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Sample records for high mg calcite

  1. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  2. Incorporation of Mg, Sr, Ba, U, and B in High-Mg Calcite Benthic Foraminifers Cultured Under Controlled pCO2

    Not, C.; Thibodeau, B.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of elemental ratios (E/Ca) has been performed in two symbiont-bearing species of high-Mg calcite benthic foraminifers (hyaline, Baculogypsina sphaerulata and porcelaneous, Amphisorus hemprichii), cultured under five pCO2 levels, representing preindustrial, modern, and three predicted future values. E/Ca ratios were analyzed by Laser Ablation coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS). We measured several E/Ca, such as Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, U/Ca, and B/Ca simultaneously. We observed that high-Mg calcite benthic foraminifers possess higher E/Ca than low-Mg calcite foraminifers, irrespective of their calcification mode (hyaline or porcelaneous). In both modes of calcification, Mg, Sr, Ba, U, and B incorporation could be controlled by Rayleigh fractionation. However, more data are needed to validate and quantify the relative importance of this process and closely investigate the presence/absence of other mechanism. Therefore, it highlights the need for a multielemental approach when looking at trace element incorporation. Finally, no significant relationship was observed between the different ratios and the pCO2 of the water, suggesting that none of the Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, U/Ca, and B/Ca is sensitive to bottom water pCO2 or pH for these species.

  3. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained ;solubility product; of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  4. High-Magnesian Calcite Mesocrystals : A Coordination Chemistry Approach

    Lenders, Jos J. M.; Dey, Archan; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Spielmann, Jan; Hendrix, Marco M. R. M.; de With, Gijsbertus; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Harder, Sjoerd; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    While biogenic calcites frequently contain appreciable levels of magnesium, the pathways leading to such high concentrations remain unclear. The production of high-magnesian calcites in vitro is highly challenging, because Mg-free aragonite, rather than calcite, is the favored product in the

  5. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  6. Diagenetic alteration in low-Mg calcite from macrofossils

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Korte, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    microscopy) and chemical (trace element abundances, isotopic ratios) screening techniques used to assess the alteration degree of low-Mg calcite macrofossils and summarize the findings on diagenetic trends observed for elemental and isotopic systems in such materials. For a robust evaluation...... of the preservation state of biogenic calcite, it is advisable to combine a set of complementary techniques. Absolute limiting values of element and isotope ratios for discarding diagenetically altered materials cannot be universally applied, but should rather be evaluated on a case to case basis. The evaluation can...

  7. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  8. Incorporation of Mg and Sr in calcite of cultured benthic foraminifera: impact of calcium concentration and associated calcite saturation state

    M. Raitzsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of the calcium concentration in seawater and thereby the calcite saturation state (Ω on the magnesium and strontium incorporation into benthic foraminiferal calcite under laboratory conditions. For this purpose individuals of the shallow-water species Heterostegina depressa (precipitating high-Mg calcite, symbiont-bearing and Ammonia tepida (low-Mg calcite, symbiont-barren were cultured in media under a range of [Ca2+], but similar Mg/Ca ratios. Trace element/Ca ratios of newly formed calcite were analysed with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS and normalized to the seawater elemental composition using the equation DTE=(TE/Cacalcite/(TE/Caseawater. The culturing study shows that DMg of A. tepida significantly decreases with increasing Ω at a gradient of −4.3×10−5 per Ω unit. The DSr value of A. tepida does not change with Ω, suggesting that fossil Sr/Ca in this species may be a potential tool to reconstruct past variations in seawater Sr/Ca. Conversely, DMg of H. depressa shows only a minor decrease with increasing Ω, while DSr increases considerably with Ω at a gradient of 0.009 per Ω unit. The different responses to seawater chemistry of the two species may be explained by a difference in the calcification pathway that is, at the same time, responsible for the variation in the total Mg incorporation between the two species. Since the Mg/Ca ratio in H. depressa is 50–100 times higher than that of A. tepida, it is suggested that the latter exhibits a mechanism that decreases the Mg/Ca ratio of the calcification fluid, while the high-Mg calcite forming species may not have this physiological tool. If the dependency of Mg incorporation on seawater [Ca2+] is also valid for deep

  9. The coordination of sulfur in synthetic and biogenic Mg calcites: The red coral case

    Perrin, J.; Rivard, C.; Vielzeuf, D.; Laporte, D.; Fonquernie, C.; Ricolleau, A.; Cotte, M.; Floquet, N.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur has been recognized in biogenic calcites for a long time. However, its structural position is matter of debate. For some authors, sulfur is a marker of the organic matrix while it is part of the calcite structure itself for others. To better understand the place of sulfur in calcite, sulfated magnesian calcites (S-MgCalcite) have been synthetized at high pressure and temperature and studied by μ-XANES spectroscopy. S-MgCalcite XANES spectra show two different types of sulfur: sulfate (SO42-) as a predominant species and a small contribution of sulfite (SO32-), both substituting for carbonate ions in the calcite structure. To address the question of the position of sulfur in biogenic calcites, the oxidation states of sulfur in the skeleton and organic tissues of Corallium rubrum have been investigated by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and sulfur K-edge micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF, Grenoble, France) on beamline ID21. In the skeleton, sulfur is mainly present as oxidized sulfur SO42- (+VI), plus a weak sulfite contribution. XANES spectra indicate that sulfur is inorganically incorporated as sulfur structurally substituted to carbonate ions (SSS). Although an organic matrix is present in the red coral skeleton, reduced organic sulfur could not be detected by μ-XANES spectroscopy in the skeleton probably due to low organic/inorganic sulfur ratio. In the organic tissues surrounding the skeleton, several sulfur oxidation states have been detected including disulfide (S-S), thioether (R-S-CH3), sulfoxide (SO2), sulfonate (SO2O-) and sulfate (SO42-). The unexpected occurrence of inorganic sulfate within the organic tissues suggests the presence of pre-organized organic/inorganic complexes in the circulatory system of the red coral, precursors to biomineralization ahead of the growth front.

  10. Mg and Sr in Arctic echinoderm calcite: Nature or nurture?

    Iglikowska, A.; Borszcz, T.; Drewnik, A.; Grabowska, M.; Humphreys-Williams, E.; Kędra, M.; Krzemińska, M.; Piwoni-Piórewicz, A.; Kukliński, P.

    2018-04-01

    The Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in echinoderm skeletal calcite are used as a proxy for Phanerozoic seawater changes, since the skeletal concentrations are, to some extent, controlled by environmental factors. However, it remains unclear how the influence of environmental factors is modified by vital effects, especially in polar waters. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare the ratios of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca among the skeletal parts of 10 common Arctic echinoderm species belonging to three classes Echinoidea, Asteroidea and Ophiuroidea that contribute substantially to the carbon cycle in the Arctic benthic system. Significant differences were recorded in echinoid skeletal element concentrations among specific skeletal parts. The lowest Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were detected in the spines (mean Mg/Ca 37.5 ± 8.8 SD; Sr/Ca 1.8 ± 0.1). The components of the Aristotle's lantern (epiphyses, pyramids and rotulas) were characterised by the highest Mg levels (Mg/Ca 79.9 ± 6.0; 75.2 ± 9.1; 60.1 ± 3.8, respectively). It is likely that mouth parts experience greater mechanical pressure compared to other body parts, and the higher content of Mg in the Aristotle's lantern contributes to its robustness. We did not find any distinctive trends in the distribution of skeletal elements in the asteroid and ophiuroid skeletal parts. The heterogeneous concentrations of Mg and Sr in different skeleton parts of the echinoids suggest possible physiological regulation of the chemical composition rather than the composition only being influenced by the environment. We cannot recommend echinoderm skeletons as reliable indicators in palaeoenvironmental reconstructions due to the possible biological control of skeletal chemistry, which may interfere with the effect of environmental variables.

  11. Calcite Wettability in the Presence of Dissolved Mg2+ and SO42-

    Generosi, Johanna; Ceccato, Marcel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    that potential determining ions in seawater, Mg2+, Ca2+, and SO42–, are responsible for altering the wettability of calcite surfaces. In favorable conditions, e.g., elevated temperature, calcium at the calcite surface can be replaced by magnesium, making organic molecules bind more weakly and water molecules...... bind more strongly, rendering the surface more hydrophilic. We used atomic force microscopy in chemical force mapping mode to probe the adhesion forces between a hydrophobic CH3-terminated AFM tip and a freshly cleaved calcite {10.4} surface to investigate wettability change in the presence of Mg2...... with calcite even after rinsing with CaCO3-saturated deionized water, suggesting sorption on or in calcite. When the calcite-saturated solution of MgSO4 was replaced by calcite-saturated NaCl at the same ionic strength, adhesion force increased again, indicating that the effect is reversible and suggesting Mg...

  12. Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence studies of calcite and MgO: surface defects and heat treatment

    Goeksu, H.Y.; Brown, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the problems which preclude accurate thermoluminescence (TL) dating of geologically formed calcite stem from different sample pre-treatment procedures, such as grinding, drilling or pre-heating. It has long been known that grinding can introduce spurious TL in calcite, but there have been wide differences of opinion as to the magnitude of the influence and its importance. Therefore, various grinding and acid-washing procedures have been suggested to avoid spurious thermoluminescence. Various models have been developed to explain the mechanism. We have studied the changes in thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) properties as well as in the spectral composition of the glow from calcite and MgO due to surface defects and heat treatment. It is found that both laboratory heat treatment and surface indents give rise to changes in TL efficiency. (author)

  13. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas and its effects on marine biological calcification

    J. B. Ries

    2010-09-01

    production increased along with calcification within the bryopsidalean and coccolithophorid algae in mineralogically favorable seawater is consistent with the hypothesis that calcification promotes photosynthesis within some species of these algae through the liberation of CO2.

    The experiments also revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals, and bacterial biofilms that secrete a mixture of aragonite and high Mg calcite, began secreting an increased proportion of their calcium carbonate as the calcite polymorph in the lower-Mg/Ca experimental seawaters. Furthermore, the Mg/Ca ratio of calcite secreted by the coccolithophores, coralline red algae, reef-dwelling animals (crustacea, urchins, calcareous tube worms, bacterial biofilms, scleractinian corals, and bryopsidalean algae declined with reductions in seawater Mg/Ca. Notably, Mg fractionation in autotrophic organisms was more strongly influenced by changes in seawater Mg/Ca than in heterotrophic organisms, a probable consequence of autotrophic organisms inducing a less controlled mode of calcification simply through the removal of CO2 via photosynthesis.

    These results indicate that biomineralogical control can be partially overridden by ambient seawater Mg/Ca and suggest that modern aragonite-secreting organisms may have secreted a mixture of aragonite and low Mg calcite, and that modern high Mg calcite-secreting organisms probably secreted low Mg calcite, in calcite seas of the past. These effects of seawater Mg/Ca on the polymorph mineralogy and calcite Mg/Ca ratio of calcareous skeletons should be accounted for in thermal-chemical reconstructions of seawater that are based upon skeletal Mg/Ca.

    Lastly, by identifying how marine calcifiers respond to changes in seawater Mg/Ca and absolute Ca2+ concentration, this work should enhance our interpretation of parallel studies investigating the effects of anthropogenic CO2

  14. Tracing high-pressure metamorphism in marbles: Phase relations in high-grade aluminous calcite-dolomite marbles from the Greek Rhodope massif in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2-CO 2 and indications of prior aragonite

    Proyer, A.; Mposkos, E.; Baziotis, I.; Hoinkes, G.

    2008-08-01

    Four different types of parageneses of the minerals calcite, dolomite, diopside, forsterite, spinel, amphibole (pargasite), (Ti-)clinohumite and phlogopite were observed in calcite-dolomite marbles collected in the Kimi-Complex of the Rhodope Metamorphic Province (RMP). The presence of former aragonite can be inferred from carbonate inclusions, which, in combination with an analysis of phase relations in the simplified system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2-CO 2 (CMAS-CO 2) show that the mineral assemblages preserved in these marbles most likely equilibrated at the aragonite-calcite transition, slightly below the coesite stability field, at ca. 720 °C, 25 kbar and aCO 2 ~ 0.01. The thermodynamic model predicts that no matter what activity of CO 2, garnet has to be present in aluminous calcite-dolomite-marble at UHP conditions.

  15. Ab initio study of single-crystalline and polycrystalline elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite crystals.

    Zhu, L-F; Friák, M; Lymperakis, L; Titrian, H; Aydin, U; Janus, A M; Fabritius, H-O; Ziegler, A; Nikolov, S; Hemzalová, P; Raabe, D; Neugebauer, J

    2013-04-01

    We employ ab initio calculations and investigate the single-crystalline elastic properties of (Ca,Mg)CO3 crystals covering the whole range of concentrations from pure calcite CaCO3 to pure magnesite MgCO3. Studying different distributions of Ca and Mg atoms within 30-atom supercells, our theoretical results show that the energetically most favorable configurations are characterized by elastic constants that nearly monotonously increase with the Mg content. Based on the first principles-derived single-crystalline elastic anisotropy, the integral elastic response of (Ca,Mg)CO3 polycrystals is determined employing a mean-field self-consistent homogenization method. As in case of single-crystalline elastic properties, the computed polycrystalline elastic parameters sensitively depend on the chemical composition and show a significant stiffening impact of Mg atoms on calcite crystals in agreement with the experimental findings. Our analysis also shows that it is not advantageous to use a higher-scale two-phase mix of stoichiometric calcite and magnesite instead of substituting Ca atoms by Mg ones on the atomic scale. Such two-phase composites are not significantly thermodynamically favorable and do not provide any strong additional stiffening effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of calcite III to aragonite transformation under high pressure and high temperature

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Wang, Duojun

    2017-10-01

    In our study, a series of Raman experiments on the phase transition of calcite at high pressure and high temperature were investigated using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy technique. It was found that calcite I transformed to calcite II and calcite III at pressures of 1.62 and 2.12 GPa and room temperature. With increasing temperature, the phase transition of calcite III to aragonite occurred. Aragonite was retained upon slowly cooling of the system, indicating that the transition of calcite III to aragonite was irreversible. Based on the available data, the phase boundary between calcite III and aragonite was determined by the following relation: P(GPa) = 0.013 × T(°C) + 1.22 (100°C ≤ T ≤ 170°C). It showed that the transition pressure linearly rose with increasing temperature. A better understanding of the stability of calcite III and aragonite is of great importance to further explore the thermodynamic behavior of carbonates and carbon cycling in the mantle.

  17. Structural evolution of calcite at high temperatures: Phase V unveiled

    Ishizawa, Nobuo; Setoguchi, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2013-01-01

    The calcite form of calcium carbonate CaCO3 undergoes a reversible phase transition between Rc and Rm at ~1240 K under a CO2 atmosphere of ~0.4 MPa. The joint probability density function obtained from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the oxygen triangles of the CO3 group in the high temperature form (Phase V) do not sit still at specified positions in the space group Rm, but migrate along the undulated circular orbital about carbon. The present study also shows how the room temperature form (Phase I) develops into Phase V through an intermediate form (Phase IV) in the temperature range between ~985 K and ~1240 K. PMID:24084871

  18. On the formation and functions of high and very high magnesium calcites in the continuously growing teeth of the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus: development of crystallinity and protein involvement.

    Veis, Arthur; Stock, Stuart R; Alvares, Keith; Lux, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sea urchin teeth grow continuously and develop a complex mineralized structure consisting of spatially separate but crystallographically aligned first stage calcitic elements of high Mg content (5-15 mol% mineral). These become cemented together by epitaxially oriented second stage very high Mg calcite (30-40 mol% mineral). In the tooth plumula, ingressing preodontoblasts create layered cellular syncytia. Mineral deposits develop within membrane-bound compartments between cellular syncytial layers. We seek to understand how this complex tooth architecture is developed, how individual crystalline calcitic elements become crystallographically aligned, and how their Mg composition is regulated. Synchrotron microbeam X-ray scattering was performed on live, freshly dissected teeth. We observed that the initial diffracting crystals lie within independent syncytial spaces in the plumula. These diffraction patterns match those of mature tooth calcite. Thus, the spatially separate crystallites grow with the same crystallographic orientation seen in the mature tooth. Mineral-related proteins from regions with differing Mg contents were isolated, sequenced, and characterized. A tooth cDNA library was constructed, and selected matrix-related proteins were cloned. Antibodies were prepared and used for immunolocaliztion. Matrix-related proteins are acidic, phosphorylated, and associated with the syncytial membranes. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy of various crystal elements shows unique amino acid, Mg, and Ca ion distributions. High and very high Mg calcites differ in Asp content. Matrix-related proteins are phosphorylated. Very high Mg calcite is associated with Asp-rich protein, and it is restricted to the second stage mineral. Thus, the composition at each part of the tooth is related to architecture and function. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  20. Impact of seawater [Ca2+] on the calcification and calcite Mg / Ca of Amphistegina lessonii

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; Thoms, S.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G. J.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Bijma, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mg / Ca ratios in foraminiferal tests are routinely used as paleotemperature proxies, but on long timescales, they also hold the potential to reconstruct past seawater Mg / Ca. The impact of both temperature and seawater Mg / Ca on Mg incorporation in Foraminifera has been quantified by a number of

  1. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  2. Differential early diagenetic low-Mg calcite cementation and rhythmic hardground development in Campanian-Maastrichtian chalk

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; J.J.P., Zijlstra

    1997-01-01

    and differences in the degree of early diagenesis. Cemented layers and hardgrounds are the result of differential early marine calcite cementation. In these limestones early calcite cementation cannot be explained by the supply of cementing materials from saturated seawater, An alternative model for early marine......The Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones in the south of the Netherlands are well-sorted fine-grained mudstones and silt- to fine sand-sized bioclastic grainstones. These limestones show a distinct lithological cyclicity manifested by fining-upward grain-size cycles with calcite-cemented layers...... calcite cementation is proposed, in which early calcite cementation occurred within the sediment at some distance below the seafloor as a result of organic matter degradation and internal redistribution of bioclastic carbonate. Bacterial organic matter degradation caused dissolution of relatively unstable...

  3. Growing spherulitic calcite grains in saline, hyperalkaline lakes: Experimental evaluation of the effects of Mg-clays and organic acids

    Mercedes-Martín, R.; Rogerson, M.R.; Brasier, A.T.; Vonhof, H.B.; Prior, T.; Fellows, S.M.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; Billing, I.; Pedley, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of spherical-radial calcite bodies - spherulites - in sublacustrine, hyperalkaline and saline systems is unclear, and therefore their palaeoenvironmental significance as allochems is disputed. Here, we experimentally investigate two hypotheses concerning the origin of spherulites. The

  4. Multiple phases of mg-calcite in crustose coralline algae suggest caution for temperature proxy and ocean acidification assessment: lessons from the ultrastructure and biomineralization in Phymatolithon (Rhodophyta, Corallinales)1.

    Nash, Merinda C; Adey, Walter

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium content, strongly correlated with temperature, has been developed as a climate archive for the late Holocene without considering anatomical controls on Mg content. In this paper, we explore the ultrastructure and cellular scale Mg-content variations within four species of North Atlantic crust-forming Phymatolithon. The cell wall has radial grains of Mg-calcite, whereas the interfilament (middle lamella) has grains aligned parallel to the filament axis. The proportion of interfilament and cell wall carbonate varies by tissue and species. Three distinct primary phases of Mg-calcite were identified: interfilament Mg-calcite (mean 8.9 mol% MgCO 3 ), perithallial cell walls Mg-calcite (mean 13.4 mol% MgCO 3 ), and hypothallium Mg-calcite (mean 17.1 mol% MgCO 3 ). Magnesium content for the bulk crust, an average of all phases present, showed a strongly correlated (R 2  = 0.975) increase of 0.31 mol% MgCO 3 per °C. Of concern for climate reconstructions is the potential for false warming signals from undetected postgrazing wound repair carbonate that is substantially enriched in Mg, unrelated to temperature. Within a single crust, Mg-content of component carbonates ranged from 8 to 20 mol% MgCO 3 , representing theoretical thermodynamic stabilities from aragonite-equivalent to unstable higher-Mg-calcite. It is unlikely that existing current predictions of ocean acidification impact on coralline algae, based on saturation states calculated using average Mg contents, provide an environmentally relevant estimate. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Microstructural Damage During High-Strain Torsion Experiments on Calcite-Anhydrite Aggregates

    Cross, A. J.; Skemer, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ductile shear zones play a critical role in localising deformation in the Earth's crust and mantle. Severe grain size reduction - a ubiquitous feature of natural mylonites - is commonly thought to cause strain weakening via a transition to grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms. Although grain size reduction is modulated by grain growth in single-phase aggregates, grain boundary pinning in well-mixed poly-phase composites can inhibit grain growth, leading to microstructural `damage' which is likely a critical element of strain localization in the lithosphere. While dynamic recrystallization has been widely explored in rock mechanics and materials science, the mechanisms behind phase-mixing remain poorly understood. In this contribution we present results from high-strain, deformation experiments on calcite-anhydrite composites. Experiments were conducted in torsion at T = 500-700°C and P 1.5 GPa, using the new Large Volume Torsion (LVT) solid-medium apparatus, to shear strains of 0.5-30. As shear strain increases, progressive thinning and necking of initially large (≤ 1 mm) calcite domains is observed, resulting in an increase in the proportion of interphase boundaries. Grain-size is negatively correlated with the fraction of interphase boundaries, such that calcite grains in well-mixed regions are significantly smaller than those in single-phase domains. Crucially, progressive deformation leads to a reduction in grain-size beyond the lower limit established by the grain size piezometer for mono-phase calcite, implying microstructural damage. These data therefore demonstrate continued microstructural evolution in two-phase composites that is not possible in single-phase aggregates. These observations mark a new `geometric' mechanism for phase mixing, complementing previous models for phase mixing involving chemical reactions, material diffusion, and/or grain boundary sliding.

  6. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  7. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications. PMID:25189418

  8. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early diagenetic high-magnesium calcite and dolomite indicate that coal balls formed in marine or brackish water: Stratigraphic and paleoclimatic implications

    Raymond, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Coal balls are carbonate and pyrite permineralizations of peat that contain three-dimensional plant fossils preserved at the cellular level. Coal balls, which occur in Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian equatorial coals, provide a detailed record of terrestrial ecology and tropical climate during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age; yet their depositional environment remains controversial. The exquisite preservation of some coal-ball fossils, e.g. pollen with pollen tubes and leaves with mesophyll, indicates rapid formation. The presence of abundant, cement-filled, void spaces within and between the plant debris in most coal balls indicates that they formed in uncompacted peat, near the surface of the mire. Botanical, taphonomic and isotopic evidence point to a freshwater origin for coal balls. The nearest living relatives of coal ball plants (modern lycopsids, sphenopsids, marratialean ferns and conifers) grow in fresh water. Coal-ball peat contains a high percentage of aerial debris, similar to modern freshwater peat. The stable oxygen isotopes of coal-ball carbonate (δ18O = 16 to 3 per mil) suggest a freshwater origin. However, the widespread occurrence of marine invertebrates and early diagenetic framboidal pyrite in coal balls suggests that many formed in close proximity to marine water. Indeed, carbonate petrology points to a marine or brackish water origin for the first-formed carbonate cements in coal balls. Petrographic and geochemical (microprobe) analysis of coal-ball carbonates in Pennsylvanian coals from the midcontinent of North America (Western Interior Basin, West Pangaea) and the Ruhr and Donets Basins (East Pangaea) indicate that the first formed carbonate is either radaxial, nonstochiometric dolomite or high magnesium calcite (9 - 17 mol % MgCO3, indicating precipitation in marine or brackish water. Although both primary dolomite and high magnesium calcite can form in lacustrine settings, the lakes in which these minerals form occur in carbonate terranes

  10. Selective Flotation of Calcite from Fluorite: A Novel Reagent Schedule

    Zhiyong Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite is an important strategic mineral. In general, fluorite ores will contain a certain amount of calcite gangue mineral. Thus, they need to be separated from each other. For an economic separation, a reverse flotation process is used to float calcite gangue from fluorite. However, little information on the separation is available. In this study, a novel reagent schedule using citric acid (CA as the depressant, sodium fluoride (NaF as the regulator and sulfoleic acid (SOA as the collector, was developed to separate calcite from fluorite. The results demonstrated a high selectivity for the flotation of calcite from fluorite using this new reagent schedule. The best selective separation for a single mineral and mixed binary minerals was obtained when 200 mg/L of NaF, 50 mg/L of CA, and 6 mg/L of SOA were used at pH 9. In addition, a batch flotation experiment was carried out using a run-of-mine feed material. Selective separation was achieved with 85.18% calcite removal while only 11.2% of fluorite was lost. An attempt was made to understand the effect of the new reagent schedule on the flotation of calcite. The results from both microflotation and bench scale flotation demonstrated a great potential for industrial application using this novel reagent schedule to upgrade fluorite ore.

  11. Hydrochemical controls on aragonite versus calcite precipitation in cave dripwaters

    Rossi, Carlos; Lozano, Rafael P.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the paleoclimatic relevance of primary calcite to aragonite transitions in stalagmites, the relative role of fluid Mg/Ca ratio, supersaturation and CO32- concentration in controlling such transitions is still incompletely understood. Accordingly, we have monitored the hydrochemistry of 50 drips and 8 pools that are currently precipitating calcite and/or aragonite in El Soplao and Torca Ancha Caves (N. Spain), investigating the mineralogy and geochemistry of the CaCO3 precipitates on the corresponding natural speleothem surfaces. The data reveal that, apart from possible substrate effects, dripwater Mg/Ca is the only obvious control on CaCO3 polymorphism in the studied stalagmites and pools, where calcite- and aragonite-precipitating dripwaters are separated by an initial (i.e. at stalactite tips) Mg/Ca threshold at ≈1.1 mol/mol. Within the analyzed ranges of pH (8.2-8.6), CO32- concentration (1-6 mg/L), supersaturation (SIaragonite: 0.08-1.08; SIcalcite: 0.23-1.24), drip rate (0.2-81 drops/min) and dissolved Zn (6-90 μg/L), we observe no unequivocal influence of these parameters on CaCO3 mineralogy. Despite the almost complete overlapping supersaturations of calcite- and aragonite-precipitating waters, the latter are on average less supersaturated because the waters having Mg/Ca above ∼1.1 have mostly achieved such high ratios by previously precipitating calcite. Both calcite and aragonite precipitated at or near oxygen isotopic equilibrium, and Mg incorporation into calcite was consistent with literature-based predictions, indicating that in the studied cases CaCO3 precipitation was not significantly influenced by strong kinetic effects. In the studied cases, the calcites that precipitate at ∼11 °C from dripwaters with initial Mg/Ca approaching ∼1.1 incorporate ∼5 mol% MgCO3, close to the published value above which calcite solubility exceeds aragonite solubility, suggesting that aragonite precipitation in high-relative-humidity caves is

  12. Calcite precipitates in Slovenian bottled waters.

    Stanič, Tamara Ferjan; Miler, Miloš; Brenčič, Mihael; Gosar, Mateja

    2017-06-01

    Storage of bottled waters in varying ambient conditions affects its characteristics. Different storage conditions cause changes in the initial chemical composition of bottled water which lead to the occurrence of precipitates with various morphologies. In order to assess the relationship between water composition, storage conditions and precipitate morphology, a study of four brands of Slovenian bottled water stored in PET bottles was carried out. Chemical analyses of the main ions and measurements of the physical properties of water samples were performed before and after storage of water samples at different ambient conditions. SEM/EDS analysis of precipitates was performed after elapsed storage time. The results show that the presence of Mg 2+ , SO 4 2- , SiO 2 , Al, Mn and other impurities such as K + , Na + , Ba and Sr in the water controlled precipitate morphology by inhibiting crystal growth and leading to elongated rhombohedral calcite crystal forms which exhibit furrowed surfaces and calcite rosettes. Different storage conditions, however, affected the number of crystallization nuclei and size of calcite crystals. Hollow calcite spheres composed of cleavage rhombohedrons formed in the water with variable storage conditions by a combination of evaporation and precipitation of water droplets during high temperatures or by the bubble templating method.

  13. CaCO3-III and CaCO3-VI, high-pressure polymorphs of calcite: Possible host structures for carbon in the Earth's mantle

    Merlini, M.; Hanfland, M.; Crichton, W. A.

    2012-06-01

    Calcite, CaCO3, undergoes several high pressure phase transitions. We report here the crystal structure determination of the CaCO3-III and CaCO3-VI high-pressure polymorphs obtained by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction. This new technical development at synchrotron beamlines currently affords the possibility of collecting single-crystal data suitable for structure determination in-situ at non-ambient conditions, even after multiphase transitions. CaCO3-III, observed in the pressure range 2.5-15 GPa, is triclinic, and it presents two closely related structural modifications, one, CaCO3-III, with 50 atoms in the unit cell [a=6.281(1) Å, b=7.507(2) Å, c=12.516(3) Å, α=93.76(2)°, β=98.95(2)°, γ=106.49(2)°, V=555.26(20) Å3 at 2.8 GPa], the second, CaCO3-IIIb, with 20 atoms [a=6.144(3) Å, b=6.3715(14) Å, c=6.3759(15) Å, α= 93.84(2)°, β=107.34(3)°, γ=107.16(3)°, V=224.33(13) Å3 at 3.1 GPa]. Different pressure-time experimental paths can stabilise one or the other polymorph. Both structures are characterised by the presence of non-coplanar CO3 groups. The densities of CaCO3-III (2.99 g/cm3 at 2.8 GPa) and CaCO3-IIIb (2.96 g/cm3 at 3.1 GPa) are lower than aragonite, in agreement with the currently accepted view of aragonite as the thermodynamically stable Ca-carbonate phase at these pressures. The presence of different cation sites, with variable volume and coordination number (7-9), suggests however that these structures have the potential to accommodate cations with different sizes without introducing major structural strain. Indeed, this structure can be adopted by natural Ca-rich carbonates, which often exhibit compositions deviating from pure calcite. Mg-calcites are found both in nature (Frezzotti et al., 2011) and in experimental syntheses at conditions corresponding to deep subduction environments (Poli et al., 2009). At these conditions, the low pressure rhombohedral calcite structure is most unlikely to be stable, and, at the same

  14. Geochemical and isotope aspects of calcite deposits and calcitic marbles hosts mineralizations, Serra do Carumbe, Vale do Ribeira, Parana state, Brazil

    Venusso, Gerson Caetano; Andrade e Silva, Antonio C. Gondim de

    2011-01-01

    The calcite deposits and the calcitic marbles hosts occur in Serra do Carumbe, in the Vale do Ribeira region, Parana State, were studied in their geochemical and isotopic aspects viewing the gathering of information about their genesis and economical use. The calcite deposits are constituted by veins and lenses, being three of them concordant and one discordant in relation to the S_0 from the hosting marbles. In these deposits four main types of calcite were recognized: rombohedrical, fibrous, banded and microcrystalline. The calcite reveal themselves having high purity, with CaO concentration above 55.30% and MgO below 0.42%. The lithogeochemical study of the marbles sequence was conducted in various suites revealing an uniformity in their composition, with high values of CaO (above 46.92%) in relation to the MgO values (below 3,37%), what favors their use for cement manufacture, except in sectors that suffered fault influences, where the marbles are impure (siliceous, magnesian, ferruginous and aluminous). Regarding their trace elements content, the hosting calcitic marbles have higher concentrations than the calcite, in the elements Sr, B, Ba and Mg, what makes evident their different formation environments. The δ"1"3C values from calcite range from –9,02 to –12,24 ‰ , referring to PDB, while the values δ"1"8O range from 24,48 to 25,23 ‰, referring to SMOW; meanwhile, for the calcitic marbles, the δ"1"3C values range from –4,03 to 1,42‰ and of δ"1"8O range from 20,71 to 23,00 ‰. The high δ"1"8O values would indicate enrichment referring to the interaction of the calcite's generator fluid with the carbonatic host rock. The δ"1"3C values indicate origin from hydrothermal solution for the calcite, although they would not allow to conclude if their sources would be superficial or profound. As for the hosting calcitic marbles, the isotopic values indicate genesis from pre-cambrian marine limestone. (author)

  15. High temperature mechanical forming of Mg alloys

    Mwembela, A.; McQueen, H.J.; Myshlyaev, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mg alloys are hot worked in the range 180-450 o C and 0.0-10 s -1 ; the present project data are compared with a wide selection of published results. The flow stresses and their dependence on temperature and strain rate are fairly similar to simple Al alloys: however, the hot ductility is much lower (≤3 in torsion). Twinning plays a significant role in Mg alloys almost independently of temperature; the twins initiate at low strains in grains poorly oriented for basal slip and in consequence become well disposed for such slip. As T rises, there is increasing formation of subgrains that spread toward the grain centers from grain and twin boundaries: this is indicative of stress concentrations inducing non-basal sup which helps provide the geometrically necessary dislocations. Above about 240 o C, dynamic (DRX) nucleates at grain and twin boundaries, preferentially at intersections; this again is evidence of non-basal slip that provides the highly misoriented cells. The boundaries in which further strain concentrates producing further DRX. The microstructure remains very heterogeneous compared to the uniform dynamically recovered substructure in Al alloys, thus giving rise to the reduced ductility. These results are employed to interpret the mechanical and microstructural behavior of Mg alloys in extrusion, rolling and forging. (author)

  16. Intracrystalline deformation of calcite

    Bresser, J.H.P. de

    1991-01-01

    It is well established from observations on natural calcite tectonites that intracrystalline plastic mechanisms are important during the deformation of calcite rocks in nature. In this thesis, new data are presented on fundamental aspects of deformation behaviour of calcite under conditions where

  17. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    P. S. Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  18. Monitoring of Calcite Precipitation in Hardwater Lakes with Multi-Spectral Remote Sensing Archives

    Iris Heine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcite precipitation is a common phenomenon in calcium-rich hardwater lakes during spring and summer, but the number and spatial distribution of lakes with calcite precipitation is unknown. This paper presents a remote sensing based method to observe calcite precipitation over large areas, which are an important prerequisite for a systematic monitoring and evaluation of restoration measurements. We use globally archived satellite remote sensing data for a retrospective systematic assessment of past multi-temporal calcite precipitation events. The database of this study consists of 205 data sets that comprise freely available Landsat and Sentinel 2 data acquired between 1998 and 2015 covering the Northeast German Plain. Calcite precipitation is automatically identified using the green spectra and the metric BGR area, the triangular area between the blue, green and red reflectance value. The validation is based on field measurements of CaCO3 concentrations at three selected lakes, Feldberger Haussee, Breiter Luzin and Schmaler Luzin. The classification accuracy (0.88 is highest for calcite concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L. False negative results are caused by the choice of a conservative classification threshold. False positive results can be explained by already increased calcite concentrations. We successfully transferred the developed method to 21 other hardwater lakes in Northeast Germany. The average duration of lakes with regular calcite precipitation is 37 days. The frequency of calcite precipitation reaches from single time detections up to detections nearly every year. False negative classification results and gaps in Landsat time series reduce the accuracy of frequency and duration monitoring, but in future the image density will increase by acquisitions of Sentinel-2a (and 2b. Our study tested successfully the transfer of the classification approach to Sentinel-2 images. Our study shows that 15 of the 24 lakes have at least one phase of

  19. Mg-lattice associations in red coralline algae

    Kamenos, N. A.; Cusack, M.; Huthwelker, T.; Lagarde, P.; Scheibling, R. E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown red coralline algae to record ambient temperature in their calcite skeletons. Temperature recorded by variation in Mg concentrations within algal growth bands has sub-annual resolution and high accuracy. The conversion of Mg concentration to temperature is based on the assumption of Ca replacement by Mg within the algal calcite skeleton at higher temperatures. While Mg-temperature relationships in coralline algae have been calibrated for some species, the location of Mg within the calcite lattice remains unknown. Critically, if Mg is not a lattice component but associated with organic components this could lead to erroneous temperature records. Before coralline algae are used in large scale climate reconstructions it is therefore important to determine the location of Mg. Synchrotron Mg-X-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES) indicates that Mg is associated with the calcite lattice in Lithothamnion glaciale (contemporary free-living, contemporary encrusting and sub-fossil free-living) and Phymatolithon calcareum (contemporary free-living) coralline algae. Mg is deposited within the calcite lattice in all seasons ( L. glaciale & P. calcareum) and thallus areas ( P. calcareum). These results suggest L. glaciale and P. calcareum are robust Mg-palaeotemperature proxies. We suggest that similar confirmation be obtained for Mg associations in other species of red coralline algae aiding our understanding of their role in climate reconstruction at large spatial scales.

  20. Preliminary study of the characteristics of a high Mg containing Al-Mg-Si alloy

    Yan, F; McKay, B J; Fan, Z; Chen, M F

    2012-01-01

    An Al-20Mg-4Si high Mg containing alloy has been produced and its characteristics investigated. The as-cast alloy revealed primary Mg 2 Si particles evenly distributed throughout an α-Al matrix with a β-Al 3 Mg 2 fully divorced eutectic phase observed in interdendritic regions. The Mg 2 Si particles displayed octahedral, truncated octahedral, and hopper morphologies. Additions of Sb, Ti and Zr had a refining influence reducing the size of the Mg 2 Si from 52 ± 4 μm to 25 ± 0.1 μm, 35 ± 1 μm and 34 ± 1 μm respectively. HPDC tensile test samples could be produced with a 0.6 wt.% Mn addition which prevented die soldering. Solution heating for 1 hr was found to dissolve the majority of the Al 3 Mg 2 eutectic phase with no evidence of any effect on the primary Mg 2 Si. Preliminary results indicate that the heat treatment has a beneficial effect on the elongation and the UTS.

  1. Thermoluminescence from natural calcites

    Calderon, T.; Jaque, F.; Coy-yll, R.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) as well as absorption and EPR spectra of x-irradiated natural calcites have been obtained. Irradiation produces UV absorption bands and a decrease of the Mn 2+ EPR spectrum. A correlation of each TL peak with the bleaching steps of UV absorption bands and the recovering in intensity of the Mn 2+ EPR spectrum has been found. These experimental results support a new model for the radiation damage and thermoluminescence process in calcites. The main point in this model is that holes become trapped at impurities, and the electrons are trapped at dislocations in the form of CO 3 3- . (author)

  2. A high resolution atlas of Mg II profiles

    Ewald, R.; Nichols-Bohlin, Joy Y.; Kondo, Yoji

    1990-01-01

    An atlas of high dispersion Mg II profiles for standard stars of spectral types B0 through G9 is presented. The atlas contains plots of the Mg II profiles for approximately 65 stars and associated equivalent width measurements for both absorption and emission components, and the subordinate lines. The atlas is used to investigate systematic behavior of the Mg II profiles and correlation of the behavior with spectral classification.

  3. Dissolution Processes at Step Edges of Calcite in Water Investigated by High-Speed Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy and Simulation.

    Miyata, Kazuki; Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Haapasilta, Ville; Spijker, Peter; Kawagoe, Yuta; Foster, Adam S; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-07-12

    The microscopic understanding of the crystal growth and dissolution processes have been greatly advanced by the direct imaging of nanoscale step flows by atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical interferometry, and X-ray microscopy. However, one of the most fundamental events that govern their kinetics, namely, atomistic events at the step edges, have not been well understood. In this study, we have developed high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) and enabled true atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ∼1 s/frame, which is ∼50 times faster than the conventional FM-AFM. With the developed AFM, we have directly imaged subnanometer-scale surface structures around the moving step edges of calcite during its dissolution in water. The obtained images reveal that the transition region with typical width of a few nanometers is formed along the step edges. Building upon insight in previous studies, our simulations suggest that the transition region is most likely to be a Ca(OH) 2 monolayer formed as an intermediate state in the dissolution process. On the basis of this finding, we improve our understanding of the atomistic dissolution model of calcite in water. These results open up a wide range of future applications of the high-speed FM-AFM to the studies on various dynamic processes at solid-liquid interfaces with true atomic resolution.

  4. Mechanism of Calcite Co-Orientation in the Sea Urchin Tooth

    Killian, Christopher; Metzler, Rebecca; Gong, Y. U. T.; Olson, Ian; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO{sub 3} is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  5. Effect of Mica and Hematite (001) Surfaces on the Precipitation of Calcite

    Huifang Xu; Mo Zhou; Yihang Fang; H. Henry Teng

    2018-01-01

    The substrate effect of mica and hematite on the nucleation and crystallization of calcite was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) methods. On mica, we found, in the absence of Mg2+, the substrates’ (001) surfaces with hexagonal and pseudo-hexagonal two-dimensional (2-D) structure can affect the orientation of calcite nucleation with calcite (001) ~// mica (001) and calcite (010) ~// mica (010) to be the m...

  6. Model study of initial adsorption of SO{sub 2} on calcite and dolomite

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-30

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO{sub 2}. Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO{sub 2} catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO{sub 3} (s) and dolomite Ca{sub x}Mg{sub 1-x}CO{sub 3} (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO{sub 2} diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO{sub 2} coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals.

  7. Model study of initial adsorption of SO2 on calcite and dolomite

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO 2 . Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO 2 catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO 3 (s) and dolomite Ca x Mg 1-x CO 3 (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO 2 diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO 4 2- (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO 2 coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO 4 2- (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals

  8. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  9. Effect of Mica and Hematite (001 Surfaces on the Precipitation of Calcite

    Huifang Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The substrate effect of mica and hematite on the nucleation and crystallization of calcite was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD methods. On mica, we found, in the absence of Mg2+, the substrates’ (001 surfaces with hexagonal and pseudo-hexagonal two-dimensional (2-D structure can affect the orientation of calcite nucleation with calcite (001 ~// mica (001 and calcite (010 ~// mica (010 to be the major interfacial relationship. On hematite, we did not observe frequent twinning relationship between adjacent calcite gains, but often saw preferentially nucleation of calcite at surface steps on hematite substrate. We suggest that calcite crystals initially nucleate from the Ca2+ layers adsorbed on the surfaces. The pseudo-hexagonal symmetry on mica (001 surface also leads to the observed calcite (001 twinning. A second and less common orientation between calcite {104} and mica (001 was detected but could be due to local structure damage of the mica surface. Results in the presence of Mg2+ show that the substrate surfaces can weaken Mg toxicity to calcite nucleation and lead to a higher level of Mg incorporation into calcite lattice.

  10. Fracture calcites at Olkiluoto. Evidence from quaternary infills for palaeohydrogeology

    Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.; Taikina-aho, O.; Karhu, J.; Loefman, J.; Pitkaenen, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.

    2002-02-01

    Recently formed secondary minerals, predominantly calcite, occur in varying amounts as fracture infills, and the calcite types, their chemical compositions and isotope ratios reflect the compositions and physicochemical factors of the groundwater system in which they were formed. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcites give direct evidence of trapping temperatures and past salinities and of the chemical compositions of the palaeo fluids. A wide range of mineralogical and geochemical examinations were carried out within the EQUIP project to examine features of this kind. The fracture calcites at the Olkiluoto site are of various origins and represent several textural types. The exact number of calcite-producing events is unknown, but the duration of the period that was appropriate for the precipitation of low temperature calcite is estimated to have exceeded 1000 Ma. Thus the number of genetically related calcite units is assumed to be considerable. This study was focused on the petrogenesis of calcites crystallized in fractures of high water conductivity during the latest stages of geological evolution. The majority of these late stage calcites form physically homogeneous, scaly layers, and in a few cases thin layers composed of idiomorphic crystals. Chemically these are almost stoichiometric calcites (CaCO 3 ). The MnO content may exceed 1%, while the amounts of other elements present are minor, although the trace element concentrations, particularly those of large ionic trace elements, can be used as distinguishing features for the recognition of individual precipitates representing different calcite generations. Evidence from fluid inclusions, or more correctly from the absence of these in the late stage calcites, can be interpreted as an indication of slow rates of crystallization under cool conditions. Many chemical variables, e.g. oxygen isotope ratios, demonstrate an equilibrium between the latest calcites and water similar to the present groundwater. Older

  11. Fracture calcites at Olkiluoto. Evidence from quaternary infills for palaeohydrogeology

    Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.; Taikina-aho, O. [Kivitieto Oy (Finland); Karhu, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Loefman, J. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Pitkaenen, P. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [TUKES, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    Recently formed secondary minerals, predominantly calcite, occur in varying amounts as fracture infills, and the calcite types, their chemical compositions and isotope ratios reflect the compositions and physicochemical factors of the groundwater system in which they were formed. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcites give direct evidence of trapping temperatures and past salinities and of the chemical compositions of the palaeo fluids. A wide range of mineralogical and geochemical examinations were carried out within the EQUIP project to examine features of this kind. The fracture calcites at the Olkiluoto site are of various origins and represent several textural types. The exact number of calcite-producing events is unknown, but the duration of the period that was appropriate for the precipitation of low temperature calcite is estimated to have exceeded 1000 Ma. Thus the number of genetically related calcite units is assumed to be considerable. This study was focused on the petrogenesis of calcites crystallized in fractures of high water conductivity during the latest stages of geological evolution. The majority of these late stage calcites form physically homogeneous, scaly layers, and in a few cases thin layers composed of idiomorphic crystals. Chemically these are almost stoichiometric calcites (CaCO{sub 3}). The MnO content may exceed 1%, while the amounts of other elements present are minor, although the trace element concentrations, particularly those of large ionic trace elements, can be used as distinguishing features for the recognition of individual precipitates representing different calcite generations. Evidence from fluid inclusions, or more correctly from the absence of these in the late stage calcites, can be interpreted as an indication of slow rates of crystallization under cool conditions. Many chemical variables, e.g. oxygen isotope ratios, demonstrate an equilibrium between the latest calcites and water similar to the present groundwater. Older

  12. High production rate of IBAD-MgO buffered substrate

    Yoshizumi, M., E-mail: myoshizumi@istec.or.j [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, Shinonome 1-10-13, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Fukushima, H.; Yamada, Y.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, Shinonome 1-10-13, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    The conventional IBAD (Ion Beam Assisted Deposition) process using fluorite materials yields low production rates, resulting in high production cost, which reduces the motivation for practical application in spite of its high quality. The IBAD process using rock salt materials, e.g. MgO, is well known as a strong candidate of practical application due to its potential of high production rate and high in-plane grain alignment. In this work, the IBAD-MgO process was investigated for a newly developed architecture of PLD (Pulsed Laser Deposition)-CeO{sub 2}/sputter-LMO (LaMnO{sub 3})/IBAD-MgO/sputter-GZO (Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7})/Hastelloy{sup TM} to make long buffered metal tapes with high properties and a high production rate. The 50 m-long IBAD-MgO substrates with about 4 deg. of DELTAphiCeO{sub 2} in an XRD phi scan could be fabricated repeatedly. A GdBCO (GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}) layer deposited on the buffered substrate showed the minimum I{sub c} value of 325 A/cm-w in a 41 m-long tape. Almost of the tape showed 500-600 A/cm-w of I{sub c} value. The deposition time for the IBAD-MgO layer was 60 s which was about 2 orders of magnitude shorter than the conventional IBAD process. The production rate of 24 m/h was realized at the IBAD-MgO process to fabricate the GdBCO coated conductor with high J{sub c} and I{sub c} properties.

  13. Origin of calcite in the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex

    Nina M. Kortelainen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwaters of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex in southern Finland are characterized by high pH values ranging up to 9.5. These values are significantly higher than those observed in silicate-rich shallow groundwater formations in crystalline bedrock areas. TheVirttaankangas sediments were discovered to contain small amounts of fine grained, dispersed calcite, which has a high tendency to increase the pH of local groundwaters. The primary goal of this study was to determine the mode of occurrence of calcite and to identifyits sources. The mineralogy of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex was studied using material from 21 sediment drill cores. Fine-grained calcite is present in trace amounts (<< 1.4 % in the glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine depositional units of the Virttaankangas complex. The topmost littoral sands were practically devoid of calcite. The isotope records of carbon and oxygen, the angular morphology of the grains and the uniform dispersion of calcite in the complex suggest a clastic origin for calcite, with no evidence for in-situ precipitation. In order to constrain the source of calcite, the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in five calcite samples was compared to the isotopic data from five carbonate rock erratics and eight crystalline bedrock samples from the region. Based on carbon and oxygen isotope ratios and chemical compositions, the dispersed calcite grains of the Virttaankangas complex appear to have been derived from the Mesoproterozoic Satakunta Formation, some 30 km NW from the Virttaankangas area. In sandstone, calcite is predominantly present as diagenetic cement in grain interspaces, concretions and interlayers. The source of detrital calcite was unexpected, as prior to this study the Satakunta sandstone hasnot been known to contain calcite.

  14. A comparison of amorphous calcium carbonate crystallization in aqueous solutions of MgCl2 and MgSO4: implications for paleo-ocean chemistry

    Han, Mei; Zhao, Yanyang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Zuozhen; Yan, Huaxiao; Sun, Bin; Meng, Ruirui; Zhuang, Dingxiang; Li, Dan; Liu, Binwei

    2018-04-01

    Based on the terminology of "aragonite seas" and "calcite seas", whether different Mg sources could affect the mineralogy of carbonate sediments at the same Mg/Ca ratio was explored, which was expected to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. In this work, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was prepared by direct precipitation in anhydrous ethanol and used as a precursor to study crystallization processes in MgSO4 and MgCl2 solutions having different concentrations at 60 °C (reaction times 240 and 2880 min). Based on the morphology of the aragonite crystals, as well as mineral saturation indices and kinetic analysis of geochemical processes, it was found that these crystals formed with a spherulitic texture in 4 steps. First, ACC crystallized into columnar Mg calcite by nearly oriented attachment. Second, the Mg calcite changed from columnar shapes into smooth dumbbell forms. Third, the Mg calcite transformed into rough dumbbell or cauliflower-shaped aragonite forms by local dissolution and precipitation. Finally, the aragonite transformed further into spherulitic radial and irregular aggregate forms. The increase in Ca2+ in the MgSO4 solutions compared with the MgCl2 solutions indicates the fast dissolution and slow precipitation of ACC in the former solutions. The phase transition was more complete in the 0.005 M MgCl2 solution, whereas Mg calcite crystallized from the 0.005 M MgSO4 solution, indicating that Mg calcite could be formed more easily in an MgSO4 solution. Based on these findings, aragonite and Mg calcite relative to ACC could be used to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. Therefore, calcite seas relative to high-Mg calcite could reflect a low concentration MgSO4 paleo-ocean, while aragonite seas could be related to an MgCl2 or high concentration of MgSO4 paleo-ocean.

  15. Hydrogen incorporation in high hole density GaN:Mg

    Zvanut, M. E.; Uprety, Y.; Dashdorj, J.; Moseley, M.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2011-03-01

    We investigate hydrogen passivation in heavily doped p-type GaN using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Samples include both conventionally grown GaN (1019 cm-3 Mg, 1017 cm-3 holes) and films grown by metal modulation epitaxy (MME), which yielded higher Mg (1- 4 x 1020 cm-3) and hole (1- 40 x 1018 cm-3) densities than found in conventionally grown GaN. The Mg acceptor signal is monitored throughout 30 minute annealing steps in N2 :H2 (92%:7%)) and subsequently pure N2 . N2 :H2 heat treatments of the lower hole density films begin to reduce the Mg EPR intensity at 750 o C, but quench the signal in high hole density films at 600 o C. Revival of the signal by subsequent N2 annealing occurs at 800 o C for the low hole density material and 600 o C in MME GaN. The present work highlights chemical differences between heavily Mg doped and lower doped films; however, it is unclear whether the difference is due to changes in hydrogen-Mg complex formation or hydrogen diffusion. The work at UAB is supported by the NSF.

  16. Acidization of shales with calcite cemented fractures

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Szymczak, Piotr; Jarosiński, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of cores drilled from shale formations reveals a relatively large number of calcite-cemented fractures. Usually such fractures are reactivated during fracking and can contribute considerably to the permeability of the resulting fracture network. However, calcite coating on their surfaces effectively excludes them from production. Dissolution of the calcite cement by acidic fluids is investigated numerically with focus on the evolution of fracture morphology. Available surface area, breakthrough time, and reactant penetration length are calculated. Natural fractures in cores from Pomeranian shale formation (northern Poland) were analyzed and classified. Representative fractures are relatively thin (0.1 mm), flat and completely sealed with calcite. Next, the morphology evolution of reactivated natural fractures treated with low-pH fluids has been simulated numerically under various operating conditions. Depth-averaged equations for fracture flow and reactant transport has been solved by finite-difference method coupled with sparse-matrix solver. Transport-limited dissolution has been considered, which corresponds to the treatment with strong acids, such as HCl. Calcite coating in reactivated natural fractures dissolves in a highly non-homogeneous manner - a positive feedback between fluid transport and calcite dissolution leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like patterns, in which most of the flow is focused. The wormholes carry reactive fluids deeper inside the system, which dramatically increases the range of the treatment. Non-uniformity of the dissolution patterns provides a way of retaining the fracture permeability even in the absence of the proppant, since the less dissolved regions will act as supports to keep more dissolved regions open. Evolution of fracture morphology is shown to depend strongly on the thickness of calcite layer - the thicker the coating the more pronounced wormholes are observed. However the interaction between

  17. Surface tension alteration on calcite, induced by ion substitution

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Andersson, Martin Peter; Bechgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of water and organic molecules with mineral surfaces controls many processes in nature and industry. The thermodynamic property, surface tension, is usually determined from the contact angle between phases, but how does one understand the concept of surface tension at the nanoscale...... preferentially as ion pairs at solution-calcite interfaces. Mg2+ incorporation weakens organic molecule adhesion while strengthening water adsorption so Mg2+ substitution renders calcite more water wet. When Mg2+ replaces 10% of surface Ca2+, the contact angle changes dramatically, by 40 to 70, converting...

  18. Intrinsic versus extrinsic controls on the development of calcite dendrite bushes, Shuzhishi Spring, Rehai geothermal area, Tengchong, Yunnan Province, China

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2012-04-01

    In the Rehai geothermal area, located near Tengchong, there is an old succession of crystalline calcite that formed from a spring that is no longer active. The thin-bedded succession, exposed on the south bank of Zaotang River, is formed of three-dimensional dendrite bushes that are up to 6 cm high and 3 cm in diameter with multiple levels of branching. Bedding is defined by color, which ranges from white to gray to almost black and locally accentuated by differential weathering that highlights the branching motif of the dendrites. The succession developed through repeated tripartite growth cycles that involved: Phase I that was characterized by rapid vertical growth of the dendrite bushes with ever-increasing branching; Phase II that developed once growth of the dendrites had almost or totally ceased, and involved an initial phase of etching that was followed by the precipitation of various secondary minerals (sheet calcite, trigonal calcite crystals, hexagonal calcite crystals, hexagonal plates formed of Ca and P, Mn precipitates, Si-Mg reticulate coatings, opal-CT lepispheres) on the branches of the calcite dendrites, and Phase III that involved deposition of detrital quartz, feldspar, clay, and calcite on top of the dendrite bushes. The tripartite growth cycle is attributed primarily to aperiodic cycles in the CO2 content of the spring water that was controlled by subsurface igneous activity rather than climatic controls. High CO2 coupled with rapid CO2 degassing triggered growth of the dendrite bushes. As CO2 levels waned, saturation levels in the spring water decreased and calcite dendrite growth ceased and precipitation of the secondary minerals took place, possibly in the microcosms of microbial mats. Deposition of the detrital sediment was probably related to surface runoff that was triggered by periods of high rainfall. Critically, this study shows that intrinsic factors rather than extrinsic factors (e.g., climate) were the prime control on the

  19. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03 Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  1. Arsenic uptake in bacterial calcite

    Catelani, Tiziano; Perito, Brunella; Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Fenter, Paul; Newville, Matthew G.; Rimondi, Valentina; Pratesi, Giovanni; Costagliola, Pilario

    2018-02-01

    Bio-mediated processes for arsenic (As) uptake in calcite were investigated by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The environmental bacterial strain Bacillus licheniformis BD5, sampled at the Bullicame Hot Springs (Viterbo, Central Italy), was used to synthesize calcite from As-enriched growth media. Both liquid and solid cultures were applied to simulate planktonic and biofilm community environments, respectively. Bacterial calcite samples cultured in liquid media had an As enrichment factor (Kd) 50 times higher than that from solid media. The XRD analysis revealed an elongation of the crystal lattice along the c axis (by 0.03Å) for biogenic calcite, which likely resulted from the substitution of larger arsenate for carbonate in the crystal. The XAS data also showed a clear difference in the oxidation state of sorbed As between bacterial and abiotic calcite. Abiotic chemical processes yielded predominantly As(V) uptake whereas bacterial precipitation processes led to the uptake of both As(III) and As(V). The presence of As(III) in bacterial calcite is proposed to result from subsequent reduction of arsenate to arsenite by bacterial activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of the incorporation of As(III) in the calcite crystal lattice, revealing a critical role of biochemical processes for the As cycling in nature.

  2. Genesis of Cenozoic intraplate high Mg# andesites in Northeast China

    Liu, J. Q.; Chen, L. H.; Zhong, Y.; Wang, X. J.

    2017-12-01

    High-Mg# andesites (HMAs) are usually generated in the converged plate boundary and have genetic relationships with slab subduction. However, it still remained controversial about the origin of those HMAs erupted in the intra-plate setting. Here we present major, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions for the Cenozoic intra-plate HMAs from Northeast China to constrain their origin and formation process. Cenozoic Xunke volcanic rocks are located in the northern Lesser Khingan Range, covering an area of about 3, 000 km2. These volcanic rocks are mainly basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite, with only several classified as trachyandesite and andesites. They have high SiO2 contents (54.3-57.4 wt%) and Mg# (49.6-57.8), falling into the scope of high Mg# andesites. The Xunke HMAs are enriched in large ion lithophile elements but depleted in high field strength elements, with positive Ba, K, Sr and negative Zr-Hf, and Ti anomalies. Their trace element absolute concentrations are between those of potassic basalts and Wuchagou HMAs. The Xunke HMAs have relatively enriched Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes (87Sr/86Sr = 0.705398-0.705764, ɛNd=-8.8-3.8, ɛHf=0.5-11.7), and low radiogenic Pb isotopes (206Pb/204Pb = 16.701-17.198), towards to the EM1 end-member, which indicates that they are ultimately derived from ancient, recycled crustal components. Primitive silica-rich melts were generated from higher degrees of partial melting of recycled crustal materials (relative to potassic basalts) and then interacted with the peridotite to produce the Xunke HMAs.

