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Sample records for high iron diet

  1. A comparison of iron bioassay diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, J L; Day, E J; Dilworth, B C

    1976-05-01

    Two broiler chick experiments wer conducted to evaluate four basal diets for iron bioassay suitability. The test basal diets, identified according to their principal ingredients and iron content, were: (1) starch-skim milk - 15 p.p.m., (2) degerminated corn-skin milk - 18 p.p.m. (3) degermianted corn-fish meal-isolated soy - 45 p.p.m., and (4) degermianted corn-fish meal-dehulled soy - 59p.p.m. Significant differences between an iron source with known low availability (ferric oxide) and a highly available iron source (ferrous sulfate) were not detected with the degerminated corn-fish meal-isolated soy or the degerminated corn-fish meal-dehulled soy diets. Likewise, there were no significant differences found between supplemental iron levels, 10 and 20 p.p.m. The corn-skim milk and starch-skim milk diets were both found to be satisfactory for iron bioassays. However, the sample size needed to estimate the population mean was almost twice as great for the starch-skim milk fed groups, than was needed for the corn-skim milk fed groups which indicates the corn-skim milk diet obtained greater sensitivity in testing iron sources and levels. Mortality was excessively high in the starch-skim milk fed group. Ferrous sulfate was superior to ferric oxide as a source of iron.

  2. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin Images Iron supplements References Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, ...

  3. [Iron content of infant diets cooked in iron utensils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borigato, E V; Martinez, F E

    1995-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent form of nutritional anemia, and infants represent one of the major risk groups. The present study was meant to evaluate the iron content of infant diets cooked in iron utensils and in aluminum utensils prepared by volunteer mothers at home. The iron content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The increase of iron in diets cooked in iron utensils was 12 to 44 times greater than in diets cooked in aluminum utensils. The pH and moisture of the diets cooked in the two types of utensils did not differ in a statistically significant manner. On the basis of these results, it was estimated that the increase in daily iron supply obtained by cooking the diet in iron utensils would be sufficient to satisfy the iron requirements of infants.

  4. Biovailability of Iron to rats fed with Iron Fortified Cassava Gari Diets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for eradication of nutritional anemia with the local diet is important for a successful intervention at the community level in Nigeria. ari samples separetely fortified with iron sulphate, iron fumarate and sodium iron EDTAat three concentrations, 25, 35 and 45 mg/kg were used as starch based rat diets. The samples ...

  5. Pork meat increases iron absorption from a 5-day fully controlled diet when compared to a vegetarian diet with similar vitamin C and phytic acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Kristensen, Mette; Hels, Ole; Morberg, Catrine; Marving, Jens; Bügel, Susanne; Tetens, Inge

    2005-07-01

    Meat increases absorption of non-haem iron in single-meal studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate, over a 5 d period, the potential increasing effect of consumption of pork meat in a whole diet on the fractional absorption of non-haem iron and the total absorption of iron, when compared to a vegetarian diet. A randomised cross-over design with 3 x 5 d whole-diet periods with diets containing Danish-produced meat, Polish-produced meat or a vegetarian diet was conducted. Nineteen healthy female subjects completed the study. All main meals in the meat diets contained 60 g of pork meat and all diets had high phytic acid content (1250 mumol/d). All main meals were extrinsically labelled with the radioactive isotope (59)Fe and absorption of iron was measured in a whole body counter. The non-haem iron absorption from the Danish meat diet was significantly higher compared to the vegetarian diet (P=0.031). The mean fractional absorption of non-haem iron was 7.9 (se1.1), 6.8 (se 1.0) and 5.3 (se 0.6) % for the Danish and Polish meat diets and vegetarian diet, respectively. Total absorption of iron was higher for both meat diets compared to the vegetarian diet (Danish meat diet: P=0.006, Polish meat diet: P=0.003). The absorption ratios of the present study were well in accordance with absorption ratios estimated using algorithms on iron bioavailability. Neither the meat diets nor the vegetarian diets fulfilled the estimated daily requirements of absorbed iron in spite of a meat intake of 180 g/d in the meat diets.

  6. High blood pressure and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  7. Iron overload potentiates diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and reduces liver PPAR-α expression in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Larissa de Freitas; Silva, Maísa; Oliveira, Riva de Paula; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2012-06-01

    Iron stores and lipids are related to the development of cardiovascular disease. Given that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) regulates important physiological processes that impact lipid and glucose homeostasis, we decided to investigate the effects of iron overload on serum lipids and the liver expression of PPAR-α, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase. Hamsters were divided into four groups. The standard group (S) was fed the AIN-93M diet, the SI group was fed the diet and iron injections, the hypercholesterolemic group (H) was fed a standard diet containing cholesterol, and the HI group was fed a high-cholesterol diet and iron injections. Serum cholesterol in the HI group was higher than in the H group. Gene expression analysis of PPAR-α showed that the HI group had a lower PPAR-α expression than H. These data show that iron, when associated with a high-fat diet, can cause increased serum cholesterol levels, possibly due to a reduction in PPAR-α expression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Diet and iron status of nonpregnant women in rural Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrand, Jeffrey R; Allen, Lindsay H; Black, Anne K; de Mata, Margarita; Pelto, Gretel H

    2002-07-01

    Few studies have examined the relation of iron status to diet in populations from developing countries with high levels of iron deficiency and diets of poor quality. The objective was to identify nutrients, dietary constituents, and foods that are associated with better iron status in a rural Mexican population. A prospective cohort study was conducted in rural central Mexico. The subjects were 125 nonpregnant women aged 16-44 y. During the 12 mo before blood collection, food intakes were assessed repeatedly by a combination of dietary recalls, food weighing, and food diaries [mean (+/-SD) days of food intake data: 18.8 +/- 5.9 d]. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and plasma ferritin were measured at the end of the study. Higher plasma ferritin concentrations were associated with greater intakes of nonheme iron and ascorbic acid after control for age, BMI, breast-feeding, season, and the time since the birth of the last child. Higher ascorbic acid intakes, but not higher intakes of heme and nonheme iron, predicted a lower risk of low hemoglobin and hematocrit values after control for the background variables. Consumption of the alcoholic beverage pulque predicted a lower risk of low ferritin and low hemoglobin values. Seasonal variation in ferritin, hemoglobin, and hematocrit values was observed. Better iron status was associated with greater intakes of foods containing nonheme iron and ascorbic acid. PULQUE:a beverage containing iron, ascorbic acid, and alcohol-may influence the iron status of women in rural central Mexico.

  9. Effects of high but nontoxic dietary manganese and iron on their metabolism by calves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Gentry, R.P.; Neathery, M.W.; Blackmon, D.M.

    1984-07-01

    Sixteen male Holstein calves were fed one of four diets for 18 days in an experiment consisting of 0 and 1000 ppm supplemental manganese and 0 and 1000 ppm added iron as manganese carbonate and ferrous carbonate. The control diet contained 55 ppm manganese and 220 ppm iron. All calves were dosed orally 48 h prior to sacrifice with 500 ..mu..Ci of manganese-54. Small intestinal iron was less in calves fed a high manganese diet, a possible interaction of these two elements at the absorption site. Feeding a high manganese diet tended to decrease iron (total) concentrations in liver and pancreas. When the high manganese diet was supplemented with additional iron, antagonistic effects of manganese on iron were eliminated. Neither iron nor manganese concentrations in tissues were affected by an increase of dietary iron. Manganese-54 content of tissue was reduced by the high manganese diet but was not affected by dietary iron. Total manganese and iron in feces fairly closely reflected dietary intake of each element with no evidence of interaction. Calves fed the high iron diet excreted less manganese-54 in their feces over 2 days. Total iron in blood serum was not affected significantly by the dietary treatments. 22 references, 2 figures, 7 tables.

  10. Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and other trace minerals from vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Janet R

    2003-09-01

    Iron and zinc are currently the trace minerals of greatest concern when considering the nutritional value of vegetarian diets. With elimination of meat and increased intake of phytate-containing legumes and whole grains, the absorption of both iron and zinc is lower with vegetarian than with nonvegetarian, diets. The health consequences of lower iron and zinc bioavailability are not clear, especially in industrialized countries with abundant, varied food supplies, where nutrition and health research has generally supported recommendations to reduce meat and increase legume and whole-grain consumption. Although it is clear that vegetarians have lower iron stores, adverse health effects from lower iron and zinc absorption have not been demonstrated with varied vegetarian diets in developed countries, and moderately lower iron stores have even been hypothesized to reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Premenopausal women cannot easily achieve recommended iron intakes, as modified for vegetarians, with foods alone; however, the benefit of routine iron supplementation has not been demonstrated. It may be prudent to monitor the hemoglobin of vegetarian children and women of childbearing age. Improved assessment methods are required to determine whether vegetarians are at risk of zinc deficiency. In contrast with iron and zinc, elements such as copper appear to be adequately provided by vegetarian diets. Although the iron and zinc deficiencies commonly associated with plant-based diets in impoverished nations are not associated with vegetarian diets in wealthier countries, these nutrients warrant attention as nutritional assessment methods become more sensitive and plant-based diets receive greater emphasis.

  11. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Hye-Ja; Jang, Han Byul; Park, Ju Yeon; Kang, Jae-Heon; Park, Kyung-Hee; Song, Jihyun

    2011-11-16

    We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717). Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324) and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577) than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004) and iron (P = 0.0012) from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P maternal education and the prevalence of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.85). As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources.

  12. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Hyeon-Jeong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. Methods The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717. Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Results Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324 and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577 than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004 and iron (P = 0.0012 from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P Conclusions As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources.

  13. The effect of vegetarian diets on iron status in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lisa M; Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg; Ekmekcioglu, Cem

    2016-11-23

    Vegetarian diets exclude meat, seafood, and products containing these foods. Although the vegetarian lifestyle could lead to a better health status in adults, it may also bear risks for certain nutritional deficiencies. Cross-sectional studies and narrative reviews have shown that the iron status of vegetarians is compromised by the absence of highly bioavailable haem-iron in meatless diets and the inhibiting effect of certain components present in plant foods on non-haem iron bioavailability. The databases Pubmed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane CentralRegister of Controlled Trials were searched for studies comparing serum ferritin, as the major laboratory parameter for iron status of adult vegetarians with non-vegetarian control groups. A qualitative review was conducted as well as an inverse-variance random-effects meta-analysis to pool available data. In addition the effect of vegetarian diets according to gender was investigated with a subgroup analysis. The results were validated using a sensitivity analysis. A total of 27 cross-sectional studies and three interventional studies were selected for the systematic review. The meta-analysis which combined data of 24 cross-sectional studies showed that adult vegetarians have significantly lower serum ferritin levels than their non-vegetarian controls (-29.71 µg/L, 95% CI [-39.69, -19.73], p vegetarian diets did not change the results considerably (-23.27 µg/L, 95% CI [-29.77, -16.76], p vegetarians are more likely to have lower iron stores compared with non-vegetarians. However, since high iron stores are also a risk factor for certain non-communicable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, it is recommended that not only vegetarians but also non-vegetarians should regularly control their iron status and improve their diet regarding the content and bioavailability of iron by consuming more plants and less meat.

  14. Data on the effects of low iron diet on serum lipid profile in HCV transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we presented new original data on the effects of iron depletion on the circulating lipid profile in B6HCV mice, a murine model of HCV-related dyslipidemia. Male adult B6HCV mice were subjected to non-invasive iron depletion by low iron diet. Serum iron concentration was assessed for evaluating the effects of the dietary iron depletion. Concentrations of circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, Low Density Lipoproteins (LDLs, High Density Lipoproteins (HDLs were analyzed and reported by using stacked line charts. The present data indicated that low serum iron concentration is associated to i lower serum triglycerides concentrations and ii increased circulating LDLs. The presented original data have not been published elsewhere.

  15. The Loss of Myocardial Benefit following Ischemic Preconditioning Is Associated with Dysregulation of Iron Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Diabetes.

