah, Rakesh; Wolfe, Christopher; Lewis, Kim M; Washington, Morris; Nayak, Saroj K; Talapatra, Saikat; Kar, Swastik

    2010-11-10

    We present a scalable and facile technique for noncovalent functionalization of graphene with 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid that exfoliates single-, few-, and multilayered graphene flakes into stable aqueous dispersions. The exfoliation mechanism is established using stringent control experiments and detailed characterization steps. Using the exfoliated graphene, we demonstrate highly sensitive and selective conductometric sensors (whose resistance rapidly changes >10,000% in saturated ethanol vapor), and ultracapacitors with extremely high specific capacitance (∼ 120 F/g), power density (∼ 105 kW/kg), and energy density (∼ 9.2 Wh/kg).

  16. Effect of filler content on the properties of expanded- graphite-based composite bipolar plates for application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Aakash; Borah, Munu; Pathak, Abhishek K.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2017-09-01

    Minimization of the weight and volume of a hydrogen-based PEM fuel cell stack is an essential area of research for the development and commercialization of PEMFCs for various applications. Graphite-based composite bipolar plates have significant advantages over conventional metallic bipolar plates due to their corrosion resistivity and low cost. On the other hand, expanded graphite is seen to be a potential candidate for facilitating the required electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of bipolar plates with a low density. Therefore, in the present study, the focus is on minimization of the high loading of graphite and optimizes its composition to meet the target properties of bipolar plates as per the USDOE target. Three types of expanded graphite (EG)-phenolic-resin-based composite bipolar plates were developed by partially replacing the expanded graphite content with natural graphite (NG) and carbon black as an additional filler. The three types of composite plate with the reinforcing constituent ratio EG:NG:R (25:25:50) give a bending strength of 49 MPa, a modulus of ~6 GPa, electrical conductivity  >100 S cm-1, a shore hardness of 55 and a bulk density of 1.55 g/cc. The 50 wt% loading of resin is sufficient to wet the 50 wt% filler content in the composite plate. This study gives an insight into using hybrid reinforcements in order to achieve the desired properties of bipolar plates.

  17. High dielectric permittivity elastomers from well-dispersed expanded graphite in low concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hassouneh, Suzan Sager; Kostrzewska, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The development of elastomer materials with a high dielectric permittivity has attracted increased interest over the last years due to their use in for example dielectric electroactive polymers. For this particular use, both the electrically insulating properties - as well as the mechanical...

  18. First principles study of oxidation behavior of irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Dong, Limin [Beijing Key Lab of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Chen [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between nuclear graphite microstructure and its oxidation resistance underlines the importance of comprehensive oxidation characterization studies of the new grades of nuclear graphite. Periodic DFT calculations are performed to model oxidation behavior of irradiated graphite. O{sub 2} molecules adsorbed on perfect and defective graphite surfaces are calculated. The adsorptive energy of O{sub 2} on defective graphite adsorption site with one carbon atom missing is approximately 10 times as strong as that on a defect-free perfect graphite surface. Monovacancy and divacancy on graphite surface can easily chemisorb O{sub 2} molecule compared to perfect surface. Two oxidation processes including CO and CO{sub 2} formation steps are analyzed. For symmetric monovacancy defect, three dangling C atoms are unsaturated and exhibit high adsorption ability, as well as reconstructed monovacancy and divacancy defects. These vacancy defects in irradiated graphite decrease oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite.

  19. Characterization of commercial expandable graphite fire retardants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focke, Walter Wilhelm, E-mail: walter.focke@up.ac.za; Badenhorst, Heinrich; Mhike, Washington; Kruger, Hermanus Joachim; Lombaard, Dewan

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Expandable graphite is less well-ordered than its graphite bisulfate progenitor. • It includes graphite oxide as a randomly interstratified phase. • CO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} are released during thermal-driven exfoliation. - Abstract: Thermal analysis and other techniques were employed to characterize two expandable graphite samples. The expansion onset temperatures of the expandable graphite's were ca. 220 °C and 300 °C respectively. The key finding is that the commercial products are not just pure graphite intercalation compounds with sulfuric acid species intercalated as guest ions and molecules in between intact graphene layers. A more realistic model is proposed where graphite oxide-like layers are also randomly interstratified in the graphite flakes. These graphite oxide-like layers comprise highly oxidized graphene sheets which contain many different oxygen-containing functional groups. This model explains the high oxygen to sulfur atomic ratios found in both elemental analysis of the neat materials and in the gas generated during the main exfoliation event.

  20. Ultrasonic metamaterials with negative modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Nicholas; Xi, Dongjuan; Xu, Jianyi; Ambati, Muralidhar; Srituravanich, Werayut; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Xiang

    2006-06-01

    The emergence of artificially designed subwavelength electromagnetic materials, denoted metamaterials, has significantly broadened the range of material responses found in nature. However, the acoustic analogue to electromagnetic metamaterials has, so far, not been investigated. We report a new class of ultrasonic metamaterials consisting of an array of subwavelength Helmholtz resonators with designed acoustic inductance and capacitance. These materials have an effective dynamic modulus with negative values near the resonance frequency. As a result, these ultrasonic metamaterials can convey acoustic waves with a group velocity antiparallel to phase velocity, as observed experimentally. On the basis of homogenized-media theory, we calculated the dispersion and transmission, which agrees well with experiments near 30 kHz. As the negative dynamic modulus leads to a richness of surface states with very large wavevectors, this new class of acoustic metamaterials may offer interesting applications, such as acoustic negative refraction and superlensing below the diffraction limit.

  1. Elastic modulus of hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Benny; Wagner, H Daniel

    2012-02-23

    This work aims at evaluating the elastic modulus of hard biological tissues by considering their staggered platelet micro-structure. An analytical expression for the effective modulus along the stagger direction is formulated using three non-dimensional structural variables. Structures with a single staggered hierarchy (e.g. collagen fibril) are first studied and predictions are compared with the experimental results and finite element simulations from the literature. A more complicated configuration, such as an array of fibrils, is analyzed next. Finally, a mechanical model is proposed for tooth dentin, in which variations in the multi-scale structural hierarchy are shown to significantly affect the macroscopic mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  3. Simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrzycka-Szelewa, Elżbieta; Lulewicz, Marta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) was developed. Among six pairs of absorption atomic lines of Rh and Ru, which are close enough to enable their simultaneous detection, two pairs were selected for further studies. Best results were obtained for measurements of the resonance line of rhodium at 343.489 nm and the adjacent secondary line of ruthenium at 343.674 nm (23% intensity of this line). For evaluated lines, the absorbance values were obtained using three pixels. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1200 °C and 2600 °C, respectively. Under these conditions the limits of detection achieved for Rh and Ru were found to be 1.0 μg L- 1 and 1.9 μg L- 1, respectively. The characteristic mass was 12.9 pg for Rh and 71.7 pg for Ru. Repeatability of the results expressed as a relative standard deviation was typically below 6%. The trueness of the method was confirmed by analysis of the certified reference material - platinum ore (SARM 76). The recovery of Rh and Ru from the platinum ore was 93.0 ± 4.6% and 90.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the direct simultaneous determination of trace amounts of rhodium and ruthenium in spiked river water, road runoff, and municipal sewage. Separation of interfering matrix on cation exchange resin was required before analysis of road dust and tunnel dust (CW-7) by HR-CS GFAAS.

  4. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  5. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1).

  6. Highly active, bi-functional and metal-free B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H. R.; Shyy, W.; Wu, M. C.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2017-10-01

    The potential of B4C as a metal-free catalyst for vanadium redox reactions is investigated by first-principles calculations. Results show that the central carbon atom of B4C can act as a highly active reaction site for redox reactions, due primarily to the abundant unpaired electrons around it. The catalytic effect is then verified experimentally by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests, both of which demonstrate that B4C nanoparticles can enhance the kinetics for both V2+/V3+ and VO2+/VO2+ redox reactions, indicating a bi-functional effect. The B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrodes are finally prepared and tested in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). It is shown that the batteries with the prepared electrodes exhibit energy efficiencies of 88.9% and 80.0% at the current densities of 80 and 160 mA cm-2, which are 16.6% and 18.8% higher than those with the original graphite felt electrodes. With a further increase in current densities to 240 and 320 mA cm-2, the batteries can still maintain energy efficiencies of 72.0% and 63.8%, respectively. All these results show that the B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrode outperforms existing metal-free catalyst modified electrodes, and thus can be promising electrodes for VRFBs.

  7. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  8. Bulk Modulus Relaxation in Partially Molten Dunite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, I.; Cline, C. J., II

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic solgel-derived Fo90 olivine was mixed with 3.5 wt % basaltic glass and hot-pressed within Ni/Fe foil to produce a dense aggregate expected to contain a small melt fraction at temperatures ≥ 1100°C. This specimen was precision ground and tested in both torsional and flexural forced oscillation to determine the relaxation behavior of both shear (G) and bulk (K) moduli at seismic frequencies. A recent upgrade of our experimental facility allows such measurements to be made without alteration of the driver/detector geometry, and uses an oscillating bending force rather than a bending moment, as previously described. The torsional and flexural tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at 200 MPa confining pressure, with oscillation periods ranging between 1 and 1000 s, during slow staged-cooling from 1300 to 25°C. Shear modulus and associated dissipation data are consistent with those for melt-bearing olivine specimens previously tested in torsion, with a pronounced dissipation peak superimposed on high-temperature background within the 1-1000 s observational window at temperatures of 1100-1200°C. A filament elongation model relates the observed flexural measurements to the variations along the experimental assembly of the complex Young's modulus (E*), bending moment and diametral moment of inertia. With E* given by 1/E*=1/(3G*) + 1/(9K*), and the complex shear modulus (G*) derived from torsional oscillation, any relaxation of K can be identified. Preliminary modeling shows that the viscoelastic properties in flexure are broadly consistent with those expected from the shear-mode viscoelasticity with anharmonic (real) values of K. However, some discrepancies between modeled results and flexure data at super-solidus temperatures require further investigation of possible differences in shear modulus relaxation between the torsional and flexural modes, and of potential relaxation of the bulk modulus through stress-induced changes in melt redistribution and

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and morphologic studies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavand, R.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) function as effective catalysts in specific reactions, such as methanation and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses. It is our purpose to physicochemically characterize their surfaces, at which catalysis occurs, by surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using the symmetric peak component anaylsis technique developed in our laboratory to reveal previously hidden components. Ru NPs were deposited by evaporation (0.25-1.5 nm nominal deposition range) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). In addition to their surfaces being characterized by XPS, an indication of morphology was obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our use of symmetric peak component XPS analysis has revealed detailed information on a previously unidentified surface oxide initially formed, as well as on the valence electronic structure and its variation with NP size, information that is of potential importance in the use of these NPs in catalysis. Each of the several Ru core XPS spectra characterized (3d, 3p and 3s) was found to be composed of three symmetric components. Together with two metal oxide O1s components, these give evidence of a rather complex, previously unidentified oxide that is initially formed. The Ru valence band (4d and 5s) spectra clearly demonstrate a loss of metallicity, a simultaneous increase of the Kubo gap, and an abrupt transfer in valence electron density from the 4d to the 5s orbitals (known as electron spill-over), as the NP size decreases below 0.5 nm. TEM photomicrographs, as a function of deposition rate, show that, at a rate that gives insufficient time for the NP condensation energy to dissipate, the initially well-separated NPs are capable of diffusing laterally and aggregating. This indicates weak NP bonding to the HOPG substrate. Carbide is formed, at both high and low deposition rates, at Ru deposition thicknesses greater than 0.25 nm, its formation explained by Ru NPs reacting with residual

  10. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  11. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  12. Graphite/isobutylene-isoprene rubber highly porous cryogels as new sorbents for oil spills and organic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Junchen; Gu, Ting; Chai, Wenbo; Li, Hongbing

    2013-08-28

    The preparation, by a freeze-thaw method, of new graphite/isobutylene-isoprene rubber (IIR) sorbents for oil and organic liquid is described. Graphite was expected to improve the adsorption properties. The cryogels were prepared by solution crosslinking IIR rubber in the presence of graphite in benzene at various temperatures, using sulfur monochloride as the crosslinker, and characterized by SEM and contact angle measurements. The dried cryogels, with interconnected macropores were sponge-like soft materials, with excellent buoyancy and hydrophobicity. They also showed excellent sorption characteristics, with the best sample exhibiting maximum sorption capacities of 17.8 g g(-1) for crude oil, 21.6 g g(-1) for diesel oil, and 23.4 g g(-1) for lubricating oil, respectively. The samples also showed excellent sorption capability for organic liquids, absorbing up to around twenty times their own mass. After rapid and effective desorption, taking just 3-5 h, the cryogels were recovered. They could also be reused more than 30 times by simply centrifuging to remove the sorbed liquid. These characteristics mean that the cryogels prepared in this study are promising materials for removal of large-scale oil or toxic organic spills.

  13. Graphene prepared by thermal reduction–exfoliation of graphite oxide: Effect of raw graphite particle size on the properties of graphite oxide and graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dao, Trung Dung; Jeong, Han Mo, E-mail: hmjeong@mail.ulsan.ac.kr

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Effect of raw graphite particle size on properties of GO and graphene is reported. • Size of raw graphite affects oxidation degree and chemical structure of GO. • Highly oxidized GO results in small-sized but well-exfoliated graphene. • GO properties affect reduction degree, structure, and conductivity of graphene. - Abstract: We report the effect of raw graphite size on the properties of graphite oxide and graphene prepared by thermal reduction–exfoliation of graphite oxide. Transmission electron microscope analysis shows that the lateral size of graphene becomes smaller when smaller size graphite is used. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that graphite with smaller size is more effectively oxidized, resulting in a more effective subsequent exfoliation of the obtained graphite oxide toward graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that reduction of the graphite oxide derived from smaller size graphite into graphene is more efficient. However, Raman analysis suggests that the average size of the in-plane sp{sup 2}-carbon domains on graphene is smaller when smaller size graphite is used. The enhanced reduction degree and the reduced size of sp{sup 2}-carbon domains contribute contradictively to the electrical conductivity of graphene when the particle size of raw graphite reduces.

  14. Laser ultrasonic assessment of the effects of porosity and microcracking on the elastic moduli of nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James B., E-mail: spicer@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Olasov, Lauren R.; Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I. [Carbon and Composites Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to measure the elastic moduli of various nuclear graphites. Measurements were made to assess wavespeeds for longitudinal and shear waves in different propagation directions and these were used along with density measurements to compute the longitudinal and shear moduli as well as Young's modulus. All moduli decreased with increasing graphite porosity and these variations could be interpreted using models describing the effect of porosity on material stiffness. Extrapolations for these models to zero porosity were used to infer the moduli for theoretically dense graphite; the results were far below predicted values reported in the literature for fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. Differences can be attributed to microcracking in the graphite microstructure. Using models for the effects of microcracking on modulus, estimates for microcrack populations indicate that the number of cracks per unit volume must be much greater than the number of pores per unit volume. Experimental results reported in the literature for irradiated graphites as well as for the stress dependence of graphite modulus are consistent with the influence of microcracking on elastic behavior and could be interpreted using concepts developed here. Results in this work for graphite structure-property relationships should allow for more sophisticated characterization of nuclear graphites using ultrasonic methods. - Highlights: • Moduli of nuclear graphites measured using laser ultrasonic methods. • Estimates made for the moduli of fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. • Models for modulus used to assess effects of microcracking on stiffness. • Microcrack densities estimated using models for effect of microcracks on modulus.

  15. The Effect of Novolac and Graphite Polycrystal on the Acetone Penetration and Thermal Resistance of Nanocomposites Based on Nitrile Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Mahboudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Developments of high diffusive environments in coincidence with emerging fluids with strong ability to destroy polymeric systems have resulted in rapid deformation and destruction of polymeric parts when in contact with such aggressive environments. Therefore, nowadays, there is a great need to develop highly resistant materials towards aggressive chemicals and harsh conditions. In this paper the effect of graphite polycrystal powders and novolac type phenolic resin has been experimentally studied towards acetone diffusion and thermal stability of polyacrylonitrile butadiene rubber/novolac/graphite polycrystal nanocomposites. The results obtained from dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and swelling in acetone showed that after 32 h samples reached to 94.2% of final swelling state. By using Avrami equation and swelling experimental data, the functionality of Ln(m/m0 to novolac and graphite polycrystal weight fraction and test duration time were evaluated. This theoretical equation evaluated and predicted the amount of Ln(m/m0 with 5.92% error after 32 h. Increases in graphite polycrystal content were followed by decreases in diffusion of acetone and modulus, before glass transition temperature, and increased thermal stability and thermal resistance of the nanocomposites. Increases in novolac content by 35 wt%, decreased glass transition temperature, thermal stability and thermal resistance of the nanocomposites. In nanocomposite, containing 45 wt% of novolac, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA data and scanning electron microscope (SEM images showed phase separation of thermoset and elastomer in the nanocomposite blend.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and morphologic studies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavand, R.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E., E-mail: edward.sacher@polymtl.ca

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Ru nanoparticle 3d, 3p, and 3s core XPS spectra were found to be composed of three symmetric components. The first component, Ru1, is due to zerovalent R, while components Ru2 and Ru3 are attributed to surface oxide species. • The nanoparticle surface additionally possesses a carbon-rich surface, from residual gas hydrocarbons present in the vacuum. • TEM photomicrographs show the aggregation and partial coalescence of nanoparticles deposited at high deposition rates, provoked by the high rate of release of the heat of condensation, indicating weak bonding to the HOPG substrate. • The analysis of the valence band indicates an increase of the Kubo gap with decreasing NP size, accompanied by an abrupt electron spill-over from the 4d to the 5s orbital. - Abstract: Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) function as effective catalysts in specific reactions, such as methanation and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses. It is our purpose to physicochemically characterize their surfaces, at which catalysis occurs, by surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using the symmetric peak component anaylsis technique developed in our laboratory to reveal previously hidden components. Ru NPs were deposited by evaporation (0.25–1.5 nm nominal deposition range) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). In addition to their surfaces being characterized by XPS, an indication of morphology was obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our use of symmetric peak component XPS analysis has revealed detailed information on a previously unidentified surface oxide initially formed, as well as on the valence electronic structure and its variation with NP size, information that is of potential importance in the use of these NPs in catalysis. Each of the several Ru core XPS spectra characterized (3d, 3p and 3s) was found to be composed of three symmetric components. Together with two metal oxide O1s components, these give evidence of a rather complex

  17. Resilient Modulus Characterization of Compacted Cohesive Subgrade Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Sas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil investigations concerning cyclic loading focus on the evaluation, in particular, of design parameters, such as elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio, or resilient modulus. Structures subjected to repeated loading are vulnerable to high deformations, especially when subgrade soils are composed of cohesive, fully-saturated soils. Such subgrade soils in the eastern part of Europe have a glacial genesis and are a mix of sand, silt, and clay fractions. The characteristic of, e.g., Young modulus variation and resilient modulus from repeated loading tests, is presented. Based on performed resonant column and cyclic triaxial tests, an analytical model is proposed. The model takes into consideration actual values of effective stress p′, as well as loading characteristics and the position of the effective stress path. This approach results in better characterization of pavement or industrial foundation systems based on the subgrade soil in undrained conditions. The recoverable strains characterized by the resilient modulus Mr value in the first cycle of loading was between 44 MPa and 59 MPa for confining pressure σ’3 equal to 45 kPa, and between 48 MPa and 78 MPa for σ’3 equal to 90 kPa. During cyclic loading, cohesive soil, at first, degrades. When pore pressure reaches equilibrium, the resilient modulus value starts to increase. The above-described phenomena indicate that, after the plastic deformation caused by excessive load and excess pore water pressure dissipation, the soil becomes resilient.

  18. Dynamic modulus of nanosilica modified porous asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, A. K.; Masri, K. A.; Ahmad, J.; Samsudin, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    Porous asphalt (PA) is a flexible pavement layer with high interconnected air void contents and constructed using open-graded aggregates. Due to high temperature environment and increased traffic volume in Malaysia, PA may have deficiencies particularly in rutting and stiffness of the mix. A possible way to improve these deficiencies is to improve the asphalt binder used. Binder is normally modified using polymer materials to improve its properties. However, nanotechnology presently is being gradually used for asphalt modification. Nanosilica (NS), a byproduct of rice husk and palm oil fuel ash is used as additive in this study. The aim of this study is to enhance the rutting resistance and stiffness performance of PA using NS. This study focused on the performance of PA in terms of dynamic modulus with the addition of NS modified binder to produce better and more durable PA. From the result of Dynamic SPT Test, it shows that the addition of NS was capable in enhancing the stiffness and rutting resistance of PA. The addition of NS also increase the dynamic modulus value of PA by 50%.

  19. Igneous Graphite in Enstatite Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous graphite. a rare constituent in terrestrial mafic and ultramafic rocks. occurs in three EH and one EL enstatite chondrite impact-melt breccias as 2-150 Ilm long euhedrallaths. some with pyramidal terminations. In contrast. graphite in most enstatite chondrites exsolved from metallic Fe-Ni as polygonal. rounded or irregular aggregates. Literature data for five EH chondrites on C combusting at high temperatures show that Abee contains the most homogeneous C isotopes (i.e. delta(sup 13)C = -8.1+/-2.1%); in addition. Abee's mean delta(sup l3)C value is the same as the average high-temperature C value for the set of five EH chondrites. This suggests that Abee scavenged C from a plurality of sources on its parent body and homogenized the C during a large-scale melting event. Whereas igneous graphite in terrestrial rocks typically forms at relatively high pressure and only moderately low oxygen fugacity (e.g., approx. 5 kbar. logfO2, approx. -10 at 1200 C ). igneous graphite in asteroidal meteorites formed at much lower pressures and oxygen fugacities.

  20. Graphite Microstructural Characterization Using Time-Domain and Correlation-Based Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-12-06

    Among techniques that have been used to determine elastic modulus in nuclear graphites, ultrasonic methods have enjoyed wide use and standards using contacting piezoelectric tranducers have been developed to ensure repeatability of these types of measurements. However, the use of couplants and the pressures used to effectively couple transducers to samples can bias measurements and produce results that are not wholly related to the properties of the graphite itself. In this work, we have investigated the use of laser ultrasonic methods for making elastic modulus measurements in nuclear graphites. These methods use laser-based transmitters and receivers to gather data and do not require use of ultrasonic couplants or mechanical contact with the sample. As a result, information directly related to the elastic responses of graphite can be gathered even if the graphite is porous, brittle and compliant. In particular, we have demonstrated the use of laser ultrasonics for the determination of both Young’s modulus and shear modulus in a range of nuclear graphites including those that are being considered for use in future nuclear reactors. These results have been analyzed to assess the contributions of porosity and microcracking to the elastic responses of these graphites. Laser-based methods have also been used to assess the moduli of NBG-18 and IG-110 where samples of each grade were oxidized to produce specific changes in porosity. These data were used to develop new models for the elastic responses of nuclear graphites and these models have been used to infer specific changes in graphite microstructure that occur during oxidation that affect elastic modulus. Specifically, we show how ultrasonic measurements in oxidized graphites are consistent with nano/microscale oxidation processes where basal plane edges react more readily than basal plane surfaces. We have also shown the use of laser-based methods to perform shear-wave birefringence measurements and have shown

  1. HEAT RESISTANCE OF GRAPHITIZED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Savchenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The investigation of temperature dependences of steels' mechanical properties and heat resistance under conditions of thermal cyclic loads. It's necessary to determine the mechanical properties and heat resistance indices of graphitized steels and cast iron VCh400 within the temperature range of 20…800°С. Methodology. Graphitized steels of the following chemical composition (mass %: 0.61…1.04C; 1.19…1.59%Si; 0.32…0.37%Mn; 0.12…0.17%Al; 0.008…0.014%S and 0.016…0.025%Р have been heat-treated according to the mode: heating up to 810°С – holding for 2 hours; cooling down to 680°С – holding for 2 hours with further cooling using the furnace in order to provide the ferrite-pearlite metallic base with graphite inclusions. In order to determine heat resistance indices (heat stresses index K and the material's resistance criterion at thermal cyclic load C the indices of graphitized steels' and cast irons' mechanical properties in the temperature range of 20…800°С have been investigated. Findings. It has been established that as a result of lower carbon content and smaller quantity of graphite inclusions, graphitized steel exceeds such indices of nodular cast iron VCh400 as: tensile strength and plasticity at room and high temperatures, and also heat resistance criteria K and C. This steel can be used to manufacture articles operating under conditions of thermal cyclic loads. Originality. Tensile strength and percent elongation of graphitized steels within the temperature range of 20…800°С have been determined. Calculations of heat resistance criteria to the heat stresses index K and the material's resistance criterion at thermal cyclic loads C within the temperature range 20…800°С in comparison with nodular cast iron of VCh400 grade have been carried out. Practical value. The expediency of using graphitized steel for manufacturing of articles operating under conditions of thermal cyclic loads has been shown.