  3. Mineralogical-Chemical Characteristics of Calcite from Zletovo, Sasa and Buchim Deposits

    Shijakova-lvanova, Tena; Paneva-Zajkova, Vesna; Donova, Ilinka

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents mineralogical-chemical characteristics, dependence between some elements and concentration of some calcite elements of Zletovo, Sasa and Buchim deposits. Calcite from Sasa, Zletovo and Buchim occurs in rhombohedral crystals of different size. The colour is white, but in Buchim it is white, pink, and yellow. Their twinning is very common. Chemical composition of calcite was determined by AES-ICP. Results show that in calcite from Buchim the concentration of Ba is much higher in pink calcite from than in white or yellow. The concentration of Zn and Ph is the lowest in white calcite. The calcite from Zletovo contains much higher concentrations of Pb, Zn, Sr, but calcite of Buchim which is pink contains higher amounts of Ba and Co. The concentrations of CaO, MgO, and MnO in all calcite simples are approximately equal. Concentration of all other elements in calcite of Sasa, Zletovo and Buchim is approximately equal. TG and DTA curves out on all simples were recorded.The decompositions of the samples of calcite starts at different temperature and it is not finish until 1000 o C. (Author)

  4. Utilization of calcite produced in Turkey for paper coating

    Hüdaverdi Eroğlu

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is one of the coating pigments widely used in paper industry. Especially, in recent years calcium carbonate filler has gained high importance in alkaline pulping. In Turkey industry actually imports calcium carbonate; whereas, there are rich calcite reservoirs in the country. In this study two different types of domestic ground (GCC calcite samples were used. Physical and chemical properties of calcite samples were tested firstly. CaCO3 percentages of both samples were 97.3 % and 97.6 % (min. 95 % CaCO3. MgCO3 and Fe2O3 percentages were within the desired limits. Brightness values were 95.5 % and 94.5 % and yellowness 1.1 % and 1.5 % elrepho. These values also were within the requested limits. Under 2 microns particle size and over 10 microns particle size fractions were 95 % and 89 % (min. 80 and 1 % and 2 % (max. 2 respectively. Dry matter rates were between 40 %-65 %, for the pilot plant-coating machine. During the preparation of coating color calcium carbonate has been used together with kaolin. The ratios of calcium carbonate to kaolin were 30/70, 40/60, 50/50, 60/40, 70/30, 100/0. In coating color preparation latex was used as a binder because of its wide applications. Latex percentages were 11, 12, and 13 %. Coated papers were glossed and physically tested. As a result, both calcium carbonate samples were found suitable for using in coating color preparation. By the utilization of domestic calcium carbonate in coated paper production, there will be foreign currencies saving.

  5. Coprecipitation of cadmium with calcite

    Fujino, Osamu; Kumagai, Tetsu; Shigematsu, Tsunenobu; Matsui, Masakazu

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of cadmium between precipitates of calcite and saturated aqueous solution was measured at 25 0 C to understand the distribution of cadmium in the bivalves. Calcite was precipitated from calcium bicarbonate solution by the gradual release of carbon dioxide. The cadmium ions were coprecipitated in calcite, obeying the logarithmic distribution law. The apparent distribution coefficient was decreased as α, α'-dipyridyl increased, but the true distribution coefficient was found to be an almost constant value, 560. This value is fairly close to the ratio of solubility product constants K sub(calcite)/K sub(CdCO 3 ), 890. This suggests that the deviation of the present solid solution from ideality is not very large. (auth.)

  6. Evolution and the Calcite Eye Lens

    Williams, Vernon L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcite is a uniaxial, birefringent crystal, which in its optically transparent form, has been used for animal eye lenses, the trilobite being one such animal. Because of the calcite birefringence there is a difficulty in using calcite as a lens. When the propagation direction of incoming light is not exactly on the c-axis, the mages blur. In this paper, calcite blurring is evaluated, and the non-blurring by a crystallin eye lens is compared to a calcite one.

  7. MgB2 and Mg1-xAlxB2 single crystals: high pressure growth and physical properties

    Karpinski, J.; Kazakov, S.M.; Jun, J.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Angst, M.; Puzniak, R.; Wisniewski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Single crystals of MgB 2 have been grown with a high pressure cubic anvil technique. They grow via the peritectic decomposition of the MgNB 9 ternary nitride. The crystals are of a size up to 2 x 1 x 0.1 mm 3 with a weight up to 230 μg. Typically they have transition temperatures between 38 and 38.6 K with a width of 0.3-0.5 K. Investigations of the P-T phase diagram prove that the MgB 2 phase is stable at least up to 2190 deg. C at high hydrostatic pressure in the presence of Mg vapor under high pressure. Substitution of aluminum for magnesium in single crystals leads to stepwise decrease of T c . This indicates a possible appearance of superstructures or phases with different T c 's. The upper critical field decreases with Al doping

  8. Strontium Incorporation into Calcite Generated by Bacterial Ureolysis

    Yoshiko Fujita; George D. Redden; Jani C. Ingram; Marnie M. Cortez; Robert W. Smith

    2004-01-01

    Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolysis was investigated as part of an assessment of a proposed remediation approach for 90Sr contamination in groundwater. Urea hydrolysis produces ammonium and carbonate and elevates pH, resulting in the promotion of calcium carbonate precipitation. Urea hydrolysis by the bacterium Bacillus pasteurii in a medium designed to mimic the chemistry of the Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho resulted in a pH rise from 7.5 to 9.1. Measured average distribution coefficients (DEX) for Sr in the calcite produced by ureolysis (0.5) were up to an order of magnitude higher than values reported in the literature for natural and synthetic calcites (0.02-0.4). They were also higher than values for calcite produced abiotically by ammonium carbonate addition (0.3). The precipitation of calcite in these experiments was verified by X-ray diffraction. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) depth profiling (up to 350 nm) suggested that the Sr was not merely sorbed on the surface, but was present at depth within the particles. X-ray absorption near edge spectra showed that Sr was present in the calcite samples as a solid solution. The extent of Sr incorporation appeared to be driven primarily by the overall rate of calcite precipitation, where faster precipitation was associated with greater Sr uptake into the solid. The presence of bacterial surfaces as potential nucleation sites in the ammonium carbonate precipitation treatment did not enhance overall precipitation or the Sr distribution coefficient. Because bacterial ureolysis can generate high rates of calcite precipitation, the application of this approach is promising for remediation of 90Sr contamination in environments where calcite is stable over the long term

  9. The influence of solution composition and grain boundaries on the replacement of calcite by dolomite

    Moraila Martinez, Teresita de Jesus; Putnis, Christine V.; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    microreactors during reactive fluid flow: experimental dolomitization of a calcite marble. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. 168:1045. 2. Jonas L., Müller T., Dohmen R., Baumgartner L., Putlitz B. (2015). Transport-controlled hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates. Geology. doi:10.1130/G36934.1 3. Kaczmarek S.E., Sibley D.F., (2011). On the evolution of dolomite stoichiometry and cation order during high-temperature synthesis experiments: An alternative model for geochemical evolution of natural dolomites. Sedimentary Geology. 246, 30-40.

  10. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface

    Pasarín, I. S.; Yang, M.; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2012-01-01

    To produce biominerals, such as shells, bones, and teeth, living beings create organic compounds that control the growth of the solid phase. Investigating the atomic scale behavior of individual functional groups at the mineral-fluid interface provides fundamental information that is useful...... for constructing accurate predictive models for natural systems. Previous investigations of the activity of coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAP) on calcite, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [ Henriksen, K., Young, J. R., Bown, P. R., and Stipp, S. L. S.Palentology 2004, 43 (Part 3), 725...... dynamics (MD) simulations, the structuring on calcite of a layer of the simplest carbon chain molecule that contains an OH group, ethanol (CH 3-CH2-OH). We found evidence that EtOH forms a highly ordered structure at the calcite surface, where the first layer molecules bond with calcite. The ethanol...

  11. Biocementation of Concrete Pavements Using Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation.

    Jeong, Jin-Hoon; Jo, Yoon-Soo; Park, Chang-Seon; Kang, Chang-Ho; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-07-28

    In this study, the feasibility of introducing calcite-forming bacteria into concrete pavements to improve their mechanical performance was investigated. Lysinibacillus sphaericus WJ-8, which was isolated in a previous study and is capable of exhibiting high urease activity and calcite production, was used. When analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, WJ-8 showed a significant amount of calcite precipitation. The compressive strength of cement mortar mixed with WJ-8 cells and nutrient medium (urea with calcium lactate) increased by 10% compared with that of the controls. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the increase in strength was due to the calcite formed by the WJ-8 cells.

  12. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    Belova, Dina Alexandrovna; Lakshtanov, Leonid; Carneiro, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite...... = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts...... of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface....

  13. Environmental controls for the precipitation of different fibrous calcite cement fabrics

    Ritter, Ann-Christine; Wiethoff, Felix; Neuser, Rolf D.; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Abiogenic calcite cements are widely used as climate archives. They can yield information on environmental change and climate dynamics at the time when the sediment was lithified in a (marine) diagenetic environment. Radiaxial-fibrous (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous (FOFC) calcite cements are two very common and similar pore-filling cement fabrics in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic carbonate rocks (Richter et al., 2011) and in Holocene Mg-calcitic speleothems (Richter et al., 2015). Both fabrics are characterised by distinct crystallographic properties. Current research has shown that these fabrics are often underexplored and that a careful combination of conservative and innovative proxies allows for a better applicability of these carbonate archives to paleoenvironmental reconstructions (Ritter et al., 2015). A main uncertainty in this context is that it is still poorly understood which parameters lead to the formation of either RFC or FOFC and if differential crystallographic parameters affect proxy data from these fabrics. This study aims at a better understanding of the environmental factors that may control either RFC or FOFC precipitation. Therefore, suitable samples (a stalagmite and a Triassic marine cement succession), each with clearly differentiable layers of RFC and FOFC, were identified and analysed in high detail using a multi-proxy approach. Detailed thin section and cathodoluminescence analysis of the samples allowed for a precise identification of layers consisting solely of either RFC or FOFC. Isotopic (δ13C, δ18O) as well as trace elemental compositions have been determined and the comparison of data obtained from these different carbonate archives sheds light on changes in environmental parameters during RFC or FOFC precipitation. References: Richter, D.K., et al., 2011. Radiaxial-fibrous calcites: A new look at an old problem. Sedimentary Geology, 239, 26-36 Richter, D.K., et al., 2015. Radiaxial-fibrous and fascicular-optic Mg-calcitic cave

  14. High-Resolution Mg/Ca Ratios in a Coralline Red Alga as a Proxy for Bering Sea Temperature Variations and Teleconnections

    Halfar, J.; Steffen, H.; Kronz, A.; Steneck, R. S.; Adey, W.; Lebednik, P. A.

    2009-05-01

    We present the first continuous high-resolution record of Mg/Ca variations within an encrusting coralline red alga of the species Clathromorphum nereostratum from Amchitka Island, Aleutian Islands. Mg/Ca ratios of individual growth increments were analyzed by measuring a single point electron microprobe transect yielding a resolution of 15 samples/year on average, generating a continuous record from 1830 to 1967 of algal Mg/Ca variations. Results show that Mg/Ca ratios in the high-Mg calcite skeleton display pronounced annual cyclicity and archive late spring to late fall sea surface temperature (SST) corresponding to the main season of algal growth. Mg/Ca values correlate well to local SST (ERSSTJun-Nov, 1902-1967; r = 0.73 for 5-year mean), as well as to an air temperature record from the same region. Our data correlate well to a shorter Mg/Ca record from a second site, corroborating the ability of the alga to reliably record regional environmental signals. In addition, Mg/Ca ratios relate well to a 29-year stable oxygen isotope time series measured on the same sample, which provides additional support for the use of Mg as a paleotemperature proxy in coralline red algae, that is, unlike stable oxygen isotopes, not influenced by salinity fluctuations. High spatial correlation to large-scale SST variability in the North Pacific is observed, with patterns of strongest correlation following the direction of major oceanographic features (i.e., the signature of the Alaska Current and the Alaskan Stream), which play a key role in the exchange of water masses between the North Pacific and the Bering Sea through Aleutian Island passages. The time series further displays significant teleconnections with the signature of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in the northeast Pacific and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation.

  15. Distribution of Minor Elements in Calcite From the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Marshall, B. D.; Whelan, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Calcite is sporadically distributed in fractures and cavities in the volcanic rocks that form the 500- to 700-m-thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Previous work has shown that the calcite precipitated from water moving downward through the unsaturated zone since the volcanic rocks were emplaced approximately 13 Ma. Calcite thus serves as a proxy for the chemistry and amounts of past percolation, two parameters that are important in predictions of the future behavior of the potential radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Latest calcite, which began forming between approximately 5 and 2 Ma, typically displays fine-scale growth zoning defined by distributions of Mn (inferred from cathodoluminescence), Mg, and Sr. Electron microprobe (EPMA) mapping of outermost calcite reveals Mg growth zoning1 and higher overall concentrations of Mg in late calcite than in older calcite. Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) maps were obtained by slow rastering of the samples over a 100-watt X-ray source collimated through a final aperture of 100 μ m. Although the spatial resolution of the micro-XRF mapping is much less than that of EPMA, this technique reveals distributions of some elements to which EPMA is less sensitive. Micro-XRF maps show that Sr is spatially correlated with Mg; Sr concentrations range to 500 μ g/g at the resolution of the 100-μ m collimator. Because both Mg and Sr have similar calcite-water distribution coefficients much less than one, the Mg/Sr in calcite reflects the Mg/Sr of the water that precipitated the calcite. The distribution coefficient for Mn is greater than one and variations in Mn are not correlated with Mg and Sr. Covariation of Mg and Sr in the percolating water may be explained by reactions that affect the rate of uptake of chemical constituents from the overlying rock and soil, and/or evaporation. Late calcite has lower δ 13C values, probably due to a regional change from wetter to drier climate conditions. The higher Mg and

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  17. Interactions between cadmium and calcite

    van der Weijden, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis is composed of five chapters, some of which have been published or have been accepted for publication. The contents in some of the chapters may therefore slightly overlap, also because the subjects are closely related. The first two chapters focus mostly on the sorption of Cd on calcite,

  18. Effect of different seawater Mg

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium, incorporated in foraminiferal calcite (Mg/CaCC), is used intensively to reconstruct past seawater temperatures but, in addition to temperature, the Mg/CaCC of foraminiferal tests also depends on the ratio of Mg and Ca in seawater (Mg/CaSW). The physiological mechanisms responsible for

  19. High surface hole concentration p-type GaN using Mg implantation

    Long Tao; Yang Zhijian; Zhang Guoyi

    2001-01-01

    Mg ions were implanted on Mg-doped GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The p-type GaN was achieved with high hole concentration (8.28 x 10 17 cm -3 ) conformed by Van derpauw Hall measurement after annealing at 800 degree C for 1 h. this is the first experimental report of Mg implantation on Mg-doped GaN and achieving p-type GaN with high surface hole concentration

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of thin sputtered MgB2 films on MgO substrates in high magnetic fields

    Savio Fabretti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the magnetic anisotropy ratio of thin sputtered polycrystalline MgB2 films on MgO substrates. Using high magnetic field measurements, we estimated an anisotropy ratio of 1.35 for T = 0 K with an upper critical field of 31.74 T in the parallel case and 23.5 T in the perpendicular case. Direct measurements of a magnetic-field sweep at 4.2 K show a linear behavior, confirmed by a linear fit for magnetic fields perpendicular to the film plane. Furthermore, we observed a change of up to 12% of the anisotropy ratio in dependence of the film thickness.

  1. Biotic control of skeletal growth by scleractinian corals in aragonite-calcite seas.

    Tomihiko Higuchi

    Full Text Available Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas.

  2. Study of reverse flotation of calcite from scheelite in acidic media

    Deng, Rongdong; Huang, Yuqing; Hu, Yuan; Ku, Jiangang; Zuo, Weiran; Yin, Wanzhong

    2018-05-01

    A new coated-reactive reverse flotation method based on the generation of CO2 bubbles at a calcite surface in acidic solution was used to separate calcite from scheelite. The dissolution kinetics of coated and uncoated calcite were studied in sulfuric acid. The CO2 bubbles generated on the uncoated calcite particle surface are enough to float the particle. However, most of these bubbles left the surface quickly, preventing calcite from floating. Here, a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol polymer and sodium dodecyl sulfonate was used to coat the mineral particles and form a stable membrane, resulting in the formation of a stable foam layer on the calcite surface. After the calcite is coated, the generated bubbles could be successfully captured on the calcite surface, and calcite particles could float to the air-water interface and remain there for more than one hour. Flotation tests indicated that a high-quality tungsten concentrate with a grade of more than 75% and a recovery of more than 99% could be achieved when the particle size was between 0.3 and 1.5 mm. The present results provide theoretical support for the development of a highly efficient flotation separation for carbonate minerals.

  3. Highly Resolved Mg/Ca Depth Profiles of Planktic Foraminifer test Walls Using Single shot Measurements of fs-LA-ICPMS

    Jochum, K. P.; Schiebel, R.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Haug, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Foraminifers are sensitive archives of changes in climate and marine environment. It has been shown that the Mg/Ca signal is a suitable proxy of seawater temperature, because the incorporation of Mg depends on ambient water temperature. In contrast to most former studies, where this ratio is determined by solution-based bulk analysis of 20 - 30 specimens, we have investigated Mg/Ca in single specimens and single chambers at high resolution. A new fs-200 nm-LA-ICPMS technique was developed for the µm-sized layered calcite shells. To generate depth profiles with a resolution of about 50 nm/shot, we chose a low fluence of about 0.3 Jcm-2 and performed single shot measurements of the double charged 44Ca++ and the single charged 25Mg+ ions together. Precision (RSD) of the Mg/Ca data is about 5 %. Calibration was performed with the carbonate reference material MACS-3 from the USGS. Our results for different species from the Arabian Sea and Caribbean Sea demonstrate that Mg/Ca of different chambers vary and indicate that the foraminifer individuals built their chambers in different water depths and/or experienced seasonal changes in seawater temperature caused, for example, by upwelling (cold) versus stratified (warm) conditions. Typically, the Mg/Ca ratios of the final two chambers of the planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii from a sediment core of the Arabian Sea differ by about 5 mmol/mol from earlier chambers (2 mmol/mol) corresponding to seawater temperatures of 28 °C and 18 °C, respectively. In addition, mass fractions of other elements like Sr, Mn, Fe, Ba, and U have been determined with fs-LA-ICPMS using fast line scans, and thus provide further insights in the ecology of foraminifers.

  4. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  5. Magnesian calcite and the problem of the origin of carbonates in the deep-sea Old Black Sea sediments

    Georgiev, V M

    1988-04-01

    The Old Black Sea (Lower-Middle Holocene) deep-sea sediments in the Black Sea basin contain carbonate laminae with a fixed position in the section - in the base of the typical sapropelic muds. The areal distribution of these laminae covers the whole continental slope and rise. They are usually lacking in the sediments of the abyssal plain. XRD, SEM and EDS studies show that the laminae comprise mainly authigenic carbonates - aragonite and magnesian calcite. Aragonite occurs as elongated rice-shaped monocrystals or as diverse aggregates of elongated crystal platelets. The magnesian calcite (6-14 mol % MgCO/sub 3/) forms aggregates of isometric grains with submicritic dimensions between the aragonite grains or individual laminae consisting of idiomorphic rhombohedral and/or skeleton crystals. Low-magnesian calcite is also found sometimes. Usually it is related to Holocene coccoliths without traces of recrystallization. The laminae do not show traces of lithification. A hemogenic-synsedimentary genesis of the carbonate laminae is suggested; their mineral composition witnesses marine chemical composition of the initial solutions with a high Mg/Ca ratio.

  6. Preparation of high quality superconducting thin MgB2 films for electronics

    Surdu, Andrei; Zdravkov, Vladimir; Sidorenko, Anatolie; Rossolenko, Anna; Ryazanov, Valerii; Bdikin, Igor; Kroemer, Oliver; Nold, Eberhard; Koch, Thomas; Schimmel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report the growth of high-Tc MgB 2 smooth films which are prepared in a two-step process: 1) deposition of the precursor films and 2) their annealing in Mg vapor with a specially designed, reusable reactor. Our method opens perspectives for the use of MgB 2 films in microelectronics, especially for high-frequency applications. (authors)

  7. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    Andersson, M. P.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3- CO32- + H+, when HCO3- is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80-100 atoms) to represent the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from -6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 < pH < 6.35, where H2CO30 is the dominant dissolved species. When bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution, 10.35. This means that adsorbed carbonate is stable even when the concentration of dissolved CO32- is several orders of magnitude lower. This has a significant effect on surface charge and thus the behaviour of the calcite surface. Our results help explain the potential determining behaviour of the carbonate species in calcite-water systems, particularly in the pH range where the bicarbonate species dominates in water and where the carbonate species dominates at the surface, i.e. when 7.5 < pH < 10.35. Our atomic scale data for the various calcite surface sites provide the needed input to improve and constrain surface complexation modelling and are especially useful for predicting behaviour in systems where experiments are difficult or impossible, such as at high temperature and pressure.

  8. The effect of Si on precipitation in Al–Cu–Mg alloy with a high Cu/Mg ratio

    Liu, L.; Chen, J.H.; Wang, S.B.; Liu, C.H.; Yang, S.S.; Wu, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    The precipitations in an Al–5.0Cu–0.3Mg (wt%) alloy and an Al–5.0Cu–0.3Mg–0.3Si (wt%) alloy have been systematically investigated by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to clarify the effect of Si addition. The nucleation and growth process of θ′ (Al 2 Cu) phase in Si-containing alloy during isothermal ageing at 180 °C is revealed in detail. The formation of Q″-type precipitates, on which the θ′ precursors nucleate heterogeneously, contributes to the considerable increase in the ageing kinetics and higher strength at the early ageing stage. The thickening of the θ′ precipitate is largely confined due to the rather small size of fine Q″-type precipitate. As a result, a large proportion of θ′ phase precipitates possess a specific thickness of 2c θ′ and change slightly during the entire observed duration of ageing. The θ′ growth mechanism distinct from the Al–Cu–Mg alloy finally leads to a refined θ′ morphology regarding the thickness and aspect ratio (diameter/thickness). As is counterintuitive, the θ′ precipitate thickness distribution is demonstrated to have little effect on the mechanical property steadiness at the late ageing stage of the Al–Cu–Mg–(Si) alloys

  9. Oxidation characteristics of MgF2 in air at high temperature

    Chen, H. K.; Jie, Y. Y.; Chang, L.

    2017-02-01

    High temperature oxidation properties of MgF2 in air were studied. The changes of phase composition, macro surface morphology, weight and elemental composition of MgF2 samples with temperature were investigated by using XRD, EDS and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the oxidation reaction of MgF2 converted to MgO occurred at high temperature, and the reaction was accelerated by the increase of temperature and the presence of impurities. This result clarifies the understanding of the high temperature oxidation behavior of MgF2 in air, and provides a theoretical basis for the reasonable application of MgF2 in optical coating materials, electronic ceramic materials and magnesium melt protection.

  10. First-principle Calculations of Mechanical Properties of Al2Cu, Al2CuMg and MgZn2 Intermetallics in High Strength Aluminum Alloys

    LIAO Fei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural stabilities, mechanical properties and electronic structures of Al2Cu, Al2CuMg and MgZn2 intermetallics in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu aluminum alloys were determined from the first-principle calculations by VASP based on the density functional theory. The results show that the cohesive energy (Ecoh decreases in the order MgZn2 > Al2CuMg > Al2Cu, whereas the formation enthalpy (ΔH decreases in the order MgZn2 > Al2Cu > Al2CuMg. Al2Cu can act as a strengthening phase for its ductile and high Young's modulus. The Al2CuMg phase exhibits elastic anisotropy and may act as a crack initiation point. MgZn2 has good plasticity and low melting point, which is the main strengthening phase in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu aluminum alloys. Metallic bonding mode coexists with a fractional ionic interaction in Al2Cu, Al2CuMg and MgZn2, and that improves the structural stability. In order to improve the alloys' performance further, the generation of MgZn2 phase should be promoted by increasing Zn content while Mg and Cu contents are decreased properly.

  11. High surface hole concentration p-type GaN using Mg implantation

    Long Tao; Zhang Guo Yi

    2001-01-01

    Mg ions were implanted on Mg-doped GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The p-type GaN was achieved with high hole concentration (8.28 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 3) conformed by Van derpauw Hall measurement after annealing at 800 degree C for 1 h. this is the first experimental report of Mg implantation on Mg-doped GaN and achieving p-type GaN with high surface hole concentration

  12. Synthesis of high surface area spinel-type MgAl2O4 nanoparticles by

    68

    Spinel-type magnesium aluminate, MgAl2O4, is an effective refractory ceramic for ... such as good mechanical strength at high temperatures, high resistance to ... Materials. The starting chemicals with laboratory grade purity were provided ...

  13. High Temperature Properties and Recent Research Trend of Mg-RE Alloys

    Nam, Soo Woo [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    For the applications in automotive, aircraft, aerospace, and electronic industries, the lightest structural Mg alloys have received much attention since 2000. There has been some progress for the improvement of the mechanical properties such as room temperature strength, formability and mechanical anisotropy. However, the high temperature strength of Mg alloys is very low to be used for the parts and structures of high temperature conditions. For the last decade, considerable efforts are concentrated for the development of Mg alloys to be used at high temperature. Newly developing Mg-RE alloys are the good examples for the high temperature use. In this regard, this review paper introduces the recent research trends for the development of Mg-RE alloys strengthened with some precipitates and the long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures related RE elements.

  14. High Temperature Properties and Recent Research Trend of Mg-RE Alloys

    Nam, Soo Woo

    2017-01-01

    For the applications in automotive, aircraft, aerospace, and electronic industries, the lightest structural Mg alloys have received much attention since 2000. There has been some progress for the improvement of the mechanical properties such as room temperature strength, formability and mechanical anisotropy. However, the high temperature strength of Mg alloys is very low to be used for the parts and structures of high temperature conditions. For the last decade, considerable efforts are concentrated for the development of Mg alloys to be used at high temperature. Newly developing Mg-RE alloys are the good examples for the high temperature use. In this regard, this review paper introduces the recent research trends for the development of Mg-RE alloys strengthened with some precipitates and the long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures related RE elements.

  15. Synthesis of high-surface-area spinel-type MgAl2O4 nanoparticles ...

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 1. Synthesis of high-surface-area spinel-type MgAl 2 O 4 nanoparticles by [Al(sal) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2 [Mg(dipic) 2 ] and [Mg(H 2 O) 6 ][Al(ox) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2 ·5H 2 O: influence of inorganic precursor type. Volume 40 Issue 1 February 2017 pp 45-53 ...

  16. Cretaceous joints in southeastern Canada: dating calcite-filled fractures

    Schneider, David; Spalding, Jennifer; Gautheron, Cécile; Sarda, Philippe; Davis, Donald; Petts, Duane

    2017-04-01

    To resolve the timing of brittle tectonism is a challenge since the classical chronometers required for analyses are not often in equilibrium with the surrounding material or simply absent. In this study, we propose to couple LA-ICP-MS U-Pb and (U-Th)/He dating with geochemical proxies in vein calcite to tackle this dilemma. We examined intracratonic Middle Ordovician limestone bedrock that overlies Mesoproterozoic crystalline basement, which are cut by NE-trending fault zones that have historic M4-5 earthquakes along their trace. E-W to NE-SW vertical joint sets, the relatively youngest stress recorded in the bedrock, possess 1-7 mm thick calcite veins that seal fractures or coat fracture surfaces. The veins possess intragranular calcite that are lined with fine-grained calcite along the vein margin and can exhibit µm- to mm-scale offset (e.g. displaced fossil fragments in host rock). Calcite d18O and d13C values are analogous to the bulk composition of Middle to Late Ordovician limestones, and suggest vein formation from a source dominated by connate fluids. The calcite contain trails of fluid inclusions commonly along fractures, and 3He/4He analyses indicate a primitive, deep fluid signature (R/Ra: 0.5-2.7). Trace element geochemistry of the calcite is highly variable, generally following the elevated HREE and lower LREE of continental crust trends but individual crystals from a single vein may vary by three orders of magnitude. LA-ICP-MS geochemical traverse across veins show elevated concentrations along (sub)grain boundaries and the vein-host rock contact. Despite abundant helium concentrations, (U-Th)/He dating was unsuccessful yielding highly dispersed dates likely from excess helium derived from the fluid inclusions. However, LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating on calcite separated from the veins yielded model ages of 110.7 ± 6.8 Ma (MSWD: 0.53; n: 16) to 81.4 ± 8.3 Ma (MSWD: 2.6; n: 17). Since all veins are from the same ENE-trend, we regressed all the calcite dates

  17. The impact of Mg contents on Sr partitioning in benthic foraminifers

    Mewes, Antje; Langer, Gerald; Reichart, Gert Jan; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, Gernot; Bijma, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Foraminiferal calcite Mg/Ca (Mg/CaCC) is used in paleoceanographic studies to reconstruct temperature. Furthermore, the Mg/CaCC is influenced by different seawater Mg/Ca (Mg/CaSW). Foraminiferal calcite Sr/Ca (Sr/CaCC) can potentially be used to reconstruct Sr/Ca ratios of seawater (Sr/CaSW). As

  18. The inclusions of Mg-B (MgB12?) as potential pinning centres in high-pressure-high-temperature-synthesized or sintered magnesium diboride

    Prikhna, T A; Gawalek, W; Savchuk, Ya M; Habisreuther, T; Wendt, M; Sergienko, N V; Moshchil, V E; Nagorny, P; Schmidt, Ch; Dellith, J; Dittrich, U; Litzkendorf, D; Melnikov, V S; Sverdun, V B

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study of the structure and superconductive characteristics of high-pressure-high-temperature (2 GPa, 700-1000 deg. C )-synthesized and sintered MgB 2 without additions from different initial powders was performed. Among various secondary phases Mg-B inclusions with a stoichiometry close to MgB 12 were identified. With an increasing amount of these inclusions the critical current density increased. So these inclusions can be feasible pinning centres in MgB 2 . The highest j c values in zero field were 1300 kA cm -2 at 10 K, 780 kA cm -2 at 20 K and 62 kA cm -2 at 35 K and in 1 T field were 1200 kA cm -2 at 10 K, 515 kA cm -2 at 20 K and 0.1 kA cm -2 at 35 K for high-pressure-synthesized magnesium diboride and the field of irreversibility at 20 K reached 8 T. The average grain sizes calculated from x-ray examinations in materials having high j c were 15-37 nm

  19. Relationships Between Temperature, pH, and Crusting on Mg/Ca Ratios in Laboratory-Grown Neogloboquadrina Foraminifera

    Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Hill, Tessa M.; Russell, Ann D.; Spero, Howard J.

    2017-11-01

    Mg/Ca ratio paleothermometry in foraminifera is an important tool for the reconstruction and interpretation of past environments. However, existing Mg/Ca:temperature relationships for planktic species inhabiting middle- and high-latitude environments are limited by a lack of information about the development and impact of low-Mg/Ca ratio "crusts" and the influence of the carbonate system on Mg/Ca ratios in these groups. To address this, we cultured individual specimens of Neogloboquadrina incompta and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in seawater across a range of temperature (6°-12°C) and pH (7.4-8.2). We found by laser ablation inductively couple mass spectrometry analyses of shells that culture-grown crust calcite in N. incompta had a lower Mg/Ca ratio than ontogenetic calcite formed at the same temperature, suggesting that temperature is not responsible for the low-Mg/Ca ratio of neogloboquadrinid crusts. The Mg/Ca:temperature relationship for ontogenetic calcite in N. incompta was consistent with the previously published culture-based relationship, and no significant relationship was found between Mg/Ca ratios and pH in this species. However, the Mg/Ca ratio in laboratory-cultured N. pachyderma was much higher than that reported in previous core top and sediment trap samples, due to lack of crust formation in culture. Application of our ontogenetic calcite-specific Mg/Ca:temperature relationships to fossil N. pachyderma and N. incompta from five intervals in cores from the Santa Barbara Basin and the Bering Sea shows that excluding crust calcite in fossil specimens may improve Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates.

  20. Formation of nanocrystalline MgB sub 2 under high pressure

    Sun, L; Kikegawa, T; Cao, L; Zhan, Z; Wu, Q; Wu, X; Wang, W

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural features of MgB sub 2 at ambient pressure and high pressure have been investigated by means of in situ synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The x-ray diffraction measurements indicated that nanocrystalline MgB sub 2 formed in the pressure range of 26.3-30.2 GPa. TEM investigations reveal complex structure domains with evident lattice distortion in the relevant samples. The superconductivity of nanocrystalline MgB sub 2 was measured and compared with that of the starting sample of MgB sub 2.

  1. Surface Complexation Modeling of Calcite Zeta Potential Measurement in Mixed Brines for Carbonate Wettability Characterization

    Song, J.; Zeng, Y.; Biswal, S. L.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    We presents zeta potential measurements and surface complexation modeling (SCM) of synthetic calcite in various conditions. The systematic zeta potential measurement and the proposed SCM provide insight into the role of four potential determining cations (Mg2+, SO42- , Ca2+ and CO32-) and CO2 partial pressure in calcite surface charge formation and facilitate the revealing of calcite wettability alteration induced by brines with designed ionic composition ("smart water"). Brines with varying potential determining ions (PDI) concentration in two different CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) are investigated in experiments. Then, a double layer SCM is developed to model the zeta potential measurements. Moreover, we propose a definition for contribution of charged surface species and quantitatively analyze the variation of charged species contribution when changing brine composition. After showing our model can accurately predict calcite zeta potential in brines containing mixed PDIs, we apply it to predict zeta potential in ultra-low and pressurized CO2 environments for potential applications in carbonate enhanced oil recovery including miscible CO2 flooding and CO2 sequestration in carbonate reservoirs. Model prediction reveals that pure calcite surface will be positively charged in all investigated brines in pressurized CO2 environment (>1atm). Moreover, the sensitivity of calcite zeta potential to CO2 partial pressure in the various brine is found to be in the sequence of Na2CO3 > Na2SO4 > NaCl > MgCl2 > CaCl2 (Ionic strength=0.1M).

  2. The coprecipitation of Sr2+ with calcite at 250C and 1 atm

    Pingitore, N.E. Jr.; Eastman, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The incorporation of Sr 2+ into calcite at earth surface aqueous conditions is affected by the absolute concentration of Sr 2+ , the presence of Ba 2+ and NaCl in the solution and the rate of precipitation. At solution ratios (molar) of Sr 2+ to Ca 2+ in the low 10 -3 range, which yield calcites with several hundred ppm Sr 2+ , kappasub(calcite) sup(Sr) typically assumes a value between 0.10 and 0.20. Above these concentrations the value of kappasub(calcite) sup(Sr) drops to approximately 0.06. Furthermore, if minor amounts of Ba 2+ or large amounts of Na + (0.48 M) are added to a dilute Sr 2+ solution, a value around 0.06 for kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) is found. This 'strontium concentration effect' and the associated 'competitive cation effect' suggest that small amounts of Sr 2+ may be incorporated into a limited number of nonlattice sites in calcite. Incorporation of Sr 2+ into these sites, presumably defects, noticeably affects kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) only at low Sr 2+ concentrations and in the absence of competition from other large cations. An increase in kappasub(calcite)sup(Sr) with rate of precipitation, qualitatively similar to that found in other studies, was observed only when precipitation times were decreased from days to hours. For many geologic settings a partition coefficient for Sr 2+ into calcite of 0.06 appears appropriate, but there are situations - very low Sr 2+ concentrations, the presence of Mg 2+ , and fast precipitation rates - in which a larger value might better approximate natural partitioning. (author)

  3. Calcite biomineralization in coccoliths: Evidence from atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Henriksen, Karen; Stipp, S.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy......geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy...

  4. Paleohydrogeological implications from fracture calcites and sulfides in a major hydrogeological zone HZ19 at Olkiluoto

    Sahlstedt, E.; Karhu, J.; Rinne, K.

    2009-08-01

    30 samples of fracture mineral fillings in or near water conducting fractures at Olkiluoto were collected from 10 drill cores for fracture mineral studies. The aim of the study was to obtain information about past hydrogeochemical conditions at Olkiluoto using the calcite morphology, the chemical characteristics and the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in calcite. The chemical composition of fracture calcites at Olkiluoto is nearly stoichiometric CaCO 3 . Most variation in the composition of calcite is due to differences in the Mn content, which could indicate variations in groundwater redox conditions. Meaningful REE patterns were obtained for the calcites. REE patterns showed generally negative Eu anomalies, but one fracture calcite specimen had a distinct positive Eu anomaly. This positive anomaly could be related to ancient hydrothermal conditions, although derivation of the anomaly from the host rock cannot be excluded. Preliminary results for calcite U-Th dating of fracture calcites are reported. The isotopic composition of U and Th were analysed by a new multiple collector LA-ICPMS instrument. U and Th concentrations in fracture calcites are generally 18 O values of calcite range from -17 to -7 per mille. Most of the calcites may have been precipitated in the presence of waters with oxygen isotope ratios similar to those in the present-day groundwaters at Olkiluoto. Two samples with an oxygen isotopic composition highly depleted in 18 O were interpreted to have been precipitated at elevated temperatures. The δ 13 C values of calcite showed a wide range of values from -26 to +35 per mille. Multiple sources for carbon are implied. The highest δ 13 C values indicate methanic conditions in the fracture at the time of calcite precipitation. It appears that the methanic environment has earlier extended to shallower depths compared to the location of the methanic environment in the present-day fracture system (> 300 m). Ten pyrite samples were analysed

  5. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  6. Precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution prepared by solidification under high pressure

    Jie, J.C.; Wang, H.W.; Zou, C.M.; Wei, Z.J.; Li, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution containing 21.6 at.% Mg prepared by solidification under 2 GPa was investigated. The results show that the γ-Al 12 Mg 17 phase is formed and the β′ phase cannot be observed in the solid solution during ageing process. The precipitation of γ and β phases takes place in a non-uniform manner during heating process, i.e. the γ and β phases are first formed in the interdendritic region, which is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of Mg atoms in the solid solution solidified under high pressure. Peak splitting of X-ray diffraction patterns of Al(Mg) solid solution appears, and then disappears when the samples are aged at 423 K for different times, due to the non-uniform precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution. The direct transformation from the γ to β phase is observed after ageing at 423 K for 24 h. It is considered that the β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β which needs the diffusion of Mg atoms across the interface of α/γ phases. - Highlights: • The γ phase is formed and the β′ phase is be observed in Al(Mg) solid solution. • Peak splitting of XRD pattern of Al(Mg) solid solution appears during aged at 150 °C. • The β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β

  7. Calcite Fluid Inclusion, Paragenetic, and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Thermal Event(s) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Peterman, B.; Moscati, R.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository situated above the water table in 12.7 Ma tuffs. A wealth of textural and geochemical evidence from low-temperature deposits of calcite and silica, indicates that their genesis is related to unsaturated zone (UZ) percolation and that the level of the potential repository has never been saturated. Nonetheless, some scientists contend that thermal waters have periodically risen to the surface depositing calcite and opal in the tuffs and at the surface. This hypothesis received some support in 1996 when two-phase fluid inclusions (FIs) with homogenization temperatures (Th) between 35 and 75 C were reported from UZ calcite. Calcite deposition likely followed closely on the cooling of the tuffs and continues into the present. The paragenetic sequence of calcite and silica in the UZ is early stage calcite followed by chalcedony and quartz, then calcite with local opal during middle and late stages. Four types of FIs are found in calcite assemblages: (1) all-liquid (L); (2) all-vapor (V); (3) 2-phase with large and variable V:L ratios; and (4) a few 2-phase with small and consistent V:L ratios. Late calcite contains no FI assemblages indicating elevated depositional temperatures. In early calcite, the Th of type 4 FIs ranges from ∼ 40 to ∼ 85 C. Such temperatures (sub-boiling) and the assemblage of FIs are consistent with deposition in the UZ. Some delta 18O values < 10 permil in early calcite support such temperatures. Type 4 FIs, however, seem to be restricted to the early calcite stage, during which either cooling of the tuffs or regional volcanism were possible heat sources. Nonetheless, at present there is no compelling evidence of upwelling water as a source for the calcite/opal deposits

  8. Superhard MgB sub 2 bulk material prepared by high-pressure sintering

    Ma, H A; Chen, L X; Zhu, P W; Ren, G Z; Guo, W L; Fu, X Q; Zou Guang Tian; Ren, Z A; Che, G C; Zhao, Z X

    2002-01-01

    Superhard MgB sub 2 bulk material with a golden metallic shine was synthesized by high-pressure sintering for 8 h at 5.5 GPa and different temperatures. Appropriate pressure and temperature conditions for synthesizing polycrystalline MgB sub 2 with high hardness were investigated. The samples were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The Vickers hardness, bulk density, and electrical resistivity were measured at room temperature.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of an Al–Mg alloy solidified under high pressures

    Jie, J.C.; Zou, C.M.; Brosh, E.; Wang, H.W.; Wei, Z.J.; Li, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Al–42.2Mg alloy was solidified under pressures of 1, 2, and 3 GPa and the microstructure analyzed. •A thermodynamic calculation of the Al–Mg phase diagram at high pressures was performed. •The phase content changes from predominantly γ-Al 12 Mg 17 at 1 GPa to FCC solid solution at 3 GPa. •The β-Al 3 Mg 2 is predicted to remain stable at low temperatures but is not observed. •The alloy solidified at high pressure has remarkably enhanced ultimate tensile strength. -- Abstract: Phase formation, the microstructure and its evolution, and the mechanical properties of an Al–42.2 at.% Mg alloy solidified under high pressures were investigated. After solidification at pressures of 1 GPa and 2 GPa, the main phase is the γ phase, richer in Al than in equilibrium condition. When the pressure is further increased to 3 GPa, the main phase is the supersaturated Al(Mg) solid solution with Mg solubility up to 41.6 at.%. Unlike in similar alloys solidified at ambient pressure, the β phase does not appear. Calculated high-pressure phase diagrams of the Al–Mg system show that although the stability range of the β phase is diminished with pressure, it is still thermodynamically stable at room temperature. Hence, the disappearance of the β phase is interpreted as kinetic suppression, due to the slow diffusion rate at high pressures, which inhibits solid–solid reactions. The Al–42.2 at.% Mg alloy solidified under 3 GPa has remarkably enhanced ultimate tensile strength compared to the alloy solidified under normal atmospheric pressure

  10. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface.

    Pasarín, I S; Yang, M; Bovet, N; Glyvradal, M; Nielsen, M M; Bohr, J; Feidenhans'l, R; Stipp, S L S

    2012-02-07

    To produce biominerals, such as shells, bones, and teeth, living beings create organic compounds that control the growth of the solid phase. Investigating the atomic scale behavior of individual functional groups at the mineral-fluid interface provides fundamental information that is useful for constructing accurate predictive models for natural systems. Previous investigations of the activity of coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAP) on calcite, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [Henriksen, K., Young, J. R., Bown, P. R., and Stipp, S. L. S. Palentology 2004, 43 (Part 3), 725-743] and molecular dynamics (MD) modeling [Yang, M., Stipp, S. L. S., and Harding, J. H. Cryst. Growth Des. 2008, 8 (11), 4066-4074], have suggested that OH functional groups control polysaccharide attachment. The purpose of this work was to characterize, using X-ray reflectivity (XR) combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the structuring on calcite of a layer of the simplest carbon chain molecule that contains an OH group, ethanol (CH(3)-CH(2)-OH). We found evidence that EtOH forms a highly ordered structure at the calcite surface, where the first layer molecules bond with calcite. The ethanol molecules stand up perpendicularly at the interface or nearly so. As a consequence, the fatty, CH(3) ends form a new surface, about 6 Å from the termination of the bulk calcite, and beyond that, there is a thin gap where ethanol density is low. Following is a more disordered layer that is two to three ethanol molecules thick, about 14 Å, where density more resembles that of bulk liquid ethanol. The good agreement between theory and experiment gives confidence that a theoretical approach can offer information about behavior in more complex systems.

  11. Texture development in Al-Mg alloys during high temperature annealing

    Saitou, T.; Inagaki, H.

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the effect of Mg content on annealing textures developed in Al-Mg alloys during high temperature annealing, Al-Mg alloys containing up to 9 wt.% Mg in supersaturated solid solution were cold rolled 95% and isothermally annealed at 450 C. Their textures were investigated with the orientation distribution function analysis. It was found that, in the recrystallization textures observed at complete recrystallization, addition of more than 1 wt.% Mg was sufficient to suppress the development of {100} left angle 001 right angle. With increasing Mg content, {100} left angle 001 right angle decreased remarkably, whereas {100} left angle 013 right angle and {103} left angle 321 right angle increased. Thus, {100} left angle 013 right angle and {103} left angle 321 right angle were found to be the main orientations of the recrystallization textures of Al-Mg alloys annealed at high temperatures. {100} left angle 013 right angle developed most remarkably at 4 wt.% Mg, while {103} left angle 321 right angle showed the maximum development at 7 wt.% Mg. During subsequent grain growth at 450 C, remarkable texture changes were observed only in the alloys containing Mg in the range between 2 and 4 wt.%. In these alloys, {100} left angle 013 right angle developed at the expense of {100} left angle 001 right angle at earlier stages of grain growth, whereas {103} left angle 321 right angle increased independently of these two orientations at later stages of grain growth. Reflecting these texture changes, grain growth occurred in these alloys discontinuously. Such a discontinuous grain growth with large texture changes is expected, if strong textures are already present before grain growth, and if recrystallized grains having similar orientations are distributed by forming large clusters before grain growth. (orig.)

  12. Paleohydrogeological implications from fracture calcites in fissures of low transmissivity. A report of investigations in 2011

    Sahlstedt, E.; Karhu, J.

    2014-07-01

    Samples of fracture fillings were collected from 26 bedrock fractures at Olkiluoto. Special attention was paid to fractures having low transmissivities of <1E-8 m 2 /s. The chemical composition and the C and O isotopic composition of the fracture filling calcite were analysed. In addition, fluid inclusions were studied and microthermometric measurements conducted on fracture filling calcite. The most common minor element in calcite fillings was Mn, having concentrations up to 3.4 wt-%. The δ13C values had a wide range, from -13.0 to 14.5 per mille, and the δ18O values a narrower range, from -13.4 to -7.3 per mille. The δ18O values of late-stage calcite appear to be independent of the transmissivity of the fractures, ranging from -11.2 to -7.3 per mille over a T range from 3E -6 to 1.6E -1 1 m 2 /s. The δ13C values of late-stage calcite appear to have more variation at high transmissivities of >1E-8 m 2 /s. Unusually low and high δ13C values in late-stage calcite fillings occur in the upper ∼ 400 m of the bedrock and are probably related to microbial reduction processes, at near surface (<60 m) conditions to oxidation of organic matter resulting in low δ13C values and at ∼ 55-400 m to methanogenesis, causing high δ 13C values. A relatively low spread in the δ 13C values of late-stage calcite precipitates in low transmissivity (<1E-8 m 2 /s) fractures is most likely caused by stable conditions in the areas of low conductivity in the bedrock, reflecting slow dissolution/reprecipitation of older carbonate fillings. Fluid inclusion data indicate variation in fracture water types from high temperature, ∼ 200 deg C, low salinity fluid with < 4 wt-% of NaCl eq to low temperature, <100 deg C, high salinity fluid with 17-29 wt-% of NaCl eq . The high temperature fluid is associated with Group 5 calcite fillings and the low temperature fluid with Group 3 calcite. The composition of fluids related to Group 4 calcite falls roughly between the compositions

  13. Origin of calcite in the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex

    Nina M. Kortelainen; Petri J. Korkeakoski; Juha A. Karhu

    2007-01-01

    Groundwaters of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex in southern Finland are characterized by high pH values ranging up to 9.5. These values are significantly higher than those observed in silicate-rich shallow groundwater formations in crystalline bedrock areas. TheVirttaankangas sediments were discovered to contain small amounts of fine grained, dispersed calcite, which has a high tendency to increase the pH of local groundwaters. The primary goal of this study was to determine the mode of...

  14. Reversal of rocuronium-induced (1.2 mg kg-1) profound neuromuscular block by accidental high dose of sugammadex (40 mg kg-1).

    Molina, A.L.; Boer, H.D. de; Klimek, M.; Heeringa, M.; Klein, J.

    2007-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first selective relaxant binding agent and reverses rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block. A case is reported in which a patient accidentally received a high dose of sugammadex (40 mg kg-1) to reverse a rocuronium-induced (1.2 mg kg-1) profound neuromuscular block. A fast and

  15. High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Mg-Zn-Ca Alloys with Excellent Biodegradation Performance

    Hofstetter, J.; Becker, M.; Martinelli, E.; Weinberg, A. M.; Mingler, B.; Kilian, H.; Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    This article deals with the development of fine-grained high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) magnesium alloys intended for use as biodegradable implant material. The alloys contain solely low amounts of Zn and Ca as alloying elements. We illustrate the development path starting from the high-Zn-containing ZX50 (MgZn5Ca0.25) alloy with conventional purity, to an ultrahigh-purity ZX50 modification, and further to the ultrahigh-purity Zn-lean alloy ZX10 (MgZn1Ca0.3). It is shown that alloys with high Zn-content are prone to biocorrosion in various environments, most probably because of the presence of the intermetallic phase Mg6Zn3Ca2. A reduction of the Zn content results in (Mg,Zn)2Ca phase formation. This phase is less noble than the Mg-matrix and therefore, in contrast to Mg6Zn3Ca2, does not act as cathodic site. A fine-grained microstructure is achieved by the controlled formation of fine and homogeneously distributed (Mg,Zn)2Ca precipitates, which influence dynamic recrystallization and grain growth during hot forming. Such design scheme is comparable to that of HSLA steels, where low amounts of alloying elements are intended to produce a very fine dispersion of particles to increase the material's strength by refining the grain size. Consequently our new, ultrapure ZX10 alloy exhibits high strength (yield strength R p = 240 MPa, ultimate tensile strength R m = 255 MPa) and simultaneously high ductility (elongation to fracture A = 27%), as well as low mechanical anisotropy. Because of the anodic nature of the (Mg,Zn)2Ca particles used in the HSLA concept, the in vivo degradation in a rat femur implantation study is very slow and homogeneous without clinically observable hydrogen evolution, making the ZX10 alloy a promising material for biodegradable implants.

  16. Growth of high quality large area MgB2 thin films by reactive evaporation

    Moeckly, Brian H.; Ruby, Ward S.

    2006-01-01

    We report a new in-situ reactive deposition thin film growth technique for the production of MgB2 thin films which offers several advantages over all existing methods and is the first deposition method to enable the production of high-quality MgB2 films for real-world applications. We have used this growth method, which incorporates a rotating pocket heater, to deposit MgB2 films on a variety of substrates, including single-crystalline, polycrystalline, metallic, and semiconductor materials u...

  17. Mechanical Properties and Fabrication of Nanostructured Mg_2SiO_4-MgAl_2O_4 Composites by High-Frequency Induction Heated Combustion

    Shon, In-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Su; Hong, Kyung-Tae; Doh, Jung-Mann; Yoon, Jin-Kook

    2011-01-01

    Nanopowders of MgO, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were made by high energy ball milling. The rapid sintering of nanostructured MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites was investigated by a high-frequency induction heating sintering process. The advantage of this process is that it allows very quick densification to near theoretical density and inhibition of grain growth. Nanocrystalline materials have received much attention as advanced engineering materials with improved physical and mechanical properties. As nanomaterials possess high strength, high hardness, excellent ductility and toughness, undoubtedly, more attention has been paid for the application of nanomaterials. Highly dense nanostructured MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites were produced with simultaneous application of 80 MPa pressure and induced output current of total power capacity (15 kW) within 2 min. The sintering behavior, gain size and mechanical properties of MgAl_2O_4-Mg_2SiO_4 composites were investigated.

  18. Production of high specific activity 27Mg by fast neutron irradiation and recoil-aided leaching

    Wierczinski, B.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Volkers, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    High specific activity 27 Mg was produced via recoil-aided leaching from alumina in aqueous medium during irradiation with fast neutrons from a nuclear reactor. After irradiation the aqueous medium was passed through an IC-chelate column, the 24 Na formed during irradiation was removed by elution with 0.25 ml . l -1 sodium acetate and subsequently the 27 Mg was eluted with 2 mol . l -1 hydrochloric acid. Irradiation of alumina with a particle size of 3 μm and a specific surface area of 100 m 2 . g -1 in Milli-Q Plus Water yielded 90% of the total 27 Mg activity produced. Under standard conditions activities of about 8 . 10 5 Bq and specific activities of ca. 10 13 Bq . mol -1 were obtained at the end of irradiation. The standard working conditions involved irradiation of 200 mg alumina dispersed in 0.5 ml liquid in a fast neutron flux of 3 . 10 15 m -2 . s -1 for 15 min, a waiting time of 10 min, and a processing time of 15 minutes. Various alumina samples with different particle sizes and specific surfaces were tested, and the 27 Mg yields were fitted to a mathematical function. Since the high leaching yields cannot only be explained by recoil only, other phenomena such as diffusion and leaching aided by the high hydration energy of the Mg 2+ ion are probably involved. (orig.)

  19. The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwaters

    C. Neal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the potential for calcium carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self cleansing mechanism". Calcium carbonate saturation levels and phosphate concentrations (SRP - soluble reactive phosphate across the major eastern UK river basins are examined to test for solubility controls. The study shows that calcite saturation varies for each catchment as a function of flow and biological activity rather than by direct regulation by SRP. Indeed, there is no evidence, for any of the rivers studied, that calcite solubility controls hold. However, for groundwater and groundwater-fed springs in the Chalk of the Thames basin, calcite saturation is observed with associated low SRP levels. A self-cleansing mechanism may well be operative within the Chalk due to two factors. Firstly, there is a high potential for nucleation on the calcite micro-crystals in the aquifer. Secondly, there are within aquifer reactions that remove the calcite nucleating inhibitors (SRP and dissolved organic carbon, DOC to levels lower than those occurring within the rivers do. These inhibitors enter the catchment at very high concentrations in association with agricultural pollution (fertilizer application and animal slurry and household contamination (e.g. sewage sources from septic tanks. Under low flow conditions, when the saturation index for calcite is at its highest, so too is the concentration of the nucleation inhibitor SRP. Companion work shows that calcite precipitation can occur at the water-sediment interface of the river and this may involve SRP removal. The data, as a whole, define an apparent bound for calcite solubility control where in the presence of nucleating centres, SRP must be less than 4 mM-P l-1 and DOC must be less than 150 mM-C l-1: a condition that does not seem to pertain within most UK rivers. Keywords: calcite, calcium carbonate, phosphate, soluble reactive phosphate, dissolved

  20. Phase controlled synthesis of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with high uniformity

    Wang, S.F.; Li, Q.; Zu, X.T.; Xiang, X.; Liu, W.; Li, S.

    2016-01-01

    (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through modifying the atomic ratio of polysaccharide and chelating agent at an optimal sintering temperature. In the process, the polysaccharide plays an important role in drastically shrinking the precursor during the gel drying process. In the metal-complex structure, M"2"+ ion active sites were coordinated by −OH of the water molecules except for EDTA anions. The MFe_2O_4 magnetic nanoparticles exhibited enhanced magnetic properties when compared with nano-MFe_2O_4 of similar particle size synthesized by other synthesis route reported in the literature. In particular, the sintering temperature improves the crystallinity and increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles significantly. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the proposed model for MFe_2O_4 nanoparticle synthesis, starting from EDTA-chelated M"2"+ (M=Mg, Ca, or Ba) cations (left). High dispersion (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a modified polyacrylamide gel route. Optimized utilization of polysaccharide, chelating agent, and sintering temperature allowed the formation of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles with a narrow diameter distribution. - Highlights: • We report a modified polyacrylamide gel route to synthesize (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. • Chelate mechanism of metal ions (Mg, Ca, Ba) and EDTA has been discussed. • Phase transformation process of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrites has been discussed. • The preparation method increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles.

  1. Phase controlled synthesis of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with high uniformity

    Wang, S.F., E-mail: wangshifa2006@yeah.net [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Science and technology on vacuum technology and physics laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China); Li, Q. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Zu, X.T., E-mail: xtzu@uestc.edu.cn [Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Xiang, X.; Liu, W. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Li, S., E-mail: sean.li@unsw.edu.au [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through modifying the atomic ratio of polysaccharide and chelating agent at an optimal sintering temperature. In the process, the polysaccharide plays an important role in drastically shrinking the precursor during the gel drying process. In the metal-complex structure, M{sup 2+} ion active sites were coordinated by −OH of the water molecules except for EDTA anions. The MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles exhibited enhanced magnetic properties when compared with nano-MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} of similar particle size synthesized by other synthesis route reported in the literature. In particular, the sintering temperature improves the crystallinity and increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles significantly. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the proposed model for MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle synthesis, starting from EDTA-chelated M{sup 2+} (M=Mg, Ca, or Ba) cations (left). High dispersion (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a modified polyacrylamide gel route. Optimized utilization of polysaccharide, chelating agent, and sintering temperature allowed the formation of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles with a narrow diameter distribution. - Highlights: • We report a modified polyacrylamide gel route to synthesize (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. • Chelate mechanism of metal ions (Mg, Ca, Ba) and EDTA has been discussed. • Phase transformation process of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrites has been discussed. • The preparation method increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles.