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    Vladimir Vinokur

    Full Text Available Whether the diabetic heart benefits from ischemic preconditioning (IPC, similar to the non-diabetic heart, is a subject of controversy. We recently proposed new roles for iron and ferritin in IPC-protection in Type 1-like streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat heart. Here, we investigated iron homeostasis in Cohen diabetic sensitive rat (CDs that develop hyperglycemia when fed on a high-sucrose/low-copper diet (HSD, but maintain normoglycemia on regular-diet (RD. Control Cohen-resistant rats (CDr maintain normoglycemia on either diet. The IPC procedure improved the post-ischemic recovery of normoglycemic hearts (CDr-RD, CDr-HSD and CDs-RD. CDs-HSD hearts failed to show IPC-associated protection. The recovery of these CDs-HSD hearts following I/R (without prior IPC was better than their RD controls. During IPC ferritin levels increased in normoglycemic hearts, and its level was maintained nearly constant during the subsequent prolonged ischemia, but decayed to its baseline level during the reperfusion phase. In CDs-HSD hearts the baseline levels of ferritin and ferritin-saturation with iron were notably higher than in the controls, and remained unchanged during the entire experiment. This unique and abnormal pattern of post-ischemic recovery of CDs-HSD hearts is associated with marked changes in myocardial iron homeostasis, and suggests that iron and iron-proteins play a causative role/s in the etiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Microbial Biosignatures in High Iron Thermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteau, M. N.; Embaye, T.; Jahnke, L. L.; Cady, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    The emerging anoxic source waters at Chocolate Pots hot springs in Yellowstone National Park contain 2.6 to 11.2 mg/L Fe(II) and are 51-54° C and pH 5.5-6.0. These waters flow down the accumulating iron deposits and over three major phototrophic mat communities: Synechococcus/Chloroflexus at 51-54° C, Pseudanabaena at 51-54° C, and a narrow Oscillatoria at 36-45° C. We are assessing the contribution of the phototrophs to biosignature formation in this high iron system. These biosignatures can be used to assess the biological contribution to ancient iron deposits on Earth (e.g. Precambrian Banded Iron Formations) and, potentially, to those found on Mars. Most studies to date have focused on chemotrophic iron-oxidizing communities; however, recent research has demonstrated that phototrophs have a significant physiological impact on these iron thermal springs (Pierson et al. 1999, Pierson and Parenteau 2000, and Trouwborst et al., 2003). We completed a survey of the microfossils, biominerals, biofabrics, and lipid biomarkers in the phototrophic mats and stromatolitic iron deposits using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat was heavily encrusted with iron silicates while the narrow Oscillatoria mat was encrusted primarily with iron oxides. Encrustation of the cells increased with depth in the mats. Amorphous 2-line ferrihydrite is the primary precipitate in the spring and the only iron oxide mineral associated with the mats. Goethite, hematite, and siderite were detected in dry sediment samples on the face of the main iron deposit. Analysis of polar lipid fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) generated a suite of lipid biomarkers. The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat contained two mono-unsaturated isomers of n-C18:1 with smaller amounts of polyunsaturated n-C18:2, characteristic of cyanobacteria

  17. Combined high-fat diet and sustained high sucrose consumption promotes NAFLD in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Tovar, Armando R; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Noriega, Lilia G; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernandez, María del Carmen; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Uribe, Misael; Torres, Nimbe

    2015-01-01

    The study of NAFLD in humans has several limitations. Using murine models helps to understand disease pathogenesis. Evaluate the impact of 4 different diets in the production of NAFLD with emphasis on a combined high-fat plus sustained high sucrose consumption. Eight week-old male Wistar rats were divided in four groups and fed for 90 days with the following diets: 1) Control chow diet (C); 2) High-fat cholesterol diet (HFC) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 3) High-fat cornstarch diet (HFCO) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 4) Chow diet + 20% sucrose in drinking water (HSD). Metabolic changes, leptin levels, liver histology, hepatic and plasma lipid composition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and liver gene expression of FAS, SREBP-1 and PPAR-α were evaluated. The HFC diet had the highest grade of steatosis (grade 2 of 3) and HSD showed also steatosis (grade 1). Liver weight TG and colesterol concentrations in liver were greater in the HFC diet. There were no increased levels of iron in the liver. Rats in HFC gained significantly more weight (P < 0.001). All experimental groups showed fasting hyperglycemia. HFC had the highest glucose level (158.5 ± 7 mg/dL) (P < 0.005). The HSD and the HFCO diets developed also hyperglycemia. HSD had significantly higher fasting hyperinsulinemia. Serum leptin was higher in the HFC diet (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the HFC diet with combination of high fat and high sucrose is more effective in producing NAFLD compared with a high sucrose diet only.

  18. The effect of supplementing sow and piglet diets with different forms of iron

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    Aliny Kétilim Novais

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chelated iron supplementation on gestating and lactating sows and on their suckling and weaned piglets. Reproductive traits, piglet performance, hematological parameters, and the iron concentrations in colostrum, milk, and stillborn livers were measured. Ninety-six sows were subjected to one of three treatment groups. Group T1 comprised pregnant and lactating sows treated with diets supplemented with inorganic iron (551 mg Fe/kg and suckling piglets administered 200 mg of injectable iron dextran. Group T2 was the same as T1, except that sows after 84 days of gestation, lactating sows, and suckling piglets were fed a diet supplemented with 150 mg Fe/kg of chelated iron, and suckling piglets were administered injectable iron dextran. Group T3 was the same as T2 but without injectable iron dextran for suckling piglets. During the nursery phase, all of the weaned piglets were penned with their original groups or treatments and received isonutritive and isocaloric feeds. Piglets from the T2 and T3 groups also received an additional 150 mg Fe/kg of chelated iron via their feed. There were no differences among the treatments for reproductive traits or the iron concentrations in the colostrum, milk, or liver. The piglets that did not receive the injectable iron dextran showed the poorest performance during the pre-and post-weaning phases and showed the poorest hematological parameters of the suckling piglets. The chelated iron supplementation is insufficient to meet piglet demand. The iron dextran supply is necessary for suckling and weaned piglets.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the best sources of iron. Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you ...

  20. Dietary strategies to improve the iron and zinc nutriture of young women following a vegetarian diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R S; Donovan, U M; Heath, A L

    1997-01-01

    Dietary strategies to enhance the content and bioavailability of iron and zinc in vegetarian diets were compiled. Strategies included increasing promoters and decreasing antagonists of iron and zinc absorption, adopting food preparation and processing methods which hydrolyze the phytate content of cereals and legumes, and using iron cookware. These strategies were used to devise two vegetarian menus based on food consumption patterns derived from three day weighed food records of 78 Canadian lacto-ovo-vegetarian adolescents. The iron and zinc, as well as calcium, phosphorus, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A, protein and energy content of the devised menus were all higher than the actual intakes and the corresponding Canadian recommended nutrient intakes. Results show the overall nutrient adequacy of the recommended vegetarian menus and indicate that young lacto-vegetarian women can potentially meet their estimated dietary requirements for absorbed iron and zinc through modest modifications to the diet. Laboratory studies designed to measure the total amount of iron and zinc absorbed from these diets by young vegetarian women are needed to verify the efficacy of the devised menus.

  1. High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan-Merchan, W.; Saveliev, A. V.; Taylor, A. M.

    2008-03-01

    Single-step flame synthesis of iron oxide nanorods is performed using iron probes inserted into an opposed-flow methane oxy-flame. The high temperature reacting environment of the flame tends to convert elemental iron into a high density layer of iron oxide nanorods. The diameters of the iron oxide nanorods vary from 10 to 100 nm with a typical length of a few microns. The structural characterization performed shows that nanorods possess a highly ordered crystalline structure with parameters corresponding to cubic magnetite (Fe3O4) with the [100] direction oriented along the nanorod axis. Structural variations of straight nanorods such as bends, and T-branched and Y-branched shapes are frequently observed within the nanomaterials formed, opening pathways for synthesis of multidimensional, interconnected networks.

  2. Effect of nutrition education and diet modification in iron depleted preschool children in nurseries in Tehran: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevisan, Farnaz; Kimiagar, Masood; Kalantaree, Nasser; Valaee, Nasser; Shaheedee, Nooshin

    2004-07-01

    In view of the high prevalence of iron deficiency in preschool children and its consequences, this study was carried out to examine the effect of nutrition education and dietary modification on 438 two- to six-year-old nursery school children in Tehran in 1999. Sixty-two children who were judged anemic, iron-depleted, or having low iron stores were randomly allocated to "control," "dietary modification" (consuming one additional citrus fruit after lunch), and "nutrition education" (teaching the mothers proper eating patterns based on the food pyramid) groups. Food habits were surveyed, including 24-hour dietary recall and food frequency, as well as timing of consumption of special items; this survey was carried out for each child before and after intervention. After three months, blood samples were taken from the subjects. The prevalence of anemia, iron depletion, and low iron stores was 11.4, 62.8, and 15.1% respectively, with no significant differences observed in hemoglobin and percent transferrin saturation (%TS) between the groups. Mean+/-SD serum ferritin concentrations in "control," "diet modification," and "nutrition education" groups were 8.9+/-3.1, 9.5+/-3.7, and 6.9+/-2.3 microg/dL. The same figures at the end of intervention were 6.9+/-3.5, 11.2+/-5, and 10.7+/-5.9 microg/dL, respectively. Analysis of variance showed ferritin concentrations to be significantly different, in that there was a reduction in the control and elevation in the nutrition education groups. There was no significant difference in %TS before and after the intervention. During three months of intervention, changes in frequency of fruit and fruit juice intake after the meals in nutrition education and diet modification groups were significantly correlated to serum ferritin alteration. Frequency of fruit juice intake (rich in vitamin C) after meals (at least five times a week) can significantly increase serum ferritin within three months. Therefore, educating mothers of iron

  3. Combined therapy of iron chelator and antioxidant completely restores brain dysfunction induced by iron toxicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-01-01

    .... We investigated the effects of iron overload induced by high iron-diet consumption on brain mitochondrial function, brain synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Iron chelator (deferiprone) and antioxidant (n-acetyl cysteine...

  4. Effects of Radiation and a High Iron Load on Bone Mineral Density

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    Yuen, E.; Morgan, J. L. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Gonzales, E.; Camp, K.; Smith, S. M.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts on long duration space flight missions to the moon or mars are exposed to radiation and have increase iron (Fe) stores, both of which can independently induce oxidative stress and may exacerbate bone mass loss and strength. We hypothesize a high Fe diet and a fractionated gamma radiation exposure would increase oxidative stress and lower bone mass. Three mo-old, SD rats (n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate Fe diet (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or a high Fe diet (650 mg Fe/kg diet) for 4 wks and either a cumulative 3 Gy dose (fractionated 8 x 0.375 Gy) of gamma radiation (Cs-137) or sham exposure starting on day 14. Elisa kit assessed serum catalase, clinical analyzer assessed serum Fe status and ex vivo pQCT scans measured bone parameters in the proximal/midshaft tibia and femoral neck. Mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending and femoral neck test. There is a significant decrease in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) from radiation (p less than 0.05) and a trend in diet (p=0.05) at the proximal tibia. There is a significant interaction in cortical BMD from the combined treatments at the midshaft tibia (p less than 0.05). There is a trending decrease in total BMD from diet (p=0.07) at the femoral neck. In addition, high serum Fe was correlated to low trabecular BMD (p less than 0.05) and high serum catalase was correlated to low BMD at all 3 bone sites (p less than 0.05). There was no difference in the max load of the tibia or femoral neck. Radiation and a high iron diet increases iron status and catalase in the serum and decreases BMD.

  5. A study on the prevalence of adequacy of Iron and Vitamin C in children's diets

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    Roseane Moreira Sampaio Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to apply methodological procedures to determine the prevalence of adequacy of Iron and vitamin C in children's diets. It was included 238 children aged 2 to 3 years enrolled in 2009 in 25 day care centers in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. Dietary intake was assessed by weighing the food and food record. Assessing the prevalence of nutrient adequacy took into consideration the individual and the group. The best estimate of the needs of the individual is given by the estimated average requirement (EAR, since we do not know the true needs of the individual who is being evaluated. To estimate the need of the group method was used EAR as the cutoff. The prevalence of adequacy of iron and vitamin C in children's diets was 91.2 and 62.2%, respectively. All necessary to achieve the method EAR as the cutoff were used, but became unviable the adjustment of the observed consumption data to estimate the distribution of usual intake in this group. We conclude that the study of probability of adequacy of habitual diet in iron and vitamin C in the age group in question was only possible with the use of procedures for the individual.

  6. High-Protein Diets and Renal Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Peter; Osther, Palle; Pedersen, Agnes N.

    2015-01-01

    High-protein diets (i.e., protein content of more than 25% of energy or more than 2 g/kg body weight per day) based on meat and dairy products are repeatedly promoted for weight reduction and better health, but the evidence supporting these notions is quite dubious. As described in the present re...

  7. The Combined Effects of Iron Excess in the Diet and Chromium(III) Supplementation on the Iron and Chromium Status in Female Rats.

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    Staniek, Halina; Wójciak, Rafał W

    2017-11-21

    Inadequate iron supply has significant consequences to health. There are some relations between the metabolism of different trace elements, such as iron, zinc, copper and chromium. However, the direction of these interactions can be antagonistic or synergistic, and it depends on many factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the combined effects of supplementary of chromium(III) propionate complex (Cr3) with iron excess on the Cr and Fe status in healthy female rats. The 36 healthy female Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups (six animals in each) with different Fe levels-adequate (45 mg kg(-1)-100% RDA) and high (excessive-180 mg kg(-1)-400% RDA). At the same time, they were supplemented with Cr(III) at doses of 1, 50 and 500 mg kg(-1) of diet: C1-control (Fe 45 mg kg(-1), Cr 1 mg kg(-1)); C50 (Fe 45 mg kg(-1), Cr 50 mg kg(-1)); C500 (Fe 45 mg kg(-1), Cr 500 mg kg(-1)); H1 (Fe 180 mg kg(-1), Cr 1 mg kg(-1)); H50 (Fe 180 mg kg(-1), Cr 50 mg kg(-1)); H500 (Fe 180 mg kg(-1), Cr 500 mg kg(-1)). The serum iron level and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were measured with colorimetric methods. The serum ferritin level was measured by means of electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The serum transferrin level was measured with the ELISA method. Haematological measurements were made with an automated blood analyser. The Cr and Fe tissular levels were measured with the AAS method. The exposure to a high level of Fe(III) alone or in combination with Cr caused Fe accumulation in tissues, especially in the liver and kidneys, but there were no significant changes in the TIBC, transferrin, ferritin concentration in the serum and most haematological parameters. Moreover, the serum, hepatic and renal Cr concentrations decreased. The doses of supplementary Cr(III) given separately or in combination with high level of Fe(III) disturbed the Cr content in the liver and kidneys of healthy female rats. However, they did not change most

  8. Influence of diet, menstruation and genetic factors on iron status: a cross-sectional study in Spanish women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; López-Parra, Ana M; Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2014-03-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the combined influence of diet, menstruation and genetic factors on iron status in Spanish menstruating women (n = 142). Dietary intake was assessed by a 72-h detailed dietary report and menstrual blood loss by a questionnaire, to determine a Menstrual Blood Loss Coefficient (MBLC). Five selected SNPs were genotyped: rs3811647, rs1799852 (Tf gene); rs1375515 (CACNA2D3 gene); and rs1800562 and rs1799945 (HFE gene, mutations C282Y and H63D, respectively). Iron biomarkers were determined and cluster analysis was performed. Differences among clusters in dietary intake, menstrual blood loss parameters and genotype frequencies distribution were studied. A categorical regression was performed to identify factors associated with cluster belonging. Three clusters were identified: women with poor iron status close to developing iron deficiency anemia (Cluster 1, n = 26); women with mild iron deficiency (Cluster 2, n = 59) and women with normal iron status (Cluster 3, n = 57). Three independent factors, red meat consumption, MBLC and mutation C282Y, were included in the model that better explained cluster belonging (R2 = 0.142, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the combination of high red meat consumption, low menstrual blood loss and the HFE C282Y mutation may protect from iron deficiency in women of childbearing age. These findings could be useful to implement adequate strategies to prevent iron deficiency anemia.