  2. Modeling of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2008-01-01

    Based on density functional calculations, optimized structures of graphite oxide are found for various coverage by oxygen and hydroxyl groups, as well as their ratio corresponding to the minimum of total energy. The model proposed describes well known experimental results. In particular, it explains why it is so difficult to reduce the graphite oxide up to pure graphene. Evolution of the electronic structure of graphite oxide with the coverage change is investigated.

  3. Shear modulus reconstruction by ultrasonically measured strain ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Matsuzawa, Hidenori

    2007-12-01

    In addition to a description of our three previously developed one-dimensional (1D) methods from the viewpoint of shear modulus reconstruction using the strain ratio, two new methods for stabilizing the 1D methods are described, together with their limitations. As confirmed using human in vivo breast tissues, method 1 for evaluating the strain ratio itself is useful when the measurement accuracy of the strain distribution is high. However, because tissues having high shear moduli, such as scirrhous carcinoma, often form singular points/regions, both methods 2 and 3 using the strain ratio (initial estimate) and a regularization method are effective for realizing a unique, stable, useful shear modulus reconstruction. Because method 3 carries out implicit integration only at singular points/regions, whereas method 2 carries out implicit integration throughout the region of interest (ROI), the smaller number of singular points enables more rapid shear modulus reconstruction by method 3 than by method 2. Like method 1, method 3 is also useful when the measurement accuracy of the strain distribution is high. However, when evaluating strain distribution in an ROI with a high spatial resolution to obtain a shear modulus reconstruction having a high spatial resolution, shear modulus reconstructions obtained by methods 1, 2, and 3 often become laterally unstable due to the instability and low accuracy of the strains in the reference regions (reference strains), i.e., regularization in methods 2 and 3 cannot reduce the instability in the initial estimate. To cope with this instability, (i) the reconstruction obtained by calculating the strain ratio should be low-pass filtered; for breast tissues, in particular, the reconstruction of the inverse shear modulus should be low-pass filtered, not the reconstruction of the shear modulus. (ii) Otherwise, when using homogeneous regions as a reference, such as a block of reference material, fatty tissue, or parenchyma, evaluation of

  4. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  5. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  6. Flexible SiC/Si3N4 Composite Nanofibers with in Situ Embedded Graphite for Highly Efficient Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Yani; Zhang, Litong

    2017-08-30

    SiC/Si3N4 composite nanofibers with in situ embedded graphite, which show highly efficient electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption performance in gigahertz frequency, were prepared by electrospinning with subsequent polymer pyrolysis and annealing. By means of incorporating graphite and Si3N4 into SiC, the EM wave absorption properties of the nanofibers were improved. The relationship among processing, fiber microstructure, and their superior EM wave absorption performance was systematically investigated. The EM wave absorption capability and effective absorption bandwidth (EAB) of nanofibers can be simply controlled by adjusting annealing atmosphere and temperature. The nanofibers after annealing at 1300 °C in Ar present a minimum reflection loss (RL) of -57.8 dB at 14.6 with 5.5 GHz EAB. The nanofibers annealed in N2 at 1300 °C exhibit a minimum RL value of -32.3 dB at a thickness of 2.5 mm, and the EAB reaches 6.4 GHz over the range of 11.3-17.7 GHz. The highly efficient EM wave absorption performance of nanofibers are closely related to dielectric loss, which originated from interfacial polarization and dipole polarization. The excellent absorbing performance together with wider EAB endows the composite nanofibers potential to be used as reinforcements in polymers and ceramics (SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, etc.) to improve their EM wave absorption performance.

  7. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma–solution contact area.

  8. Silicon Nanoparticle/Nanowire and Graphite Composite Anode with Increased Binder for Lithium-Ion Coin Cells Aimed at High Energy Density Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Ali

    Silicon and graphite composite anode materials were prepared for a lithium ion half-cell with lithium metal as the reference electrode. All silicon/graphite composite anodes were prepared in the lab with mixing of slurry using ball milling technique. Battery grade copper foil was used as the current collector for the anode. The anode was coated using the doctor blade technique with thickness of 100μm and further calendared to provide higher energy densities for active material per cubic volume. The ratio of binder used was significantly higher than previously tested to show silicon material takes longer to detach from current collector with increased cycle life. Galvanostatic cycling show lithiation and de-lithiation of silicon anode with respect to lithium metal. Impedance measurements were taken for coin cells prior to cycle life tests. Silicon anode half-cell was charged/discharged for many cycles showing improved cycle life with great capacity retention. Charts show silicon expansion of material after cycle life however due to increased amount of binder material less silicon separates from the copper current collector initially. The coin cells made provide reproducible results which can be used for practical applications and have the ability for large volume production of high energy Li-ion batteries.

  9. Solid sampling determination of total fluorine in baby food samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-11-15

    This study describes the applicability of solid sampling technique for the determination of fluorine in various baby foods via molecular absorption of calcium monofluoride generated in a graphite furnace of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Fluorine was determined at CaF wavelength, 606.440nm in a graphite tube applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000°C and a molecule forming temperature of 2200°C. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.20ng and 0.17ng of fluorine, respectively. The fluorine concentrations determined in standard reference sample (bush branches and leaves) were in good agreement with the certified values. By applying the optimized parameters, the concentration of fluorine in various baby foods were determined. The fluorine concentrations were ranged from

  10. Design and synthesis of palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black hybrids as high-performance catalysts for formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huayu; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a facile two-step method to synthesize high-performance palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black (Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black) hybrids for electrooxidizing formic acid and methanol. The coating of g-C3N4 on carbon black surface is realized by a low-temperature heating treatment, followed by the uniform deposition of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) via a wet chemistry route. Owning to the significant synergistic effects of the individual components, the preferred Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black electrocatalyst exhibits exceptional forward peak current densities as high as 2155 and 1720 mA mg-1Pd for formic acid oxidation in acid media and methanol oxidation in alkaline media, respectively, far outperforming the commercial Pd-C catalyst. The catalyst also shows reliable stability, demonstrating that the newly-designed hybrids have great promise in constructing high-performance portable fuel cell systems.

  11. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  12. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; natural graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, U.H.; Schmidt, H.W.; Taylor, H.A.; Sutphin, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Natural graphite is a crystalline mineral of pure carbon which normally occurs in the form of platelet-shaped crystals. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, low thermal expansion, and lubricity, that make it almost irreplaceable for certain uses such as refractories and steelmaking. Graphite ore types are crystalline (flake and lump} or 'amorphous' (cryptocrystalline}. Refractory applications use the largest total amount of natural graphite, while the most important use of crystalline graphite is in crucibles for handling molten metals. All graphite deposits being mined today are found in the following metamorphic environments: (1) contact metamorphosed coal generally is a source of amorphous graphite; (2)disseminated crystalline flake graphite comes from syngenetic metasediments; and (3) crystalline lump graphite is found in epigenetic veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Graphite may also occur as a trace mineral in ultrabasic rocks and pegmatites, but these are economically insignificant. The world's identified economically exploitable resources of crystalline graphite in major deposits are estimated to be about 9.7 million metric tons of concentrate. In-place resources of amorphous graphite are about 11.5 million metric tons. Of these, less than 2 percent of the crystalline ore and less than 1 percent of the amorphous ore are in western industrial countries. World mining production of natural graphite rose from 347,000 metric tons in 1973 to 659,000 metric tons in 1986, while the proportion produced by central economy countries increased from about 50 percent for the period from 1973 to 1978 to more than 64 percent in 1979 to 1986. It is estimated that crystalline flake graphite accounts for at least 180,000 metric tons of total annual world mining production of natural graphite, and amorphous graphite makes up the rest.

  13. Coating method for graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  14. Terahertz generation from graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, G.; Chakkittakandy, R.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of subpicosecond terahertz pulses is observed when graphite surfaces are illuminated with femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses. The nonlinear optical generation of THz pulses from graphite is unexpected since, in principle, the material possesses a centre of inversion symmetry.

  15. On the damage and fracture of nuclear graphite at multiple length-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Mingard, Ken; Lord, Oliver T.; Flewitt, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Gilsocarbon graphite, as a neutron moderator and load-bearing component in the core of the UK fleet of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors, possesses complex microstructural features including defects/pores over a range of length-scales from nanometres to millimetres in size. As a consequence, this material exhibits different characteristics when specimens of different length-scale are deformed. In this work, the deformation and fracture of this material have been characterised using in situ methods for specimens of micrometre size (meso-scale) and the results are then compared with those measured one length-scale smaller, and those at the macro-scale. At the micro-scale, sampling a volume of material (2 × 2 × 10 μm) excludes micro- and macro-size pores, the strength was measured to be as high as 1000 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 67 GPa). When the specimen size is increased by one order of magnitude to the meso-scale, the strength is reduced to about 100 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 20 GPa) due to the inclusion of micro-size pores. For larger engineering-size specimens that include millimetre-size pores, the strength of the material averages about 20 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 11 GPa). This trend in the data is discussed and considered in the context of selecting the appropriate data for relevant multi-scale modelling.

  16. Graphite fluoride fibers and their applications in the space industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1990-01-01

    Characterization and potential space applications of graphite fluoride fibers from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers are presented. Graphite fluoride fibers with fluorine to carbon ratios of 0.65 and 0.68 were found to have electrical resistivity values of 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 11) Ohms-cm, respectively, and thermal conductivity values of 24 and 5 W/m-K, respectively. At this fluorine content range, the fibers have tensile strength of 0.25 + or - 0.10 GPa (36 + or - 14 ksi), Young's modulus of 170 + or - 30 GPa (25 + or - 5 Msi). The coefficient of thermal expansion value of a sample with fluorine to carbon ratio of 0.61 was found to be 7 ppm/C. These properties change and approach the graphite value as the fluorine content approach 0. Electrically insulative graphite fluoride fiber is at least five times more thermally conductive than fiberglass. Therefore, it can be used as a heat sinking printed circuit board material for low temperature, long life power electronics in spacecraft. Also, partially fluorinated fiber with tailor-made physical properties to meet the requirements of certain engineering design can be produced. For example, a partially fluorinated fiber could have a predetermined CTE value in -1.5 to 7 ppm/C range and would be suitable for use in solar concentrators in solar dynamic power systems. It could also have a predetermined electrical resistivity value suitable for use as a low observable material. Experimental data indicate that slightly fluorinated graphite fibers are more durable in the atomic oxygen environment than pristine graphite. Therefore, fluorination of graphite used in the construction of spacecraft that would be exposed to the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen may protect defect sites in atomic oxygen protective coatings and therefore decrease the rate of degradation of graphite.

  17. Factors affecting the thermal shock behavior of yttria stabilized hafnia based graphite and tungsten composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, L. D.; Manning, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Hafnia-based composites containing either graphite or tungsten were investigated as rocket nozzle throat inserts in solid propellant rocket engines. The thermal shock resistance of these materials is considered in terms of macroscopic thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, and compressive fracture stress. The effect of degree of hafnia stabilization, density, and graphite or tungsten content upon these parameters is discussed. The variation of the ratio of elastic modulus to compressive fracture stress with density and its effect upon thermal shock resistance of these materials are discussed in detail.

  18. Research on Fatigue Strain and Fatigue Modulus of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangping Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete fatigue strain and fatigue modulus evolution play a vital role in the evaluation of the material properties. In this paper, by analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of existing concrete strain analysis methods, the level-S nonlinear fatigue strain model was proposed. The parameters’ physical meaning, the ranges, and the impact on the shape of the curve were all discussed. Then, the evolution model of fatigue modulus was established based on the fatigue strain evolution model and the hypothesis of fatigue modulus inversely related fatigue strain amplitude. The results indicate that the level-S model covered all types of fatigue strain evolution. It is very suitable for the description of strain evolution of concrete for its strong adaptability and high accuracy. It was found that the fitting curves coincided with the experimental curves very well, and the correlation coefficients were all above 0.98. The evolution curves of fatigue strain modulus both have three stages, namely, variation phase, linear change stage, and convergence stage. The difference is that the fatigue strain evolution curve is from the lower left corner to the upper right corner, but the fatigue modulus evolution curve is from the upper left corner to the right lower corner.

  19. LIMITED OXIDATION OF IRRADIATED GRAPHITE WASTE TO REMOVE SURFACE CARBON-14

    OpenAIRE

    TARA E. SMITH; SHILO MCCRORY; MARY LOU DUNZIK-GOUGAR

    2013-01-01

    Large quantities of irradiated graphite waste from graphite-moderated nuclear reactors exist and are expected to increase in the case of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) deployment [1,2]. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Fachinger et al. [2] have demonstrated that thermal treatment of irradiated graphite removes a significant fraction o...

  20. Young's modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhikang; Deng, Jinglan; He, Liang; Zhuo, Rongshu; Zhu, Ruiqi; Shi, Yang; Liu, Hui; Yang, Wei; Yuan, Hui; Chen, Yiming; Huang, Yue; Zheng, Yi

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical model for calculating the Young's modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers with a coating is proposed, and validated by a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model using ANSYS parametric design language (APDL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization. Compared with typical theoretical models (Rayleigh-Ritz model, Euler-Bernoulli (E-B) beam model and spring mass model), the proposed theoretical model can obtain Young's modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers more precisely. Also, the influences of coating's geometric dimensions on Young's modulus and resonant frequency of microcantilevers are discussed. The thickness of coating has a great influence on Young's modulus and resonant frequency of multi-layer microcantilevers, and the coating should be considered to calculate Young's modulus more precisely, especially when fairly thicker coating is employed.

  1. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Swetha Sara Philip; Deepa John; Sheeja Susan John

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  2. Determination of Young's Modulus of Graphene by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Yoon, Duhee; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene are interesting research subjects because its Young's modulus and strength are extremely high. Values of ˜1 TPa for the Young's modulus have been reported [Lee et al. Science, 321, 385 (2008), Koenig et al. Nat. Nanotech. 6, 543 (2011)]. We made a graphene sample on a SiO2/Si substrate with closed-bottom holes by mechanical exfoliation. A pressure difference across the graphene membrane was applied by putting the sample in a vacuum chamber. This pressure difference makes the graphene membrane bulge upward like a balloon. By measuring the shifts of the Raman G and 2D bands, we estimated the amount of strain on the graphene membrane. By comparing the strain estimated from the Raman measurements with numerical simulations based on the finite element method, we obtained the Young's modulus of graphene.

  3. Internal features of graphite in cast irons. Confocal microscopy: useful tool for graphite growth imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca-Isern, N; Tartera, J; Espanol, M; Marsal, M; Bertran, G; Castel, S

    2002-01-01

    Spherulitic crystallisation is a mode of growth of crystals from the melt. Considerable attention has been given to spheroidal graphite formation, providing detailed information about the internal microstructure of the spherulites in spheroidal (SG irons) and compacted graphite irons (CG irons) (Stefanescu, D., 1990. Cast Irons. ASM Handbook, 10th ed., vol. 1). Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for this mode of crystallisation are not fully understood. This study deals with the inoculation mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the study of the inclusions for the heterogeneous nucleation of graphite. It is shown that the graphite nuclei are sulfide products of the nodularizing treatment. It has been observed that when rare-earth treatment is applied, the central nucleus consists of a core and an envelope from which the graphite grows. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM), in reflection mode, was used to study the internal features of the spheroidal graphite growth. Confocal reflection imaging, which has a capacity for optical sectioning of the sample, provides high-resolution images of surface and subsurface regions of interest contained within a semi-transparent sample. Furthermore, three-dimensional reconstruction of these optical sections can provide insight into the mechanism of graphite growth mechanism interpretation. With CSLM the radial growth of graphite was seen. Other techniques, such as TEM, SEM-EDS, WDS, AES and SAM were also used to corroborate the results.

  4. New insights into the Young's modulus of staggered biological composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Benny; Wagner, H Daniel

    2013-03-01

    This communication presents a simplified "mechanics-of-materials" approach for describing the mechanics of staggered composite architectures, such as those arising in a variety of biological tissues. This analysis calculates the effective modulus of the bio-composite and provides physical insights into its elastic behavior. Simplified expressions for high- and low-mineralized tissues are then proposed and the effects of the mineral thickness ratio and aspect ratio on the modulus are demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  6. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source. (JDH)

  7. Graphite and fiberglass additives for improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge cycle life of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenciano, J.; Sánchez, A.; Trinidad, F.; Hollenkamp, A. F.

    In order to accommodate regenerative braking energy input in hybrid and mild hybrid vehicles while maintaining boosting power at high rates of discharge, valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries must operate permanently at partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) conditions. As a consequence, new failure modes appear, e.g., irreversible sulfation in negative plates, that have to be overcome. In this way, work has been done to apply some solutions like improving charge acceptance in this "sulfated medium". Several batches of 6 V 20 Ah AGM VRLA batteries with spiral cell design have been assembled and tested, each batch containing novel additives in the negative active material (NAM). It has been observed that the addition of a sufficient amount of expanded graphite significantly improves cycle life under PSoC conditions. Moreover, life duration is also extended, although to a lesser extent, by using a novel fiberglass which increases surface area of NAM.

  8. High flux irradiations of Li coatings on polycrystalline W and ATJ graphite with D, He, and He-seeded D plasmas at Magnum PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; F. Bedoya,; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning on PFCs (Plasma Facing Components) on a variety of substrate platforms (e.g. graphite, Mo, etc.) has resulted in improved plasma performance on multiple magnetic fusion devices. On graphite, this improvement occurs through the control of retention and recycling of hydrogen

  9. High performance asymmetric supercapacitor based on molybdenum disulphide/graphene foam and activated carbon from expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masikhwa, Tshifhiwa M; Madito, Moshawe J; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien K; Manyala, Ncholu

    2017-02-15

    Molybdenum disulphide which has a graphene-like single layer structure has excellent mechanical and electrical properties and unique morphology, which might be used with graphene foam as composite in supercapacitor applications. In this work, Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2)/graphene foam (GF) composites with different graphene foam loading were synthesized by the hydrothermal process to improve on specific capacitance of the composites. Asymmetric supercapacitor device was fabricated using the best performing MoS2/GF composite and activated carbon derived from expanded graphite (AEG) as positive and negative electrodes, respectively, in 6M KOH electrolyte. The asymmetric MoS2/GF//AEG device exhibited a maximum specific capacitance of 59Fg-1 at a current density of 1Ag-1 with maximum energy and power densities of 16Whkg-1 and 758Wkg-1, respectively. The supercapacitor also exhibited a good cyclic stability with 95% capacitance retention over 2000 constant charge-discharge cycles. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of MoS2/GF//AEG as a promising material for electrochemical energy storage application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nitrogen–doped graphitized carbon shell encapsulated NiFe nanoparticles: A highly durable oxygen evolution catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lei; Luo, Langli; Feng, Zhenxing; Engelhard, Mark; Xie, Xiaohong; Han, Binghong; Sun, Junming; Zhang, Jianghao; Yin, Geping; Wang, Chongmin; Wang, Yong; Shao, Yuyan

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a crucial role in various energy conversion devices such as water electrolyzers and metal–air batteries. Precious metal catalysts such as Ir, Ru and their oxides are usually used for enhanced reaction kinetics but are limited by their scarce resource. The challenges associated with alternative non–precious metal catalysts such as transition metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides etc. are their low electronic conductivity and poor durability. Here, we report OER catalysts of NiFe nanoparticles encapsulated by nitrogen–doped graphitized carbon shells derived from bimetallic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) precursors. The optimal OER catalyst shows excellent activity (360 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm–2GEO) and durability (no obvious degradation after 20 000 cycles). The electron-donation from Fe and tuned electronic structure of metal cores by Ni are revealed to be primary contributors to the enhanced OER activity. We further demonstrated that the structure and morphology of encapsulating carbon shells, which are the key factors influencing the durability, are facilely controlled by chemical state of precursors. Severe metal particle growth probably caused by oxidation of carbon shells and encapsulated nanoparticles is believed to the main mechanism for activity degradation in these catalysts.

  11. Facile synthesis of graphitic C3N4 nanoporous-tube with high enhancement of visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiru; Gao, Jianping; Mei, Shunkang; Wu, Yongli; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhai, Xiangang; Yang, Jiangbing; Hao, Chaoyue; Yan, Jing

    2017-12-01

    A simple and convenient method was used to synthesize a graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanoporous-tube by using SiO2 nanoparticles as pore formers. The structure of the g-C3N4 nanoporous-tube was characterized by the SEM and TEM images. Taking photodegradation of RhB as an example, the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared g-C3N4 nanoporous-tube was investigated. It can photodegrade 90% RhB in 40 min under visible-light irradiation and obtain a k value of 0.04491 min‑1, which is 8.16 times that of bulk g-C3N4, 3.09 times that of tubular g-C3N4 and 1.48 times that of tubular g-C3N4-SiO2. The significant enhancement in photocatalytic efficiency is due to the edge effect of the pores and the special structure of the tubes. In addition, the possible mechanism of photocatalytic degradation of RhB was also proposed based on the trapping experiment of active species, which indicated that the superoxide radicals ({{{{O}}}2}\\bullet -) and the holes (h +) were the main reactive species in this photocatalyst. This work may open up a new idea of innovation in g-C3N4 structure and inspire its follow-up study.

  12. Modulus-Pressure Equation for Confined Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor, Gennady Y; Shen, Vincent K; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [J. Chem. Phys., (2015) 143, 194506], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus $K$ of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on modulus-pressure dependence $K(P)$, which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for ...

  13. Determination of bending modulus of elasticity of Pterygota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two different international testing norms, DIN52186 (1978) and ISO8375 (1985) were used to determine the bending modulus of elasticity (MOE) of Pterygota macrocarpa K. Schum (Kyere) and Piptadeniastrum africanum (Dahoma). The results from the two testing norms for each timber species were highly correlated, with ...

  14. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  15. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  16. Intercalated graphite electrical conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    For years NASA has wanted to reduce the weight of spacecraft and aircraft. Experiments are conducted to find a lightweight synthetic metal to replace copper. The subject of this paper, intercalated graphite, is such a material. Intercalated graphite is made by heating petroleum or coal to remove the hydrogen and to form more covalent bonds, thus increasing the molecular weight. The coal or petroleum eventually turns to pitch, which can then be drawn into a fiber. With continued heating the pitch-based fiber releases hydrogen and forms a carbon fiber. The carbon fiber, if heated sufficiently, becomes more organized in parallel layers of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms in the form of graphite. A conductor of intercalated graphite is potentially useful for spacecraft or aircraft applications because of its low weight.