  2. Development of MgB2 superconductor wire with high critical current

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Yi Jeong; Yi, Ji Hye; Lee, Ji Hyun; Tan, Kai Sin

    2009-07-01

    The MgB 2 superconductor with smaller grain size could improve its critical properties by providing flux pinning centers with high grain boundary density. The effects of C doping such as charcoal, paper ash and glycerin on the superconducting properties was investigated for in situ processed MgB 2 samples using low purity semi-crystalline B powder. The results show a decrease in Tc and an enhancement of Jc at high fields for the C-doped samples as compared to the un-doped samples. A combined process of a mechanical ball milling and liquid glycerin (C 3 H 8 O 3 ) treatment of B powder has been conducted to enhance the superconducting properties of MgB 2 . The mechanical ball milling was effective for grain refinement, and a lattice disorder was easily achieved by glycerin addition. With the combined process, the critical properties was further increased due to a higher grain boundary density and a greater C substitution. To get fine grain structure of MgB 2 with high critical current properties, mechanical milling for as-received B powder and low temperature solid-state reaction of 550 or 600 .deg. C were attempted to in situ powder-in-tube processed MgB 2 /Fe wires. The critical current properties of the MgB 2 wires using the milled B powder were enhanced due to a smaller grain size and an increased volume of the superconducting phase. The solid-state reaction of a low temperature process for the samples using the milled B powder resulted in a poorer crystallinity with a smaller grain size, which improved superconducting properties. We established the system to measure the transport current properties of the MgB 2 wires. The field dependence of the transport Jc was evaluated for the MgB 2 wires heat-treated at different heat treatment conditions using ball-milled and glycerin-treated B powder. The MgB 2 magnet was developed and the AC loss of MgB 2 wire was also investigated. A conduction cooling device to cool the MgB 2 coil down to 4 K has been fabricated and the

  3. High-precision masses of 29-33Mg and the N=20 shell ''closure''

    Lunney, D.; Audi, G.; Gaulard, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Vieira, N.

    2006-01-01

    High-precision mass measurements have been performed on the exotic magnesium isotopes 29-33 Mg using the MISTRAL radiofrequency spectrometer, especially suited for very short-lived nuclides. This method, combined with the powerful tool of resonant laser ionization at ISOLDE, has provided a significant reduction of uncertainty for the masses of the most exotic Mg isotopes: a relative error of 7 x 10 -7 was achieved for the weakly produced 33 Mg that has a half-life of only 90 ms. Moreover, the mass of 33 Mg is found to change by over 250 keV. Verifying and minimizing binding energy uncertainties in this region of the nuclear chart is important for understanding the lack of binding energy that is normally associated with magic numbers. (orig.)

  4. High-Mg basalts as a Signal of Magma System Replenishment at Lopevi Island, Vanuatu

    Stewart, R. B.; Smith, I. E.; Turner, M. B.; Cronin, S. J.

    2007-05-01

    Lopevi is is a basalt to basaltic andesite island stratovolcano in central Vanuatu and is part of a long-lived, mature Island Arc chain. Central Vanuatu is tectonically influenced by the subduction of the D'Entrecasteaux zone. Primitive rock types that have been identified from the arc include picrites, ankaramites and high MgO basalts. High MgO rocks are generally considered to be a relatively rare component of arc-type magma suites but as detailed sequence sampling of individual volcanoes occurs, they have been identified more often. Here we report on the occurrence of high-Mg basalts in a sequence of lavas erupted in the last 100 years from Lopevi volcano. Activity at Lopevi is characteristically intermittent with eruptive sequences occurring over a c. 6 year period, separated by longer periods of repose. A major eruptive episode in 1939 caused evacuation of the island and the next eruptive episode in the 1960's also led to evacuation. The 1960's cycle of activity ended in 1982. The most recent phase of activity commenced in 1998 with a return to eruption of more siliceous, high alumina basaltic andesite. Geochemical data show that the 1960's lavas were different from those erupted earlier and later. They are olivine basalts with up to 9 wt percent MgO, 70 ppm Ni and 300 ppm Cr; Al2O3 content is about 12 wt percent. The 2003 lavas and pre-1960's lavas, in contrast, are basaltic andesites with c. 4 wt percent MgO, less than 25 ppm Ni, less than 100 ppm Cr and c. 20 wt percent Al2O3. The 1960's Lopevi sequence of eruptions represents an injection of a more primitive, high MgO magma at the end of a 21 year quiescent period after the major eruptions of 1939. Injection of small batches of more primitive magmas over decadal time periods at Lopevi marks the initiation of a new magmatic cycle. The occurrence of high MgO magmas as part of a cycle that includes typically low MgO arc type rocks demonstrates a consanguineous relationship and shows that high MgO arc type

  5. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  6. Seasonal dynamics of stable isotopes and element ratios in authigenic calcites during their precipitation and dissolution, Sacrower See (northeastern Germany

    Bernd ZOLITSCHKA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of chemical and physical water properties as well as particle fluxes was monitored in Sacrower See (northeastern Germany during two consecutive years (Oct 2003 - Oct 2005. Additonally, we measured δ18O and δ13C as well as Sr:Ca and Mg:Ca ratios of authigenic calcites that were collected in sequencing sediment traps in order to disentangle environmental and climatic factors controlling these parameters. In particular, our aim was to find out if element ratios and the isotopic composition of calcites reflect changes in water and air temperatures. Lake water is highly enriched in 18O (-1.3 to -2.5‰ VSMOW with an evaporative increase of 0.6‰ during summer. Values are 5-6‰ more positive than groundwater values and 4-5‰ more positive than long-term weighted annual means of precipitation. During spring and summer, high amounts of dissolved phosphate cause eutrophic conditions and calcite precipitation in isotopic disequilibrium. Measured values are depleted in 18O by 2 to 10‰ compared to calculated equilibrium values. Resuspension and partial dissolution of calcite in the water column contribute to this isotopic divergence in summer and autumn as δ18Oca and δ13C values increased in the hypolimnion during this time. Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios are altered by dissolution as well. In the hypolimnion these ratios were higher than in the epilimnion. Another reason for the huge deviation between measured and theoretical δ18Oca values during summer is the occurrence of large amounts of Phacotus lenticularis in the carbonate fraction. High amounts of Phacotus lead to more negative δ18Oca and more positive δ13C values. Several characteristics of δ18Oca and δ13C are also reflected by Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios and isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon were influenced by the onset and stability of stratification. Especially the earlier onset of stratification in 2005 caused higher sediment fluxes and more positive carbon and

  7. Low-power, high-uniform, and forming-free resistive memory based on Mg-deficient amorphous MgO film with rough surface

    Guo, Jiajun; Ren, Shuxia; Wu, Liqian; Kang, Xin; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Saving energy and reducing operation parameter fluctuations remain crucial for enabling resistive random access memory (RRAM) to emerge as a universal memory. In this work, we report a resistive memory device based on an amorphous MgO (a-MgO) film that not only exhibits ultralow programming voltage (just 0.22 V) and low power consumption (less than 176.7 μW) but also shows excellent operative uniformity (the coefficient of variation is only 1.7% and 2.2% for SET and RESET voltage, respectively). Moreover, it also shows a forming-free characteristic. Further analysis indicates that these distinctive properties can be attributed to the unstable local structures and the rough surface of the Mg-deficient a-MgO film. These findings show the potential of using a-MgO in high-performance nonvolatile memory applications.

  8. Highly efficient green light harvesting from Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles: Structural and optical studies

    Sharma, Sarla, E-mail: mail2sarlasharma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302055 (India); Vyas, Rishi [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Sharma, Neha [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302055 (India); Singh, Vidyadhar [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University, Okinawa 9040495 (Japan); Singh, Arvind [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Kataria, Vanjula; Gupta, Bipin Kumar [National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), New Delhi 110012 (India); Vijay, Y.K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302055 (India)

    2013-03-05

    Graphical abstract: Demonstration of highly efficient green light emission harvesting from Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized via facile wet chemical route with an average particle size ∼15 nm. The resulted nanoparticles exhibit intense green emission peaking at 530 nm upon 325 nm excitation. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of visible emission depends upon the doping concentration of Mg. The PL intensity was found maximum up to 4% doping of Mg and beyond it exhibits a decrees in emission. The obtained highly luminescent green emission of ZnO nanoparticle would be an ultimate choice for next generation optoelectronics device materials. Highlights: ► Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O nanoparticles were prepared by mechanochemical processing. ► High blue emission intensity was observed contrary to previous reports. ► Blue emission is suggested to be originating from the high density of defects. ► Defect density in as-milled condition is very high resulting in high emission. ► Mg promoted non-radiative recombination and lowered intensities. -- Abstract: Highly efficient green light emission was observed from Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles synthesized via facile wet chemical route with an average particle size ∼15 nm. The XRD analysis confirmed the growth of wurtzite phase of ZnO nanoparticles. Moreover, the optical properties of these nanoparticles were investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. The resulted nanoparticles exhibit intense green emission peaking at 530 nm (2.34 eV) upon 325 nm (3.81 eV) excitation. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of visible emission depends upon the doping concentration of Mg. The PL intensity was found maximum up to 4% doping of Mg, and beyond it exhibits a decrees in emission. Furthermore, by varying the band gap from 3.50 to 3.61 eV, the PL spectra showed a near band edge (NBE) emission at wavelength around 370 nm (3.35 eV) and a broad deep level emission in the visible region. The obtained highly

  9. An essential factor for high Mg2+ tolerance of Staphylococcus aureus

    Joshua Armitano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Internal bacterial concentration of Mg2+, the most abundant divalent cation in living cells, is estimated to be in the single millimolar range. However, many bacteria will thrive in media with only micromolars of Mg2+, by using a range of intensely studied and highly efficient import mechanisms, as well as in media with very high magnesium concentration, presumably mediated by currently unknown export mechanisms. Staphylococcus aureus has a particularly high Mg2+ tolerance for a pathogen, growing unimpaired in up to 770 mM Mg2+, and we here identify SA0657, a key factor in this tolerance. The predicted domain structure of SA0657 is shared with a large number of proteins in bacteria, archaea and even eukarya, for example CorB from Salmonella and the human CNNM protein family. One of the shared domains, a CBS pair potentially involved in Mg2+ sensing, contains the conserved Glycine326 which we establish to be a key residue for SA0657 function. In light of our findings, we propose the name MpfA, Magnesium Protection Factor A, for SA0657.

  10. Microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge for tetracycline removal.

    Meng, Xian; Liu, Zhimeng; Deng, Cheng; Zhu, Mengfu; Wang, Deyin; Li, Kui; Deng, Yu; Jiang, Mingming

    2016-12-15

    A novel microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge was prepared, including synthesis of precursor colloid, dip-coating and thermal decomposition. Combined SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS studies show the nano-MgO is irregularly distributed on the membrane surface or pore walls and forms a positively charged nano coating. And the nano-MgO coating is firmly attached to the diatomite membrane via SiO chemical bond. Thus the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane behaves strong electropositivity with the isoelectric point of 10.8. Preliminary filtration tests indicate that the as-prepared nano-MgO/diatomite membrane could remove approximately 99.7% of tetracycline in water through electrostatic adsorption effect. The desirable electrostatic property enables the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane to be a candidate for removal of organic pollutants from water. And it is convinced that there will be a great application prospect of charged ceramic membrane in water treatment field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Casting defects and mechanical properties of high pressure die cast Mg-Zn-Al-RE alloys

    Xiao, Wenlong; Easton, Mark A.; Zhu, Suming; Nie, Jianfeng [CAST Cooperative Research Centre, Department of Materials Engineering Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew S. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [CSIRO Process Science and Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jia, Shusheng [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, Ministry of Education, Department of Materials Science and Engineering Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2012-02-15

    The die casting defects and tensile properties of high pressure die cast (HPDC) Mg-Zn-Al-RE alloys with various combinations of Zn and Al were studied. The results show that die casting defects in Mg-Zn-Al-RE alloys are affected by the percentage of Zn and Al contents. The hot tearing susceptibility (HTS) of Mg-Zn-Al-RE alloys tends to increase with increasing Zn content up to 6 wt%, while a further increase of Al and/or Zn content reduces the HTS. In tensile tests, the yield strength (YS) is generally improved by increasing Zn or Al content, whereas the tensile strength (TS) and ductility appear to depend largely on the presence of casting defects. Compared with Mg-Zn-Al alloys, the mechanical properties of the Mg-Zn-Al-RE alloy are significantly improved. The Mg-4Zn-4Al-4RE alloy is found to have few casting defects and the optimal tensile properties. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Development of Ti-sheathed MgB2 wires with high critical current density

    Liang, G; Fang, H; Hanna, M; Yen, F; Lv, B; Alessandrini, M; Keith, S; Hoyt, C; Tang, Z; Salama, K

    2006-01-01

    Working towards developing lightweight superconducting magnets for future space and other applications, we have successfully fabricated mono-core Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires by the powder-in-tube method. The wires were characterized by magnetization, electrical resistivity, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry measurements. The results indicate that the Ti sheath does not react with the magnesium and boron, and the present wire rolling process can produce MgB 2 wires with a superconducting volume fraction of at least 64% in the core. Using the Bean model, it was found that at 5 K, the magnetic critical current densities, J c , measured in magnetic fields of 0, 5, and 8 T are about 4.2 x 10 5 , 3.6 x 10 4 , and 1.4 x 10 4 A cm -2 , respectively. At 20 K and 0 T, the magnetic J c is about 2.4 x 10 5 A cm -2 . These results show that at zero and low fields, the values of the magnetic J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires are comparable with the best results available for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires. At high fields, however, the J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires appears higher than that for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires

  13. Study of the response reduction of LiF:Mg, Ti dosimeter for high dose dosimetry

    Torkzadeh, Falamarz [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faripour, Heidar [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Laser and Optics Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mardashti, Forough; Manouchehri, Farhad [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School

    2017-07-15

    A single crystal and 5 polycrystalline samples of LiF:Mg, Ti and their pellets were prepared and investigated so as to apply thermoluminescence high gamma dose dosimetry. Three zones of single crystal with dopant concentrations of 200 ppm of Mg and 20 ppm of Ti were also used to prepare the single crystal samples. For polycrystalline samples, dopant concentrations of 0.062 mol% Mg and Ti concentrations in the range of 0.016 and 0.046 mol% were used. All the samples were exposed to gamma doses of 1 kGy to 700 kGy and their response changes were determined by a gamma dose test of about 60 mGy. According to the results obtained, the use of response reduction by curve-fitting up to about 300 kGy can be performed reliably for high dose gamma dosimetry.

  14. High output power of differently cut Nd:MgO:LiTaO3 CW lasers

    Sun, D. H.; Liu, S. D.; Wang, D. Z.; Sang, Y. H.; Kang, X. L.; Liu, H.; Bi, Y.; Yan, B. X.; He, J. L.; Wang, J. Y.

    2013-04-01

    A high-quality Nd3+ and Mg2+ co-doped LiTaO3 (Nd:MgO:LT) crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The polarized absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra were studied, and the absorption cross section was calculated by Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory. The laser performance with different sample cuts of the crystal was investigated for the first time, and it was found that Nd:MgO:LT crystal with different cutting directions (a and c) exhibits different laser properties. By optimizing a partial reflectivity mirror in the laser experimental setting, a high continuous wave output power of 3.58 W was obtained at 1092 and 1076 nm with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 22.78% and slope efficiency of 26.06%. The results indicate that Nd:MgO:LT crystal is a promising candidate for the manufacture of Nd3+ doped periodically poled MgO:LiTaO3 crystal (Nd:PPMgOLT), which should have considerable applications in self-frequency doubling and optical parametric oscillation laser devices.

  15. High output power of differently cut Nd:MgO:LiTaO3 CW lasers

    Sun, D H; Liu, S D; Wang, D Z; Sang, Y H; Kang, X L; Liu, H; He, J L; Wang, J Y; Bi, Y; Yan, B X

    2013-01-01

    A high-quality Nd 3+ and Mg 2+ co-doped LiTaO 3 (Nd:MgO:LT) crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The polarized absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra were studied, and the absorption cross section was calculated by Judd–Ofelt (J–O) theory. The laser performance with different sample cuts of the crystal was investigated for the first time, and it was found that Nd:MgO:LT crystal with different cutting directions (a and c) exhibits different laser properties. By optimizing a partial reflectivity mirror in the laser experimental setting, a high continuous wave output power of 3.58 W was obtained at 1092 and 1076 nm with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 22.78% and slope efficiency of 26.06%. The results indicate that Nd:MgO:LT crystal is a promising candidate for the manufacture of Nd 3+ doped periodically poled MgO:LiTaO 3 crystal (Nd:PPMgOLT), which should have considerable applications in self-frequency doubling and optical parametric oscillation laser devices. (paper)

  16. Cellular Response to Doping of High Porosity Foamed Alumina with Ca, P, Mg, and Si

    Edwin Soh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Foamed alumina was previously synthesised by direct foaming of sulphate salt blends varying ammonium mole fraction (AMF, foaming heating rate and sintering temperature. The optimal product was produced with 0.33AMF, foaming at 100 °C/h and sintering at 1600 °C. This product attained high porosity of 94.39%, large average pore size of 300 µm and the highest compressive strength of 384 kPa. To improve bioactivity, doping of porous alumina by soaking in dilute or saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP or CaP + Mg was done. Saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP and CaP + Mg were made with excess salt in distilled water and decanted. Dilute solutions were made by diluting the 100% solution to 10% concentration. Doping with Si was done using the sol gel method at 100% concentration only. Cell culture was carried out with MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Cellular response to the Si and P doped samples was positive with high cell populations and cell layer formation. The impact of doping with phosphate produced a result not previously reported. The cellular response showed that both Si and P doping improved the biocompatibility of the foamed alumina.

  17. MgB_{2} nonlinear properties investigated under localized high rf magnetic field excitation

    Tamin Tai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The high transition temperature and low surface resistance of MgB_{2} attracts interest in its potential application in superconducting radio frequency accelerating cavities. However, compared to traditional Nb cavities, the viability of MgB_{2} at high rf fields is still open to question. Our approach is to study the nonlinear electrodynamics of the material under localized rf magnetic fields. Because of the presence of the small superconducting gap in the π band, the nonlinear response of MgB_{2} at low temperature is potentially complicated compared to a single-gap s-wave superconductor such as Nb. Understanding the mechanisms of nonlinearity coming from the two-band structure of MgB_{2}, as well as extrinsic sources of nonlinearity, is an urgent requirement. A localized and strong rf magnetic field, created by a magnetic write head, is integrated into our nonlinear-Meissner-effect scanning microwave microscope [T. Tai et al., IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 21, 2615 (2011ITASE91051-822310.1109/TASC.2010.2096531]. MgB_{2} films with thickness 50 nm, fabricated by a hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition technique on dielectric substrates, are measured at a fixed location and show a strongly temperature-dependent third harmonic response. We propose that several possible mechanisms are responsible for this nonlinear response.

  18. Structure of spinel at high temperature using in-situ XANES study at the Al and Mg K-edge

    Ligny, D de [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, LPCML, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Neuville, D R [Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, Geochimie-Cosmochimie, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Flank, A-M; Lagarde, P, E-mail: deligny@pcml.univ-lyon1.f [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 France (France)

    2009-11-15

    We present structural information obtained on spinel at high temperature (298-2400 K) using in situ XANES at the Mg and Al K-edge. Spinel, {sup [4]}(Al{sub x},Mg{sub 1-x}){sup [6]}(Al{sub 2-x},Mg{sub x})O{sub 4}, with increasing temperature, show a substitution of Mg by Al and Al by Mg in their respective sites. This substitution corresponds to an inversion of the Mg and Al sites. Furthermore, both experiments at the Al and Mg K-edges are in good agreement with XANES calculation made using FDMNES code.

  19. Nucleation, growth and evolution of calcium phosphate films on calcite.

    Naidu, Sonia; Scherer, George W

    2014-12-01

    Marble, a stone composed of the mineral calcite, is subject to chemically induced weathering in nature due to its relatively high dissolution rate in acid rain. To protect monuments and sculpture from corrosion, we are investigating the application of thin layers of hydroxyapatite (HAP) onto marble. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and crystal and lattice compatibility with calcite. A mild, wet chemical synthesis route, in which diammonium hydrogen phosphate salt was reacted with marble, alone and with cationic and anionic precursors under different reaction conditions, was used to produce inorganic HAP layers on marble. Nucleation and growth on the calcite substrate was studied, as well as metastable phase evolution, using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Film nucleation was enhanced by surface roughness. The rate of nucleation and the growth rate of the film increased with cationic (calcium) and anionic (carbonate) precursor additions. Calcium additions also influenced phase formation, introducing a metastable phase (octacalcium phosphate) and a different phase evolution sequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly stable carbon coated Mg2Si intermetallic nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anode

    Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Hou, Mengyan; Liu, Yao; Bin, Duan; Sun, Yunhe; Fan, Long; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is an ideal candidate anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, it suffers from rapid capacity fading due to large volume expansion upon lithium insertion. Herein, we design and fabricate highly stable carbon coated porous Mg2Si intermetallic anode material using facile mechano-thermal technique followed by carbon coating using thermal vapour deposition (TVD), toluene as carbon source. The electrode exhibits an excellent first reversible capacity of 726 mAh g-1 at a rate of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the electrode demonstrates high rate capability (380 mAh g-1 at high rate of 2 A g-1) as well as high cycle stability, with capacity retentions of 65% over 500 cycles. These improvements are attributable to both Mg supporting medium and the uniform carbon coating, which can effectively increase the conductivity and electronic contact of the active material and protects large volume alterations during the electrochemical cycling process.

  1. Prediction of superconducting ternary hydride MgGeH6: from divergent high-pressure formation routes.

    Ma, Yanbin; Duan, Defang; Shao, Ziji; Li, Da; Wang, Liyuan; Yu, Hongyu; Tian, Fubo; Xie, Hui; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2017-10-18

    Invigorated by the high temperature superconductivity in some binary hydrogen-dominated compounds, we systematically explored high-pressure phase diagrams and superconductivity of a ternary Mg-Ge-H system using ab initio methods. Stoichiometric MgGeH 6 with high hydrogen content exhibiting Pm3[combining macron] symmetry was predicted from a series of high-pressure synthesis paths. We performed an in-depth study on three distinct formation routes to MgGeH 6 , i.e., Mg + Ge + 3H 2 → MgGeH 6 , MgGe + 3H 2 → MgGeH 6 and MgH 2 + GeH 4 → MgGeH 6 at high pressures. By directly squeezing three elemental solids Mg + Ge + 3H 2 , we obtained ternary MgGeH 6 at 200 GPa. By adding a little bit of the MgGe alloy into hydrogen, we found that MgGeH 6 can form and stabilize at about 200 GPa. More intriguingly, upon compressing MgH 2 and GeH 4 to 250 GPa, we also predicted the same MgGeH 6 . Electron structure calculations reveal that the cubic MgGeH 6 is a good metal and takes on ionic character. Electron-phonon coupling calculation reveals a large λ = 1.16 for MgGeH 6 at 200 GPa. In particular, we found that ternary MgGeH 6 could be a potential high temperature superconductor with a superconducting transition temperature T c of ∼67 K at 200 GPa.

  2. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  3. Pinning in high performance MgB{sub 2} thin films and bulks: Role of Mg-B-O nano-scale inhomogeneities

    Prikhna, Tatiana, E-mail: prikhna@mail.ru [Institute for Superhard Materials of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine , 2, Avtozavodskaya Str. , Kiev 07074 (Ukraine); Shapovalov, Andrey [Institute for Superhard Materials of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine , 2, Avtozavodskaya Str. , Kiev 07074 (Ukraine); Eisterer, Michael [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Shaternik, Vladimir [G.V. Kurdyumov Institute for Metal Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 Academician Vernadsky blvd., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Goldacker, Wilfried [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein (Germany); Weber, Harald W. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Moshchil, Viktor; Kozyrev, Artem; Sverdun, Vladimir [Institute for Superhard Materials of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine , 2, Avtozavodskaya Str. , Kiev 07074 (Ukraine); Boutko, Viktor [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after O.O. Galkin of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, R. Luxemburg str.72, Donetsk-114, 83114 (Ukraine); Grechnev, Gennadiy [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47, Prospekt Nauky, Kharkiv 61103 (Ukraine); Gusev, Alexandr [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after O.O. Galkin of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, R. Luxemburg str.72, Donetsk-114, 83114 (Ukraine); Kovylaev, Valeriy; Shaternik, Anton [Institute for Superhard Materials of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine , 2, Avtozavodskaya Str. , Kiev 07074 (Ukraine)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Pinning in MgB{sub 2} depends on the Mg-B-O nano-scaled inhomogeneities. • Finer oxygen-enriched inhomogeneities is the reason of the higher J{sub c} in MgB{sub 2} thin films as compared to bulk. • The results of DOS calculations for MgB{sub 2-x}O{sub x} compounds demonstrate that they have metal-like behavior. • Ordered oxygen distribution in MgB{sub 2} (in pairs or zigzags) reduces binding energy. - Abstract: The comparison of nano-crystalline MgB{sub 2} oxygen-containing thin film (140 nm) and highly dense bulk materials showed that the critical current density, J{sub c}, depends on the distribution of Mg-B-O nano-scale inhomogeneities. It has been shown that MgB{sub 2} bulks with high J{sub c} in low (∼10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} in 0-1 T at 10 K) and medium magnetic fields contain MgB{sub 0.6-0.8}O{sub 0.8-0.9} nano-inclusions, where δT{sub c} or a combined δT{sub c} (dominant) / δ{sub l} pinning mechanism prevails, while in bulk MgB{sub 2} with high J{sub c} in high magnetic fields (B{sub irr}(18.5 K) = 15 T, B{sub c2}(0 K) = 42.1 T) MgB{sub 1.2-2.7}O{sub 1.8-2.5} nano-layers are present and δ{sub l} pinning prevails. The structure of oxygen-containing films with high J{sub c} in low and high magnetic fields (J{sub c} (0 T) = 1.8 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} and J{sub c} (5 T) = 2 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} at 10 K) contains very fine oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inhomogeneities and δ{sub l} pinning is realized. The results of DOS calculations in MgB{sub 2-x}O{sub x} cells for x = 0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 demonstrate that all compounds are conductors with metal-like behaviour. In the case of ordered oxygen substitution for boron the binding energy, E{sub b}, does not increase sufficiently as compared with that for MgB{sub 2}, while when oxygen atoms form zigzag chains the calculated E{sub b} is even lower (E{sub b} = −1.15712 Ry).

  4. Efficient MgO-based mesoporous CO2 trapper and its performance at high temperature.

    Han, Kun Kun; Zhou, Yu; Chun, Yuan; Zhu, Jian Hua

    2012-02-15

    A novel MgO-based porous adsorbent has been synthesized in a facile co-precipitation method for the first time, in order to provide a candidate for trapping CO(2) in flue gas at high temperature. The resulting composite exhibits a mesoporous structure with a wide pore size distribution, due to the even dispersion and distribution of microcrystalline MgO in the framework of alumina to form a concrete-like structure. These sorbents can capture CO(2) at high temperature (150-400°C), possessing high reactivity and stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption processes, providing competitive candidates to control CO(2) emission. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  6. Selective adsorption of benzhydroxamic acid on fluorite rendering selective separation of fluorite/calcite

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong; Khoso, Sultan Ahmed; Gao, Jiande; Sun, Wei; Pu, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-03-01

    Fluorite, a chief source of fluorine in the nature, usually coexists with calcite mineral in ore deposits. Worldwide, flotation techniques with a selective collector and/or a selective depressant are commonly preferred for the separation of fluorite from calcite. In the present study, an attempt was made to use benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector for the selective separation of fluorite from calcite without using any depressant. Results obtained from the flotation experiments for single mineral and mixed binary minerals revealed that the BHA has a good selective collecting ability for the fluorite when 50 mg/L of BHA was used at pH of 9. The results from the zeta potential and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the BHA easily chemisorbs onto the fluorite as compared to calcite. Crystal chemistry calculations showed the larger Ca density and the higher Ca activity on fluorite surface mainly account for the selective adsorption of BHA on fluorite, leading to the selective separation of fluorite from calcite. Moreover, a stronger hydrogen bonding with BHA and the weaker electrostatic repulsion with BHA- also contribute to the stronger interaction of BHA species with fluorite surface.

  7. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Rigo, Vagner A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, UTFPR, Cornélio Procópio, PR (Brazil); Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal Fluminense, UFF, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  8. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  9. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: calcite present early in the aboral plumula.

    Stock, Stuart R; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D; Dorvee, Jason R

    2012-11-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: when and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of metasomatism in the calcite-pitchblende system: 2. Replacement of pitchblende by calcite

    Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1996-01-01

    The principal mechanisms of the nasturan replacement by calcite -intrametasomatism, frontal metasomatism, dispersive metasomatism, and transformative metasomatism - are discussed in terms of G.L. Pospelov's (1973) concept. The main chemical condition required by the process is an oxidized environment, in which the tetravalent uranium of pitchblende or transitional reduced phases (coffinite) oxidizes to yield readily soluble uranyl compounds. The latter are replaced by calcite

  11. Sealing process with calcite in the Nojima active fault zone revealed from isotope analysis of calcite

    Arai, Takashi; Tsukahara, Hiroaki; Morikiyo, Toshiro

    2003-01-01

    The Nojima fault appeared on the surface in the northern part of Awaji Island, central Japan as a result of the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake (1995, M=7.2). Active fault drilling was performed by the Disaster Prevention Research Institute (DPRI), Kyoto University, and core samples were retrieved from 1410 to 1710 m, which were composed of intact and fractured granodiorites. We obtained calcite samples and gas samples from the vein in marginal fracture and non-fracture zones. We analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite and carbon dioxide to investigate the characteristic isotope ratios of fluids in the active fault zone, to estimate the origins of fluids, and to determine the sealing process of fractures. The analyzed values of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite were -10.3 to -7.2 per mille, 18 to 23 per mille, respectively, and carbon isotope ratios of CO 2 were -21 to -17 per mille. If carbon isotope ratios of calcite were at equilibrium with those of CO 2 , the precipitation temperature of calcite is calculated to be 30 to 50 deg C. This temperature is consistent with the present temperature of the depth where drilling cores were retrieved. Oxygen isotope ratios of H 2 O that, precipitated calcite were calculated to be -1.8 to -5.5 per mille. These values indicate calcite were precipitated from mixed fluids of sea water and meteoric water. Therefore, the marginal fracture zone of the Nojima fault was sealed with calcite, which was generated from mixing of sea water and meteoric water in situ. (author)

  12. Time scales for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings and implications for saturated zone radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Winterle, J.R.; Murphy, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis was performed to estimate time scales for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings in the fractured tuff aquifer that underlies Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, where groundwater is chemically undersaturated with respect to calcite. The impetus for this analysis originates from speculation that undissolved calcite in the saturated zone is evidence for limited diffusive exchange between fracture and matrix waters. Assuming that matrix diffusion is the rate-limiting process, the time scale for dissolution of calcite fracture fillings depends on the amount of calcite initially deposited, the distance between flowing fractures, the degree of chemical disequilibrium, and the rate of diffusion. Assuming geochemistry of J-13 well water in free-flowing fractures, estimated time scales for complete dissolution of matrix-entrapped calcite range from about 10 4 yr for a 2 mm-thick deposit located 1 m from a flowing fracture, to over 10 7 yr for a 2 cm-thick deposit located 100 m from a flowing fracture. The authors conclude that, given the geochemical and hydrologic characteristics observed at YM, the persistence of calcite minerals over geologic time scales in aquifers where flowing water is under-saturated with calcite does not necessarily preclude matrix diffusion as a dilution mechanism. However, the model suggests that the effective spacing between flowing fractures may be large enough to diminish the overall benefit of matrix diffusion to proposed high-level waste repository performance

  13. High resolution microstructure characterization of the interface between cold sprayed Al coating and Mg alloy substrate

    Wang, Qiang; Qiu, Dong; Xiong, Yuming; Birbilis, Nick; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) has validated the intimate metallurgical (atomic) bond formed along the interface of a cold-sprayed Al coating upon an Mg-alloy (AZ91) substrate. The compressive impact led to the formation of nanostructured layers of about 300–500 nm into the substrate. A highly distorted lattice structure with the inclusion of small amorphous zones was observed at the periphery of the particle/substrate interface, as a result of adiabatic shear plastic deformation at a high strain rate.

  14. High Porosity Alumina as Matrix Material for Composites of Al-Mg Alloys

    Gömze, L A; Egész, Á; Gömze, L N; Ojima, F

    2013-01-01

    The sophisticated industry and technologies require higher and higher assumptions against mechanical strength and surface hardness of ceramic reinforced metal alloys and metal matrix composites. Applying the well-known alumina powders by dry pressing technology and some special pore-forming additives and sintering technology the authors have successfully developed a new, high porosity alumina matrix material for composites of advenced Al-Mg alloys. The developed new matrix material have higher than 30% porosity, with homogenous porous structure and pore sizes from few nano up to 2–3 mm depending on the alloys containments. Thanks to the used materials and the sintering conditions the authors could decrease the wetting angles less than 90° between the high porosity alumina matrix and the Al-Mg alloys. Applied analytical methods in this research were laser granulometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Digital image analysis was applied to microscopy results, to enhance the results of transformation

  15. Preparation of MgO with High Surface Area, and Modification of Its Pore Characteristics

    Lee, Moon Hee; Park, Dong Gon [Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Thermal decomposition of hydrated surface layer of Mg(OH){sub 2} at 500 .deg. C in vacuum turned non-porous MgO into porous one with high surface area of around 270 m{sup 2}/g. Most of its surface area, 74 %, was from micropores, and rest of it was from mesopores in wedge-shaped slits, exhibiting bimodal size distribution centered around 30 and 90 A. Rehydration followed by subsequent dehydration at 300 .deg. C in dynamic vacuum further raised the surface area to 340 m{sup 2}/g. Fraction of microporous surface area was increased to 93%, and the shape of the mesopores was modified into parallel slits with a specific dimension of 32 A. Application of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} over MgO via iron complex formation did not alter the pore characteristics of MgO core, except slightly increased pore dimension. Over the course of the modification, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} stayed on the surface possibly via spill-over reaction.

  16. Ionic Conductivity of the Perovskites, NaMgF3MgF3 and KZnF3 at High Temperatures

    Andersen, N. H.; Kjems, Jørgen; Hayes, W.

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out a study of the ionic conductivity of NaMgF3, KMgF3 and KZnF3 up to temperatures close to the melting point. Our results, in contrast to previous reports in the literature, show no abnormal ionic conductivity at high temperatures. Care in interpretation of results is required...... because of surface electronic conduction....

  17. Experimental diagenesis: insights into aragonite to calcite transformation of Arctica islandica shells by hydrothermal treatment

    Casella, Laura A.; Griesshaber, Erika; Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Müller, Dirk; Ritter, Ann-Christine; Hippler, Dorothee; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Dietzel, Martin; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Angiolini, Lucia; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2017-03-01

    . Newly formed calcite nucleated at locations which were in contact with the fluid, at the shell surface, in the open pore system, and along growth lines. In the experiments with fluids simulating meteoric water, calcite crystals reached sizes up to 200 µm, while in the experiments with Mg-containing fluids the calcite crystals reached sizes up to 1 mm after 7 days of alteration. Aragonite is metastable at all applied conditions. Only a small bulk thermodynamic driving force exists for the transition to calcite. We attribute the sluggish replacement reaction to the inhibition of calcite nucleation in the temperature window from ca. 50 to ca. 170 °C or, additionally, to the presence of magnesium. Correspondingly, in Mg2+-bearing solutions the newly formed calcite crystals are larger than in Mg2+-free solutions. Overall, the aragonite-calcite transition occurs via an interface-coupled dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, which preserves morphologies down to the sub-micrometre scale and induces porosity in the newly formed phase. The absence of aragonite replacement by calcite at temperatures lower than 175 °C contributes to explaining why aragonitic or bimineralic shells and skeletons have a good potential of preservation and a complete fossil record.

  18. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    Wolthers, M.; Nehrke, G.; Gustafsson, J.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth

  19. Improvement of IBAD-MgO texturing for high throughput of buffered substrate

    Ito, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Matsuse, K.; Kuriki, R.; Tokumaru, M.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    2011-01-01

    The requirements from the market on two important factors of performance and cost need to be satisfied for commercialization of the coated conductors. Highly biaxially grain texturing with high production rate should be realized from the perspective of buffer layers processing. IBAD-MgO process is one of the major techniques which are possible to satisfy those requirements. The structure of our buffered substrate is IBS-GZO/IBAD-MgO/RFsputter-LaMnO 3 /PLD-CeO 2 . The PLD-CeO 2 process is the rate limiting and cost dominant one in this architecture. It is proposed that the self-texturing CeO 2 layer thickness could be reduced by optimization of the MgO processing due to higher MgO texturing and/or effective growth of self-texturing CeO 2 . Influence of the IBAD beam conditions and deposition time has been studied to optimize the IBAD conditions. Optimized IBAD conditions were decided from the viewpoints of in-plane grain texturing and the stability to obtain high texturing on fabrication. The Δφ value of CeO 2 layer was improved from 4-5 o to 3-3.5 o by the optimization. This buffered substrate gave high and uniform I c values of 524-565 A/cm-width for 50 m long GdBCO (1.5 μm) tape, indicating uniform distribution of Δφ(CeO 2 ). This improvement of Δφ(CeO 2 ) enables to reduce the CeO 2 thickness down to 300 nm without making Δφ(CeO 2 ) > 5 o , which improves CeO 2 throughput from 10 m/h to 30 m/h. A 50 m long patch sample showed more uniform Δφ distribution around 4 o even by high speed of 30 m/h as CeO 2 through-put. Highly and uniformly textured CeO 2 buffered substrate was obtained in 100 m long cost-effectively by optimization of IBAD-MgO processing.

  20. Improvement of IBAD-MgO texturing for high throughput of buffered substrate

    Ito, T., E-mail: t-ito@istec.or.jp [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Takahashi, Y.; Matsuse, K.; Kuriki, R.; Tokumaru, M.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The requirements from the market on two important factors of performance and cost need to be satisfied for commercialization of the coated conductors. Highly biaxially grain texturing with high production rate should be realized from the perspective of buffer layers processing. IBAD-MgO process is one of the major techniques which are possible to satisfy those requirements. The structure of our buffered substrate is IBS-GZO/IBAD-MgO/RFsputter-LaMnO{sub 3}/PLD-CeO{sub 2}. The PLD-CeO{sub 2} process is the rate limiting and cost dominant one in this architecture. It is proposed that the self-texturing CeO{sub 2} layer thickness could be reduced by optimization of the MgO processing due to higher MgO texturing and/or effective growth of self-texturing CeO{sub 2}. Influence of the IBAD beam conditions and deposition time has been studied to optimize the IBAD conditions. Optimized IBAD conditions were decided from the viewpoints of in-plane grain texturing and the stability to obtain high texturing on fabrication. The {Delta}{phi} value of CeO{sub 2} layer was improved from 4-5{sup o} to 3-3.5{sup o} by the optimization. This buffered substrate gave high and uniform I{sub c} values of 524-565 A/cm-width for 50 m long GdBCO (1.5 {mu}m) tape, indicating uniform distribution of {Delta}{phi}(CeO{sub 2}). This improvement of {Delta}{phi}(CeO{sub 2}) enables to reduce the CeO{sub 2} thickness down to 300 nm without making {Delta}{phi}(CeO{sub 2}) > 5{sup o}, which improves CeO{sub 2} throughput from 10 m/h to 30 m/h. A 50 m long patch sample showed more uniform {Delta}{phi} distribution around 4{sup o} even by high speed of 30 m/h as CeO{sub 2} through-put. Highly and uniformly textured CeO{sub 2} buffered substrate was obtained in 100 m long cost-effectively by optimization of IBAD-MgO processing.

  1. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Melting temperatures of MgO under high pressure determined by micro-texture observation

    Kimura, T.; Ohfuji, H.; Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.

    2016-12-01

    Periclase (MgO) is the second abundant mineral after bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle, and its melting temperature (Tm) under pressure is important to constrain the chemical composition of ultra-deep magma formed near the mantle-core boundary. However, the melting behavior is highly controversial among previous studies: a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) study reported a melting curve with a dTm/dP of 30 K/GPa at zero pressure [1], while several theoretical computations gave substantially higher dTm/dP of 90 100 K/GPa [2,3]. We performed a series of LHDAC experiments for measurements of Tm of MgO under high pressure, using single crystal MgO as the starting material. The melting was detected by using micro-texture observations of the quenched samples. We found that the laser-heated area of the sample quenched from the Tm in previous LHDAC experiments [1] showed randomly aggregated granular crystals, which was not caused by melting, but by plastic deformation of the sample. This suggests that the Tms of their study were substantially underestimated. On the other hand, the sample recovered from the temperature higher by 1500-1700 K than the Tms in previous LHDAC experiments showed a characteristic internal texture comparable to the solidification texture typically shown in metal casting. We determined the Tms based on the observation of this texture up to 32 GPa. Fitting our Tms to the Simon equation yields dTm/dP of 82 K/GPa at zero pressure, which is consistent with those of the theoretical predictions (90 100 K/GPa) [2,3]. Extrapolation of the present melting curve of MgO to the pressure of the CMB (135 GPa) gives a melting temperature of 8900 K. The present steep melting slope offers the eutectic composition close to peridotite (in terms of Mg/Si ratio) throughout the lower mantle conditions. According to the model for sink/float relationship between the solid mantle and the magma [4], a considerable amount of iron (Fe/(Mg+Fe) > 0.24) is expected

  3. Biogenic processes in crystalline bedrock fractures indicated by carbon isotope signatures of secondary calcite

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A.; Pitkänen, Petteri; Whitehouse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Variation in 13 C/ 12 C-isotope ratios of fracture filling calcite was analyzed in situ to investigate carbon sources and cycling in fractured bedrock. The study was conducted by separating sections of fracture fillings, and analyzing the 13 C/ 12 C-ratios with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Specifically, the study was aimed at fillings where previously published sulfur isotope data indicated the occurrence of bacterial sulfate reduction. The results showed that the δ 13 C values of calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ (VPDB). The analysis also showed high variations within single fillings of up to 39‰. The analyzed calcite fillings were mostly associated with two calcite groups, of which Group 3 represents possible Paleozoic fluid circulation, based on comparison with similar dated coatings within the Baltic Shield and the succeeding Group 1–2 fillings represent late-stage, low temperature mineralization and are possibly late Paleozoic to Quaternary in age. Both generations were associated with pyrite with δ 34 S values indicative of bacterial sulfate reduction. The δ 13 C values of calcite, however, were indicative of geochemical environments which were distinct for these generations. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite varied from −22.1‰ to +11‰, with a distinct peak at −16‰ to −12‰. Furthermore, there were no observable depth dependent trends in the δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite were indicative of organic matter degradation and methanogenesis. In contrast to the Group 3 fillings, the δ 13 C values of Group 1–2 calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ and they showed systematic variation with depth. The near surface environment of <30 m (bsl) was characterized by δ 13 C values indicative of degradation of surface derived organic matter, with δ 13 C values ranging from −30.3‰ to −5.5‰. The intermediate depth of

  4. Integrated Approach for Understanding Impurity Adsorption on Calcite: Mechanisms for Micro-scale Surface Phenomena

    Vinson, M. D.; Arvidson, R. S.; Luttge, A.

    2004-12-01

    A longstanding goal within the field of environmental geochemistry has been the development of a fundamental understanding of the kinetics that governs the interactions of solution-borne impurities with the calcite mineral surface. Recent dissolution experiments using Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have shown distinct differences in the interaction of these three impurity ions with the calcite crystal surface. Because the dissolution of carbonate minerals in soils and sediments influences the uptake and migration of groundwater contaminants, a rigorous understanding of the basic processes that occur at the mineral-fluid interface is necessary. We have used vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) coupled with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to examine calcite crystal dissolution in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+, all known dissolution inhibitors and possible groundwater contaminants. We have studied the kinetics of impurity-crystal interactions at a pH 8.8, and in the presence or absence of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our data show that, when individually introduced into undersaturated solutions, Mg2+ and Mn2+ are shown to activate the calcite crystal surface, resulting in enhanced etch pit nucleation rates and step density. Conversely, Sr2+ is shown to cause passivation of the calcite surface. The effect is intensified when solutions are saturated with respect to atmospheric CO2. Results indicate that aqueous CO32- (or HCO3-) may influence how aqueous metal ionic complexes interact with the crystal surface. Furthermore, the influence is differently exhibited, and passivation or activation ultimately depends on the properties of the diffusing metal ion or metal-hydroxide complex. These properties include for example, differences in hydration enthalpy, the effective ionic radius, and electron shell configuration.

  5. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface

    Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Yang, Mingjun; Javadi, Meshkat Sadat

    2015-01-01

    . Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite...... surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond...... with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface....

  6. The increase in T sub c for MgB sub 2 superconductor under high pressure

    Liu, Z X; You, J Y; Li, S C; Zhu, J L; Yu, R C; Li, F Y; Su, S K

    2002-01-01

    We report in situ high-pressure studies up to 1.0 GPa on MgB sub 2 superconductor which had been synthesized at high pressure. The as-prepared sample is of high quality as regards having a sharp superconducting transition (T sub c) at 39 K. The in situ high-pressure measurements were carried out using a Be-Cu piston-cylinder-type instrument with a mixed oil as the pressure-transmitting medium, which provides a quasi-hydrostatic pressure environment at low temperature. The superconducting transitions were measured using the electrical conductance method. It is found that T sub c increases with pressure in the initial pressure range, leading to a parabolic-like T sub c -P evolution.

  7. The increase in Tc for MgB2 superconductor under high pressure

    Liu, Z-X; Jin, C-Q; You, J-Y; Li, S-C; Zhu, J-L; Yu, R-C; Li, F-Y; Su, S-K

    2002-01-01

    We report in situ high-pressure studies up to 1.0 GPa on MgB 2 superconductor which had been synthesized at high pressure. The as-prepared sample is of high quality as regards having a sharp superconducting transition (T c ) at 39 K. The in situ high-pressure measurements were carried out using a Be-Cu piston-cylinder-type instrument with a mixed oil as the pressure-transmitting medium, which provides a quasi-hydrostatic pressure environment at low temperature. The superconducting transitions were measured using the electrical conductance method. It is found that T c increases with pressure in the initial pressure range, leading to a parabolic-like T c -P evolution

  8. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    broadening from macroscopic dielectric effects. We detect water adsorbed on the high surface area synthetic calcite, which permits observation of the chemistry of thin liquid films on calcite using transmission infrared spectroscopy. The combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory also...... asymmetric for the coccoliths and the synthetic calcite prepared using the carbonation method. It can be very well fitted by two peaks: a narrow Lorenzian at lower frequency and a broader Gaussian at higher frequency. These two samples both have a high specific surface area. Density functional theory...

  9. High-temperature electromass transfer in the perovskite La-Sr-Ga-Fe-Mg-O ceramics

    Aleksandrovskij, V.V.; Kaleva, G.M.; Mosunov, A.V.; Politova, E.D.; Stefanovich, S.Yu.; Avetistov, A.K.; Venskovskij, N.U.

    2001-01-01

    Physicochemical mechanism of oxygen-ion transfer in perovskite-like solid solutions within La-Sr-Ga-Fe-Mg-O system was studied using kinetic dependences of oxygen deficit at variation of gas medium composition. One discusses relation between the phenomenon of mass loss, linear deformation and conducting features of a ceramic material. Oxygen-ion transfer was determined to proceed by vacancy jumping mechanism. On the basis of data on dielectric relaxation in lanthanum gallate base solid solutions one obtained new evidences of vacancy correlation under high temperature [ru

  10. FORMATION OF CALCITE AND SILICA FROM PERCOLATION IN A HYDROLOGICALLY UNSATURATED SETTING, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Paces, J.B.; Whelan, J.F.; Peterman, Z.E.; Marshall, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Geological, mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic evidence from coatings of calcite and silica on open fractures and lithophysal cavities within welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain indicate an origin from meteoric water percolating through a thick (500 to 700 m) unsaturated zone (UZ) rather than from pulses of ascending ground water. Geologic evidence for a UZ setting includes the presence of coatings in only a small percentage of cavities, the restriction of coatings to fracture footwalls and cavity floors, and an absence of mineral high-water marks indicative of water ponding. Systematic mineral sequences (early calcite, followed by chalcedony with minor quartz and fluorite, and finally calcite with intercalated opal forming the bulk of the coatings) indicate progressive changes in UZ conditions through time, rather than repeated saturation by flooding. Percolation under the influence of gravity also results in mineral textures that vary between steeply dipping sites (thinner coatings of blocky calcite) and shallowly dipping sites (thicker coatings of coarse, commonly bladed calcite, with globules and sheets of opal). Micrometer-scale growth banding in both calcite and opal reflects slow average growth rates (scale of mm/m.y.) over millions of years rather than only a few rapidly deposited growth episodes. Isotopic compositions of C, O, Sr, and U from calcite and opal indicate a percolation-modified meteoric water source, and collectively refute a deeper ground-water source. Chemical and isotopic variations in coatings also indicate long-term evolution of water compositions. Although some compositional changes are related to shifts in climate, growth rates in the deeper UZ are buffered from large changes in meteoric input. Coatings most likely formed from films of water flowing down connected fracture pathways. Mineral precipitation is consistent with water vapor and carbon dioxide loss from films at very slow rates. Data collectively indicate that mineral coatings

  11. Preparation of cold Mg+ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-01

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a 24 Mg + ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little maintenance

  12. Calcite production by coccolithophores in the south east Pacific Ocean

    L. Beaufort

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BIOSOPE cruise covered an oceanographic transect through the centre of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG from the Marquesas archipelago to the Peru-Chile upwelling (PCU. Water samples from 6 depths in the euphotic zone were collected at 20 stations. The concentrations of suspended calcite particles, coccolithophores cells and detached coccoliths were estimated together with size and weight using an automatic polarizing microscope, a digital camera, and a collection of softwares performing morphometry and pattern recognition. Some of these softwares are new and described here for the first time. The coccolithophores standing stocks were usually low and reached maxima west of the PCU. The coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa spp. and Crenalithus spp. (Order Isochrysidales represented more than 30% of all the suspended calcite particles detected in the size range 0.1–46 μm (22% of PIC in term of calcite weight. These species grew preferentially in the Chlorophyll maximum zone. In the SPG their maximum cell concentrations were recorded between depth of 150 and 200 m, which is unusually deep for these taxa. The weight of coccoliths and coccospheres were correlated to their size. Large and heavy coccoliths and coccospheres were found in regions with relatively high fertility in the Marquises Island and in the PCU. Small and light coccoliths and coccospheres were found west of the PCU. This distribution is strongly related to ocean chemistry in particular to alkalinity and to carbonate ions concentration. The biotic (coccolithophores production influence on calcification is mainly driven at the local scale (depth whereas the abiotic (carbonate chemistry plays its most important role at the regional (horizontal level. Here 94% of the variability of coccolith and coccosphere weight can be explained by a change in 7 environmental variables.

  13. Phase 1 Final Technical Report - MgB2 Synthesis: Pushing to High Field Performance

    Bhatia, Mohit; McIntyre, Peter

    2009-01-01

    crystalline boron results in the formation of parasitic phases such as MgB4, MgB7, etc. Such parasitic phases are a primary element of the connectivity problem, in which even though a sample powder may contain grains of high-quality MgB2, adjacent grains are surrounded by intergrowths of parasitic phases so that current trans-port is badly degraded. The best results to date have been obtained using boron powder produced long ago for a rocket propellant development project. The synthesis process was complex and is now largely lost, and the manufacturing equipment has long since been scrapped. The last batch of the powder has been used during recent years to support MgB2 R and D at several labs, but supplies are dwindling. ATC has identified a first application of its plasma torch to synthesize phase-pure amorphous boron flake using a rapid-quench splat technique. Inexpensive technical-grade boron would be purified of contaminants, then dispersed as an aerosol in inert gas and passed through the plasma torch to melt it into a spray. The spray would be splat-condensed on a rotating drum to form pure amorphous flake. The process would begin with technical-grade boron powder, having good stoichiometric purity, nanoscale particles, but significant contamination of MgO and crystalline boron. We used wet chemistry to remove B2O3 completely and reduced the MgO impurity, and analyzed the particle size distribution using a Coulter counter and the phase composition using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD). The next step will be to build an rf plasma torch with a recirculating single-component aerosol feed and the cooled splat drum and collector, and undertake process devel-opment for amorphous boron powder. This revised goal has two benefits. First, it is an easier technology than our ultimate goal of a multi-component laminar flow torch. We have been counseled by those experienced in plasma torch technology that our ultimate goal will require a torch that should be feasible but has never been

  14. Thermomechanical Treatments on High Strength Al-Zn-Mg(-Cu) Alloys

    Di Russo, E; Conserva, M; Gatto, F

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the metallurgical properties of Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy products processed according to newly developed Final Thermomechanical Treatments (FTMT) of T-AHA type...

  15. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Shaw, Samuel; Benning, Liane G

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of nanoparticulate amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range of environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-25 °C) using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (ED-XRD) in conjunction with high-resolution electron microscopy, ex situ X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallization process occurs in two stages; firstly, the particles of ACC rapidly dehydrate and crystallize to form individual particles of vaterite; secondly, the vaterite transforms to calcite via a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism with the reaction rate controlled by the surface area of calcite. The second stage of the reaction is approximately 10 times slower than the first. Activation energies of calcite nucleation and crystallization are 73±10 and 66±2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. A model to calculate the degree of calcite crystallization from ACC at environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-40 °C) is also presented.

  16. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite was stud......The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite...... of a high degree of super-saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (SIHAP⩽7.83). The amount of phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition, in particular, adsorption increases as the CO32- activity decreases (at constant pH) and as pH increases (at constant CO32- activity). The primary effect...... of ionic strength on phosphate sorption onto calcite is its influence on the activity of the different aqueous phosphate species. The experimental results were modeled satisfactorily using the constant capacitance model with >CaPO4Ca0 and either >CaHPO4Ca+ or >CaHPO4- as the adsorbed surface species...

  17. Features of dynamic strain aging in high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    Peng Kaiping; Chen Wenzhe; Zhang Haoguo; Qian Kuangwu [Fuzhou Univ., Fujian (China)

    1997-08-30

    The present work investigates mainly the regulation and features of the occurrence of serrated yielding phenomenon of a high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy LC4 under various heat treatments and loading conditions. The main results are: (1) In the serrated yielding temperature region a critical transition temperature T{sub t} exists. The critical plastic strain has a negative or positive temperature coefficient within the temperature region lower or higher than T{sub t}; (2) The reason for this phenomenon might be the existence of an absorbed resource which diminishes the pinning effect of solute atoms to mobile dislocations; (3) in the positive coefficient region two reverse thermal activation processes occur simultaneously. One is the solute atoms diffuse to the moving dislocations and pin the dislocations. The other one is the absorbed resource absorbs the solute and diminishes the pinning effect; (4) for LC4, the activation energy of the first process is equivalent to the diffusion activation energy of Mg in Al matrix and the second one is equivalent to that of the interface absorbed solute atoms. (orig.) 6 refs.

  18. Mg-aminoclay as stabilizer for synthesizing highly stable and reactive nZVI for decontamination

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Lee, Young-Chul; Mines, Paul D.

    Despite the large surface area and superior reactivity of nZVI, its limited stability is a major obstacle for in situ subsurface remediation. In this study, Mg-aminoclay (MgAC) was applied for the first time as a stabilizer in nZVI synthesis. With increased doses of Mg-aminoclay, nZVI particle gr...

  19. Trace element partitioning in fluvial tufa reveals variable portions of biologically influenced calcite precipitation

    Ritter, Simon M.; Isenbeck-Schröter, Margot; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Scholz, Christian; Rheinberger, Stefan; Höfle, Bernhard; Frank, Norbert

    2018-03-01

    The formation of tufa is essentially influenced by biological processes and, in order to infer environmental information from tufa deposits, it has to be determined how the geochemistry of biologically influenced tufa deviates from equilibrium conditions between water and calcite precipitate. We investigated the evolution of the water and tufa geochemistry of consecutive tufa barrages in a small tufa-depositing creek in Southern Germany. High incorporation of divalent cations into tufa is ubiquitous, which is probably promoted by an influence of biofilms in the tufa element partitioning. The distribution coefficients for the incorporation of Mg, Sr and Ba into tufa at the Kaisinger creek D(Mg), D(Sr) and D(Ba) are 0.020-0.031, 0.13-0.18 and 0.26-0.43, respectively. This agrees with previous research suggesting that biofilm influenced tufa will be enriched in divalent cations over equilibrium values in the order of Mg formation with likely higher distribution coefficients and inorganically-driven tufa formation with likely lower distribution coefficients. Additionally, the distribution coefficients of metals in tufa of the Kaisinger creek D(Cd), D(Zn), D(Co) and D(Mn) show values of 11-22, 2.2-12, 0.7-4.9 and 30-57, respectively. These metals are highly enriched in upstream tufa deposits and their contents in tufa strongly decrease downstream. Such highly compatible elements could therefore be used to distinguish easily between different lateral sections in fluvial barrage-dam tufa depositional systems and could serve as a useful geochemical tool in studying ancient barrage-dam tufa depositional systems.

  20. ELLERMAN BOMBS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. IV. VISIBILITY IN Na I AND Mg I

    Rutten, R. J.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Vissers, G. J. M., E-mail: R.J.Rutten@uu.nl [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-08-01

    Ellerman bombs are transient brightenings of the wings of the solar Balmer lines that mark reconnection in the photosphere. Ellerman noted in 1917 that he did not observe such brightenings in the Na i D and Mg i b lines. This non-visibility should constrain EB interpretation, but has not been addressed in published bomb modeling. We therefore test Ellerman’s observation and confirm it using high-quality imaging spectrometry with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. However, we find a diffuse brightness in these lines that seems to result from prior EBs. We tentatively suggest this is a post-bomb hot-cloud phenomenon also found in recent EB spectroscopy in the ultraviolet.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of superconductor MgB sub 2 under high pressure

    Tang, J; Gu, H W; Matsushita, A; Takano, Y; Togano, K; Kito, H; Ihara, H

    2002-01-01

    The superconductivity and the lattice properties of a sintered MgB sub 2 material have been investigated under high pressure up to 10 GPa. The transition temperature was found to decrease linearly with increasing hydrostatic pressure at a rate of 1.03 K GPa sup - sup 1 , which can be explained with the classical Bardeen-Cooper-Shrieffer theory based on an electron-phonon coupling mechanism. The crystal lattice exhibits an anisotropic compressibility characterized by a larger compressibility along the c-direction than the a/b-directions. The anisotropy is attributed to a weaker inter-plane bonding along the c-axis in comparison with a stronger intra-plane bonding perpendicular to the c-axis. The bulk modulus of the measured material was deduced to be 172 GPa.