  9. Iron and zinc status in rats with diet-induced marginal deficiency of vitamin A and/or copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houwelingen, F; Van den Berg, G J; Lemmens, A G; Sijtsma, K W; Beynen, A C

    1993-07-01

    The hypothesis was tested that there are interactions of marginal copper and vitamin A deficiency regarding iron and zinc status. Copper restriction (1 vs 5 mg Cu/kg diet) significantly lowered copper concentrations in plasma and tissues of rats and reduced blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, and iron concentrations in tibia and femur, but raised iron concentrations in liver. Vitamin A restriction (0 vs 4000 IU vitamin A/kg diet) reduced plasma retinol concentrations and induced a fall of blood hemoglobin and hematocrit. Neither copper nor vitamin A restriction for up to 42 d affected feed intake and body wt gain. There were no interrelated effects of vitamin A and copper deficiency on iron status. Copper deficiency slightly depressed liver, spleen, and kidney zinc concentrations. Vitamin A deficiency lowered zinc concentrations in heart, but only when the diets were deficient in copper.

  10. Mineral Intake in Urban Pregnant Women from Base Diet, Fortified Foods, and Food Supplements: Focus on Calcium, Iron, and Zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hai Xian; Han, Jun Hua; Li, Hu Zhong; Liang, Dong; Deng, Tao Tao; Chang, Su Ying

    2016-12-01

    In the Chinese national nutrition surveys, fortified foods were not investigated separately from the base diet, and the contribution of fortified foods to micronutrients intake is not very clear. This study investigated the diet, including fortified foods and food supplements, of urban pregnant women and analyzed the intake of calcium, iron, and zinc to assess the corresponding contributions of fortified foods, food supplements, and the base diet. The results demonstrated that the base diet was the major source of calcium, iron, and zinc, and was recommended to be the first choice for micronutrients intake. Furthermore, consumption of fortified foods and food supplements offered effective approaches to improve the dietary intake of calcium, iron, and zinc in Chinese urban pregnant women. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  11. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the material, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered.

    Durante los últimos años se ha prestado mucha atención a la familia de intermetálicos Fe-Al, puesto que estos constituyen un considerable potencial como materiales de ingeniería en aplicaciones a temperaturas intermedias o altas, sobre todo en casos donde se necesita alta resistencia a la oxidación o corrosión. A pesar del considerable esfuerzo desarrollado para obtener aleaciones con mejores propiedades, su resistencia mecánica a alta temperatura no es muy elevada. Se discutirán los aspectos que contribuyen a la baja resistencia mecánica a temperatura elevada en función de la estructura de dislocaciones y los mecanismos de anclaje que operan en este intermetálico. Se considerarán, también, maneras alternativas para mejorar la resistencia a temperatura elevada mediante la modificación de la microestructura y la incorporación de partículas de segunda fase.

  12. Helicobacter pylori adaptation in vivo in response to a high-salt diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, John T; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Algood, Holly M Scott; Gaudieri, Silvana; Mallal, Simon; Cover, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17% restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories than in mice (~22%. We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS. The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378 in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression.

  14. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung-Mei; Lin, Yow-Sien; Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Pei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Chueh-Lien; Tsao, Ya-Tzu; Chang, Wen; Hsieh, I-Shan; Chern, Yijuang; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT) gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT) exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17%) restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories) than in mice (~22%). We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein) for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein) for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS). The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378) in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression.

  15. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less {sup 59}Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal.

  16. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  17. Some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Terashima, H.; Sato, E.; Naito, M. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    It is important to develop the production and utilization technology of highly reactive coke in order to improve the efficiency of blast furnace reactions. In this study, some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke produced in a coke oven chamber were investigated. First, the effects of catalytic Fe powder addition to coal before carbonization on coke strength were investigated. The addition of Fe powder decreased the coal caking property and hence the resultant coke drum index. On the other hand it increased coke reactivity (JIS coke reactivity index and CRI) to a great extent. This means that the caking property of blended coals needs to be adjusted higher to produce iron coke with required strength and high reactivity. Secondly, it was shown that the iron ore reacts with silica brick at 1200{sup o}C in a condition similar to that in a coke oven chamber. The iron ore and silica reacted to produce fayalite and the brick was damaged. On the other hand, it was proven that the iron ore does not react with silica brick at 1100{sup o}C in the above condition. Based on this fundamental study, iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity was successfully produced in a coke oven chamber on a commercial scale by adjusting the coal blend composition and the coke oven temperature. Furthermore it was revealed that about 70 % of iron in iron ore powder added to coal was reduced to metallic iron during carbonization.

  18. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B 12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  19. High doses of vitamin A impair iron absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel FR

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fabíola Rainato Gabriel, Vivian MM Suen, Julio Sergio Marchini, José Eduardo Dutra de OliveiraDivision of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, BrazilObjective: The present study aimed to determine the influence of vitamin A on iron absorption when vitamin A and iron are administered together orally compared with the administration of iron alone.Methods: This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial conducted on healthy men with normal red blood cell indices. Five experiments were performed, with iron (10 mg; iron (10 mg plus vitamin A (450, 900 and 1800 µg, and placebo. After an 8-hour fast, basal (T0 blood samples were collected: basal (T0, 2 hours (T1, and 4 hours (T2 after the ingestion of the compounds to be studied. Iron was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Serum ferritin was determined by an immunometric method, ie, by chemoluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Plasma retinol was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Serum curves and the sum of the area under the curve adjusted to the mixed effects linear model were determined (P < 0.05.Results: Vitamin A at the doses of 450 and 900 µg had a stimulating effect, which, however, did not differ significantly from that of experiment 1 in which iron was used alone. At the dose of 1800 µg, vitamin A had a negative effect on iron absorption.Conclusion: High doses of vitamin A may cause lower serum iron levels, whereas a low dose favors iron absorption.Keywords: iron absorption, serum iron, vitamin A, oral iron, oral supplement

  20. Comprehensive Utilization of Iron and Phosphorus from High-Phosphorus Refractory Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongsheng; Zhang, Qi; Han, Yuexin; Gao, Peng; Li, Guofeng

    2018-02-01

    An innovative process of coal-based reduction followed by magnetic separation and dephosphorization was developed to simultaneously recover iron and phosphorus from one typical high-phosphorus refractory iron ore. The experimental results showed that the iron minerals in iron ore were reduced to metallic iron during the coal-based reduction and the phosphorus was enriched in the metallic iron phase. The CaO-SiO2-FeO-Al2O3 slag system was used in the dephosphorization of metallic iron. A hot metal of 99.17% Fe and 0.10% P was produced with Fe recovery of 84.41%. Meanwhile, a dephosphorization slag of 5.72% P was obtained with P recovery of 67.23%. The contents of impurities in hot metal were very low, and it could be used as feedstock for steelmaking after a secondary refining. Phosphorus in the dephosphorization slag mainly existed in the form of a 5CaO·P2O5·SiO2 solid solution where the P2O5 content is 13.10%. At a slag particle size of 20.7 μm (90% passing), 94.54% of the P2O5 could be solubilized in citric acid, indicating the slag met the feedstock requirements in phosphate fertilizer production. Consequently, the proposed process achieved simultaneous Fe and P recovery, paving the way to comprehensive utilization of high-phosphorus refractory iron ore.

  1. Comprehensive Utilization of Iron and Phosphorus from High-Phosphorus Refractory Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongsheng; Zhang, Qi; Han, Yuexin; Gao, Peng; Li, Guofeng

    2017-11-01

    An innovative process of coal-based reduction followed by magnetic separation and dephosphorization was developed to simultaneously recover iron and phosphorus from one typical high-phosphorus refractory iron ore. The experimental results showed that the iron minerals in iron ore were reduced to metallic iron during the coal-based reduction and the phosphorus was enriched in the metallic iron phase. The CaO-SiO2-FeO-Al2O3 slag system was used in the dephosphorization of metallic iron. A hot metal of 99.17% Fe and 0.10% P was produced with Fe recovery of 84.41%. Meanwhile, a dephosphorization slag of 5.72% P was obtained with P recovery of 67.23%. The contents of impurities in hot metal were very low, and it could be used as feedstock for steelmaking after a secondary refining. Phosphorus in the dephosphorization slag mainly existed in the form of a 5CaO·P2O5·SiO2 solid solution where the P2O5 content is 13.10%. At a slag particle size of 20.7 μm (90% passing), 94.54% of the P2O5 could be solubilized in citric acid, indicating the slag met the feedstock requirements in phosphate fertilizer production. Consequently, the proposed process achieved simultaneous Fe and P recovery, paving the way to comprehensive utilization of high-phosphorus refractory iron ore.

  2. Refractory iron-deficiency anemia and gluten intolerance - Response to gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Luis Rodrigo; Álvarez, Dolores Fuentes; Martínez, Isabel Pérez; Mieres, Noemí Alvarez; García, Pilar Niño; García, Ruth de Francisco; Menéndez, Sabino Riestra; Alegre, Santiago Vivas; Goñi, José Luis Olcoz

    2011-07-01

    refractory iron-deficiency anemia has a multifactorial origin related to various gastrointestinal conditions, with celiac disease plus malabsorption and IBD together with isolated gluten intolerance being most common. to determine the prevalence of serum, genetic, and histological markers for gluten intolerance, and to analyze the response to gluten withdrawal from the diet in these patients. a number of patients with refractory anemia were prospectively and consecutively enrolled. A protocol to measure serum (TGt-2), genetic (HLA-DQ2/DQ8), and histological markers for celiac disease was applied. All followed a gluten-free diet for a median 3.6 years. Sustained remission of anemia during follow-up was interpreted as positive response. ninety-eight patients (84% females) with a mean age of 54 years were studied. Anti-TGt2 antibodies were positive in 5% of cases. A total of 67 cases (68%) were haplotype HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 (+). We found villous atrophy (Marsh III) in 13% of patients, and an inflammatory pattern (Marsh I or II) in 13%. All remaining 72 patients (74%) had no histological duodenal changes.Age, anemia duration, number of transfusions, number of parenteral iron doses, and time on a gluten-free diet were all compared according to the presence or absence of villous atrophy and HLA-DQ2/8 positivity, and no significant differences were found for any of the analyzed variables. Response was positive in 92% of subjects. celiac disease with villous atrophy is rarely a cause of refractory anemia. Gluten intolerance with no histological lesions is seen in almost 75% of patients, and therefore plays a relevant role in its development.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  6. Trend overtime of total haemoglobin, iron metabolism and trace minerals in veal calves fed high amounts of two different solid feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Stefani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty Polish Friesian veal calves were administrated high amounts of two different solid feeds (maize grain and a mix diet containing 10% of straw and 8% of soy in addition to the traditional milk replacer diet. Compared to the mix diet, maize grain had a lower content of iron, copper and zinc and a minor fibre level. Effects of the two diets on calves’ blood haemoglobin, iron, iron metabolism parameters, copper and zinc concentrations were studied. Haemoglobin concentration resulted higher at the end of the fattening for calves fed the mix diet, as expected. Values remained, however, within ranges that allowed acceptable carcass paleness. Haematic iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC and total iron binding capacity (TIBC levels were not significantly different between the two solid feeds. Lower copper and zinc blood concentrations resulted for calves fed the mix diet were likely due to the feed fibre interfering with the bioavailability of the two minerals, according to what happens for iron.

  7. [Treatment of iron deficiency in predialysis state by low molecular weight iron dextran high doses intravenously].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fievet, Patrick; Coppin, Mathilde; Brazier, François; Lefèvre, Magali; Stephan, Robin; Demontis, Renato

    2012-02-01

    Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in predialysis stage. Iron deficiency is more common than in normal patients and plays a key role in the genesis of anemia. Its correction avoids the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA) or reduces their dosage. Treatment with oral iron is often poorly tolerated and ineffective, necessitating the use of intravenous iron. New forms of injectable iron allow the use of high doses and correct iron deficiency in a single administration with consequent preservation of venous capital and lower costs. We studied the effectiveness of iron dextran of low molecular weight (LMWID) in high doses to correct iron deficiency and treat anemia in predialysis CKD patients. Twenty-nine doses of 500 to 1600 mg were administered to 25 patients followed for CKD (GFR between 60 and 10 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), selected on biological criteria of iron deficiency defined by a ratio of transferrin saturation (TSAT) iron overload. Their serum ferritin was higher than the rest of the population before treatment, while the TSAT was no different, reflecting a functional deficiency. Their hemoglobin did not increase after treatment in contrast to the rest of the population suggesting the unavailability of iron for erythropoiesis with accumulation in the reticuloendothelial system. Renal function did not change significantly and there were no cases of acute renal failure. No immediate side effect was observed. Three patients presented delayed reactions to such self-limiting myalgia and arthralgia. No venous inflammatory reaction was noted. The administration of high doses of LMWID is effective in treating anemia of CKD in the predialysis stage with a satisfactory tolerance, without affecting kidney function and helps preserve the venous capital. It should be reserved for patients whose serum ferritin is less than or equal to 150 μg/L. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights

  8. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  9. CAST-IRONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Krutilin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of physical-mechanical characteristics of cast iron slugs, received by semicontinuos way of casting, at temperatures from 850 up to 1100^ С are given. 