  17. Young’s modulus evaluation and thermal shock behavior of a porous SiC/cordierite composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac-Marković M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous SiC/Cordierite Composite Material with graphite content (10% was synthesized. Evaluation of Young modulus of elasticity and thermal shock behavior of these samples was presented. Thermal shock behavior was monitored using water quench test, and non destructive methods such are UPVT and image analysis were also used for accompaniment the level of destruction of the samples during water quench test. Based on the level of destruction graphical modeling of critical number of cycles was given. This approach was implemented on discussion of the influence of the graphite content on thermal stability behavior of the samples. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45012

  18. Enhancements in crystallinity, thermal stability, tensile modulus and strength of sisal fibres and their PP composites induced by the synergistic effects of alkali and high intensity ultrasound (HIU) treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Prakash; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    In this investigation, sisal fibres were treated with the combination of alkali and high intensity ultrasound (HIU) and their effects on the morphology, thermal properties of fibres and mechanical properties of their reinforced PP composites were studied. FTIR and FE-SEM results confirmed the removal of amorphous materials such as hemicellulose, lignin and other waxy materials after the combined treatments of alkali and ultrasound. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed an increase in the crystallinity of sisal fibres with an increase in the concentration of alkali. Thermogravimetric results revealed that the thermal stability of sisal fibres obtained with the combination of both alkali and ultrasound treatment was increased by 38.5°C as compared to the untreated fibres. Morphology of sisal fibre reinforced composites showed good interfacial interaction between fibres and matrix after the combined treatment. Tensile properties were increased for the combined treated sisal fibres reinforced PP composites as compared to the untreated and pure PP. Tensile modulus and strength increased by more than 50% and 10% respectively as compared to the untreated sisal fibre reinforced composite. It has been found that the combined treatment of alkali and ultrasound is effective and useful to remove the amorphous materials and hence to improve the mechanical and thermal properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Mechanical and Structural Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kay Woodroof

    1982-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) and graphite/polyimide composites (C6000/PMR 15) were exposed to various levels of 0.5 MeV electron radiation with the maximum dose being 10,000 Mrad. A three point bending test was used to evaluate the ultimate stress and modulus of the composites. In all composites except transverse samples of C6000/PMR 15 ultimate stress values remained approximately constant or increased slightly. The modulus values remained approximately constant for all composite types regardless of the radiation level. Interfacial aspects of composites were studied. Interlaminar shear tests were performed on T300/5208 and C6000/PMR 15 composites irradiated to 10,000 Mrad. There was an initial increase in interlaminar shear strength (up to 1,000 Mrad) followed by a sharp decrease with further radiation exposure. Using scanning electron microscopy no visual differences in the mode of fracture could be detected between ruptured control samples and those exposed to various levels of radiation. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) revealed little change in the surface elements present in control and highly irradiated T300/5208 composite samples.

  20. Facile and Scalable Synthesis Method for High-Quality Few-Layer Graphene through Solution-Based Exfoliation of Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Boon-Hong; Wu, Tong-Fei; Hong, Jong-Dal

    2017-02-08

    Here we describe a facile and scalable method for preparing defect-free graphene sheets exfoliated from graphite using the positively charged polyelectrolyte precursor poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV-pre) as a stabilizer in an aqueous solution. The graphene exfoliated by PPV-pre was apparently stabilized in the solution as a form of graphene/PPV-pre (denoted to GPPV-pre), which remains in a homogeneous dispersion over a year. The thickness values of 300 selected 76% GPPV-pre flakes ranged from 1 to 10 nm, corresponding to between one and a few layers of graphene in the lateral dimensions of 1 to 2 μm. Furthermore, this approach was expected to yield a marked decrease in the density of defects in the electronic conjugation of graphene compared to that of graphene oxide (GO) obtained by Hummers' method. The positively charged GPPV-pre was employed to fabricate a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) electrode layer-by-layer with negatively charged GO, yielding (GPPV-pre/GO)n film electrode. The PPV-pre and GO in the (GPPV-pre/GO)n films were simultaneously converted using hydroiodic acid vapor to fully conjugated PPV and reduced graphene oxide (RGO), respectively. The electrical conductivity of (GPPV/RGO)23 multilayer films was 483 S/cm, about three times greater than that of the (PPV/RGO)23 multilayer films (166 S/cm) comprising RGO (prepared by Hummers method). Furthermore, the superior electrical properties of GPPV were made evident, when comparing the capacitive performances of two supercapacitor systems; (polyaniline PANi/RGO)30/(GPPV/RGO)23/PET (volumetric capacitance = 216 F/cm3; energy density = 19 mWh/cm3; maximum power density = 498 W/cm3) and (PANi/RGO)30/(PPV/RGO)23/PET (152 F/cm3; 9 mWh/cm3; 80 W/cm3).

  1. Wear Properties of Nuclear Graphite IG-110 at Elevated Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Dunkun; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Yeonwook [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) is designed to produce electricity and hydrogen. Graphite is used as reflector, support structures, and a moderator in reactor core; it has good resistance to neutron and is a suitable material at high temperatures. Friction is generated in the graphite structures for the core reflector, support structures, and moderator because of vibration from the HTR-10 fuel cycle flow. In this study, the wear characteristics of the isotropic graphite IG-110 used in HTR-10 were evaluated. The reciprocating wear test was carried out for graphite against graphite. The effects of changes in the contact load and sliding speeds at room temperature and 400℃ on the coefficient of friction and specific wear rate were evaluated. The wear behavior of graphite IG-110 was evaluated based on the wear surfaces.

  2. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  3. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  4. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  5. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  6. SnO2@PANI Core-Shell Nanorod Arrays on 3D Graphite Foam: A High-Performance Integrated Electrode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Yang, Chengkai; Gao, Xin; Chen, Shuai; Hu, Yiran; Guan, Huanqin; Ma, Yurong; Zhang, Jin; Zhou, Henghui; Qi, Limin

    2017-03-22

    The rational design and controllable fabrication of electrode materials with tailored structures and superior performance is highly desirable for the next-generation lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, a novel three-dimensional (3D) graphite foam (GF)@SnO2 nanorod arrays (NRAs)@polyaniline (PANI) hybrid architecture was constructed via solvothermal growth followed by electrochemical deposition. Aligned SnO2 NRAs were uniformly grown on the surface of GF, and a PANI shell with a thickness of ∼40 nm was coated on individual SnO2 nanorods, forming a SnO2@PANI core-shell structure. Benefiting from the synergetic effect of 3D GF with large surface area and high conductivity, SnO2 NRAs offering direct pathways for electrons and lithium ions, and the conductive PANI shell that accommodates the large volume variation of SnO2, the binder-free, integrated GF@SnO2 NRAs@PANI electrode for LIBs exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and good electrochemical stability. A high discharge capacity of 540 mAh g-1 (calculated by the total mass of the electrode) was achieved after 50 cycles at a current density of 500 mA g-1. Moreover, the electrode demonstrated superior rate performance with a discharge capacity of 414 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 3 A g-1.

  7. Formation of thin graphite films upon carbon diffusion through nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustin, E. G.; Isaev, N. V.; Luzanov, V. A.; Temiryazeva, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    Experimental results on the synthesis of thin graphite films with the aid of annealing of nickel films on carbon substrate are presented. Highly oriented pyrolitic graphite is used as the substrate to provide structural quality of the deposited nickel film. It is shown that the cyclic annealing of the structure with intermediate cooling leads to crystallization of primary amorphous carbon into a film consisting of flakes of vertical graphene. The process of graphite formation is discussed.

  8. Ultrasound-based Relative Elastic Modulus Imaging for Visualizing Thermal Ablation Zones in a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Brace, Chris; Andreano, Anita; DeWall, Ryan J.; Rubert, Nick; Fisher, Ted G.; Varghese, Tomy; Lee, Fred; Hall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasound-based elastic modulus imaging to visualize thermal ablation zones in an in vivo porcine model is reported in this article. Elastic modulus images of soft tissues are estimated as an inverse optimization problem. Ultrasonically-measured displacement data are utilized as inputs to determine an elastic modulus distribution that provides the best match to this displacement field. A total of 14 in vivo thermal ablation zones were investigated in this study. To determine the accuracy of delineation of each thermal ablation zone using elastic modulus imaging, the dimensions (lengths of long and short axes) and the are of each thermal ablation zone obtained from an elastic modulus image was compared to the corresponding gross pathology photograph of the same ablation zone. Comparison of elastic modulus imaging measurements and gross pathology measurements showed high correlation with respect to the area of thermal ablation zones (Pearson coefficient = 0.950 and pelastic modulus imaging can more accurately depict thermal ablation zones, when compared to strain imaging (14.7% versus 22.3% absolute percent error in area measurements, respectively). Furthermore, elastic modulus imaging also provide higher (more than a factor of two) contrast-to-noise ratios for evaluating these thermal ablation zones than those on corresponding strain images, thereby reducing inter-observer variability. Our preliminary results suggest that elastic modulus imaging might potentially enhance the ability to visualize thermal ablation zones, thereby improving assessment of ablative therapies. PMID:20354279

  9. Crack growth properties of nuclear graphite under cyclic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakui, H.; Oku, T.

    1986-01-01

    Crack growth properties of four kinds of nuclear graphites under cyclic loading conditions were investigated at room temperature, 373, 673 and 975 K, using double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. The crack growth rates can be expressed as a function of the stress intensity factor range at the constant mean stress intensity factor ( Kmean) and the constant minimum stress intensity factor ( Kmin): that is, da/ dN = CΔK1n, where the constants C and n depend upon the kind of graphite and its coke grain size. The crack growth rate at the constant Kmean becomes smaller than that at the constant Kmin. For the fine-grained graphite tested at higher temperatures, the crack growth rate increases with increasing temperature. Also cracks in the coarse grained coke graphites extend at a higher rate than that in the fine-grained high strength graphites. It seems that cracks in graphites run mostly along the coke grain boundaries.

  10. Determination of the modulus of elasticity of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed; Wang, Defu; Pye, David

    2007-10-01

    To determine the material behavior of the human cornea in the form of simple relationships between the modulus of elasticity and intraocular pressure (IOP) and to establish the effect of age on the material behavior. Human corneal specimens with age between 50 and 95 years were tested under inflation conditions to determine their behavior. The corneas were subjected to two extreme load rates to represent dynamic and static loading conditions. The pressure-deformation results were analyzed using shell theory to derive the relationship between the modulus of elasticity and IOP. The corneas demonstrated a nonlinear hyperelastic behavior pattern with an initial low stiffness stage and a final high stiffness stage. Despite the nonlinearity of the pressure deformation results, the relationship between the modulus of elasticity and the applied pressure was almost linear. A considerable increase was noted in the values of the modulus of elasticity associated with both age and load rate. General equations were derived to calculate the values of the secant and tangent moduli of elasticity in terms of IOP for any age greater than 50 years, and these equations are presented in a simple form suitable for use in numerical simulations. Adequate representation of corneal material behavior is essential for the accurate predictive modeling of corneal biomechanics. The material models developed in this work could be implemented in numerical simulations of refractive surgery procedures, corneal shape changes due to contact lens wear, and other applications.

  11. Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide from Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Vega, Yazmin I; Leyva-Porras, Cesar C; Mireles, Marcela; Quevedo-López, Manuel; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2013-11-01

    A facile method for preparing functionalized graphene oxide single layers with nitroxide groups is reported herein. Highly oxidized graphite oxide (GO=90.6%) was obtained, slightly modifying an improved Hummer's method. Oxoammonium salts (OS) were investigated to introduce nitroxide groups to GO, resulting in a one-step functionalization and exfoliation. The mechanisms of functionalization/exfoliation are proposed, where the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to ketone groups, and the formation of alkoxyamine species are suggested. Two kinds of functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT1 and GOFT2) were obtained by controlling the amount of OS added. GOFT1 and GOFT2 exhibited a high interlayer spacing (d0001 = 1.12nm), which was determined by X-ray diffraction. The presence of new chemical bonds C-N (~9.5 %) and O-O (~4.3 %) from nitroxide attached onto graphene layers were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Single-layers of GOFT1 were observed by HRTEM, exhibiting amorphous and crystalline zones at a 50:50 ratio; in contrast, layers of GOFT2 exhibited a fully amorphous surface. Fingerprint of GOFT1 single layers was obtained by electron diffraction at several tilts. Finally, the potential use of these materials within Nylon 6 matrices was investigated, where an unusual simultaneous increase in tensile stress, tensile strain and Young's modulus was observed.

  12. Determination of Modulus of Elasticity and Shear Modulus by the Measurement of Relative Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labašová, Eva

    2016-12-01

    This contribution is focused on determining the material properties (Young modulus and shear modulus) of the testing samples. The theoretical basis for determining material properties are the knowledge of linear elasticity and strength. The starting points are dependencies among the modulus of elasticity, shear modulus, normal stress and relative strain. The relative strains of the testing samples were obtained by measuring predefined load conditions using a strain-gauge bridge and the universal measurement system Quantum X MX 840. The integration of these tasks into the teaching process enhances practical and intellectual skills of students at secondary level technical universities.

  13. Determination of Modulus of Elasticity and Shear Modulus by the Measurement of Relative Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labašová Eva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is focused on determining the material properties (Young modulus and shear modulus of the testing samples. The theoretical basis for determining material properties are the knowledge of linear elasticity and strength. The starting points are dependencies among the modulus of elasticity, shear modulus, normal stress and relative strain. The relative strains of the testing samples were obtained by measuring predefined load conditions using a strain-gauge bridge and the universal measurement system Quantum X MX 840. The integration of these tasks into the teaching process enhances practical and intellectual skills of students at secondary level technical universities.

  14. Effect of graphite loading on the electrical and mechanical properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide)/Poly (Vinyl Chloride) polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, M. D. S.; Supri, A. G.; Hanif, M. P. M.; Yazid, M. I. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, films consisting of a blend of poly (ethylene oxide)/poly (vinyl chloride) (PEO/PVC) and a conductive filler, graphite were prepared and characterized for their mechanical and electrical properties. Solid polymer blend films based on PEO/PVC (50/50 wt%/wt%) with different graphite loading were prepared by using solution casting technique. Electrical conductivity results discovered the conductivity increased with increasing of filler loading. However, increasing amount of graphite loading led to a decreased in tensile strength and young’s modulus of PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films. The dispersion of graphite and mechanism of conductive path in the polymer films were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films shows that agglomeration occurred to complete the connection of conductive path, thus improving the conductivity behavior of the polymer films.

  15. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  16. Investigation of the Electric and Magnetic Properties of Intercalated Graphites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    the two-zone vapor transport method. Employing this groth process. The structure of graphite intercalation the graphite temperature was maintained at...GIC such as CoCl2 , and NiCl2 were also reported by Ka- rnia et . 122,23, recently theme transitos wer also conimed by Elahy et &1 [241. The authors of...intercalating anhydrous FeC 3 into highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using the two-zone vapour transport method. Employing this growth process, the graphite

  17. Fast arsenic speciation in water by on-site solid phase extraction and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Bencs, László; Koncz, Kornél; Tatár, Enikő; Weiszburg, Tamás; Záray, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    A method of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS), combined with on-site separation/solid phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for the speciation of inorganic As (iAs) in geothermal and drinking water samples. The HR-CS-GFAAS calibration curves were linear up to 200 μg/L As, but using second order polynomial fitting, accurate calibration could be performed up to 500 μg/L. It has been demonstrated that sample pH should not be higher than 8 for an accurate speciation of As(V) with a recovery of ≈ 95%. Geothermal water had fairly high salt content (≈ 2200 mg/L) due to the presence of chlorides and sulfates at mg/L levels. Therefore, a two-fold dilution of these types of samples before SPE is recommended, especially, for total As determinations, when the As concentration is as high as 400 μg/L. For drinking water, sampled from public wells with records of As concentrations higher than the 10 μg/L in the past, the reduction of As contamination below the WHO's health limit value could be observed. However, the electrical conductivity was close to 2500 μS/cm, i.e., the guideline limit for drinking water, which was due to their higher chloride content. The proposed fit-for-purpose SPE-HR-CS-GFAAS method could be a candidate for screening drinking water quality.

  18. Flexible, highly graphitized carbon aerogels based on bacterial cellulose/lignin: Catalyst-free synthesis and its application in energy storage devices

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2015-04-15

    Currently, most carbon aerogels are based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or graphene, which are produced through a catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Biomass based organic aerogels and carbon aerogels, featuring low cost, high scalability, and small environmental footprint, represent an important new research direction in (carbon) aerogel development. Cellulose and lignin are the two most abundant natural polymers in the world, and the aerogels based on them are very promising. Classic silicon aerogels and available organic resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) or lignin-resorcinol-formaldehyde (LRF) aerogels are brittle and fragile; toughening of the aerogels is highly desired to expand their applications. This study reports the first attempt to toughen the intrinsically brittle LRF aerogel and carbon aerogel using bacterial cellulose. The facile process is catalyst-free and cost-effective. The toughened carbon aerogels, consisting of blackberry-like, core-shell structured, and highly graphitized carbon nanofibers, are able to undergo at least 20% reversible compressive deformation. Due to their unique nanostructure and large mesopore population, the carbon materials exhibit an areal capacitance higher than most of the reported values in the literature. This property makes them suitable candidates for flexible solid-state energy storage devices. Besides energy storage, the conductive interconnected nanoporous structure can also find applications in oil/water separation, catalyst supports, sensors, and so forth. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Aerrow: A probe-format graphite calorimeter for absolute dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in the clinical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, James; Sarfehnia, Arman; Bancheri, Julien; Seuntjens, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the design, operation, initial experimental evaluation, and characterization of a small-scale graphite calorimeter probe - herein referred to as the Aerrow - developed for routine use in the clinical environment, are described. Similar in size and shape to a Farmer type cylindrical ionization chamber, the Aerrow represents the first translation of calorimetry intended for direct use by clinical physicists in the radiotherapy clinic. Based on a numerically optimized design obtained in previous work, a functioning Aerrow prototype capable of two independent modes of operation (quasi-adiabatic and isothermal) was constructed in-house. Reference dose measurements were performed using both Aerrow operation modes in a 6 MV photon beam and were directly compared to results obtained with a calibrated reference-class ionization chamber. The Aerrow was then used to quantify the absolute output of five clinical linac-based photon beams (6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF, and 15 MV; 63.2% < %dd(10)× < 76.3%). Linearity, dose rate, and orientation dependences were also investigated. Compared to an ion chamber-derived dose to water of 76.3 ± 0.7 cGy, the average doses measured using the Aerrow were 75.6 ± 0.7 and 74.7 ± 0.7 cGy/MU for the quasi-adiabatic and isothermal modes, respectively. All photon beam output measurements using the Aerrow in water-equivalent phantom agreed with chamber-based clinical reference dosimetry data within combined standard uncertainties. The linearity of the Aerrow's response was characterized by an adjusted R2 value of 0.9998 in the dose range of 80 cGy to 470 cGy. For the dose-rate dependence, no statistically significant effects were observed in the range of 0.5 Gy/min to 5.4 Gy/min. A relative photon beam quality dependence of 1.7% was calculated in the range of 60 Co to 24 MV (58.4% < %dd(10)× < 86.8%) using Monte Carlo. Finally, the angular dependence (gantry stationary and detector rotated) of the

  20. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  1. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  2. High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry compared with ion chromatography for quantitative determination of dissolved fluoride in river water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Philip; Sturm, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A; Meermann, Björn

    2017-10-03

    In addition to beneficial health effects, fluoride can also have adverse effects on humans, animals, and plants if the daily intake is strongly elevated. One main source of fluoride uptake is water, and thus several ordinances exist in Germany that declare permissible concentrations of fluoride in, for example, drinking water, mineral water, and landfill seepage water. Controlling the fluoride concentrations in aqueous matrices necessitate valid and fast analytical methods. In this work an alternative method for the determination of fluoride in surface waters based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied. Fluoride detection was made possible by the formation of a diatomic molecule, GaF, and detection of characteristic molecular absorption. On HR-CS-GFMAS parameter optimization, the method was adapted to surface water sample analysis. The influence of potential main matrix constituents such as Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- as well as surface water sampling/storage conditions on the molecular absorption signal of GaF was investigated. Method validation demonstrated a low limit of detection (8.1 μg L-1) and a low limit of quantification (26.9 μg L-1), both sufficient for direct river water sample analysis after 0.45-μm filtration. The optimized HR-CS-GFMAS method was applied for the analysis of real water samples from the rivers Rhine and Moselle. For method validation, samples were also analyzed by an ion chromatography (IC) method. IC and HR-CS-GFMAS results both agreed well. In comparison with IC, HR-CS-GFMAS has higher sample throughput, a lower limit of detection and a lower limit of quantification, and higher selectivity, and is a very suitable method for the analysis of dissolved fluoride in river water. Graphical abstract High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied for the quantitative analysis of dissolved fluoride in river

  3. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  4. Thermal design and validation of radiation detector for the ChubuSat-2 micro-satellite with high-thermal-conductive graphite sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daeil; Miyata, Kikuko; Nagano, Hosei

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes thermal design of the radiation detector (RD) for the ChubuSat-2 with the use of high-thermal-conductive materials. ChubuSat-2 satellite is a 50-kg-class micro-satellite joint development with Nagoya University and aerospace companies. The main mission equipment of ChubuSat-2 is a RD to observe neutrons and gamma rays. However, the thermal design of the RD encounters a serious problem, such as no heater for RD and electric circuit alignment constrain. To solve this issue, the RD needs a new thermal design and thermal control for successful space missions. This paper proposes high-thermal-conductive graphite sheets to be used as a flexible radiator fin for the RD. Before the fabrication of the device, the optimal thickness and surface area for the flexible radiator fin were determined by thermal analysis. Consequently, the surface area of flexible radiator fin was determined to be 8.6×104 mm2. To verify the effects of the flexible radiator fin, we constructed a verification model and analyzed the temperature distributions in the RD. Also, the thermal vacuum test was performed using a thermal vacuum chamber, which was evacuated at a pressure of around 10-4 Pa, and its internal temperature was cooled at -80 °C by using a refrigerant. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the flexible radiator fin is effective. And the thermal vacuum test results are presented good correlation with the analysis results.

  5. Determination of macro and trace elements in multivitamin dietary supplements by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    In this research, three different commercially available multivitamin dietary supplements were analyzed by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) with slurry sampling. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se were determined and compared to the amounts stated by producers. The safety of multivitamin dietary supplements depends on various factors including the manufacturing process and the purity and origins of the raw ingredients. For this reason, this research determined concentrations of several toxic elements (As, Cd, and Pb). Microwave-assisted high pressure Teflon bomb digestion was used to determine total amounts of elements in samples. Samples were prepared as slurries at a concentration of 0.1% (m/v) for macro elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se) and at a concentration of % (m/v) for trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb) in acidic media (3M HNO3). The influence of acid concentration, Triton X-100 addition, sonication time, and sonication power on absorbance was investigated. The accuracy of this method was validated by analyses of NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC DORM-1 (Dogfish Muscle), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver), NBS SRM 1570 (Spinach Leaves) and NBS SRM 1573 (Tomato Leaves) certified reference materials. The measured elements contents in these reference materials (except NRCC DOLT-2) were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The theory of cyclic voltammetry of electrochemically heterogeneous surfaces: comparison of different models for surface geometry and applications to highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kristopher R; Lawrence, Nathan S; Hartshorne, R Seth; Compton, Richard G

    2012-05-28

    The cyclic voltammetry at electrodes composed of multiple electroactive materials, where zones of one highly active material are distributed over a substrate of a second, less active material, is investigated by simulation. The two materials are assumed to differ in terms of their electrochemical rate constants towards any given redox couple. For a one-electron oxidation or reduction, the effect on voltammetry of the size and relative surface coverages of the zones as well as the rate constant of the slower zone are considered for systems where it is much slower than the rate constant of the faster zones. The occurrence of split peak cyclic voltammetry where two peaks are observed in the forward sweep, is studied in terms of the diffusional effects present in the system. A number of surface geometries are compared: specifically the more active zones are modelled as long, thin bands, as steps in the surface, as discs, and as rings (similar to a partially blocked electrode). Similar voltammetry for the band, step and ring models is seen but the disc geometry shows significant differences. Finally, the simulation technique is applied to the modelling of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and experimental conditions under which it may be possible to observe split peak voltammetry are predicted.

  7. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  8. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  9. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Dongwook Lee; Jiwon Seo

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized ? electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, ? electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The ? electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp 3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negativ...