  2. The Effect of Increasing Sn Content on High-Temperature Mechanical Deformation of an Mg-3%Cu-1%Ca Alloy

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chill casting of magnesium alloy samples with secondary alloying elements of Cu, Ca and Sn at % w.t. concentrations in the range 1–5, 0.1–5 and 0.1–3 respectively, gave rise to appreciably enhanced resistance to high-temperature creep, while maintaining good heat conductivity. The latter was considered to be driven by Cu and Mg-Cu intermetallics while it was clear that Sn mediated the high-temperature performance, mainly via networks of Mg2Sn and MgCaSn precipitates along the Mg matrix grain boundaries. It was postulated that Sn formed intermetallics by preferential substitution of Ca atoms and, thus, did not degrade the heat conductivity by retaining Cu. The % w.t. stoichiometry with the optimum combination of heat conductivity and resistance to high-temperature creep was found to be Mg-3Cu-1Ca-0.1Sn.

  3. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature processability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    Cifuentes, Sandra C.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate.Este trabajo aborda la influencia de magnesio en el comportamiento a fusión y en la estabilidad térmica de nuevos compuestos de PLLA / Mg biorreabsorbibles como una forma de investigar su procesabilidad mediante técnicas convencionales, lo que probablemente requerirá una etapa en estado fundido a alta temperatura para moldear el material mediante el uso de una etapa de compresión, extrusión o inyección. Para este fin, los materiales de PLLA cargados con partículas de magnesio, de diferentes tamaños y fracción de volumen, se prepararon por la técnica de disolución y colada, evitando así el procesado a alta temperatura antes del análisis. El análisis mediante DSC, DSC modulada y termogravimetría demuestra que, aunque la estabilidad térmica de PLLA se reduce, el intervalo de temperatura para su procesado por rutas convencionales es suficientemente amplio. Además, las partículas de magnesio no alteran la cristalización del pol

  4. Charge Exchange of Highly Charged Ne and Mg Ions with H and He

    Lyons, D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    Cross sections for single electron capture (SEC), or charge exchange (CX), in collisions of Ne(8-10)+ and Mg(8-12)+ with H and He, are computed using an approximate multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) formalism. Final-state-resolved cross sections for the principal (n), orbital angular momentum (ℓ), and where appropriate, total spin angular momentum (S) quantum numbers are explicitly computed, except for the incident bare ions Ne10+ and Mg12+. In the latter two cases, n{\\ell }-resolution is obtained from analytical ℓ-distribution functions applied to n-resolved MCLZ cross sections. In all cases, the cross sections are computed over the collision energy range 1 meV/u to 50 keV/u with LZ parameters estimated from atomic energies obtained from experiment, theory, or, in the case of high-lying Rydberg levels, estimated with a quantum defect approach. Errors in the energy differences in the adiabatic potentials at the avoided crossing distances give the largest contribution to the uncertainties in the cross sections, which are expected to increase with decreasing cross section magnitude. The energy differences are deduced here with the Olson-Salop-Tauljberg radial coupling model. Proper selection of an ℓ-distribution function for bare ion collisions introduces another level of uncertainty into the results. Comparison is made to existing experimental or theoretical results when available, but such data are absent for most considered collision systems. The n{\\ell }S-resolved SEC cross sections are used in an optically thin cascade simulation to predict X-ray spectra and line ratios that will aid in modeling the X-ray emission in environments where CX is an important mechanism. Details on a MCLZ computational package, Stueckelberg, are also provided.

  5. Examination of TL and optical absorption in calcite's mineral

    Sabikoglu, I.; Can, N.

    2009-01-01

    Calcite which is a form of crystalline of the calcium carbonate composes parent material of chalk stone (limestone) and marble. Calcite which presents in various colors also in our country consists of yellow, blue, transparent and green colors. In this study, green calcite mineral which is taken from the region of Ayvalik, was examined of its thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption features in different doses. It has been obtained a large TL peak in 179 degree C and absorption peak in 550 mm.

  6. Neutron-activation determination of the rare earths in natural calcites using a semiconductor detector

    Vaganov, N.A.; Bulnaev, A.I.; Mejer, V.A.; Ponomarev, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The application of germanium semiconducting detector is described. The detector has an energy resolution about 1 KeV and makes it possible to determine the content of Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, and Yb in natural calcites with high sensitivity. The region of soft γ-radiation of activated calcites is more favourable for measurements to be performed than the region of hard γ-rays. Semiconducting detectors of radiation type are relatively cheap; they can be stored at room temperature. The limit of determining rare earth elements in calcites is (g): Eu-1.5.10 -9 ; Tb-4.0.10 -9 ; Yb-7.0.10 -9 ; Ce-1.0.10 -7 ; Nd-5.0.10 -7 ; Gd-1.0.10 -6 . A relative error of concentration determination is 10-20%

  7. Rearrangement of porous CaO aggregates during calcite decomposition in vacuum

    Beruto, D.; Barco, L.; Searcy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    High-resolution SEM photographs, N 2 adsorption isotherms, Hg porosimetry, and micrometer measurements were used to characterize CaO particle shapes and pore-size distributions that result when calcite crystals are decomposed in vacuum at 686 0 C. The surface area of the CaO produced from large calcite crystals is constant at 116 + or - 4 m 2 /g independent of the extent of reaction. The volume occupied by a CaO aggregate is approx. = 98 + or - 2% that of the original calcite crystal. The approx. = 54% total porosity is comprised of 42% pores of approx. = 5 nm cross section and 12% pores of approx. = 10 μm cross section. The duplex pore structure is formed by a diffusionless repacking of CaO particles that initially form with a more uniform distribution of particles and pores

  8. Nyctemeral variations of magnesium intake in the calcitic layer of a Chilean mollusk shell ( Concholepas concholepas, Gastropoda)

    Lazareth, Claire E.; Guzman, Nury; Poitrasson, Franck; Candaudap, Frederic; Ortlieb, Luc

    2007-11-01

    Mollusk shells are increasingly used as records of past environmental conditions, particularly for sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstructions. Many recent studies tackled SST (and/or sea-surface salinity) tracers through variations in the elementary (Mg and Sr) or stable isotope (δ 18O) composition within mollusk shells. But such attempts, which sometimes include calibration studies on modern specimens, are not always conclusive. We present here a series of Mg and Sr analyses in the calcitic layer of Concholepas concholepas (Muricidae, Gastropoda) with a very high time-resolution on a time window covering about 1 and a half month of shell formation, performed by Laser Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The selected specimen of this common Chilean gastropod was grown under controlled environmental conditions and precise weekly time-marks were imprinted in the shell with calcein staining. Strontium variations in the shell are too limited to be interpreted in terms of environmental parameter changes. In contrast, Mg incorporation into the shell and growth rate appear to change systematically between night and day. During the day, Mg is incorporated at a higher rate than at night and this intake seems positively correlated with water temperature. The nightly reduced Mg incorporation is seemingly related to metabolically controlled processes, formation of organic-rich shell increments and nocturnal feeding activity of the animals. The nyctemeral Mg changes in the C. concholepas shell revealed in this study might explain at least part of the discrepancies observed in previous studies on the use of Mg as a SST proxy in mollusk shells. In the case of C. concholepas, Mg cannot be used straightforwardly as a SST proxy.

  9. Mg doping induced high structural quality of sol–gel ZnO nanocrystals: Application in photocatalysis

    Abed, Chayma; Bouzidi, Chaker [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Elhouichet, Habib, E-mail: Habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis 2092 (Tunisia); Gelloz, Bernard [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 2-24-16 Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Ferid, Mokhtar [Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nancrystals doped with Mg were prepared from sol–gel method. • Structural and optical properties of ZnO:Mg nanocrystals were investigated. • Good crystalline quality of ZnO nanocrystals was reported after Mg doping. • Good photocatalytic activity of Mg doped ZnO nanocrystals was demonstrated under sun light illumination. - Abstract: Undoped and Mg doped ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) ZnO:x%Mg (x = 1, 2, 3, and 5) were synthesized using sol–gel method. The structural and optical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectivity, and photoluminescence (PL). XRD analysis demonstrates that all prepared samples present pure hexagonal wurtzite structure without any Mg related phases. The NCs size varies from 26.82 nm to 42.96 nm with Mg concentrations; it presents an optimal value for 2% of Mg. The Raman spectra are dominated by the E{sub 2high} mode. For highly Mg doping (5%), the occurrence of silent B{sub 1(low)} mode suggested that the Mg ions do substitute at Zn sites in the ZnO lattice The band gap energy was estimated from both Tauc and Urbach methods and found to be 3.39 eV for ZnO:2%Mg. The PL spectra exhibit two emission bands in the UV and visible range. Their evolution with Mg doping reveals the reduction of defect density in ZnO at low Mg doping by filling Zn vacancies. In addition, it was found that further Mg doping, above 2%, improves the photocatalytic activity of ZnO NCs for photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under sunlight irradiation. The efficient electron–hole separation is the main factor responsible for the enhancement of photocatalytic performance of Mg doped ZnO NCs. Through this work, we show that by varying the Mg contents in ZnO, this material can be a potential candidate for both optoelectronic and photocatalytic applications.

  10. An investigation of the heterogeneous nucleation of calcite

    House, W.A.; Tutton, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation kinetics of calcite from dilute calcium bicarbonate solutions onto pyrex glass seeds is investigated by using a modified form of the Davies and Jones equation. The rate constant is evaluated from experiments using calcite seeds and it is demonstrated that the growth rate does not increase in proportion to the increase in surface area accompanying precipitation. The number of heteronucleated particles is estimated by assuming a constant density of growth sites on the different calcite surfaces. A comparison is made between the specific surface areas of calcite obtained by the calcium-45 isotopic exchange method and other values. (orig.)

  11. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Kobe University, Rokko-dai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: oni@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Kobe University, Rokko-dai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite.

  12. Atom-resolved AFM imaging of calcite nanoparticles in water

    Imada, Hirotake; Kimura, Kenjiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An advanced frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM) was applied for imaging particles. ► Atom-resolved topography of nano-sized particles of calcite was observed in water. ► Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of calcite. ► A promising ability of FM-AFM was demonstrated in imaging nano-sized particles. - Abstract: The atom-resolved topography of calcite nanoparticles was observed in water using a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope. Locally ordered structures were found and assigned to a (104) facet of crystalline calcite

  13. Atomic size and local order effects on the high temperature strength of binary Mg alloys

    Abaspour, Saeideh, E-mail: s.abaspour78@gmail.com [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Zambelli, Victor [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), The University of Queensland (Australia); Cáceres, Carlos H. [ARC-Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    The solid solution strengthening introduced by Ca (0.6 and 0.9 at%) and Sn 0.5–2.5 at%) was studied through tensile, compression and stress relaxation tests at room temperature, 373 K (100 °C) and 453 K (180 °C) on solution heat-treated and quenched specimens and compared with existing data for binary alloys containing Ca, Sn, Y, Gd, Nd, Zn and Al as well as for AZ91 alloy. At room temperature the solution-hardening rate introduced by Ca and Sn was much higher than that of Al, matching those of Y, Gd and Zn. Calcium also reduced the tension/compression asymmetry. At high temperature Ca effectively prevented stress relaxation, nearly matching Y, Gd and Nd. Tin was less effective, but still outperformed Al and AZ91 at low stresses. The effects at room and high temperature introduced by Ca and Sn appeared consistent with the presence of short-range order, in line with those introduced by Y, Nd, Gd and Zn. The larger than Mg atom size of Ca, Nd, Gd and Y can be expected to intensify the local order by strengthening the atomic bonds through its effects on the local electron density, accounting for their greater strengthening at high temperature. For given difference in atomic size, the effects on the local order are expected to be lesser for smaller sized atoms like Sn and Zn, hence their more subdued effects.

  14. Greenschist-Facies Pseudotachylytes and Gouge: a Microstructural Study of the Deformation Propagation at the Boundary Between Hp-Metabasite and Calcite Bearing Metasediments

    Crispini, L.; Scambelluri, M.; Capponi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent friction experiments on calcite-bearing systems reproduce pseudotachylyte structures, that are diagnostic of dinamic calcite recrystallization related to seismic slip in the shallow crust. Here we provide the study of a pseudotachylyte (PT) bearing low angle oblique-slip fault. The fault is linked to the exhumation of Alpine HP-ophiolites and it is syn- to post-metamorphic with respect to retrograde greenschist facies metamorphism. The observed microstructures developed at the brittle-ductile transition and suggest that seismic and interseismic slip was enhanced by interaction with fluids. The fault zone is in-between high-pressure eclogite-facies metabasites (hangingwall) and calcite bearing metasediments (footwall). The mafic rocks largely consist of upper greenschist facies hornblende, albite, chlorite, epidote with relict eclogitic garnet, Na-pyroxene and rutile; metasediments correspond to calcschist and micaschist with quartz, phengite, zoisite, chlorite, calcite and relics of garnet. Key features of the oucrop are: the thickness and geometry of the PT and gouge; the multiple production of PT characterized by overprinting plastic and brittle deformation; the occurrence in footwall metasediments of mm-thick bands of finely recrystallized calcite coeval with PT development in the hangingwall. The damage zone is ca. 2 m-thick and is characterized by two black, ultra-finegrained straight and sharp Principal Slip Zones (PSZ) marked by PT. The damage zone shows a variety of fault rocks (cataclasite and ultracataclasite, gouge and PT) with multiple crosscutting relationships. Within the two main PSZ, PT occurs in 10-20 cm thick layer, in small scale injection veins and in microfractures. In the mafic hanging wall, the PT is recrystallized and does not preserve glass: it shows flow structures with subrounded, embayed and rebsorbed quartz in a fine grained matrix composed of isotropic albite + chlorite + quartz + epidote + titanite, suggesting recrystallization

  15. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Li, Yan Vivian, E-mail: yan.li@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Department of Design and Merchandising (United States); Cathles, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmc19@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract.

  16. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl_2, and MgCl_2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract

  17. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2016-03-02

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.

  18. On the origin of calcite-cemented sandstones in the clearwater formation oil-sands, Alberta

    Colquhoun, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis examined the formation of calcite-cemented sandstones in the Clearwater Formation within the Cold Lake and southern Primrose areas of the Alberta oil sands. Three stages of diagenesis have been recognized, both in the calcite-cemented sandstones and reservoir sands. Diagenesis of the Clearwater Formation in the Cold Lake and southern Primrose areas ended once the reservoir filled with hydrocarbons, but in the Cold Lake area, diagenesis of water-saturated sands likely continued after hydrocarbon emplacement. The reservoir sands in the formation contain a diverse clay mineral assemblage. In general, 0.7 nm clays dominate the diagenetic clay mineralogy of the Clearwater sands. Reservoir sands that contain large amounts of detrital clays and early diagenetic, grain-coating chlorite/smectite have significantly reduced bitumen-saturation. The presence of detrital and diagenetic smectitic clays complicates the removal of bitumen from the Clearwater formation using cyclic steam stimulation techniques because they swell during steam stimulation and reduce porosity and permeability of reservoir sands. Reservoir sands that contain kaolinite, feldspar and calcite react to form smectitic clays, which swell upon cyclic steam stimulation and further reduce porosity and permeability of reservoir sands. However, in the Cold Lake and Primrose areas, the dominant clay mineral is berthierine, which is associated with high calcite, which help to preserve porosity, permeability and bitumen saturation. The porous nature of bitumen-saturated, calcite-cemented sandstones that are laterally extensive could possibly provide a preferential path for steam to initiate calcite dissolution and produce significant concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide in injected fluids. It was noted that this may then precipitate as carbonate scale within the reservoir and could cause formation damage or affect production equipment. 207 refs., 9 tabs., 58 figs., 3 appendices.

  19. Interaction of ethanol and water with the {1014} surface of calcite

    Cooke, David; Gray, R J; Sand, K K

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model the interaction between ethanol, water, and the {1014} surface of calcite. Our results demonstrate that a single ethanol molecule is able to form two interactions with the mineral surface (both Ca-O and O-H), resulting in a highly ordered, st...

  20. Grain Refinement and High-Performance of Equal-Channel Angular Pressed Cu-Mg Alloy for Electrical Contact Wire

    Aibin Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pass equal-channel angular pressing (EACP was applied to produce ultrafine-grained (UFG Cu-0.2wt%Mg alloy contact wire with high mechanical/electric performance, aim to overcome the catenary barrier of high-speed trains by maximizing the tension and improving the power delivery. Microstructure evolution and overall properties of the Cu-Mg alloy after different severe-plastic-deformation (SPD routes were investigated by microscopic observation, tensile and electric tests. The results show that the Cu-Mg alloy after multi-pass ECAP at 473 K obtains ultrafine grains, higher strength and desired conductivity. More passes of ECAP leads to finer grains and higher strength, but increasing ECAP temperature significantly lower the strength increment of the UFG alloy. Grain refinement via continuous SPD processing can endow the Cu-Mg alloy superior strength and good conductivity characteristics, which are advantageous to high-speed electrification railway systems.

  1. MgAl2O4 spinel refractory as containment liner for high-temperature alkali salt containing environments

    Peascoe-Meisner, Roberta A [Knoxville, TN; Keiser, James R [Oak Ridge, TN; Hemric, James G [Knoxville, TN; Hubbard, Camden R [Oak Ridge, TN; Gorog, J Peter [Kent, WA; Gupta, Amul [Jamestown, NY

    2008-10-21

    A method includes containing a high-temperature alkali salt containing environment using a refractory containment liner containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel. A method, includes forming a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel having an exterior chill zone defined by substantially columnar crystallization and an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and removing at least a portion of the exterior chill zone from the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel by scalping the refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel to define at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization. A product of manufacture includes a refractory brick containing MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 spinel including an interior zone defined by substantially equiaxed crystallization; and at least one outer surface having an area of substantially equiaxed crystallization.

  2. High-resolution study of levels in the astrophysically important nucleus 26Mg and resulting updated level assignments

    Adsley, P.; Brümmer, J. W.; Faestermann, T.; Fox, S. P.; Hammache, F.; Hertenberger, R.; Meyer, A.; Neveling, R.; Seiler, D.; de Séréville, N.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2018-04-01

    Background: The 22Ne(α ,n )25Mg reaction is an important source of neutrons for the s -process. Direct measurement of this reaction and the competing 22Ne(α ,γ )26Mg reaction are challenging due to the gaseous nature of both reactants, the low cross section and the experimental challenges of detecting neutrons and high-energy γ rays. Detailed knowledge of the resonance properties enables the rates to be constrained for s -process models. Purpose: Previous experimental studies have demonstrated a lack of agreement in both the number and excitation energy of levels in 26Mg. To try to resolve the disagreement between different experiments, proton and deuteron inelastic scattering from 26Mg have been used to identify excited states. Method: Proton and deuteron beams from the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratorium at Garching, Munich, were incident upon enriched 26MgO targets. Scattered particles were momentum-analyzed in the Q3D magnetic spectrograph and detected at the focal plane. Results: Reassignments of states around Ex=10.8 -10.83 MeV in 26Mg suggested in previous works have been confirmed. In addition, new states in 26Mg have been observed, two below and two above the neutron threshold. Up to six additional states above the neutron threshold may have been observed compared to experimental studies of neutron reactions on 25Mg, but some or all of these states may be due to 24Mg contamination in the target. Finally, inconsistencies between measured resonance strengths and some previously accepted Jπ assignments of excited 26Mg states have been noted. Conclusion: There are still a large number of nuclear properties in 26Mg that have yet to be determined and levels that are, at present, not included in calculations of the reaction rates. In addition, some inconsistencies between existing nuclear data exist that must be resolved in order for the reaction rates to be properly calculated.

  3. Cryogenic milling for the fabrication of high J{sub c} MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductors

    Kim, D. N.; Kang, M. O.; Park, H. W. [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jun, B. H.; Kim, C. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Cryogenic milling which is a combined process of low-temperature treatment and mechanical milling was applied to fabricate high critical current density (J{sub c}) MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductors. Liquid nitrogen was used as a coolant, and no solvent or lubricant was used. Spherical Mg (6-12 μm, 99.9 % purity) and plate-like B powder (⁓ 1 μm, 97 % purity) were milled simultaneously for various time periods (0, 2, 4, 6 h) at a rotating speed of 500 rpm using ZrO{sub 2} balls. The (Mg{sup +2B}) powders milled were pressed into pellets and heat-treated at 700°C for 1 h in flowing argon. The use of cryomilled powders as raw materials promoted the formation reaction of superconducting MgB{sub 2}, reduced the grain size of MgB{sub 2}, and suppressed the formation of impurity MgO. The superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) of MgB{sub 2} was not influenced as the milling time (t) increased up to 6 h. Meanwhile, the critical current density (J{sub c}) of MgB{sub 2} increased significantly when t increased to 4 h. When t increased further to 6 h, however, Jc decreased. The J{sub c} enhancement of MgB{sub 2} by cryogenic milling is attributed to the formation of the fine grain MgB{sub 2} and a suppression of the MgO formation.

  4. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments.

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-06-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10(-4) mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments.

  5. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  6. Dissolution of coccolithophorid calcite by microzooplankton and copepod grazing

    Antia, A. N.; Suffrian, K.; Holste, L.; Müller, M. N.; Nejstgaard, J. C.; Simonelli, P.; Carotenuto, Y.; Putzeys, S.

    2008-01-01

    Independent of the ongoing acidification of surface seawater, the majority of the calcium carbonate produced in the pelagial is dissolved by natural processes above the lysocline. We investigate to what extent grazing and passage of coccolithophorids through the guts of copepods and the food vacuoles of microzooplankton contribute to calcite dissolution. In laboratory experiments where the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi was fed to the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, the heterotrophic flagellate Oxyrrhis marina and the copepod Acartia tonsa, calcite dissolution rates of 45-55%, 37-53% and 5-22% of ingested calcite were found. We ascribe higher loss rates in microzooplankton food vacuoles as compared to copepod guts to the strongly acidic digestion and the individual packaging of algal cells. In further experiments, specific rates of calcification and calcite dissolution were also measured in natural populations during the PeECE III mesocosm study under differing ambient pCO2 concentrations. Microzooplankton grazing accounted for between 27 and 70% of the dynamic calcite stock being lost per day, with no measurable effect of CO2 treatment. These measured calcite dissolution rates indicate that dissolution of calcite in the guts of microzooplankton and copepods can account for the calcite losses calculated for the global ocean using budget and model estimates.

  7. Organic geochemistry and stable isotope composition of New Zealand carbonate concretions and calcite fracture fills

    Pearson, M.J.; Nelson, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonate concretion bodies, representing a number of morphological types, and associated calcite fracture fills, mainly from New Zealand, have been studied both organically and inorganically. Extracted organic material is dominated by a complex polymeric dark brown highly polar fraction with a subordinate less polar and lighter coloured lipid fraction. The relative proportion of the two fractions is the principal control on the colour of fracture fill calcites. Concretions are classified mainly by reference to their carbonate stable carbon and oxygen isotope and cation composition. Typical subspherical calcitic septarian concretions, such as those in the Paleocene Moeraki and the Eocene Rotowaro Siltstones, contain carbon derived mainly by bacterial sulfate reduction in marine strata during early diagenesis. Other concretions, including a septarian calcitic type from the Northland Allochthon, have a later diagenetic origin. Siderite concretions, abundant in the nonmarine Waikato Coal Measures, are typically dominated by methanogenic carbon, whereas paramoudra-like structures from the Taranaki Miocene have the most extreme carbon isotope compositions, probably resulting from methane formation or oxidation in fluid escape conduits. Lipids from concretion bodies and most fracture fill calcites contain significant concentrations of fatty acids. Concretion bodies dominated by bimodally distributed n-fatty acids with strong even-over-odd preference, in which long chain n-acids are of terrestrial origin, have very low hydrocarbon biomarker maturities. Concretion bodies that lack long chain n-acids often have higher apparent biomarker maturity and prominent alpha-omega diacids. Such diacids are abundant in fracture fill calcites at Rotowaro, especially where calcite infills the septaria of a siderite concretion in the non-marine Waikato Coal Measures, and support the view that fluid transport resulted in carbonate entrapment of the fracture-hosted acids. Diacids also

  8. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 and 70 deg by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected medium-width filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  9. Mineral contents and their solubility on calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals from cockle shell powder (Anadara granosa Linn)

    Widyastuti, S.; Pramushinta, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    Prepared and characterized calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals improves solubility. Calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals were synthesized using precipitation method from the waste of blood clam cockle shells (Anadara granosa Linn). This study was conducted to analyze mineral composition of nanocrystals calcium carbonat calcite cockle (Anadara granosa) shell for calcium fortification of food applications and to evaluate the solubilities of Calsium and Phospor. The sample of nanocrystals from cockle shells was evaluated to determine the content of 11 macro-and micro-elements. These elements are Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Sodium (Na), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Ferrum (Fe), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Zink (Zn), Boron (B) and Silica (Si)). Cockleshell powders were found to contain toxic elements below detectable levels. The solubilities of Calcium and Phospor were p<0.05.

  10. High-temperature deformation of SiC-whisker-reinforced MgO-PSZ/mullite composites

    Parthasarathy, T.A.; Hay, R.S.; Ruh, R.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of 33.5 vol% SiC whisker loading on high-temperature deformation of 1 wt% MgO-38.5 wt% zirconia-mullite composites was studied between 1,300 and 1,400 C. At strain rates of 10 -6 to 5 x 10 -4 /s the creep resistance of zirconia-mullite composites without SiC reinforcement was inferior to monolithic mullite of similar grain size. Analysis of the results suggested that the decreased creep resistance of mullite-zirconia composites compared to pure mullite could be at least partially explained by mechanical effects of the weaker zirconia phase, increased effective diffusivity of mullite by zirconia addition, and to the differences in mullite grain morphology. With SiC whisker reinforcement, the deformation rate at high stress was nearly the same as that of the unreinforced material, but at low stress the creep rates of the SiC-reinforced material were significantly lowered. The stress dependence of the creep rate of unreinforced material suggested that diffusional creep was the operative mechanism, while the reinforced material behaved as if a threshold stress for creep existed. The threshold stress could be rationalized based on a whisker network model. This was supported by data on other whisker-containing materials; however, the threshold stress had a temperature dependence that was orders of magnitude higher than the elastic constants, leaving the physical model incomplete. The effects of residual stresses and amorphous phases at whisker/matrix interfaces are invoked to help complete the physical model for creep threshold stress

  11. The role of silicate surfaces on calcite precipitation kinetics

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illuminate how calcite precipitation depends on the identity and structure of the growth substrate. Calcite was precipitated at 25°C from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of seeds of either calcite or one of six silicate materials: augite, enstatite......, labradorite, olivine, basaltic glass and peridotite rock. Calcite saturation was achieved by mixing a CaCl2-rich aqueous solution with a NaHCO3-Na2CO3 aqueous buffer in mixed-flow reactors containing 0.5-2g of mineral, rock, or glass seeds. This led to an inlet fluid calcite saturation index of 0.6 and a p...

  12. Preparation and thermoluminescent dosimetry features of high sensitivity LiF:Mg,Ce phosphor

    Shoushtari, M. K.; Zahedifar, M.; Sadeghi, E.

    2018-04-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) kinetics and dosimetry features of newly produced LiF doped with Mg and Ce were investigated. Different contents of Mg (0-1 mol%) and Ce (0-2 mol%) were introduced in host material by melting method. The most TL sensitivity of the fabricated phosphor was obtained at 0.7 and 0.05 mol% concentrations of Mg and Ce impurities, respectively. The optimum pre-irradiation annealing regime of the synthesized LiF-based material was found at 350 °C for 10 min. Kinetic parameters of LiF:Mg,Ce dosimeter were obtained using different methods of computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD), initial rise (IR) and isothermal decay (ID). A good conformity are observed between the results obtained from different kinetic analysis methods. Other TL features such as fading, dose response and reusability were also examined.

  13. Effects of high energy ball milling on synthesis and characteristics of Ti-Mg alloys

    Chikwanda, HK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of Ti-Mg alloys using mechanical alloying method has been investigated. Effects of the mechanical alloying parameters on the resultant microstructural features have been studied. This work presents the effects of milling speed...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rotational order-disorder phase transition in calcite

    Kawano, Jun; Miyake, Akira; Shimobayashi, Norimasa; Kitamura, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of calcite was carried out with the interatomic potential model based on ab initio calculations to elucidate the phase relations for calcite polymorphs and the mechanism of the rotational order-disorder transition of calcite at high temperature at the atomic scale. From runs of MD calculations with increasing temperature within a pressure range of 1 atm and 2 GPa, the transition of calcite with R3-barc symmetry into a high-temperature phase with R3-barm symmetry was reproduced. In the high-temperature R3-barm phase, CO 3 groups vibrate with large amplitudes either around the original positions in the R3-barc structure or around other positions rotated ± 60 deg., and their positions change continuously with time. Moreover, contrary to the suggestion of previous investigators, the motion of CO 3 groups is not two-dimensional. At 1 atm, the transition between R3-barc and R3-barm is first order in character. Upon increasing temperature at high pressure, however, first a first-order isosymmetric phase transition between the R3-barc phases occurs, which corresponds to the start of ± 120 deg. flipping of CO 3 groups. Then, at higher temperatures, the transition of R3-barc to R3-barm phases happens, which can be considered second order. This set of two types of transitions at elevated pressure can be characterized by the appearance of an 'intermediate' R3-barc phase between the stable region of calcite and the high-temperature R3-barm phase, which may correspond to the CaCO 3 -IV phase.

  15. Calcite as a bone substitute. Comparison with hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate with regard to the osteoblastic activity

    Monchau, F., E-mail: Francine.monchau@univ-artois.fr [Laboratoire Genie Civil et geo-Environnement (EA 4515, Universite Lille Nord de France), Equipe Biomateriaux Artois (Universite d' Artois), IUT/GMP, 1230, rue de l' Universite, BP 819, 62408 Bethune cedex (France); Hivart, Ph.; Genestie, B. [Laboratoire Genie Civil et geo-Environnement (EA 4515, Universite Lille Nord de France), Equipe Biomateriaux Artois (Universite d' Artois), IUT/GMP, 1230, rue de l' Universite, BP 819, 62408 Bethune cedex (France); Chai, F. [Laboratoire Medicaments et Biomateriaux a Liberation Controlee (INSERM U 1008, Universite Lille Nord de France), Groupe de Recherche sur les Biomateriaux (Universite Lille-2), Faculte de Medecine, 1, place de Verdun, 59045 Lille cedex (France); and others

    2013-01-01

    Close to the bone mineral phase, the calcic bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), are commonly used as substitutes or filling materials in bone surgery. Besides, calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) is also used for their excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. However, the problem with the animal-origin aragonite demands the new technique to synthesize pure calcite capable of forming 3D bone implant. This study aims to manufacture and evaluate a highly-pure synthetic crystalline calcite with good cytocompatibility regarding to the osteoblasts, comparing to that of HA and {beta}-TCP. After the manufacture of macroporous bioceramic scaffolds with the identical internal architecture, their cytocompatibility is studied through MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts with the tests of cell viability, proliferation, vitality, etc. The results confirmed that the studied process is able to form a macroporous material with a controlled internal architecture, and this synthesized calcite is non-cytotoxic and facilitate the cell proliferation. Indeed requiring further improvement, the studied calcite is definitely an interesting alternative not only to coralline aragonite but also to calcium phosphate ceramics, particularly in bone sites with the large bone remodelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Macroporous calcite manufacturing with controlled architecture as bone substitute Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity: adaptation of the colony-forming method with the target cells: MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of osteoblast proliferation and activity on calcite, HA and TCP.

  16. Fabrication of calcite blocks from gypsum blocks by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions in sodium carbonate solution.

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Ayami

    2017-03-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) has been used as a bone substitute, and is a precursor for carbonate apatite, which is also a promising bone substitute. However, limited studies have been reported on the fabrication of artificial calcite blocks. In the present study, cylindrical calcite blocks (ϕ6×3mm) were fabricated by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using different calcium sulfate blocks as a precursor. In the dissolution-precipitation reactions, both CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 transformed into calcite, a polymorph of CaCO 3 , while maintaining their macroscopic structure when immersed in 1mol/L Na 2 CO 3 solution at 80°C for 1week. The diametral tensile strengths of the calcite blocks formed using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 were 1.0±0.3 and 2.3±0.7MPa, respectively. The fabrication of calcite blocks using CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and CaSO 4 proposed in this investigation may be a useful method to produce calcite blocks because of the self-setting ability and high temperature stability of gypsum precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity.

  18. A superplastic Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr powder alloy with high hardness and modulus

    Phillips, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Structure/property studies were made on an experimental Al-3.18% Li-4.29% Cu-1.17% Mg-0.18% Zr powder alloy, which is of the low density/high modulus type. Alloy powder was made by the P and W/GPD rapid solidification rate (RSR) process, canned, and extruded to bar. The density was 2.458 x 10/sup 6/ g/m/sup 3/. The material was solution-treated, and aged at 149 0 C(300 0 F), 171 0 C(340 0 F), and 193 0 C(380 0 F), using hardness tests to determine the aging curves. Testpieces solution-treated at 516 0 C(961 0 F) showed an average yield strength (0.2% offset) of 43.3 ksi (299 MPa) and ultimate tensile strength of 50.0 ksi (345 MPa), with 1% elongation, which increased to 73.0 ksi (503 MPa) and 73.1 ksi (504 MPa), respectively, with only 0.2% elongation, on peak aging at 193 0 C(380 0 F), with a modulus of elasticity of 11.4 x 10/sup 6/ psi (78.3 GPa). Hardness values reached 90-92 R/sub B/ on aging at 149-193 0 C(300-380 0 F). The as-extruded alloy showed superplastic behavior at 400-500 0 C(752-932 0 F) with elongations of 80-185% on 25.6 mm, peaking at 450 0 C(842 0 F). An RSR Al-2.53% Li-2.82% Mn-0.02% Zr extruded allow showed only 18-23% elongation at 400-500 0 C(752-932 0 F)

  19. Fabrication of seven-core multi-filamentary MgB2 wires with high critical current density by an internal Mg diffusion process

    Togano, K; Hur, J M; Matsumoto, A; Kumakura, H

    2009-01-01

    We found that the reaction between a Mg core and a B powder layer in an internal Mg diffusion (IMD)-processed multi-filamentary wire can proceed rapidly even at a furnace temperature lower than the melting point of Mg (650 deg. C), resulting in the formation of a reacted layer with a fine composite structure and, hence, excellent in-field critical current properties. The multi-filamentary wire is composed of an outermost Cu-Ni sheath and seven filaments with a Ta sheath, a Mg core, and B+SiC powder filled in the space between the Ta sheath and the Mg core. Heat treatment at 645 deg. C for 1 h produced a reacted layer with dense composite structure along the inner wall of the Ta sheath and a hole at the center of each core. This reaction probably initiated from the heat generation at the B/Mg interface, resulting in a temperature rise of the Mg core and the occurrence of liquid Mg infiltration. The J c value at 4.2 K for the reacted layer exceeds 10 5 cm -2 at 9 T, which is the highest reported so far for MgB 2 wire, including powder-in-tube (PIT)-processed wires. These results indicate that the IMD process can compete in terms of practical wire fabrication with the conventional PIT process.

  20. High Coke-Resistance Pt/Mg1-xNixO Catalyst for Dry Reforming of Methane.

    Faris A J Al-Doghachi

    Full Text Available A highly active and stable nano structured Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalysts was developed by a simple co-precipitation method. The obtained Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst exhibited cubic structure nanocatalyst with a size of 50-80 nm and realized CH4 and CO2 conversions as high as 98% at 900°C with excellent stability in the dry reforming of methane. The characterization of catalyst was performed using various kinds of analytical techniques including XRD, BET, XRF, TPR-H2, TGA, TEM, FESEM, FT-IR, and XPS analyses. Characterization of spent catalyst further confirms that Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst has high coke-resistance for dry reforming. Thus, the catalyst demonstrated in this study, offers a promising catalyst for resolving the dilemma between dispersion and reducibility of supported metal, as well as activity and stability during high temperature reactions.

  1. Sugar as an optimal carbon source for the enhanced performance of MgB2 superconductors at high magnetic fields

    Shcherbakova, O. V.; Pan, A. V.; Wang, J. L.; Shcherbakov, A. V.; Dou, S. X.; Wexler, D.; Babić, E.; Jerčinović, M.; Husnjak, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of an extended study of the effect of sugar doping on the structural and electromagnetic properties of MgB2 superconductors. High values of the upper critical field (Bc2) of 36 T and the irreversibility field (Birr) of 27 T have been estimated at the temperature of 5 K in a bulk MgB2 sample with the addition of 10 wt% of sugar. The critical current density (Jc(Ba)) of sugar-doped samples has been significantly improved in the high field region. The value of transport Jc has reached as high as 108 A m-2 at 10 T and 5 K for Fe-sheathed sugar-doped MgB2 wire. The analysis of the pinning mechanism in the samples investigated indicated that dominant vortex pinning occurs on the surface type of pinning defects, such as grain boundaries, dislocations, stacking faults etc, for both pure and doped MgB2. In sugar-doped samples, pinning is governed by numerous crystal lattice defects, which appear in MgB2 grains as a result of crystal lattice distortion caused by carbon substitution for boron and nano-inclusions. The drastically improved superconducting properties of sugar-doped samples are also attributed to the highly homogeneous distribution and enhanced reactivity of this dopant with host Mg and B powders. The results of this work suggest that sugar is the optimal source of carbon for doping MgB2 superconductor, especially for application at high magnetic fields.

  2. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    Xiao Wang; Wei Wang; Jingli Wang; Hao Wu; Chang Liu

    2017-01-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgG...

  3. Possible superlattice formation in high-temperature treated carbonaceous MgB2 at elevated pressure

    Tschauner, Oliver; Errandonea, Daniel; Serghiou, George

    2006-01-01

    We report indications of a phase transition in carbonaceous MgB 2 above 9 GPa at 300 K after stress relaxation by laser heating. The transition was detected using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The observed changes are consistent with a second-order structural transition involving a doubling of the unit cell along c and a reduction of the boron site symmetry. Moreover, the Raman spectra suggest a reduction in electron-phonon coupling in the slightly modified MgB 2 structure consistent with the previously proposed topological transition in MgB 2 . However, further attributes including deviatoric stress, lattice defects, and compositional variation may play an important role in the observed phenomena

  4. Anisotropy of the critical current in MgB2 tapes made of high energy milled precursor powder

    Hässler, W.; Kovac, P.; Eisterer, M.

    2010-01-01

    For applications of MgB2 wires or tapes, high critical currents in high magnetic fields are essential. By using tapes in superconducting coils the anisotropic behaviour of the critical current, i.e. the dependence on the direction of the external field in relation to the tape surface, has to be t...

  5. Prediction study on mechanical and thermodynamic properties of orthorhombic Mg2SiO4 under high temperature

    Zhou, Jianting; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yue; Shong, Jun; Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Juan; Zheng, Zhou; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this work, based on density functional theory and quasi-harmonic Debye model, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of orthorhombic Mg 2 SiO 4 under high temperature are predicted. We found out that α-Mg 2 SiO 4 is mechanically stable under the condition from about 0 to 74 GPa. Results indicate that the main cause of mechanical instability is high pressure, and the effect caused by high temperature is small. C 11 , C 22 , C 33 , B and v p reduce with temperature just a little and increase with pressure obviously. Mg 2 SiO 4 has excellent resistance to strong compression; however the resistance to shear is unsatisfactory. The C v tends to the Petit and Dulong limit at high temperature under any pressure, and it is proportional to T 3 at extremely low temperature. Pressure has an opposite effect on C v than temperature. The suppressed effect on C v caused by pressure is not obvious under low and very high temperature. Mg 2 SiO 4 has three different thermal expansion coefficients (α) along a-, b- and c-axes, and α a <α c <α b . α increases rapidly at low temperature (about <300 K), and slows down at high temperature. High pressure would greatly suppress expansion caused by temperature. Nevertheless, increasing tendency of α b and α c is still obvious under high pressure, especially α b . All the properties are mainly due to Si–O covalent bonds and their directions

  6. MgCo2-D2 and MgCoNi-D2 systems synthesized at high pressures and interaction mechanism during the HDDR processing

    Chubin Wan

    2017-02-01

    MgCo2 is a new example of the hydrogen storage alloy, in which a successful HDDR processing results in the reversible formation of the initial intermetallic at much lower temperatures than in the equilibrium phase diagram of the Mg-Co system.

  7. High surface area niobium oxides as catalysts for improved hydrogen sorption properties of ball milled MgH2

    Bhat, V.V.; Rougier, A.; Aymard, L.; Nazri, G.A.; Tarascon, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    We report, high surface area (up to 200 m 2 /g) nanocrystalline niobium oxide (so called p-Nb 2 O 5 ) synthesized by 'chimie douce' route and its importance in enhancing the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH 2 . p-Nb 2 O 5 induces faster kinetics than commonly used commercial Nb 2 O 5 (c-Nb 2 O 5 ) when ball milled with MgH 2 (named (MgH 2 ) catalyst ) by reducing the time of desorption from 35 min in (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 to 12 min in (MgH 2 ) p-Nb 2 O 5 at 300 deg. C. The BET surface area of as-prepared Nb 2 O 5 was tuned by heat treatment and its effect on sorption properties was studied. Among them, both p-Nb 2 O 5 and Nb 2 O 5 :350 (p-Nb 2 O 5 heated to 350 deg. C with a BET specific surface area of 46 m 2 /g) desorb 5 wt.% within 12 min, exhibiting the best catalytic activity. Furthermore, thanks to the addition of high surface area Nb 2 O 5 , the desorption temperature was successfully lowered down to 200 deg. C, with a significant amount of desorbed hydrogen (4.5 wt.%). In contrast, the composite (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 shows no desorption at this 'low' temperature

  8. High mobility 2D electron gas in CdTe/CdMgTe heterostructures

    Karczewski, G.; Jaroszynski, J.; Kurowski, M.; Barcz, A.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kossut, J.

    1997-01-01

    We report on iodine doping of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Cd(Mn)Te quasi-bulk films and modulation-doped CdTe/Cd 1-y Mg y Te two-dimensional (2D) single quantum well structures. Modulation doping with iodine of CdTe/Cd 1-y Mg y Te structures resulted in fabrication of a 2D electron gas with mobility exceeding 10 5 cm 2 /(Vs). This is the highest mobility reported in wide-gap II-VI materials

  9. Uranyl incorporation into calcite and aragonite: XAFS and luminescence studies

    Reeder, R.J.; Nugent, M.; Lamble, G.M.; Tait, C.D.; Morris, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption, luminescence, and Raman spectroscopic studies of U(VI)-containing calcite and aragonite show that the UO 2 2+ ion, the dominant and mobile form of dissolved uranium in near-surface waters, has a disordered and apparently less stable coordination environment when incorporated into calcite in comparison to aragonite, both common polymorphs of CaCO 3 . Their findings suggest that calcite, a widely distributed authigenic mineral in soils and near-surface sediments and a principal weathering product of concrete-based containment structures, is not likely to be a suitable host for the long-term sequestration of U(VI). The more stable coordination provided by aragonite suggests that its long-term retention should be favored in this phase, until it inverts to calcite. Consequently, future remobilization of U(VI) coprecipitated with calcium carbonate minerals should not be ruled out in assessments of contaminated sites. Their observation of a similar equatorial coordination of UO 2 2+ in aragonite and the dominant aqueous species [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- ] but a different coordination in calcite indicates that a change in UO 2 2+ coordination is required for its incorporation into calcite. This may explain the observed preferential uptake of U(VI) by aragonite relative to calcite

  10. Adsorption of a novel reagent scheme on scheelite and calcite causing an effective flotation separation.

    Gao, Yuesheng; Gao, Zhiyong; Sun, Wei; Yin, Zhigang; Wang, Jianjun; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-02-15

    The efficient separation of scheelite from calcium-bearing minerals, especially calcite, remains a challenge in practice. In this work, a novel reagent scheme incorporating a depressant of sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) and a collector mixture of octyl hydroxamic acid (HXMA-8) and sodium oleate (NaOl) was employed in both single and mixed binary mineral flotation, and it proved to be highly effective for the separation. Furthermore, the role of the pH value in the separation was evaluated. Additionally, the mechanism of the selective separation was investigated systemically via zeta potential measurements, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis, X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy analysis and crystal chemistry calculations. It turns out that the selective chemisorption of SHMP on calcite (in the form of complexation between H 2 PO 4 - /HPO 4 2- and Ca 2+ ) over scheelite is ascribed to the stronger reactivity and higher density of Ca ions on the commonly exposed surfaces of calcite minerals. The intense adsorption of HXMA-8 on scheelite over calcite due to the match of the OO distances in WO 4 2- of scheelite and CONHOH of HXMA-8 holds the key to the successful separation. We were also interested in warranting the previous claim that NaOl is readily adsorbed on both minerals via chemisorption. Our results provided valuable insights into the application of mixed collectors and an effective depressant for flotation separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactions of Ni and Ca at the calcite-solution interface

    Carlsson, T.; Aalto, H.

    1996-10-01

    The performance assessment of repositories for spent nuclear fuel need, among other things, data describing the solubilities of radionuclides in the near field and far field. The solubility limits are often used in order to estimate the maximum concentrations of radionuclides during their possible transport to the biosphere. The solubilities used are mostly the individual solubilities for pure solids of the actual radionuclides. This way of using solubility limits represents a conservative performance assessment where the estimated nuclide concentrations are unrealistically high. This is acceptable from a performance assessment point of view but very unsatisfactory for an optimal design of the repository. In order to make the assessment more realistic, coprecipitation and solid solution formation should be taken into account. Only solids which are, in geological terms, formed in fast reactions need to be considered, which in practice restricts the number of radionuclide scavengers to calcite and iron(III)oxihydroxide. This work focuses on the Ni coprecipitation with calcite. The systems were studied under anoxic conditions and consisted of calcite-saturated 0.05 M NaCl solutions in equilibrium with synthetic calcite. The solutions were initially spiked with 63 Ni and 45 Ca and the concentrations of these elements were determined using liquid scintillation counting. (18 refs.)

  12. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin 10 mg and atorvastatin 20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia – Prospective study to evaluate the Use of Low doses of the Statins Atorvastatin and Rosuvastatin (PULSAR

    García Hugo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease do not achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goals. This study compared the efficacy and safety of low doses of rosuvastatin (10 mg and atorvastatin (20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods A total of 996 patients with hypercholesterolemia (LDL-C ≥ 3.4 and Results Rosuvastatin 10 mg reduced LDL-C levels significantly more than atorvastatin 20 mg at week 6 (44.6% vs. 42.7%, p Conclusion In high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia, rosuvastatin 10 mg was more efficacious than atorvastatin 20 mg at reducing LDL-C, enabling LDL-C goal achievement and improving other lipid parameters. Both treatments were well tolerated.

  13. Effects of increased pCO2 and geographic origin on purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite elemental composition

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (such as Mg and Sr) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore the effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low to high magnesium calcites. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions along the US west coast (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg/Ca or Sr/Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 ppm; pH = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated CO2 (900 ppm; pH = 7.72 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr/Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr incorporation under elevated CO2 (Sr/Ca = 2

  14. The Remaining Service Time Upon Reaching a High Level in M/G/1 Queues

    de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Nicola, V.F.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    The distribution of the remaining service time upon reaching some target level in an M/G/1 queue is of theoretical as well as practical interest. In general, this distribution depends on the initial level as well as on the target level, say, B. Two initial levels are of particular interest, namely,

  15. Preparation of MgO Catalytic Support in Shaped Mesoporous High Surface Area Form

    Gulková, Daniela; Šolcová, Olga; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, 1-3 (2004), s. 137-149 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : MgO support * sigh Surface area * texture Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2004

  16. High-Pressure Study of Perovskites and Postperovskites in the (Mg,Fe)GeO 3 System

    Stan, Camelia V.; Dutta, Rajkrishna; Cava, Robert J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Duffy, Thomas S. (Princeton); (UC)

    2017-06-22

    The effect of incorporation of Fe2+ on the perovskite (Pbnm) and postperovskite (Cmcm) structures was investigated in the (Mg,Fe)GeO3 system at high pressures and temperatures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Samples with compositions of Mg# ≥ 48 were shown to transform to the perovskite (~30 GPa and ~1500 K) and postperovskite (>55 GPa, ~1600–1800 K) structures. Compositions with Mg# ≥ 78 formed single-phase perovskite and postperovskite, whereas those with Mg# < 78 showed evidence for partial decomposition. The incorporation of Fe into the perovskite structure causes a decrease in octahedral distortion as well as a modest decrease in bulk modulus (K0) and a modest increase in zero-pressure volume (V0). It also leads to a decrease in the perovskite-to-postperovskite phase transition pressure by ~9.5 GPa over compositions from Mg#78 to Mg#100.

  17. Microstructural stability of heat-resistant high-pressure die-cast Mg-4Al-4Ce alloy

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jinghuai; Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Yan; Su, Minliang; Wu, Ruizhi; Zhang, Zhongwu [Harbin Engineering Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology; Jiao, Yufeng [Jiamusi Univ. (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-05-15

    The thermal stability of Al-RE (rare earth) intermetallic phases with individual RE for heat-resistant high-pressure die-casting Mg-Al-RE alloys is investigated. The results of this study show that the main strengthening phase of Mg-4Al-4Ce alloy is Al{sub 11}Ce{sub 3}, whose content is about 5 wt.% according to quantitative X-ray diffraction phase analysis. The Al{sub 11}Ce{sub 3} phase appears to have high thermal stability at 200 C and 300 C, while phase morphology change with no phase structure transition could occur for Al{sub 11}Ce{sub 3} when the temperature reaches 400 C. Furthermore, besides the kinds of rare earths and temperature, stress is also an influencing factor in the microstructural stability of Mg-4Al-4Ce alloy.

  18. Mechanically activated self-propagated high-temperature synthesis of nanometer-structured MgB2

    Radev, D.D.; Marinov, M.; Tumbalev, V.; Radev, I.; Konstantinov, L.

    2005-01-01

    Nanometer-sized MgB 2 was prepared via a two-step modification of the mechanically activated self-propagated high-temperature synthesis. The experimental conditions and some structural and phase characteristics of the synthesized product are reported. It is shown that a single-phase material can be prepared after 2 h of intense mechanical treatment of the starting magnesium and boron powders and a synthesis induced at a current-pulse density of 30 A cm -2 . The average size of MgB 2 particles synthesized in this way is 70-80 nm. It is also shown that using the same reagents and the 'classic' high-temperature interaction at 850 deg C with a protective atmosphere of pure Ar, mean particle size of the MgB 2 obtained is 50 μm

  19. Effect of sheath material on critical current characteristics of MgB2 at high temperatures

    Kiuchi, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Kurokawa, T.; Otabe, E.S.; Matsushita, T.; Okada, M.; Tanaka, K.; Kumakura, H.; Kitaguchi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Critical current density and irreversibility field were measured at various temperatures and magnetic fields for MgB 2 PIT tape specimens with different sheaths materials. The experimental results were compared with theoretical estimations using the flux creep-flow model. It is found that the hardness of sheath material indirectly affects the pinning property only through the packing density of MgB 2 . It is considered that the critical current density is mainly determined by a low value of distributed local critical current density determined by grain connectivity. On the other hand, the irreversibility field which is approximately the same among the three tapes is mainly determined by the average pinning strength

  20. Raman spectra of MgB2 at high pressure and topological electronic transition

    Meletov, K.P.; Kulakov, M.P.; Kolesnikov, N.N.; Arvanitidis, J.; Kourouklis, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Raman spectra of the MgB 2 ceramic samples were measured as a function of pressure up to 32 GPa at room temperature. The spectrum at normal conditions contains a very broad peak at ∼ 590 cm -1 related to the E 2g phonon mode. The frequency of this mode exhibits a strong linear dependence in the pressure region from 5 to 18 GPa, whereas beyond this region the slope of the pressure-induced frequency shift is reduced by about a factor of two. The pressure dependence of the phonon mode up to ∼ 5 GPa exhibits a change in the slope as well as a hysteresis effect in the frequency vs. pressure behavior. These singularities in the E 2g mode behavior under pressure support the suggestion that MgB 2 may undergo a pressure-induced topological electronic transition [ru

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. FeII/MgII Emission Line Ratio in High Redshift Quasars

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Appenzeller, I.

    2003-01-01

    the evolution of the FeII/MgII ratio over a wider range in cosmic time, we measured this ratio for composite quasar spectra which cover a redshift range of 0 4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f = 6 to 9, when the age of the universe was ~0.5 Gyr (H_o = 72 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0...

  3. Inhibitory effect of high [Mg2+] on the vasopressin-stimulated hydroosmotic permeability of the isolated perfused cortical collecting duct

    Falkenstein D.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High magnesium concentration inhibits the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP on smooth muscle contraction and platelet aggregation and also influences hepatocyte AVP receptor binding. The aim of this study was to determine the role of magnesium concentration [Mg2+] in AVP-stimulated water transport in the kidney collecting duct. The effect of low and high peritubular [Mg2+] on the AVP-stimulated osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf was evaluated in the isolated perfused rabbit cortical collecting duct (CCD. Control tubules bathed and perfused with standard Ringer bicarbonate solution containing 1 mM Mg2+ presented a Pf of 223.9 ± 27.2 µm/s. When Mg2+ was not added to the bathing solution, an increase in the AVP-stimulated Pf to 363.1 ± 57.2 µm/s (P<0.05 was observed. An elevation of Mg2+ to 5 mM resulted in a decrease in Pf to 202.9 ± 12.6 µm/s (P<0.05. This decrease in the AVP-stimulated Pf at 5 mM Mg2+ persisted when the CCDs were returned to 1 mM Mg2+, Pf = 130.2 ± 20.3 µm/s, and was not normalized by the addition of 8-[4-chlorophenylthio]-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, a cAMP analogue, to the preparation. These data indicate that magnesium may play a modulatory role in the action of AVP on CCD osmotic water permeability, as observed in other tissues.

  4. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2016-02-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work we conducted ikaite crystal growth experiments at near-freezing temperatures using the single diffusion silica gel technique, prepared with a natural aqueous solution from the polymictic lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57‧S, 70°23‧W) in Patagonia, Argentina. The ikaite crystals were recovered from the gels and the transformation reactions were monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy at two different temperatures. The first spectra collected showed the characteristic features of ikaite. In successive spectra new bands at 1072, 1081 and 1086 cm-1 and changes in the intensity of bands corresponding to the OH modes were observed. These changes in the Raman spectra were interpreted as corresponding to intermediate stages of the transformation of ikaite into calcite and/or vaterite. After a few hours, the characteristics of the Raman spectrum were consistent with those of calcite. While ikaite directly transforms into calcite at 10 °C in contact with air, at 20 °C this transformation involves the formation of intermediate, metastable vaterite. During the whole process the external shape of ikaite crystals was preserved. Therefore, this transformation showed the typical characteristics of a pseudomorphic mineral replacement, involving the generation of a large amount of porosity to account for the large difference in molar volumes between ikaite and calcite. A mechanism involving the coupled dissolution of ikaite and crystallization of calcite/vaterite is proposed for this

  5. Controlling the size and morphology of precipitated calcite particles by the selection of solvent composition

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2017-11-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate is used as an additive in the manufacture of many products. Particles with specific characteristics can be obtained by the selection of precipitation conditions, including temperature and the composition of solvent. In this work, calcium carbonate particles were obtained in the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide at 65 °C. Initial Ca(OH)2 suspensions were prepared in pure water and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol or glycerol of the concentration range up to 20% (vol.). The course of reaction was monitored by conductivity measurements. Precipitated solids were analyzed by FTIR, XRD, SEM and the particles size distribution was determined by a laser diffraction method. The adsorption of ethylene glycol or glycerol on the surface of scalenohedral and rhombohedral calcite was testes by a normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The addition of organic solvents changed the viscosity of reaction mixtures, the rate of carbon dioxide absorption and the solubility of inorganic components and therefore influence calcium carbonate precipitation conditions. All synthesized calcium carbonate products were in a calcite form. Scalenohedral calcite crystals were produced when water was a liquid phase, whereas addition of organic solvents resulted in the formation of rhombo-scalenohedral particles. The increase in organic compounds concentration resulted in the decrease of mean particles size from 2.4 μm to 1.7 μm in ethylene glycol solutions and to 1.4 μm in glycerol solutions. On the basis of adsorption tests, it was confirm that calcite surface interact stronger with glycerol than ethylene glycol. The interaction between scalenohedral calcite and used organic additives was higher in comparison to the pure rhombohedral form applied as a stationary phase.

  6. High-MgO Vitric Ash in Upper Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i: A Preliminary Description

    Rose, T. R.; Fiske, R. S.; Swanson, D.

    2011-12-01

    Small, well-formed Pele's tears containing anomalously high values of MgO were recently discovered in outcrops of the upper Kulanaokuaiki Tephra at and near the base of Uwekahuna Bluff, the western wall of Kilauea Caldera. Electron microprobe analyses of more than 60 high-MgO tears, which are 1-3 mm in diameter, show that most contain 11 to 12 wt. % MgO with a few approaching 13 % MgO. Separate microprobe analyses for sulfur and chlorine of 20 grains revealed no appreciable amounts of either, indicating the magma was largely degassed. Polished-section studies employing an analytical scanning electron microscope show most tears are composed of pure microvesicular glass with scattered skeletal olivine crystals and rare chromite. The abundance of skeletal olivine appears to increase with decreasing MgO content of the glass. These tears contain among the highest known MgO values of any material erupted subaerially from Kilauea. The high-MgO tears occur in a 1-6 cm thick layer of medium-coarse lithic-crystal-vitric ash. The top of this layer consists of 2-3 mm of very fine lithic-crystal ash. The lithics and many of the olivine crystals in this layer are highly oxidized. This deposit is at the top of a sequence of several lithic beds that are interspersed with thinner vitric units totaling about 75 cm in thickness. It is overlain by 9-13 cm of medium pumice lapilli and coarse vitric ash at the top of the "Bluff base" and "mid-Bluff" tephra sections described by Fiske et al. (2009). This high-MgO glass layer has been found thus far in only one other locality, a 2 m-deep soils study pit within Kipuka Puaulu, 3.5 km northwest of the caldera. Based upon stratigraphic relationships and preliminary microprobe data, a few other likely exposures of the high-MgO deposit have been identified north and west of the caldera. The high-MgO vitric ash in the upper Kulanaokuaiki Tephra has a primitive composition that suggests little if any shallow level storage of magma. Instead, the

  7. KF-loaded mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides: high performance transesterification catalysts for biodiesel production.