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high in iron. Kids or teens on a vegetarian diet also might not get enough iron, because ... Vegetarianism Word! Anemia Vitamins About Anemia What's a Vegetarian? Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Becoming a Vegetarian ...

  11. Microstructure Control of High-alloyed White Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalec M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of studies of high-alloyed white cast iron modified with lanthanum, titanium, and aluminium-strontium. The samples were taken from four melts of high-vanadium cast iron with constant carbon and vanadium content and near-eutectic microstructure into which the tested inoculants were introduced in an amount of 1 wt% respective of the charge weight. The study included a metallographic examinations, mechanical testing, as well as hardness and impact resistance measurements taken on the obtained alloys. Studies have shown that different additives affect both the microstructure and mechanical properties of high-vanadium cast iron.

  12. High incidence of iron depletion and restless leg syndrome (RLS) in regular blood donors: intravenous iron sucrose substitution more effective than oral iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgegård, G; Schneider, K; Ulfberg, J

    2010-11-01

    Iron depletion is common in regular blood donors. The objective of the study was to investigate the frequency and severity of iron depletion in regular blood donors and whether IV iron is more effective than oral to avoid iron depletion and symptoms thereof, especially restless legs syndrome (RLS). One hundred and twenty blood donors with at least five previous whole blood donations were randomized to receive either IV iron sucrose (Venofer(®), RenaPharma/Vifor, Uppsala, Sweden), 200 mg, or to 20×100 mg of oral iron sulphate (Duroferon(®), GlaxoSmithKline, Stockholm, Sweden), after each blood donation during 1 year. Iron status and RLS incidence and severity were investigated. Iron status was generally poor among regular blood donors, especially in women, with a high incidence of iron depletion (>20%) and RLS (18%). The IV iron group increased storage iron to a greater extent than the oral iron group after 12 months (P=0·0043). Female donors were more responsive to IV iron sucrose compared to oral iron sulphate, particularly female donors below 50 years of age. RLS severity scores were significantly lower in the IV iron group. The two treatments were safe. Iron status is poor in regular blood donors, restless legs syndrome is common, and the routine iron supplementation is insufficient. IV iron sucrose substitutes iron loss in blood donors more efficiently compared with oral iron sulphate, especially in women. Iron substitution to blood donors should be individualized and based on P-ferritin monitoring. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  13. Copper Deficiency in Sheep with High Liver Iron Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Karolina Freitas de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of enzootic ataxia among sheep raised in the northeastern region of Brazil is described. Copper (Cu deficiency was diagnosed in a herd of 56 sheep, among which five presented characteristic clinical symptoms of enzootic ataxia. The symptoms began 30 days after birth, with a clinical condition that included locomotion difficulty, limb ataxia, tremors, and continual falls. Liver biopsies were performed and blood was collected to determine hepatic and plasmatic Cu, iron (Fe, and zinc (Zn concentration, respectively. The laboratory results showed that the animals presented low copper concentrations in the plasma and liver, without difference between the clinically healthy animals and those affected by enzootic ataxia. Even after supplementation with adequate Cu levels had been recommended, it was found on a new visit to the farm four months later that one animal still presented a clinical condition and that the hepatic Cu levels of the herd had not risen. Despite the low copper content of the diet, the high hepatic Fe levels found suggest that antagonism due to this element may have been an important factor in triggering copper deficiency in these animals, and thus, additional copper supplementation may be necessary for these animals.

  14. Association of Maternal Diet With Zinc, Copper, and Iron Concentrations in Transitional Human Milk Produced by Korean Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cho, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Soo; Choi, Hyeon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the transitory milk of Korean lactating mothers and to investigate the relationship between these concentrations and maternal diet. Human milk samples were collected between 5 and 15 days postpartum from 96 healthy, lactating mothers in postpartum care centers in Seoul, Korea. Dietary intake during lactation was determined based on a 3-day dietary record. The mean zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the human milk samples collected were 3.88 ± 1.74 mg/L, 0.69 ± 0.25 mg/L, and 5.85 ± 8.53 mg/L, respectively. The mothers who consumed alcoholic beverages during pregnancy had tended to have lower concentrations of zinc and copper, as well as significantly lower concentrations of iron, in their milk (p maternal diet and nutrient concentrations in transitory human milk can provide useful information, particularly in regard to infant growth.

  15. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  16. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized inside highly ordered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanosized iron oxide, a moderately large band-gap semiconductor and an essential component of optoelectrical and magnetic devices, has been prepared successfully inside the restricted internal pores of mesoporous silica material through in-situ reduction during impregnation. The samples were characterized by ...

  17. New developments in high quality grey cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Riposan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews original data obtained by the present authors, revealed in recent separate publications, describing specific procedures for high quality grey irons, and reflecting the forecast needs of the worldwide iron foundry industry. High power, medium frequency coreless induction furnaces are commonly used in electric melting grey iron foundries. This has resulted in low sulphur (1,500 °C, contributing to unfavourable conditions for graphite nucleation. Thin wall castings are increasingly produced by these electric melt shops with a risk of greater eutectic undercooling during solidification. The paper focused on two groups of grey cast irons and their specific problems: carbides and graphite morphology control in lower carbon equivalent high strength irons (CE=3.4%-3.8%, and austenite dendrite promotion in eutectic and slightly hypereutectic irons (CE=4.1%-4.5%, in order to increase their strength characteristics. There are 3 stages and 3 steps involving graphite formation, iron chemistry and iron processing that appear to be important. The concept in the present paper sustains a threestage model for nucleating flake graphite [(Mn,XS type nuclei]. There are three important groups of elements (deoxidizer, Mn/S, and inoculant and three technological stages in electric melting of iron (superheat, pre-conditioning of base iron, final inoculation. Attention is drawn to a control factor (%Mn x (%S ensuring it equals to 0.03 – 0.06, accompanied by 0.005wt.%–0.010wt.% Al and/or Zr content in inoculated irons. It was found that iron powder addition promotes austenite dendrite formation in eutectic and slightly eutectic, acting as reinforcement for the eutectic cells. But, there is an accompanying possible negative influence on the characteristics of the (Mn,XS type graphite nuclei (change the morphology of nuclei from polygonal compact to irregular polygonal, and therefore promote chill tendency in treated irons. A double addition (iron

  18. Thermal conductivity of iron at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, S.; Ohta, K.; Yagi, T.; Hirose, K.

    2016-12-01

    Earth generates and preserves a dipole magnetic field by self-sustained dynamo action in its liquid outer core for geologic timescale. Secular cooling of the core induces growth of the solid inner core that contributes additional buoyant source for the core convection. The electrical and thermal conductivities of core are fundamental physical parameters for knowing the dynamics inside the Earth. Direct measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivities of iron (Fe) at the Earth's core conditions have been recently reported (Konôpková et al., 2016; Ohta et al., 2016). Measurements of Fe thermal conductivity at the core conditions suggested thermal conductivity of the outer core was 18-32 W/m/K (Konôpková et al., 2016). On the other hand, Ohta et al. (2016) experimentally determined electrical conductivity of Fe at the core conditions, and estimated the core conductivity to be 75-117 W/m/K from obtained electrical conductivity and Wiedemann-Franz relation (κ = σLT; κ: thermal conductivity, σ: electrical conductivity, L: Lorenz number, T: absolute temperature) with ideal Lorenz number. Such large discrepancy in the estimated core thermal conductivity throw doubt on the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz relation at extremely high P-T conditions. In this study, we performed thermal conductivity measurements on Fe up to 130 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell using the pulsed light heating thermoreflectance technique (Ohta et al., 2012). The obtained thermal conductivity of Fe is in good agreement with calculated thermal conductivity via high-P/room-T Fe electrical conductivity and the Wiedemann-Franz law with constant Lorenz number up to around 50 GPa. However, the obtained thermal conductivity deviated downward from the calculated thermal conductivity profile above 50 GPa. Our results suggest pressure-dependent Lorenz number of Fe,which could be due to pressure- induced electronic topological transition in hcp Fe (Glazyrin et al., 2013). Kon

  19. Iron status in rats fed on diets containing marginal amounts of vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijtsma, K W; Van Den Berg, G J; Lemmens, A G; West, C E; Beynen, A C

    1993-11-01

    Severe vitamin A deficiency in rats is known to cause anaemia associated with growth retardation and impaired water retention. However, study of the effect of marginal vitamin A intake is of more interest because such intake may mirror the situation in humans in many developing countries. Therefore, in two experiments, the effect of marginal vitamin A deficiency on Fe status was investigated in male rats. After 28 d of feeding either low- or high-vitamin A diets (0 or 120 v. 1200 retinol equivalents/kg feed), body weight and feed intake were not influenced by the level of vitamin A in the diet. Liver weight was lowered by vitamin A deficiency. Water intake was not influenced in rats fed on a low-vitamin A diet. Plasma retinol concentrations were decreased in rats fed on diets low in vitamin A. Marginal vitamin A deficiency produced slightly lower blood haemoglobin concentrations; it did not systematically affect packed cell volume. The concentration of Fe in liver was significantly higher when diets low in vitamin A were fed, but hepatic Fe mass was not affected. Significantly lower Fe levels were observed in femurs of rats with vitamin A deficiency. The effects on liver and femur Fe concentrations were seen with diets adequate in Fe but not with diets deficient in Fe. The efficiency of apparent Fe absorption was significantly increased by low intakes of vitamin A, provided that the dietary Fe concentration was adequate. It is speculated that depressed uptake of Fe by bone marrow is the primary feature of altered Fe status in rats with marginal vitamin A deficiency.

  20. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Jessica M. V.; da Luz, Marcio H. M.; Antunes, Hanna K. M.; Giampá, Sara Q. de Campos; Martins, Vilma R.; Lee, Kil S.

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC) and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR) or with normal diet (CTL) for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA) was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological disorders. Our

  1. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. V. Pino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR or with normal diet (CTL for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological

  2. Is Routine Iron Supplementation Necessary in Pregnant Women With High Hemoglobin?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alizadeh, Leila; Salehi, Leili

    2016-01-01

    ... outcomes, it seems that iron supplementation in women with high hemoglobin (Hb) should be limited. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of iron supplementation on iron status markers in pregnant women with high Hb...

  3. Some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Hidetoshi Terashima; Eiji Sato; Masaaki Naito [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2007-07-01

    It is important to develop the production and utilization technology of highly reactive coke in order to improve the efficiency of blast furnace reactions. In this study, some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke produced in a coke oven chamber were investigated. First, the effects of catalytic Fe powder addition to coal before carbonization on coke strength were investigated. The addition of Fe powder decreased the coal caking property and hence the resultant coke drum index (DI150 15). On the other hand it increased coke reactivity (JIS coke reactivity index and CRI) to a great extent. This means that the caking property of blended coals needs to be adjusted higher to produce iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity. Secondly, it was shown that the iron ore reacts with silica brick at 1200{sup o}C in a condition similar to that in a coke oven chamber. The iron ore and silica reacted to produce fayalite (2FeO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}) and the brick was damaged. On the other hand, it was proven that the iron ore does not react with silica brick at 1100{sup o}C in the above condition. Based on this fundamental study, iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity was successfully produced in a coke oven chamber on a commercial scale by adjusting the coal blend composition and the coke oven temperature. Furthermore it was revealed that about 70% of iron in iron ore powder added to coal was reduced to metallic iron during carbonization in coke ovens.

  4. Some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Terashima, H.; Sato, E.; Naito, M. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Futtsu (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    The development of production and utilization technology of highly reactive coke is significant in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. In this report, some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke produced in a coke oven chamber were investigated. First, the effects of catalytic Fe powder addition to coal before carbonization on coke strength were investigated. The addition of Fe powder decreased coal caking property and hence resultant coke drum index (DI{sup 150}{sub 15}). On the other hand it increased coke reactivity (JIS coke reactivity index and CRI) to a great extent. This means that caking property of blended coals needs to be adjusted higher to produce the iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity. Secondly, it was shown that the iron ore reacts with silica brick at 1200{sup o}C in a condition similar to that in a coke oven chamber. The iron ore and silica reacted to produce fayalite (2FeO {center_dot}SiO{sub 2}) and the brick was damaged. On the other hand, it was proved that the iron ore does not react with silica brick at 1100{sup o}C in the above condition. Based on this fundamental study, the iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale by adjusting the coal blend composition and the coke oven temperature. Furthermore it was revealed that about 70% of iron in iron ore powder added to coal was reduced to metallic iron during carbonization in coke ovens.