  10. Electron dynamics in MoS2-graphite heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinwu; He, Dawei; Yi, Lixin; Zhao, Siqi; He, Jiaqi; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Hui

    2017-10-05

    The electron dynamics in heterostructures formed by multilayer graphite and monolayer or bulk MoS2 were studied by femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Samples of monolayer MoS2-multilayer graphite and bulk MoS2-multilayer graphite were fabricated by exfoliation and dry transfer techniques. Ultrafast laser pulses were used to inject electron-hole pairs into monolayer or bulk MoS2. The transfer of these photocarriers to the adjacent multilayer graphite was time resolved by measuring the differential reflection of a probe pulse. We found that photocarriers injected into monolayer MoS2 transfer to graphite on an ultrafast time scale shorter than 400 fs. Such an efficient charge transfer is key to the development of high performance optoelectronic devices with MoS2 as the light absorbing layer and graphite as electrodes. The absorption coefficient of monolayer MoS2 can be controlled by the carriers in graphite. This process can be used for interlayer coupling and control. In a bulk MoS2-graphite heterostructure, the photocarrier transfer time is about 220 ps, due to the inefficient interlayer charge transport in bulk MoS2. These results provide useful information for developing optoelectronic devices based on MoS2-graphite heterostructures.

  11. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; François, Luciane L.; Jesus, Alexandre de [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B., E-mail: mbdessuy@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Andrade, Jailson B. de [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq — INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + Ca and HNO{sub 3} + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part. - Highlights: • Spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone. • The analytical lines at 217.001 nm and 283.306 nm using HR-CS GF AAS. • Various combinations of compounds were used to create reference spectra. • LSBC

  12. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  13. Multigene Genetic Programming for Estimation of Elastic Modulus of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohammadi Bayazidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new multigene genetic programming (MGGP approach for estimation of elastic modulus of concrete. The MGGP technique models the elastic modulus behavior by integrating the capabilities of standard genetic programming and classical regression. The main aim is to derive precise relationships between the tangent elastic moduli of normal and high strength concrete and the corresponding compressive strength values. Another important contribution of this study is to develop a generalized prediction model for the elastic moduli of both normal and high strength concrete. Numerous concrete compressive strength test results are obtained from the literature to develop the models. A comprehensive comparative study is conducted to verify the performance of the models. The proposed models perform superior to the existing traditional models, as well as those derived using other powerful soft computing tools.

  14. Influence of compression pressure on Young's modulus of ceramic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shantir, Omar; Trník, Anton

    2017-07-01

    The samples used in this study are created from a porcelain mixture. This mixture is a high strength aluminous porcelain which is used in electrotechnical engineering (high voltage insulators). The porcelain mixture contains clay, kaolin, feldspar, alumina, and small amount of other admixtures. The samples are made with three different compression pressures (80, 90, and 110 MPa). Impulse excitation technique, termodilatometry, and termogravimetry are used to determine Young's modulus. The analyses are performed in the temperature range from 30 °C to 1100 °C with a heating rate of 5 °C/min in a static air atmosphere. It is found out that values of Young's modulus do not increase linearly with the compression pressure.

  15. Cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride heterostructure nanowire loading with a nickel hydroxide cocatalyst for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production in water under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiping; Sun, Zijun; Liu, Xiang; Jia, Hongxing; Du, Pingwu

    2016-02-28

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water in a noble-metal-free system has attracted much attention in recent years. Herein we report on the use of core/shell cadmium sulfide/graphitic carbon nitride (CdS/g-C3N4) heterojunction nanorods modified by nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) as a highly efficient photocatalyst for visible light-driven hydrogen production from water. Due to efficient separation of the photoexcited charge carriers in the CdS/g-C3N4 core/shell nanorods and the synergistic effect of Ni(OH)2, the optimal hydrogen evolution rate over Ni(OH)2-CdS/g-C3N4 is 115.18 μmol h(-1) mg(-1) under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm), which is ∼26 times higher than the CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite without Ni(OH)2 and ∼7 times better than the 0.5 wt% Pt-CdS/g-C3N4 nanorod composite. The apparent quantum efficiency is ∼16.7% at an excitation of 450 nm. During photocatalysis, no degradation of Ni(OH)2 was observed based on the XPS data, indicating that it is a robust cocatalyst. Moreover, the present photocatalyst showed excellent photocatalytic stability for hydrogen production and the turnover number (TON) reached ∼24,600 over 90 hours.

  16. Method development for the determination of bromine in coal using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Castilho, Ivan N. B.; Welz, Bernhard; Gois, Jefferson S.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2014-06-01

    This work reports a simple approach for Br determination in coal using direct solid sample analysis in a graphite tube furnace and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. The molecular absorbance of the calcium mono-bromide (CaBr) molecule has been measured using the rotational line at 625.315 nm. Different chemical modifiers (zirconium, ruthenium, palladium and a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates) have been evaluated in order to increase the sensitivity of the CaBr absorption, and Zr showed the best overall performance. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 800 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using certified coal reference materials (BCR 181, BCR 182, NIST 1630a, and NIST 1632b) with good agreement (between 98 and 103%) with the informed values for Br. The detection limit was around 4 ng Br, which corresponds to about 1.5 μg g- 1 Br in coal, based on a sample mass of 3 mg. In addition, the results were in agreement with those obtained using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, based on a Student t-test at a 95% confidence level. A mechanism for the formation of the CaBr molecule is proposed, which might be considered for other diatomic molecules as well.

  17. Design, Manufacturing, and Characterization of High-Performance Lightweight Bipolar Plates Based on Carbon Nanotube-Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Hybrid Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study on manufacturing and characterization of a platform material for high-performance lightweight bipolar plates for fuel cells based on nanocomposites consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs. The experiments were designed and performed in three steps. In the preexperimental stage, xGnP-epoxy composite samples were prepared at various xGnP weight percentages to determine the maximum processable nanofiller concentration. The main part of the experiment employed the statistics-based design of experiments (DOE methodology to identify improved processing conditions and CNT : xGnP ratio for minimized electrical resistivity. In the postexperimental stage, optimized combinations of material and processing parameters were investigated. With the aid of a reactive diluent, 20 wt.% was determined to the be maximum processable carbon nanomaterial content in the epoxy. The DOE analyses revealed that the CNT : xGnP ratio is the most dominant factor that governs the electrical properties, and its implications in relation to CNT-xGnP interactions and microstructure are elucidated. In addition, samples fabricated near the optimized condition revealed that there exists an optimal CNT : xGnP ratio at which the electrical performance can be maximized. The electrical and mechanical properties of optimal samples suggest that CNT-xGnP hybrid nanocomposites can serve as an alternative material platform for affordable, lightweight bipolar plates.

  18. Determination of sulfur in human hair using high resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and its correlation with total protein and albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Baysal, Asli

    2017-04-01

    Human hair is a valuable contributor for biological monitoring. It is an information storage point to assess the effects of environmental, nutritional or occupational sources on the body. Human proteins, amino acids or other compounds are among the key components to find the sources of different effects or disorders in the human body. Sulfur is a significant one of these compounds, and it has great affinity to some metals and compounds. This property of the sulfur affects the human health positively or negatively. In this manuscript, sulfur was determined in hair samples of autistic and age-match control group children via molecular absorption of CS using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. For this purpose, hair samples were appropriately washed and dried at 75 °C. Then samples were dissolved in microwave digestion using HNO3 for sulfur determination. Extraction was performed with HCl hydrolysation by incubation for 24 h at 110 °C for total protein and albumin determination. The validity of the method for the sulfur determination was tested using hair standard reference materials. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified values at 95% confidence level. Finally correlation of sulfur levels of autistic children's hair with their total protein and albumin levels were done.

  19. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Micro-sampling method based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for calcium determination in blood and mitochondrial suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Mª Jesús; Sevilla, Mª Teresa; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Procopio, Jesús R

    2017-08-01

    A micro-sampling and straightforward method based on high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) was developed to determine extracellular and intracellular Ca in samples of interest in clinical and biomedical analysis. Solid sampling platforms were used to introduce the micro-samples into the graphite furnace atomizer. The secondary absorption line for Ca, located at 239.856nm, was selected to carry out the measurements. Experimental parameters such as pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of sample introduced for the measurements were optimized. Calibration was performed using aqueous standards and the approach to measure at the wings of the absorption lines was employed for the expansion of the linear response range. The limit of detection was of 0.02mgL-1 Ca (0.39ng Ca) and the upper limit of linear range was increased up to 8.0mgL-1 Ca (160ng Ca). The proposed method was used to determine Ca in mitochondrial suspensions and whole blood samples with successful results. Adequate recoveries (within 91-107%) were obtained in the tests performed for validation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of solid sampling for determination of Mo, Ni, Co, and V in soil by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babos, Diego Victor; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Neto, José Anchieta Gomes

    2017-04-01

    New methods are proposed for the determination of Mo, Ni, Co, and V in soils using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with direct solid sampling. Cobalt and V were simultaneously determined, and different analytical lines of Ni and V were monitored to adjust sensitivity for each sample. Accuracy was checked by means of soil certified reference materials, and also by flame atomic absorption spectrometry as comparative technique. The results for Mo, Ni, Co, and V found by proposed methods were in agreement with certified values and with those obtained by the comparative technique at 95% confidence level. The concentrations found in different soil samples were in the ranges 0.19-1.84 mg kg- 1 (Mo), 9.2-22.7 mg kg- 1 (Ni), 1.1-10.7 mg kg- 1 (Co), and 35.6-426.1 mg kg- 1 (V). The relative standard deviations were in the ranges 3.2-10% (Mo), 2.8-9.8% (Ni), 4.0-9.2% (Co), and 1.2-8.0% (V). The limits of quantification for Mo, Ni, Co, and V were 0.027, 0.071, 0.15, and 1.43 ng, respectively.

  2. Solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for gold determination in geological samples after preconcentration onto carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Mróz, Agnieszka; Dąbrowska, Marzena; Olszański, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    A novelty method for the determination of gold in geological samples by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS HR CS GF AAS) after solid-phase extraction onto modified carbon nanotubes (CNT) was described. The methodology developed is based on solid phase extraction of Au(III) ions from digested samples to eliminate strong interference caused by iron compounds and problems related to inhomogeneities of the samples. The use of aqueous or solid standard for calibration was studied and the slope of calibration curve was the same for both of these modes. This statement indicates the possibility to perform the calibration of the method using aqueous standard solutions. Under optimum conditions the absolute detection limit for gold was equal to 2.24 · 10- 6 μg g- 1 while the adsorption capacity of modified carbon nanotubes was 264 mg g- 1. The proposed procedure was validated by the application of certified reference materials (CRMs) with different content of gold and different matrix, the results were in good agreement with certified values. The method was successfully applied for separation and determination of gold ions in complex geological samples, with precision generally better than 8%.

  3. Investigation of chemical modifiers for sulfur determination in diesel fuel samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry using direct analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Charles S. [Instituto Federal Sul-rio-grandense, Câmpus Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Química, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Química, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Química, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Andrade, Jailson B. [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B., E-mail: mbdessuy@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Química, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry has been applied for sulfur determination in diesel fuel. The sharp rotational lines of the carbon monosulfide molecule (formed during the vaporization step) were used to measure the absorbance. The analytical line at 258.056 nm was monitored using the sum of three pixels. Different chemical modifiers were investigated and the mixture of palladium and magnesium was used as chemical modifier in combination with iridium as permanent modifier. L-Cysteine was chosen as sulfur standard and the calibration was done against aqueous standard solutions. The proposed method was applied for the analyses of four diesel samples: two S10 samples and two S500 samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of sulfur in diesel fuel (NIST 2724b). Accurate results, for samples and CRM, were achieved after a dilution with propan-1-ol. The following figures of merit were obtained: characteristic mass of 17 ± 3 ng, limit of detection and limit of quantification of 1.4 mg kg{sup −1} and 4.7 mg kg{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • Ir, Ru and Zr were investigated as permanent modifiers. • Ca, Mg, Pd and Pd/Mg were investigated as modifiers in solution. • Indirect determination of sulfur monitoring the molecular absorbance of the CS • Direct analysis of diesel samples using a dilution in propan-1-ol.

  4. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Post Office Box 676, 13560-970, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Rego, Jardes F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil); Neto, Jose A. Gomes, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Post Office Box 355, 14801-970, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 Degree-Sign C and 2400 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R{sup 2} > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g{sup -1} Cr. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct solid sampling is first time employed for Cr in plant materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calibration curves with liquids and solids are coincident. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microanalysis of plants for Cr is validated by reference materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed HR-CS GF AAS method is environmental friendly.

  5. N/S/B-doped graphitized carbon encased Fe species as a highly active and durable catalyst towards oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Lan; Cheng, Guang-Chun; Chen, Wen-Wen; Liu, Cai-Di; Yuan, Li-Fang; Yang, Bei-Bei; Hao, Ce

    2018-03-15

    Exploring cost-effective, high-performance and durable non-precious metal catalysts is of great significance for the acceleration of sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we report an intriguing heteroatom-doped graphitized carbon encased Fe species composite by introducing N, S and B sequentially. The experimental approach was designed ingeniously for that the FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O could catalyze thiourea to synthesize N, S co-doped carbon materials which would further react with H 3 BO 3 and NH 3 (emerged at the heat-treatment process) to prepare N, S and B co-doped carbon materials (Fe-N/S/B-C). The Fe-N/S/B-C exhibits an impressive ORR activity for its half-wave potential of -0.1 V, which is 36 mV or 19 mV higher than that of the corresponding single or dual doped counterparts (Fe-N-C or Fe-N/S-C) and 31 mV positive than that of Pt/C catalyst, respectively. Further chronoamperometric measurement and accelerated aging test confirm the excellent electrochemical durability of Fe-N/S/B-C with the stable core-shell structure. The remarkable ORR performance and facile preparation method enable Fe-N/S/B-C as a potential candidate in electrochemical energy devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of Micro-Cup-Extrusion Using a Graphit-ic Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microextrusion is becoming increasingly important for the manufacturing of microcomponents. However, this reduction in scale to a microlevel means that the influence of friction and the need for suitable lubrication are greatly increased. This study therefore looks at the use of a low-friction and highly wear resistant Graphit-ic coating on the mold-forming section of a microextrusion mold, this coating being applied by a closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating technique. A microcup of CuZn33 brass alloy was then extruded, with a wall thickness of 0.45 mm, outside diameter of 2.9 mm, and an internal diameter of 2 mm. The experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold coating with Graphit-ic film are compared against the experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold uncoating with Graphit-ic film. This showed that the load was decreased a lot and the self-lubricating solid coating facilitates a smooth extrusion process. As the extrusion rate was quite high, smoothed particle hydrodynamics method simulations of the extrusion process were conducted, these being then compared with the experimental results. These result showed that the SPH simulation can be applied to show the deformation of materials and predict the load trend.

  7. A regularization-free Young's modulus reconstruction algorithm for ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaochang; Gao, Jing; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging aims to reconstruct the distribution of elastic modulus (e.g., Young's modulus) within biological tissues, since the value of elastic modulus is often related to pathological changes. Currently, most elasticity imaging algorithms face a challenge of choosing the value of the regularization constant. We propose a more applicable algorithm without the need of any regularization. This algorithm is not only simple to use, but has a relatively high accuracy. Our method comprises of a nonrigid registration technique and tissue incompressibility assumption to estimate the two-dimensional (2D) displacement field, and finite element method (FEM) to reconstruct the Young's modulus distribution. Simulation and phantom experiments are performed to evaluate the algorithm. Simulation and phantom results showed that the proposed algorithm can reconstruct the Young's modulus with an accuracy of 63∼85%.

  8. Proposal of Design Formulae for Equivalent Elasticity of Masonry Structures Made with Bricks of Low Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of low elastic modulus are occasionally used in some developing countries, such as Indonesia and India. Most of the previous research efforts focused on masonry structures built with bricks of considerably high elastic modulus. The objective of this study is to quantify the equivalent elastic modulus of lower-stiffness masonry structures, when the mortar has a higher modulus of elasticity than the bricks, by employing finite element (FE simulations and adopting the homogenization technique. The reported numerical simulations adopted the two-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs using quadrilateral elements with four nodes. The equivalent elastic moduli of composite elements with various bricks and mortar were quantified. The numerically estimated equivalent elastic moduli from the FE simulations were verified using previously established test data. Hence, a new simplified formula for the calculation of the equivalent modulus of elasticity of such masonry structures is proposed in the present study.

  9. Resilient modulus characteristics of soil subgrade with geopolymer additive in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Nasuhi; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Rahayu, Wiwik

    2017-06-01

    Resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil are generally very low with high potential of deformation and low bearing capacity. The efforts to improve the peat subgrade resilient modulus characteristics is required, one among them is by adding the geopolymer additive. Geopolymer was made as an alternative to replace portland cement binder in the concrete mix in order to promote environmentally friendly, low shrinkage value, low creep value, and fire resistant material. The use of geopolymer to improve the mechanical properties of peat as a road construction subgrade, hence it becomes important to identify the effect of geopolymer addition on the resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil. This study investigated the addition of 0% - 20% geopolymer content on peat soil derived from Ogan Komering Ilir, South Sumatera Province. Resilient modulus measurement was performed by using cyclic triaxial test to determine the resilience modulus model as a function of deviator stresses and radial stresses. The test results showed that an increase in radial stresses did not necessarily lead to an increase in modulus resilient, and on the contrary, an increase in deviator stresses led to a decrease in modulus resilient. The addition of geopolymer in peat soil provided an insignificant effect on the increase of resilient modulus value.

  10. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  11. Interpenetrated Networks between Graphitic Carbon Infilling and Ultrafine TiO2 Nanocrystals with Patterned Macroporous Structure for High-Performance Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenji; Yan, Zhijun; Dai, Yan; Du, Naixu; Jiang, Xiaobin; Dai, Hailing; Li, Xiangcun; He, Gaohong

    2017-06-21

    Interpenetrated networks between graphitic carbon infilling and ultrafine TiO2 nanocrystals with patterned macropores (100-200 nm) were successfully synthesized. Polypyrrole layer was conformably coated on the primary TiO2 nanoparticles (∼8 nm) by a photosensitive reaction and was then transformed into carbon infilling in the interparticle mesopores of the TiO2 nanoparticles. Compared to the carbon/graphene supported TiO2 nanoparticles or carbon coated TiO2 nanostructures, the carbon infilling would provide a conductive medium and buffer layer for volume expansion of the encapsulated TiO2 nanoparticles, thus enhancing conductivity and cycle stability of the C-TiO2 anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In addition, the macropores with diameters of 100-200 nm in the C-TiO2 anode and the mesopores in carbon infilling could improve electrolyte transportation in the electrodes and shorten the lithium ion diffusion length. The C-TiO2 electrode can provide a large capacity of 192.8 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 200 mA g-1, which is higher than those of the pure macroporous TiO2 electrode (144.8 mA h g-1), C-TiO2 composite electrode without macroporous structure (128 mA h g-1), and most of the TiO2 based electrodes in the literature. Importantly, the C-TiO2 electrode exhibits a high rate performance and still delivers a high capacity of ∼140 mA h g-1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g-1 (∼5.88 C), suggesting good lithium storage properties of the macroporous C-TiO2 composites with high capacity, cycle stability, and rate capability. This work would be instructive for designing hierarchical porous TiO2 based anodes for high-performance LIBs.

  12. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-03-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration.

  13. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-07

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated.

  14. Evaluation of Antenna Foundation Elastic Modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcginness, H.; Anderson, G.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment to measure the elastic deflection of the DSS 14 concrete pedestal under the weight of the antenna was conducted in February 1983 and is compared to a similiar experiment made in 1968. Comparison of the results confirms the decrease in elastic modulus measured on core samples recently taken from the pedestal.

  15. Measuring Elastic Modulus of Sintered Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.; Eastman, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Technique minimizes effect of substrate on thin sintered coating. Uniaxial tension test yields approximate value for elastic modulus of sintered material on thin substrate. Electrode composed of central perforated nickel plated steel sheet about 4 mils (0.1mm) thick, coated on each face by porous sintered nickel about 8 mils (0.2mm) thick.

  16. Structural relaxation monitored by instantaneous shear modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on aging of the silicone oil MS704 for sudden changes of temperature from 210.5 to 209.0 K and from 207.5 to 209.0 K studied by continuously monitoring the instantaneous shear modulus G [infinity]. The results are interpreted within the Tool-Narayanaswamy formalism with a reduced...

  17. Analysis of bed joint influence on masonry modulus of elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Zavalis, R.; Jonaitis, B.; Paulo B. Lourenço

    2014-01-01

    The means of determining the modulus of elasticity presented in technical literature often underestimate factors such as the influence of mechanical properties of the bed joint mortar and the influence of contact zone of the masonry unit and mortar on the elasticity modulus. Research carried out by the authors show that the modulus of elasticity of the bed joint considering influence of the contact zone (effective modulus of elasticity) is 3 to 25 times less than mortar modulus of...

  18. Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 August 2016 – 29 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic...ERC 14. ABSTRACT A method for determining the stress relaxation master curve of solid rocket propellants was developed. The propellant was tested in... stress relaxation modulus, Mpa; E∞ = long-term equilibrium modulus, Mpa; E0 = storage modulus, Mpa; E0 0 = loss modulus, Mpa; F = Fisher test

  19. Highly Flexible and Sensitive Wearable E-Skin Based on Graphite Nanoplatelet and Polyurethane Nanocomposite Films in Mass Industry Production Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Wang, Huatao; Su, Zhiwei; Zhang, Minghao; Hu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yijie; Wang, Ziao; Zhong, Bo; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Junpeng; Xing, Scott Guozhong

    2017-11-08

    Graphene and nanomaterials based flexible pressure sensors R&D activities are becoming hot topics due to the huge marketing demand on wearable devices and electronic skin (E-Skin) to monitor the human body's actions for dedicated healthcare. Herein, we report a facile and efficient fabrication strategy to construct a new type of highly flexible and sensitive wearable E-Skin based on graphite nanoplates (GNP) and polyurethane (PU) nanocomposite films. The developed GNP/PU E-Skin sensors are highly flexible with good electrical conductivity due to their unique binary microstructures with synergistic interfacial characteristics, which are sensitive to both static and dynamic pressure variation, and can even accurately and quickly detect the pressure as low as 0.005 N/50 Pa and momentum as low as 1.9 mN·s with a gauge factor of 0.9 at the strain variation of up to 30%. Importantly, our GNP/PU E-Skin is also highly sensitive to finger bending and stretching with a linear correlation between the relative resistance change and the corresponding bending angles or elongation percentage. In addition, our E-Skin shows excellent sensitivity to voice vibration when exposed to a volunteer's voice vibration testing. Notably, the entire E-Skin fabrication process is scalable, low cost, and industrially available. Our complementary experiments with comprehensive results demonstrate that the developed GNP/PU E-Skin is impressively promising for practical healthcare applications in wearable devices, and enables us to monitor the real-world force signals in real-time and in-situ mode from pressing, hitting, bending, stretching, and voice vibration.

  20. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 : A cylindrical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium and graphite with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 21 atom %.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Perel, R. L.; Wagschal, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Racah Inst. of Physics

    2010-09-30

    Specifications and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 12 began in late Jan. 1958, and the Assembly 12 program ended in Feb. 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates, depleted uranium plates and graphite plates loaded into stainless steel drawers which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide depleted uranium plates and seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide graphite plates. The length of each column was 9 in. (228.6 mm) in each half of the core. The graphite plates were included to produce a softer neutron spectrum that would be more characteristic of a large power reactor. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the radial blanket was approximately 12 in. and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 21 in. (533.4 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/12, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on Feb. 5, 1958. The subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/12 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. An accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/12 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Growth on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles are coated and act as catalysts for CNT growth. The growth temperature ranges from 550 to 1000 C at an ambient pressure. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane contents of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than 800 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in a rough fiber surface with no CNT grown on the surface. When the growth temperature is relatively low (650 - 800 C), CNT are fabricated on the graphite surface with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends. Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT can be determined, depending on methane concentrations.