    Tao, Guiju; Hua, Zile; Gao, Zhe; Zhu, Yan; Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yu; Shu, Zhu; Zhang, Lingxia; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-09-21

    Using newly developed mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides as supports, a novel kind of high performance transesterification catalysts for biodiesel production has been synthesized. More importantly, the impregnation solvent was for the first time found to substantially affect the structures and catalytic performances of the resultant transesterification catalysts.

  8. Microbially induced separation of quartz from calcite using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Padukone, S Usha; Natarajan, K A

    2011-11-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and their metabolites were successfully utilized to achieve selective separation of quartz and calcite through microbially induced flotation and flocculation. S. cerevisiae was adapted to calcite and quartz minerals. Adsorption studies and electrokinetic investigations were carried out to understand the changes in the surface chemistry of yeast cells and the minerals after mutual interaction. Possible mechanisms in microbially induced flotation and flocculation are outlined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High dosages of sermion (30-60 mg per day) neuropsychiatric efficacy for encephalopathy monotherapy in irradiated patients

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovskij, K.N.; Yur'ev, K.L.; Petrova, I.V.; Bomko, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Open randomised with parallel groups clinical trial was carried out for an assessment of neuropsychiatric efficacy of monotherapy by high dosages of Sermion (30-60 mg per day) in 57 liquidators at the age of 33-65 years irradiated by 50-900 mGy with organic mental disorders (encephalopathy) occurred following cleaning up works in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in 1986-1987. According to the obtained results Sermion 30-60 mg per day may be recommended for the treatment of patients with organic mental disorders (encephalopathy) exposed to ionising radiation

  10. Ikaite pseudomorphs in the Zaire deep-sea fan: An intermediate between calcite and porous calcite

    Jansen, J. H. F.; Woensdregt, C. F.; Kooistra, M. J.; van der Gaast, S. J.

    1987-03-01

    Translucent brown aggregates of calcium-carbonate crystals have been found in cores from the Zaire deep-sea fan (west equatorial Africa). The aggregates are well preserved but very friable. Upon storage they become yellowish white and cloudy and release water. Chemical, mineralogical (XRD), petrographical, crystal-morphological, and stable-isotope data demonstrate that the crystals have passed through three phases: (1) an authigenic carbonate phase, probably calcium carbonate, which is represented by the external habit of the present crystals; (2) a translucent brown ikaite phase (CaCO3·6H2O), unstable at temperatures above 5 °C; and (3) a phase consisting of calcite microcrystals that are poorly cemented and form a porous mass within the crystal form of the morphologically unchanged first phase. The transformation from the first phase into ikaite was probably a kinetic replacement. The transformation from ikaite into the third phase occurred because of storage at room temperature. The presence of ikaite is indicative of a low-temperature, anaerobic, organic-carbon-rich marine environment. Ikaite is probably the precursor of a great number of porous calcite pseudomorphs, and possibly also of many marine authigenic microcrystalline carbonate nodules.

  11. Fragmentation of high-spin particle-hole states in 26Mg

    Segel, R.E.; Amusa, A.; Geesaman, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of 134 MeV protons to seven 6 - states in 26 Mg has been studied. By combining the results with those of a companion electron scattering study, and utilizing DWIA calculations, it has been possible to extract isoscalar and isovector excitation amplitudes. Shell model calculations using (1d 5/2 ) 10-n-p (2s 1/2 ) n (1f 7/2 ) p , with p = 0 and 1, model spaces can reproduce the general features of the fragmentation, but not the structure of the yrast 6 - state. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Raman study of electronic excitations in MgB2 with application of high magnetic field

    Machtoub, L.; Takano, Y.; Kito, H.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first results of Raman scattering with application of magnetic field on magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ). In this work, we have investigated the magnetic field dependence of the 72 meV (E 2g mode) and the pair-breaking peak around 100 cm -1 which corresponds to σ-band gap. Intensity enhancement of Raman features around 800 cm -1 accompanied with broadening in the line shape of E 2g mode has been observed in some polycrystalline samples at 0 GPa. Results are compared with previous Raman study under hydrostatic pressure

  13. Growth of high-quality large-area MgB2 thin films by reactive evaporation

    Moeckly, B H; Ruby, W S

    2006-01-01

    We report a new in situ reactive deposition thin film growth technique for the production of MgB 2 thin films which offers several advantages over all existing methods and is the first deposition method to enable the production of high-quality MgB 2 films for real-world applications. We have used this growth method, which incorporates a rotating pocket heater, to deposit MgB 2 films on a variety of substrates, including single-crystalline, polycrystalline, metallic, and semiconductor materials up to 4 inch in diameter. This technique allows growth of double-sided, large-area films in the intermediate temperature range of 400-600 deg. C. These films are clean, well-connected, and consistently display T c values of 38-39 K with low resistivity and residual resistivity values. They are also robust and uncommonly stable upon exposure to atmosphere and water. (rapid communication)

  14. Fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy processed using selective laser melting

    Zhang, Hu; Zhu, Haihong; Nie, Xiaojia; Qi, Ting; Hu, Zhiheng; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The proposed paper illustrates the fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy produced by selective laser melting (SLM) process. Al-Cu-Mg alloy is one of the heat treatable aluminum alloys regarded as difficult to fusion weld. SLM is an additive manufacturing technique through which components are built by selectively melting powder layers with a focused laser beam. The process is characterized by short laser-powder interaction times and localized high heat input, which leads to steep thermal gradients, rapid solidification and fast cooling. In this research, 3D Al-Cu-Mg parts with relative high density of 99.8% are produced by SLM from gas atomized powders. Room temperature tensile tests reveal a remarkable mechanical behavior: the samples show yield and tensile strengths of about 276 MPa and 402 MPa, respectively, along with fracture strain of 6%. The effect of solution treatment on microstructure and related tensile properties is examined and the results demonstrate that the mechanical behavior of the SLMed Al-Cu-Mg samples can be greatly enhanced through proper heat treatment. After T4 solution treatment at 540°C, under the effect of precipitation strengthening, the tensile strength and the yield strength increase to 532 MPa and 338 MPa, respectively, and the elongation increases to 13%.

  15. A simple dissolved metals mixing method to produce high-purity MgTiO3 nanocrystals

    Pratapa, Suminar; Baqiya, Malik A.; Istianah,; Lestari, Rina; Angela, Riyan

    2014-01-01

    A simple dissolved metals mixing method has been effectively used to produce high-purity MgTiO 3 (MT) nanocrystals. The method involves the mixing of independently dissolved magnesium and titanium metal powders in hydrochloric acid followed by calcination. The phase purity and nanocrystallinity were determined by making use of laboratory x-ray diffraction data, to which Rietveld-based analyses were performed. Results showed that the method yielded only one type magnesium titanate powders, i.e. MgTiO 3 , with no Mg 2 TiO 4 or MgTi 2 O 5 phases. The presence of residual rutile or periclase was controlled by adding excessive Mg up to 5% (mol) in the stoichiometric mixing. The method also resulted in MT nanocrystals with estimated average crystallite size of 76±2 nm after calcination at 600°C and 150±4 nm (at 800°C). A transmission electron micrograph confirmed the formation of the nanocrystallites

  16. New horizon for high performance Mg-based biomaterial with uniform degradation behavior: Formation of stacking faults.

    Zhang, Jinghuai; Xu, Chi; Jing, Yongbin; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Shujuan; Fang, Daqing; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Zhang, Milin; Wu, Ruizhi

    2015-09-09

    Designing the new microstructure is an effective way to accelerate the biomedical application of magnesium (Mg) alloys. In this study, a novel Mg-8Er-1Zn alloy with profuse nano-spaced basal plane stacking faults (SFs) was prepared by combined processes of direct-chill semi-continuous casting, heat-treatment and hot-extrusion. The formation of SFs made the alloy possess outstanding comprehensive performance as the biodegradable implant material. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 318 MPa), tensile yield strength (TYS: 207 MPa) and elongation (21%) of the alloy with SFs were superior to those of most reported degradable Mg-based alloys. This new alloy showed acceptable biotoxicity and degradation rate (0.34 mm/year), and the latter could be further slowed down through optimizing the microstructure. Most amazing of all, the uniquely uniform in vitro/vivo corrosion behavior was obtained due to the formation of SFs. Accordingly we proposed an original corrosion mechanism for the novel Mg alloy with SFs. The present study opens a new horizon for developing new Mg-based biomaterials with highly desirable performances.

  17. Influence of water on clumped-isotope bond reordering kinetics in calcite

    Brenner, Dana C.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Stolper, Daniel A.

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen self-diffusion in calcite and many other minerals is considerably faster under wet conditions relative to dry conditions. Here we investigate whether this "water effect" also holds true for solid-state isotope exchange reactions that alter the abundance of carbonate groups with multiple rare isotopes ('clumped' isotope groups) via the process of solid-state bond reordering. We present clumped-isotope reordering rates for optical calcite heated under wet, high-pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only modest increases in reordering rates under such conditions compared with rates for the same material reacted in dry CO2 under low-pressure conditions. Activation energies under wet, high-pressure conditions are indistinguishable from those for dry, low-pressure conditions, while rate constants are resolvably higher (up to ∼3 times) for wet, high-pressure relative to dry, low-pressure conditions in most of our interpretations of experimental results. This contrasts with the water effect for oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, which is associated with lower activation energies, and diffusion coefficients that are ≥103 times higher compared with dry (pure CO2) conditions in the temperature range of this study (385-450 °C). The water effect for clumped-isotopes leads to calculated apparent equilibrium temperatures ("blocking temperatures") for typical geological cooling rates that are only a few degrees higher than those for dry conditions, while O self-diffusion blocking temperatures in calcite grains are ∼150-200 °C lower in wet conditions compared with dry conditions. Since clumped-isotope reordering is a distributed process that occurs throughout the mineral volume, our clumped-isotope results support the suggestion of Labotka et al. (2011) that the water effect in calcite does not involve major changes in bulk (volume) diffusivity, but rather is primarily a surface phenomenon that facilitates oxygen exchange between the calcite surface and external

  18. Measurement and analysis of quadruple (αγγ) angular correlations for high spin states of 24Mg

    Wiedenhoever, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-01-01

    The high-lying, α-decaying states in 24 Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of α and γ emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the (αγ) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, (αγγ) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated

  19. Exploring the coordination change of vanadium and structure transformation of metavanadate MgV2O6 under high pressure

    Tang, Ruilian; Li, Yan; Xie, Shengyi; Li, Nana; Chen, Jiuhua; Gao, Chunxiao; Zhu, Pinwen; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), first-principles calculations, and electrical resistivity measurements were carried out under high pressure to investigate the structural stability and electrical transport properties of metavanadate MgV2O6. The results have revealed the coordination change of vanadium ions (from 5+1 to 6) at around 4 GPa. In addition, a pressure-induced structure transformation from the C2/m phase to the C2 phase in MgV2O6 was detected above 20 GPa, and both phases coexisted up to the highest pressure. This structural phase transition was induced by the enhanced distortions of MgO6 octahedra and VO6 octahedra under high pressure. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity decreased with pressure but exhibited different slope for these two phases, indicating that the pressure-induced structural phase transitions of MgV2O6 was also accompanied by the obvious changes in its electrical transport behavior. PMID:27924843

  20. High - Resolution SST Record Based on Mg/Ca Ratios of Late Holocene Planktonic Foraminifers From the Great Bahama Bank

    Mueller, A.; Reijmer, J. J.; Roth, S.

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed five different planktic foraminifera species in the high resolution core MD 992201 off the Great Bahama Bank (79° 16.34 W; 25° 53.49 N) in 290 m water depth. This 38.05 m long core comprises a 7,000 year long Holocene record. The selected species were Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globorotalia menardii and Globigerinella aequilateralis, which live in the upper 200 m of the water column. The Mg/Ca ratios of these different foraminifers show species-specific values, which represent a distinct habitat depth. With this species-specific Mg/Ca ratios we can reconstruct a temperature profile through the water column. The lowest Mg/Ca are shown by G. menardii (2.5 - 4 mmol/mol), followed by G. sacculifer (4.2 - 5.6 mmol/mol), G. ruber (5.1 - 7.2 mmol/mol) and G. aequilateralis (5.5 - 8.7 mmol/mol). Highest are shown by O. universa (6 - 14 mmol/mol). During the Little Ice Age, the Mg/Ca ratios of all species except for the deeper dwelling G. menardii, became more variable and showed lower ratios. The shallow dwelling species like G. ruber and G. sacculifer display an increase in the Mg/Ca ratios during the Medieval Warm Period. Our data show that transferring Mg/Ca ratios into SST based calibration curves known from literature needs re-evaluation. Species-specific calibration seems to be necessary to achieve reliable results.

  1. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Marutschke, Christoph; Walters, Deron; Walters, Deron; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-08-22

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic - yet decisive - question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid-liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface.

  2. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Marutschke, Christoph; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika; Walters, Deron; Cleveland, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic—yet decisive—question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid–liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface. (paper)

  3. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  4. Role of Fungi in the Biomineralization of Calcite

    Saskia Bindschedler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microbial biomineralization, much of the scientific attention is focused on processes carried out by prokaryotes, in particular bacteria, even though fungi are also known to be involved in biogeochemical cycles in numerous ways. They are traditionally recognized as key players in organic matter recycling, as nutrient suppliers via mineral weathering, as well as large producers of organic acids such as oxalic acid for instance, an activity leading to the genesis of various metal complexes such as metal-oxalate. Their implications in the transformation of various mineral and metallic compounds has been widely acknowledged during the last decade, however, currently, their contribution to the genesis of a common biomineral, calcite, needs to be more thoroughly documented. Calcite is observed in many ecosystems and plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycles of both carbon (C and calcium (Ca. It may be physicochemical or biogenic in origin and numerous organisms have been recognized to control or induce its biomineralization. While fungi have often been suspected of being involved in this process in terrestrial environments, only scarce information supports this hypothesis in natural settings. As a result, calcite biomineralization by microbes is still largely attributed to bacteria at present. However, in some terrestrial environments there are particular calcitic habits that have been described as being fungal in origin. In addition to this, several studies dealing with axenic cultures of fungi have demonstrated the ability of fungi to produce calcite. Examples of fungal biomineralization range from induced to organomineralization processes. More examples of calcite biomineralization related to direct fungal activity, or at least to their presence, have been described within the last decade. However, the peculiar mechanisms leading to calcite biomineralization by fungi remain incompletely understood and more research is

  5. Very high upper critical fields in MgB2 produced by selective tuning of impurity scattering

    Gurevich, A; Patnaik, S; Braccini, V; Kim, K H; Mielke, C; Song, X; Cooley, L D; Bu, S D; Kim, D M; Choi, J H; Belenky, L J; Giencke, J; Lee, M K; Tian, W; Pan, X Q; Siri, A; Hellstrom, E E; Eom, C B; Larbalestier, D C

    2004-01-01

    We report a significant enhancement of the upper critical field H c2 of different MgB 2 samples alloyed with nonmagnetic impurities. By studying films and bulk polycrystals with different resistivities ρ, we show a clear trend of an increase in H c2 as ρ increases. One particular high resistivity film had a zero-temperature H c2 (0) well above the H c2 values of competing non-cuprate superconductors such as Nb 3 Sn and Nb-Ti. Our high-field transport measurements give record values H c2 perp (0) ∼ 34 T and H c2 par (0) ∼ 49 T for high resistivity films and H c2 (0) ∼ 29 T for untextured bulk polycrystals. The highest H c2 film also exhibits a significant upward curvature of H c2 (T) and a temperature dependence of the anisotropy parameter γ(T)=H c2 par / H c2 opposite to that of single crystals: γ(T) decreases as the temperature decreases, from γ(T c ) ∼ 2 γ(0) ∼ 1.5. This remarkable H c2 enhancement and its anomalous temperature dependence are a consequence of the two-gap superconductivity in MgB 2 , which offers special opportunities for further H c2 increases by tuning of the impurity scattering by selective alloying on Mg and B sites. Our experimental results can be explained by a theory of two-gap superconductivity in the dirty limit. The very high values of H c2 (T) observed suggest that MgB 2 can be made into a versatile, competitive high-field superconductor

  6. High magnetic coercivity of FePt-Ag/MgO granular nanolayers

    Roghani, R.; Sebt, S. A.; Khajehnezhad, A.

    2018-06-01

    L10-FePt ferromagnetic nanoparticles have a hight coercivity of Tesla order. Thus, these nanoparticles, with size of 10 to 15 nm and uniform surface distribution, are suitable in magnetic data storage technology with density of more than 1GB. In order to improve structural and magnetic properties of FePt nanoparticles, some elements and combinations have been added to compound. In this research, we show that due to the presence of the Ag, the phase transition temperature of FePt from fcc to L10-fct phase decreases. The presence of Ag as an additive in FePt-Ag nanocomposite, increases the magnetic coercivity. This nanocomposite, with 10% Ag, was deposited by magnetron sputtering on the MgO heat layer. VSM results of 10 nm nanoparticles show that coercivity has increased up to 1.4 T. XRD and FESEM results confirm that the size of the L10-FePt nanoparticles are 10 nm and their surface distribution are uniform. Ag gradually form nano scale clusters with separate lattice and FePt-Ag nanocomposite appears. The result of this process is emptiness of Ag position in FePt-fcc lattice. So, the mobility of Fe and Pt atoms in this lattice increases and it can be possible for them to move in lower temperature. This mechanism explain the effect of Ag on decreasing the transition temperature to fct-L10 phase, and hight coercivity of FePt nanoparticles.

  7. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature process ability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    Cifuentes, S. C.; Benavemente, R.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate. (Author)

  8. Does magnesium compromise the high temperature process ability of novel biodegradable and bioresorbables PLLA/Mg composites?

    Cifuentes, S. C.; Benavemente, R.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    This paper addresses the influence of magnesium on melting behaviour and thermal stability of novel bioresorbable PLLA/Mg composites as a way to investigate their processability by conventional techniques, which likely will require a melt process at high temperature to mould the material by using a compression, extrusion or injection stage. For this purpose, and to avoid any high temperature step before analysis, films of PLLA loaded with magnesium particles of different sizes and volume fraction were prepared by solvent casting. DSC, modulated DSC and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrate that although thermal stability of PLLA is reduced, the temperature window for processing the PLLA/Mg composites by conventional thermoplastic routes is wide enough. Moreover, magnesium particles do not alter the crystallization behaviour of the polymer from the melt, which allows further annealing treatments to optimize the crystallinity in terms of the required combination of mechanical properties and degradation rate. (Author)

  9. High temperature phase transition in SOFC anodes based on Sr2MgMoO6-δ

    Marrero-Lopez, D.; Pena-Martinez, J.; Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Nunez, P.

    2009-01-01

    The double perovskite Sr 2 MgMoO 6-δ has been recently reported as an efficient anode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In the present work, this material have been investigated by high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and impedance spectroscopy to further characterise its properties as SOFC anode. DSC and XRD measurements indicate that Sr 2 MgMoO 6-δ exhibits a reversible phase transition around 275 deg. C from triclinic (I1-bar) with an octahedral tilting distortion to cubic (Fm3-barm) without octahedral distortion. This phase transition is continuous with increasing temperature without any sudden cell volume change during the phase transformation. The main effect of the phase transformation is observed in the electrical conductivity with a change in the activation energy at low temperature. La 3+ and Fe-substituted Sr 2 MgMoO 6-δ phases were also investigated, however these materials are unstable under oxidising conditions due to phase segregations above 600 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: The double perovskite Sr 2 MgMoO 6 , recently proposed as an efficient SOFC anode for direct hydrocarbon oxidation, exhibits a reversible structural phase transition from triclinic to cubic at 275 deg. C.

  10. High-power, continuous-wave, mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator based on MgO:sPPLT.

    Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-07-01

    We report a stable, high-power, cw, mid-IR optical parametric oscillator using MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically poled LiTaO₃ (MgO:sPPLT) pumped by a Yb fiber laser at 1064 nm. The singly resonant oscillator (SRO), based on a 30 mm long crystal, is tunable over 430 nm from 3032 to 3462 nm and can generate as much as 5.5 W of mid-IR output power, with >4 W of over 60% of the tuning range and under reduced thermal effects, enabling room temperature operation. Idler power scaling measurements at ~3.3 μm are compared with an MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO₃ cw SRO, confirming that MgO:sPPLT is an attractive material for multiwatt mid-IR generation. The idler output at 3299 nm exhibits a peak-to-peak power stability better than 12.8% over 5 h and frequency stability of ~1 GHz, while operating close to room temperature, and has a linewidth of ~0.2 nm, limited by the resolution of the wavemeter. The corresponding signal linewidth at 1570 nm is ~21 MHz.

  11. Formation and mosaicity of coccolith segment calcite of the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi.

    Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Kelm, Klemens; Hoffmann, Ramona; Watermeyer, Philipp; Alexa, Patrick; Villinger, Clarissa; Rupp, Ulrich; Schlüter, Lothar; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Griesshaber, Erika; Walther, Paul; Schmahl, Wolfgang W

    2018-02-01

    Coccolithophores belong to the most abundant calcium carbonate mineralizing organisms. Coccolithophore biomineralization is a complex and highly regulated process, resulting in a product that strongly differs in its intricate morphology from the abiogenically produced mineral equivalent. Moreover, unlike extracellularly formed biological carbonate hard tissues, coccolith calcite is neither a hybrid composite, nor is it distinguished by a hierarchical microstructure. This is remarkable as the key to optimizing crystalline biomaterials for mechanical strength and toughness lies in the composite nature of the biological hard tissue and the utilization of specific microstructures. To obtain insight into the pathway of biomineralization of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths, we examine intracrystalline nanostructural features of the coccolith calcite in combination with cell ultrastructural observations related to the formation of the calcite in the coccolith vesicle within the cell. With TEM diffraction and annular dark-field imaging, we prove the presence of planar imperfections in the calcite crystals such as planar mosaic block boundaries. As only minor misorientations occur, we attribute them to dislocation networks creating small-angle boundaries. Intracrystalline occluded biopolymers are not observed. Hence, in E. huxleyi calcite mosaicity is not caused by occluded biopolymers, as it is the case in extracellularly formed hard tissues of marine invertebrates, but by planar defects and dislocations which are typical for crystals formed by classical ion-by-ion growth mechanisms. Using cryo-preparation techniques for SEM and TEM, we found that the membrane of the coccolith vesicle and the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope are in tight proximity, with a well-controlled constant gap of ~4 nm between them. We describe this conspicuous connection as a not yet described interorganelle junction, the "nuclear envelope junction". The narrow gap of this junction likely

  12. Early to Middle Jurassic palaeoenvironmental changes: High resolution δ13C and δ18O records from the UK

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    Low-Mg-calcite fossils, such as bivalves, belemnites and brachiopods, and bulk rocks have been extensively utilized to reconstruct past seawater chemistry and paleoenviron¬mental changes. Recent work on major bioevents demonstrated that particularly higher resolution stable isotope records...... are necessary to reveal short-term paleoenviron¬mental fluctuations and, in addition, to discover its causes. Here we present a new high resolution carbon and oxygen isotope dataset generated from low-Mg-calcite fossils, fossil wood and bulk rocks collected from Early to Middle Jurassic marine successions...

  13. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jingli; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-03-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgGa δ doped AlGaN SLs. Mg acceptor activation energy was significantly reduced from 0.378 to 0.331 eV by using MgGa δ doping in SLs instead of traditional doping in alloys. This new process was confirmed to be able to realize high p-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN.

  14. Combined neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of Sr/Mg-doped lanthanum gallates up to high temperatures

    Guenter, M. M.; Lerch, M.; Boysen, H.; Toebbens, D.; Suard, E.; Baehtz, C.

    2006-08-01

    Combined neutron diffraction and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction methods have been used to examine the crystal structures of two sample sets of Sr/Mg-doped Lanthanum gallate with the compositions La0.9Sr0.1Ga1-yMgyO3-0.5(0.1+y) (y=0, 0.1, 0.2) and La0.8Sr0.2Ga1-yMgyO3-0.5(0.2+y) (y=0.15, 0.2) up to 900 °C. At room temperature all samples of the first series exhibit orthorhombic structures with space group Imma: La0.9Sr0.1GaO2.95: a=5.4904(1)Å, b=7.7757(1)Å, c=5.5229(1)Å; La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.9Mg0.1O2.9: a=5.5100(1)Å, b=7.8080(1)Å, c=5.5411(1)Å; La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O2.85: a=5.5269(1)Å, b=7.8318(2)Å, c=5.5459(1)Å. The samples of the second series have the cubic perovskite structure with space group Pm3¯m at room temperature: La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.85Mg0.15O2.825: a=3.9160(1)Å; La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.20O2.80: a=3.9195(1)Å. Samples of the first series transform from the orthorhombic to a rhombohedral (Imma→R3¯c) structure at ˜170 °C for La0.9Sr0.1GaO2.95, at ˜430 °C for La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.9Mg0.1O2.9, and between 600 and 700 °C for La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O2.85. Both La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.85Mg0.15O2.825 and La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2 show no structural deviations from the cubic aristotype over the whole temperature range. The room temperature Imma structures of the first series are justified by a domain model and are rationalized in terms of static disorder increasing with Mg content, thus driving the phase transition temperatures to higher values in agreement with tolerance factor considerations. The distortion of the rhombohedral high-temperature phases (octahedra tilting and compression) and the effect of phase transitions on the ionic conductivity are discussed.

  15. MG-RAST version 4-lessons learned from a decade of low-budget ultra-high-throughput metagenome analysis.

    Meyer, Folker; Bagchi, Saurabh; Chaterji, Somali; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Grama, Ananth; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Trimble, William L; Wilke, Andreas

    2017-09-26

    As technologies change, MG-RAST is adapting. Newly available software is being included to improve accuracy and performance. As a computational service constantly running large volume scientific workflows, MG-RAST is the right location to perform benchmarking and implement algorithmic or platform improvements, in many cases involving trade-offs between specificity, sensitivity and run-time cost. The work in [Glass EM, Dribinsky Y, Yilmaz P, et al. ISME J 2014;8:1-3] is an example; we use existing well-studied data sets as gold standards representing different environments and different technologies to evaluate any changes to the pipeline. Currently, we use well-understood data sets in MG-RAST as platform for benchmarking. The use of artificial data sets for pipeline performance optimization has not added value, as these data sets are not presenting the same challenges as real-world data sets. In addition, the MG-RAST team welcomes suggestions for improvements of the workflow. We are currently working on versions 4.02 and 4.1, both of which contain significant input from the community and our partners that will enable double barcoding, stronger inferences supported by longer-read technologies, and will increase throughput while maintaining sensitivity by using Diamond and SortMeRNA. On the technical platform side, the MG-RAST team intends to support the Common Workflow Language as a standard to specify bioinformatics workflows, both to facilitate development and efficient high-performance implementation of the community's data analysis tasks. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Calcite deposits in drill cores USW G-2 and USW GU-3/G-3 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Preliminary report

    Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-04-01

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for deep geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Should a repository be developed at Yucca Mountain, the preferred location is within the upper unsaturated tuffaceous volcanic rocks. In this location, one factor of concern is the amount and rate of aqueous transport through the unsaturated rocks toward the underlying saturated intervals. Calcite, one of the most recently-formed minerals at Yucca Mountain, is of minor abundance in the unsaturated rocks but is widely distributed. Studies of calcite ages, isotopic systematics, chemistry and petrography could lead to a better understanding of transport processes at Yucca Mountain

  17. The role of Mg in the crystallization of monohydrocalcite

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Shaw, Samuel; Bots, Pieter; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa; Benning, Liane G.

    2014-02-01

    Monohydrocalcite is a member of the carbonate family which forms in Mg-rich environments at a wide range of Mg/Ca ratios Mg2+aq/Ca2+aq≥0.17stock solutions. However, its crystallite and particle size are inversely proportional to these parameters. At high supersaturations (SIMHC = 3.89) nanometer-sized single crystals of monohydrocalcite form, while at low values (SIMHC = 2.43) the process leads to low-angle branching spherulites. Many carbonates produced during biomineralization form at similar conditions to most synthetic monohydrocalcites, and thus we hypothesize that some calcite or aragonite deposits found in the geologic record that have formed at high Mg/Ca ratios could be secondary in origin and may have originally formed via a metastable monohydrocalcite intermediate. High-Mg monohydrocalcite (χMgCO3 > 0.06) consists of individual nanometer-sized crystals (500 °C (Fig. 9b). Such high-Mg monohydrocalcites are uncommon in nature, but can be synthesized in the laboratory at high initial supersaturation levels (SI > 3.25). Low-Mg monohydrocalcite (χMgCO3 bonded to Mg, so it fully dehydrates at low temperatures (150-200 °C). They have the same composition as natural monohydrocalcites reported in the literature, and can be synthesized in the laboratory at lower supersaturation levels (SI relationships. Firstly, our on-line experiment shows an increase in nanocrystal sizes during the secondary crystallization of monohydrocalcite, which is coupled with a significant decrease in χMgCO3 (from ˜0.26 to ˜0.065). This corresponds to the transition from high- to low-Mg monohydrocalcite, suggesting that the former would be metastable and rapidly transforming to the latter, possibly triggered by the removal of Mg from aqueous solution. Secondly, Davis et al. (2000) determined that the solubility of Mg-calcite (Ca1-xMgxCO3; x = 0-0.20) varies by approximately half an order of magnitude depending on the Mg content of the solid (Ksp = 10-8.0-10-8.5). A similar

  18. Preparation of a high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy by mechanical alloying and press-forming

    Tang Huaguo [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Cheng Zhiqiang [College of Resources and Environment, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118 (China); Liu Jianwei [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Ma Xianfeng, E-mail: xfma@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high strength aluminum alloy of Al-2 wt.%Mg-2 wt.%Cu has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy only consists of solid solution {alpha}-Al. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grains size of {alpha}-Al was about 300 nm-5 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening are the main reasons for such a high strength. - Abstract: A high strength aluminum alloy, with the ratio of 96 wt.%Al-2 wt.%Mg-2 wt.%Cu, has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. The alloy exhibited a high tensile strength of 780 MPa and a high microhardness of 180 HV. X-ray diffraction characterizations confirmed that the alloy only consists of a solid solution {alpha}-Al. Microstructure characterizations revealed that the grain size of {alpha}-Al was about 300 nm-5 {mu}m. The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening were considered to be the reason for such a high strength.

  19. The high-pressure behavior of spherocobaltite (CoCO3): a single crystal Raman spectroscopy and XRD study

    Chariton, Stella; Cerantola, Valerio; Ismailova, Leyla; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Kupenko, Ilya; McCammon, Catherine; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Magnesite (MgCO3), calcite (CaCO3), dolomite [(Ca, Mg)CO3], and siderite (FeCO3) are among the best-studied carbonate minerals at high pressures and temperatures. Although they all exhibit the calcite-type structure ({R}\\bar{3}{c}) at ambient conditions, they display very different behavior at mantle pressures. To broaden the knowledge of the high-pressure crystal chemistry of carbonates, we studied spherocobaltite (CoCO3), which contains Co2+ with cation radius in between those of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in calcite and magnesite, respectively. We synthesized single crystals of pure spherocobaltite and studied them using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells at pressures to over 55 GPa. Based on single crystal diffraction data, we found that the bulk modulus of spherocobaltite is 128 (2) GPa and K' = 4.28 (17). CoCO3 is stable in the calcite-type structure up to at least 56 GPa and 1200 K. At 57 GPa and after laser heating above 2000 K, CoCO3 partially decomposes and forms CoO. In comparison to previously studied carbonates, our results suggest that at lower mantle conditions carbonates can be stable in the calcite-type structure if the radius of the incorporated cation(s) is equal or smaller than that of Co2+ (i.e., 0.745 Å).

  20. Growth of thin films of TiN on MgO(100) monitored by high-pressure RHEED

    Pryds, Nini; Cockburn, D.; Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) operated at high pressure has been used to monitor the initial growth of titanium nitride (TiN) thin films on single-crystal (100) MgO substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This is the first RHEED study where the growth of TiN films...... electron microscopy. These observations are in good agreement with the three-dimensional Volmer-Weber growth type, by which three-dimensional crystallites are formed and later cause a continuous surface roughening. This leads to an exponential decrease in the intensity of the specular spot in the RHEED...

  1. Structure and properties during aging of an ultra-high strength Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy

    Gayle, Frank W.; Heubaum, Frank H.; Pickens, Joseph R.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and properties of the strengthening phases formed during aging in an Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy (Weldalite 049) were elulcidated, by following the development of the microstructure by means of TEM. The results of observations showed that the Weldalite 049 alloy has a series of unusual and technologically useful combinations of mechanical properties in different aging conditions, such as natural aging without prior cold work to produce high strengths, a reversion temper of lower yield strength and unusually high ductility, a room temperature reaging of the reversion temper eventually leading to the original T4 hardness, and ultrahigh-strength T6 properties.

  2. Effect of process variables on synthesis of MgB2 by a high energy ball mill

    Kurama Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of superconductivity of MgB2 in 2001, with a critical temperature of 39 K, offered the promise of important large-scale applications at around 20 K. Except than the other featured synthesis methods, mechanical activation performed by high energy ball mills, as bulk form synthesis or as a first step of wire and thin film productions, has considered as an effective alternative production route in recent years. The process of mechanical activation (MA starts with mixing the powders in the right proportion and loading the powder mixture into the mill with the grinding media. The milled powder is then consolidated into a bulk shape and heat-treated to obtain desired microstructure and properties. Thus, the important components of the MA process are the raw materials, mill type and process variables. During the MA process, heavy deformation of particles occure. This is manifested by the presence of a variety of crystal defects such as dislocations, vacancies, stacking faults and increased number of particle boundaries. The presence of this defect structure enhances the diffusivity of solute hence the critical currents and magnetic flux pinning ability of MgB2 are improved. The aim of the present study is to determine the effects of process variables such as ball-to-powder mass ratio, size of balls, milling time, annealing temperature and contribution of process control agent (toluene on the product size, morphology and conversion level of precursor powders to MgB2 after subsequent heat treatment. The morphological analyses of the samples were performed by a high vacuum electron microscope ZEISS SUPRA VP 50. The phase compositions of the samples were performed with an Rigaku-Rint 2200 diffractometer, with nickel filtered Cu Kα radiation and conversion level. The MgB2 phase wt % was calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The obtained results were discussed according to the process variables to find out their affect on the structure

  3. Theoretical Modeling for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Iron-bearing MgSiO3 under High Pressure

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2012-12-01

    The behaviors of iron (Fe) in MgSiO3 perovskite, including valence state, spin state, and chemical environments, at high pressures are of fundamental importance for more detailed understanding the properties of the Earth's lower mantle. The pressure induced spin transition of Fe-bearing MgO and MgSiO3 are detected often by using high-resolution K-edge X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) [1,2,3] and confirmed by theoretical simulations. [4,5] Since the Fe K-edge XES is associated to the 3p orbital, which is far from the valence orbitals (3d and 4s), it provides no information about its coordination environments. However, the Fe L-edge XES and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can directly present the distribution and intensity of Fe-3d character. To identify both the spin states and the coordination environments of iron-bearing MgSiO3, we systematically investigate the L-edge XAS, XES and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing MgSiO3 under high pressure by using the first-principles density functional method combined with the slater-transition method. Our results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ can be distinguished easily by taking the XPS spectra. The spin transition of Fe2+ and Fe3+ can also be clearly certified by XAS and XES. Interestingly, the broadness of L-edge XES of Fe changes depending on the iron position, meaning that its coordination environment might also be distinguishable by using high-resolution XES measurements. Research supported by the Ehime University G-COE program and KAKENHI. [1] James Badro, Guillaume Fiquet, FranÇois Guyot, Jean-Pascal Rueff, Viktor V. Struzhkin, György VankÓ, and Giulio Monaco. Science 300, 789 (2003), [2] James Badro, Jean-Pascal Rueff, György VankÓ, Giulio Monaco, Guillaume Fiquet, and FranÇois Guyot, Science 305, 383 (2004), [3] Jung-Fu Lin, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Steven D. Jacobsen, Michael Y. Hu, Paul Chow, Jennifer Kung, Haozhe Liu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Gussell J. Hemley, Nature 436, 377 (2005). [4

  4. Microstructure and high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium alloy modified by Sc, Mg and Zr additions

    Naga Raju, P. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)], E-mail: puvvala_nagaraju@yahoo.com; Srinivasa Rao, K. [Metallurgical Engineering Department, Andhra University, Visakapatnam 530003 (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500258 (India); Kamaraj, M.; Prasad Rao, K. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2007-08-25

    The present work pertains to the improvement of high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium-copper (6.3%) alloy. Addition of scandium, magnesium and zirconium to the base metal AA2219 was adopted to improve this high temperature stability. These additions were systematically varied by preparing alloys of different composition using gas tungsten arc melting. Long time ageing studies and impression creep technique were used to study the high temperature stability of the alloys. These modified compositions of the alloy resulted in fine equiaxed grains, refined eutectics, large number of high temperature stable and finer precipitates. Among all the compositions, 0.8% Sc + 0.45% Mg + 0.2% Zr addition was found to be significant in improving the high temperature stability of AA2219 alloy. This may be attributed to the possible microstructural changes, solute enrichment of the matrix and pinning of the grain boundaries by the finer precipitates.

  5. Interaction mechanisms of europium and nickel with calcite

    Sabau, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the safety assessment of an underground repository for nuclear waste, sorption reactions are one of the main processes to take into account to predict the migration of the radionuclides which might be transferred from the waste canisters to underground waters over geological time scales. Sorption of aqueous species on minerals can include adsorption processes, surface (co)-precipitation, and even incorporation in the bulk of the material, which can lead to the irreversibility of some sorption reactions. This work is focused on two elements: Eu(III) as an analogue of trivalent actinides and Ni(II) as activation product. Calcite was chosen as adsorbent due to its presence in Callovian-Oxfordian clay rocks. Our study combines batch experiments with spectroscopic techniques (TRLFS, RBS and SEM-EDXS) to elucidate the mechanisms occurring at Eu(III)/Ni(II) calcite interface. To obtain a better understanding on the systems, before starting sorption experiments, aqueous chemistry of Eu(III) and Ni(II) was carefully investigated. Macroscopic results showed a strong retention of Eu(III) on calcite, no matter the initial concentration, contact time and CO 2 partial pressure. Ni(II) was also readily sorbed by calcite, but the retention was influenced by contact time and concentration. Time-dependent sorption experiments showed a marked and slow increase of retention upon a long time range (up to 4 months).Desorption results indicated a partly reversible sorption for Ni(II). TRLFS highlighted the influence of initial concentration and contact time on the interaction of Eu(III) with calcite. With the help of RBS and SEM-EDXS, it enabled to discriminate between different mechanisms like surface precipitation, inner-sphere complexation and incorporation. RBS showed incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite up to 250 nm, contrary to Ni(II) which was located at the surface. (author) [fr

  6. Changes in the Mg profile and in dislocations induced by high temperature annealing of blue LEDs

    Meneghini, M.; Trivellin, N.; Berti, M.; Cesca, T.; Gasparotto, A.; Vinattieri, A.; Bogani, F.; Zhu, D.; Humphreys, C. J.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2013-03-01

    The efficiency of the injection and recombination processes in InGaN/GaN LEDs is governed by the properties of the active region of the devices, which strongly depend on the conditions used for the growth of the epitaxial material. To improve device quality, it is very important to understand how the high temperatures used during the growth process can modify the quality of the epitaxial material. With this paper we present a study of the modifications in the properties of InGaN/GaN LED structures induced by high temperature annealing: thermal stress tests were carried out at 900 °C, in nitrogen atmosphere, on selected samples. The efficiency and the recombination dynamics were evaluated by photoluminescence measurements (both integrated and time-resolved), while the properties of the epitaxial material were studied by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) channeling measurements. Results indicate that exposure to high temperatures may lead to: (i) a significant increase in the photoluminescence efficiency of the devices; (ii) a decrease in the parasitic emission bands located between 380 nm and 400 nm; (iii) an increase in carrier lifetime, as detected by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The increase in device efficiency is tentatively ascribed to an improvement in the crystallographic quality of the samples.

  7. Depressing effect of phenoxyl acetic acids on flotation of minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues

    2007-01-01

    Phenoxyl acetic acids were applied to determine their depressing effect on minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues. Calcite,mixture of calcite and fluorite, and nickel ore were used in the flotation. And the depression mechanism was studied by the determination of contact angle, zeta potential, adsorptive capacity of collector, and IR analysis as well. It is found that 0.1 mmol/L of phenoxyl acetic acid derived from pyrogallol or gallic acid exhibits strong depressing ability on calcite in almost zero yields at pH value of 9.8, and calcite can be depressed in the flotation of calcite/fluorite mixture for approximate 87% yield of fluorite. The flotation result of practical nickel ore containing serpentine indicates that these two depressants may also show better depression performance to serpentine than traditional depressants such as sodium fluosilicate and carboxylmethyl cellulose. Analysis for the depression mechanism reveals that there exists strong chemical interaction between the depressants and minerals.

  8. Physicochemical Processes and the Evolution of Strength in Calcite Fault Gouge at Room Temperature

    Carpenter, B. M.; Viti, C.; Collettini, C.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of calcite in and near faults, as the dominant material, cement, or vein fill, indicates that the mechanical behavior of carbonate-dominated material likely plays an important role in shallow- and mid-crustal faulting. Furthermore, a variety of physical and chemical processes control the evolution of strength and style of slip along seismogenic faults and thus play a critical role in the seismic cycle. Determining the role and contributions of these types of mechanisms is essential to furthering our understanding of the processes and timescales that lead to the strengthening of faults during interseismic periods and their behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. To further our understanding of these processes, we performed laboratory-shearing experiments on calcite gouge at normal stresses from 1 to 100 MPa, under conditions of saturation and at room temperature. We performed velocity stepping (0.1-1000μm/s) and slide-hold-slide (1-3000s) tests, to measure the velocity dependence of friction and the amount of frictional strengthening respectively, under saturated conditions with pore fluid that was in equilibrium with CaCO3. At 5 MPa normal stress, we also varied the environmental conditions by performing experiments under conditions of 5% RH and 50 % RH, and saturation with: silicone oil, demineralized water, and the equilibrated solution combined with 0.5M NaCl. Finally, we collected post experimental samples for microscopic analysis. Our combined analyses of rate-dependence, strengthening behavior, and microstructures show that calcite fault gouge transitions from brittle to semi-brittle behavior at high normal stress and low sliding velocities. Furthermore, our results also highlight how changes in pore water chemistry can have significant influence on the mechanical behavior of calcite gouge in both the laboratory and in natural faults. Our observations have important implications for earthquake nucleation and propagation on faults in

  9. Common Ion Effects In Zeoponic Substrates: Dissolution And Cation Exchange Variations Due to Additions of Calcite, Dolomite and Wollastonite

    Beiersdorfer, R. E.; Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    c1inoptilolite-rich tuff-hydroxyapatite mixture (zeoponic substrate) has the potential to serve as a synthetic soil-additive for plant growth. Essential plant macro-nutrients such as calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, ammonium and potassium are released into solution via dissolution of the hydroxyapatite and cation exchange on zeolite charged sites. Plant growth experiments resulting in low yield for wheat have been attributed to a Ca deficiency caused by a high degree of cation exchange by the zeolite. Batch-equilibration experiments were performed in order to determine if the Ca deficiency can be remedied by the addition of a second Ca-bearing, soluble, mineral such as calcite, dolomite or wollastonite. Variations in the amount of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite resulted in systematic changes in the concentrations of Ca and P. The addition of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite to the zeoponic substrate resulted in an exponential decrease in the phosphorous concentration in solution. The exponential rate of decay was greatest for calcite (5.60 wt. % -I), intermediate for wollastonite (2.85 wt.% -I) and least for dolomite (1.58 wt.% -I). Additions of the three minerals resulted in linear increases in the calcium concentration in solution. The rate of increase was greatest for calcite (3.64), intermediate for wollastonite (2.41) and least for dolomite (0.61). The observed changes in P and Ca concentration are consistent with the solubilities of calcite, dolomite and wollastonite and with changes expected from a common ion effect with Ca. Keywords: zeolite, zeoponics, common-ion effect, clinoptilolite, hydroxyapatite

  10. Effects of limestone petrography and calcite microstructure on OPC clinker raw meals burnability

    Galimberti, Matteo; Marinoni, Nicoletta; Della Porta, Giovanna; Marchi, Maurizio; Dapiaggi, Monica

    2017-10-01

    Limestone represents the main raw material for ordinary Portland cement clinker production. In this study eight natural limestones from different geological environments were chosen to prepare raw meals for clinker manufacturing, aiming to define a parameter controlling the burnability. First, limestones were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Powder Diffraction and Optical Microscopy to assess their suitability for clinker production and their petrographic features. The average domains size and the microstrain of calcite were also determined by X-Ray Powder Diffraction line profile analysis. Then, each limestone was admixed with clay minerals to achieve the adequate chemical composition for clinker production. Raw meals were thermally threated at seven different temperatures, from 1000 to 1450 °C, to evaluate their behaviour on heating by ex situ X-Ray Powder Diffraction and to observe the final clinker morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results indicate the calcite microstrain is a reliable parameter to predict the burnability of the raw meals, in terms of calcium silicates growth and lime consumption. In particular, mixtures prepared starting from high-strained calcite exhibit a better burnability. Later, when the melt appears this correlation vanishes; however differences in the early burnability still reflect on the final clinker composition and texture.

  11. Morphology of calcite crystals in clast coatings from four soils in the Mojave desert region

    Chadwick, Oliver A.; Sowers, Janet M.; Amundson, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic calcite-crystal coatings on clasts were examined in four soils along an altitudinal gradient on Kyle Canyon alluvium in southern Nevada. Clast coatings were studied rather than matrix carbonate to avoid the effects of soil matrix on crystallization. Six crystal sizes and shapes were recognized and distinguished. Equant micrite was the dominant crystal form with similar abundance at all elevations. The distributions of five categories of spar and microspar appear to be influenced by altitudinally induced changes in effective moisture. In the drier, lower elevation soils, crystals were equant or parallel prismatic with irregular, interlocking boundaries while in the more moist, higher elevation soils they were randomly oriented, euhedral, prismatic, and fibrous. There was little support for the supposition that Mg(+2) substitution or increased (Mg + Ca)/HCO3 ratios in the precipitating solution produced crystal elongation.

  12. The influence of mineralogical, chemical and physical properties on grindability of commercial clinkers with high MgO level

    Souza, Vladia Cristina G. de; Koppe, Jair Carlos; Costa, Joao F.C.L.; Vargas, Andre Luis Marin; Blando, Eduardo; Huebler, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates various methods able to identify possible mineralogical, physical and chemical influences on the grindability of commercial clinkers with high MgO level. The aim of the study is to evaluate the hardness and elastic modulus of the clinker mineral phases and their fracture strength during the comminution processes, comparing samples from clinkers with low MgO level (0.5%) and clinkers with elevated MgO levels (> 5.0%). The study of the influence of mineralogical, chemical and physical properties was carried out using several analytical techniques, such as: optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These techniques were useful in qualifying the different clinker samples. The drop weight test (DWT) and the Bond ball mill grindability test were performed to characterize the mechanical properties of clinkers. Nanoindentation tests were also carried out. Results from the Bond ball mill grindability test were found to be related to the hardness of the mineral phase and to mineralogical characteristics, such as type and amount of inclusions in silicates, belite and alite crystals shape, or microcracked alites. In contrast, the results obtained by the DWT were associated to the macro characteristics of clinkers, such as porosity, as well as to the hardness and mineralogical characteristics of belite crystals in clusters. Hardness instrumented tests helped to determine the Vickers hardness and elastic modulus from the mineral phases in commercial clinkers and produced different values for the pure phases compared to previous publications

  13. Bulk and Surface Aqueous Speciation of Calcite: Implications for Low-Salinity Waterflooding of Carbonate Reservoirs

    Yutkin, Maxim P.

    2017-08-25

    Low-salinity waterflooding (LSW) is ineffective when reservoir rock is strongly water-wet or when crude oil is not asphaltenic. Success of LSW relies heavily on the ability of injected brine to alter surface chemistry of reservoir crude-oil brine/rock (COBR) interfaces. Implementation of LSW in carbonate reservoirs is especially challenging because of high reservoir-brine salinity and, more importantly, because of high reactivity of the rock minerals. Both features complicate understanding of the COBR surface chemistries pertinent to successful LSW. Here, we tackle the complex physicochemical processes in chemically active carbonates flooded with diluted brine that is saturated with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and possibly supplemented with additional ionic species, such as sulfates or phosphates. When waterflooding carbonate reservoirs, rock equilibrates with the injected brine over short distances. Injected-brine ion speciation is shifted substantially in the presence of reactive carbonate rock. Our new calculations demonstrate that rock-equilibrated aqueous pH is slightly alkaline quite independent of injected-brine pH. We establish, for the first time, that CO2 content of a carbonate reservoir, originating from CO2-rich crude oil and gas, plays a dominant role in setting aqueous pH and rock-surface speciation. A simple ion-complexing model predicts the calcite-surface charge as a function of composition of reservoir brine. The surface charge of calcite may be positive or negative, depending on speciation of reservoir brine in contact with the calcite. There is no single point of zero charge; all dissolved aqueous species are charge determining. Rock-equilibrated aqueous composition controls the calcite-surface ion-exchange behavior, not the injected-brine composition. At high ionic strength, the electrical double layer collapses and is no longer diffuse. All surface charges are located directly in the inner and outer Helmholtz planes. Our evaluation of

  14. Origin of the reversed yield asymmetry in Mg-rare earth alloys at high temperature

    Hidalgo-Manrique, P.; Herrera-Solaz, V.; Segurado, J.; Llorca, J.; Gálvez, F.; Ruano, O.A.; Yi, S.B.; Pérez-Prado, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour in tension and compression of an extruded Mg–1 wt.% Mn–1 wt.% Nd (MN11) alloy was studied along the extrusion direction in the temperature range −175 °C to 300 °C at both quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. Microstructural analysis revealed that the as-extruded bar presents a recrystallized microstructure and a weak texture that remain stable in the whole temperature range. A remarkable reversed yield stress asymmetry was observed above 150 °C, with the compressive yield stress being significantly higher than the tensile yield stress. The origin of this anomalous reversed yield stress asymmetry, which to date remains unknown, was investigated through the analysis of the macro and microtexture development during deformation, as well as by means of crystal plasticity finite element simulations of a representative volume element of the polycrystal. The critical resolved shear stresses of slip and twining for simulated single crystals were obtained as a function of the temperature by means of an inverse optimisation strategy. Experimental and simulation results suggest that the reversed yield asymmetry may be primarily attributed to the non-Schmid behaviour of pyramidal 〈c + a〉 slip, which is the dominant deformation mechanism at high temperatures. It is proposed, furthermore, that the asymmetry is enhanced at quasi-static strain rates by the stronger interaction of 〈c + a〉 dislocations with the diffusing solute atoms and particles in compression than in tension

  15. Diagenesis of echinoderm skeletons: Constraints on paleoseawater Mg/Ca reconstructions

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Stolarski, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    One of the most profound environmental changes thought to be reflected in chemical composition of numerous geological archives is Mg/Ca ratio of the seawater, which has varied dramatically throughout the Phanerozoic. Echinoderms that today typically form high magnesium calcite skeletons are increasingly being utilized as a proxy for interpreting secular changes in seawater chemistry. However, accurate characterization of the diagenetic changes of their metastable high magnesium calcite skeletons is a prerequisite for assessing their original, major-element geochemical composition. Here we expand the existing models of diagenesis of echinoderm skeleton by integration of various analytical methods that up to now rarely have been used to assess the diagenetic changes of fossil echinoderms. We validated the preservation of a suite of differently preserved echinoderm ossicles, mostly crinoids, ranging in age from the Cambrian through Recent. In 13 of 99 fossil echinoderm ossicles we found well-preserved porous microstructure (stereom), non-luminescent behaviour or blotchy dark color in cathodoluminescence, and distinct nanostructural features (layered and nanocomposite structure). Moreover, in representatives of such preserved samples, distribution of sulphates associated with organic matter is identical to those in Recent echinoderms. Only such ossicles, despite of local micrometer-scale diagenetic changes, were herein considered well-preserved, retaining their original major-element skeletal composition. By contrast, majority of samples show transformation to the stable low magnesium calcite that leads to obliteration of the primary geochemical and micro/nanostructural features and is accompanied with increase in cathodoluminescence emission intensity. Using only well-preserved fossil echinoderm samples, we found purely random variation in Mg/Ca in echinoderm skeletons through the observed time series; any periodicities in echinoderm skeletal Mg/Ca ratio which might

  16. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  17. High hydrogen desorption properties of Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures: The effects of multiple catalysts in situ formed by adding nickel sulfides/graphene

    Xie, Xiubo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Liu, Tong

    2017-12-01

    Nickel sulfides decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been produced by co-reducing Ni2+ and graphene oxide (GO), and is subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) produced by hydrogen plasma metal reaction (HPMR). The nickel sulfides of about 800 nm completely in situ change to MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni multiple catalysts after first hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process at 673 K. The Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite shows the highest hydrogen desorption kinetics and capacity properties, and the catalytic effect order of the additives is NiS/rGO, NiS and rGO. At 573 K, the Mg-NiS/rGO nanocomposite can quickly desorb 3.7 wt% H2 in 10 min and 4.5 wt% H2 in 60 min. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite are decreased to 44.47 and 63.02 kJ mol-1, smaller than those of the Mg-5wt%rGO and Mg-5wt%NiS samples. The best hydrogen desorption properties of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite can be explained by the synergistic catalytic effects of the highly dispersed MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni catalysts on the rGO sheets, and the more nucleation sites between the catalysts, rGO sheets and Mg matrix.

  18. Adsorption of polar aromatic hydrocarbons on synthetic calcite

    Madsen, Lene; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Grøn, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The wettability of hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. A model system of synthetic call cite, cyclohexane and the three probe molecules: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine, have been...

  19. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans for induced calcite precipitation.

    Heidari Nonakaran, Siamak; Pazhouhandeh, Maghsoud; Keyvani, Abdullah; Abdollahipour, Fatemeh Zahra; Shirzad, Akbar

    2015-12-01

    Biomineralization is a process by which living organisms produce minerals. The extracellular production of these biominerals by microbes has potential for various bioengineering applications. For example, crack remediation and improvement of durability of concrete is an important goal for engineers and biomineral-producing microbes could be a useful tool in achieving this goal. Here we report the isolation, biochemical characterization and molecular identification of Pseudomonas azotoformans, a microbe that produces calcite and which potentially be used to repair cracks in concrete structures. Initially, 38 bacterial isolates were isolated from soil and cements. As a first test, the isolates were screened using a urease assay followed by biochemical tests for the rate of urea hydrolysis, calcite production and the insolubility of calcite. Molecular amplification and sequencing of a 16S rRNA fragment of selected isolates permitted us to identify P. azotoformans as a good candidate for preparation of biotechnological concrete. This species was isolated from soil and the results show that among the tested isolates it had the highest rate of urea hydrolysis, produced the highest amount of calcite, which, furthermore was the most adhesive and insoluble. This species is thus of interest as an agent with the potential ability to repair cracks in concrete.

  20. Radiation-induced paramagnetic species in natural calcite speleothems

    Rossi, A.M.; Poupeau, G.

    1989-01-01

    The ESR natural spectrum of humic-free speleothem calcite single crytals in the region of g = 2.0000 is a composite of lines from 4 radiogenic species, in addition to Mn ++ lines. Laboratory irradiation causes appearrance of three more species. Use of isotropic F species (g = 2.0003) for dating is possible if specific cautions are followed. (author) [pt

  1. Removal of trace elements from landfill leachate by calcite precipitation

    Ettler, V.; Zelená, O.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Strnad, L.; Coufal, P.; Bezdička, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 88, 1-3 (2006), s. 28-31 ISSN 0375-6742 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB3111402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : landfill leachate * calcite * scavenging Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2006

  2. Immobilization of nanoparticles by occlusion into microbial calcite

    Skuce, Rebecca L.; Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; MacLaren, Ian

    2017-01-01

    systems. In this study, the ureolytic bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii was used to induce calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of organo-metallic manufactured nanoparticles. As calcite crystals grew the nanoparticles in the solution became trapped inside these crystals. Capture of NPs within...