  5. Shifting diet, shifting culture? A bioarchaeological approach to island dietary development on Iron-Age Öland, Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, Helene

    2017-06-01

    The diet and subsistence in Iron-Age Öland is debated as earlier studies and different archaeological sources seemingly provide conflicting interpretations. The objectives of this study are therefore to: (i) add new insights on diet and (ii) investigate the chronological variation in detail. It is common in studies of diet to investigate differences between datasets defined by archaeological periods (determined by artefact typology), but it is rare to explore whether these dietary changes are, in fact, well correlated with these temporal categories or not. Stable isotope analysis of 108 individuals and 25 animals was used to interpret diet in comparison with data from earlier studies. Different values of TLE (Trophic Level Effect) for δ15 N were compared for interpretations of diet. Of the 108 individuals, 42 were subjected to 14 C analysis in this study. The isotopes from Iron-Age animals on Öland indicate that the local, contemporary ecology is specific. The human isotope values show chronological development both when pooled in chronological groups by typology and by more specific 14 C chronology. The new samples of animals as well as the use of 5‰ TLE for δ15 N values results in the diet reinterpreted as mainly domesticate-based, with at least two shifts in diet occurring in the Iron Age. The use of 14 C dates in connection with the stable isotope results indicates a dietary transition occurring between 200 BC and AD 200, a date range that spans two typologically determined time periods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. High-Protein Diets: Are They Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PM, et al. Long term weight maintenance after advice to consume low carbohydrate, higher protein diets e A systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases. 2014;24:224. Liebman M. ...

  7. Effects of long-term exposures to low iron and branched-chain amino acid containing diets on aging skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuho; Men, Sok Sambo; Liang, Chen; Receno, Candace N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Korol, Donna L; Heffernan, Kevin S; DeRuisseau, Keith C

    2018-02-01

    Aging skeletal muscle displays an altered iron status that may promote oxidative stress and sarcopenia. A diet containing low iron (LI) could reduce muscle iron status and attenuate age-related muscle atrophy. Supplemental branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) may also alleviate sarcopenia by promoting muscle protein synthesis and iron status improvement. This study examined individual and combined effects of LI and BCAA diets on anabolic signaling and iron status in skeletal muscle of aging rats. Twenty-nine-month-old male Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats consumed the following control-base diets: control + regular iron (35 mg iron/kg) (CR; n = 11); control + LI (∼6 mg iron/kg) (CL; n = 11); 2×BCAA + regular iron (BR; n = 10); and 2×BCAA + LI (BL; n = 12) for 12 weeks. Although LI and/or 2×BCAA did not affect plantaris muscle mass, 2×BCAA groups showed lower muscle iron content than did CR and CL groups (P < 0.05). p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation was greater in 2×BCAA and LI animals compared with CR animals (P < 0.05). Interactions between IRON and BCAA were observed for proteins indicative of mitochondrial biogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) and oxidative capacity (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 and citrate synthase) (P < 0.05) wherein the combined diet (BL) negated potential benefits of individual diets. Antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase activity, and oxidative injury (3-nitrotyrosine, protein carbonyls, and 4-hydroxynonenal) were similar between groups. In conclusion, 12 weeks of LI and 2×BCAA diets showed significant impacts on increasing anabolic signaling as well as ameliorating iron status; however, these interventions did not affect muscle mass.

  8. Are meat and heme iron intake associated with pancreatic cancer? Results from the NIH-AARP diet and health cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunk, Pulkit; Hecht, Eric; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2016-05-01

    Several studies on pancreatic cancer have reported significant positive associations for intake of red meat but null associations for heme iron. We assessed total, red, white and processed meat intake, meat cooking methods and doneness and heme iron and mutagen intake in relation to pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort. A total of 322,846 participants (187,265 men and 135,581 women) successfully completed and returned the food frequency questionnaire between 1995 and 1996. After a mean follow-up of 9.2 years (up to 10.17 years), 1,417 individuals (895 men and 522 women) developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and trends were calculated using the median value of each quantile. Models incorporated age as the time metric and were adjusted for smoking history, body mass index, self-reported diabetes and energy-adjusted saturated fat. Pancreatic cancer risk significantly increased with intake of total meat (Q5 vs. Q1: HR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.02-1.42, p-trend = 0.03), red meat (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48, p-trend = 0.02), high-temperature cooked meat (HR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.00-1.45, p-trend = 0.02), grilled/barbequed meat (HR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.03-1.50, p-trend = 0.007), well/very well done meat (HR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.58, p-trend = 0.005) and heme iron from red meat (Q4 vs. Q1: HR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.01-1.45, p-trend = 0.04). When stratified by sex, these associations remained significant in men but not women except for white meat intake in women (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.74, p-trend = 0.04). Additional studies should confirm our findings that consuming heme iron from red meat increases pancreatic cancer risk. © 2015 UICC.

  9. Are meat and heme iron intake associated with pancreatic cancer? Results from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunk, Pulkit; Hecht, Eric; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Several studies on pancreatic cancer have reported significant positive associations for intake of red meat but null associations for heme iron. We assessed total, red, white, and processed meat intake, meat cooking methods and doneness, and heme iron and mutagen intake in relation to pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort. 322,846 participants (187,265 men; 135,581 women) successfully completed and returned the food frequency questionnaire between 1995–1996. After a mean follow-up of 9.2 years (up to 10.17 years), 1,417 individuals (895 men, 522 women) developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), and trends were calculated using the median value of each quantile. Models incorporated age as the time metric and were adjusted for smoking history, BMI, self-reported diabetes, and energy-adjusted saturated fat. Pancreatic cancer risk significantly increased with intake of total meat (Q5 vs. Q1 HR=1.20, 95% CI 1.02–1.42, p-trend=0.03), red meat (HR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01–1.48, p-trend=0.02), high-temperature cooked meat (HR=1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.45, p-trend=0.02), grilled/barbequed meat (HR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03–1.50, p-trend=0.007), well/very well done meat (HR=1.32, 95% CI 1.10–1.58, p-trend = 0.005), and heme iron from red meat (Q4 vs. Q1 HR=1.21, 95% CI 1.01–1.45, p-trend=0.04). When stratified by sex, these associations remained significant in men but not women except for white meat intake in women (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.02–1.74, p-trend = 0.04). Additional studies should confirm our findings that consuming heme iron from red meat increases pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:26666579

  10. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  11. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Crescenzo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

  12. High efficiency iron electrode and additives for use in rechargeable iron-based batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Aniszfeld, Robert; Manohar, Aswin; Malkhandi, Souradip; Yang, Bo

    2017-02-21

    An iron electrode and a method of manufacturing an iron electrode for use in an iron-based rechargeable battery are disclosed. In one embodiment, the iron electrode includes carbonyl iron powder and one of a metal sulfide additive or metal oxide additive selected from the group of metals consisting of bismuth, lead, mercury, indium, gallium, and tin for suppressing hydrogen evolution at the iron electrode during charging of the iron-based rechargeable battery. An iron-air rechargeable battery including an iron electrode comprising carbonyl iron is also disclosed, as is an iron-air battery wherein at least one of the iron electrode and the electrolyte includes an organosulfur additive.

  13. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  14. Food Insecurity, Poor Diet Quality, and Suboptimal Intakes of Folate and Iron Are Independently Associated with Perceived Mental Health in Canadian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Karen M; Gondara, Lovedeep; Kaplan, Bonnie J

    2017-03-14

    To address nutrition-related population mental health data gaps, we examined relationships among food insecurity, diet quality, and perceived mental health. Stratified and logistic regression analyses of respondents aged 19-70 years from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 were conducted ( n = 15,546). Measures included the Household Food Security Survey Module, diet quality (i.e., comparisons to the Dietary Reference Intakes , Healthy Eating Index), perceived mental health (poor versus good), sociodemographics, and smoking. In this sample, 6.9% were food insecure and 4.5% reported poor mental health. Stratified analysis of food security and mental health status by age/gender found associations for poor diet quality, protein, fat, fibre, and several micronutrients ( p -values mental health emerged for food insecurity (OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.45-1.71), poor diet quality (1.61, 95% CI 1.34-1.81), and suboptimal intakes of folate (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.17-1.90) and iron (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.23-1.88). Population approaches that improve food security and intakes of high quality diets may protect people from poor mental health.

  15. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ...) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase...

  16. High performance multicrystalline silicon: Grain structure and iron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autruffe, Antoine; M'hamdi, Mohammed; Schindler, Florian; Heinz, Friedemann D.; Ekstrøm, Kai Erik; Schubert, Martin C.; Di Sabatino, Marisa; Stokkan, Gaute

    2017-10-01

    A study of the spatial occurrence of iron precipitation in a high performance multicrystalline silicon (HPMC-Si) sample is presented. The separated effects of grain-boundaries, sparse intra-granular dislocations, and dislocation clusters are investigated by combining the Fei imaging method with glow discharge mass spectroscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and two iron precipitation models. While the area-averaged precipitation at grain boundaries is relatively minor, almost the whole iron precipitation occurs within the grains, despite the very low intra-granular dislocation density. The fraction of non-precipitated iron in the studied HPMC-Si material was found to be one to two orders of magnitude higher than that reported previously for standard materials.

  17. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  18. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need added iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  19. Gluten-free diet survey: are Americans with coeliac disease consuming recommended amounts of fibre, iron, calcium and grain foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T; Dennis, M; Higgins, L A; Lee, A R; Sharrett, M K

    2005-06-01

    This survey was conducted to assess nutrient intakes and food consumption patterns of adults with coeliac disease who adhere to a strict gluten-free diet. Three-day estimated self-reported food records were used to assess daily intakes of calories, percent daily calories from carbohydrates, dietary fibre, iron, calcium and grain food servings. Volunteers for this survey were recruited through notices placed in coeliac disease support group newsletters, as well as a national magazine for persons with coeliac disease. Forty-seven volunteers met all criteria for participation and returned useable food records. Group mean daily intake of nutrients by gender: Males (n = 8): 2882 calories; 55% carbohydrate; 24.3 g dietary fibre; 14.7 mg iron; 1288.8 mg calcium; 6.6 grain food servings. Females (n = 39): 1900 calories; 52% carbohydrate; 20.2 g dietary fibre; 11.0 mg iron; 884.7 mg calcium; 4.6 grain food servings. Recommended amounts of fibre, iron and calcium were consumed by 46, 44 and 31% of women and 88, 100 and 63% of men, respectively. Nutrition therapy for coeliac disease has centred around food allowed/not allowed on a gluten-free diet. Emphasis also should be placed on the nutritional quality of the gluten-free diet, particularly as it concerns the iron, calcium and fibre consumption of women. The use of the estimated food record as the dietary survey method may have resulted in the under-reporting of energy intake. Due to the small sample size and possible bias of survey participants, the findings of this survey may not be representative of the larger coeliac community.

  20. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  1. Glucose tolerance in response to a high-fat diet is improved by a high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honors, Mary A; Hargrave, Sara L; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2012-09-01

    Consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet results in insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Weight loss is often recommended to reverse these metabolic alterations and the use of a high-protein (HP), low-carbohydrate diet is encouraged. In lean rats, consumption of a HP diet improves glycemic control. However, it is unknown whether this diet has a similar effectiveness in rodents with impaired glucose tolerance. Rats were fed a HF or a chow (CH) diet for 6 weeks and then switched to a HP diet or a CH or pair-fed (PF) to the amount of kcals consumed per day by the HP group. Following the diet switch, body weight gain was attenuated as compared to HF rats, and similar between HP, CH, and PF rats. Despite similar weight progression, HP and PF rats had a significant decrease in body fat after 2 weeks, as compared to HF rats. In contrast, CH rats did not show this effect. Glucose tolerance was attenuated more quickly in HP rats than in CH or PF rats. These results indicate that a HP diet may be more effective than a balanced diet for improving glycemic control in overweight individuals.

  2. Development of instant noodles from high-iron rice and iron-fortified rice flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparat Reungmaneepaitoon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Instant high-iron noodles, prepared from wheat flour and high iron brown rice flour, were developed. Three varieties of rice flour, Suphan Buri 90 (SB, Homnin 313 (HW and Homnin 1000 (HP, containing amylose content of 30.40, 19.10 and 15.74% (w/w and iron content of 1.24, 2.04 and 2.22 (mg/100 g respectively, were used to replace wheat flour for instant fried noodle production. To determine the physicochemical properties and acceptability of instant fried noodles,different percentages (30, 40, 50% (w/w of each rice flour sample were used. The instant fried noodles were fortified with ferrous sulphate at levels of 0, 32, 64% iron of RDI per serving. Increasing amount of iron content in the mixtures decreased the L* value, b* value and increased a* value for the color of the instant fried noodle with brown rice flour. The texture characteristic of the noodles with 30, 40, 50% replacement with each variety of brown rice flour were significantly different from those of wheat noodle. Tensile force of the noodles decreased from 11.57±1.30 g to 6.38±1.45 g (SB, 8.36±0.96 g to 5.71±0.57 g (HP and 10.09±1.20 g to 5.46±1.31 g (HW as the rice flour content increased from 30 to 50%. The sensoryacceptability of the noodles made from each variety of 30% brown rice flour fortified with 32% iron of RDI had higher preference scores for elasticity, firmness, color and overall acceptability, than those with 64% iron of RDI. Instant fried noodles with HW and HP brown rice flour were subjected to consumer test using 100 rural primary school children. The frequency percent of the acceptability scores of the noodle with HP and HW were 88 and 84% respectively. Shelf life studyrevealed that the developed products were still acceptable up to 4 months. These products were claimed to be high iron noodle.

  3. Heat Treatment in High Chromium White Cast Iron Ti Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron alloyed with titanium was investigated. The austenitizing temperatures of 980°C and 1150°C for 1 hour each followed by tempering at 260°C for 2 hours have been performed and the effect of these treatments on wear resistance/impact toughness combination is reported. The microstructure of irons austenitized at 1150°C showed a fine precipitate of secondary carbides (M6C23 in a matrix of eutectic austenite and eutectic carbides (M7C3. At 980°C, the structure consisted of spheroidal martensite matrix, small amounts of fine secondary carbides, and eutectic carbides. Titanium carbides (TiC particles with cuboidal morphology were uniformly distributed in both matrices. Irons austenitized at 980°C showed relatively higher tensile strength compared to those austenitized at 1150°C, while the latter showed higher impact toughness. For both cases, optimum tensile strength was reported for the irons alloyed with 1.31% Ti, whereas maximum impact toughness was obtained for the irons without Ti-addition. Higher wear resistance was obtained for the samples austenitized at 980°C compared to the irons treated at 1150°C. For both treatments, optimum wear resistance was obtained with 1.3% Ti.