  2. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  3. Soft ceramics for high temperature lubrication: graphite-free lubricants for hot and warm forging of steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main research focus of this thesis is on the development of the next generation of solid lubricants for high temperature forming of steel. These lubricants are based on ceramic nanoparticles which are more resistant to temperature and oxidation than traditional lubricants. Nowadays, the most

  4. The Influence of Pores on Irradiation Property of Selected Nuclear Graphites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengcao Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As structural material and moderator in high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR, nuclear graphite endures large flux of irradiation in its service time. The microstructure of nuclear graphite is a topical issue studied to predict the irradiation property of graphite and improve manufacturing process. In our present work, the pores in graphite are focused, and the relationship between pore and irradiation behavior is discussed. Three kinds of nuclear graphite (IG-11, NBG-18, and HSM-SC are concerned, and their porosity, pore size, and morphology before and after irradiation are studied, respectively. A comparison between the three graphites shows that dense small pores which are uniformly distributed in graphite bring better irradiation property because the pores can accommodate some of the internal stress caused by irradiation expansion. Coke particles of small size and a thorough mixture between coke and binder are suggested to obtain such pores in nuclear graphite and thus improve irradiation property.

  5. Measure of the magnitude of Young's modulus in whisker-like samples of the Bi-based high-Tc materials Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub x and Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tritt, T.M.; Ehrlich, A.C.; Gillespie, D.J. (Materials Physics Branch, Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA)); Marone, M.; Chen Xinfen; Skove, M.J.; Tessema, G.X. (Clemson Univ., Dept. of Physics, SC (USA)); Franck, J.P.; Jung, J. (Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Physics, Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1991-08-01

    We have measured Young's modulus in ribbon-like whisker samples of the high-Tc materials: Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. This is the first direct measurement of Young's modulus for whiskers of any of the high Tc materials. We used a stress-strain probe that applies an axial force (uniaxial stress) to the whisker-like sample and simultaneously measures the corresponding sample elongation. The slope of the resulting stress-strain curve yields the magnitude of Young's modulus (Y). We found these Bi based high-Tc materials to be soft with Y {approx equal} 20 GPa for Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} and Y {approx equal} 25 GPa for Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. (orig.).

  6. Determination of the flexural modulus of elasticity of orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kun; Darvell, Brian W

    2010-08-01

    To design a protocol for the determination of the flexural modulus of elasticity of wire with high accuracy and precision. Cantilever bending was used at long span and low loads, using a laser displacement sensor. Various wires were tested for proof-of-concept: stainless steel, Elgiloy, Wiptam and a gold alloy, with primary attention being paid to the source and magnitude of errors. The moduli of elasticity were determined with a median relative error of approximately 0.15%, with a worst case of 0.56%, taking into account all measurement errors. The precision was such as to permit distinctions between the values for the wires of different thermomechanical history. The determination of the elastic modulus of wires may be made with good precision using cantilever bending providing attention is given to all sources of error. These results represent the most reliable measures of modulus of elasticity of orthodontic archwires to date. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lithium rich cathode/graphite anode combination for lithium ion cells with high tolerance to near zero volt storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, K. R.; Staub, J. W.; Hladky, M. P.; Landi, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Management of reversible lithium is an advantageous approach to design lithium ion cells that are tolerant to near zero volt (NZV) storage under fixed resistive load towards highly controllable, enhanced user-inactive safety. Presently, the first cycle loss from a high energy density Li-rich HE5050 cathode is used to provide excess reversible lithium when paired with an appropriately capacity matched mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) anode. Cells utilizing 1.2 M LiPF6 3:7 v/v ethylene carbonate:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte and a lithium reference were used for 3-electrode testing. After conditioning, a fixed resistive load was applied to 3-electrode cells for 72 or 168-h during which the anode potential and electrode asymptotic potential (EAP) remained less than the copper dissolution potential. After multiple storage cycles (room temperature or 40 °C), the NZV coulombic efficiency (cell reversibility) exceeded 97% and the discharge capacity retention was >98%. Conventional 2-electrode HE5050/MCMB pouch cells stored at NZV or open circuit for 3 days had nearly identical rate capability (up to 5C) and discharge performance stability (for 500 cycles under a 30% depth of discharge low-earth-orbit regime). Thus, lithium ion cells with appropriately capacity matched HE5050/MCMB electrodes have excellent tolerance to prolonged NZV storage, which can lead to enhanced user-inactive safety.

  8. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of zinc oxide on graphite drawn on paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C. S.; Herrera, M. U.; Tapia, A. K. G.

    2017-04-01

    Flexible substrates have many promising applications in sensing, electronics, and electromagnetic shielding and energy storage among many others. Paper can serve as substrate for these kinds of technologies offering a cheaper alternative. In this study, Zinc oxide (ZnO) was successfully deposited on graphite drawn on paper using electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Graphite from commercially-available pencil was drawn on paper. Graphite drawn on paper was used as electrodes for the EPD process. High-voltage power supply was used as source while ground ZnO in acetone was used as suspension in the deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results reveal the deposition of ZnO on Graphite. In addition, the electrical contact of the ZnO-graphite interface showed Ohmic behaviour by two-point probe method.

  10. Speciation analysis of volatile and non-volatile vanadium compounds in Brazilian crude oils using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Fabio G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: welz@qmc.ufsc.br; Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Alessandra F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heitmann, Uwe [ISAS - Institute of Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-02-03

    A method is proposed that makes possible determining total and 'thermally stable' vanadium in crude oil without prior separation, and to calculate 'volatile' vanadium by difference. The volatile fraction is believed to be largely vanadyl porphyrine complexes. The method is based on the unsurpassed background correction capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS), which allows pyrolysis temperatures as low as 300 deg. C to be used. The samples were prepared as oil-in-water emulsions, and aqueous standards emulsified in the same way were used for calibration. Total vanadium has been determined using a pyrolysis temperature of 400 deg. C, and 'thermally stable' vanadium using a pyrolysis temperature of 800 deg. C. The content of total vanadium in 12 Brazilian crude oil samples was found to be between less than 0.04 and about 30 mg kg{sup -1}. The volatile fraction was between 5 and 51% of the total content, and there was no correlation between the total and the volatile vanadium content. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.04 and 0.12 mg kg{sup -1} of V in crude oil, respectively, based on a mass of 2 g of oil in 10 mL of emulsion. The precision was better than 4% at the 3 mg kg{sup -1} level and better than 1.5% at the 30 mg kg{sup -1} level of V in crude oil.

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: a green route for large-scale production of porous graphene and graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paola; Hu, Anming; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Duley, Walter W; Zhou, Norman Y

    2014-02-21

    Porous graphene (PG) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are attracting attention due to their potential applications in photovoltaics, catalysis, and bio-related fields. We present a novel way for mass production of these promising materials. The femtosecond laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is employed for their synthesis. Porous graphene (PG) layers were found to float at the water-air interface, while graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were dispersed in the solution. The sheets consist of one to six stacked layers of spongy graphene, which form an irregular 3D porous structure that displays pores with an average size of 15-20 nm. Several characterization techniques have confirmed the porous nature of the collected layers. The analyses of the aqueous solution confirmed the presence of GQDs with dimensions of about 2-5 nm. It is found that the formation of both PG and GQDs depends on the fs-laser ablation energy. At laser fluences less than 12 J cm(-2), no evidence of either PG or GQDs is detected. However, polyynes with six and eight carbon atoms per chain are found in the solution. For laser energies in the 20-30 J cm(-2) range, these polyynes disappeared, while PG and GQDs were found at the water-air interface and in the solution, respectively. The origin of these materials can be explained based on the mechanisms for water breakdown and coal gasification. The absence of PG and GQDs, after the laser ablation of HOPG in liquid nitrogen, confirms the proposed mechanisms.

  12. Simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel fly ash using solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Valdivia, A; Vereda Alonso, E; López Guerrero, M M; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J; Cano Pavón, J M; García de Torres, A

    2018-03-01

    A green and simple method has been proposed in this work for the simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel ash samples by solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS HR CS GFAAS). The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows eliminating pretreatment steps, involving minimal manipulation of sample. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9931. The concentrations found in the fuel ash samples analysed ranged from 0.66% to 4.2% for V, 0.23-0.7% for Ni and 0.10-0.60% for Fe. Precision (%RSD) were 5.2%, 10.0% and 9.8% for V, Ni and Fe, respectively, obtained as the average of the %RSD of six replicates of each fuel ash sample. The optimum conditions established were applied to the determination of the target analytes in fuel ash samples. In order to test the accuracy and applicability of the proposed method in the analysis of samples, five ash samples from the combustion of fuel in power stations, were analysed. The method accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results obtained using the proposed method with the results obtained by ICP OES previous acid digestion. The results showed good agreement between them. The goal of this work has been to develop a fast and simple methodology that permits the use of aqueous standards for straightforward calibration and the simultaneous determination of V, Ni and Fe in fuel ash samples by direct SS HR CS GFAAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rennan G.O., E-mail: rgoa01@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica Ambiental, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vignola, Fabiola; Castilho, Ivan N.B. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3{sigma}), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.12 ng m{sup -3} in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m{sup 3} collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g{sup -1}, equivalent to 0.41 ng m{sup -3} in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g{sup -1} and 381 {+-} 24 ng g{sup -1}. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m{sup -3} and 1.47 {+-} 0.09 ng m{sup -3}. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  14. Determination of Pb (Lead), Cd (Cadmium), Cr (Chromium), Cu (Copper), and Ni (Nickel) in Chinese tea with high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wen-Si; Ren, Ting; Zhao, Li-Jiao

    2016-01-01

    The contents of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and nickel were determined in 25 tea samples from China, including green, yellow, white, oolong, black, Pu'er, and jasmine tea products, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The methods used for sample preparation, digestion, and quantificational analysis were established, generating satisfactory analytical precisions (represented by relative standard deviations ranging from 0.6% to 2.5%) and recoveries (98.91-101.32%). The lead contents in tea leaves were 0.48-10.57 mg/kg, and 80% of these values were below the maximum values stated by the guidelines in China. The contents of cadmium and chromium ranged from 0.01 mg/kg to 0.39 mg/kg and from 0.27 mg/kg to 2.45 mg/kg, respectively, remaining in compliance with the limits stipulated by China's Ministry of Agriculture. The copper contents were 7.73-63.71 mg/kg; only 64% of these values complied with the standards stipulated by the Ministry of Agriculture. The nickel contents ranged from 2.70 mg/kg to 13.41 mg/kg. Consequently, more attention must be paid to the risks of heavy metal contamination in tea. The quantitative method established in this work lays a foundation for preventing heavy metal toxicity in human from drinking tea and will help establish regulations to control the contents of heavy metals in tea. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Determination of Pb (Lead, Cd (Cadmium, Cr (Chromium, Cu (Copper, and Ni (Nickel in Chinese tea with high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Si Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The contents of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, and nickel were determined in 25 tea samples from China, including green, yellow, white, oolong, black, Pu'er, and jasmine tea products, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The methods used for sample preparation, digestion, and quantificational analysis were established, generating satisfactory analytical precisions (represented by relative standard deviations ranging from 0.6% to 2.5% and recoveries (98.91–101.32%. The lead contents in tea leaves were 0.48–10.57 mg/kg, and 80% of these values were below the maximum values stated by the guidelines in China. The contents of cadmium and chromium ranged from 0.01 mg/kg to 0.39 mg/kg and from 0.27 mg/kg to 2.45 mg/kg, respectively, remaining in compliance with the limits stipulated by China's Ministry of Agriculture. The copper contents were 7.73–63.71 mg/kg; only 64% of these values complied with the standards stipulated by the Ministry of Agriculture. The nickel contents ranged from 2.70 mg/kg to 13.41 mg/kg. Consequently, more attention must be paid to the risks of heavy metal contamination in tea. The quantitative method established in this work lays a foundation for preventing heavy metal toxicity in human from drinking tea and will help establish regulations to control the contents of heavy metals in tea.

  16. Direct determination of bromine in plastic materials by means of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flórez, M.R.; Resano, M., E-mail: mresano@unizar.es

    2013-10-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of bromine in polymers, which could be interesting in view of the current regulations restricting the use of organobrominated compounds. The method developed is based on the addition of Ca (300 μg) and Pd (30 μg) to favor the formation of CaBr, which is monitored at the main molecular “lines” (rotational spectra) found in the vicinity of 625.315 nm. It was found that accurate results could be obtained for all the samples investigated (polyethylene, polypropylene and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene certified reference materials) using any of the lines studied and constructing the calibration curve with aqueous standards. Furthermore, the combined use of the main four CaBr lines available in the spectral area simultaneously monitored permits to easily expand the linear range up to 2000 ng, provides a limit of detection of 1.8 ng (1.8 μg g{sup −1} for a mass of 1 mg) and further improves precision to values between 3–7% RSD. Overall, the method proposed seems suited for the fast and simple control of these types of samples (approximately 10 min for sample are required), circumventing the traditional problems associated with sample digestion (e.g., losses of volatile compounds), and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations. - Highlights: • Owing to the extended use of BFRs, Br determination in plastics is of great interest. • Solid sampling HR CS GFMAS permits the direct determination of Br, as CaBr, in plastics. • A fast and simple methodology with aqueous standards for calibration is proposed. • A LOD of 1.8 μg g{sup −1} and precision values in the 3–7% RSD range are achieved.

  17. Fibonacci difference sequence spaces for modulus functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldip Raj

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we introduce Fibonacci difference sequence spaces l(F, Ƒ, p, u and  l_∞(F, Ƒ, p, u by using a sequence of modulus functions and a new band matrix F. We also make an effort to study some inclusion relations, topological and geometric properties of these spaces. Furthermore, the alpha, beta, gamma duals and matrix transformation of the space l(F, Ƒ, p, u are determined.

  18. Modulus for the coal ash. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.

    1944-06-30

    This summary outlined the procedure for obtaining a modulus to determine the effects of varying ash content. This modulus was to indicate the relative amounts of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide after addition of alkalais or alkaline-earth constituents found in catalysts. The calculation of the modulus was based upon stoichiometric ratios of these oxides to other major components of ash as represented in the major minerals in the ash. The assumptions about the conditions in low- to intermediate-temperature coking included the following: (1) magnesium oxide was found only in biotite, which contained potassium oxide, magnesium oxide, aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, and water in the respective mole ratios 1:4:2:6:1. (2) Potassium oxide outside of biotite was found only in muscovite, which contained potassium oxide, aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, and water in the respective mole ratios 1:1:6:2. (3) Sodium oxide was combined only with aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide in the mole ratios 1:1:6. (4) Phosphoric acid was found as aluminum phosphate. (5) Lime was found in anortite, which contained calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, or calcium oxide combined with aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide in the mole ratios 1:1:2. (6) Aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide existed mainly in the hydrated state with the two of them combined with water in the mole ratios 1:2:2. The completed formula for the modulus was given as M = (aluminum oxide) + (silicon dioxide) - 0.65(magnesium oxide) - 4.90(potassium oxide + sodium oxide) - 3.96(calcium oxide) - 0.72(phosphorous pentoxide), where the parentheses should be filled by numbers in weight units for the respective compounds.

  19. Facile synthesis of graphite-reduced graphite oxide core-sheath fiber via direct exfoliation of carbon fiber for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qinghua; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Huijuan; Guo, Lin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-06-25

    A graphite-reduced graphite oxide (rGO) core-sheath structured fiber was synthesized through chemical exfoliation of graphitic carbon fiber. The graphitic carbon fiber was oxidized to form a graphite-graphite oxide core-sheath fiber and followed by thermal exfoliation to form a graphite-rGO core-sheath fiber. The core-sheath fiber with a three-dimensionally (3D) structured rGO sheath possesses a high surface area and pore size around 5.5 nm. A two-electrode supercapacitor constructed with this core-sheath fiber-based paper exhibited a high specific capacitance (140 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1)), high power density of 45 kW/kg, and good cycling stability (10% capacity loss after 3000 cycles). The surface area normalized capacitance reached as high as 59.4 μF cm(-2), indicating the effective use of surface area. The low equivalent series resistance value of 0.45 ohm in the Nyquist plot indicates an extremely small resistance between the graphite core and rGO sheet sheath. The hierarchical three-dimensional structure enables one to maximize the advantages of both graphite and rGO sheets. The 3D-structured rGO sheets sheath with regular pore structure is favorable for ion diffusion due to its interconnected porous system, while the graphite core provides an electron transport pathway with high conductivity.

  20. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  1. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB

  2. Absolute cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in highly uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1–3 diaminopropane (Dap2+) for DNA permits the growth on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291–21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA− transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an absolute cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films. PMID:23927289

  3. Effects of resin hydrophilicity on water sorption and changes in modulus of elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shuichi; Hashimoto, Masanori; Wadgaonkar, Bakul; Svizero, Nadia; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Yiu, Cynthia; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Foulger, Stephen; Saito, Takashi; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2005-11-01

    As acidic monomers of self-etching adhesives are incorporated into dental adhesives at high concentrations, the adhesive becomes more hydrophilic. Water sorption by polymers causes plasticization and lowers mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to compare the water sorption and modulus of elasticity (E) of five experimental neat resins (EX) of increasing hydrophilicity, as ranked by their Hoy's solubility parameters and five commercial resins. After measuring the initial modulus of all resin disks by biaxial flexure, half the specimens were stored in hexadecane and the rest were stored in water. Repeated measurements of stiffness were made for 3 days. Water sorption and solubility measurements were made in a parallel experiment. None of the specimens stored in oil showed any significant decrease in modulus. All resins stored in water exhibited a time-dependent decrease in modulus that was proportional to their degree of water sorption. Water sorption of EX was proportional to Hoy's solubility parameter for polar forces (delta(p)) with increasing polarity resulting in higher sorption. The least hydrophilic resin absorbed 0.55 wt% water and showed a 15% decrease in modulus after 3 days. The most hydrophilic experimental resin absorbed 12.8 wt% water and showed a 73% modulus decrease during the same period. The commercial resins absorbed between 5% and 12% water that was associated with a 19-42% reduction in modulus over 3 days.

  4. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  5. Effects of compositions of filler, binder and porosity on elastic and fracture properties of nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyaw, S.T., E-mail: si.kyaw@nottingham.ac.uk; Sun, W.; Becker, A.A.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Micromechanics based homogenisation method is used for graphite microstructures. • Elastic and fracture properties are estimated based on graphite microstructures. • Fracture behaviours are studied using compact tension simulation. • Fracture behaviours are studied using four point bending simulation. • Flexural strengths were obtained and compared to experimental results from literature. - Abstract: Physical mechanisms at different length scales have to be taken into account while predicting the overall failure of nuclear graphite structures of advanced gas cooled graphite reactors. In this paper, the effect of composition of meso graphite phases and porosity on the aggregate elastic properties is predicted using the Eshelby homogenisation method. Results indicate an overall decrease in elastic modulus with an increase in porosity. Subsequently, the moduli at different porosity levels are used to predict the critical strain energy release rates for crack propagation of graphite, and fracture behaviour is studied using compact tension and four point bending tests. Compared to flexural strength at zero porosity level, significant reduction in strength of up to 80% at 30% porosity level is observed. Evolution of flexural strength due to porosity is also compared against available experimental values of graphite from UK nuclear plants.

  6. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  7. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shijing; Argondizzo, Adam; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Petek, Hrvoje

    2017-01-01

    Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  8. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijing Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  9. Fullerenes, Graphitic Smokes and the Nature of Planetary Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, L.; Poreda, R.; Nuth, J.

    2003-04-01

    We have begun to carry out experiments on synthetic material "graphitic smokes" to evaluate the noble gases in the larger fullerene cages. Graphitic smokes (GS) are produced by electrically heating a hollowed out graphite rod in a noble gas atmosphere. The hollow graphite rod allows the C to condense out of the gas more uniformly in comparison to the Kratschmer arc evaporator synthesis of fullerenes. Some of these carbonaceous condensates were analyzed for Xe and values as high as 13.7 × 10-6 cm^3 STP/bm of 132Xe were obtained. This is some 2X magnitude greater than typical 132Xe amounts for other synthesized carbonaceous residues. We obtained some graphitic smokes synthesized in a noble gas mixture (49% neon, 49% argon, 1% Xe and 1% Kr with the balance of pressure coming from He) and used our fullerene extraction protocol to determine whether fullerene was a carrier phase for the noble gases measured in the graphitic smoke material. Preliminary measurements of He and Ne in toluene extracted graphitic smokes residues (100 μg) indicated that fullerene (mostly C60 and C70) is indeed a carrier phase. Our yield for He corresponds to one ^4He per 880,000 fullerene molecules and is similar to the abundances measured in synthetic fullerenes produced in the arc evaporator. We are continuing our studies of the graphitic smokes with emphasis on the isolation and separation of the larger cages (C84-C200) and direct measurements of the noble gases. The graphitic smokes will be prepared with various mixtures of noble gases of known composition and extracted for fullerenes. The very efficient trapping of Xe in the graphitic smokes strongly suggests a more significant role for the larger fullerene cages to encapsulate the heavy noble gases. A more complete characterization of the larger fullerene cages may well lead to a better understanding of the nature of planetary atmospheres.

  10. Asphalt mix characterization using dynamic modulus and APA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    final report summarizes two research efforts related to asphalt mix characterization: dynamic modulus and Asphalt Pavement Analyzer testing. One phase of the research consisted of a laboratory-based evaluation of dynamic modulus of Oregon dense-grade...

  11. Crystal alignment of graphite as a negative electrode material of the lithium-ion secondary batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, M.G. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); The Technology Commercialization Center, Hyosung R and D Business Laboratory, 183, Hoge-Dong, Dongan-Ku, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 431-080 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sungmg@hanmail.net; Hattori, K.; Asai, S. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    The major problem on magnetic alignment of graphite particles is the difficulty to produce graphite particles composed of a single crystal, and suppress their agglomeration. Thus, it is essential to produce graphite particles composed of a single crystal and disperse them using mechanical grinding or shearing with addition of a suitable dispersant. In this study, the suitable dispersant for graphite particle and the optimum condition for mechanical grinding are studied in respect to the crystal alignment of natural graphite in slip casting under a high magnetic field.

  12. Internal Grains Within KFC Graphites: Implications for Their Stellar Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2005-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations find high s-process element enrichments in internal carbides, suggesting an AGB origin for most Murchison KFC presolar graphites. Other rare phases (iron phases and metallic osmium) are consistent with a SN origin.

  13. Planar lighting from optimized graphite papers made of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ziqi; Xu, Huailiang; Zhou, Bucun; Qi, Zeming; Qu, Yan; Zhu, Yanwu

    2017-05-01

    We report the preparation of large-area graphite papers with thicknesses from 100 μm to more than 1 mm, by the reduction and graphitization of graphite oxide at elevated temperatures. The papers can be produced on a size of 20 × 20 cm2 and have a low mass density. X-ray diffraction and Raman characterization show that the stacking of graphitic layers in the papers follows the Bernal stacking, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates a carbon purity of above 98 at. % in the papers. The graphite papers have an electrical conductivity of 2533-4996 S/m and a thermal conductivity of 42-149 W/mK, depending on the thickness. When a power input of above 10 W is applied on the paper with a thickness of 98 μm, incandescence is observed, corresponding to a temperature of higher than 1000 °C, which is increased with the input power.

  14. Nondestructive Measurement of Dynamic Modulus for Cellulose Nanofibril Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Qing; Robert J. Ross; Zhiyong Cai; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films was performed using cantilever beam vibration (CBV) and acoustic methods to measure dynamic modulus. Static modulus was tested using tensile tension method. Correlation analysis shows the data measured by CBV has little linear relationship with static modulus, possessing a correlation coefficient (R

  15. Catalytically graphitized glass-like carbon examined as anode for lithium-ion cell performing at high charge/discharge rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, Jan M.; Knofczynski, Krzysztof [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, ul. Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-10-20

    The influence of a long-time heat treatment of hard carbon in the presence of iron catalyst on its structural properties and electrochemical performance is concerned in terms of potential application as anode material for lithium-ion cell. Glass-like carbon spheres obtained by carbonization of phenol resin were catalytically graphitized by heat treatment at temperature 1000 C in argon atmosphere for 20 h and 100 h. After this process iron was completely removed from the product of reaction. The original carbon was entirely useless as anode for Li-ion cell because of its extremely poor reversible capacity (54 mAh g{sup -1}). Due to heat treatment composite materials consisting of microcrystalline graphite admixed with turbostratic carbon were produced. Modified carbons were tested as anode materials using gradually increasing current density. Based on electrochemical measurements a mixed intercalation/insertion mechanism for storage of lithium ions was concluded. Discharge capacity of carbon heat treated for 100 h attained value of 276 mAh g{sup -1} and its reversible capacity appeared to be better than that of flaky graphite upon discharging at current density in the range 50-250 mA g{sup -1}. (author)

  16. Elastic modulus of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultrich, B.; Scheibe, H.-J.; Grandremy, G.; Schneider, D.; Siemroth, P.