  3. Two new solid solutions in calcite-magnesite system identified in a sample from coral reefs in the northern Perth basin

    Li, D.Y.; O'Connor, B.H.; Zhu, Z.R.; Collins, L.B.; Hunter, B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Dolomite, CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 , is an economically important mineral, being of particular significance in petroleum geology. Carbonate rocks have long been a focus of investigation because these rocks contain an estimated 60 percent of the world's recoverable petroleum, and include most of the world's largest reservoirs. Correct phase identification in carbonates has concerned sedimentologists and petroleum geologists for decades. A new type of solid solution in the calcite (CaCO 3 ) - magnesite (MgCO 3 ) system has been identified at Curtin University by Rietveld XRD and neutron diffraction data analysis in a sample from late Pleistocene reefs in the northern Perth Basin. It is known that the structure of calcite (space group R3C) will be transformed to dolomite (R3), which has an ordered distribution of Ca and Mg in the structure, if 50% of its Ca atoms are substituted by Mg in terms of the Ca-Mg atomic ratio. However, the upper limit of Mg substitution for Ca in calcite under sedimentary-geological conditions without there being a change in structure to dolomite is still unknown. Two carbonates examined at Curtin showed Mg substitution for Ca in calcite under coral reef sedimentary conditions of 18.1% and 37.7%, whereas Bragg peak shifts for a 'dolomite, line for these samples were interpreted by geologists as indicative of dolomite with a certain extent of order-disorder distribution between Ca and Mg atoms. The observations have provided an opportunity to re-examine the origins of dolomite and aspects of dolomitization in a coral reef environment in the Quaternary

  4. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  5. Dramatically enhanced ultraviolet photosensing mechanism in a n-ZnO nanowires/i-MgO/n-Si structure with highly dense nanowires and ultrathin MgO layers

    Kim, Dong Chan; Jung, Byung Oh; Cho, Hyung Koun; Lee, Ju Ho; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Jun Hee

    2011-01-01

    This study reports that the visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetecting properties of ZnO nanowire based photodetectors were remarkably improved by introducing ultrathin insulating MgO layers between the ZnO nanowires and Si substrates. All layers were grown without pause by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and the density and vertical arrangement of the ZnO nanowires were strongly dependent on the thickness of the MgO layers. The sample in which an MgO layer with a thickness of 8 nm was inserted had high density nanowires with a vertical alignment and showed dramatically improved UV photosensing performance (photo-to-dark current ratio = 1344.5 and recovery time = 350 ms). The photoresponse spectrum revealed good visible-blind UV detectivity with a sharp cut off at 378 nm and a high UV/visible rejection ratio. A detailed discussion regarding the developed UV photosensing mechanism from the introduction of the i-MgO layers and highly dense nanowires in the n-ZnO nanowires/i-MgO/n-Si substrates structure is presented in this work.

  6. Single crystal growth, characterization and high-pressure Raman spectroscopy of impurity-free magnesite (MgCO3)

    Liang, Wen; Li, Zeming; Yin, Yuan; Li, Rui; Chen, Lin; He, Yu; Dong, Haini; Dai, Lidong; Li, Heping

    2018-05-01

    The understanding of the physical and chemical properties of magnesite (MgCO3) under deep-mantle conditions is highly important to capture the essence of deep-carbon storage in Earth's interior. To develop standard rating scales, the impurity-free magnesite single crystal, paying particular attention to the case of avoiding adverse impacts of Ca2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ impurities in natural magnesite, is undoubtedly necessary for all research of magnesite, including crystalline structural phase transitions, anisotropic elasticity and conductivity, and equation of state (EoS). Thus, a high-quality single crystal of impurity-free magnesite was grown successfully for the first time using the self-flux method under high pressure-temperature conditions. The size of the magnesite single crystal, observed in a plane-polarized microscope, exceeds 200 μm, and the crystal exhibits a rhombohedral structure to cleave along the (101) plane. In addition, its composition of Mg0.999 ± 0.001CO3 was quantified through electron probing analysis. The structural property was investigated by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction and the unit cell dimensions obtained in the rhombohedral symmetry of the R\\bar {3}c space group are a = 4.6255 (3) and c = 14.987 (2), and the final R = 0.0243 for 718 reflections. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of the magnesite single crystal was performed up to 27 GPa at ambient temperature. All Raman active bands, ν i, without any splitting increased almost linearly with increasing pressure. In combination with the high-pressure Raman results {{d/ν _i}}{{{d}P}} and the bulk modulus K T (103 GPa) reported from magnesite EoS studies, the mode Grüneisen parameters (1.49, 1.40, 0.26, and 0.27) of each vibration ( T, L, ν 4, and ν 1) were calculated.

  7. Mechanism of Enhancing Extraction of Vanadium from Stone Coal by Roasting with MgO

    Fang Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the extraction of vanadium from stone coal by roasting with MgO and leaching with sulfuric acid has been investigated, and the mechanism analysis of stone coal roasting with MgO was studied. The results indicated that under the conditions that the mass fraction of the particles with grain size of 0–0.074 mm in raw ore was 75%, the roasting temperature was 500 °C, the roasting time was 1 h, MgO addition was 3 wt %, the sulfuric acid concentration was 20 vol %, the liquid-to-solid ratio was 1.5 mL/g, the leaching temperature was 95 °C, and leaching time was 2 h, resulting in a vanadium leaching efficiency of 86.63%, which increased by 7.73% compared with that of blank roasting. The mechanism analysis showed that the degree of calcite decomposition was low and, thus, magnesium vanadate was more easily formed than calcium vanadate below 500 °C. Moreover, magnesium vanadate was easier to dissolve than calcium vanadate during the sulfuric acid leaching process. Thus, the vanadium leaching efficiency was enhanced by using MgO as a roasting additive below 500 °C. Additionally, at high temperature the formation of tremolite would consume calcium oxide produced from the decomposition of calcite, thus, the formation of calcium vanadate was hindered, and V2O5 would react with MgO to form magnesium vanadate. Therefore, the vanadium leaching efficiency of roasting with MgO was higher than that of blank roasting at high temperature.

  8. Kinetics of Inorganic Calcite Dissolution in Seawater under Pressure

    Dong, S.; Subhas, A.; Rollins, N.; Berelson, W.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    While understanding calcium carbonate dissolution is vital in constructing global carbon cycles and predicting the effect of seawater acidification as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2, there is still a major debate over the basic formulation of a dissolution rate law. The kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution are typically described by the equation: Rate=k(1-Ω)n, while Ω=[Ca2+][CO32-]/Ksp. In this study, 13C-labeled calcite is dissolved in unlabeled seawater and the evolving d13C composition of the fluid is traced over time to establish dissolution rate. Instead of changing ion concentration to obtain varying Ω (as in our previous study; Subhas et al. 2015), we changed Ksp by conducting experiments under different pressures (described in theory as ∂lnKsp/∂P=-ΔV/RT, where ΔV is partial molal volume). This involved the construction of a pressure vessel that could hold our sample bag and provide aliquots while remaining pressurized. Pressure experiments were conducted between 0-2000PSI. Results support the conclusion in our previous study that near-equilibrium dissolution rates are highly nonlinear, but give a disparate relationship between undersaturation and dissolution rate if Ω is calculated assuming the specific ΔV embedded in CO2SYS. A revised ΔV from -37cm3 to -65cm3 would make the dissolution formulation equation agree, but clearly appears unreasonable. Our results are explained by a pressure effect on carbonate dissolution kinetics over and above the influence of pressure on Ω. If this is a phenomenon that occurs in nature, then we would predict that dissolution should be occurring shallower in the water column (as sometimes observed) than indicated by standard Ω calculations.

  9. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  10. High-pressure X-ray diffraction, Raman, and computational studies of MgCl2 up to 1 Mbar: Extensive pressure stability of the β-MgCl2 layered structure.

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Zaug, Joseph M; Bastea, Sorin; Kalkan, Bora; Konôpková, Zuzana; Kunz, Martin

    2016-08-12

    Magnesium chloride (MgCl2) with the rhombohedral layered CdCl2-type structure (α-MgCl2) has been studied experimentally using synchrotron angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy using a diamond-anvil cell up to 100 GPa at room temperature and theoretically using first-principles density functional calculations. The results reveal a pressure-induced second-order structural phase transition to a hexagonal layered CdI2-type structure (β-MgCl2) at 0.7 GPa: the stacking sequence of the Cl anions are altered resulting in a reduction of the c-axis length. Theoretical calculations confirm this phase transition sequence and the calculated transition pressure is in excellent agreement with the experiment. Lattice dynamics calculations also reproduce the experimental Raman spectra measured for the ambient and high-pressure phase. According to our experimental results MgCl2 remains in a 2D layered phase up to 100 GPa and further, the 6-fold coordination of Mg cations is retained. Theoretical calculations of relative enthalpy suggest that this extensive pressure stability is due to a low enthalpy of the layered structure ruling out kinetic barrier effects. This observation is unusual, as it contradicts with the general structural behavior of highly compressed AB2 compounds.

  11. Sorption and catalytic oxidation of Fe(II) at the surface of calcite

    Mettler, S.; Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Von Gunten, U.

    The effect of sorption and coprecipitation of Fe(II) with calcite on the kinetics of Fe(II) oxidation was investigated. The interaction of Fe(II) with calcite was studied experimentally in the absence and presence of oxygen. The sorption of Fe(II) on calcite occurred in two distinguishable steps:

  12. Effects of Alloying Elements on Room and High Temperature Tensile Properties of Al-Si Cu-Mg Base Alloys =

    Alyaldin, Loay

    In recent years, aluminum and aluminum alloys have been widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. Among the most commonly used cast aluminum alloys are those belonging to the Al-Si system. Due to their mechanical properties, light weight, excellent castability and corrosion resistance, these alloys are primarily used in engineering and in automotive applications. The more aluminum is used in the production of a vehicle, the less the weight of the vehicle, and the less fuel it consumes, thereby reducing the amount of harmful emissions into the atmosphere. The principal alloying elements in Al-Si alloys, in addition to silicon, are magnesium and copper which, through the formation of Al2Cu and Mg2Si precipitates, improve the alloy strength via precipitation hardening following heat treatment. However, most Al-Si alloys are not suitable for high temperature applications because their tensile and fatigue strengths are not as high as desired in the temperature range 230-350°C, which are the temperatures that are often attained in automotive engine components under actual service conditions. The main challenge lies in the fact that the strength of heat-treatable cast aluminum alloys decreases at temperatures above 200°C. The strength of alloys under high temperature conditions is improved by obtaining a microstructure containing thermally stable and coarsening-resistant intermetallics, which may be achieved with the addition of Ni. Zr and Sc. Nickel leads to the formation of nickel aluminide Al3Ni and Al 9FeNi in the presence of iron, while zirconium forms Al3Zr. These intermetallics improve the high temperature strength of Al-Si alloys. Some interesting improvements have been achieved by modifying the composition of the base alloy with additions of Mn, resulting in an increase in strength and ductility at both room and high temperatures. Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys such as the 354 (Al-9wt%Si-1.8wt%Cu-0.5wt%Mg) alloys show a greater response to heat treatment as a

  13. Laser-induced local activation of Mg-doped GaN with a high lateral resolution for high power vertical devices

    Kurose, Noriko; Matsumoto, Kota; Yamada, Fumihiko; Roffi, Teuku Muhammad; Kamiya, Itaru; Iwata, Naotaka; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    2018-01-01

    A method for laser-induced local p-type activation of an as-grown Mg-doped GaN sample with a high lateral resolution is developed for realizing high power vertical devices for the first time. As-grown Mg-doped GaN is converted to p-type GaN in a confined local area. The transition from an insulating to a p-type area is realized to take place within about 1-2 μm fine resolution. The results show that the technique can be applied in fabricating the devices such as vertical field effect transistors, vertical bipolar transistors and vertical Schottkey diode so on with a current confinement region using a p-type carrier-blocking layer formed by this technique.

  14. Large-scale high-resolution scanning Hall probe microscope used for MgB2 filament characterization

    Cambel, V; Fedor, J; Gregusova, D; Kovac, P; Husek, I

    2005-01-01

    The scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) is an important imaging tool used for detailed studies of superconductors in basic science as well as in the industrial sector. It can be used for the studies of losses, current distribution, and effects at grain boundaries. However, only a few SHPMs for magnetic field imaging at temperatures below 77 K have been proposed up to now, most of them designed for small-area (∼10x10 μm 2 ) scanning. We present a large-scale low-temperature SHPM developed for imaging the entire magnetic field in close proximity to magnetic and superconducting samples at 4.2-300 K. The microscope combines a large scanned area and high spatial and magnetic field resolution. The instrument is designed as an insert of standard helium flowing cryostats. The Hall sensor scans an area up to 7 x 25 mm 2 in the whole temperature interval with a spatial resolution better than 5 μm. The presented system is used for the study of ex situ prepared MgB 2 filament. We show that external magnetic field induces local supercurrents in the MgB 2 , from which the critical current can be estimated. Moreover, it indicates the microstructure and space homogeneity of the superconductor

  15. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties in Superlight Mg-Li Alloy Processed by High-Pressure Torsion

    Qian Su

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of LZ91 Mg-Li alloy processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT at an ambient temperature were researched in this paper. The microstructure analysis demonstrated that significant grain refinement was achieved after HPT processing with an average grain size reducing from 30 μm (the as-received condition to approximately 230 nm through 10 turns. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed LZ91 alloy was consisted of α phase (hexagonal close-packed structure, hcp and β phase (body-centered cubic structure, bcc before and after HPT processing. The mean value of microhardness increased with the increasing number of HPT turns. This significantly increased hardness of specimens can be explained by Hall-Petch strengthening. Simultaneously, the distribution of microhardness along the specimens was different from other materials after HPT processing due to the different mechanical properties of two different phases. The mechanical properties of LZ91 alloy processed by HPT were assessed by the micro-tensile testing at 298, 373, 423, and 473 K. The results demonstrate that the ultra-fine grain LZ91 Mg-Li alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties: tensile elongation is approximately 400% at 473 K with an initial strain rate of 1 × 10−2 s−1.

  16. The comparison of the effects of standard 20 mg atorvastatin daily and 20 mg atorvastatin every other day on serum LDL-cholesterol and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels.

    Keleş, Telat; Akar Bayram, Nihal; Kayhan, Tuğba; Canbay, Alper; Sahin, Deniz; Durmaz, Tahir; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Diker, Erdem

    2008-12-01

    In this study, we aimed at comparing the effects of standard once daily 20 mg atorvastatin treatment with that of atorvastatin 20 mg administered every other day on serum lipids and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. Sixty-one patients with serum total cholesterol levels of above 200 mg/dl and low density lipoprotein (LDL)--cholesterol levels of above 130 mg/dl were included in this prospective, randomized study. The patients were randomized into daily treatment of 20 mg atorvastatin (standard treatment) and 20 mg atorvastatin every other day (every other day treatment) groups. Before the treatment and at each visit, serum lipids and hs-CRP levels of all the patients were measured. Statistical analyses were performed Chi-square, unpaired t and two-way repeated measurements ANOVA tests. In the every other day treatment group, there was a 36.1% reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels by the end of first month (p0.05). The LDL cholesterol levels of the group receiving 20 mg atorvastatin every day was reduced by %41 by the end of 1 month (pevery other day, there was a 21% decrease in hs-CRP levels compared to the basal measurements at the end of first month (pevery day the decrease in hs-CRP levels at the end of one month was more striking (37%, p0.05). Alternate-day dosing of atorvastatin causes a significant lipid-lowering and antiinflammatory effects similar to that of daily administration and yet may provide some cost savings.

  17. Effects of Citrate and Arginine on Sorption of Nickel to Yazd Sepiolite and Calcite

    Ahmadreza Sheikhhosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pollution of soil and water environment by release of heavy metals is of great concerns of the last decades. Sorption of heavy metals by low cost materials is considered as an inexpensive and efficient method used for removal of heavy metals from soil-water systems. The presence of different ligands with various complexing abilities can change the sorption properties of heavy metals and their fate in the environment as well. In order to assess the effect of citrate and arginine as natural organic ligands in soil environment, in a batch study we investigated the effects of these ligands on equilibrium sorption of nickel to sepiolite and calcite minerals and also kinetics of Ni sorption by these minerals. Materials and Methods: Minerals used in this study included sepiolite from Yazd (Iran and pure calcite (Analytical grade, Merck, Germany. Sepiolite was purified, saturated with Ca using 0.5 M CaCl2, powdered in a mortar and sieved by non-metal 230 mesh standard wire sieve. For equilibrium sorption study, in a 50-mL polyethylene centrifuge tube,0.3 g sample of each mineral was suspended in 30 mL of a 0.01 M CaCl2 solution containing 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg L-1 Ni (NiCl2 and containing zero (as control or 0.1mmol L-1 citrate or arginine ligands. The applied concentrationsfor each ligand can naturally occur in soils. Preparedtubes were shaken (180±2 rpm, 25±1oC for 24 h using an orbital shaker and centrifuged (4000×g for 10 min and the supernatants were analyzed for Ni concentration using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAnalyst 200 Perkin-Elmer at a wavelength of 232 nm and a detection limit of 0.05 mg L-1. The quantity of Ni retained by each mineral at equilibrium was calculated using equation qe = (Ci - CeV/W where qe was the amount of nickel retained by mineral surface at equilibrium. Ci and Ce were the initial and the equilibrium concentrations (mg L-1 of Ni, respectively, V was the volume (L of the solution

  18. The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2013-06-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (e.g. magnesium) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low- to high-Mg calcites. Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions spanning a range of carbonate chemistry conditions (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg / Ca or Sr / Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 μatm; pHT = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated pCO2 (900 μatm; pHT = 7.73 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr / Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr

  19. The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages

    M. LaVigne

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (e.g. magnesium into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2 on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low- to high-Mg calcites. Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions spanning a range of carbonate chemistry conditions (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California. Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg / Ca or Sr / Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 μatm; pHT = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD. However, when reared under elevated pCO2 (900 μatm; pHT = 7.73 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1, skeletal Sr / Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr

  20. Creation of nanopores on graphene planes with MgO template for preparing high-performance supercapacitor electrodes

    Wang, Huanjing; Sun, Xiuxia; Liu, Zonghuai; Lei, Zhibin

    2014-05-01

    Creation of nanopores on graphene planar sheets is of great significance in promoting the kinetic diffusion of electrolyte and enhancing the utilization efficiency of graphene planar sheets. Herein, we developed a facile chemical vapor deposition strategy to prepare highly porous graphene with flake-like MgO as template and ferrocene as the carbon precursor. The graphene layers show a highly porous structure with small mesopores of 4-8 nm, large mesopores of 10-20 nm and additional macropores of 100-200 nm. These nanopores on graphene sheets provide numerous channels for fast ion transport perpendicular to the 2D basal plane, while the good powder conductivity ensures an effective electron propagation within the 2D graphene plane. As a result, a specific capacitance of 303 F g-1, an areal capacitance up to 17.3 μF cm-2 and a nearly tenfold shorter time constant were achieved when compared with those of nonporous and stacked graphene electrodes. The method demonstrated herein would open up an opportunity to prepare porous graphene for a wide applications in energy storage, biosensors, nanoelectronics and catalysis.Creation of nanopores on graphene planar sheets is of great significance in promoting the kinetic diffusion of electrolyte and enhancing the utilization efficiency of graphene planar sheets. Herein, we developed a facile chemical vapor deposition strategy to prepare highly porous graphene with flake-like MgO as template and ferrocene as the carbon precursor. The graphene layers show a highly porous structure with small mesopores of 4-8 nm, large mesopores of 10-20 nm and additional macropores of 100-200 nm. These nanopores on graphene sheets provide numerous channels for fast ion transport perpendicular to the 2D basal plane, while the good powder conductivity ensures an effective electron propagation within the 2D graphene plane. As a result, a specific capacitance of 303 F g-1, an areal capacitance up to 17.3 μF cm-2 and a nearly tenfold shorter time

  1. Low p-type contact resistance by field-emission tunneling in highly Mg-doped GaN

    Okumura, Hironori; Martin, Denis; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Mg-doped GaN with a net acceptor concentration (NA-ND) in the high 1019 cm-3 range was grown using ammonia molecular-beam epitaxy. Electrical properties of NiO contact on this heavily doped p-type GaN were investigated. A potential-barrier height of 0.24 eV was extracted from the relationship between NA-ND and the specific contact resistivity (ρc). We found that there is an optimum NA-ND value of 5 × 1019 cm-3 for which ρc is as low as 2 × 10-5 Ω cm2. This low ρc is ascribed to hole tunneling through the potential barrier at the NiO/p+-GaN interface, which is well accounted for by the field-emission model.

  2. Highly Efficient Flexible Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Improved Electron Extraction Using MgZnO Nanocrystals.

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Santra, Pralay Kanti; Tian, Lei; Johansson, Malin B; Rensmo, Håkan; Johansson, Erik M J

    2017-08-22

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have high potential for realizing an efficient and lightweight energy supply for flexible or wearable electronic devices. To achieve highly efficient and flexible CQD solar cells, the electron transport layer (ETL), extracting electrons from the CQD solid layer, needs to be processed at a low-temperature and should also suppress interfacial recombination. Herein, a highly stable MgZnO nanocrystal (MZO-NC) layer is reported for efficient flexible PbS CQD solar cells. Solar cells fabricated with MZO-NC ETL give a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.4% and 9.4%, on glass and flexible plastic substrates, respectively. The reported flexible CQD solar cell has the record efficiency to date of flexible CQD solar cells. Detailed theoretical simulations and extensive characterizations reveal that the MZO-NCs significantly enhance charge extraction from CQD solids and diminish the charge accumulation at the ETL/CQD interface, suppressing charge interfacial recombination. These important results suggest that the low-temperature processed MZO-NCs are very promising for use in efficient flexible solar cells or other flexible optoelectronic devices.

  3. Carbonate dissolution rates in high salinity brines: Implications for post-Noachian chemical weathering on Mars

    Phillips-Lander, Charity M.; Parnell, S. R.; McGraw, L. E.; Elwood Madden, M. E.

    2018-06-01

    A diverse suite of carbonate minerals including calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) have been observed on the martian surface and in meteorites. Terrestrial carbonates usually form via aqueous processes and often record information about the environment in which they formed, including chemical and textural biosignatures. In addition, terrestrial carbonates are often found in association with evaporite deposits on Earth. Similar high salinity environments and processes were likely active on Mars and some areas may contain active high salinity brines today. In this study, we directly compare calcite and magnesite dissolution in ultrapure water, dilute sulfate and chloride solutions, as well as near-saturated sulfate and chloride brines with known activity of water (aH2O) to determine how dissolution rates vary with mineralogy and aH2O, as well as aqueous cation and anion chemistry to better understand how high salinity fluids may have altered carbonate deposits on Mars. We measured both calcite and magnesite initial dissolution rates at 298 K and near neutral pH (6-8) in unbuffered solutions containing ultrapure water (18 MΩ cm-1 UPW; aH2O = 1), dilute (0.1 mol kg-1; aH2O = 1) and near-saturated Na2SO4 (2.5 mol kg-1, aH2O = 0.92), dilute (0.1 mol kg-1, aH2O = 1) and near-saturated NaCl (5.7 mol kg-1, aH2O = 0.75). Calcite dissolution rates were also measured in dilute and near-saturated MgSO4 (0.1 mol kg-1, aH2O = 1 and 2.7 mol kg-1, aH2O = 0.92, respectively) and MgCl2 (0.1 mol kg-1, aH2O = 1 and 3 mol kg-1, aH2O = 0.73, respectively), while magnesite dissolution rates were measured in dilute and near-saturated CaCl2 (0.1 mol kg-1, aH2O = 1 and 9 mol kg-1, aH2O = 0.35). Initial calcite dissolution rates were fastest in near-saturated MgCl2 brine, while magnesite dissolution rates were fastest in dilute (0.1 mol kg-1) NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. Calcite dissolution rates in near-saturated Na2SO4 were similar to those observed in the dilute solutions (-8.00 ± 0

  4. Biphasic Response to Luteolin in MG-63 Osteoblast-Like Cells under High Glucose‑Induced Oxidative Stress

    Naser Abbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical evidence indicates the diabetes-induced impairment of osteogenesis caused by a decrease in osteoblast activity. Flavonoids can increase the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts in a high-glucose state. However, some flavonoids such as luteolin may have the potential to induce cytotoxicity in osteoblast-like cells. This study was performed to investigate whether a cytoprotective concentration range of luteolin could be separated from a cytotoxic concentration range in human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells in high-glucose condition. Methods: Cells were cultured in a normal- or high-glucose medium. Cell viability was determined with the MTT assay. The formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured using probe 2’,7’ -dichlorofluorescein diacetate, and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated with an alkaline phosphatase bioassay. Results: ROS generation, reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell death induced by high glucose were inhibited by lower concentrations of luteolin (EC50, 1.29±0.23 µM. Oxidative stress mediated by high glucose was also overcome by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. At high concentrations, luteolin caused osteoblast cell death in normal- and high-glucose states (IC50, 34±2.33 and 27±2.42 µM, respectively, as represented by increased ROS and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity. Conclusion: Our results indicated that the cytoprotective action of luteolin in glucotoxic condition was manifested in much lower concentrations, by a factor of approximately 26 and 20, than was its cytotoxic activity, which occurred under normal or glucotoxic condition, respectively.

  5. Calcite encrustation in macro-algae Chara and its implication to the formation of carbonate-bound cadmium

    Siong, Kian; Asaeda, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    We studied the relationship between macro-algae Chara (Stoneworts) calcite (CaCO 3 ) encrustation and the speciation of cadmium (Cd) accumulated by the plant. Results showed that 17% of the total Cd (0.3 mg kg -1 ) accumulated by Chara fibrosa exposed to 1 μg Cd L -1 was carbonate-bound. The percentage of carbonate-bound Cd in the plant exposed to 10 μg Cd L -1 increased from 48% in young thalli (total Ca -1 , total Cd: 125 mg kg -1 ) to 63% in calcified mature thalli (total Ca: 190 mg g -1 ; total Cd: 134 mg kg -1 ). Based on mineral saturation calculation and reliability analysis of the sequential fractionation procedure, precipitation of otavite (CdCO 3 ) and co-precipitation of Cd with calcite, occurring in the alkaline regions of Chara cell wall, are probably the mechanisms of carbonate-bound Cd formation. Thick marl sediment frequently found beneath charophyte meadows suggests a long-term storage of Ca as well as the precipitated or co-precipitated Cd in the sediment after the plant senescence and decomposition.

  6. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik [SNU; (LLNL); (NSRRC); (Okayama); (UC); (CIW); (Wash State U); (Nagoya); (SBU)

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  7. Preparation of cold Mg{sup +}ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-15

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a {sup 24}Mg{sup +} ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little

  8. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids.

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G; Kunitake, Miki E; Tang, Chiu C; Duer, Melinda J; Freeman, Colin L; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H; Estroff, Lara A; Baker, Shefford P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit-mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules-remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  9. High selectivity and stability of Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 for in-situ catalytic upgrading fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    Karnjanakom, Surachai; Suriya-umporn, Thanyamai; Bayu, Asep; Kongparakul, Suwadee; Samart, Chanatip; Fushimi, Chihiro; Abudula, Abuliti; Guan, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 was developed for in-situ catalytic upgrading of bio-oils. • Mg/Al-MCM-41 exhibited high selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbons. • The ratio of produced hydrocarbon reached up to 80% in upgraded bio-oil. • 1 wt.% Mg/Al-MCM-41 showed the highest catalytic activity. • Mg/Al-MCM-41 had stable reusability due to its coking inhabitation ability. - Abstract: In-situ catalytic upgrading of bio-oils derived from the fast pyrolysis of cellulose, lignin or sunflower stalk over Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 was investigated in details. It is found that Mg species with doping amounts ranged between 0.25 and 10 wt.% was well dispersed on Al-MCM-41, and that doping Mg on Al-MCM-41 effectively adjusted the acidity and basicity of the catalysts, resulting in significant improvement of bio-oil quality. Mg/Al-MCM-41 exhibited high selective conversion of bio-oils derived from cellulose, lignin or sunflower stalk to high value-added aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic cracking, deoxygenation and aromatization. In the upgraded bio-oil, the relative total hydrocarbon amount reached up to approximately ≥80%, which consisted of aromatic hydrocarbon approximately 76% and aliphatic hydrocarbon approximately 4% for all feedstocks. The selectivity to the monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTXs) increased while the coke formed on the catalyst decreased with the increase in Mg doping amount. 1 wt.% Mg/Al-MCM-41 resulted in the highest relative total hydrocarbon amount in the upgraded bio-oil at lower catalytic deoxygenation temperature, and showed stable reusability for at least 5 cycles. It is expected that Mg/Al-MCM-41 can be widely applied for bio-oil upgrading in a practical process.

  10. An equation of state for high pressure-temperature liquids (RTpress) with application to MgSiO3 melt

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Bower, Dan J.

    2018-05-01

    The thermophysical properties of molten silicates at extreme conditions are crucial for understanding the early evolution of Earth and other massive rocky planets, which is marked by giant impacts capable of producing deep magma oceans. Cooling and crystallization of molten mantles are sensitive to the densities and adiabatic profiles of high-pressure molten silicates, demanding accurate Equation of State (EOS) models to predict the early evolution of planetary interiors. Unfortunately, EOS modeling for liquids at high P-T conditions is difficult due to constantly evolving liquid structure. The Rosenfeld-Tarazona (RT) model provides a physically sensible and accurate description of liquids but is limited to constant volume heating paths (Rosenfeld and Tarazona, 1998). We develop a high P-T EOS for liquids, called RTpress, which uses a generalized Rosenfeld-Tarazona model as a thermal perturbation to isothermal and adiabatic reference compression curves. This approach provides a thermodynamically consistent EOS which remains accurate over a large P-T range and depends on a limited number of physically meaningful parameters that can be determined empirically from either simulated or experimental datasets. As a first application, we model MgSiO3 melt representing a simplified rocky mantle chemistry. The model parameters are fitted to the MD simulations of both Spera et al. (2011) and de Koker and Stixrude (2009), recovering pressures, volumes, and internal energies to within 0.6 GPa, 0.1 Å3 , and 6 meV per atom on average (for the higher resolution data set), as well as accurately predicting liquid densities and temperatures from shock-wave experiments on MgSiO3 glass. The fitted EOS is used to determine adiabatic thermal profiles, revealing the approximate thermal structure of a fully molten magma ocean like that of the early Earth. These adiabats, which are in strong agreement for both fitted models, are shown to be sufficiently steep to produce either a center

  11. Effect of different seawater Mg2 + concentrations on calcification in two benthic foraminifers

    Mewes, Antje; Langer, Gerald; de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium, incorporated in foraminiferal calcite (Mg/CaCC), is used intensively to reconstruct past seawater temperatures but, in addition to temperature, the Mg/CaCC of foraminiferal tests also depends on the ratio of Mg and Ca in seawater (Mg/CaSW). The physiological mechanisms responsible for these proxy relationships are still unknown. This culture study investigates the impact of different seawater [Mg2 +] on calcification in two benthic foraminiferal species precipitating contrasting Mg/CaCC: Ammonia aomoriensis, producing low-Mg calcite and Amphistegina lessonii, producing intermediate-Mg calcite. Foraminiferal growth and test thickness were determined and, Mg/Ca was analyzed using Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Results show that at present-day seawater Mg/CaSW of ~ 5, both species have highest growth rates, reflecting their adaptation to modern seawater element concentrations. Test thickness is not significantly affected by different Mg/CaSW. The relationship between Mg/CaSW and Mg/CaCC shows a distinct positive y-axis intercept, possibly reflecting at least two processes involved in foraminiferal biomineralization. The associated Mg partition (DMg) changes non-linearly with increasing Mg/CaSW, hence suggesting that the DMg is best described by an exponential function approaching an asymptote. PMID:26089590

  12. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  13. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2016-01-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3− CO32− + H+, when HCO3− is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80–100 atoms) to represent...... the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from −6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite...... even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 bicarbonate is adsorbed on calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution...

  14. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2016-11-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of {sup 14}C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  15. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14 C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO 3 ) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of 14 C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  16. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure

    T.S. Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  17. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure.

    Yang, T S; Yao, S H; Chang, Y Y; Deng, J H

    2018-01-08

    Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  18. Distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils of India

    Ganesan, V.; Ragupathy, S.; Parthipan, B.; Rani, D.B.R.; Mahadevan, A.

    1991-12-31

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorhizzal (VAM) status was assessed for coal, lignite and calcite mine spoils. The three study sites were: The Kothagudem coal field in the south central region where waste materials are piled 1 to 2 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from plants growing on the waste. Neyveli, on the southeastern coast, is a lignite coal mine where the spoil is piled 70 to 100 m high on the soil surface. Samples were collected from recently revegetated mine spoil and from 25 year old revegetated sites. The calcite mine at Thazhaiyuthu in the south where the spoil is piled up 2 to 3 m on the soil surface. Samples were collected from 4 to 7 year old reclaimed sites. The wastes generally supported different plant species. The level of VAM infection of plants was markedly different in each mine spoil, with the maximum infection in the coal and calcite spoils, and the least in the lignite spoil. There was more infection in the 25 year old lignite spoil than in the newly revegetated spoil. There were different VAM species in each spoil, and no one species was present in all of the samples. The authors conclude that one of the factors leading to the differences between spoils is the amount of topsoil contained in the spoil (least in the lignite spoils which are very deep). The other is age of the spoils. Unfortunately the authors concluded that the best approach is to enrich the spoils with VAM rather than salvaging and replacing topsoil

  19. Geochemical signatures of fluid paleo-transfer in fracture filling calcite from low permeability rock masses: examples taken from Bure's and Tournemire's site in France and northern Switzerland; Signatures geochimiques de paleocirculations aqueuses dans la calcite de remplissage de fracture de massifs argileux peu permeables et de leurs encaissants: exemples pris sur les sites de Bure, Tournemire et Suisse du nord

    Lecocq, D

    2002-12-15

    Fractures in rock masses represent preferential path for fluid transfer and, as such, are the most efficient way for migration of radionuclides at a regional scale. The impact of fracturing on hydrogeological system is a major challenge for underground radioactive waste storage projects. In this context, geochemistry of fracture-filling calcite is used to better understand physical and chemical properties of palaeo-fluids. A new methodology has been developed to analyze Mg, Mn, Fe, Sr and Rare Earth Elements REE (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy and Yb) in calcite by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Analyses of calcite crystals have been performed in fractures from Jurassic clays and limestones in France (Bure and Tournemire sites) and northern Switzerland (Mt Terri's tunnel and deep borehole). On each case, several geochemical signatures are observed, according to REE partitioning and Mn and Fe concentrations. In the Bure site, a dependence of calcite geochemistry from fracture host rock has been evidenced. On the other hand, speciation of REE in solution equilibrated with clayey or calcareous rocks at circum-neutral pH (7 to 8) is not significantly influenced by the media: speciation is dominated by carbonate species in both cases and phosphate complexes can modify heavy REE availability in relatively to light REE. These results point out that in fractures in clays, calcite crystallizes at equilibrium with a fluid expulsed during diagenesis from clay minerals, recording the effect of clays and accessory phases. In limestone fractures, calcite records a later event related to the past functioning of the present aquifer, and the fluid has reached equilibrium with the rock minerals. In secondary filling calcite from Toarcian Argilites faults close to Tournemire's tunnel, three successive generations of calcite are observed in an extensive fault, and a fourth in a compressive one. In Aalenian Opalinus Clays veins, comparison between existing isotopic data and Mn, Fe

  20. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    Vučinić Dušica R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking strength of the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with 1.5% stearic acid using wet process, are higher for 2.8% and 5.2%, respectively, compared to the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with the same amount of acid used in the dry process. The tensile strength difference between the mixtures increases with the increase of the concentration of used stearic acid up to 3%. The strength of PVC mixture with the calcite modified by wet process is 3.1% higher compared to the mixture containing calcite modified by dry process. The results showed that the bonding strength between calcite and the adsorbed organic component affected tensile strength, tensile elongation and breaking strength of the PVC mixtures. The best filler was obtained by wet modification using 1.5% stearic acid solution that provided the formation of a stearate monolayer chemisorbed on calcite. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet process using 1.5% stearic acid solution exhibited the best mechanical properties. This calcite was completely hydrophobic with dominant chemically adsorbed surfactant, which means that stearate chemisorbed on calcite provided stronger interaction in the calcite-stearic acid-PVC system.

  1. Surface Forces Apparatus measurements of interactions between rough and reactive calcite surfaces.

    Dziadkowiec, Joanna; Javadi, Shaghayegh; Bratvold, Jon Einar; Nilsen, Ola; Røyne, Anja

    2018-05-28

    Nm-range forces acting between calcite surfaces in water affect macroscopic properties of carbonate rocks and calcite-based granular materials, and are significantly influenced by calcite surface recrystallization. We suggest that the repulsive mechanical effects related to nm-scale surface recrystallization of calcite in water could be partially responsible for the observed decrease of cohesion in calcitic rocks saturated with water. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA), we simultaneously followed the calcite reactivity and measured the forces in water in two surface configurations: between two rough calcite surfaces (CC), or between rough calcite and a smooth mica surface (CM). We used nm-scale rough, polycrystalline calcite films prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). We measured only repulsive forces in CC in CaCO 3 -saturated water, which was related to roughness and possibly to repulsive hydration effects. Adhesive or repulsive forces were measured in CM in CaCO 3 -saturated water depending on calcite roughness, and the adhesion was likely enhanced by electrostatic effects. The pull-off adhesive force in CM became stronger with time and this increase was correlated with a decrease of roughness at contacts, which parameter could be estimated from the measured force-distance curves. That suggested a progressive increase of real contact areas between the surfaces, caused by gradual pressure-driven deformation of calcite surface asperities during repeated loading-unloading cycles. Reactivity of calcite was affected by mass transport across nm to µm-thick gaps between the surfaces. Major roughening was observed only for the smoothest calcite films, where gaps between two opposing surfaces were nm-thick over µm-sized areas, and led to force of crystallization that could overcome confining pressures of the order of MPa. Any substantial roughening of calcite caused a significant increase of the repulsive mechanical force contribution.

  2. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    Mondol, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Alam, T.; Banerjee, R. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Kumar, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chattopadhyay, K., E-mail: kamanio@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-02-27

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al{sub 3}Sc and Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  3. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    Mondol, S.; Alam, T.; Banerjee, R.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al 3 Sc and Al 3 (Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  4. External electric field: An effective way to prevent aggregation of Mg atoms on γ-graphyne for high hydrogen storage capacity

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Due to large pores in the sheet of γ-graphyne, it should be a potential materials for energy storage applications. Our calculations might motivate active experimental efforts in designing high-efficiency hydrogen storage media. • For the first time, we use an applied external electric field to prevent Mg atoms from clustering using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. • The results demonstrate that, for Mg-G after electric field (F = 0.05 V/nm) treatment, ten H_2 molecules per Mg atom can be adsorbed and the hydrogen storage capacities reach to 10.64 wt%, with the average binding energies of 0.28 eV/H_2. - Abstract: In this article, we investigate the hydrogen storage capacity of Mg-decorated γ-graphyne (Mg-G) based on DFT calculations. Our results indicate that an external electric field can effectively prevent Mg atoms aggregating on γ-graphyne sheet. The Mg-G, after electric field (F = 0.05 V/nm) treatment, can store up to ten H_2 molecules and the hydrogen storage capacity is 10.64 wt%, with the average adsorption energy of 0.28 eV/H_2. Our calculations demonstrate that Mg-G is a potential material for hydrogen storage with high capacity and might motivate active experimental efforts in designing hydrogen storage media.

  5. New Environmentalconditions Responsible for the amount of mg Incorporated in Biogenic Carbonates

    Zuddas, P.; Cherchi, A.; DeGiudici, G. B.; Buosi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of carbonate minerals formed in past and present oceans is assumed to be significantly controlled by temperature and seawater composition. Several kinetic laboratory investigations have suggested that the temperature is kinetically responsible for the amount of Mg incorporated in both abiotic and biogenic calcites and that variation of kinetic reaction mechanism resulting from the temperature changes are correlated with the variable amount of Mg incorporated in calcites. These results explain why in present-day marine carbonates low-Mg calcite cements are mainly associated with cool water while high-Mg carbonates are dominantly found in warm-water environments. An apparent inverse relationship between the global average paleo-temperature and the Mg/Ca ratio is however observed in the past formed marine carbonate. This apparent contradiction has been interpreted as resulting from a possible changing in the relative seawater geochemical cycles of these cations. Recent monitoring of costal areas in presence of heavy metals and CO2 released from industrial polluted area reveals the presence of porcelanaceous miliolids infested by microscopic boring microflora (cyanobacteria, algae and fungi). Here, benthonic foraminifera have Mg/Ca molar ratio by one order of magnitude higher when compared to the average value of the same genus living under uncontaminated environments. A similar behaviour has been found for Zn, Cd and Pb. In these contaminated environments, temperature and average major seawater composition remain constant, while PCO2 partial pressure (estimated by pH and alkalinity using the ion pairing model) is 3-5 times higher than the average for the open sea nearby. Geochemical models predicts that CO2 increase is affecting carbonate saturation state of surface water in the twenty-first century indicating that calcareous organisms may have difficulty calcifying leading to production of weaker skeletons and greater vulnerability to erosion. The

  6. Phosphate adsorption and precipitation on calcite under calco-carbonic equilibrium condition.

    Li, Zhenxuan; Sun, Xiaowen; Huang, Lidong; Liu, Dagang; Yu, Luji; Wu, Hongsheng; Wei, Dongyang

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate (PO 4 3- ) removal on calcite often entails two processes: adsorption and precipitation. Separating these two processes is of great importance for assessment of PO 4 3- stability after removal. Thus, this study was aimed at finding a critical range of conditions for separating these two processes in calco-carbonic equilibrium, by adjusting PO 4 3- concentration, reaction time and pH. PO 4 3- removal kinetic results showed that: (I) At pH7.7, PO 4 3- removal was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤2.2 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, with dominant precipitation occurring at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≥3 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction; (II) At pH8.3, adsorption was the key removal process at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤7.5 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, whereas precipitation was observed at initial PO 4 3- concentration of 10 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction, (III) At pH 9.1 and 10.1, PO 4 3- removal mechanism was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤10 mg L -1 within 24 h reaction. Based on the kinetic results, it is suggested that PO 4 3- precipitation will occur after 24 h reaction when saturation index of amorphous calcium phosphate is between 1.97 and 2.19. Besides, increasing PO 4 3- concentration does not cause a continuous decline of PO 4 3- removal percentage. Moreover, experimental removal data deviated largely from the theoretical adsorption value by CD-MUSIC model. These indicate occurrence of precipitation which is in agreement with the kinetic result. Therefore our study will provide fundamental reference information for better understanding of phosphorous stabilization after removal by calcite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. F + centre generation in MgO crystals at high density of excitation by accelerated electrons of subthreshold energy

    Annenkov, Y. M.; Surzhikov, A. P.; Surzhikov, V. P.; Pogrebnjak, A. D.

    1981-07-01

    Optical absorption spectra and the angular distribution of annihilated positrons in MgO crystals irradiated by subtreshold superdense electron pulses are measured. The experimental results obtained show the effective contribution of the creation mechanism of non-impact radiation defects in MgO crystals at the highest electron irradiation densities.

  8. Highly selective bimetallic Pt-Cu/Mg(Al)O catalysts for the aqueous-phase reforming of glycerol

    Boga, D.A.; Oord, R.; Beale, A.M.; Chung, Y.M.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Monometallic Pt and bimetallic Pt-Cu catalysts supported on Mg(Al)O mixed oxides, obtained by calcination of the corresponding layered double hydroxides (LDHs), were prepared and tested in the aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of glycerol. The effect of the Mg/Al ratio and calcination temperature of the

  9. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field,Tarim Basin,China

    2008-01-01

    interval and this intensive cementation is responsible for decreased porosity and permeability. In the CaCl2 water at the greater depth, pore water is un-der-saturated with respect to calcite, resulting in dissolution of calcite cements, as consistent with microscopic dissolution features of the samples from this depth interval. Calcite dissolution results in formation of high secondary porosity and permeability, and is responsible for the superior quality of the reservoir rocks at this depth interval. These results illustrate the importance of pore water chemis-try in controlling carbonate precipitation/dissolution, which in turn controls porosity and permeability of oil and gas reservoir rocks in major sedimentary basins.

  10. Influence of the Mg-content on ESR-signals in synthetic calcium carbonate

    Barabas, M.; Bach, A.; Mudelsee, M.; Mangini, A.

    1989-01-01

    Carbonate crystals doped with various concentrations of Mg 2+ -ions have been grown by a gel-diffusion method. An increase of the Mg/Ca-ratio to more than about 1 caused a phase change in the crystal lattice from calcite to aragonite. The properties of the ESR-signals of the synthetic carbonates were studied and compared with natural marine carbonates. The following results were derived: (a) In the presence of Mg 2+ -ions the synthetic carbonates display the same ESR-signals as natural calcites of marine origin with similar properties (thermal stability, radiation sensitivity). (b) The saturation value of the signal at g=2.0006 in synthetic calcites was found to be strongly related with the Mg-content in the crystals. (c) The signal at g=2.0036 (axial symmetry) which is present in calcite was not influenced by the Mg-concentration. Its saturation value decreases when the crystal phase changed from calcite to aragonite and in complement the signal at g=2.0031 appeared. (d) The signals at g=2.0057 and g=2.0031 are most probably not of organic origin. (author)

  11. Fabrication and properties of high-strength extruded brass using elemental mixture of Cu-40% Zn alloy powder and Mg particle

    Atsumi, Haruhiko, E-mail: atsumi-h@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Imai, Hisashi; Li, Shufeng; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kousaka, Yoshiharu; Kojima, Akimichi [San-etsu Metals Co. Ltd., 1892 Ohta, Tonami, Toyama 939-1315 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper, high-strength brass (Cu-40% Zn) alloy with magnesium (Mg) element was fabricated via powder technology process, and the effect of the additive Mg element on microstructural and mechanical properties of extruded brass alloys with {alpha}-{beta} duplex phases was investigated. Pre-mixed Cu-40% Zn alloy powder with 0.5-1.5 mass% pure Mg powder (Cu-40% Zn + Mg) was consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) equipment. SPSed Cu-40% Zn + Mg specimens consisted of {alpha}-{beta} duplex phases containing Mg(Cu{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}){sub 2} intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a mean particle size of 10-30 {mu}m in diameter. The IMCs were completely dissolved in the {alpha}-{beta} duplex phases by a heat-treatment at 973 K for 15 min; thus, in order to disperse fine IMCs on {alpha}-{beta} duplex phase matrix, the SPSed Cu-40% Zn + Mg specimens were pre-heated at the solid solutionizing condition, and immediately extruded. The extruded specimen exhibited fine {alpha}-{beta} duplex phases, containing very fine precipitates of the above Mg(Cu{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}){sub 2} IMCs with 0.5-3.0 {mu}m in diameter. In particular, a mean grain size of the extruded Cu-40% Zn + 1.0% Mg specimen was 3.32 {mu}m analyzed using an electron back-scattered diffraction. Tensile properties of the extruded Cu-40% Zn + 1.0% Mg specimen were an average value of yield strength (YS): 328 MPa, ultimate tensile strength (UTS): 553 MPa, and 25% elongation. This indicated that the extruded Cu-40% Zn + 1.0% Mg specimen revealed the significantly high-strength properties compared to a conventional binary brass alloy with 229 MPa YS and 464 MPa UTS. A high strengthening mechanism of this wrought brass alloy was mainly due to the grain refinement because of a pinning effect by the fine Mg(Cu{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}){sub 2} precipitates at the boundaries of each phase. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New high-strength extruded brass alloy with Mg was fabricated via powder metallurgy. Black

  12. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that open-quotes there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwaterclose quotes and that open-quotes instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fracturesclose quotes. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it open-quotes finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific depositsclose quotes. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits

  13. The effect of annealing atmosphere on the thermoluminescence of synthetic calcite

    Pagonis, Vasilis

    1998-01-01

    Samples of high purity calcite powder were annealed in air, nitrogen and carbon dioxide atmospheres in the temperature range 300-700 deg. C and in atmospheric pressure. The samples were subsequently irradiated and the effect of the annealing atmosphere and temperature on the thermoluminescence (TL) of the samples was studied. Our results show that both carbonate and oxygen ions play an important part in the TL of calcite annealed in this temperature range. The intensities of the TL signal in the nitrogen and carbon dioxide anneals rise continuously with the annealing temperature. For all annealing temperatures it was found that the carbon dioxide atmosphere caused an increase in the observed TL signal as compared with anneals in an inert nitrogen atmosphere, while the shape of the TL glow curves remained the same. This increase in the observed TL signal is explained via the surface adsorption of carbonate ions. The shape and location of the TL peaks suggest that samples annealed in air exhibit a different type of TL center than samples annealed in nitrogen and carbon dioxide atmospheres. A possible mechanism for the role of oxygen ions involves a surface adsorption process and a subsequent diffusion of oxygen ions in the bulk of the crystal. Annealing of the samples in air at temperatures T>600 deg. C causes a collapse of the TL signal, in agreement with previous studies of calcite powders. No such collapse of the TL signal is observed for the nitrogen and carbon dioxide anneals, suggesting that a different type of TL center and/or recombination center is involved in air anneals. Arrhenius plots for the air anneals yield an activation energy E=0.45±0.05 eV, while the carbon dioxide and nitrogen anneals yield a lower activation energy E=0.28±0.04 eV

  14. A study on the coprecipitation of arsenite and arsenate into calcite coupled with the determination of oxidation states of arsenic both in calcite and water

    Yokoyama, Yuka; Takahashi, Yoshio; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kazuya; Itai, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    It was found that the amount of arsenite incorporated into calcite is much less than that of arsenate. The result suggests that the sequestration of arsenic by coprecipitation with calcite cannot be an important chemical process under reducing conditions such as in groundwater where arsenite is the dominant arsenic species. (author)

  15. Biosorption of divalent Pb, Cd and Zn on aragonite and calcite mollusk shells

    Du Yang; Lian Fei [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhu Lingyan, E-mail: zhuly@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The potential of using mollusk shell powder in aragonite (razor clam shells, RCS) and calcite phase (oyster shells, OS) to remove Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} from contaminated water was investigated. Both biogenic sorbents displayed very high sorption capacities for the three metals except for Cd on OS. XRD, SEM and XPS results demonstrated that surface precipitation leading to crystal growth took place during sorption. Calcite OS displayed a remarkably higher sorption capacity to Pb than aragonite RCS, while the opposite was observed for Cd. However, both sorbents displayed similar sorption capacities to Zn. These could be due to the different extent of matching in crystal lattice between the metal bearing precipitate and the substrates. The initial pH of the solution, sorbent's dosage and grain size affected the removal efficiency of the heavy meals significantly, while the organic matter in mollusk shells affected the removal efficiency to a lesser extent. - Highlights: > Mollusk shells display high removal efficiency to heavy metals in contaminated water. > Surface precipitation leading to crystal growth takes place during the sorption. > Crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption. > pH, sorbent dosage and grain size of adsorbent affects the removal efficiency. > Organic matter in mollusk shells affects the removal efficiency to a less extent. - Mollusk shells display high sorption ability to heavy metals and crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption.

  16. Aragonite-Calcite Inversion During Biogenic Carbonate Sampling: Considerations for Interpreting Isotopic Measurements in Paleoclimate Studies

    Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    , suggests that the isotopic depletion is tied to the polymorphic inversion of aragonite to calcite, and not just random chance based on natural isotopic variability in the skeleton. There appears to be no relationship between the percent inversion and carbon isotopic composition. Elemental ratios also appear to remain stable during the heating and inversion process. The findings of this and published studies present, in many cases, conflicting views of the isotopic fractionation associated with inversion of aragonite to calcite. Discrepancies such as this likely result from subtle differences in sampling protocol related to instruments, drill bits, skeletal density, and possibly even laboratory conditions like temperature and humidity, further complicating our understanding and interpretation of such observations. Preliminary investigation suggests that altering milling conditions or wet milling may reduce the extent of alteration. Unfortunately, milling/drilling remains one of the only practical methods of sampling biogenic carbonates at a high resolution for paleoclimate work and, as such, caution should be taken in the interpretation of oxygen isotopic measurements from specimens of this nature.

  17. Speciation of As in calcite by micro-XAFS: Implications for remediation of As contamination in groundwater

    Yokoyama, Y; Takahashi, Y; Iwatsuki, T; Terada, Y

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of calcite as a host phase of arsenic (As) in As-contaminated groundwater, distribution behavior of Asbetween natural calcite and groundwater in deep underground was investigated based on As oxidation state. Speciation analyses of As in natural calcite by μ-XRF-XAFS analyses showed (i) preferentialarsenate uptake by calcite, and (ii) promptness of arsenate uptake by minor iron (Fe) carbonate minerals coprecipitated with calcite. These findings suggest that the effect of calcite on As remediation of the As-contamination systems stronglydepends on arsenite to arsenate ratio (i.e., redox condition) in groundwater, and maybe governed bythe amount of Fe coprecipitated with calcite.

  18. Age-hardening of an Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy (2091) processed by high-pressure torsion

    Lee, Seungwon, E-mail: chominamlsw@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); WPI, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Horita, Zenji [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); WPI, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hirosawa, Shoichi [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Matsuda, Kenji [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    This research presents the successful strengthening of an Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy (2091) through the simultaneous use of grain refinement and age hardening. Following solid-solution treatment, the alloy was processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature and the grain size was refined to {approx}140 nm. The Vickers microhardness increased with increasing strain, and saturated to a constant level of 225 Hv. A further increase in the hardness to {approx}275 Hv was achieved by aging the HPT-processed alloy at 100 Degree-Sign C and 150 Degree-Sign C. Bending tests for the samples treated using the peak aging conditions demonstrated that the stress was significantly increased while considerable ductility was retained. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the small grains are well retained even after prolonged aging, and the precipitation of fine {delta} Prime particles occurred within the small grains, which confirms that simultaneous strengthening from grain refinement and age hardening is feasible in this alloy.

  19. Synthesis of the Mg2Ni alloy prepared by mechanical alloying using a high energy ball mill

    Iturbe G, J. L.; Lopez M, B. E.; Garcia N, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Mg 2 Ni was synthesized by a solid state reaction from the constituent elemental powder mixtures via mechanical alloying. The mixture was ball milled for 10 h at room temperature in an argon atmosphere. The high energy ball mill used here was fabricated at ININ. A hardened steel vial and three steel balls of 12.7 mm in diameter were used for milling. The ball to powder weight ratio was 10:1. A small amount of powder was removed at regular intervals to monitor the structural changes. All the steps were performed in a little lucite glove box under argon gas, this glove box was also constructed in our Institute. The structural evolution during milling was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The hydrogen reaction was carried out in a micro-reactor under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature. The hydrogen storage properties of mechanically milled powders were evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analysis system. Although homogeneous refining and alloying take place efficiently by repeated forging, the process time can be reduced to one fiftieth of the time necessary for conventional mechanical milling and attrition. (Author)

  20. Synthesis of the Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy prepared by mechanical alloying using a high energy ball mill

    Iturbe G, J. L.; Lopez M, B. E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia N, M. R., E-mail: joseluis.iturbe@inin.gob.m [UNAM, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Batalla 5 de Mayo s/n, Esq. Fuerte de Loreto, Col. Ejercito de Oriente, 09230 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Mg{sub 2}Ni was synthesized by a solid state reaction from the constituent elemental powder mixtures via mechanical alloying. The mixture was ball milled for 10 h at room temperature in an argon atmosphere. The high energy ball mill used here was fabricated at ININ. A hardened steel vial and three steel balls of 12.7 mm in diameter were used for milling. The ball to powder weight ratio was 10:1. A small amount of powder was removed at regular intervals to monitor the structural changes. All the steps were performed in a little lucite glove box under argon gas, this glove box was also constructed in our Institute. The structural evolution during milling was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The hydrogen reaction was carried out in a micro-reactor under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature. The hydrogen storage properties of mechanically milled powders were evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analysis system. Although homogeneous refining and alloying take place efficiently by repeated forging, the process time can be reduced to one fiftieth of the time necessary for conventional mechanical milling and attrition. (Author)

  1. Influence of Temperature on Mechanical Behavior During Static Restore Processes of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    ZHANG Kun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow stress behaviors of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu high strength aluminum alloy during static restore processes were investigated by: Isothermal double-pass compression tests at temperatures of 300-400℃, strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1, strains of 33% +20% with the holding times of 0~900 s after the first pass compression. The results indicate that the deformation temperature has a dramatical effect on mechanical behaviors during static restore processes of the alloy. (1 At 300 ℃ and 330 ℃ lower temperatures, the recovery during the deformation is slow, and deformation energy stored in matrix is higher, flow stresses at the second pass deformation decreased during the recovery and recrystallization, and the stress softening phenomena is observed. Stress softening is increased with the increasing holding time; Precipitation during the holding time inhibites the stress softening. (2 At 360 ℃ and 400 ℃ higher temperatures, the recovery during deformation is rapid, and deformation energy stored in matrix is lower. Solid solubility is higher after holding, so that flow stress at the second pass deformation is increased, stress hardening phenomena is observed. Stress hardening decreased with the increasing holding time duo to the recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 360 ℃; Precipitation during holding also inhibited the stress softening. However, Stress hardening remains constant with the increasing holding time duo to the reasanenal there are no recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 400 ℃.