  4. Association of Maternal Diet With Zinc, Copper, and Iron Concentrations in Transitional Human Milk Produced by Korean Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cho, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Soo; Choi, Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the transitory milk of Korean lactating mothers and to investigate the relationship between these concentrations and maternal diet. Human milk samples were collected between 5 and 15 days postpartum from 96 healthy, lactating mothers in postpartum care centers in Seoul, Korea. Dietary intake during lactation was determined based on a 3-day dietary record. The mean zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the human milk samples collected were 3.88 ± 1.74 mg/L, 0.69 ± 0.25 mg/L, and 5.85 ± 8.53 mg/L, respectively. The mothers who consumed alcoholic beverages during pregnancy had tended to have lower concentrations of zinc and copper, as well as significantly lower concentrations of iron, in their milk (p < 0.047). In contrast, the mothers who took daily supplements had much higher iron concentrations in their milk (p = 0.002). Dietary intakes of zinc, copper, and iron during lactation did not affect the concentrations of zinc, copper, and iron in the milk samples analyzed. Intakes of vitamin C, selenium, and iodine were associated with the concentration of copper in the milk samples analyzed, and consumption of food categorized as 'meat and meat products' was positively associated with the concentration of zinc. Consumption of rice was the top contributor to the concentrations of all three minerals. In conclusion, associations between maternal diet and nutrient concentrations in transitory human milk can provide useful information, particularly in regard to infant growth. PMID:26839873

  5. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrient diet. Participants completed a survey rating various dimensions of hunger (physical symptoms, emotional symptoms, and location) when on their previous usual diet versus the high micronutrient density diet. Statistical analysis was conducted using non-parametric tests. Results Highly significant differences were found between the two diets in relation to all physical and emotional symptoms as well as the location of hunger. Hunger was not an unpleasant experience while on the high nutrient density diet, was well tolerated and occurred with less frequency even when meals were skipped. Nearly 80% of respondents reported that their experience of hunger had changed since starting the high nutrient density diet, with 51% reporting a dramatic or complete change in their experience of hunger. Conclusions A high micronutrient density diet mitigates the unpleasant aspects of the experience of hunger even though it is lower in calories. Hunger is one of the major impediments to successful weight loss. Our findings suggest that it is not simply the caloric content, but more importantly, the micronutrient density of a diet that influences the experience of hunger. It appears that a high nutrient density diet, after an initial phase of adjustment during which a person experiences "toxic hunger" due to withdrawal from pro-inflammatory foods, can result in a sustainable eating pattern that leads to weight loss and improved health. A high nutrient density diet provides benefits for long-term health

  6. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaser Dale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrient diet. Participants completed a survey rating various dimensions of hunger (physical symptoms, emotional symptoms, and location when on their previous usual diet versus the high micronutrient density diet. Statistical analysis was conducted using non-parametric tests. Results Highly significant differences were found between the two diets in relation to all physical and emotional symptoms as well as the location of hunger. Hunger was not an unpleasant experience while on the high nutrient density diet, was well tolerated and occurred with less frequency even when meals were skipped. Nearly 80% of respondents reported that their experience of hunger had changed since starting the high nutrient density diet, with 51% reporting a dramatic or complete change in their experience of hunger. Conclusions A high micronutrient density diet mitigates the unpleasant aspects of the experience of hunger even though it is lower in calories. Hunger is one of the major impediments to successful weight loss. Our findings suggest that it is not simply the caloric content, but more importantly, the micronutrient density of a diet that influences the experience of hunger. It appears that a high nutrient density diet, after an initial phase of adjustment during which a person experiences "toxic hunger" due to withdrawal from pro-inflammatory foods, can result in a sustainable eating pattern that leads to weight loss and improved health. A high nutrient density diet provides

  7. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Joel; Sarter, Barbara; Glaser, Dale; Acocella, Steve

    2010-11-07

    People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrient diet. Participants completed a survey rating various dimensions of hunger (physical symptoms, emotional symptoms, and location) when on their previous usual diet versus the high micronutrient density diet. Statistical analysis was conducted using non-parametric tests. Highly significant differences were found between the two diets in relation to all physical and emotional symptoms as well as the location of hunger. Hunger was not an unpleasant experience while on the high nutrient density diet, was well tolerated and occurred with less frequency even when meals were skipped. Nearly 80% of respondents reported that their experience of hunger had changed since starting the high nutrient density diet, with 51% reporting a dramatic or complete change in their experience of hunger. A high micronutrient density diet mitigates the unpleasant aspects of the experience of hunger even though it is lower in calories. Hunger is one of the major impediments to successful weight loss. Our findings suggest that it is not simply the caloric content, but more importantly, the micronutrient density of a diet that influences the experience of hunger. It appears that a high nutrient density diet, after an initial phase of adjustment during which a person experiences "toxic hunger" due to withdrawal from pro-inflammatory foods, can result in a sustainable eating pattern that leads to weight loss and improved health. A high nutrient density diet provides benefits for long-term health as well as weight loss. Because our

  8. The impact of a meat- versus a vegetable-based diet on iron status in women of childbearing age with small iron stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Bendtsen, K.M.; Henriksen, M.

    2007-01-01

    consuming the vegetable-based diet 31 (24-36) g/day, while the total iron intake was similar in the two groups (mean +/- SE) 11.0 +/- 0.5 and 12.3 +/- 0.3/day mg/day, respectively. Serum ferritin remained unchanged in women on the meat-based diet (n = 29)(before intervention (median (Q(1)-Q(3))): 16.3 (12.......7-25.3) mu g/l and after intervention: 16.5 (10.3-25.3) mu g/l, but declined from 17.3 (10.9-23.7) to 11.2 (8.8-14.6) mu g/l (P

  9. Solubility of silicon in hcp-iron at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core is believed to be composed of liquid iron alloy with one or more light elements (e.g., Birch 1952; Poirier 1994). Although a number of elements lighter than iron, including hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and sulfur, have been considered by various researchers as potential light elements in the Earth's core, silicon is one of the most attractive candidates for the light element in the core (e.g., Takafuji et al. 2005; Sakai et al. 2006; Ozawa et al. 2008, 2009, Wood et al., 2008). The Earth's inner core is considered to consist mainly of a solid iron-nickel alloy. However, multiple experimental studies revealed that the inner core is also less dense than pure iron, indicating the presence of light components in the inner core (e.g., Jephcoat and Olson 1987; Mao et al. 1998; Lin et al. 2005; Badro et al. 2007). If silicon is indeed a major light element in the liquid outer core, the maximum amount of silicon that can be incorporated in the solid inner core during inner-core solidification is limited by the solubility of silicon in solid iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary. Therefore the phase relations of iron-silicon alloys, especially the solubility of silicon in solid iron at high pressure and temperature, are the key to understanding the composition, structure, and crystallization of the inner core. The phase relations of iron-silicon alloys at high pressure have been extensively studied using a multi-anvil apparatus (Zhang and Guyot 1999; Dobson et al. 2002; Kuwayama and Hirose 2004) and a diamond-anvil cell with in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements (Lin et al. 2002; Lin et al. 2003; Dubrovinsky et al. 2003; Hirao et al. 2004; Asanuma et al. 2008, Lin et al 2009, Kuwayama et al. 2009). Below 200 GPa, the solubility of silicon in solid hcp-iron has been well studied. Solid hcp-iron can contain at least ~10 wt% Si at low temperature, but it decomposed to iron-rich hcp phase and silicon-rich bcc phase at high temperature

  10. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser Dale; Sarter Barbara; Fuhrman Joel; Acocella Steve

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrie...

  11. Obtaining of High Cr Content Cast Iron Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, C.; Bejinariu, C.; Carcea, I.; Cimpoesu, N.; Chicet, D. L.; Savin, C.

    2017-06-01

    We have obtained, through the classic casting process, 3 highly chromium-based experimental alloys proposed for replacing the FC 250 classical cast iron in braking applications. Casting was carried out in an induction furnace and cast into moulds made of KALHARTZ 8500 resin casting mixture and HARTER hardener at SC RanCon SRL Iasi. It is known that the microstructure of the cast iron is a combination of martensite with a small amount of residual austenite after the heat treatment of the ingot. In the case of high-alloy chromium alloys, the performance of the material is due to the presence of M7C3 carbides distributed in the iron matrix Resistance to machining and deformation is based on alloy composition and microstructure, while abrasion resistance will depend on properties and wear conditions.

  12. The structure of high-quality aluminium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study presents the analyse of aluminium iron cast structure (as-cast condition which are used in high temperature. While producing the casts of aluminium iron major influence has been preserve the structure of technological process parameters. The addition to Fe-C-Al alloy V, Ti, Cr leads to the improvement of functional and mechanical cast qualities. In this study, a method was investigated to eliminate the presence of undesirable Al4C3 phases in a aluminium cast iron structure and thus improve the production process. V and Ti additions in aluminium cast iron allows to development of FeAl - VC or TiC alloys. In particular, V or Ti contents above 5 wt.% were found to totally eliminate the presence of Al4C3. In addition, preliminary work indicates that the alloy with the FeAl - VC or TiC structure reveals high oxidation resistance. The introduction of 5 wt.% chromium to aluminium cast iron strengthened Al4C3 precipitate. Thus, the resultant alloy can be considered an intermetallic FeAl matrix strengthened by VC and TiC or modified Al4C3 reinforcements.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods (foods that have iron ... you: Follow a diet that excludes meat and fish, which are the best sources of iron. However, ...

  14. Spontaneous and 2-nitropropane induced levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in liver DNA of rats fed iron-deficient or manganese- and copper-deficient diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, S; Takemoto, K; Hirosue, T; Hosogai, Y

    1993-02-01

    Rats (Wistar, female, 4 weeks old) were fed iron-deficient (Fe-; 2.2 micrograms Fe/g) or manganese- and copper-deficient (Mn.Cu-; 0.3 microgram Mn/g, 0.4 microgram Cu/g) diets for 8 weeks to determine the oxidative damage of DNA by element deficiency. After feeding of the diets, 2-nitropropane (2-NP, 80 mg/kg body weight) was administered i.p. as an inducer of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) to the element-deficient rats. The hemoglobin concentration of rats in the Fe- group showed an induction of severe anemia (8.4 g/100 ml whole blood). In the Mn.Cu- group, Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of plasma and Cu.Zn-SOD activities were significantly lower than that of the normal diet group. However, total SOD activities of plasma were not depressed severely in contrast to that of the liver in the Mn.Cu- group. Background (spontaneous) levels of 8-OH-dG in normal diet group were 0.96 +/- 0.37/10(5) deoxyguanosine (dG), however, significantly higher levels were detected in the Fe- group (1.56 +/- 0.19, P < 0.01). Conversely, a lower (but not significant) level of 8-OH-dG than the normal diet group were detected in the Mn.Cu- group (0.78 +/- 0.08). Six hours after 2-NP treatment, 8-OH-dG levels in liver DNA were significantly induced to 1.44 +/- 0.24 in the normal diet fed group 1.89 +/- 0.22 in the Fe- and 1.08 +/- 0.12 in the Mn.Cu- groups. Compared to the normal diet group, these induced levels of 8-OH-dG in the Fe- group were significantly higher (P < 0.05), and that in Mn.Cu- group were significantly lower (P < 0.05). The high level of 8-OH-dG in severe iron deficiency might be the results of: (i) an increase of hydroxyl radical generation by accumulated copper in hepatocytes; or (ii), a depression of enzymatic activity for removing 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA, which is dependent on divalent cations. On the other hand, the low level of 8-OH-dG in manganese and copper deficiency might be the result of a decrease of lipid peroxidation which has been

  15. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaumontet, C.; Even, P.C.; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, A.; Piedcoq, J.; Fromentin, G.; Tomé, D.; Azzout-Marniche, D.

    2015-01-01

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the

  16. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  17. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  18. Iron concentration in breast milk normalised within one week of a single high-dose infusion of iron isomaltoside in randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Nørgaard, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    AIM: We compared the iron concentration in breast milk after a single high-dose of intravenous iron isomaltoside or daily oral iron for postpartum haemorrhage. METHODS: In this randomised controlled trial, the women were allocated a single dose of intravenous 1,200mg iron isomaltoside or oral iron......-dose of intravenous iron isomaltoside for postpartum haemorrhage led to a transient increase in the iron concentration in breast milk three days after treatment compared with oral iron. The difference disappeared one week after treatment and mean iron concentrations were within the normal range in all samples...