    1994-12-01

    Amorphous carbon films have been prepared by special pulsed vacuum arc depositon methods allowing high currents up to 1 kA and more. The Young's modulus of these films has been determined with respect to various technological parameters. For these measurements a method based on the propagation of ultrasonic surface waves has been applied which has been specially designed for the investigation of thin films below one micrometer. Large changes of the elastic modulus, depending on the technology, have been observed, contrasting with the common understanding of invariability of the elastic behavior. Reflecting the large structural variations possible in amorphous carbon, the elastic modulus represents a suitable parameter for characterizing the carbon-carbon network. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of amorphous carbon films may be used for a first estimation of film hardness because of the strong correlation of these two quantities.

  17. Differential Dynamic Modulus of Carbon Black Filled, Uncured SBR in Single-Step Large Shearing Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Youji; Fujii, Shuji; Kawahara, Seiichi; Isono, Yoshinobu; Kagami, Shigeru

    Correspondence between nonlinear viscoelastic properties and change in various networks in carbon black (CB) filled, uncured SBRs has been studied by using combined measurements of relaxation modulus, differential dynamic modulus, and volume resisitivity in wide range of filler concentrations at various shear strains. Volume resistivity at no deformation showed step-off like change which can be explained by the percolation theory. This indicates formation of contact filler network at high filler loading. In addition, change in volume resistivity showed clear correspondence with linear-nonlinear transition in viscoelasticity. By the use of simple three-network model, contributions of contact filler, bridged filler, and entanglement networks to relaxation modulus were estimated. It was found that contact filler and bridged filler networks were dominant at lower and at higher filler concentrations, respectively. It was proposed, furthermore, that differential dynamic modulus can be used as the probes for changes in contact filler and bridged filler networks, respectively.

  18. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  19. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R. [Francis Bitter Magnet Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  20. Pristine graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiev, Ayrat; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Alemany, Lawrence B; Chaguine, Pavel; Tour, James M

    2012-02-08

    Graphite oxide (GO) is a lamellar substance with an ambiguous structure due to material complexity. Recently published GO-related studies employ only one out of several existing models to interpret the experimental data. Because the models are different, this leads to confusion in understanding the nature of the observed phenomena. Lessening the structural ambiguity would lead to further developments in functionalization and use of GO. Here, we show that the structure and properties of GO depend significantly on the quenching and purification procedures, rather than, as is commonly thought, on the type of graphite used or oxidation protocol. We introduce a new purification protocol that produces a product that we refer to as pristine GO (pGO) in contrast to the commonly known material that we will refer to as conventional GO (cGO). We explain the differences between pGO and cGO by transformations caused by reaction with water. We produce ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and scanning electron microscopic analytical evidence for the structure of pGO. This work provides a new explanation for the acidity of GO solutions and allows us to add critical details to existing GO models.

  1. Mode II interlaminar fracture of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L. A.; Gillespie, J. W.; Trethewey, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The end notched flexure (ENF) specimen is employed in an investigation of the interlaminar fracture toughness in Mode II (skew symmetric shear) loading of unidirectional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Important experimental parameters such as the influence of precracking and the data reduction scheme for the Mode II toughness are discussed. Nonlinear load-deflection response is significant for the tough thermoplastic resin composite but is also present for the brittle thermoset composite. The observed nonlinearities, which are highly rate dependent, are attributed to a combination of slow stable crack growth preceding unstable crack growth and material inelastic behavior in the process zone around the crack tip.

  2. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Fan W [Johns Hopkins University; Han, Karen [Johns Hopkins University; Olasov, Lauren R [Johns Hopkins University; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Spicer, James B [Johns Hopkins University

    2015-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements

  3. Graphite materials prepared from an anthracite: a structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gonzalez; Miguel A. Montes-Moran; Ana B. Garcia [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the influence of the temperature, treatment time, and initial coal particle size on the evolution of the structural order of graphite materials that have been prepared from an anthracite at temperatures {gt} 2273 K. Crystalline parameters such as the interlayer spacing and crystallite sizes were calculated from X-ray diffractometry measurements. The analysis of the first- and second-order Raman spectra allowed the assessment of the degree of orientation at the outermost layers of these materials. The graphitization of the anthracite happened in two different stages. The temperature of 2673 K seems to be the inflection point for the change in the graphitization rate of the anthracite. Highly crystalline materials were obtained at 2673 K. Temperatures of treatment {gt}2673 K led to minor changes in the degree of structural order of the graphite materials obtained. The initial particle size of the anthracite affected the evolution of the graphitization process with temperature, because of differences in the ratio of particles that contain organic matter and mineral matter associations. The degree of graphitization achieved with this coal was comparable to that of other natural and synthetic graphites. 35 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Dual functions of TiC nanoparticles on tribological performance of Al/graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahdoost, Hamid; Nouri, Alireza; Azimi, Amin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effect of TiC nanoparticles as a reinforcement on the mechanical and tribological properties of Aluminum-based self lubricating composite was investigated. The microstructure, relative density, hardness, and tribological properties of Al/graphite and Al/TiC/graphite composites were examined as a function of graphite content. The tribo-surfaces of the samples were analyzed using SEM and EDS elemental mapping. The results indicated that the addition of TiC nanoparticles not only decreased the wear rate and coefficient of friction of the composites, but also facilitated the formation of a stable graphite layer at longer sliding distances and high sliding velocities by forming a durable graphite/TiC composite on the tribo-surface. Therefore, the stability of graphite layer can be considered as a possible cause for decrease in wear rate of the Al/TiC/graphite composite.

  5. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  6. Viscoelastic and shock response of nanoclay and graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagableh, Ahmad Mohammad

    The focus of ongoing research at University of Mississippi is to develop stronger, safer and more cost-effective structural materials for the new generation naval ships with an emphasis on lightweight nanoparticle reinforced glass/carbon polymeric based composites and structural foams for blast, shock and impact mitigation. Brominated 510A-40 vinyl ester nanocomposite resin systems are planned to be used in the composite face sheets of sandwich structures with fire-resistant foam layered in between to further reduce flammability along with optimal flexural rigidity, vibration damping and enhanced energy absorption. In this work, the viscoelastic and dynamic performance of brominated nanoclay and graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester nanocomposites for blast (shock) loading applications are studied. The Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA Q800) was used to obtain the viscoelastic properties, modulus (stiffness), creep/ stress relaxation, and damping (energy dissipation), of 1.25 and 2.5 wt. percent nanoclay and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced brominated vinyl ester. Effects of frequency (time) on the viscoelastic behavior were investigated by sweeping the frequency over three decades: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 Hz, and temperature range from 30-150°C at a step rate of 4°C per minute. Master curves were generated by time-temperature superpositioning of the experimental data at a reference temperature. Bromination of vinyl ester resin was found to significantly increase the glass transition temperature (Tg) and damping for all nanocomposites. The nano reinforced composites, however showed a drop in initial storage modulus with bromination. Nanocomposites with 1.25 and 2.5 M. percent graphite had the highest storage modulus along with the lowest damping among brominated specimens. In this research, a shock Tube, servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) and Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) are used to characterize the mechanical response and energy

  7. Trace elements determination in high salinity petroleum produced formation water by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after matrix separation using Chelex-100® resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Aline Soares; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2012-05-01

    This study describes a procedure used for the determination of trace metals (Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb) in high salinity petroleum produced formation water (PFW) employing high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for detection and Chelex-100® resin for matrix elimination and analytes preconcentration. Using 15.0 mL of PFW for the separation/preconcentration, detection limits of 0.006, 0.07, 0.03, 0.08 and 0.02 μg L- 1 were obtained for Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing three seawater certified reference materials and by recovery tests, and the data indicate that the methodology can be successfully applied to this kind of samples. The precision values, expressed as relative standard deviation (% RSD, n = 10) for 2.0 μg L- 1, were found to be 3.5, 4.0, 9.0, 5.3 and 5.9 for Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb, respectively. The proposed procedure was applied for the determination of these metals in medium and high salinity PFW samples obtained from Brazilian offshore petroleum exploration platforms.

  8. A Two-Step Methodology to Study the Influence of Aggregation/Agglomeration of Nanoparticles on Young's Modulus of Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinyue; Zare, Yasser; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2017-12-01

    A two-step technique based on micromechanical models is suggested to determine the influence of aggregated/agglomerated nanoparticles on Young's modulus of polymer nanocomposites. The nanocomposite is assumed to include nanoparticle aggregation/agglomeration and effective matrix phases. This method is examined for different samples, and the effects of important parameters on the modulus are investigated. Moreover, the highest and the lowest levels of predicted modulus are calculated based on the current methodology. The suggested technique can correctly predict Young's modulus for the samples assuming the aggregation/agglomeration of nanoparticles. Additionally, the aggregation/agglomeration of nanoparticles decreases Young's modulus of polymer nanocomposites. It is demonstrated that the high modulus of nanoparticles is not sufficient to obtain a high modulus in nanocomposites, and the surface chemistry of components should be adjusted to prevent aggregation/agglomeration and to disperse nano-sized particles in the polymer matrix.

  9. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  10. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  11. Nickel-Graphite Composite Compliant Interface and/or Hot Shoe Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Chun-Yip Li, Billy; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Anjunyan, Harut

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation high-temperature thermoelectric-power-generating devices will employ segmented architectures and will have to reliably withstand thermally induced mechanical stresses produced during component fabrication, device assembly, and operation. Thermoelectric materials have typically poor mechanical strength, exhibit brittle behavior, and possess a wide range of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. As a result, the direct bonding at elevated temperatures of these materials to each other to produce segmented leg components is difficult, and often results in localized microcracking at interfaces and mec hanical failure due to the stresses that arise from the CTE mismatch between the various materials. Even in the absence of full mechanical failure, degraded interfaces can lead to increased electrical and thermal resistances, which adversely impact conversion efficiency and power output. The proposed solution is the insertion of a mechanically compliant layer, with high electrical and thermal conductivity, between the low- and high-temperature segments to relieve thermomechanical stresses during device fabrication and operation. This composite material can be used as a stress-relieving layer between the thermoelectric segments and/or between a thermoelectric segment and a hot- or cold-side interconnect material. The material also can be used as a compliant hot shoe. Nickel-coated graphite powders were hot-pressed to form a nickel-graphite composite material. A freestanding thermoelectric segmented leg was fabricated by brazing the compliant pad layer between the high-temperature p- Zintl and low-temperature p-SKD TE segments using Cu-Ag braze foils. The segmented leg stack was heated in vacuum under a compressive load to achieve bonding. The novelty of the innovation is the use of composite material that re duces the thermomechanical stresses en - countered in the construction of high-efficiency, high-temperature therm - o-electric devices. The

  12. Graphite as negative electrode in Li-ion batteries; Le graphite comme electrode negative dans les accumulateurs Li-ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, F.; Monnier, A. [Timcal SA (France)

    1996-12-31

    The last developments in lithium batteries design have demonstrated the advantages of graphite: competitive cost, flat output curve, high capacity thanks to the obtention of a final compound close to LiC{sub 6}, good behaviour during cycling and a high mass energy. However, these advantages are slightly tarnished by parasite secondary reactions during the evolution of the element. Two different cases are encountered: the formation of a passivation layer (loss of Li ions and formation of irreversible bounds) and the formation of a passivation layer with a reaction between graphite and the solvent (partial destruction of the graphite crystal lattice). In the first case, the theoretical graphite insertion capacity remains at 372 mAh/g while in the second case the insertion capacity is greatly reduced. Abstract only. (J.S.)

  13. Young's Modulus of bilayer Silicene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Montes, Lilia; Chávez-Castillo, M. R.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.

    Mechanical properties of Silicene Nanoribbons (SNRs) are determined by their width and chirality, and can be also be modified by the presence of vacancy defects. In the case of bilayer SNRs, interlayer interactions influence its physical properties. We report results, at room temperature, on the Young's Modulus (YM) of pristine and monovacancy defective bilayers of SNRs. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using the EDIP potential. YM increases with SNRs length, depends on chirality, the number and location of vacancies. Distance between layers is also important. These results are discussed in terms of missing bonds. Atomic stress distributions for defective bilayer SNRs show a larger stress concentration around the vacancy defect. Besides, if only the second layer has a mono-vacancy at its center, a larger stress concentration is observed on the atom located just below the vacancy defect. Thus, the bilayer structure carries less strain and it can be easily deformed. Partially supported by VIEP-BUAP, Mexico.

  14. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditions oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).

  15. A Novel Method for Fabricating Wearable, Piezoresistive, and Pressure Sensors Based on Modified-Graphite/Polyurethane Composite Films

    OpenAIRE

    Yin He; Wei Li; Guilin Yang; Hao Liu; Junyu Lu; Tongtong Zheng; Xiaojiu Li

    2017-01-01

    A wearable, low-cost, highly repeatable piezoresistive sensor was fabricated by the synthesis of modified-graphite and polyurethane (PU) composites and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Graphite sheets functionalized by using a silane coupling agent (KH550) were distributed in PU/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution, which were then molded to modified-graphite/PU (MG/PU) composite films. Experimental results show that with increasing modified-graphite content, the tensile strength of the MG/PU fil...

  16. Controlling fundamentals in high-energy high-rate pulsed power materials processing of powdered tungsten, titanium aluminides, and copper-graphite composites. Final technical report, 1 Jun 87-31 Aug 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Weldon, W.F.

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the controlling fundamentals in the high-energy high-rate (1 MJ in 1s) processing of metal powders. This processing utilizes a large electrical current pulse to heat a pressurized powder mass. The current pulse was provided by a homopolar generator. Simple short cylindrical shapes were consolidated so as to minimize tooling costs. Powders were subjected to current densities of 5 kA/cm2 to 25 kA/cm2 under applied pressures ranging from 70 MPa to 500 MPa. Disks with diameters of 25 mm to 70 mm, and thicknesses of 1 mm to 10 mm were consolidated. Densities of 75% to 99% of theoretical values were obtained in powder consolidates of tungsten, titanium aluminides, copper-graphite, and other metal-ceramic composites. Extensive microstructural characterization was performed to follow the changes occuring in the shape and microstructure of the various powders. The processing science has at its foundation the control of the duration of elevated temperature exposure during powder consolidation.

  17. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  18. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, I.; Kage, H.

    2017-11-01

    Different matrix and graphite morphologies were generated by a special heat treatment in three chemically different series of flake graphite cast iron samples. As cast, furnace cooled and air cooled samples were investigated. The length of graphite particles and the pearlite volume of samples were determined by metallographic examination and these parameters were compared with the nondestructively measured magnetic parameters. Magnetic measurements were performed by the method of Magnetic Adaptive Testing, which is based on systematic measurement and evaluation of minor magnetic hysteresis loops. It was shown that linear correlation existed between the magnetic quantities and the graphite length, and also between the magnetic quantities and the relative pearlite content in the investigated cast iron. A numerical expression was also determined between magnetic descriptors and relative pearlite content, which does not depend on the detailed experimental conditions.

  19. Electron-emission processes in highly charged Ar and Xe ions impinging on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite at energies just above the kinetic threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2014-01-01

    At keV energies, many electronic processes contribute to the emission of secondary electrons in the interaction of highly charged ions on surfaces. To unravel contributions resulting from isolated hollow atoms in front of the surface or embedded in the electron gas of the target, heavy highly

  20. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene on Graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guohong; Luican, Adina; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report low temperature high magnetic field scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of graphene flakes on graphite that exhibit the structural and electronic properties of graphene decoupled from the substrate. Pronounced peaks in the tunneling spectra develop with field revealing a Landau level sequence that provides a direct way to identify graphene and to determine the degree of its coupling to the substrate. The Fermi velocity and quasiparticle lifetime, obtained from the positio...

  2. Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, Filiz; Hug, François; Bouillard, Killian; Jubeau, Marc; Frappart, Thomas; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-08-01

    Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque during low-level contractions (muscle force. However, it is not known if this relationship remains valid for higher intensities. The aim of this study was to determine: (i) the relationship between muscle shear elastic modulus and muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction and (ii) the influence of the size of the region of interest (ROI) used to average the shear modulus value. Ten healthy males performed two incremental isometric little finger abductions. The joint torque produced by Abductor Digiti Minimi was considered as an index of muscle torque and elastic modulus. A high coefficient of determination (R(2)) (range: 0.86-0.98) indicated that the relationship between elastic modulus and torque can be accurately modeled by a linear regression over the entire range (0% to 100% of MVC). The changes in shear elastic modulus as a function of torque were highly repeatable. Lower R(2) values (0.89±0.13 for 1/16 of ROI) and significantly increased absolute errors were observed when the shear elastic modulus was averaged over smaller ROI, half, 1/4 and 1/16 of the full ROI) than the full ROI (mean size: 1.18±0.24cm(2)). It suggests that the ROI should be as large as possible for accurate measurement of muscle shear modulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast and direct screening of copper in micro-volumes of distilled alcoholic beverages by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajtony, Zsolt; Laczai, Nikoletta; Dravecz, Gabriella; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Marosi, Áron; Marlok, Bence; Streli, Christina; Bencs, László

    2016-12-15

    HR-CS-GFAAS methods were developed for the fast determination of Cu in domestic and commercially available Hungarian distilled alcoholic beverages (called pálinka), in order to decide if their Cu content exceeds the permissible limit, as legislated by the WHO. Some microliters of samples were directly dispensed into the atomizer. Graphite furnace heating programs, effects/amounts of the Pd modifier, alternative wavelengths (e.g., Cu I 249.2146nm), external calibration and internal standardization methods were studied. Applying a fast graphite furnace heating program without any chemical modifier, the Cu content of a sample could be quantitated within 1.5min. The detection limit of the method is 0.03mg/L. Calibration curves are linear up to 10-15mg/L Cu. Spike-recoveries ranged from 89% to 119% with an average of 100.9±8.5%. Internal calibration could be applied with the assistance of Cr, Fe, and/or Rh standards. The accuracy of the GFAAS results was verified by TXRF analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Design of Modern Reactors for Synthesis of Thermally Expanded Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strativnov, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    One of the most progressive trends in the development of modern science and technology is the creation of energy-efficient technologies for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Nanolayered graphite (thermally exfoliated graphite) is one of the key important nanomaterials of carbon origin. Due to its unique properties (chemical and thermal stability, ability to form without a binder, elasticity, etc.), it can be used as an effective absorber of organic substances and a material for seal manufacturing for such important industries as gas transportation and automobile. Thermally expanded graphite is a promising material for the hydrogen and nuclear energy industries. The development of thermally expanded graphite production is resisted by high specific energy consumption during its manufacturing and by some technological difficulties. Therefore, the creation of energy-efficient technology for its production is very promising.

  5. Properties of metal atoms hosted inside graphite's layer lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.

    2007-02-01

    Graphite samples containing several different metals have been prepared and their optical, electrical and magnetic properties investigated. It was found that ordinary metals lose their characteristic metallic lustre on incorporation inside graphite and thus their optical reflectivities are greatly reduced. Electrical conduction of graphite is only slightly altered by transition metal hosting and these observations point towards an absence of metal-donated free electron gas in such composite materials. Nanoscale iron oxide particles are easily accommodated inside graphite’s structure through doping with a ferrofluid and again an absence of long range cooperative effects is observed. Iron oxide-containing graphite exhibits strong paramagnetic behaviour and it was used to make cores for high frequency signal transformers.

  6. On estimating the fracture probability of nuclear graphite components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2008-10-01

    The properties of nuclear grade graphites exhibit anisotropy and could vary considerably within a manufactured block. Graphite strength is affected by the direction of alignment of the constituent coke particles, which is dictated by the forming method, coke particle size, and the size, shape, and orientation distribution of pores in the structure. In this paper, a Weibull failure probability analysis for components is presented using the American Society of Testing Materials strength specification for nuclear grade graphites for core components in advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The risk of rupture (probability of fracture) and survival probability (reliability) of large graphite blocks are calculated for varying and discrete values of service tensile stresses. The limitations in these calculations are discussed from considerations of actual reactor environmental conditions that could potentially degrade the specification properties because of damage due to complex interactions between irradiation, temperature, stress, and variability in reactor operation.

  7. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. Temperature effect on IG-11 graphite wear performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Xiaowei [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: xwluo@mail.tsnghua.edu.cn; Yu Suyuan [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Sheng Xuanyu [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Shuyan [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2005-10-01

    IG-11 graphite, used in the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10), was tested under different temperatures on an SRV standard wear performance tester. The experiment temperatures were room temperature, 100, 200, 300 and 400 deg C. According to the reactor structure, the experiments were designed to test graphite-graphite and graphite-stainless steel wear. The wear debris was collected, and the worn surfaces and debris were observed under scanning electronic microscope (SEM). It was found that there were different wear mechanisms at different temperatures. The main wear mechanism at room temperature was abrasive wear; at 200 deg C, it was fatigue wear; at 400 deg C, adhesive wear was observed. This difference was mainly due to the change of stress distribution at the contact area. The distribution of wear debris was also analyzed by EDX particle analysis software.

  9. Ab initio models for polycrystalline diamond constructed from cold-compressed disordered graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Bolong; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    A general scheme is proposed to construct systematically a family of superhard sp3 carbon phases of cold-compressed graphite by combining hexagonal to cubic diamond (named as X-Carbon). Based on calculations employing density functional theory (DFT), we find that our currently proposed X-carbon can occur by compressing disordered graphite, and the X-carbon is more stable in energy than the previously proposed M, Z, W, bct-C4, P allotropes. Thus, the X-carbon is predicted to be the transition of cold-compressed graphite. The results show that the simulated x-ray diffraction pattern, Vickers hardness and bulk modulus of X-Carbon match well with the experimental data (Mao et al Science 302, 425 (2003)). These new phases are transparent superhard materials with a large hardness and wide electronic band gaps comparable to cubic diamond.

  10. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  11. Mechanical Degradation of Graphite/PVDF Composite Electrodes: A Model-Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K; Higa, K; Mair, S; Chintapalli, M; Balsara, N; Srinivasan, V

    2015-12-11

    Mechanical failure modes of a graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) composite electrode for lithium-ion batteries were investigated by combining realistic stress-stain tests and mathematical model predictions. Samples of PVDF mixed with conductive additive were prepared in a similar way to graphite electrodes and tested while submerged in electrolyte solution. Young's modulus and tensile strength values of wet samples were found to be approximately one-fifth and one-half of those measured for dry samples. Simulations of graphite particles surrounded by binder layers given the measured material property values suggest that the particles are unlikely to experience mechanical damage during cycling, but that the fate of the surrounding composite of PVDF and conductive additive depends completely upon the conditions under which its mechanical properties were obtained. Simulations using realistic property values produced results that were consistent with earlier experimental observations.

  12. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  13. A constrained modulus reconstruction technique for breast cancer assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, A; Bishop, J; Plewes, D B

    2001-09-01

    A reconstruction technique for breast tissue elasticity modulus is described. This technique assumes that the geometry of normal and suspicious tissues is available from a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance image. Furthermore, it is assumed that the modulus is constant throughout each tissue volume. The technique, which uses quasi-static strain data, is iterative where each iteration involves modulus updating followed by stress calculation. Breast mechanical stimulation is assumed to be done by two compressional rigid plates. As a result, stress is calculated using the finite element method based on the well-controlled boundary conditions of the compression plates. Using the calculated stress and the measured strain, modulus updating is done element-by-element based on Hooke's law. Breast tissue modulus reconstruction using simulated data and phantom modulus reconstruction using experimental data indicate that the technique is robust.