  2. X-ray scattering of calcite thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition: Studies in air and in calcite saturated water solution

    Wang, Peng [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hudak, Michael R.; Lerner, Allan [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grubbs, Robert K. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Wang, Shanmin [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhang, Zhan; Karapetrova, Evguenia [Advance Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hickmott, Donald [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Majewski, Jaroslaw, E-mail: jarek@lanl.gov [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Carbonates are one of the most abundant groups of minerals in earth systems and are important in many geological settings and industrial processes. Calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) thin films produced by atomic layer deposition offer a method to evaluate the surficial properties of carbonates as well as interactions at the carbonate–fluid interface. Using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffraction, these films are observed to be porous, polycrystalline, and have crystallites oriented with the major (104) calcite cleavage plane parallel to the surface of the z-cut single crystal quartz substrate. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer, present between quartz and the calcite film, does not affect the as-deposited film, but does influence how the films reorganize in contact with fluid. Without a buffer layer, calcite reorients its crystallites to have populations of (006) and (030) parallel to the substrate, while those with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer become more amorphous. Amorphous films may represent an analog to amorphous calcium carbonate and provide insights into that material's thermophysical behavior. Due to a higher percentage of pore spaces available for fluid infiltration, films deposited at higher temperature make the calcite thin films more susceptible to amorphization. These films are chemically similar, but structurally dissimilar to bulk natural calcite. Nevertheless, they can be a complementary system to traditional single crystal X-ray surface scattering studies on carbonates, particularly for important but less common minerals, to evaluate mineral–fluid interfacial interactions. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) used to produce calcite films. • Calcite film orientation and crystallinity depend on ALD parameters. • ALD calcite films can be both crystalline and amorphous. • Interaction of water with films can re-orient or amorphize the films. • ALD calcite films may be useful to study carbonate–fluid interfacial

  3. X-ray scattering of calcite thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition: Studies in air and in calcite saturated water solution

    Wang, Peng; Hudak, Michael R.; Lerner, Allan; Grubbs, Robert K.; Wang, Shanmin; Zhang, Zhan; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Hickmott, Donald; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Carbonates are one of the most abundant groups of minerals in earth systems and are important in many geological settings and industrial processes. Calcite (CaCO 3 ) thin films produced by atomic layer deposition offer a method to evaluate the surficial properties of carbonates as well as interactions at the carbonate–fluid interface. Using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffraction, these films are observed to be porous, polycrystalline, and have crystallites oriented with the major (104) calcite cleavage plane parallel to the surface of the z-cut single crystal quartz substrate. An Al 2 O 3 buffer layer, present between quartz and the calcite film, does not affect the as-deposited film, but does influence how the films reorganize in contact with fluid. Without a buffer layer, calcite reorients its crystallites to have populations of (006) and (030) parallel to the substrate, while those with an Al 2 O 3 buffer layer become more amorphous. Amorphous films may represent an analog to amorphous calcium carbonate and provide insights into that material's thermophysical behavior. Due to a higher percentage of pore spaces available for fluid infiltration, films deposited at higher temperature make the calcite thin films more susceptible to amorphization. These films are chemically similar, but structurally dissimilar to bulk natural calcite. Nevertheless, they can be a complementary system to traditional single crystal X-ray surface scattering studies on carbonates, particularly for important but less common minerals, to evaluate mineral–fluid interfacial interactions. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) used to produce calcite films. • Calcite film orientation and crystallinity depend on ALD parameters. • ALD calcite films can be both crystalline and amorphous. • Interaction of water with films can re-orient or amorphize the films. • ALD calcite films may be useful to study carbonate–fluid interfacial interactions

  4. Synthesis and properties of Pr-substituted MgZn ferrites for core materials and high frequency applications

    Mukhtar, Muhammad Waqas; Irfan, Muhammad [Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ali, Ihsan [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Akhtar, Majid Niaz [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Azhar [Department of Physics, Islamia University, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Abbas, Ghazanfar [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Rana, M.U. [Center of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Ali, Akbar [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad-44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Mukhtar, E-mail: ahmadmr25@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-01

    A series of single phase spinel ferrites having chemical formula Mg{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Pr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25) were prepared using the sol–gel technique after sintering at 700 °C. The thermal decomposition behavior of an as prepared powder was investigated by means of DTA/TGA analyses. The sintered powders were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single phase spinel structure of prepared ferrites without the presence of any impurity phase. The value of lattice parameter (a) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x) into the spinel lattice. The grain size estimated from electron microscope images is in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm which confirms the spinel crystalline nature of the investigated samples. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases whereas coercivity (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). The measured parameters suggest that these materials are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials. - Highlights: • Pr-substituted spinel ferrites synthesized by autocombustion route have been investigated. • The average grain size was in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm estimated by SEM technique. • The (M{sub s}) decreases whereas (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). • These parameters are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials.

  5. Synthesis and properties of Pr-substituted MgZn ferrites for core materials and high frequency applications

    Mukhtar, Muhammad Waqas; Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ali, Ihsan; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Rana, M.U.; Ali, Akbar; Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2015-01-01

    A series of single phase spinel ferrites having chemical formula Mg 0.5 Zn 0.5 Pr x Fe 2−x O 4 (x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25) were prepared using the sol–gel technique after sintering at 700 °C. The thermal decomposition behavior of an as prepared powder was investigated by means of DTA/TGA analyses. The sintered powders were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single phase spinel structure of prepared ferrites without the presence of any impurity phase. The value of lattice parameter (a) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x) into the spinel lattice. The grain size estimated from electron microscope images is in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm which confirms the spinel crystalline nature of the investigated samples. The saturation magnetization (M s ) decreases whereas coercivity (H c ) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). The measured parameters suggest that these materials are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials. - Highlights: • Pr-substituted spinel ferrites synthesized by autocombustion route have been investigated. • The average grain size was in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm estimated by SEM technique. • The (M s ) decreases whereas (H c ) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). • These parameters are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials

  6. Mg and 18O Variations in the Shell of the Chilean Gastropod Concholepas concholepas Reflect SST and Growth Rate variations

    Guzman, N.; Lazareth, C. E.; Poitrasson, F.; Cuif, J.; Ortlieb, L.

    2004-12-01

    To validate the use of fossil mollusc shells as recorders of environmental conditions, a primary calibration study was carried out on modern shells of the Chilean gastropod Concholepas concholepas, the so-called southern hemisphere abalone which is particularly abundant in Holocene archaeological sites. Organisms were maintained in culture tanks and feed with live mytilids. The sea water temperature in the tank was recorded every half-an-hour by an automatic device. The experiment lasted several months. Periodical marking with calcein provided a precise chronological control of the shell growth. Thus, well-dated high resolution chemical profiles could be directly compared with temperatures during shell formation. Geochemical analyses of the calcite layers include Mg, Sr and 16O/18O composition. Trace elements were analysed using Laser Ablation ICP-MS and Electron Microprobe while stable isotopes were measured on a Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS). The shell growth rate during two months of formation varied between 30 and 140 µm/day which allows us to reach a temporal resolution for chemical profiles between a few hours and three days. The growth rate variations do not seem to be related to temperature fluctuations. Only Mg content was analytically reproducible and showed significant variations across the shells. The Mg high-resolution profiles display a grossly sinusoidal shape. Shells from different sites along the coasts of Chile showed mean Mg contents of 300 ppm and 500 ppm for mean temperatures of 17 and 20° C, respectively. This suggests a gross correlation between Mg and temperature. However, high resolution Mg results do not show an exact fitting neither with temperature nor with growth rates. Other parameters, like shell ageing as suggested by an amplitude increase observed near the edge of one of the shells, or other complex biological factors, may influence Mg incorporation into the shell. \\delta 18O values of the calcite vary between -1,5 and 2

  7. AgBr/MgBi2O6 heterostructured composites with highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity

    Zhong, Liansheng; Hu, Chaohao; Zhuang, Jing; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Dianhui; Zhou, Huaiying

    2018-06-01

    AgBr/MgBi2O6 heterostructured photocatalysts were synthesized by the deposition-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL), and UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS) were employed to examine the phase structure, morphology and optical properties of the as-prepared samples. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by decomposing methylene blue (MB) solution under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm). AgBr/MgBi2O6 composites exhibited significantly enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic properties in comparison with pure MgBi2O6 and AgBr. When the molar ratio of AgBr to MgBi2O6 was 3:1, the composite catalyst showed the optimal photocatalytic activity and excellent stability. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of AgBr/MgBi2O6 composites was attributed to the formation of p-n heterojunction between AgBr and MgBi2O6, thereby resulting in the effective separation and transfer of photogenerated electrons-hole pairs.

  8. MgO Nanoparticle Modified Anode for Highly Efficient SnO2-Based Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Ma, Junjie; Yang, Guang; Qin, Minchao; Zheng, Xiaolu; Lei, Hongwei; Chen, Cong; Chen, Zhiliang; Guo, Yaxiong; Han, Hongwei; Zhao, Xingzhong; Fang, Guojia

    2017-09-01

    Reducing the energy loss and retarding the carrier recombination at the interface are crucial to improve the performance of the perovskite solar cell (PSCs). However, little is known about the recombination mechanism at the interface of anode and SnO 2 electron transfer layer (ETL). In this work, an ultrathin wide bandgap dielectric MgO nanolayer is incorporated between SnO 2 :F (FTO) electrode and SnO 2 ETL of planar PSCs, realizing enhanced electron transporting and hole blocking properties. With the use of this electrode modifier, a power conversion efficiency of 18.23% is demonstrated, an 11% increment compared with that without MgO modifier. These improvements are attributed to the better properties of MgO-modified FTO/SnO 2 as compared to FTO/SnO 2 , such as smoother surface, less FTO surface defects due to MgO passivation, and suppressed electron-hole recombinations. Also, MgO nanolayer with lower valance band minimum level played a better role in hole blocking. When FTO is replaced with Sn-doped In 2 O 3 (ITO), a higher power conversion efficiency of 18.82% is demonstrated. As a result, the device with the MgO hole-blocking layer exhibits a remarkable improvement of all J-V parameters. This work presents a new direction to improve the performance of the PSCs based on SnO 2 ETL by transparent conductive electrode surface modification.

  9. Principles of calcite dissolution in human and artificial otoconia.

    Leif Erik Walther

    Full Text Available Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV.

  10. Co-intercalation of Mg(2+) and Na(+) in Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 as a High-Voltage Cathode for Magnesium Batteries.

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Youngjin; Arumugam, Durairaj; Woo, Sang Won; Jo, Yong Nam; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun; Choi, Nam-Soon; Lee, Kyu Tae

    2016-04-06

    Thanks to the advantages of low cost and good safety, magnesium metal batteries get the limelight as substituent for lithium ion batteries. However, the energy density of state-of-the-art magnesium batteries is not high enough because of their low operating potential; thus, it is necessary to improve the energy density by developing new high-voltage cathode materials. In this study, nanosized Berlin green Fe2(CN)6 and Prussian blue Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 are compared as high-voltage cathode materials for magnesium batteries. Interestingly, while Mg(2+) ions cannot be intercalated in Fe2(CN)6, Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 shows reversible intercalation and deintercalation of Mg(2+) ions, although they have the same crystal structure except for the presence of Na(+) ions. This phenomenon is attributed to the fact that Mg(2+) ions are more stable in Na(+)-containing Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 than in Na(+)-free Fe2(CN)6, indicating Na(+) ions in Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 plays a crucial role in stabilizing Mg(2+) ions. Na(0.69)Fe2(CN)6 delivers reversible capacity of approximately 70 mA h g(-1) at 3.0 V vs Mg/Mg(2+) and shows stable cycle performance over 35 cycles. Therefore, Prussian blue analogues are promising structures for high-voltage cathode materials in Mg batteries. Furthermore, this co-intercalation effect suggests new avenues for the development of cathode materials in hybrid magnesium batteries that use both Mg(2+) and Na(+) ions as charge carriers.

  11. Incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite under recrystallization conditions

    Hellebrandt, S.E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements; Schmidt, Moritz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HGF Young Investigator Group; Hofmann, S.

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of three calcite powders with Eu(III) under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Batch contact studies with reaction times from 1 week up to 3 years revealed that the speciation differs from that observed previously in co-precipitation experiments and is dominated by a newly identified species ''γ''. The speed of formation of this species was found to depend greatly on the recrystallization rate of the studied minerals.

  12. Incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite under recrystallization conditions

    Hellebrandt, S.E.; Jordan, Norbert; Barkleit, Astrid; Schmidt, Moritz; Hofmann, S.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of three calcite powders with Eu(III) under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Batch contact studies with reaction times from 1 week up to 3 years revealed that the speciation differs from that observed previously in co-precipitation experiments and is dominated by a newly identified species ''γ''. The speed of formation of this species was found to depend greatly on the recrystallization rate of the studied minerals.

  13. Gallium isotope fractionation during Ga adsorption on calcite and goethite

    Yuan, Wei; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Chen, JiuBin; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Birck, Jean-Louis; Liu, Yujie; Schott, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Gallium (Ga) isotopic fractionation during its adsorption on calcite and goethite was investigated at 20 °C as a function of the solution pH, Ga aqueous concentration and speciation, and the solid to solution ratio. In all experiments Ga was found to be enriched in light isotopes at the solid surface with isotope fractionation △71Gasolid-solution up to -1.27‰ and -0.89‰ for calcite and goethite, respectively. Comparison of Ga isotopic data of this study with predictions for 'closed system' equilibrium and 'Rayleigh fractionation' models indicates that the experimental data are consistent with a 'closed system' equilibrium exchange between the fluid and the solid. The results of this study can be interpreted based on Ga aqueous speciation and the structure of Ga complexes formed at the solid surfaces. For calcite, Ga isotope fractionation is mainly triggered by increased Ga coordination and Ga-O bond length, which vary respectively from 4 and 1.84 Å in Ga(OH)4- to 6 and 1.94 Å in the >Ca-O-GaOH(OH2)4+ surface complex. For goethite, despite the formation of Ga hexa-coordinated >FeOGa(OH)20 surface complexes (Ga-O distances of 1.96-1.98 Å) both at acid and alkaline pH, a similar extent of isotope fractionation was found at acid and alkaline pH, suggesting that Ga(OH)4- is preferentially adsorbed on goethite for all investigated pH conditions. In addition, the observed decrease of Ga isotope fractionation magnitude observed with increasing Ga surface coverage for both calcite and goethite is likely related to the formation of Ga surface polymers and/or hydroxides with reduced Ga-O distances. This first study of Ga isotope fractionation during solid-fluid interactions suggests that the adsorption of Ga by oxides, carbonates or clay minerals could yield significant Ga isotope fractionation between secondary minerals and surficial fluids including seawater. Ga isotopes thus should help to better characterize the surficial biogeochemical cycles of gallium and its

  14. Jet-Suspended, Calcite-Ballasted Cyanobacterial Waterwarts in a Desert Spring

    Pichel-Garcia, Ferran; Wade, Bman D.; Farmer, Jack D.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a population of colonial cyanobacteria (waterwarts) that develops as the dominant primary producer in a bottom-fed, warm spring in the Cuatro Cienegas karstic region of the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert. The centimeter-sized waterwarts were suspended within a central, conically shaped, 6-m deep well by upwelling waters. Waterwarts were built by an unicellular cyanobacterium and supported a community of epiphytic filamentous cyanobacteria and diatoms but were free of heterotrophic bacteria inside. Sequence analysis of genes revealed that this cyanobacterium is only distantly related to several strains of other unicellular teria Cyanothece, Waterwarts contained orderly arrangements of mineral made up of microcrystalline low-magnesium calcite with high levels of strontium and sulfur. Waterwarts were 95.9% (v/v) glycan, 2.8% cells, and 1.3% mineral grains and had a buoyant density of 1.034 kg/L. An analysis of the hydrological properties of the spring well and the waterwarts demonstrated that both large colony size and the presence of controlled amounts of mineral ballast are required to prevent the population from being washed out of the well. The unique hydrological characteristics of the spring have likely selected for both traits. The mechanisms by which controlled nucleation of extracellular calcite is achieved remain to be explored.

  15. Decadal changes in the aragonite and calcite saturation state of the Pacific Ocean

    Feely, Richard A.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Byrne, Robert H.; Millero, Frank J.; Dickson, Andrew G.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Murata, Akihiko; Miller, Lisa A.; Greeley, Dana

    2012-09-01

    Based on measurements from the WOCE/JGOFS global CO2 survey, the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program and the Canadian Line P survey, we have observed an average decrease of 0.34% yr-1 in the saturation state of surface seawater in the Pacific Ocean with respect to aragonite and calcite. The upward migrations of the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons, averaging about 1 to 2 m yr-1, are the direct result of the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans and regional changes in circulation and biogeochemical processes. The shoaling of the saturation horizon is regionally variable, with more rapid shoaling in the South Pacific where there is a larger uptake of anthropogenic CO2. In some locations, particularly in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre and in the California Current, the decadal changes in circulation can be the dominant factor in controlling the migration of the saturation horizon. If CO2 emissions continue as projected over the rest of this century, the resulting changes in the marine carbonate system would mean that many coral reef systems in the Pacific would no longer be able to sustain a sufficiently high rate of calcification to maintain the viability of these ecosystems as a whole, and these changes perhaps could seriously impact the thousands of marine species that depend on them for survival.

  16. Assessing the effect of dissolved organic ligands on mineral dissolution rates: An example from calcite dissolution

    DeMaio, T.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments suggest that dissolved organic ligands may primarily modify mineral dissolution rates by three mechanisms: (1) metal-ligand (M-L) complex formation in solution, which increases the degree of undersaturation, (2) formation of surface M-L complexes that attack the surface, and (3) formation of surface complexes which passivate or protect the surface. Mechanisms (1) and (2) increase the dissolution rate and the third decreases it compared with organic-free solutions. The types and importance of these mechanisms may be assessed from plots of dissolution rate versus degree of undersaturation. To illustrate this technique, calcite, a common repository cementing and vein-filling mineral, was dissolved at pH 7.8 and 22 C in Na-Ca-HCO 3 -Cl solutions with low concentrations of three organic ligands. Low citrate concentrations (50 microM) increased the dissolution rate consistent with mechanism (1). Oxalate decreased the rate, consistent with mechanism (3). Low phthalate concentration (<50 microM) decreased calcite dissolution rates; however, higher concentrations increased the dissolution rates, which became faster than in inorganic solutions. Thus, phthalate exhibits both mechanisms (2) and (3) at different concentrations. In such cases linear extrapolations of dissolution rates from high organic ligand concentrations may not be valid

  17. Evolution mechanisms of MgO·Al2O3 inclusions by cerium in spring steel used in fasteners of high-speed railway

    Wang Lijun; Wang Qi; Chou Kuochih; Liu Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rare earth metal addition on the non-metallic inclusions in spring steel used in fastener of high speed railway was investigated by metallographic examination; SEM-EDS and component analysis, aiming at deform those harmful inclusions to improve service life of spring steel. MgO·Al 2 O 3 inclusions were found in present experimental steel, which is also confirmed by the stability diagram of MgO/MgO·Al 2 O 3 /Al 2 O 3 from thermodynamic consideration. After Ce addition, the evolution process of Al 2 O 3 ·MgO inclusions was determined through the surface and line scanning. The effects of time and Ce content on the evolution of Al 2 O 3 ·MgO inclusions were examined. It was indicated that Al 2 O 3 ·MgO inclusions were wrapped by rare earth inclusions to form a ring like shape Ce-riched band around the inclusion, which would be useful to improve fatigue and corrosion resistance of spring steel. It was found that diffusion of Ce 3+ , Al 3+ and Mg 2+ in inclusions core and intermediate layer would be the limited step during evolutions of inclusions. (author)

  18. Dehydriding and re-hydriding properties of high-energy ball milled LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixtures

    Crosby, Kyle; Shaw, Leon L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, U-3136, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Here we report the first investigation of the dehydriding and re-hydriding properties of 2LiBH{sub 4} + MgH{sub 2} mixtures in the solid state. Such a study is made possible by high-energy ball milling of 2LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixtures at liquid nitrogen temperature with the addition of graphite. The 2LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} mixture ball milled under this condition exhibits a 5-fold increase in the released hydrogen at 265 C when compared with ineffectively ball milled counterparts. Furthermore, both LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2} contribute to hydrogen release in the solid state. The isothermal dehydriding/re-hydriding cycles at 265 C reveal that re-hydriding is dominated by re-hydriding of Mg. These unusual phenomena are explained based on the formation of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases, the increased defect concentration in crystalline compounds, and possible catalytic effects of Mg,MgH{sub 2} and LiBH{sub 4} on their dehydriding and re-hydriding properties. (author)

  19. A paired apatite and calcite clumped isotope thermometry approach to estimating Cambro-Ordovician seawater temperatures and isotopic composition

    Bergmann, Kristin D.; Finnegan, Seth; Creel, Roger; Eiler, John M.; Hughes, Nigel C.; Popov, Leonid E.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2018-03-01

    The secular increase in δ18O values of both calcitic and phosphatic marine fossils through early Phanerozoic time suggests either that (1) early Paleozoic surface temperatures were high, in excess of 40 °C (tropical MAT), (2) the δ18O value of seawater has increased by 7-8‰ VSMOW through Paleozoic time, or (3) diagenesis has altered secular trends in early Paleozoic samples. Carbonate clumped isotope analysis, in combination with petrographic and elemental analysis, can deconvolve fluid composition from temperature effects and therefore determine which of these hypotheses best explain the secular δ18O increase. Clumped isotope measurements of a suite of calcitic and phosphatic marine fossils from late Cambrian- to Middle-late Ordovician-aged strata-the first paired fossil study of its kind-document tropical sea surface temperatures near modern temperatures (26-38 °C) and seawater oxygen isotope ratios similar to today's ratios.

  20. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  2. High-precision Mg isotope measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material by HR-MC-ICPMS—implications for the relative and absolute Mg isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    Bizzarro, Martin; Paton, Chad; Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    2011-01-01

    -isotope composition for Earth’s mantle – and hence that of the bulk silicate Earth – to be 25Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.126896 ¿ 0.000025 and 26Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.139652 ¿ 0.000033. Given the restricted range of m25Mg obtained for bulk planetary material by the sample-standard bracketing technique and the excellent agreement between...

  3. Synthesis of sub-millimeter calcite from aqueous solution

    Reimi, M. A.; Morrison, J. M.; Burns, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    A novel aqueous synthesis that leads to the formation of calcite (CaCO3) crystals, up to 500μm in diameter, will be used to facilitate the study of contaminant transport in aqueous environmental systems. Existing processes tend to be complicated and often yield nanometer-sized or amorphous CaCO3. The synthesis method presented here, which involves slow mixing of concentrated solutions of CaCl2 ¬and (NH4)2CO3, produces single crystals of rhombohedral calcite in 2 to 4 days. Variations on the experimental method, including changes in pH and solution concentration, were explored to optimize the synthesis. Scanning Electron Microscope images show the differences in size and purity observed when the crystals are grown at pH values ranging from 2 to 6. The crystals grown from solutions of pH 2 were large (up to 500 micrometers in diameter) with minimal polycrystalline calcium carbonate, while crystals grown from solutions with pH values beyond 4 were smaller (up to 100 micrometers in diameter) with significant polycrystalline calcium carbonate. The synthesis method, materials characterization, and use in future actinide contaminant studies will be discussed.

  4. Inhibiting Effect of Additives on Pressure Solution of Calcite

    Traskine, V.; Skvortsova, Z.; Badun, G.; Chernysheva, M.; Simonov, Ya.; Gazizullin, I.

    2018-05-01

    The task of protection of cultural heritage requires a better understanding of combined effects of mechanical and chemical factors involved in environmental deterioration of monuments. The present paper deals with extending some known physicochemical methods proposed for inhibiting the decay of unstressed materials to their study during water-assisted deformation. The tests have been carried out on natural limestone samples and calcite powders in CaCO3 saturated aqueous solutions under static loads causing measurable pressure solution creep. In the solutions containing 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, the creep rate decreases considerably with increasing concentration of additives. The extent of creep deceleration has been found to be proportional to the independently estimated calcite surface area occupied by adsorbed species. This fact enables us to discriminate the adsorption-induced effect from other variables controlling the pressure solution rate and may be used in screening of compounds able to minimize the environmental impact on marble and limestone objects undergoing mechanical stresses.

  5. Thermoluminescent of induced calcite by gamma and ultraviolet radiation

    Lima, J.F. de.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of brazilian calcite, exposed to gamma radiation in laboratory and heated at constant rate of 2.7 0 C/s, showed three glow peaks at 150, 250 and 350 0 C in their thermoluminescent emission curves. The analysis of these peaks, using different models, indicated that they follow a second order kinetics; it has been obtained, for the activation energy, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.7 eV, and, for the pre-exponential factors, 8.1 x 10 14 , 6.8 x10 13 and 2.4 x 10 12 s -1 . Although the total thermoluminescent emission has stayed constant, the relative height of glow peaks has changed with the temperature of annealing in the range of 400 to 700 0 C. Exposed samples were also illuminated with ultraviolet light and the resultant curves showed partial or total bleaching or some glow peaks and the growth of peaks at lower temperatures. Samples of virgin calcite, submited to increasing exposures of gamma rays, showed a corresponding enhancement of the optical absorption bands in the range of 25000 to 47000 cm -1 A subsequent illumination of these samples with ultraviolet light produced a decrease of the optical absorption bands at the same range. (author) [pt

  6. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  7. Compatibility of a Conventional Non-aqueous Magnesium Electrolyte with a High Voltage V2O5 Cathode and Mg Anode

    Sa, Niya [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Proffit, Danielle L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lipson, Albert L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hahn, Nathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Feng, Zhenxing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fister, Timothy T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ren, Yang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Cheng-Jun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vaughey, John T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liao, Chen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ceder, Gerbrand [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burrell, Anthony K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A major roadblock for magnesium ion battery development is the availability of an electrolyte that can deposit Mg reversibly and at the same time is compatible with a high voltage cathode. We report a prospective full magnesium cell utilizing a simple, non-aqueous electrolyte composed of high concentration magnesium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide in diglyme, which is compatible with a high voltage vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) cathode and a Mg metal anode. For this system, plating and stripping of Mg metal can be achieved with magnesium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide in diglyme electrolyte over a wide concentration range, however, reversible insertion of Mg into V2O5 cathode can only be attained at high electrolyte concentrations. Reversible intercalation of Mg into V2O5 is characterized and confirmed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  8. High-activity MgO-supported CoMo Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts Prepared by Non-aqueous Impregnation

    Kaluža, Luděk; Gulková, Daniela; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 162, JAN 2015 (2015), s. 430-436 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : CoMo/MgO * benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization * non-aqueous impregnation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.328, year: 2015

  9. A statistical study of high coronal densities from X-ray line-ratios of Mg XI

    Linford, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray line-ratio density diagnostic was applied to 50 Mg XI spectra of flaring active regions on the sun recorded by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the SMM. The plasma density is derived from R, the flux ratio of the forbidden to intercombination lines of the He-like ion, Mg XI. The R ratio for Mg XI is only density sensitive when the electron density exceeds a critical value (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), the low-density limit (LDL). This theoretical value of the low-density limit is uncertain as it depends on complex atomic theory. Reported coronal densities above 10 to the 12th/cu cm are uncommon. In this study, the distribution of R ratio values about the LDL is estimated and the empirical values are derived for the 1st and 2nd moments of this distribution from 50 Mg XI spectra. From these derived parameters, the percentage of observations is derived which indicated densities above this limit.

  10. Synthesis of high-surface-area spinel-type MgAl2O4 nanoparticles by

    2Institute of Chemical Technologies, Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, Tehran ... on synthesis and textural properties of magnesium aluminate nanopowders. .... −1 over temper- ature range of 10–900. ◦. C, in air atmosphere. XRD patterns ..... assigned to two phases of MgAl2O4 (JCPDS PDF no.

  11. The Uptake of Eu(III) and Th(IV) by Calcite under Hyperalkaline Conditions

    Tits, J.; Wieland, E.; Bradbury, M.H.; Eckert, P.; Schaible, A

    2002-10-01

    Calcite is an important component of Valanginian marl, a potential host rock for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (L/ILW) repository in Switzerland. This mineral also forms an important component of the disturbed zone around a repository, as it remains largely unaffected by the hyperalkaline waters migrating out of the cementitious repository . The sorption behaviour of Eu(III) and Th(IV) on Merck calcite in an artificial cement pore water (ACW) at pH 13.3 has been studied in batch-type sorption experiments. In addition, the effect of {alpha}-isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and gluconic acid (GLU) on the sorption of these two cations has been investigated. In the absence of ISA and GLU, a strong interaction of Eu(III) and Th(IV) with Merck calcite was observed. Eu(III) and Th(IV) sorption kinetics were fast and the isotherms indicated a linear adsorption behaviour over the experimentally accessible concentration range. In the case of Eu(III), a decrease of the R{sub d} value with increasing solid to liquid (S:L) ratio was observed indicating that, along with adsorption, other processes might influence the immobilisation of this cation by Merck calcite under ACW conditions. In the case of Th(IV), however, changes in the S:L ratio had no effect on the sorption behaviour . High ISA and GLU concentrations in solution significantly affected the sorption of both Eu(III) and Th(IV): R{sub d} values for Eu(III) decreased significantly at ISA concentrations higher than 10{sup -5} M and at GLU concentrations higher than 10{sup -7} M. The sorption of Th(IV) was reduced at ISA concentrations above 2.10{sup -5} M and at GLU concentrations above 10{sup -6} M. The effects of ISA and GLU on the immobilisation of Eu(III) and Th(IV) were interpreted in terms of complex formation in solution. In the case of Eu(III) the metal ligand complexes were found to have a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Complexation constants derived for the aqueous Eu(III)-ISA. and Eu(III)GLU complexes were

  12. The Uptake of Eu(III) and Th(IV) by Calcite under Hyperalkaline Conditions

    Tits, J.; Wieland, E.; Bradbury, M.H.; Eckert, P.; Schaible, A.

    2002-10-01

    Calcite is an important component of Valanginian marl, a potential host rock for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (L/ILW) repository in Switzerland. This mineral also forms an important component of the disturbed zone around a repository, as it remains largely unaffected by the hyperalkaline waters migrating out of the cementitious repository . The sorption behaviour of Eu(III) and Th(IV) on Merck calcite in an artificial cement pore water (ACW) at pH 13.3 has been studied in batch-type sorption experiments. In addition, the effect of α-isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and gluconic acid (GLU) on the sorption of these two cations has been investigated. In the absence of ISA and GLU, a strong interaction of Eu(III) and Th(IV) with Merck calcite was observed. Eu(III) and Th(IV) sorption kinetics were fast and the isotherms indicated a linear adsorption behaviour over the experimentally accessible concentration range. In the case of Eu(III), a decrease of the R d value with increasing solid to liquid (S:L) ratio was observed indicating that, along with adsorption, other processes might influence the immobilisation of this cation by Merck calcite under ACW conditions. In the case of Th(IV), however, changes in the S:L ratio had no effect on the sorption behaviour . High ISA and GLU concentrations in solution significantly affected the sorption of both Eu(III) and Th(IV): R d values for Eu(III) decreased significantly at ISA concentrations higher than 10 -5 M and at GLU concentrations higher than 10 -7 M. The sorption of Th(IV) was reduced at ISA concentrations above 2.10 -5 M and at GLU concentrations above 10 -6 M. The effects of ISA and GLU on the immobilisation of Eu(III) and Th(IV) were interpreted in terms of complex formation in solution. In the case of Eu(III) the metal ligand complexes were found to have a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Complexation constants derived for the aqueous Eu(III)-ISA. and Eu(III)GLU complexes were determined to be logβ 0 EulSA = -31.1

  13. X-ray diffraction study on the microstructure of a Mg-Zn-Y alloy consolidated by high-pressure torsion

    Jenei, Peter [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, P.O.B. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Gubicza, Jeno, E-mail: gubicza@metal.elte.hu [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, P.O.B. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Yoon, Eun Yoo; Kim, Hyoung Seop [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 95}Zn{sub 4.3}Y{sub 0.7} powder was consolidated by HPT at RT and 373 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The consolidated disks comprised ultrafine grains with high density of dislocations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quasicrystalline dispersoids strengthen the material by increasing the dislocation density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twinning in the Mg matrix was marginal during HPT. - Abstract: Mg{sub 95}Zn{sub 4.3}Y{sub 0.7} (at.%) alloy powder produced by an inert gas-atomizer was consolidated by high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature and 373 K. The phase composition and the microstructure were investigated by X-ray diffraction and the microstructural parameters were correlated to the yield strength. HPT-processing yielded an ultrafine-grained microstructure with high dislocation density, leading to a large yield strength of the samples. Both the gas-atomized powder and the consolidated samples contained an icosahedral Mg{sub 3}YZn{sub 6} phase (I-phase) besides the main phase of {alpha}-Mg. It turned out that the I-phase dispersoids strengthen the consolidated material indirectly by increasing the dislocation density due to their pinning effect.

  14. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  15. submitter Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    Sugano, Michinaka; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2015-01-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young's modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young's moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young's modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb–Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young's moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76–97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  16. Textural and isotopic evidence for Ca-Mg carbonate pedogenesis

    Diaz-Hernandez, J. L.; Sánchez-Navas, A.; Delgado, A.; Yepes, J.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2018-02-01

    Models for evaluating the terrestrial carbon cycle must take into account not only soil organic carbon, represented by a mixture of plant and animal remains, but also soil inorganic carbon, contained in minerals, mainly in calcite and dolomite. Thick soil caliches derived from weathering of mafic and ultramafic rocks must be considered as sinks for carbon storage in soils. The formation of calcite and dolomite from pedogenic alteration of volcanic tephras under an aridic moisture regime is studied in an unusually thick 3-m soil profile on Gran Canaria island (Canary Islands, Spain). The biological activity of the pedogenic environment (soil respiration) releases CO2 incorporated as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in waters. It drives the formation of low-magnesian calcite and calcian dolomite over basaltic substrates, with a δ13C negative signature (-8 to -6‰ vs. V-PDB). Precipitation of authigenic carbonates in the soil is accompanied by the formation of Mg-rich clay minerals and quartz after the weathering of basalts. Mineralogical, textural, compositional, and isotopic variations throughout the soil profile studied indicate that dolomite formed at greater depths and earlier than the calcite. The isotopic signatures of the surficial calcite and deeper dolomite crusts are primary and resulted from the dissolution-precipitation cycles that led to the formation of both types of caliches under different physicochemical conditions. Dolomite formed within a clay-rich matrix through diffusive transport of reactants. It is precipitated from water with more negative δ18O values (-1.5 to -3.5‰ vs. V-SMOW) in the subsoil compared to those of water in equilibrium with surficial calcite. Thus, calcite precipitated after dolomite, and directly from percolating solutions in equilibrium with vadose water enriched in δ18O (-0.5 to +1.5‰) due to the evaporation processes. The accumulation of inorganic carbon reaches 586.1 kg m-2 in the soil studied, which means that the

  17. Paleotransport of lanthanides and strontium recorded in calcite compositions from tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Secondary calcite occurs in both saturated and unsaturated hydrologic zones (SZ and UZ, respectively) in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In the upper UZ, the major constituents of the calcite crystal structure (C, O) have surface origins. At greater depth there is a open-quotes barren zone,close quotes straddling the water table, where calcite is rare and mixing of surface and subsurface sources may occur. Deep in the SZ, distinctive Mn calcites reflect deep sources, including Ca released as analcime or albite formed and carbonates derived from underlying Paleozoic rocks. In the UZ and in the barren zone, above the deep Mn calcites, variations in calcite lanthanide chemistry can be used to distinguish rhyolitic from quartz-latitic sources. Lanthanide ratios and Sr contents of calcites record the chemical evolution of waters flowing through the UZ and upper SZ. Variations in calcite chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone show that (1) Sr, which is readily exchanged with clays or zeolites, is essentially removed from some flowpaths that are in contact with these minerals and (2) traces of Mn oxides found in the tuffs have a significant effect of groundwater chemistry in the UZ and in the barren zone by removing almost all Ce from solution (evidenced by characteristic Ce depletions in calcite throughout this zone). Extreme Ce removal may be a result of Ce oxidation (Ce 3+ → Ce 4+ ) at the surfaces of some Mn oxides, particularly rancieite. Higher Sr contents and lack of Ce depletions in the deeper Mn calcites reflect different ages, origins, and transport systems. The calcite record of lanthanide and Sr transport in the UZ shows that minor minerals (clays and zeolites) and even trace minerals (Mn oxides) will affect the compositions of groundwaters that flow over distances greater than a few tens of meters. 43 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird eggshell calcite and body water: application to fossil eggs from Lanzarote (Canary Islands)

    Lazzerini, Nicolas; Lécuyer, Christophe; Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Daux, Valérie; Betancort, Juan Francisco; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Marco, Antonio Sánchez; Lomoschitz, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of fossil bird eggshell calcite (δ18Ocalc and δ13Ccalc) are regularly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. However, the interpretation of δ18Ocalc values of fossil eggshells has been limited to qualitative variations in local climatic conditions as oxygen isotope fractionations between calcite, body fluids, and drinking water have not been determined yet. For this purpose, eggshell, albumen water, and drinking water of extant birds have been analyzed for their oxygen and carbon isotope compositions. Relative enrichments in 18O relative to 16O between body fluids and drinking water of +1.6 ± 0.9 ‰ for semi-aquatic birds and of +4.4 ± 1.9 ‰ for terrestrial birds are observed. Surprisingly, no significant dependence to body temperature on the oxygen isotope fractionation between eggshell calcite and body fluids is observed, suggesting that bird eggshells precipitate out of equilibrium. Two empirical equations relating the δ18Ocalc value of eggshell calcite to the δ18Ow value of ingested water have been established for terrestrial and semi-aquatic birds. These equations have been applied to fossil eggshells from Lanzarote in order to infer the ecologies of the Pleistocene marine bird Puffinus sp. and of the enigmatic giant birds from the Pliocene. Both δ13Ccalc and δ18Ocalc values of Puffinus eggshells point to a semi-aquatic marine bird ingesting mostly seawater, whereas low δ13Ccalc and high δ18Ocalc values of eggshells from the Pliocene giant bird suggest a terrestrial lifestyle. This set of equations can help to quantitatively estimate the origin of waters ingested by extinct birds as well as to infer either local environmental or climatic conditions.

  19. Effect of coccolith polysaccharides isolated from the coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi, on calcite crystal formation in in vitro CaCO3 crystallization.

    Kayano, Keisuke; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Kogure, Toshihiro; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2011-02-01

    Marine coccolithophorids (Haptophyceae) produce calcified scales "coccoliths" which are composed of CaCO(3) and coccolith polysaccharides (CP) in the coccolith vesicles. CP was previously reported to be composed of uronic acids and sulfated residues, etc. attached to the polymannose main chain. Although anionic polymers are generally known to play key roles in biomineralization process, there is no experimental data how CP contributes to calcite crystal formation in the coccolithophorids. CP used was isolated from the most abundant coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi. CaCO(3) crystallization experiment was performed on agar template layered onto a plastic plate that was dipped in the CaCO(3) crystallization solution. The typical rhombohedral calcite crystals were formed in the absence of CP. CaCO(3) crystals formed on the naked plastic plate were obviously changed to stick-like shapes when CP was present in the solution. EBSD analysis proved that the crystal is calcite of which c-axis was elongated. CP in the solution stimulated the formation of tabular crystals with flat edge in the agarose gel. SEM and FIB-TEM observations showed that the calcite crystals were formed in the gel. The formation of crystals without flat edge was stimulated when CP was preliminarily added in the gel. These observations suggest that CP has two functions: namely, one is to elongate the calcite crystal along c-axis and another is to induce tabular calcite crystal formation in the agarose gel. Thus, CP may function for the formation of highly elaborate species-specific structures of coccoliths in coccolithophorids.

  20. Temperature effect on mechanical and tribological characterization of Mg-SiC nanocomposite fabricated by high rate compaction

    Majzoobi, G. H.; Rahmani, K.; Atrian, A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, dynamic compaction is employed to produce Mg-SiC nanocomposite samples using a mechanical drop hammer. Different volume fractions of SiC nano reinforcement and magnesium (Mg) micron-size powder as the matrix are mechanically milled and consolidated at different temperatures. It is found that with the increase of temperature the sintering requirements is satisfied and higher quality samples are fabricated. The density, hardness, compressive strength and the wear resistance of the compacted specimens are characterized in this work. It was found that by increasing the content of nano reinforcement, the relative density of the compacted samples decreases, whereas, the micro-hardness and the strength of the samples enhance. Furthermore, higher densification temperatures lead to density increase and hardness reduction. Additionally, it is found that the wear rate of the nanocomposite is increased remarkably by increasing the SiC nano reinforcement.

  1. Superior high creep resistance of in situ nano-sized TiCx/Al-Cu-Mg composite.

    Wang, Lei; Qiu, Feng; Zhao, Qinglong; Zha, Min; Jiang, Qichuan

    2017-07-03

    The tensile creep behavior of Al-Cu-Mg alloy and its composite containing in situ nano-sized TiC x were explored at temperatures of 493 K, 533 K and 573 K with the applied stresses in the range of 40 to 100 MPa. The composite reinforced by nano-sized TiC x particles exhibited excellent creep resistance ability, which was about 4-15 times higher than those of the unreinforced matrix alloy. The stress exponent of 5 was noticed for both Al-Cu-Mg alloy and its composite, which suggested that their creep behavior was related to dislocation climb mechanism. During deformation at elevated temperatures, the enhanced creep resistance of the composite was mainly attributed to two aspects: (a) Orowan strengthening and grain boundary (GB) strengthening induced by nano-sized TiC x particles, (b) θ' and S' precipitates strengthening.

  2. Sulphate partitioning into calcite: Experimental verification of pH control and application to seasonality in speleothems

    Wynn, Peter M.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Borsato, Andrea; Spötl, Christoph; Hartland, Adam; Baker, Andy; Frisia, Silvia; Baldini, James U. L.

    2018-04-01

    Carbonate-associated sulphate (CAS) is a useful carrier of palaeoenvironmental information throughout the geologic record, particularly through its stable isotope composition. However, a paucity of experimental data restricts quantitative understanding of sulphate incorporation into carbonates, and consequently CAS concentrations and their diagenetic modifications are rarely interpreted. However, in the case of calcite speleothems, the remarkably high-resolution CAS records which are obtainable via modern microanalytical techniques represent a potentially invaluable source of palaeoenvironmental information. Here, we describe the results of controlled experiments of sulphate co-precipitation with calcite in freshwater solutions where pH, saturation state, and sulphate concentration were varied independently of each other. Solution pH is confirmed as the principal control on sulphate incorporation into calcite. The relative efficiency of incorporation was calculated as a partition coefficient DSO4 = (mSO4/mCO3)solid/(mSO4/mCO3)solution. High crystal growth rates (driven by either pH or saturation state) encouraged higher values of DSO4 because of an increasing concentration of defect sites on crystal surfaces. At low growth rates, DSO4 was reduced due to an inferred competition between sulphate and bicarbonate at the calcite surface. These experimental results are applied to understand the incorporation of sulphate into speleothem calcite. The experimentally determined pH-dependence suggests that strong seasonal variations in cave air PCO2 could account for annual cycles in sulphate concentration observed in stalagmites. Our new experimentally determined values of DSO4 were compared with DSO4 values calculated from speleothem-drip water monitoring from two caves within the Austrian and Italian Alps. At Obir cave, Austria, DSO4 (×105) varies between 11.1 (winter) and 9.0 (summer) and the corresponding figures for Ernesto cave, Italy, are 15.4 (winter) and 14

  3. Face-specific Replacement of Calcite by Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Liesegang, M.; Milke, R.; Neusser, G.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica, composed of nanoscale spheres, is an important biomineral, alteration product of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface, and precursor material for stable silicate minerals. Despite constant progress in silica sphere synthesis, fundamental knowledge of natural silica particle interaction and ordering processes leading to colloidal crystals is absent so far. To understand the formation pathways of silica spheres in a geologic environment, we investigated silicified Cretaceous mollusk shell pseudomorphs from Coober Pedy (South Australia) using focused ion beam (FIB)-SEM tomography, petrographic microscopy, µ-XRD, and EMPA. The shells consist of replaced calcite crystals (ionic strength remain constant throughout the replacement process, permitting continuous silica nanoparticle formation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation. Our study provides a natural example of the transformation of an atomic crystal to an amorphous, mesoscale ordered material; thus, links the research fields of natural colloidal crystal formation, carbonate-silica replacement, and crystallization by oriented particle aggregation (CPA).

  4. Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

    2001-01-01

    The(sup 207)Pb/(sup 235)U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88(+-) 0.05 and 9.7(+-) 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event

  5. High-Throughput Investigation of a Lead-Free AlN-Based Piezoelectric Material, (Mg,Hf)xAl1-xN.

    Nguyen, Hung H; Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Van Minh, Le; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2017-06-12

    We conducted a high-throughput investigation of the fundamental properties of (Mg,Hf) x Al 1-x N thin films (0 piezoelectric materials. For the high-throughput investigation, we prepared composition-gradient (Mg,Hf) x Al 1-x N films grown on a Si(100) substrate at 600 °C by cosputtering AlN and MgHf targets. To measure the properties of the various compositions at different positions within a single sample, we used characterization techniques with spatial resolution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) with a beam spot diameter of 1.0 mm verified that Mg and Hf had substituted into the Al sites and caused an elongation of the c-axis of AlN from 5.00 Å for x = 0 to 5.11 Å for x = 0.24. In addition, the uniaxial crystal orientation and high crystallinity required for piezoelectric materials to be used as application devices were confirmed. The piezoelectric response microscope indicated that this c-axis elongation increased the piezoelectric coefficient almost linearly from 1.48 pm/V for x = 0 to 5.19 pm/V for x = 0.24. The dielectric constants of (Mg,Hf) x Al 1-x N were investigated using parallel plate capacitor structures with ∼0.07 mm 2 electrodes and showed a slight increase by substitution. These results verified that (Mg,Hf) x Al 1-x N is a promising material for piezoelectric-based application devices, especially for vibrational energy harvesters.

  6. High figure of merit and thermoelectric properties of Bi-doped Mg2Si0.4Sn0.6 solid solutions

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Yin, Kang; Chi, Hang; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2013-01-01

    The study of Mg 2 Si 1−x Sn x -based thermoelectric materials has received widespread attention due to a potentially high thermoelectric performance, abundant raw materials, relatively low cost of modules, and non-toxic character of compounds. In this research, Mg 2.16 (Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 ) 1−y Bi y solid solutions with the nominal Bi content of 0≤y≤0.03 are prepared using a two-step solid state reaction followed by spark plasma sintering consolidation. Within this range of Bi concentrations, no evidence of second phase segregation was found. Bi is confirmed to occupy the Si/Sn sites in the crystal lattice and behaves as an efficient n-type dopant in Mg 2 Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 . Similar to the effect of Sb, Bi doping greatly increases the electron density and the power factor, and reduces the lattice thermal conductivity of Mg 2.16 Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 solid solutions. Overall, the thermoelectric figure of merit of Bi-doped Mg 2.16 Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 solid solutions is improved by about 10% in comparison to values obtained with Sb-doped materials of comparable dopant content. This improvement comes chiefly from a marginally higher Seebeck coefficient of Bi-doped solid solutions. The highest ZT∼1.4 is achieved for the y=0.03 composition at 800 K. - Graphical abstract: (a)The relationship between electrical conductivity and power factor for Sb/Bi-doped Mg 2.16 (Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 ) 1−y (Sb/Bi) y (0 2.16 (Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 ) 1−y Bi y (0≤y≤0.03) solid solutions. (c)Temperature dependent dimensionless figure of merit ZT of Mg 2.16 (Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 ) 1−y Bi y (0≤y≤0.03) solid solutions. - Highlights: • Bi doped Mg 2.16 Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 showed 15% enhancement in the power factor as compared to Sb doped samples. • Bi doping reduced κ ph of Mg 2.16 Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 due to stronger point defect scattering. • The highest ZT=1.4 at 800 K was achieved for Mg 2.16 (Si 0.4 Sn 0.6 ) 0.97 Bi 0.03

  7. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  8. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  9. Effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response of calcite with oleate

    D. G. Horta

    Full Text Available Abstract Phosphate flotation performance can be influenced by the dissolution kinetics of the minerals that compose the ore. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of dissolution kinetics on flotation response with oleate (collector of calcites from different origins and genesis. The calcite samples were first purified and characterized by x-ray Fluorescence (XRF and the Rietveld method applied to x-ray Diffractometry data (RXD. Experiments of calcite dissolution and microflotationwere performed at pH 8 and pH 10.The pH effect on the calcite dissolution and flotation indicates the possible influence of the carbonate/bicarbonate ions provided by the CO2 present in the air. In addition, the flotation response is greater as the dissolution increases, making more Ca2+ ions available to interact with collector molecules. This result corroborates the surface precipitation mechanism proposed foroleate adsorption on the calcite surface.

  10. α-MnO2 Nanowires/Graphene Composites with High Electrocatalytic Activity for Mg-Air Fuel Cell

    Jiang, Min; He, Hao; Huang, Chen; Liu, Bo; Yi, Wen-Jun; Chao, Zi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene was synthesized and studied in Mg-air fuel cell. • The performance of α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene is close to the Pt/C. • The ORR mechanism involves a one-step, quasi-4-electron pathway. • A large area (5 cm*5 cm) cathode was prepared and tested in a full cell. - Abstract: This paper reports the preparation of α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene composites as the cathode catalyst for magnesium-air fuel cell and its excellent electrochemistry performance. The composites are synthesized by self-assembly of α-MnO 2 nan α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene was synthesized and studied in Mg-air fuel cell. α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene was synthesized and studied in Mg-air fuel cell. owires (NWs) on the surface of graphene via a simple hydrothermal method. The α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene composites showed a higher electrochemical activity than the commercial MnO 2 . The oxygen reduction peak of the α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene composites catalyst is tested in a 0.1 M KOH solution at −0.252 V, which is more positive than the commercial MnO 2 (−0.287 V). The ORR limit current density for 28% α-MnO2 NWs/graphene composite is approximately 2.74 mA/cm 2 , which is similar to that of the 20% Pt/C(2.79 mA/cm 2 ) in the same conditions. Based on the Koutecky–Levich plot, the ORR mechanism of the composite involves a one-step, quasi-4-electron pathway. In addition, magnesium-air fuel cell with α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene as catalyst possesses higher current density (140 mA/cm 2 ) and power density (96 mW/cm 2 ) compared to the commercial MnO 2 . This study proves that the cost-effective α-MnO 2 NWs/graphene with higher power generation ability make it possible for the substitute of the noble metals catalyst in the Mg-air fuel cell.

  11. Application of rapid solidification powder metallurgy to the fabrication of high-strength, high-ductility Mg-Al-Zn-Ca-La alloy through hot extrusion

    Ayman, Elsayed, E-mail: ayman@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Junko, Umeda; Katsuyoshi, Kondoh [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of hot extruded Mg-7Al-1Zn-1Ca powder alloys with an addition of 1.5% La or 3.3% La were investigated. Both rapidly solidified powders, produced via spinning water atomization process, and cast billets were extruded at 573, 623 and 673 K to optimize the processing conditions for obtaining better mechanical response. Powders were consolidated using both cold compaction and spark plasma sintering. The tensile properties of the extruded alloys were then evaluated and correlated to their microstructures. The results showed that the use of rapidly solidified Mg-7Al-1Zn-1Ca alloy powders with La additions could lead to effective grain refinement and super saturation of alloying elements, which in turn resulted in the improved mechanical response. The Mg-7Al-1Zn-1Ca-1.5La alloy extruded at 573 K attained ultimate tensile strength of 450 {+-} xx MPa and elongation of 17 {+-} xx%, superior to the Mg-7Al-1Zn-1Ca-3.3La alloy and other Mg alloys like Mg-Al-Mn-Ca. This may help extend the application of Mg alloys to higher load-carrying parts while maintaining the excellent advantage of light weight.

  12. Modeling interactive effects of Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at high temperature

    Lu, Baotong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The capability of Pb impurity degrading the passivity of alloy 800 in high temperature water is much stronger than those of dissolved Ca/Mg salts. • The interactive effects of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity are likely a result competitive adsorption. • A phenomenological model to interpret the interactive effect of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity. - Abstract: A phenomenological model is postulated to interpret the interactive impacts of dissolved Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of Alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at 300 °C. Passivity degradation is characterized by the retarded dehydration during passivation and increased donor density in passive film. Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ can cause the passivity degradation in the Pb-free chemistries but, if the Pb-contamination concentration exceeds a critical value, would reduce the detrimental effect of Pb-contamination. This behavior may be related to the extremely strong adsorption capacity of Pb contamination. Finally, the applications in the water management strategy of nuclear power plants are discussed.

  13. Investigating calcite growth rates using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D)

    Cao, Bo; Stack, Andrew G.; Steefel, Carl I.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Lammers, Laura N.; Hu, Yandi

    2018-02-01

    Calcite precipitation plays a significant role in processes such as geological carbon sequestration and toxic metal sequestration and, yet, the rates and mechanisms of calcite growth under close to equilibrium conditions are far from well understood. In this study, a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used for the first time to measure macroscopic calcite growth rates. Calcite seed crystals were first nucleated and grown on sensors, then growth rates of calcite seed crystals were measured in real-time under close to equilibrium conditions (saturation index, SI = log ({Ca2+}/{CO32-}/Ksp) = 0.01-0.7, where {i} represent ion activities and Ksp = 10-8.48 is the calcite thermodynamic solubility constant). At the end of the experiments, total masses of calcite crystals on sensors measured by QCM-D and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were consistent, validating the QCM-D measurements. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were compared with reported macroscopic growth rates measured with auto-titration, ICP-MS, and microbalance. Calcite growth rates measured by QCM-D were also compared with microscopic growth rates measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and with rates predicted by two process-based crystal growth models. The discrepancies in growth rates among AFM measurements and model predictions appear to mainly arise from differences in step densities, and the step velocities were consistent among the AFM measurements as well as with both model predictions. Using the predicted steady-state step velocity and the measured step densities, both models predict well the growth rates measured using QCM-D and AFM. This study provides valuable insights into the effects of reactive site densities on calcite growth rate, which may help design future growth models to predict transient-state step densities.

  14. High pressure phase transitions in Mg{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}O: Theory

    Srivastava, Anurag; Chauhan, Mamta [Advanced Material Research Lab, Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior (India); Singh, R.K. [Department of Physics, ITM University, Gurgaon (India); Padegaonker, Rishikesh [Indian Embassy School, Sana (Yemen)

    2011-08-15

    We have analysed a B1 {yields} B2 structural phase transitions in Mg{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}O solid solutions and their ground state properties by using first principle density functional theory and charge transfer interaction potential (CTIP) approach. The effects of exchange-correlation interactions are handled by the generalized gradient approximation with Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof type parameterization. CTIP approach includes the long range modified Coulomb with charge transfer interactions and short range part of this model includes the van der Waals as well as Hafemeister Flygare type overlap repulsive interactions. The study observes a linear variation of calculated transition pressure, bulk modulus and lattice parameter of Mg{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}O as a function of Ca composition. The observed results for the end point members are in agreement to their experimental counterparts and the deviations have been discussed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Restrictions in Mg/Ca-Paleotemperature Estimations in High-Latitude Bottom Waters: Evidence from the Fram Strait and the Nordic Seas

    Werner, K.; Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; Not, C.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Husum, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mg to Ca ratios of the benthic foraminifer species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi provide a great potential for reconstructing bottom water temperatures, especially from the lower end of the temperature range between 0 and 6°C (Tisserand et al., 2013). A set of core top samples from the Fram Strait and the Norwegian margin have been studied for Mg/Ca ratios in C. wuellerstorfi in order to establish a calibration relationship to the environmental conditions. In this part of the northern North Atlantic the bottom water temperature range between -0.5 and -1°C. For the calibration to modern water mass conditions, modern oceanographic data from both existing conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) casts and the World Ocean Data Base 2013 (Boyer et al., 2013) have been used. Benthic Mg/Ca ratios are relatively high suggesting a preference of C. wuellerstorfi to incorporate Mg below 0°C. Although no correlation has been found to existing temperature calibrations, the data are in line with earlier Mg/Ca data from C. wuellerstorfi in the area (Martin et al., 2002; Elderfield et al., 2006). The carbonate ion effect is most likely a main cause for the relatively high Mg/Ca ratios found in core top samples from the Fram Strait and the Nordic Seas, however, other factors may influence the values as well. Holocene records of benthic trace metal/Ca ratios from the eastern Fram Strait display trends similar to those found in other proxy indicators, despite the difficulties to constrain a temperature calibration for this low temperature range. In particular, the benthic B/Ca and Li/Ca records resemble trends in Holocene planktic foraminifer assemblages, suggesting to be influenced by environmental factors such as the carbonate ion effect consistent for the entire water column.

  16. Speciation in Aqueous MgSO4 Fluid at High Pressures and Temperatures Studied by First-Principles Modeling and Raman Spectroscopy

    Jahn, S.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous fluids play an essential role in mass and energy transfer in the lithosphere. Their presence has also a large effect on physical properties of rocks, e.g. the electrical conductivity. Many chemical and physical properties of aqueous fluids strongly depend on the speciation, but very little is known about this fundamental parameter at high pressures and temperatures, e.g. at subduction zone conditions. Here we use a combined approach of first-principles molecular dynamics simulation and Raman spectroscopy to study the molecular structure of aqueous 2~mol/kg MgSO4 fluids up to pressures of 3~GPa and temperatures of 750~°C. MgSO4-H2O is selected as a model system for sulfate bearing subduction zone fluids. The simulations are performed using Car-Parrinello dynamics, a system size of 120 water and four MgSO4 molecules with production runs of at least 10~ps at each P and T. Raman spectra were obtained in situ using a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell with external heating. Both simulation and spectroscopic data show a dynamic co-existence of various associated molecular species as well as dissociated Mg2+ and SO42- in the single phase fluid. Fitting the Raman signal in the frequency range of the ν1-SO42- stretching mode yields the P-T dependence of the relative proportions of different peaks. The latter can be assigned to species based on literature data and related to the species found in the simulation. The dominant associated species found in the P-T range of interest here are Mg-SO4 ion pairs with one (monodentate) and two (bidentate) binding sites. At the highest P and T, an additional peak is identified. At low pressures and high temperature (T>230~°C), kieserite, MgSO4·H2O, nucleated in the experiment. At the same conditions the simulations show a clustering of Mg, which is interpreted as a precursor of precipitation. In conclusion, the speciation of aqueous MgSO4 fluid shows a complex behavior at high P and T that cannot be extrapolated

  17. The origin of the ore-bearing solution in the Pb-Zn veins of the western Harz, Germany, as deduced from rare-earth element and isotope distributions in calcites

    Moeller, P.; Parekh, P.P.; Morteani, G.; Hoefs, J.

    1979-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) and stable-isotope distribution patterns in calcites from the mining areas of St. Andreasberg, Clausthal and Bad Grund, western Harz, Germany, have been determined. Three types of REE distribution patterns were found: type I is characterized by high amounts of light REE without any Ce and Eu anomalies and relativity homogeneous C- and O-isotopic composition. Type II displays conspicuous Ce and Eu anomalies at lower levels of concentration of the light REE. Type III has very low amounts of REE. Type II and III exhibit a more variable C-isotopic composition than type I. The calcite with type I patterns is assumed to be derived mainly from magnetic waters. A possible source for the magnetic waters seems to be the Brocken-Oker granite. Type-II calcites and the sulfides are probably derived from upheated country rock whereas calcite with type-III pattern mineralized from relatively cold descending solutions. The calcite with type-I pattern turns out to be not in equilibrium with sulfides, although both are in intimate contact, e.g. in banded ores. This non-equilibrium indicates two independent sources for this calcite with type-I pattern and the sulfides. (Auth.)

  18. A time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) study of the interaction of trivalent actinides (curium(III)) with calcite

    Stumpf, Th.; Fanghaenel, Th.