  19. Effect of dietary iron on fetal growth in pregnant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Andrea C; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S; Spitalnik, Steven L; Hod, Eldad A; Prestia, Kevin A

    2013-04-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder. Children and pregnant women are at highest risk for developing iron deficiency because of their increased iron requirements. Iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy is associated with adverse effects on fetal development, including low birth weight, growth retardation, hypertension, intrauterine fetal death, neurologic impairment, and premature birth. We hypothesized that pregnant mice fed an iron-deficient diet would have a similar outcome regarding fetal growth to that of humans. To this end, we randomly assigned female C57BL/6 mice to consume 1 of 4 diets (high-iron-low-bioavailability, high-iron-high-bioavailability, iron-replete, and iron-deficient) for 4 wk before breeding, followed by euthanasia on day 17 to 18 of gestation. Compared with all other groups, dams fed the high-iron-high-bioavailability diet had significantly higher liver iron. Hct and Hgb levels in dams fed the iron-deficient diet were decreased by at least 2.5 g/dL as compared with those of all other groups. In addition, the percentage of viable pups among dams fed the iron-deficient diet was lower than that of all other groups. Finally, compared with all other groups, fetuses from dams fed the iron-deficient diet had lower fetal brain iron levels, shorter crown-rump lengths, and lower weights. In summary, mice fed an iron-deficient diet had similar hematologic values and fetal outcomes as those of iron-deficient humans, making this a useful model for studying iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  20. High bioavailablilty iron maize (Zea mays L. developed through molecular breeding provides more absorbable iron in vitro (Caco-2 model and in vivo (Gallus gallus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tako Elad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron (Fe deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Iron biofortification is a preventative strategy that alleviates Fe deficiency by improving the amount of absorbable Fe in crops. In the present study, we used an in vitro digestion/Caco 2 cell culture model as the guiding tool for breeding and development of two maize (Zea mays L. lines with contrasting Fe bioavailability (ie. Low and High. Our objective was to confirm and validate the in vitro results and approach. Also, to compare the capacities of our two maize hybrid varieties to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb synthesis and to improve the Fe status of Fe deficient broiler chickens. Methods We compared the Fe-bioavailability between these two maize varieties with the presence or absence of added Fe in the maize based-diets. Diets were made with 75% (w/w maize of either low or high Fe-bioavailability maize, with or without Fe (ferric citrate. Chicks (Gallus gallus were fed the diets for 6 wk. Hb, liver ferritin and Fe related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin maintenance efficiency (HME and total body Hb Fe values were used to estimate Fe bioavailability from the diets. Results DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin expressions were higher (P  Conclusions We conclude that the High Fe-bioavailability maize contains more bioavailable Fe than the Low Fe-bioavailability maize, presumably due to a more favorable matrix for absorption. Maize shows promise for Fe biofortification; therefore, human trials should be conducted to determine the efficacy of consuming the high bioavailable Fe maize to reduce Fe deficiency.

  1. Phototrophs in High-Iron-Concentration Microbial Mats: Physiological Ecology of Phototrophs in an Iron-Depositing Hot Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, B K; Parenteau, M. N.; B. M. Griffin

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [14C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of ph...

  2. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  3. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  4. A Drosophila model of high sugar diet-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Na

    Full Text Available Diets high in carbohydrates have long been linked to progressive heart dysfunction, yet the mechanisms by which chronic high sugar leads to heart failure remain poorly understood. Here we combine diet, genetics, and physiology to establish an adult Drosophila melanogaster model of chronic high sugar-induced heart disease. We demonstrate deterioration of heart function accompanied by fibrosis-like collagen accumulation, insulin signaling defects, and fat accumulation. The result was a shorter life span that was more severe in the presence of reduced insulin and P38 signaling. We provide evidence of a role for hexosamine flux, a metabolic pathway accessed by glucose. Increased hexosamine flux led to heart function defects and structural damage; conversely, cardiac-specific reduction of pathway activity prevented sugar-induced heart dysfunction. Our data establish Drosophila as a useful system for exploring specific aspects of diet-induced heart dysfunction and emphasize enzymes within the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway as candidate therapeutic targets.

  5. Simulation of high concentration of iron in dense shelf water in the Okhotsk Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Uchimoto, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Jun; MITSUDERA, Humio; MISUMI, Kazuhiro; Tsumune, Daisuke; WAKATSUCHI, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    An ocean general circulation model coupled with a simple biogeochemical model was developed to simulate iron circulation in and around the Sea of Okhotsk. The model has two external sources of iron: dust iron at the sea surface and sedimentary iron at the seabed shallower than 300 m. The model represented characteristic features reasonably well, such as high iron concentration in the dense shelf water (DSW) and its mixing, which extends southward in the intermediate layer from the northwester...

  6. Siderophore production in high iron environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S. A.; Hoffman, C. L.; Moffett, J. W.; Edwards, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Up until recently, the geochemical cycling of Fe in deep sea hydrothermal plumes has assumed to be inorganically dominated, resulting in quantitative precipitation of all hydrothermally sourced Fe to the seafloor. Recent detection of organic Fe binding ligands within both the dissolved and particulate phase (Bennett et al., 2008; Toner et al., 2009), suggests that hydrothermally sourced Fe may be important on a global scale (Tagliabue et al., 2010). The source of these organic ligands is currently unknown; hypotheses include the possible entrainment of organic carbon from the biologically rich diffuse flow areas, or in-situ production from microbial processes. However, the microbial production of organic ligands is only expected when Fe is a limited micronutrient, which is not the case in the hydrothermal environment. The importance of Fe cycling microorganisms within hydrothermal systems was previously overlooked due to the poor energetics with regards to Fe oxidation and reduction. But their recent detection within the hydrothermal system, both around low temperature Fe rich mineral deposits and within hydrothermal plumes (Edwards et al., 2004; Sylvan et al., In prep) suggests that they may have an important role in the hydrothermal Fe cycle, potentially resulting in an interplay between Fe and organic carbon. Within the laboratory, we have carried out experiments to investigate an Fe oxidizing bacteria in a variety of high Fe environments. We have detected both the production of siderophores and an increase in reduced Fe when the Fe oxidizing bacteria is exposed to both Fe(III) and Fe(II) rich minerals. The role of these microbes in the mineral dissolution of Fe sulfides along the seafloor and within the hydrothermal plume, may have important implications on the speciation of Fe and the role of siderophores in the marine environment. Bennett, S.A. et al. 2008. EPSL, 270: 157-167. Edwards, K.J. et al. 2004. Geomicrobiology Journal, 21: 393-404. Sylvan, J.B. et al

  7. High Caloric Diet for ALS Patients: High Fat, High Carbohydrate or High Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ALS is a fatal motor neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle atrophy and weakness, dysarthria, and dysphagia. The mean survival of ALS patients is three to five years, with 50% of those diagnosed dying within three years of onset (1. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial to set an appropriate plan for metabolic and nutritional support in ALS. Nutritional management incorporates a continuous assessment and implementation of dietary modifications throughout the duration of the disease. The nutritional and metabolic approaches to ALS should start when the diagnosis of ALS is made and should become an integral part of the continuous care to the patient, including nutritional surveillance, dietary counseling, management of dysphagia, and enteral nutrition when needed. Malnutrition and lean body mass loss are frequent findings in ALS patients necessitating comprehensive energy requirement assessment for these patients. Malnutrition is an independent prognostic factor for survival in ALS with a 7.7 fold increase in risk of death. Malnutrition is estimated to develop in one quarter to half of people with ALS (2. Adequate calorie and protein provision would diminish muscle loss in this vulnerable group of patients. Although appropriate amount of energy to be administered is yet to be established, high calorie diet is expected to be effective for potential improvement of survival; ALS patients do not normally receive adequate  intake of energy. A growing number of clinicians suspect that a high calorie diet implemented early in their disease may help people with ALS meet their increased energy needs and extend their survival. Certain high calorie supplements appear to be safe and well tolerated by people with ALS according to studies led by Universitäts klinikum Ulm's and, appear to stabilize body weight within 3 months. In a recent study by Wills et al., intake of high-carbohydrate low-fat supplements has been recommended in ALS patients (3

  8. Biofortified red mottled beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in a maize and bean diet provide more bioavailable iron than standard red mottled beans: Studies in poultry (Gallus gallus and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glahn Raymond P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard colored beans to deliver iron (Fe for hemoglobin synthesis. Two isolines of large-seeded, red mottled Andean beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., one standard ("Low Fe" and the other biofortified ("High Fe" in Fe (49 and 71 μg Fe/g, respectively were used. This commercial class of red mottled beans is the preferred varietal type for most of the Caribbean and Eastern and Southern Africa where almost three quarters of a million hectares are grown. Therefore it is important to know the affect of biofortification of these beans on diets that simulate human feeding studies. Methods Maize-based diets containing the beans were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements for broiler except for Fe (Fe concentrations in the 2 diets were 42.9 ± 1.2 and 54.6 ± 0.9 mg/kg. One day old chicks (Gallus gallus were allocated to the experimental diets (n = 12. For 4 wk, hemoglobin, feed-consumption and body-weights were measured. Results Hemoglobin maintenance efficiencies (HME (means ± SEM were different between groups on days 14 and 21 of the experiment (P In-vitro analysis showed lower iron bioavailability in cells exposed to standard ("Low Fe" bean based diet. Conclusions We conclude that the in-vivo results support the in-vitro observations; biofortified colored beans contain more bioavailable-iron than standard colored beans. In addition, biofortified beans seems to be a promising vehicle for increasing intakes of bioavailable Fe in human populations that consume these beans as a dietary staple. This justifies further work on the large-seeded Andean beans which are the staple of a large-region of Africa where iron-deficiency anemia is a primary cause of infant death and poor health status.

  9. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  10. Arsenic Sequestration By Sorption Processes in High-Iron Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, R.A.; Dixit, S.; Campbell, K.M.; Jew, A.D.; Hering, J.G.; O' Day, P.A.

    2009-06-04

    High-iron sediments in North Haiwee Reservoir (Olancha, CA), resulting from water treatment for removal of elevated dissolved arsenic in the Los Angeles Aqueduct system, were studied to examine arsenic partitioning between solid phases and porewaters undergoing shallow burial. To reduce arsenic in drinking water supplies, ferric chloride and a cationic polymer coagulant are added to the aqueduct upstream of Haiwee Reservoir, forming an iron-rich floc that scavenges arsenic from the water. Analysis by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the aqueduct precipitate is an amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) similar to ferrihydrite, and that arsenic is associated with the floc as adsorbed and/or coprecipitated As(V). Arsenic-rich floc and sediments are deposited along the inlet channel as aqueduct waters enter the reservoir. Sediment core samples were collected in two consecutive years from the edge of the reservoir along the inlet channel using 30- or 90-cm push cores. Cores were analyzed for total and extractable arsenic and iron concentrations. Arsenic and iron speciation and mineralogy in sediments were examined at selected depths by synchrotron XAS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Sediment-porewater measurements were made adjacent to the core sample sites using polyacrylamide gel probe samplers. Results showed that sediment As(V) is reduced to As(III) in all cores at or near the sediment-water interface (0--4 cm), and only As(III) was observed in deeper sediments. Analyses of EXAFS spectra indicated that arsenic is present in the sediments mostly as a bidentate-binuclear, inner-sphere sorption complex with local atomic geometries similar to those found in laboratory studies. Below about 10 cm depth, XAS indicated that the HFO floc had been reduced to a mixed Fe(II, III) solid with a local structure similar to that of synthetic green rust (GR) but with a slightly contracted average interatomic Fe-Fe distance in the hydroxide layer. There was no

  11. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased mortal...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Causes Not having enough iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ...

  13. [Vitamin and mineral supplements in the diet of military personnel: effect on the balance of iron, copper and manganese, immune reactivity and physical work-capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtseva, I P; Nosolodin, V V; Zaĭtsev, O N; Gladkikh, I P; Koznienko, I V; Beliakov, R A; Arshinov, N P

    2012-03-01

    Conducted with the participation of 50 students of military educational study the effect of various vitamin and mineral complexes for the provision by the body naturally iron, copper and manganese on the immune and physical status. Found that diets enriched BMV was accompanied by a significant delay in the micro-elements, mainly iron, which indicates a deficiency of these bioelements in chickens Santo during the summer. Under the influence of vitamin-mineral complexes significantly increased rates of natural and specific immunity. As the delay increases significantly increased iron medical indicators of immunological reaction efficiency and physical performance.

  14. Effect of irradiation and storage in the iron availability in lamb meat treated with different diets; Efeito da irradiacao e do armazenamento na disponibilidade de ferro em carne de cordeiro tratado com diferentes dietas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia]. E-mail: acornel@cena.usp.br; arthur@cena.usp.br; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br; Couto, Meylene Aparecida Luzia [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: malcouto@esalq.usp.br

    2008-10-15

    Irradiation is an efficient method to increase the microbiological safety and to maintain the nutrients such as iron in the meat. The best absorption form, heme iron, should be preserved in order to increase the nutritional quality of stored meat. The diet can alter the nutrients contents and form in the meat. The iron is provided from the diet and it is an essential element for the metabolic processes such as oxygen transport, oxidative metabolism, and cellular growth. Meat lamb samples treated with different diets (it controls, TAC1, TAC2 and sorghum) were wrapped to vacuous, and irradiated in the doses 0, 2 and 4 kGy and stored at 4 deg C during 15 days. The values of total iron and heme iron were measured at 0 and 15 days of storage. The storage reduced the content of total iron (18.36 for 14.28 mg.100 g{sup -1}) and heme iron (13.78 for 10.52 mg.100 g{sup -1}). The diets affected the levels of total and heme iron of the meat, and the sorghum diet was the one that presented the larger content. The dose of 2 kGy was the one that affected the iron the most independently of the storage time. It was verified that the amounts of total and heme iron varied according to the storage time, irradiation doses, and lamb diets. (author)

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods (foods that ... happen if you: Follow a diet that excludes meat and fish, which are the best sources of ...