  14. Graphite oral tattoo: case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    .... We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos...

  15. On the complex ageing characteristics of high-power LiFePO4/graphite battery cells cycled with high charge and discharge currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groot, Jens; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Ana-Irina

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion batteries are known to undergo complex ageing processes, where the operating conditions have a profound and non-linear effect on both calendar life and cycle life. This is especially a challenge for the automotive industry, where the requirements on product lifetime and reliability...... are demanding. The aim of the present work is to quantify the ageing in terms of capacity fade and impedance growth as a function of operating conditions typical to high-power automotive applications; high charge and discharge rate, elevated temperatures and wide state-of-charge windows. The cycle life of 34...

  16. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  17. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  18. Manipulation of the elastic modulus of polymers at the nanoscale: influence of UV-ozone cross-linking and plasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jessica M; Stafford, Christopher M; Vogt, Bryan D

    2010-09-28

    The mechanical stability of polymeric nanostructures is critical to the processing, assembly, and performance of numerous existing and emerging technologies. A key predictor of mechanical stability is the elastic modulus. However, a significant reduction in modulus has been reported for thin films and nanostructures when the thickness or size of the polymer material decreases below a critical length scale. Routes to mitigate or even eliminate this reduction in modulus, and thus enhancing the mechanically stability of polymeric nanostructures, would be extremely valuable. Here, two routes to modulate the mechanical properties of polymers at the nanoscale are described. Exposure to ultraviolet light and ozone (UVO) cross-links the near surface region of high molecular mass PS films, rendering the elastic modulus independent of thickness. However, UVO cannot eliminate the decrease in modulus of low molecular mass PS or PMMA due to limited reaction depth and photodegradation, respectively. Alternatively, the thickness dependence of the elastic modulus of both PS and PMMA can be eliminated by addition of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) at 5% by mass. Furthermore, an increase in modulus is observed for films with thicknesses less than 30 nm with 5% DOP by mass in comparison to neat PS. Although DOP acts as a plasticizer for both PS and PMMA in the bulk, evidence indicates that DOP acts as an antiplasticizer at the nanoscale. By maintaining or even increasing the elastic modulus of polymers at the nanoscale, these methods could lead to improved stability of polymeric nanostructures and devices.

  19. Interfacial Modulus Mapping during Structural Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jianfeng; Cui, Shushan; Zhang, Jihua; Rong, Yonghua

    2017-10-01

    Through the modified phase-field model the local soft mode mechanism of nucleation during martensitic transformation was confirmed in shape memory alloys. It was discovered that the modulus loss (8 pct) depended on the martensitic nucleation exceeding the loss (1 pct) during the martensitic growth. The elastic modulus and the stress across the martensite/parent interface differed from those across the martensitic twin boundary. The modulus losses in systems with three variants, two variants, and one variant were compared.

  20. Predictive Models for Modulus of Rupture and Modulus of Elasticity of Particleboard Manufactured in Different Pressing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Sebahattin; Aras, Uğur; Kalaycıoğlu, Hülya; Erişir, Emir; Aydın, Aytaç

    2017-07-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of particleboard has gained a great importance due to its increasing usage as a building material in recent years. This study aims to develop artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models for predicting modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of particleboard depending on different pressing temperature, pressing time, pressing pressure and resin type. Experimental results indicated that the increased pressing temperature, time and pressure in manufacturing process generally improved the mechanical properties of particleboard. It was also seen that ANN and MLR models were highly successful in predicting the MOR and MOE of particleboard under given conditions. On the other hand, a comparison between ANN and MLR revealed that the ANN was superior compared to the MLR in predicting the MOR and MOE. Finally, the findings of this study are expected to provide beneficial insights for practitioners to better understand usability of such composite materials for engineering applications and to better assess the effects of pressing conditions on the MOR and MOE of particleboard.

  1. Synergistically improved thermal conductivity of polyamide-6 with low melting temperature metal and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low melting temperature metal (LMTM-tin (Sn was introduced into polyamide-6 (PA6 and PA6/graphite composites respectively to improve the thermal conductivity of PA6 by melt processing (extruding and injection molding. After introducing Sn, the thermal conductivity of PA6/Sn was nearly constant because of the serious agglomeration of Sn. However, when 20 wt% (5.4 vol% of Sn was added into PA6 containing 50 wt% (33.3 vol% of graphite, the thermal conductivity of the composite was dramatically increased to 5.364 versus 1.852 W·(m·K–1 for the PA6/graphite composite, which suggests that the incorporation of graphite and Sn have a significant synergistic effect on the thermal conductivity improvement of PA6. What is more, the electrical conductivity of the composite increased nearly 8 orders of magnitudes after introducing both graphite and Sn. Characterization of microstructure and energy dispersive spectrum analysis (EDS indicates that the dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn was much more uniform than that of PA6/Sn composite. According to Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurement and EDS, the uniform dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn and the high thermal conductivity of PA6/graphite/Sn are speculated to be related with the electron transfer between graphite and Sn, which makes Sn distribute evenly around the graphite layers.

  2. Ion irradiation induced structural modifications and increase in elastic modulus of silica based thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, S. A.; Qi, Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Mehner, A.; Lucca, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ion irradiation is an alternative to heat treatment for transforming organic-inorganic thin films to a ceramic state. One major shortcoming in previous studies of ion-irradiated films is the assumption that constituent phases in ion-irradiated and heat-treated films are identical and that the ion irradiation effect is limited to changes in composition. In this study, we investigate the effects of ion irradiation on both the composition and structure of constituent phases and use the results to explain the measured elastic modulus of the films. The results indicated that the microstructure of the irradiated films consisted of carbon clusters within a silica matrix. It was found that carbon was present in a non-graphitic sp2-bonded configuration. It was also observed that ion irradiation caused a decrease in the Si-O-Si bond angle of silica, similar to the effects of applied pressure. A phase transformation from tetrahedrally bonded to octahedrally bonded silica was also observed. The results indicated the incorporation of carbon within the silica network. A combination of the decrease in Si-O-Si bond angle and an increase in the carbon incorporation within the silica network was found to be responsible for the increase in the elastic modulus of the films.

  3. Synthesis of mesoporous NiCo2S4 deposited on reduced graphite oxide assistant by co-polymer Pluronic F127 for high-performance supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huiya; Yang, Shuo; Zhao, Wenliang; Yang, Zhengchun; Li, Xuan; Li, Huijun; Yao, Pei

    2017-10-01

    Mesoporous NiCo2S4 particles deposited on reduced graphite oxide (RGO) sheets using the co-polymer Pluronic F127 as a structure-directing agent have been successfully prepared as a supercapacitor electrode. The formation of F127 micelles alleviated the aggregation of the RGO sheets and generated NiCo2S4 nanoparticles through hydrophilic affinity of ethylene oxide (EO) ends to produce porous channels during the hydrothermal process. This resulted in a large specific area of the prepared material, and superior electrochemical performance in terms of outstanding rate capability of 85.6% (from 1 A g-1 to 20 A g-1) and cycling stability (92.7% retention after 6500 cycles), features that are crucial for supercapacitors in practical application.

  4. Trace elements determination in high salinity petroleum produced formation water by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after matrix separation using Chelex-100 Registered-Sign resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Aline Soares [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos 149, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco A, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, 21941-909 (Brazil); Santelli, Ricardo Erthal, E-mail: santelli@iq.ufrj.br [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista s/n, Centro, Niteroi/RJ, 24020-150 (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos 149, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco A, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, 21941-909 (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study describes a procedure used for the determination of trace metals (Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb) in high salinity petroleum produced formation water (PFW) employing high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for detection and Chelex-100 Registered-Sign resin for matrix elimination and analytes preconcentration. Using 15.0 mL of PFW for the separation/preconcentration, detection limits of 0.006, 0.07, 0.03, 0.08 and 0.02 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained for Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing three seawater certified reference materials and by recovery tests, and the data indicate that the methodology can be successfully applied to this kind of samples. The precision values, expressed as relative standard deviation (% RSD, n = 10) for 2.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}, were found to be 3.5, 4.0, 9.0, 5.3 and 5.9 for Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb, respectively. The proposed procedure was applied for the determination of these metals in medium and high salinity PFW samples obtained from Brazilian offshore petroleum exploration platforms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Petroleum-produced formation water were analyzed for Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In batch analyte preconcentration/matrix separation using Chelex-100 Registered-Sign was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limits between 0.006 and 0.08 {mu}g L{sup -1} were found by using HR-CS-GFAAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace elements characterization is possible using the developed method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum trace element concentrations found could support future Brazilian directives.

  5. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  6. Elastic modulus in the selection of interbody implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heary, Robert F; Parvathreddy, Naresh; Sampath, Sujitha; Agarwal, Nitin

    2017-06-01

    The modulus of elasticity of an assortment of materials used in spinal surgery, as well as cortical and cancellous bones, is determined by direct measurements and plotting of the appropriate curves. When utilized in spine surgery, the stiffness of a surgical implant can affect its material characteristics. The modulus of elasticity, or Young's modulus, measures the stiffness of a material by calculating the slope of the material's stress-strain curve. While many papers and presentations refer to the modulus of elasticity as a reason for the choice of a particular spinal implant, no peer-reviewed surgical journal article has previously been published where the Young's modulus values of interbody implants have been measured. Materials were tested under pure compression at the rate of 2 mm/min. A maximum of 45 kilonewtons (kN) compressive force was applied. Stress-strain characteristics under compressive force were plotted and this plot was used to calculate the elastic modulus. The elastic modulus calculated for metals was more than 50 Gigapascals (GPa) and had significantly higher modulus values compared to poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) materials and allograft bone. The data generated in this paper may facilitate surgeons to make informed decisions on their choices of interbody implants with specific attention to the stiffness of the implant chosen.

  7. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a generalized spherical mean operator, we define generalized modulus of smoothness in the space L k 2 ( R d ) . Based on the Dunkl operator we define Sobolev-type space and -functionals. The main result of the paper is the proof of the equivalence theorem for a -functional and a modulus of smoothness for the ...

  8. Generalized Vector-Valued Sequence Spaces Defined by Modulus Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işik Mahmut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the vector-valued sequence spaces , , and , and , using a sequence of modulus functions and the multiplier sequence of nonzero complex numbers. We give some relations related to these sequence spaces. It is also shown that if a sequence is strongly -Cesàro summable with respect to the modulus function then it is -statistically convergent.

  9. Bulk modulus of metals according to structureless pseudopotential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structureless pseudopotential model was fully developed. The developed method was used to calculate the bulk modulus and kinetic energy contribution to the bulk modulus of 46 elemental metals. The results obtained were compared with experimental values and their variation with electron density parameter was studied ...

  10. Young's modulus of peritubular and intertubular human dentin by nano-indentation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskind, Daniel; Hasday, Moran; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2011-04-01

    The local Young modulus of dry dentin viewed as a hierarchical composite was measured by nano-indentation using two types of experiments, both in a continuous stiffness measurement mode. First, tests were performed radially along straight lines running across highly mineralized peritubular dentin sections and through less mineralized intertubular dentin areas. These tests revealed a gradual decrease in Young's modulus from the bulk of the peritubular dentin region where modulus values of up to ∼40-42GPa were observed, down to approximately constant values of ∼17GPa in the intertubular dentin region. A second set of nano-indentation experiments was performed on the facets of an irregular polyhedron specimen cut from the intertubular dentin region, so as to probe the modulus of intertubular dentin specimens at different orientations relative to the tubular direction. The results demonstrated that the intertubular dentin region may be considered to be quasi-isotropic, with a slightly higher modulus value (∼22GPa) when the indenting tip axis is parallel to the tubular direction, compared to the values (∼18GPa) obtained when the indenting tip axis is perpendicular to the tubule direction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low Modulus Silicone Elastomer Networks with Desirable Viscoelastic Properties for Cell Mobility Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Julie N. L.; Genzer, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Biocompatible silicone elastomer networks provide a versatile platform for studying the effect of compliance on cell movement. In conventional network formation schemes, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is cross-linked via reactive end groups, and the modulus of the material is controlled by the ratio of polymer to cross-linker. However, low modulus networks fabricated in this manner are imperfect and insufficiently cross-linked with high soluble fractions and reduced elasticity, especially as the network modulus approaches that of soft tissues (on the order of 10 kPa). In order to overcome these limitations, we synthesized PDMS chains in which vinylmethylsiloxane units were incorporated every ~15-20 kDa along the polymer backbone. We then cross-linked the polymer through the vinyl groups using hydrosilylation chemistry. The resultant networks exhibited lower soluble fractions and lower viscous dissipation/greater elasticity as compared to equivalent-modulus networks fabricated by the conventional end-group cross-linking scheme. We attribute the mechanical properties of our networks to the presence of network-bound free chain ends that effectively plasticize the network to lower the modulus without compromising network elasticity.

  12. Characterisation of reduced graphene oxides prepared from natural flaky, lump and amorphous graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Weijun; Li, Hongqiang, E-mail: lhq-18@163.com; Hu, Yang; Liu, Yanyan; Song, Shaoxian

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Natural flaky, lumpy and amorphous graphites were used to synthesis rGO. • Investigation the effect of the crystal morphology on the oxidation process of GrO and characteristics of prepared rGO. • Low graphitisation degree, big specific surface area and small lateral size were beneficial to the oxidation of graphite. - Abstract: The characterisation of reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) prepared from natural flaky, lumpy, and amorphous graphites using Hummers method was investigated. The prepared graphite oxides (GrOs) and rGOs were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical performance. The results showed that amorphous graphite was much easier to oxidise than lumpy and flaky graphites and was preferable for preparing single or double layer graphene because low graphitisation degree, high defect degree, high specific surface area and small crystal size were beneficial for (1) the oxidants to attack the exposed carbon atoms, (2) the intercalation of oxidants, and (3) the diffusion of oxidants between graphitic layers. In addition, rGO synthesised from amorphous graphite had the most defects and the smallest size of the in-plane sp{sup 2} domains compared to those obtained from the other two nature graphites.

  13. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  14. Elastic modulus of a colloidal suspension of rigid spheres at rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasol, Laurentiu; Chateau, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    By modeling a colloidal suspension at rest as a solid, a new expression for the linear elastic modulus is obtained. This estimate is valid for a yield stress colloidal suspension submitted to a small strain. Interestingly, it is also possible to construct an hypothesis allowing one to recover the high-frequency modulus classically found by means of a classical 'fluid approach'. However, in most of the situations, the moduli obtained by the two approaches are different. To cite this article: L. Pasol, X. Chateau, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  15. Simultaneous determination of Cd and Fe in beans and soil of different regions of Brazil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lisia M G; Welz, Bernhard; Araujo, Rennan G O; Jacob, Silvana do C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Martens, Andreas; Gonzaga Martens, Irland B; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-11-11

    A fast routine screening method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium and iron in bean and soil samples is proposed, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling. The primary absorption line at 228.802 nm has been used for the determination of cadmium, and an adjacent secondary line, at 228.726 nm, for iron. Fourteen bean samples and 10 soil samples from nine states all over Brazil have been analyzed. The limits of detection (3 sigma, n = 10) were 2.0 microg kg(-1) for Cd and 4.5 mg kg(-1) for Fe. The relative standard deviation ranged from 4 to 7% for Cd and from 5 to 28% for Fe, which is usually acceptable for a screening method. The accuracy of the method has been confirmed by the analysis of two certified reference materials; the results were in agreement with the certified values at a 95% confidence interval.

  16. High Voltage LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2/Graphite Cell Cycled at 4.6 V with A FEC/HFDEC-Based Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Feng, Zhenxing; Zeng, Li; Wu, Tianpin; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Fenter, Paul; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2017-08-09

    A high voltage LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2/graphite cell with a fluorinated electrolyte formulation 1.0 m LiPF6 fluoroethylene carbonate/bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) carbonate is reported and its electrochemical performance is evaluated at cell voltage of 4.6 V. Comparing with its nonfluorinated electrolyte counterpart, the reported fluorinated one shows much improved Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention when a higher cut-off voltage (4.6 V) is applied. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data clearly demonstrate the superior oxidative stability of the new electrolyte. The structural stability of the bulk cathode materials cycled with different electrolytes is extensively studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction.

  17. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  18. Highly sensitive and selective aptasensor for detection of adenosine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from carbon dots to nano-graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Xu, Guanhong; Wei, Fangdi; Ma, Yunsu; Ma, Yujie; Song, Yueyue; Cen, Yao; Hu, Qin

    2017-12-15

    In this article, a novel aptasensor was fabricated by modifying carbon dots (CDs) with adenosine aptamer (CDs-aptamer) for sensitive, selective and quantitative detection of adenosine (AD). When nano-graphite (NG) as an energy acceptor was added into the CDs-aptamer (energy donor) solution, the fluorescence of CDs-aptamer was quenched due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). When AD was present in the solution of CDs-aptamer/NG, the process of FRET was inhibited because of the specific combination between AD and AD aptamer. As a result, the fluorescence of CDs-aptamer was restored due to the dissociation of CDs-aptamer from NG and its change was proportional to the AD concentration. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range was found to be 2-50nM for the detection of AD with a detection limit of 0.63nM. Furthermore, the application of the proposed approach was demonstrated in real sample with satisfying results and it showed promise in diagnostic purpose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NiS and MoS2nanosheet co-modified graphitic C3N4ternary heterostructure for high efficient visible light photodegradation of antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuejun; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xinyi; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Dongmei; Lv, Jun; Zheng, Zhixiang; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-01-05

    The development of efficient solar driven catalytic system for the degradation of antibiotics has become increasingly important in environmental protection and remediation. Non-noble-metal NiS and MoS 2 nanosheet co-modified graphitic C 3 N 4 ternary heterostructure has been synthesized via a facile combination of hydrothermal and ultrasound method, and the ternary heterostructure has been utilized for photocatalytic degradation of antibiotic agents. The antibiotics of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) were photodegraded by the hybrid under the visible light. The optimal photodegradation rate of the ternary heterostructure reaches about 96% after 2h irradiation, which is 2.1 times higher than that of pure g-C 3 N 4 for TC degradation. The photocatalytic degradation rates of the ternary heterostructure for both CIP and TC obey the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The enhanced visible light adsorption and charge separation efficiency contribute to the photocatalytic performance of the ternary heterostructure. This work provides new insights and pathways by which efficient degradation of antibiotics can be achieved and will stimulate further studies in this important field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rigid-flexible coupling high ionic conductivity polymer electrolyte for an enhanced performance of LiMn2O4/graphite battery at elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pu; Duan, Yulong; Hu, Deping; Qin, Bingsheng; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Qingfu; Liu, Zhihong; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2015-03-04

    LiMn2O4-based batteries exhibit severe capacity fading during cycling or storage in LiPF6-based liquid electrolytes, especially at elevated temperatures. Herein, a novel rigid-flexible gel polymer electrolyte is introduced to enhance the cyclability of LiMn2O4/graphite battery at elevated temperature. The polymer electrolyte consists of a robust natural cellulose skeletal incorporated with soft segment poly(ethyl α-cyanoacrylate). The introduction of the cellulose effectively overcomes the drawback of poor mechanical integrity of the gel polymer electrolyte. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation demonstrates that the poly(ethyl α-cyanoacrylate) matrices effectively dissociate the lithium salt to facilitate ionic transport and thus has a higher ionic conductivity at room temperature. Ionic conductivity of the gel polymer electrolyte is 3.3 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature. The gel polymer electrolyte remarkably improves the cycling performance of LiMn2O4-based batteries, especially at elevated temperatures. The capacity retention after the 100th cycle is 82% at 55 °C, which is much higher than that of liquid electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 in carbonate solvents). The polymer electrolyte can significantly suppress the dissolution of Mn(2+) from surface of LiMn2O4 because of strong interaction energy of Mn(2+) with PECA, which was investigated by DFT calculation.

  1. Investigating the effects of stress on the pore structures of nuclear grade graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joshua E.L., E-mail: joshua.taylor@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Hall, Graham N., E-mail: graham.n.hall@manchester.ac.uk; Mummery, Paul M., E-mail: paul.m.mummery@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-03-15

    Graphite is used as a moderating material and as a structural component in a number of current generation nuclear reactors. During reactor operation stresses develop in the graphite components, causing them to deform. It is important to understand how the microstructure of graphite affects the material's response to these stresses. A series of experiments were performed to investigate how the pore structures of Pile Grade A and Gilsocarbon graphites respond to loading stresses. A compression rig was used to simulate the build-up of operational stresses in graphite components, and a confocal laser microscope was used to study variation of a number of important pore properties. Values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were calculated and compared to existing literature to confirm the validity of the experimental techniques. Mean pore areas were observed to decrease linearly with increasing applied load, mean pore eccentricity increased linearly, and a small amount of clockwise pore rotation was observed. The response to build-up of stresses was dependent on the orientation of the pores and basal planes and the shapes of the pores with respect to the loading axis. It was proposed that pore closure and pore reorientation were competing processes. Pore separation was quantified using ‘nearest neighbour’ and Voronoi techniques, and non-pore regions were found to shrink linearly with increasing applied load. - Highlights: • Effects of stress on pore structures of Gilsocarbon and PGA graphites were studied. • Application of a compressive load was used to generate stresses in graphite. • Inverse linear relationship between stress and pore area was observed. • Mean pore eccentricity increased, clockwise pore rotation observed. • Separation of pores quantified using Voronoi and ‘nearest-neighbour’ methods.

  2. Natural graphite demand and supply - Implications for electric vehicle battery requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Donald W.; Virta, Robert L.; Mahdavi, Mahbood; Sangine, Elizabeth S.; Fortier, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Electric vehicles have been promoted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lessen U.S. dependence on petroleum for transportation. Growth in U.S. sales of electric vehicles has been hindered by technical difficulties and the high cost of the lithium-ion batteries used to power many electric vehicles (more than 50% of the vehicle cost). Groundbreaking has begun for a lithium-ion battery factory in Nevada that, at capacity, could manufacture enough batteries to power 500,000 electric vehicles of various types and provide economies of scale to reduce the cost of batteries. Currently, primary synthetic graphite derived from petroleum coke is used in the anode of most lithium-ion batteries. An alternate may be the use of natural flake graphite, which would result in estimated graphite cost reductions of more than US$400 per vehicle at 2013 prices. Most natural flake graphite is sourced from China, the world's leading graphite producer. Sourcing natural flake graphite from deposits in North America could reduce raw material transportation costs and, given China's growing internal demand for flake graphite for its industries and ongoing environmental, labor, and mining issues, may ensure a more reliable and environmentally conscious supply of graphite. North America has flake graphite resources, and Canada is currently a producer, but most new mining projects in the United States require more than 10 yr to reach production, and demand could exceed supplies of flake graphite. Natural flake graphite may serve only to supplement synthetic graphite, at least for the short-term outlook.

  3. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  4. Graphite Nanoplatelet Modified Epoxy Resin for Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics with Enhanced Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach to deliver graphene or graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs into carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRPs to enhance the multifunctional properties of carbon/epoxy laminates was demonstrated. GNPs improved the typically low interlaminar mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CFRPs after direct vacuum infusion of GNP doped resin obtained via in situ exfoliation by three-roll milling (TRM. Compared to high shear mixing or probe ultrasonication, TRM produces higher shear rates and stresses to exfoliate and finely disperse GNP particles within an epoxy matrix. This environmentally friendly and industrial scalable process does not require the use of solvents, additives, or chemical treatments. The flexural modulus and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of CFRPs was increased by 15% and by 18%, respectively, with the addition of 5 wt.% in situ exfoliated GNP in the doped epoxy resin. Out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivity, at the same filler content, were, respectively, improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and 50%.