    2002-01-01

    Cm(III) interaction with calcite was investigated in the trace concentration range. Two different Cm(III)/calcite sorption species were found. The first Cm(III) sorption species consists of a curium ion that is bonded onto the calcite surface. The second Cm(III) sorption species has lost its complete hydration sphere and is incorporated into the calcite bulk structure /1/. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of high-n dielectronic Rydberg satellites in the spectra of Na-like Zn XX and Mg-like Zn XIX

    Fournier, K.B.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Flora, F.; Bollanti, S.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Murra, D.; Belyaev, V.S.; Vinogradov, V.I.; Kyrilov, A.S.; Matafonov, A.P.; Francucci, M.; Martellucci, S.; Petrocelli, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed spectra from highly charged zinc ions in a variety of laser-produced plasmas. Spectral features that are Na- and Mg-like satellites to high-n Rydberg transitions in the Ne-like Zn XXI spectrum are analyzed and modeled. Identifications and analysis are made by comparison with highly accurate atomic structure calculations and steady state collisional-radiative models. Each observed Zn XX and Zn XIX feature comprises up to ≅2 dozen individual transitions, these transitions are excited principally by dielectronic recombination through autoionizing levels in Na- and Mg-like Zn 19+ and Zn 18+ . We find these satellites to be ubiquitous in laser-produced plasmas formed by lasers with pulse lengths that span four orders of magnitude, from 1 ps to ≅10 ns. The diagnostic potential of these Rydberg satellite lines is demonstrated

  20. Performance of MgO:PPLN, KTA, and KNbO₃ for mid-wave infrared broadband parametric amplification at high average power.

    Baudisch, M; Hemmer, M; Pires, H; Biegert, J

    2014-10-15

    The performance of potassium niobate (KNbO₃), MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN), and potassium titanyl arsenate (KTA) were experimentally compared for broadband mid-wave infrared parametric amplification at a high repetition rate. The seed pulses, with an energy of 6.5 μJ, were amplified using 410 μJ pump energy at 1064 nm to a maximum pulse energy of 28.9 μJ at 3 μm wavelength and at a 160 kHz repetition rate in MgO:PPLN while supporting a transform limited duration of 73 fs. The high average powers of the interacting beams used in this study revealed average power-induced processes that limit the scaling of optical parametric amplification in MgO:PPLN; the pump peak intensity was limited to 3.8  GW/cm² due to nonpermanent beam reshaping, whereas in KNbO₃ an absorption-induced temperature gradient in the crystal led to permanent internal distortions in the crystal structure when operated above a pump peak intensity of 14.4  GW/cm².

  1. Effect of Mg{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} dopants on the structural, magnetic and high-frequency ferromagnetic properties of barium hexaferrite

    Shams, Mohammad H. [Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jarib Street, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rozatian, Amir S.H., E-mail: a.s.h.rozatian@phys.ui.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jarib Street, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefi, Mohammad H. [Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jarib Street, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Valíček, Jan [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mining and Geology, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Šepelák, Vladimir [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, 04001 Košice (Slovakia)

    2016-02-01

    The doped barium hexaferrite, BaFe{sub 12−x}(Mg{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}){sub x}O{sub 19} with 1≤x≤5, is synthesized by a solid state ceramic method. Its crystalline structure, morphology, as well as static and dynamic magnetic properties are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vibrating sample magnetometry, and vector network analysis, respectively. The cation distribution of Mg{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} in the hexagonal structure of BaFe{sub 12−x}(Mg{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}){sub x}O{sub 19} is investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The effect of Mg{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} dopants on static and high-frequency magnetic properties of the ferrite is studied. - Highlights: • The BaFe{sub 12−x}(MgTi){sub 0.5x}O{sub 19} (x =1– 5) are synthesized by a solid state reaction method. • The Mg{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} dopants take positions 12k for x=1 and 4f{sub 1} and 4f{sub 2} for x=5. • The coercivity and magnetization are decreased with an increase in Mg–Ti content. • The ferromagnetic resonance frequency is decreased with increase of x. • The FMR is shifted to lower frequencies due to the reduction of the anisotropy field.

  2. Anisotropic Growth of Otavite on Calcite: Implications for Heteroepitaxial Growth Mechanisms

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2017-12-18

    Elucidating how cation intermixing can affect the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial growth in aqueous media has remained a challenging endeavor. Toward this goal, in situ atomic force microscopy was employed to image the heteroepitaxial growth of otavite (CdCO3) at the (10-14) surface of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals in static aqueous conditions. Heteroepitaxial growth proceeded via spreading of three-dimensional (3D) islands and two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers at low and high initial saturation levels, respectively. Experiments were carried out as a function of applied force and imaging mode thus enabling determination of growth mechanisms unaltered by imaging artifacts. This approach revealed the significant anisotropic nature of heteroepitaxial growth on calcite in both growth modes and its dependence on supersaturation, intermixing, and substrate topography. The 3D islands not only grew preferentially along the [42-1] direction relative to the [010] direction, resulting in rod-like surface precipitates, but also showed clear preference for growth from the island end rich in obtuse/obtuse kink sites. Pinning to step edges was observed to often reverse this tendency. In the 2D growth mode, the relative velocities of acute and obtuse steps were observed to switch between the first and second atomic layers. This phenomenon stemmed from the significant Cd-Ca intermixing in the first layer, despite bulk thermodynamics predicting the formation of almost pure otavite. Composition effects were also responsible for the inability of 3D islands to grow on 2D layers in cases where both modes were observed to occur simultaneously. Overall, the AFM images highlighted the effects of intermixing on heteroepitaxial growth, particularly how it can induce thickness-dependent growth mechanisms at the nanoscale.

  3. High-quality InN films on MgO (100) substrates: The key role of 30° in-plane rotation

    Compeán García, V. D.; López Luna, E.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A. [Coordinación para la Innovación y Aplicación de la Ciencia y Tecnología (CIACyT), Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (UASLP), Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Orozco Hinostroza, I. E. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, 78216 San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Escobosa Echavarría, A. [Electric Engineering Department, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-12

    High crystalline layers of InN were grown on MgO(100) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Good quality films were obtained by means of an in-plane rotation process induced by the annealing of an InN buffer layer to minimize the misfit between InN and MgO. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction showed linear streaky patterns along the [011{sup ¯}0] azimuth and a superimposed diffraction along the [112{sup ¯}0] azimuth, which correspond to a 30° α-InN film rotation. This rotation reduces the mismatch at the MgO/InN interface from 19.5% to less than 3.5%, increasing the structural quality, which was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Only the (0002) c plane diffraction of α-InN was observed and was centered at 2θ = 31.4°. Raman spectroscopy showed two modes corresponding to the hexagonal phase: E1(LO) at 591 cm{sup −1} and E2(high) at 488 cm{sup −1}. Hall effect measurements showed a carrier density of 9 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and an electron Hall mobility of 340 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for a film thickness of 140 nm.

  4. High-quality InN films on MgO (100) substrates: The key role of 30° in-plane rotation

    Compeán García, V. D.; López Luna, E.; Rodríguez, A. G.; Vidal, M. A.; Orozco Hinostroza, I. E.; Escobosa Echavarría, A.

    2014-01-01

    High crystalline layers of InN were grown on MgO(100) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Good quality films were obtained by means of an in-plane rotation process induced by the annealing of an InN buffer layer to minimize the misfit between InN and MgO. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction showed linear streaky patterns along the [011 ¯ 0] azimuth and a superimposed diffraction along the [112 ¯ 0] azimuth, which correspond to a 30° α-InN film rotation. This rotation reduces the mismatch at the MgO/InN interface from 19.5% to less than 3.5%, increasing the structural quality, which was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Only the (0002) c plane diffraction of α-InN was observed and was centered at 2θ = 31.4°. Raman spectroscopy showed two modes corresponding to the hexagonal phase: E1(LO) at 591 cm −1 and E2(high) at 488 cm −1 . Hall effect measurements showed a carrier density of 9 × 10 18  cm −3 and an electron Hall mobility of 340 cm 2 /(V s) for a film thickness of 140 nm

  5. An XRPD and EPR spectroscopy study of microcrystalline calcite bioprecipitated by Bacillus subtilis

    Perito, B.; Romanelli, M.; Buccianti, A.; Passaponti, M.; Montegrossi, G.; Di Benedetto, F.

    2018-05-01

    We report in this study the first XRPD and EPR spectroscopy characterisation of a biogenic calcite, obtained from the activity of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Microcrystalline calcite powders obtained from bacterial culture in a suitable precipitation liquid medium were analysed without further manipulation. Both techniques reveal unusual parameters, closely related to the biological source of the mineral, i.e., to the bioprecipitation process and in particular to the organic matrix observed inside calcite. In detail, XRPD analysis revealed that bacterial calcite has slightly higher c/a lattice parameters ratio than abiotic calcite. This correlation was already noticed in microcrystalline calcite samples grown by bio-mineralisation processes, but it had never been previously verified for bacterial biocalcites. EPR spectroscopy evidenced an anomalously large value of W 6, a parameter that can be linked to occupation by different chemical species in the next nearest neighbouring sites. This parameter allows to clearly distinguish bacterial and abiotic calcite. This latter achievement was obtained after having reduced the parameters space into an unbiased Euclidean one, through an isometric log-ratio transformation. We conclude that this approach enables the coupled use of XRPD and EPR for identifying the traces of bacterial activity in fossil carbonate deposits.

  6. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala; Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan

    2017-01-01

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO 2 flow rate, Ca (OH) 2 concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH) 2 concentration and increasing the CO 2 flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  7. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala [Hanil Cement Corporation, Danyang (Korea, Republic of); Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO{sub 2} flow rate, Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration and increasing the CO{sub 2} flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  9. Control of temperature and aqueous Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio on the (trans-)formation of ikaite

    Purgstaller, B.; Dietzel, M.; Baldermann, A.; Mavromatis, V.

    2017-11-01

    The calcium carbonate hexahydrate mineral ikaite (CaCO3 ṡ 6 H2O) has been documented in aquatic environments at near-freezing temperatures. An increase of the prevailing temperature in the depositional environment, results in the transformation of natural ikaite into less soluble calcium carbonate phases occasionally leaving calcite pseudomorphs in the sediments, which are considered as an indicator for primary cold water temperatures. Detailed understanding on the physicochemical parameters controlling ikaite (trans-)formation however, such as temperature and reactive solution chemical composition, are still under debate. In order to study the formation of ikaite, we conducted precipitation experiments under controlled physicochemical conditions (pH = 8.3 ± 0.1; T = 6, 12, and 18 ± 0.1 °C) at defined aqueous molar Mg/Ca ratios. The transformation of ikaite into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs was investigated in solution and at air exposure. The obtained results reveal the formation of ikaite at temperatures up to 12 °C, whereas Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate precipitated at 18 °C. In contact with the reactive solution ikaite transformed into aragonite at aqueous molar Mg2+/Ca2+ ratios of ≥14. In contrast, ikaite separated from the Mg-rich solution and exposed to air transformed in all cases into calcite/vaterite. The herein obtained temperature limit of ≤12 for ikaite formation is significantly higher than formerly expected and most probably caused by (i) the high saturation degree of the solution with respect to ikaite and (ii) the slow dehydration of the aqueous Ca2+ ion at low temperatures. This result questions the suitability of calcite pseudomorphs (i.e. glendonites) as a proxy for near-freezing temperatures. Moreover, our findings show that the CaCO3 polymorph formed from ikaite is strongly controlled by the physicochemical conditions, such as aqueous molar Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of the reactive fluid and H2O availability throughout the

  10. Biomimetic mineralization of CaCO3 on a phospholipid monolayer: from an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor to calcite via vaterite.

    Xiao, Junwu; Wang, Zhining; Tang, Yecang; Yang, Shihe

    2010-04-06

    A phospholipid monolayer, approximately half the bilayer structure of a biological membrane, can be regarded as an ideal model for investigating biomineralization on biological membranes. In this work on the biomimetic mineralization of CaCO(3) under a phospholipid monolayer, we show the initial heterogeneous nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate precursor (ACC) nanoparticles at the air-water interface, their subsequent transformation into the metastable vaterite phase instead of the most thermodynamically stable calcite phase, and the ultimate phase transformation to calcite. Furthermore, the spontaneity of the transformation from vaterite to calcite was found to be closely related to the surface tension; high surface pressure could inhibit the process, highlighting the determinant of surface energy. To understand better the mechanisms for ACC formation and the transformation from ACC to vaterite and to calcite, in situ Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), ex situ scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed. This work has clarified the crystallization process of calcium carbonate under phospholipid monolayers and therefore may further our understanding of the biomineralization processes induced by cellular membranes.

  11. Preparation of high-strength Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe alloy via heat treatment and rolling

    Liu, Chong-yu; Yu, Peng-fei; Wang, Xiao-ying; Ma, Ming-zhen; Liu, Ri-ping

    2014-07-01

    An Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe alloy was solid-solution treated at 560°C for 3 h and then cooled by water quenching or furnace cooling. The alloy samples which underwent cooling by these two methods were rolled at different temperatures. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the rolled alloys were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and tensile testing. For the water-quenched alloys, the peak tensile strength and elongation occurred at a rolling temperature of 180°C. For the furnace-cooled alloys, the tensile strength decreased initially, until the rolling temperature of 420°C, and then increased; the elongation increased consistently with increasing rolling temperature. The effects of grain boundary hardening and dislocation hardening on the mechanical properties of these rolled alloys decreased with increases in rolling temperature. The mechanical properties of the 180°C rolling water-quenched alloy were also improved by the presence of β″ phase. Above 420°C, the effect of solid-solution hardening on the mechanical properties of the rolled alloys increased with increases in rolling temperature.

  12. A SAP/Al-Mg-Si composite alloy for use as a proton beam window of a high-power proton accelerator

    Schroeder, G.; Ribbens, A.; Fiorini, P.; Giordano, G.

    1987-12-01

    A composite material consisting of a sintered aluminium product (SAP) core surrounded by an Al-Mg-Si alloy rim was studied with respect to its applicability as a stationary window inside a high-power proton beam. This paper summarizes the experimental procedures and results on both the composite material and individual SAP alloys in terms of materials preparation, microstructural characterization, leak tightness, deformation and burst behaviour, sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement, and irradiation effects after helium preimplantation. Regarding any of these items, the material either proved good or showed only minor degradation. It is thus considered as promising for uses involving high thermomechanical load inside a high-radiation environment. (orig.)

  13. Significance of grain boundaries and stacking faults on hydrogen storage properties of Mg2Ni intermetallics processed by high-pressure torsion

    Hongo, Toshifumi; Edalati, Kaveh; Arita, Makoto; Matsuda, Junko; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2015-01-01

    Mg 2 Ni intermetallics are processed using three different routes to produce three different microstructural features: annealing at high temperature for coarse grain formation, severe plastic deformation through high-pressure torsion (HPT) for nanograin formation, and HPT processing followed by annealing for the introduction of stacking faults. It is found that both grain boundaries and stacking faults are significantly effective to activate the Mg 2 Ni intermetallics for hydrogen storage at 423 K (150 °C). The hydrogenation kinetics is also considerably enhanced by the introduction of large fractions of grain boundaries and stacking faults while the hydrogenation thermodynamics remains unchanged. This study shows that, similar to grain boundaries and cracks, stacking faults can act as quick pathways for the transportation of hydrogen in the hydrogen storage materials

  14. Self-healing of drying shrinkage cracks in cement-based materials incorporating reactive MgO

    Qureshi, T. S.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Excessive drying shrinkage is one of the major issues of concern for longevity and reduced strength performance of concrete structures. It can cause the formation of cracks in the concrete. This research aims to improve the autogenous self-healing capacity of traditional Portland cement (PC) systems, adding expansive minerals such as reactive magnesium oxide (MgO) in terms of drying shrinkage crack healing. Two different reactive grades (high ‘N50’and moderately high ‘92-200’) of MgO were added with PC. Cracks were induced in the samples with restraining end prisms through natural drying shrinkage over 28 days after casting. Samples were then cured under water for 28 and 56 days, and self-healing capacity was investigated in terms of mechanical strength recovery, crack sealing efficiency and improvement in durability. Finally, microstructures of the healing materials were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. Overall N50 mixes show higher expansion and drying shrinkage compared to 92-200 mixes. Autogenous self-healing performance of the MgO containing samples were much higher compared to control (only PC) mixes. Cracks up to 500 μm were sealed in most MgO containing samples after 28 days. In the microstructural investigations, highly expansive Mg-rich hydro-carbonate bridges were found along with traditional calcium-based, self-healing compounds (calcite, portlandite, calcium silicate hydrates and ettringite).

  15. Measurement of low-LET radiation dose aboard the chinese scientific experiment satellite (1988) by highly sensitive LiF (Mg, Cu, P) TL chips

    Zhang Zhonglun; Zheng Yanzhen.

    1989-01-01

    Low-LET radiation dose is an important portion of spaceflight dose. It is a new application that highly sensitive LiF(Mg, Cu, P) TL chips are used in measurement of low-LET dose aboard the chinese scientific experiment satellite. Avarage dose rate in satellite is 9.2 mrad/day and on the ground is about 0.32 mrad/day

  16. Isopiestic investigation of the osmotic coefficients of MgBr{sub 2}(aq) and study of bromide salts solubility in the (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) system at T = 323.15 K. Thermodynamic model of solution behaviour and (solid + liquid) equilibria in the MgBr{sub 2}(aq), and (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) systems to high concentration and temperature

    Christov, Christomir, E-mail: christov@svr.igic.bas.b [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, ul. ' Acad. G. Bonchev' , bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-03-15

    The isopiestic method has been used to determine the osmotic coefficients of the binary solutions MgBr{sub 2}(aq) (from 0.4950 to 2.5197 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}) at the temperature T = 323.15 K. Sodium chloride solutions have been used as isopiestic reference standards. The solubility of the bromide minerals in the mixed system (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) has been investigated at T = 323.15 K by the physico-chemical analysis method. In addition to simple salts {l_brace}KBr(cr) and MgBr{sub 2} . 6H{sub 2}O(cr){r_brace}, equilibrium crystallization of the highly incongruent double salt with stoichiometric composition 1:1:6 {l_brace}bromcarnallite: KBr . MgBr{sub 2} . 6H{sub 2}O(cr){r_brace} was also established. The results obtained from the isopiestic and solubility measurements have been combined with all other experimental thermodynamic quantities available in the literature (osmotic coefficients, and solubility of the bromide mineral) to construct a chemical model that calculates solute and solvent activities and (solid + liquid) equilibria in the MgBr{sub 2}(aq) binary, and (m{sub 1}KBr + m{sub 2}MgBr{sub 2})(aq) mixed systems from dilute to high solution concentration within the (273.15 to 438.15) K temperature range. The solubility modelling approach based on fundamental Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. It was found, that the standard for 2-1 type of electrolytes approach with three ({beta}{sup (0)}, {beta}{sup (1)}, and C{sup {phi}}) single electrolyte ion interaction parameters gives excellent agreement with osmotic coefficients from T = (298.15 to 373.45) K; up to saturation at 298.15 K, and up to m(MgBr{sub 2}) = 5.83 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 373.45 K, and with MgBr{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O(cr) equilibrium pure water solubility data within the (273.15 to 438.15) K temperature range and up to {approx}8.5 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} used in parameterization. The model for the ternary system gives very good

  17. Properties of MgO to 1.2 TPa from high-precision experiments on Sandia's Z machine and first-principles simulations using QMC and DFT

    Shulenburger, Luke

    2015-11-01

    MgO is a major constituent of Earth's mantle, the rocky cores of gas giants and is a likely component of the interiors of many exoplanets. The high pressure - high temperature behavior of MgO directly affects equation of state models for planetary structure and formation. In this work, we examine MgO under extreme conditions using experimental and theoretical methods to determine the phase diagram and transport properties. Using plate impact experiments on Sandia's Z facility a low entropy solid-solid phase transition from B1 to B2 is clearly determined. The melting transition, on the other hand, is subtle, involving little to no signal in us-up space. Theoretical work utilizing density functional theory (DFT) provides a complementary picture of the phase diagram. The solid-solid phase transition is identified through a series of quasi-harmonic phonon calculations and thermodynamic integration, while the melt boundary is found using phase coexistence calculations. The calculation of reflectivity along the Hugoniot and the influence of the ionic structure on the transport properties requires particular care because of the underestimation of the band gap and attendant overestimation of transport properties due to the use of semi-local density functional theory. We will explore the impact of this theoretical challenge and its potential solutions in this talk. Finally, understanding the behavior of MgO as the pressure releases from the Hugoniot state is a key ingredient to modeling giant impact events. We explore this regime both through additional DFT calculations and by observing the release state of the MgO into lower impedance materials. The integrated use of DFT simulations and high-accuracy shock experiments together provide a comprehensive understanding of MgO under extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U

  18. Preparation of a high strength Al–Cu–Mg alloy by mechanical alloying and press-forming

    Tang Huaguo; Cheng Zhiqiang; Liu Jianwei; Ma Xianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A high strength aluminum alloy of Al–2 wt.%Mg–2 wt.%Cu has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. ► The alloy only consists of solid solution α-Al. ► The grains size of α-Al was about 300 nm–5 μm. ► The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening are the main reasons for such a high strength. - Abstract: A high strength aluminum alloy, with the ratio of 96 wt.%Al–2 wt.%Mg–2 wt.%Cu, has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. The alloy exhibited a high tensile strength of 780 MPa and a high microhardness of 180 HV. X-ray diffraction characterizations confirmed that the alloy only consists of a solid solution α-Al. Microstructure characterizations revealed that the grain size of α-Al was about 300 nm–5 μm. The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening were considered to be the reason for such a high strength.

  19. Color-tunable and highly thermal stable Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors

    Zhang, Haiming; Zhang, Haoran; Liu, Yingliang [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Lei, Bingfu, E-mail: tleibf@scau.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Deng, Jiankun [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Liu, Wei-Ren [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Zeng, Yuan; Zheng, Lingling; Zhao, Minyi [Guangdong Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Optical Agricultural, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Tb{sup 3+} activated Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36} phosphor was prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. The Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors show intense green light emission under UV excitation. The phosphor exhibit two groups of emission lines from about 370 to 700 nm, which originating from the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 7}F{sub J} and {sup 5}D{sub 4}-{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of the Tb{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The cross-relaxation mechanism between the {sup 5}D{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} emission was investigated and discussed. The emission colors of these phosphors can be tuned from bluish-green to green by adjusting the Tb{sup 3+} doping concentration. Furthermore, the thermal quenching temperature (T{sub 1/2}) is higher than 500 K. The excellent thermal stability and color-tunable luminescent properties suggest that the developed material is a promising green-emitting phosphor candidate for optical devices. - Highlights: • A Color-tunable emitting phosphor Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} was prepared successfully via high-temperature solid-state reaction. • The photoluminescence of Sr{sub 2}MgAl{sub 22}O{sub 36}:Tb{sup 3+} shows highly thermal stable. • The cross-relaxation mechanism between the {sup 5}D{sub 3} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} emission was investigated and discussed.

  20. Color-tunable and highly thermal stable Sr_2MgAl_2_2O_3_6:Tb"3"+ phosphors

    Zhang, Haiming; Zhang, Haoran; Liu, Yingliang; Lei, Bingfu; Deng, Jiankun; Liu, Wei-Ren; Zeng, Yuan; Zheng, Lingling; Zhao, Minyi

    2017-01-01

    Tb"3"+ activated Sr_2MgAl_2_2O_3_6 phosphor was prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. The Sr_2MgAl_2_2O_3_6:Tb"3"+ phosphors show intense green light emission under UV excitation. The phosphor exhibit two groups of emission lines from about 370 to 700 nm, which originating from the characteristic "5D_3-"7F_J and "5D_4-"7F_J transitions of the Tb"3"+ ion, respectively. The cross-relaxation mechanism between the "5D_3 and "5D_4 emission was investigated and discussed. The emission colors of these phosphors can be tuned from bluish-green to green by adjusting the Tb"3"+ doping concentration. Furthermore, the thermal quenching temperature (T_1_/_2) is higher than 500 K. The excellent thermal stability and color-tunable luminescent properties suggest that the developed material is a promising green-emitting phosphor candidate for optical devices. - Highlights: • A Color-tunable emitting phosphor Sr_2MgAl_2_2O_3_6:Tb"3"+ was prepared successfully via high-temperature solid-state reaction. • The photoluminescence of Sr_2MgAl_2_2O_3_6:Tb"3"+ shows highly thermal stable. • The cross-relaxation mechanism between the "5D_3 and "5D_4 emission was investigated and discussed.

  1. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+K+-ATPase-ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site.

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul; Fedosova, Natalya U

    2013-07-02

    The Na(+),K(+)-ATPase maintains electrochemical gradients for Na(+) and K(+) that are critical for animal cells. Cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), widely used in the clinic and recently assigned a role as endogenous regulators of intracellular processes, are highly specific inhibitors of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Here we describe a crystal structure of the phosphorylated pig kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in complex with the CTS representative ouabain, extending to 3.4 Å resolution. The structure provides key details on CTS binding, revealing an extensive hydrogen bonding network formed by the β-surface of the steroid core of ouabain and the side chains of αM1, αM2, and αM6. Furthermore, the structure reveals that cation transport site II is occupied by Mg(2+), and crystallographic studies indicate that Rb(+) and Mn(2+), but not Na(+), bind to this site. Comparison with the low-affinity [K2]E2-MgF(x)-ouabain structure [Ogawa et al. (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(33):13742-13747) shows that the CTS binding pocket of [Mg]E2P allows deep ouabain binding with possible long-range interactions between its polarized five-membered lactone ring and the Mg(2+). K(+) binding at the same site unwinds a turn of αM4, dragging residues Ile318-Val325 toward the cation site and thereby hindering deep ouabain binding. Thus, the structural data establish a basis for the interpretation of the biochemical evidence pointing at direct K(+)-Mg(2+) competition and explain the well-known antagonistic effect of K(+) on CTS binding.

  2. The Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Mg Incorporation in Planktonic Foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white): Results from a Global Sediment Trap Mg/Ca Database

    Gray, W. R.; Weldeab, S.; Lea, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber is arguably the most important proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) in tropical and sub tropical regions, and as such guides our understanding of past climatic change in these regions. However, the sensitivity of Mg/Ca to salinity is debated; while analysis of foraminifera grown in cultures generally indicates a sensitivity of 3 - 6% per salinity unit, core-top studies have suggested a much higher sensitivity of between 15 - 27% per salinity unit, bringing the utility of Mg/Ca as a SST proxy into dispute. Sediment traps circumvent the issues of dissolution and post-depositional calcite precipitation that hamper core-top calibration studies, whilst allowing the analysis of foraminifera that have calcified under natural conditions within a well constrained period of time. We collated previously published sediment trap/plankton tow G. ruber (white) Mg/Ca data, and generated new Mg/Ca data from a sediment trap located in the highly-saline tropical North Atlantic, close to West Africa. Calcification temperature and salinity were calculated for the time interval represented by each trap/tow sample using World Ocean Atlas 2013 data. The resulting dataset comprises >240 Mg/Ca measurements (in the size fraction 150 - 350 µm), that span a temperature range of 18 - 28 °C and 33.6 - 36.7 PSU. Multiple regression of the dataset reveals a temperature sensitivity of 7 ± 0.4% per °C (p < 2.2*10-16) and a salinity sensitivity of 4 ± 1% per salinity unit (p = 2*10-5). Application of this calibration has significant implications for both the magnitude and timing of glacial-interglacial temperature changes when variations in salinity are accounted for.

  3. Epitaxial growth of high purity cubic InN films on MgO substrates using HfN buffer layers by pulsed laser deposition

    Ohba, R.; Ohta, J.; Shimomoto, K.; Fujii, T.; Okamoto, K.; Aoyama, A.; Nakano, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Fujioka, H.; Oshima, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cubic InN films have been grown on MgO substrates with HfN buffer layers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It has been found that the use of HfN (100) buffer layers allows us to grow cubic InN (100) films with an in-plane epitaxial relationship of [001] InN //[001] HfN //[001] MgO . X-ray diffraction and electron back-scattered diffraction measurements have revealed that the phase purity of the cubic InN films was as high as 99%, which can be attributed to the use of HfN buffer layers and the enhanced surface migration of the film precursors by the use of PLD. - Graphical abstract: Cubic InN films have been grown on MgO substrates with HfN buffer layers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It has been revealed that the phase purity of the cubic InN films was as high as 99 %, which can be attributed to the use of HfN buffer layers and the enhanced surface migration of the film precursors by the use of PLD.

  4. A novel double perovskite tellurate Eu3+-doped Sr2MgTeO6 red-emitting phosphor with high thermal stability

    Liang, Jingyun; Zhao, Shancang; Yuan, Xuexia; Li, Zengmei

    2018-05-01

    A series of novel double perovskite tellurate red-emitting phosphors Sr2MgTeO6:xEu3+ (x = 0.05-0.40) were successfully synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, photoluminescence properties and thermal stability of the phosphor were investigated in detail. The phosphor shows dominant emission peak at 614 nm belonging to the 5D0 → 7F2 electric dipole transition under 465 nm excitation. The luminescence intensity keeps increasing with increasing the content of Eu3+ to 25 mol%, and the critical transfer distance of Eu3+ was calculated to be 12 Å. The quenching temperature for Sr2MgTeO6:0.25Eu3+ was estimated to be above 500 K. This spectral feature reveals high color purity and excellent chromaticity coordinate characteristics. Therefore, Eu3+-doped Sr2MgTeO6 phosphors are potential red phosphors for blue chip-based white light-emitting diode and display devices.

  5. Improved high temperature refractory. [MgCr/sub 2/O/sub 4/ composite with ZrO/sub 2/

    Singh, J.P.; James, J.; Picciolo, J.J.

    1985-12-10

    A high chromia refractory composite has been developed with improved thermal shock resistance and containing about 5 to 30 wt % of unstabilized ZrO/sub 2/ having a temperature-dependent phase change resulting in large expansion mismatch between the ZrO/sub 2/ and the chromia matrix which causes microcracks to form during cooling in the high chromia matrix. The particle size preferably is primarily between about 0.6 to 5 microns and particularly below about 3 microns with an average size in the order of 1.2 to 1.8 microns.

  6. Effect of Mg and Cu on mechanical properties of high-strength welded joints of aluminum alloys obtained by laser welding

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental investigations of welded joints of high-strength aluminum-lithium alloys of the Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li systems are reported. The welded joints are obtained by means of laser welding and are subjected to various types of processing for obtaining high-strength welded joints. A microstructural analysis is performed. The phase composition and mechanical properties of the welded joints before and after heat treatment are studied. It is found that combined heat treatment of the welded joint (annealing, quenching, and artificial ageing) increases the joint strength, but appreciably decreases the alloy strength outside the region thermally affected by the welding process.

  7. Conditions of uranium-bearing calcite formation in ore-enclosing sediments of the Semizbaj deposit (Kazakhstan)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Maksimova, I.G.; Dojnikova, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation into uranium-bearing calcite, forming the cement of gravelly-sandy rocks of the Semizbaj uranium deposit. Core sampling in prospecting boreholes were used to establish geological conditions, place and time of uranium-bearing calcite formation. Calcite was investigated by optical, electron-microscope and radiographic methods. It is shown that uranium in calcite doesn't form its own mineral phase and exists in scattered state. Uranium in calcite-bearing minerals is present in isomorphic form. Uranium content in calcite was equal to 0.009-0.15 %. It is proposed that mineralization, formed in sedimentary rocks by processes of ground-stratum oxidation, is the source of uranium, enriching calcite. refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Highly transparent and thermal-stable silver nanowire conductive film covered with ZnMgO by atomic-layer-deposition

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Dongchen; Li, Min; Xu, Hua; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Peng, Junbiao; Xu, Miao

    2017-12-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been considered as a promising material for next generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However AgNWs films have several intrinsic drawbacks, such as thermal stability and storage stability. Herein, we demonstrate a laminated ZnO/MgO (ZnMgO, ZMO) as a protective layer on the AgNWs films using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated films exhibited a low sheet resistance of 16 Ω/sq with high transmittance of 91% at 550 nm, an excellent thermal stability and bending property. The ZMO film grows perpendicularly on the surface of the AgNWs, making a perfect coverage of bulk silver nanowires and junction, which can effectively prompt the electrical transport behavior and enhance stability of the silver nanowires network.

  9. Iodine-129 and Iodine-127 speciation in groundwater at the Hanford Site, U.S.: iodate incorporation into calcite

    Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States, has large radioactive waste plumes containing high 129I levels. The geochemical transport and fate of radioiodine depends largely on its chemical speciation that is greatly affected by environmental factors. This study reports, for the first time, the speciation of stable and radioactive iodine in the groundwater from the Hanford Site. Iodate was the dominant species and accounts for up to 84%, followed by organo-iodine and minimal levels of iodide. The relatively high pH and oxidizing environment may have prevented iodate reduction. Our results identified that calcite precipitation caused by degassing of CO2 during deep groundwater sampling incorporated between 7 to 40% of dissolved iodine (including 127I and 129I) that was originally in the groundwater, transforming dissolved to particulate iodate during sampling. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying iodine incorporation by calcite, laboratory experiments were carried out to replicate this iodine sequestering processes. Two methods were utilized in this study, 1) addition of sodium carbonate; 2) addition of calcium chloride followed by sodium carbonate where the pH was well controlled at ~8.2, which is close to the average pH of Hanford Site groundwater. It was demonstrated that iodate was the main species incorporated into calcite and this incorporation process could be impeded by elevated pH and decreasing ionic strength in groundwater. This study provides critical information for predicting the long-term fate and transport of 129I at the Hanford Site and reveals a potential means for improved remediation strategies of 129I

  10. Priming and stress under high humidity and temperature on the physiological quality of Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG-5 seeds

    Thiago Barbosa Batista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Palisade grass is a forage plant that is widely used in pasture cropping in the Brazilian savannah. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate palisade grass (Brachiaria brizantha cv. MG–5 seeds subjected to priming and stress at high humidity and temperature (before and after conditioning. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 2x5 factorial arrangement. Seeds were exposed to stress under high humidity and temperature (before and after conditioning and five priming treatments [Water (Control, potassium nitrate (KNO3 at 0.2%, calcium nitrate Ca(NO32 at 0.2%, gibberellin (GA3 at 0.2% and glucose at 10%] with four replications. Two experiments were performed: Experiment I - seed with chemical scarification using H2SO4 and Experiment II - without scarification. The stress on the seed was applied using artificial aging at 41°C for 96 hours. Seed priming was accomplished by immersion at 25°C for 2 hours. Thereafter, the seeds were oven-dried at 35°C until they regained hygroscopic equilibrium. Seed germination and vigor were evaluated. Priming using KNO3 and Ca(NO32 produced seeds with high tolerance to stress under high temperature, and this process is efficient to overcome dormancy.

  11. Mg and Ca isotope fractionation during CaCO3 biomineralisation

    Chang, Veronica T.-C.; Williams, R.J.P.; Makishima, Akio; Belshawl, Nick S.; O'Nions, R. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The natural variation of Mg and Ca stable isotopes of carbonates has been determined in carbonate skeletons of perforate foraminifera and reef coral together with Mg/Ca ratios to assess the influence of biomineralisation processes. The results for coral aragonite suggest its formation, in terms of stable isotope behaviour, approximates to inorganic precipitation from a seawater reservoir. In contrast, results for foraminifera calcite suggest a marked biological control on Mg isotope ratios presumably related to its low Mg content compared with seawater. The bearing of these observations on the use of Mg and Ca isotopes as proxies in paleoceanography is considered

  12. Calcite dissolution along a transect in the western tropical Indian Ocean: A multiproxy approach

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    Three paleocarbonate ion proxies, size index, planktonic foraminifera shell weight, and calcite crystallinity, have been employed here to a set of core top samples from the western tropical Indian Ocean in the water depth ranges from 1086 to 4730 m...

  13. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  14. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: suzuki@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  15. Hysteresis losses in MgB{sub 2} superconductors exposed to combinations of low AC and high DC magnetic fields and transport currents

    Magnusson, N., E-mail: niklas.magnusson@sintef.no [SINTEF Energy Research, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Abrahamsen, A.B. [DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Liu, D. [Electrical Power Processing Group, TU Delft, Mekelweg 4, NL-2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Runde, M. [SINTEF Energy Research, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Polinder, H. [Electrical Power Processing Group, TU Delft, Mekelweg 4, NL-2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A method for calculating hysteresis losses in the low AC – high DC magnetic field and transport current range has been shown. • The method can be used in the design of wind turbine generators for calculating the losses in the generator DC rotor. • First estimates indicate tolerable current ripple in the 0.1% range for a 4 T DC MgB{sub 2} generator rotor coil. - Abstract: MgB{sub 2} superconductors are considered for generator field coils for direct drive wind turbine generators. In such coils, the losses generated by AC magnetic fields may generate excessive local heating and add to the thermal load, which must be removed by the cooling system. These losses must be evaluated in the design of the generator to ensure a sufficient overall efficiency. A major loss component is the hysteresis losses in the superconductor itself. In the high DC – low AC current and magnetic field region experimental results still lack for MgB{sub 2} conductors. In this article we reason towards a simplified theoretical treatment of the hysteresis losses based on available models in the literature with the aim of setting the basis for estimation of the allowable magnetic fields and current ripples in superconducting generator coils intended for large wind turbine direct drive generators. The resulting equations use the DC in-field critical current, the geometry of the superconductor and the magnitude of the AC magnetic field component as parameters. This simplified approach can be valuable in the design of MgB{sub 2} DC coils in the 1–4 T range with low AC magnetic field and current ripples.

  16. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M ⊙ . Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars

  17. What concentration of actinides can be packed into calcite? Hints from rare earth element (REE) composition

    Christiansen, J.; Stipp, S.L.S.; Waight, T.; Baker, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For reliable modelling of actinide mobility in the event of spent fuel repository failure, we need data describing the uptake capacity of the minerals likely to find themselves in the transport path. Calcite (CaCO 3 ) is a common secondary mineral in fractures and pore fillings, especially downstream from degrading concrete facilities, so it is a likely candidate for incorporation. Investigations made under ACTAF, a 5. Framework EURATOM integrated project, as well as some other research studies, have shown that actinides are successfully incorporated as substituting ions within the calcite mineral structure. The question remaining, is how much can calcite take up. Geologists routinely use relative concentrations of rare Earth elements (REE's), the lanthanides, for interpreting rock genesis and history. One can also adopt them as analogues for the radioactive elements because their f-orbital electron configuration makes them behave very much like actinides. We collected and analysed a suite of 70 calcite samples from a great number of possible formation environments, geological ages and geographical locations, for the purpose of finding the range and maximum of total f-orbital substitution possible in calcite, under natural conditions. We analysed them using Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The maximum concentration found was about 5 x 10 -3 mole/kg total REE in a sample that had a geological history of formation where REE fluids played a role. Over the whole suite, total REE ranged from less than 10 -4 moles/kg for limestone samples formed from biogenic calcite where REE-enriched fluids would have played a negligible role. Thus, in natural calcite, REE's are present and all evidence points to a structural incorporation within the mineral rather than as a separate REE-rich phase. These data compare favourably with mole fractions from calcite grown synthetically, where as much as 6 x 10 -3

  18. The ambient and high temperature deformation behavior of Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloy with minor Ti, Zr, Ni additions

    Hernandez-Sandoval, J.; Garza-Elizondo, G.H.; Samuel, A.M.; Valtiierra, S.; Samuel, F.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Characterization on the precipitation of Ni- and Zr-based intermetallics. • High temperature tensile properties of 354 alloy containing Zr and Ni below 0.5%. • Quality index charts as a function of heat treatment. • Yield strength and ductility color contours as a function of aging temperature and aging time. - Abstract: The principal aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of minor additions of nickel and zirconium on the strength of cast aluminum alloy 354 at ambient and high temperatures. Tensile properties of the as-cast and heat-treated alloys were determined at room temperature and at high temperatures (190 °C, 250 °C, 350 °C). The results show that Zr reacts only with Ti, Si and Al. From the quality index charts constructed for these alloys, the quality index attains minimum and maximum values of 259 MPa and 459 MPa, in the as-cast and solution-treated conditions; also, maximum and minimum values of yield strength are observed at 345 MPa and 80 MPa, respectively, within the series of aging treatments applied. A decrease in tensile properties of ∼10% with the addition of 0.4 wt.% nickel is attributed to a nickel–copper reaction. The reduction in mechanical properties due to addition of different elements is attributed principally to the increase in the percentage of intermetallic phase particles formed during solidification; such particles act as stress concentrators, decreasing the alloy ductility. Tensile test results at ambient temperatures show a slight increase (∼10%) in alloys with Zr and Zr/Ni additions, particularly at aging temperatures above 240 °C. Additions of Zr and Zr + Ni increase the high temperature tensile properties, in particular for the alloy containing 0.2 wt.% Zr + 0.2 wt.% Ni, which exhibits an increase of more than 30% in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared with the base 354 alloy

  19. Precipitation of Calcite during the Deposition of Paleogene Sangkarewang Oil Shale, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    Agus Haris Widayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.2.3.185-197Geochemical and petrographical analyses were carried out to investigate the occurrence of calcite in theformer Ombilin lacustrine lake. The study involves eight samples taken from a 56 m long drill core of Sangkarewangoil shale. Geochemical investigation showed that the samples consist of varied terrigenous input represented by Si, Al, K, and Ti, and autochthonous input represented by S, total organic carbon (TOC, and d13C of bulk organic matter. Along the drill core profile the abundance of autochthonous input decreases upwards, while that of terrigenous input oppositely increases upwards. Petrographical analysis revealed that calcite is a major mineral in the samples. In this study, the abundance of calcite could be represented by the abundance of Ca, as calcite is the only significant Ca containing mineral. Ca is abundant in the samples (8.4% in average and its concentration varies similarly with those of S, TOC, and d13C, suggesting that the element as well as calcite incorporates the autochthonous input. Thevariation of calcite abundance in the drill core profile is considered to be related with primary productivity changes during the development of the former lake. Higher primary productivity represented by more positive of d13C value(-24.8‰ during the deposition of the lower part of the drill core profile promoted the higher amount of deposited organic matter. In such environment, the supersaturation of carbonate ion in lake water was also reached and significant precipitation of authigenic calcite occurred. As the lake developed, the primary productivity decreased as indicated by more negative of d13C value (eventually -26.8‰. This condition led to the decreases of deposited organic matterand calcite in the lake sediments.

  20. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-05-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with needle fibre calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this paper the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented. Moreover, on a global

  1. Quasicrystal-reinforced Mg alloys.

    Kyun Kim, Young; Tae Kim, Won; Hyang Kim, Do

    2014-04-01

    The formation of the icosahedral phase (I-phase) as a secondary solidification phase in Mg-Zn-Y and Mg-Zn-Al base systems provides useful advantages in designing high performance wrought magnesium alloys. The strengthening in two-phase composites (I-phase + α -Mg) can be explained by dispersion hardening due to the presence of I-phase particles and by the strong bonding property at the I-phase/matrix interface. The presence of an additional secondary solidification phase can further enhance formability and mechanical properties. In Mg-Zn-Y alloys, the co-presence of I and Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 phases by addition of Ca can significantly enhance formability, while in Mg-Zn-Al alloys, the co-presence of the I-phase and Mg 2 Sn phase leads to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Dynamic and static recrystallization are significantly accelerated by addition of Ca in Mg-Zn-Y alloy, resulting in much smaller grain size and more random texture. The high strength of Mg-Zn-Al-Sn alloys is attributed to the presence of finely distributed Mg 2 Sn and I-phase particles embedded in the α -Mg matrix.

  2. Calcite/aragonite-biocoated artificial coral reefs for marine parks

    Volodymyr Ivanov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural formation of the coral reefs is complicated by slow biomediated precipitation of calcium carbonate from seawater. Therefore, manufactured artificial coral reefs can be used for the formation of “underwater gardens” in marine parks for the recreational fishing and diving that will protect natural coral reefs from negative anthropogenic effects. Additionally, the coating of the concrete, plastic or wooden surfaces of artificial coral reef with calcium carbonate layer could promote attachment and growth of coral larvae and photosynthetic epibiota on these surfaces. Three methods of biotechnological coating of the artificial coral reefs have been tested: (1 microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from concentrated calcium chloride solution using live bacterial culture of Bacillus sp. VS1 or dead but urease-active cells of Yaniella sp. VS8; (2 precipitation from calcium bicarbonate solution; (3 precipitation using aerobic oxidation of calcium acetate by bacteria Bacillus ginsengi strain VSA1. The thickness of biotechnologically produced calcium carbonate coating layer was from 0.3 to 3 mm. Biocoating using calcium salt and urea produced calcite in fresh water and aragonite in seawater. The calcium carbonate-coated surfaces were colonized in aquarium with seawater and hard corals as inoculum or in aquarium with fresh water using cyanobacteria Chlorella sorokiana as inoculum. The biofilm on the light-exposed side of calcium carbonate-coated surfaces was formed after six weeks of incubation and developed up to the average thickness of 250 µm in seawater and about 150 µm in fresh water after six weeks of incubation. The biotechnological manufacturing of calcium carbonate-coated concrete, plastic, or wooden surfaces of the structures imitating natural coral reef is technologically feasible. It could be commercially attractive solution for the introduction of aesthetically pleasant artificial coral reefs in marine parks and

  3. Sealing of rock joints by induced calcite precipitation. A case study from Bergeforsen hydro power plant

    Hakami, E.; Qvarfort, U.; Ekstav, A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of sealing rock fractures by injecting water saturated with calcite solution, and hereby inducing a calcite precipitation inside the fracture, is investigated. The way of reaction and the amount of calcite precipitation will depend on the saturation of calcium carbonate in the water, the temperature, the pH and the CO 2 -pressure. There is experience of lime-saturated water injection in the rock foundation below the dam at Bergeforsens power plant (1955-1968). It was observed that the consumption of injected lime water decreased with time. A possible reason to the decrease in lime water consumption is that calcite has precipitated such that the permeability of the rock in general is lowered. Another explanation to this could be that calcite precipitation is concentrated to the fractures surrounding the injection holes, thus preventing the lime water from penetrating further into the rock. It is recommended that further studies of the fracture fillings in drill cores from Bergeforsen is performed. The aim of such study should be to determine the extent of induced calcite precipitation and to investigate its chemical and physical properties. (authors)

  4. Indirect improvement of high temperature mechanical properties of a Mg-based alloy Elektron21 by addition of AlN nanoparticles

    Daudin, R. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMaP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Terzi, S. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, TEC-TS, EPN Campus, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mallmann, C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMaP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Martín, R. Sánchez [IMDEA Materials Institute, Tecnogetafe C/ Eric Kandel, 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Lhuissier, P. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMaP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Boller, E.; Pacureanu, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Katsarou, L.; Dieringa, H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Magnesium Innovation Centre – MagIC, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Salvo, L. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMaP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2017-03-14

    Magnesium being the lightest metal on earth used as a structural material, the design of the chemistry and the microstructures of Mg-based alloys has been developed over the years to always further ameliorate their mechanical properties. A supplementary option consists in adding ceramic nanoparticles to such alloys to design Mg-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) displaying improvement of both strength and ductility. In practice however, careful attention is required to understand the fundamental mechanisms at the heart of the enhancement of these properties as they still remain quite uncertain and subjected to misleading interpretations. Here, high temperature (350 °C) strain rate jump tests in compression reveal an enhancement of 20–60% of the mechanical properties when AlN nano-particles are added to the Elektron21 alloy (Mg-2.8Nd-1.2Gd-0.4Zr-0.3Zn, in wt%). At the same time, nano-indentation investigations suppose that forest or Orowan strengthening, due to particles-dislocations interactions, is unlikely to occur. Instead, using complementary microstructural characterization techniques (scanning electron macroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy as well as micro- and nano-tomography), we show that AlN nano-particles physically and chemically interact with the alloy and modify the overall microstructure, in particular the intermetallic phase, at the origin of the improvement of the mechanical properties.

  5. Measurement and modeling of the low-temperature penetration-depth anomaly in high-quality MgB{sub 2} thin films

    Agassi, Y.D. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States); Oates, D.E., E-mail: OATES@LL.MIT.EDU [MIT-Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA 02420 (United States); Moeckly, B.H. [STI, Inc. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Based on our measurements of intermodulation distortion in MgB{sub 2}, we have previously proposed that the {pi} energy-gap in MgB{sub 2} entails six nodal lines [Y.D. Agassi, D.E. Oates, and B.H. Moeckly, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 174522]. Here we report high-precision measurements in MgB{sub 2} stripline resonators that show an increase of the penetration depth as the temperature is decreased below 5 K. This increase is consistent with the Script-Small-L = 6 symmetry of the {pi} energy gap that we have proposed. We interpret the increase as a manifestation of Andreev surface-attached states that are associated with the nodal lines of the {pi} energy gap. Penetration-depth calculations are in good agreement with our data. To reconcile the present interpretation with existing literature, we review other penetration-depth data, magnetic-impurity and tunneling experiments, and data on the paramagnetic Meissner effect. We conclude that these data do not rule out the interpretation of our experimental data based on a nodal {pi} energy gap.

  6. Optimization of superconductivity properties in MgB2 Wires and tapes to generate high magnetic fields

    Serrano, German

    2005-01-01

    We present, in this work, a study of the effects of doping, heat treatments and mechanisms of deformation, over the microstructure and superconducting properties of powder in tube (PIT) M g B 2 wires and tapes.We observed that nano-SiC doping improves the critical current density (J c ) and the upper critical field (H c 2).The combined use of doping and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing), produces samples with high density and improves J c s.We studied the influence of number and temperature of intermediate heat treatments (TTI), during the fabrication of wires and tapes.We observed that TTI made at low temperature ( o C), results in wires and tapes with better microstructure than those made at high temperature.Moreover, the increment of the heat treatments numbers at high temperature, decreases the quality of microstructure and J c .In the study of sheaths materials, we observed that the J c values measured by magnetization in Ti sheath samples are two order of magnitude larger than the values measured by transport, which indicates macroscopic fracture problems.On other hand, we fabricated tapes with excellent J c values (10 4 A/cm 2 at 4K and 7T), which are similar to those of samples made with HIPing.This tape presents some degree of grains alignment, as a consequence of rolling.We observed J c anisotropy in both transport and magnetization measurements in a range between 4 and 26K, and the same effect in H c 2.The anisotropy factor in Jc increase with applied field, while the anisotropy in Hc2 is constant with temperature (H c 2 parallel H c 2 perpendicular ∼1.2).Finally, we observed that carbon nanotubes doping improves H c 2 and this effects is most important at temperatures below 5K.This increase in H c 2 was predicted by Gurevich [45], as an effect of modification in scattering coefficient between electronics bands of M g B 2 by doping [es

  7. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3 with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 1020 cm-3 show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3. The p-GaN and p-Al0.11Ga0.89N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3-3.5 V and series resistances of 6-10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  8. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan, E-mail: alan.doolittle@ece.gatech.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The p-GaN and p-Al{sub 0.11}Ga{sub 0.89}N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3–3.5 V and series resistances of 6–10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  9. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10 19 cm −3 with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 10 20 cm −3 show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10 19 cm −3 . The p-GaN and p-Al 0.11 Ga 0.89 N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3–3.5 V and series resistances of 6–10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K

  10. Petrological constraints on the high-Mg basalts from Capo Marargiu (Sardinia, Italy): Evidence of cryptic amphibole fractionation in polybaric environments

    Tecchiato, Vanni; Gaeta, Mario; Mollo, Silvio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Bachmann, Olivier; Perinelli, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    This study deals with the textural and compositional characteristics of the calc-alkaline stratigraphic sequence from Capo Marargiu Volcanic District (CMVD; Sardinia island, Italy). The area is dominated by basaltic to intermediate hypabyssal (dikes and sills) and volcanic rocks (lava flows and pyroclastic deposits) emplaced during the Oligo-Miocene orogenic magmatism of Sardinia. Interestingly, a basaltic andesitic dome hosts dark-grey, crystal-rich enclaves containing up 50% of millimetre- to centimetre-sized clinopyroxene and amphibole crystals. This mineral assemblage is in equilibrium with a high-Mg basalt recognised as the parental magma of the entire stratigraphic succession at CMVD. Analogously, centimetre-sized clots of medium- and coarse-grained amphibole + plagioclase crystals are entrapped in andesitic dikes that ultimately intrude the stratigraphic sequence. Amphibole-plagioclase cosaturation occurs at equilibrium with a differentiated basaltic andesite. Major and trace element modelling indicates that the evolutionary path of magma is controlled by a two-step process driven by early olivine + clinopyroxene and late amphibole + plagioclase fractionation. In this context, enclaves represent parts of a cumulate horizon segregated at the early stage of differentiation of the precursory high-Mg basalt. This is denoted by i) resorption effects and sharp transitions between Mg-rich and Mg-poor clinopyroxenes, indicative of pervasive dissolution phenomena followed by crystal re-equilibration and overgrowth, and ii) reaction minerals found in amphibole coronas formed at the interface with more differentiated melts infiltrating within the cumulate horizon, and carrying the crystal-rich material with them upon eruption. Coherently, the mineral chemistry and phase relations of enclaves indicate crystallisation in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment under water-rich conditions. On the other hand, the upward migration and subsequent fractionation of the

  11. Discovery of high-performance low-cost n-type Mg3Sb2-based thermoelectric materials with multi-valley conduction bands

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Pedersen, Steffen Hindborg

    2017-01-01

    Widespread application of thermoelectric devices for waste heat recovery requires low-cost high-performance materials. The currently available n-type thermoelectric materials are limited either by their low efficiencies or by being based on expensive, scarce or toxic elements. Here we report a low-cost...... because of the multi-valley band behaviour dominated by a unique near-edge conduction band with a sixfold valley degeneracy. This makes Te-doped Mg3Sb1.5Bi0.5 a promising candidate for the low- and intermediate-temperature thermoelectric applications....

  12. Investigation of dosimetric characteristics of the high sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P Thermoluminescent Dosemeter and its applications in diagnostic radiology - a review

    Fung, K.L. E-mail: orkarl@polyu.edu.hk

    2004-05-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric properties of the high sensitivity TLD (Thermoluminescent Dosemeter) of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and its applications in diagnostic radiology. A reproducible readout and annealing regime for this high sensitivity TLD was developed in the initial part of this study with the newly installed automatic TLD Reader system. Basic dosimetric characteristics of this T.L. dosemeter were then investigated. This paved the foundation for subsequent selected novel application studies in diagnostic radiology. This study exploits the favourable dosimetric properties of these T.L. dosemeters in some selected novel dosimetric applications in diagnostic radiology with an anthropomorphic phantom. The applications studied in radiological procedures included: dose reduction in lumbar spine radiography utilizing the 'anode heel effect'; gonad dose variation with kV{sub p} in chest radiography; foetal dose comparison between computed tomography (CT) and computed radiography (CR) in X-ray pelvimetry; lens dose reduction with bismuth eye-shields in CT brain studies; foetal dose assessment of early pregnancy in common high risk radiological examinations. It is anticipated that the unique and favourable dosimetric performance of LiF:Mg,Cu,P T.L. phosphor will be exploited further in measurements of low level dose received by patients and staff in diagnostic radiological procedures such as paediatric X-ray examinations.

  13. Investigation of dosimetric characteristics of the high sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P Thermoluminescent Dosemeter and its applications in diagnostic radiology - a review

    Fung, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric properties of the high sensitivity TLD (Thermoluminescent Dosemeter) of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and its applications in diagnostic radiology. A reproducible readout and annealing regime for this high sensitivity TLD was developed in the initial part of this study with the newly installed automatic TLD Reader system. Basic dosimetric characteristics of this T.L. dosemeter were then investigated. This paved the foundation for subsequent selected novel application studies in diagnostic radiology. This study exploits the favourable dosimetric properties of these T.L. dosemeters in some selected novel dosimetric applications in diagnostic radiology with an anthropomorphic phantom. The applications studied in radiological procedures included: dose reduction in lumbar spine radiography utilizing the 'anode heel effect'; gonad dose variation with kV p in chest radiography; foetal dose comparison between computed tomography (CT) and computed radiography (CR) in X-ray pelvimetry; lens dose reduction with bismuth eye-shields in CT brain studies; foetal dose assessment of early pregnancy in common high risk radiological examinations. It is anticipated that the unique and favourable dosimetric performance of LiF:Mg,Cu,P T.L. phosphor will be exploited further in measurements of low level dose received by patients and staff in diagnostic radiological procedures such as paediatric X-ray examinations

  14. Speleothem Mg-isotope time-series data from different climate belts

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Richter, D. K.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Niedermayr, A.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-04-01

    Speleothem Mg-isotope time-series data from different climate belts Sylvia Riechelmann (1), Dieter Buhl(1), Detlev K. Richter (1), Andrea Schröder-Ritzrau (2), Dana F.C. Riechelmann (3), Andrea Niedermayr (1), Hubert B. Vonhof (4) , Jasper Wassenburg (1), Adrian Immenhauser (1) (1) Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Universitätsstraße 150, D-44801 Bochum, Germany (2) Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany (3) Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institute of Geography, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 21, D-55128 Mainz, Germany (4) Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands The Magnesium isotope proxy in Earth surface research is still underexplored. Recently, field and laboratory experiments have shed light on the complex suite of processes affecting Mg isotope fractionation in continental weathering systems. Magnesium-isotope fractionation in speleothems depends on a series of factors including biogenic activity and composition of soils, mineralogy of hostrock, changes in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios, water residence time in the soil and hostrock and disequilibrium factors such as the precipitation rate of calcite in speleothems. Furthermore, the silicate (here mainly Mg-bearing clays) versus carbonate weathering ratio depends on air temperature and rainfall amount, also influencing the soil biogenic activity. It must be emphasized that carbonate weathering is generally dominant, but under increasingly warm and more arid climate conditions, silicate weathering rates increase and release 26Mg-enriched isotopes to the soil water. Furthermore, as shown in laboratory experiments, increasing calcite precipitation rates lead to elevated delta26Mg ratios and vice versa. Here, data from six stalagmite time-series Mg-isotope records (Thermo Fisher Scientific Neptune MC-ICP-MS) are shown. Stalagmites

  15. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Foster, T.; Clode, P. L.

    2016-03-01

    Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility may leave animals that produce ar