  5. Material Based Structure Design: Numerical Analysis Thermodynamic Response of Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite /Al Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Yan, Shilin; Yu, Dingshan

    2016-12-01

    Amine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based thermally conductive adhesive (TCA) was studied in the previous paper and applied here in thermal pyrolytic graphite (TPG)/Al radiator due to its high thermal conductivity, toughness and cohesiveness. In this paper, in an attempt to confirm the application of TCA to TPG/Al sandwich radiator, the thermodynamic response in TPG/Al sandwich composites associated with key material properties and structural design was investigated using finite element simulation with commercial available ANSYS software. The induced thermal stress in TCA layer is substantial due to the thermal expansion mismatch between Al plate and TPG. The maximum thermal stress is located near the edge of TCA layer with the von Mises stress value of 4.02 MPa and the shear stress value of 1.66 MPa. The reasonable adjustment of physical-mechanical properties including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young,s modulus and the thickness of TCA layer, Al plate and TPG are beneficial for reducing the temperature of the top surface of the upper skin and their effects on the reduction of thermal structural response in some ways. These findings will highlight the structural optimization of TPG/Al radiator for future application.

  6. Preparation and characterization of electrospun in-situ cross-linked gelatin-graphite oxide nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jianchao; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun gelatin(Gel) nanofibers scaffold has such defects as poor mechanical property and quick degradation due to high solubility. In this study, the in situ cross-linked electrospinning technique was used for the production of gelatin nanofibers. Deionized water was chosen as the spinning solvent and graphite oxide (GO) was chosen as the enhancer. The morphological structure, porosity, thermal property, moisture absorption, and moisture retention performance, hydrolysis resistance, mechanical property, and biocompatibility of the produced nanofibers were investigated. Compared with in situ cross-linked gelatin nanofibers scaffold, in situ cross-linked Gel-GO nanofibers scaffold has the following features: (1) the hydrophilicity, moisture absorption, and moisture retention performance slightly reduce, while the hydrolysis resistance is improved; (2) the breaking strength, breaking elongation, and Young's modulus are significantly improved; (3) the porosity slightly reduces while the biocompatibility considerably increases. The in situ cross-linked Gel-GO nanofibers scaffold is likely to be applied in such fields as drug delivery and scaffold for skin tissue engineering.

  7. Production test PTA-002, increased graphite temperature limit -- B, C and D Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-17

    The fundamental objective of the graphite temperature limit is to prevent excessive oxidation of the graphite moderator blocks with carbon dioxide and water vapor in the reactor atmosphere. Laboratory tests have shown that 10% uniform oxidation of graphite results in a loss in strength of approximately 50%. Production Test IP-725 was conducted at F Reactor for a period of six months at graphite temperatures approximately 50 and 100 C higher than the present graphite temperature limit of 650 C. The results from the F Reactor test suggest that an increase in the graphite temperature limit from 650 C to 700 C is technically feasible from the standpoint of oxidation of the graphite moderator with CO{sub 2}. Any significant additional increase was shown to lead to excessively high oxidation rates and is therefore not considered feasible. The objective of this test, therefore, is to extend the higher temperature investigations to B, C, and D Reactors. For the duration of this test, the graphite temperature limit will be increased from 650 C and 700 C, corresponding to an increase in the graphite stringer temperature limit from 735 C to 790 C. The test is expected to last for approximately six months but may be terminated early on any or all the reactors.

  8. Bulk-bronzied graphites for plasma-facing components in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Doerner, R.; Khandagle, M. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Causey, R.; Wilson, K. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Croessmann, D.; Whitley, J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Holland, D.; Smolik, G. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Matsuda, T.; Sogabe, T. (Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd., O

    1990-06-01

    Newly developed bulk-boronized graphites and boronized C-C composites with a total boron concentration ranging from 1 wt % to 30 wt % have been evaluated as plasma-facing component materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bulk-boronized graphites have been bombarded with high-flux deuterium plasmas at temperatures between 200 and 1600{degree}C. Plasma interaction induced erosion of bulk-boronized graphites is observed to be a factor of 2--3 smaller than that of pyrolytic graphite, in regimes of physical sputtering, chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. Postbombardment thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that bulk-boronized graphites enhance recombinative desorption of deuterium, which leads to a suppression of the formation of deuterocarbon due to chemical sputtering. The tritium inventory in graphite has been found to decrease by an order of magnitude due to 10 wt % bulk-boronization at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. The critical heat flux to induce cracking for bulk-boronized graphites has been found to be essentially the same as that for non-boronized graphites. Also, 10 wt % bulk-boronization of graphite hinders air oxidation nearly completely at 800{degree}C and reduces the steam oxidation rate by a factor of 2--3 at around 1100 and 1350{degree}C. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  10. Sensitive determination of the Young's modulus of thin films by polymeric microcantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombi, Paolo; Bergese, Paolo; Bontempi, Elza

    2013-01-01

    A method for the highly sensitive determination of the Young's modulus of TiO2 thin films exploiting the resonant frequency shift of a SU-8 polymer microcantilever (MC) is presented. Amorphous TiO2 films with different thickness ranging from 10 to 125 nm were grown at low temperature (90 °C) with...

  11. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  12. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  13. The effect of mineral fillers on the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of halogen-free flame-retardant polypropylene/expandable graphite compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattausch, Hannelore; Laske, Stephan; Hohenwarter, Dieter; Holzer, Clemens

    2015-05-01

    In many polyolefin applications, such as electrical cables or automotive applications, the fire protection is a very important task. Unfortunately flame-retardant polymeric materials are often halogenated and form toxic substances in case of fire, which explains the general requirement to reduce the halogen content to zero. Non-halogenated, state-of-the-art flame retardants must be incorporated into the polymer in very high grades (> 40 wt%) leading to massive decrease in mechanical properties and/or processability. In this research work halogen-free flame-retardant polypropylene (PP) /expandable graphite (EG) were filled with minerals fillers such as layered silicates (MMT), magnesium hydroxide (MgOH), zeolite (Z) and expanded perlite (EP) in order to enhance the flame-retardant effect. The rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of these materials were investigated to gain more fundamental knowledge about synergistic combinations of flame-retardants and other additives. The rheological properties were characterized with a rotational rheometer with plate-plate setup. The EG/EP/PP compound exhibited the highest increase in viscosity (˜ 37 %). As representative value for the mechanical properties the Young's modulus was chosen. The final Young's modulus values of the twofold systems gained higher values than the single ones. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) was utilized to investigate the material with respect to volatile substances and combustion behavior. All materials decomposed in one-step degradation. The EG filled compounds showed a significant increase in sample weight due to the expansion of EG. The combustion behavior of these materials was characterized by cone calorimeter tests. Especially combinations of expandable graphite with mineral fillers exhibit a reduction of the peak heat release rate during cone calorimeter measurements of up to 87% compared to pure PP.

  14. On the relationship between indentation hardness and modulus, and the damage resistance of biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, David; Lenz, Anne-Kristin; Oyen, Michelle L

    2017-07-15

    indentation is a widespread tool for characterising the mechanical properties of biological materials. Here, we show that the ratio between indentation hardness and modulus is approximately constant in biological materials. A simple elastic-plastic series deformation model is employed to rationalise part of this correlation, and criteria for a meaningful comparison of indentation hardness across biological materials are proposed. The ratio between indentation hardness and modulus emerges as the key parameter characterising the relative amount of irreversible deformation during indentation. Despite their comparatively high hardness to modulus ratio, biological materials are susceptible to quasiplastic deformation, due to their high toughness: quasi-plastic deformation is hence hypothesised to be a frequent yet poorly understood phenomenon, highlighting an important area of future research. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulus of Elasticity and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of ITO Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Austin D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elhadj, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-24

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the modulus of elasticity (E) and thermal expansion coefficient (α) of RF sputtered Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as a function of temperature (T), and to collect ITO film stress data. In order to accomplish that goal, the Toho FLX-2320-S thin film stress measurement machine was used to collect both single stress and stress-temperature data for ITO coated fused silica and sapphire substrates. The stress measurement function of the FLX-2320-S cannot be used to calculate the elastic modulus of the film because the Stoney formula incorporates the elastic modulus of the substrate, rather than of the film itself.

  16. Comparison of mechanical and ultrasound elastic modulus of ovine tibial cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Caroline A; Wilson, Lance J; Langton, Christian; Epari, Devakar

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models of bones can be created by deriving geometry from an X-ray CT scan. Material properties such as the elastic modulus can then be applied using either a single or set of homogeneous values, or individual elements can have local values mapped onto them. Values for the elastic modulus can be derived from the CT density values using an elasticity versus density relationship. Many elasticity-density relationships have been reported in the literature for human bone. However, while ovine in vivo models are common in orthopaedic research, no work has been done to date on creating FE models of ovine bones. To create these models and apply relevant material properties, an ovine elasticity-density relationship needs to be determined. Using fresh frozen ovine tibias the apparent density of regions of interest was determined from a clinical CT scan. The bones were the sectioned into cuboid samples of cortical bone from the regions of interest. Ultrasound was used to determine the elastic modulus in each of three directions - longitudinally, radially and tangentially. Samples then underwent traditional compression testing in each direction. The relationships between apparent density and both ultrasound, and compression modulus in each direction were determined. Ultrasound testing was found to be a highly repeatable non-destructive method of calculating the elastic modulus, particularly suited to samples of this size. The elasticity-density relationships determined in the longitudinal direction were very similar between the compression and ultrasound data over the density range examined. A clear difference was seen in the elastic modulus between the longitudinal and transverse directions of the bone samples, and a transverse elasticity-density relationship is also reported. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting the thermal shock resistance of several hafnia based composites containing graphite or tungsten. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of hafnia based composites containing graphite powder or tungsten fibers was investigated in terms of material properties which include thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, compressive fracture stress, modulus of elasticity, and phase stability in terms of the processing parameters of hot pressing pressure and/or density, degree of stabilization of the hafnia, and composition. All other parameters were held constant or assumed constant. The thermal shock resistance was directly proportional to the compressive fracture stress to modulus of elasticity ratio and was not affected appreciably by the small thermal expansion or thermal conductivity changes. This ratio was found to vary strongly with the composition and density such that the composites containing graphite had relatively poor thermal shock resistance, while the composites containing tungsten had superior thermal shock resistance.

  18. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Janney, Mark A.

    2005-02-15

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of graphene on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohong; Luican, Adina; Andrei, Eva Y

    2009-05-01

    We report low temperature high magnetic field scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of graphene flakes on graphite that exhibit the structural and electronic properties of graphene decoupled from the substrate. Pronounced peaks in the tunneling spectra develop with increasing field revealing a Landau level sequence that provides a direct way to identify graphene and to determine the degree of its coupling to the substrate. The Fermi velocity and quasiparticle lifetime, obtained from the positions and width of the peaks, provide access to the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions.

  20. Graphite/Cyanate Ester Face Sheets for Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Harold; Shaffer, Joseph; Romeo, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that thin face sheets of wide-aperture deformable mirrors in adaptive-optics systems be made from a composite material consisting of cyanate ester filled with graphite. This composite material appears to offer an attractive alternative to low-thermal-expansion glasses that are used in some conventional optics and have been considered for adaptive-optics face sheets. Adaptive-optics face sheets are required to have maximum linear dimensions of the order of meters or even tens of meters for some astronomical applications. If the face sheets were to be made from low-thermal-expansion glasses, then they would also be required to have thicknesses of the order of a millimeter so as to obtain the optimum compromise between the stiffness needed for support and the flexibility needed to enable deformation to controlled shapes by use of actuators. It is difficult to make large glass sheets having thicknesses less than 3 mm, and 3-mm-thick glass sheets are too stiff to be deformable to the shapes typically required for correction of wavefronts of light that has traversed the terrestrial atmosphere. Moreover, the primary commercially produced candidate low-thermal-expansion glass is easily fractured when in the form of thin face sheets. Graphite-filled cyanate ester has relevant properties similar to those of the low-expansion glasses. These properties include a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the order of a hundredth of the CTEs of other typical mirror materials. The Young s modulus (which quantifies stiffness in tension and compression) of graphite-filled cyanate ester is also similar to the Young's moduli of low-thermal-expansion glasses. However, the fracture toughness of graphite-filled cyanate ester is much greater than that of the primary candidate low-thermal-expansion glass. Therefore, graphite-filled cyanate ester could be made into nearly unbreakable face sheets, having maximum linear dimensions greater than a meter and thicknesses of

  1. High-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography on a porous graphitized carbon column coupled to an Orbitrap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure photoionization for screening exogenous anabolic steroids in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus, Edward D; Luzyanin, Boris P; Ivanov, Alexander V; Kubatiev, Aslan A

    2015-10-15

    The presence in a urinary matrix of a large number of endogenous steroids and corticosteroids with similar structures can hamper the detection of specific exogenous steroids using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with reversed-phase columns. Therefore, the development of LC/MS methods using alternative columns is of great interest. Porous graphitized carbon is a unique stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with properties differing from traditional silica-based and polymeric stationary phases. The new method involves enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and determination by high-temperature HPLC/Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HTLC/Orbitrap MS) with atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). To achieve APPI of doping substances, the mobile phase consisted of 0.1% CF3COOH (A) and a mixture of acetonitrile/2-propanol (25:75 v/v), containing 0.1% CF3COOH (B), which was used as an effective proton source. A screening method for the detection of 57 exogenous steroids has been developed. The method was validated by spiking 10 different blank urine samples at different concentration levels. Validation parameters included limit of detection (LOD), selectivity, ion suppression, extraction recovery, and repeatability. All studied compounds had an LOD lower than the minimum required performance level. Of the 57 steroids studied, 55 showed recovery better than 70%. For all of the analytes, the relative retention times proved to be stable between days, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) smaller than 0.3%. In addition, the interday RSDs of the peak area ratios ranged between 0.7% and 14.5%. The proposed method matches the basic requirements of all methods used to analyze drugs or metabolites in an antidoping laboratory, i.e., sensitivity, selectivity, and specificity. The acquisition of full-scan mass spectra with accurate masses can be a valuable tool in the retrospective evaluation of analyzed samples for anabolic

  2. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  3. GRAFEC: A New Spanish Program to Investigate Waste Management Options for Radioactive Graphite - 12399

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Eva; Pina, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Marina [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22, 28040-MADRID (Spain); Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz [Furnaces Nuclear Application Grenoble SAS (FNAG), 4, avenue Charles de Gaulle, 38800 Le Pont de Claix (France); Leganes Nieto, Jose Luis; Quiros Gracian, Maria [ENRESA, C/ Emilio Vargas,7 - 28043 - MADRID (Spain); Seemann, Richard [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Wilhelm-Rohn-Strasse 35, 63450 Hanau (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Spain has to manage about 3700 tons of irradiated graphite from the reactor Vandellos I as radioactive waste. 2700 tons are the stack of the reactor and are still in the reactor core waiting for retrieval. The rest of the quantities, 1000 tons, are the graphite sleeves which have been already retrieved from the reactor. During operation the graphite sleeves were stored in a silo and during the dismantling stage a retrieval process was carried out separating the wires from the graphite, which were crushed and introduced into 220 cubic containers of 6 m{sup 3} each and placed in interim storage. The graphite is an intermediate level radioactive waste but it contains long lived radionuclides like {sup 14}C which disqualifies disposal at the low level waste repository of El Cabril. Therefore, a new project has been started in order to investigate two new options for the management of this waste type. The first one is based on a selective decontamination of {sup 14}C by thermal methods. This method is based on results obtained at the Research Centre Juelich (FZJ) in the Frame of the EC programs 'Raphael' and 'Carbowaste'. The process developed at FZJ is based on a preferential oxidation of {sup 14}C in comparison to the bulk {sup 12}C. Explanations for this effect are the inhomogeneous distribution and a weaker bounding of {sup 14}C which is not incorporated in the graphite lattice. However these investigations have only been performed with graphite from the high temperature reactor Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor Juelich AVR which has been operated in a non-oxidising condition or research reactor graphite operated at room temperature. The reactor Vandellos I has been operated with CO{sub 2} as coolant and significant amounts of graphite have been already oxidised. The aim of the project is to validate whether a {sup 14}C decontamination can also been achieved with graphite from Vandellos I. A second possibility under investigation is the

  4. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ammar, M.R. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Université Orléans, CS90055, F-45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rouzaud, J.N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, UMR CNRS ENS 8538, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges R{sub p} of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200–1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower

  5. Development and demonstration of manufacturing processes for fabricating graphite/Larc-160 polyimide structural elements, part 4, paragraph B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the development of processes for production of Celion/LARC-160 graphite-polyimide materials, quality control, and the fabrication of Space Shuttle composite structure components is reported. Liquid chromatographic analyses of three repeatibility batches were performed and are compared to previous Hexcel standard production and to variables study LARC-160 intermediate resins. Development of processes for chopped fiber molding are described and flexural strength, elastic modulus, and other physical and mechanical properties of the molding are presented.

  6. Temperature effects on the behavior of carbon 14 in nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbermann, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat à l’énergie atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette 91191 (France); Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie, Université Lyon 1, 94 Bd. Niels Bohr, Villeurbanne 69622 (France); Perrat-Mabilon, A. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Laurent, G. [EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); and others

    2014-08-01

    The dismantling of the 1st French generation UNGG (Uranium Naturel Graphite Gas) nuclear reactors operated by the French utility, EDF (Electricité de France) will generate around 17,000 tons of irradiated graphite wastes that have to be disposed of. {sup 14}C is one of the main radioactive dose contributors over 10,000 years. For the management of this waste, it is mandatory to get an accurate estimation of {sup 14}C. The general aim of our work is therefore to simulate the behavior of {sup 14}C in nuclear graphite and to elucidate the coupled and decoupled effects of temperature, irradiation and radiolytic corrosion that mainly influence {sup 14}C behavior in graphite during reactor operation. This paper focuses on the behavior of {sup 13}C implanted into nuclear graphite and used to simulate the presence of {sup 14}C displaced from its original structural site through recoil during neutron irradiation. It aims at evaluating both the temperature and the disorder level of the implanted graphite structure effects on {sup 13}C migration using two complementary techniques, NRA and SIMS, to evaluate the {sup 13}C distribution at the millimeter and micrometer lateral scales respectively. Raman micro-spectroscopy is used to check the graphite structure evolution. The results show that {sup 13}C is not released up to 1600 °C whatever the initial structural disorder level of the implanted graphite. This might be due to the fact that {sup 13}C might be trapped into interstitial clusters. The extrapolation of our results to the behavior of {sup 14}C shows that reactor temperatures (200–500 °C) did not induce any {sup 14}C release. Moreover, as long as there is no gasification of the graphite matrix, high temperatures tend to stabilize {sup 14}C into the remaining graphite structure. This fact has to be considered in case of high temperature purification of {sup 14}C from irradiated graphite.

  7. Elasticity modulus and damping ratio of macaw palm rachillas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Villar, Flora Maria de Melo; Pinto, Francisco de Assis de Carvalho; Santos, Fábio Lúcio; Grossi, José Antônio Saraiva; Velloso, Nara Silveira

    2017-01-01

    .... Thus, this study seeks to determine the modulus of elasticity and the damping ratio of four different plant accessions obtained from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV...

  8. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Miklos Z [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hobson, Maritza A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Varghese, Tomy [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Harter, Josephine [Department of Surgical Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kliewer, Mark A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hartenbach, Ellen M [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zagzebski, James A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  9. Microstructure, elastic and electromagnetic properties of epoxy-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, S.; Micciulla, F.; Levin, V. M.; Petronyuk, Yu. S.; Chernozatonskii, L. A.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Macutkevic, J.; Pletnev, M. A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2015-06-01

    A set of epoxy resin-based composites filled with 0.25 - 2.0 wt.% of commercially available exfoliated graphite (EG) and thick graphene (TG), prepared by suspending EG particles in cyclohexane, and submitting the suspension to a series of grinding and ultrasonic dispersion steps, was produced. The microstructure of such epoxy-graphite composites has been studied by the impulse acoustic microscopy technique. According to acoustic microscopy data, exfoliated graphite microparticles have been well dispersed in the epoxy matrix. TG nanoflakes demonstrated persistent tendency to clustering and formation of agglomerates. The addition of graphite particles in small amount (0.25 - 2.0 wt.%) did not influence the bulk elastic properties of epoxy-graphite composite materials. Being extremely lightweight, 0.003 g cm-3, EG had a lower percolation threshold than TG, at the level of 1-1.5 wt.% against 2.1-3.2 wt.%, respectively. As a result, epoxy composites filled with 1.0-2.0 wt.% EG provided high electromagnetic (EM) interference shielding both at microwave and THz frequencies. In contrast, no significant influence of TG loading was observed at low weight fraction (up to 2 wt.%) on the EM performance of epoxy composites.

  10. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  11. Mineralogical and isotopic characterization of graphite deposits from the Anatectic Complex of Toledo, central Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Méndez, Iván; Boixereu, Ester; Villaseca, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Graphite is found dispersed in high-grade metapelitic rocks of the Anatectic Complex of Toledo (ACT) and was mined during the mid twentieth century in places where it has been concentrated (Guadamur and la Puebla de Montalbán mines). Some samples from these mines show variable but significant alteration intensity, reaching very low-T hydrothermal (supergene) conditions for some samples from the waste heap of the Guadamur site (<100 °C and 1 kbar). Micro-Raman and XRD data indicate that all the studied ACT graphite is of high crystallinity irrespective of the degree of hydrothermal alteration. Chemical differences were obtained for graphite δ13C composition. ACT granulitic graphite shows δ13CPDB values in the range of -20.5 to -27.8 ‰, indicating a biogenic origin. Interaction of graphite with hydrothermal fluids does not modify isotopic compositions even in the most transformed samples from mining sites. The different isotopic signatures of graphite from the mining sites reflect its contrasted primary carbon source. The high crystallinity of studied graphite makes this area of central Spain suitable for graphitic exploration and its potential exploitation, due to the low carbon content required for its viability and its strategic applications in advanced technologies, such as graphene synthesis.

  12. A reverse method for the determination of the radiological inventory of irradiated graphite at reactor scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicaise, Gregory [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Poncet, Bernard [EDF-DP2D, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six gas-cooled nuclear reactors operated by Electricite De France (EDF). Determining the radionuclide content of this waste is an important legal commitment for both safety reasons and in order to determine the best suited management strategy. As evidenced by numerous studies nuclear graphite is a very pure material, however, it cannot be considered from an analytical viewpoint as a usual homogeneous material. Because of graphite high purity, radionuclide measurements in irradiated graphite exhibit very high discrepancies especially when corresponding to precursors at trace level. Therefore the assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements leads in most of cases to a gross over or under-estimation that can be detrimental to graphite waste management. A reverse method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess the radionuclide inventory as precisely as possible.

  13. Synthesis of Cu-coated Graphite Powders Using a Chemical Reaction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jun-Ho; Park, Hyun-Kuk; Oh, Ik-Hyun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae-Won [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, Cu-coated graphite powders for a low thermal expansion coefficient and a high thermal conductivity are fabricated using a chemical reaction process. The Cu particles adhere to the irregular graphite powders and they homogeneously disperse in the graphite matrix. Cu-coated graphite powders are coarser at approximately 3-4 μm than the initial graphite powders; furthermore, their XRD patterns exhibit a low intensity in the oxide peak with low Zn powder content. For the passivation powders, the transposition solvent content has low values, and the XRD pattern of the oxide peaks is almost non-existent, but the high transposition solvent content does not exhibit a difference to the non-passivation treated powders.

  14. The irradiation dimensional changes of grade TSX graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C R; Woodruff, E M

    1988-01-01

    Grade TSX graphite is used as a moderator in the N Reactor which has operated since 1963. This reactor, designed for a 25-year life, is under study to determine the possibility of significantly extending the operating life. One limiting factor is dimensional growth of the graphite lattice making up the core of the reactor. Since the original demands (25-year life) were modest, the dimensional change behavior was derived from a compendium of irradiation data from other grades and only confirmed by a few low-exposure irradiation experiments. Therefore, to generate actual dimensional change data for grade TSX to exposures relevant to the life extension plans, a series of irradiations of TSX graphite were run in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge. This report contains experimental results of such testing. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Formulation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Copolymer for Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum char yield was obtained with a copolymer containing 25% mol fraction DGEBE and 75% mol fraction DGEBA (Epon 828). To achieve the high values (above 40%), a large quantity of catalyst (trimethoxyboroxine) was necessary. Although a graphite laminate 1/8" thick was successfully fabricated, the limited life of the catalyzed epox