  16. Molecular strategies of microbial iron assimilation: from high-affinity complexes to cofactor assembly systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miethke, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms have to cope with restricted iron bioavailability in most environmental habitats as well as during host colonization. The continuous struggle for iron has brought forth a plethora of acquisition and assimilation strategies that share several functional and mechanistic principles. One common theme is the utilization of high-affinity chelators for extracellular iron mobilization, generally known as siderophore-dependent iron acquisition. This basic strategy is related with another central aspect of microbial iron acquisition, which is the release of the mobilized iron from extracellular sources to allow its transfer and incorporation into metabolically active proteins. A variety of mechanisms which are often coupled with high-affinity uptake have evolved to facilitate the removal of iron from siderophore ligands; however, they differ in many key aspects including substrate specificities and release efficiencies. The most sophisticated iron release pathways comprise processes of specific hydrolysis and reduction of ferric siderophores, especially in the case of high-affinity iron complexes with greatly negative redox potentials that often represent crucial factors for virulence development in bacterial and fungal pathogens. During the following steps of iron utilization, the acquired metal is transferred through intracellular trafficking pathways which may include diverse storage compartments in order to be directed to cofactor assembly systems and to final protein targeting. Several of these iron channeling routes have been described recently and provide first insights into the later steps of iron assimilation that characterize an essential part of the cellular iron homeostasis network.

  17. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  18. Consumption of a low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet (the ketogenic diet) exaggerates biotin deficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahiro; Matsui, Tomoyoshi; Ando, Saori; Ishii, Yoshie; Sawamura, Hiromi; Ebara, Shuhei; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that acts as a cofactor for several carboxylases. The ketogenic diet, a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, is used to treat drug-resistant epilepsy and promote weight loss. In Japan, the infant version of the ketogenic diet is known as the "ketone formula." However, as the special infant formulas used in Japan, including the ketone formula, do not contain sufficient amounts of biotin, biotin deficiency can develop in infants who consume the ketone formula. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the ketogenic diet on biotin status in mice. Male mice (N = 32) were divided into the following groups: control diet group, biotin-deficient (BD) diet group, ketogenic control diet group, and ketogenic biotin-deficient (KBD) diet group. Eight mice were used in each group. At 9 wk, the typical symptoms of biotin deficiency such as hair loss and dermatitis had only developed in the KBD diet group. The total protein expression level of biotin-dependent carboxylases and the total tissue biotin content were significantly decreased in the KBD and BD diet groups. However, these changes were more severe in the KBD diet group. These findings demonstrated that the ketogenic diet increases biotin bioavailability and consumption, and hence, promotes energy production by gluconeogenesis and branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which results in exaggerated biotin deficiency in biotin-deficient mice. Therefore, biotin supplementation is important for mice that consume the ketogenic diet. It is suggested that individuals that consume the ketogenic diet have an increased biotin requirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased mortality in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. CKD patients are often treated with iv iron therapy in order to maintain iron stores and erythropoietin responsiveness, also in the case of not being iron depleted. Therefore, the effect of a single high iv dose of two different iron preparations, iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), on plasma levels of FGF23 and phosphate was examined in normal and uremic iron repleted rats. Methods Iron was administered iv as a single high dose of 80 mg/kg bodyweight and the effects on plasma levels of iFGF23, phosphate, Ca2+, PTH, transferrin, ferritin and iron were examined in short and long term experiments (n = 99). Blood samples were obtained at time 0, 30, 60, 180 minutes, 24 and 48 hours and in a separate study after 1 week. Uremia was induced by 5/6-nephrectomy. Results Nephrectomized rats had significant uremia, hyperparathyroidism and elevated FGF23. Iron administration resulted in significant increases in plasma ferritin levels. No significant differences were seen in plasma levels of iFGF23, phosphate and PTH between the experimental groups at any time point within 48 hours or at 1 week after infusion of the iron compounds compared to vehicle. Conclusions In non-iron depleted normal and uremic rats a single high dose of either of two intravenous iron preparations, iron isomaltoside 1000, and ferric carboxymaltose, had no effect on plasma levels of iFGF23 and phosphate for up to seven days. PMID:24373521

  20. Cast iron zinc galvanizing improved by high temperature oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jędrzejczyk; M. Hajduga

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate influence of the high-temperature oxidation, as the preliminary stage previous to coating with zinc on the change of surface layer structure as well as subsurface layer of cast iron with flake, vermicular and nodular graphite.Design/methodology/approach: The experiment was led in the temperature range: 850-1050ºC in ambient air. Samples have been taken out from the furnace separately after: 2-12 hours. After scale layer removal the hot dip zinc coating in industrial condi...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or iron supplements, when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. ... in the diet. Too much milk also may prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. ...

  2. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  3. High-fat and ketogenic diets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Wills, Anne-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Epidemiologic data suggest that malnutrition is a common feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage in this patient population. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse models, a high-fat diet has been shown to lead to weight gain and prolonged survival. However, little research has been conducted to test whether nutritional interventions might ameliorate the disease course in humans. Here we review the currently available evidence supporting the potential role of dietary interventions as a therapeutic tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ultimately, determining whether a high-fat or ketogenic diet could be beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will require large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

  4. Growth response of broiler chickens to finisher diets containing high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of including high amounts of wheat bran (WB) in finisher diets on growth performance and economy of gain of broiler chickens. The WB contained g kg-1 of dry matter, 894.3; crude protein, 193.5; ether extract, 42.1; crude fibre, 97.1; ash, 49.5; neutral detergent fibre, 503.8; acid detergent ...

  5. High Fat Diet Induced Obesity and Nutrient Sensing TOR Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has grown to epidemic proportions globally, with 400 million considered obese. Evidence indicates that excessive dietary accumulation of lipids (obesity) is a risk factor in causing deleterious effects on metabolism and has been strongly linked to the progression of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Investigating the origin and effects of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and its genetic mediators is an important step in understanding the mechanisms that contribute to obesity. Howe...

  6. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in middle-aged mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Amanda N; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2014-05-07

    Consuming a high-fat diet may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals. It has been demonstrated that blueberry supplementation can allay age-related behavioral deficits. To determine if supplementation of a high-fat diet with blueberries offers protection against putative high-fat diet-related declines, 9-month-old C57Bl/6 mice were maintained on low-fat (10% fat calories) or high-fat (60% fat calories) diets with and without 4% freeze-dried blueberry powder. Novel object recognition memory was impaired by the high-fat diet; after 4 months on the high-fat diet, mice spent 50% of their time on the novel object in the testing trial, performing no greater than chance performance. Blueberry supplementation prevented recognition memory deficits after 4 months on the diets, as mice on this diet spent 67% of their time on the novel object. After 5 months on the diets, mice consuming the high-fat diet passed through the platform location less often than mice on low-fat diets during probe trials on days 2 and 3 of Morris water maze testing, whereas mice consuming the high-fat blueberry diet passed through the platform location as often as mice on the low-fat diets. This study is a first step in determining if incorporating more nutrient-dense foods into a high-fat diet can allay cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  8. Mobility and diet in Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age Germany : evidence from multiple isotope analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oelze, Viktoria Martha

    2012-01-01

    Prehistoric human diet can be reconstructed by the analysis of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) stable isotopes in bone, whereas ancient mobility and provenance can be studied using the isotopes of strontium (Sr) and oxygen (O) in tooth enamel, and of sulphur in bone. Although thirty years

  9. Diet of Tollund Man. Stable isotope analyses of an Iron Age bog body from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt Nielsen, Nina; Philippsen, Bente; Jensen, L. V.

    Tollund Man is one of the world’s most famous bog bodies due to his exceptionally well-preserved head. He was found in 1950 by peat cutters in a bog near Bjældskovdal, c. 10 km west of Silkeborg. During the years, several analyses have been performed on the body to shed light on the life and death...... and hair of Tollund Man. The analysis of the isotopes of C, N and S reveals the diet on long and short time scales: The isotope signature in the bone sample reflects the average diet in the years prior to death; the isotope signature in the hair reflects the diet in the last months of his life. Any...... difference between the results of the two analyses may indicate a change in the diet in the months before death and could potentially shed light on the circumstances leading to the human sacrifice of Tollund Man. After excavation, the femur bone (and the main part of the body) of Tollund Man was merely left...

  10. Differential effects of high-carbohydrate and high-fat diets on hepatic lipogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Damiano, Fabrizio; Siculella, Luisa; Zara, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic fatty acid synthesis is influenced by several nutritional and hormonal factors. In this study, we have investigated the effects of distinct experimental diets enriched in carbohydrate or in fat on hepatic lipogenesis. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups and fed distinct experimental diets enriched in carbohydrates (70% w/w) or in fat (20 and 35% w/w). Activity and expression of the mitochondrial citrate carrier and of the cytosolic enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase were analyzed through the study with assessments at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Liver lipids and plasma levels of lipids, glucose, and insulin were assayed in parallel. Whereas the high-carbohydrate diet moderately stimulated hepatic lipogenesis, a strong inhibition of this anabolic pathway was found in animals fed high-fat diets. This inhibition was time-dependent and concentration-dependent. Moreover, whereas the high-carbohydrate diet induced an increase in plasma triglycerides, the high-fat diets determined an accumulation of triglycerides in liver. An increase in the plasmatic levels of glucose and insulin was observed in all cases. The excess of sucrose in the diet is converted into fat that is distributed by bloodstream in the organism in the form of circulating triglycerides. On the other hand, a high amount of dietary fat caused a strong inhibition of lipogenesis and a concomitant increase in the level of hepatic lipids, thereby highlighting, in these conditions, the role of liver as a reservoir of exogenous fat.

  11. Naringin Improves Diet-Induced Cardiovascular Dysfunction and Obesity in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Kauter; Md Ashraful Alam; Lindsay Brown

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and fatty liver, together termed metabolic syndrome, are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Chronic feeding of a diet high in saturated fats and simple sugars, such as fructose and glucose, induces these changes in rats. Naturally occurring compounds could be a cost-effective intervention to reverse these changes. Flavonoids are ubiquitous secondary plant metabolites; naringin gives the bitter taste to grapefruit. This study has evaluated th...

  12. Revised Healthy Lifestyle-Diet Index and associations with obesity and iron deficiency in schoolchildren: The Healthy Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Y; Moschonis, G; Papandreou, C; Politidou, E; Naoumi, A; Peppas, D; Mavrogianni, C; Lionis, C; Chrousos, G P

    2015-02-01

    The Healthy Lifestyle-Diet Index (HLD-index), previously developed to assess the degree of adherence to dietary and lifestyle guidelines for primary schoolchildren, was revised according to updated recommendations. Τhe association of the revised HLD-index (R-HLD-index) with obesity and iron deficiency (ID) was also examined. A representative sample of 2660 primary schoolchildren from Greece (9-13 years old) participating in the 'Healthy Growth Study' was examined. Twelve components related to dietary and lifestyle patterns were used to develop the R-HLD-index. Scores from 0 up to 4 were assigned to each one of these components, giving a total score ranging from 0 to 48. The associations between the R-HLD-index, obesity and ID were examined via logistic regression analysis. The total score of the R-HLD-index calculated for each one of the study participants was found to range between 2 and 32 units, with higher scores being indicative of a healthier lifestyle and better diet quality. After adjusting for potential confounders, logistic regression analysis showed that an increase in the R-HLD-index score by one unit was associated with 6% lower odds for obesity. However, no significant association was observed between the R-HLD-index score and ID. The R-HLD-index may be a useful tool for public health policy makers and healthcare professionals when assessing diet quality and lifestyle patterns of primary schoolchildren. Identification of children with lower scores in the R-HLD-index and its individual components could guide tailored made interventions targeting specific children and behaviors. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. Iron loss in high-power arc steelmaking furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Karasyov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is considered the power operating mode of a high-power arc steelmaking furnaces (ASMF in the period of the flat bath. It is revealed that electric energy is mainly spent for heating and overheating the foamed slag. Heat transferring from slag to metal is carried out by the convective agitation of the bath. For agitation there is used intensive purging of the bath with oxygen that causes increased iron losses with the running foamed slag. There are noted the negative points of working with the foamed slag. It is recommended to expand R&D in the field of optimizing the power operating mode of high-power ASMF.

  14. Distinct Adipose Depots from Mice Differentially Respond to a High-Fat, High-Salt Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeClercq, Vanessa C; Goldsby, Jennifer S; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Dietary factors such as high-sodium or high-fat (HF) diets have been shown to induce a proinflammatory phenotype. However, there is limited information with respect to how microenvironments of distinct intra-abdominal adipose depots respond to the combination of a high-salt, HF diet. We tested the hypothesis that HF feeding would cause changes in distinct adipose depots, which would be further amplified by the addition of high salt to the diet. Twenty-seven male C57BL6 mice were fed an HF diet (60% of kcal from fat), an HF + high-salt diet (4% wt:wt), a control diet [low-fat (LF);10% of kcal from fat], or an LF + high-salt diet for 12 wk. The main sources of fat in the diets were corn oil and lard. Adipokines in serum and released from adipose tissue organ cultures were measured by immunoassays. QIAGEN's Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to perform functional analysis of the RNA-sequencing data from distinct adipose depots. Diet-induced obesity resulted in a classical inflammatory phenotype characterized by increased concentrations of circulating inflammatory mediators (38-56%) and reduced adiponectin concentrations (27%). However, high-salt feeding did not exacerbate the HF diet-induced changes in adipokines and cytokines. Leptin and interleukin-6 were differentially released from adipose depots and HF feeding impaired adiponectin and resistin secretion across all 3 depots (34-48% and 45-83%, respectively). The addition of high salt to the HF diet did not further modulate secretion in cultured adipose tissue experiments. Although gene expression data from RNA sequencing indicated a >4.3-fold upregulation of integrin αX (Itgax) with HF feeding in all 3 depots, markers of cellular function were differentially expressed in response to diet across depots. Collectively, these findings highlight the role of distinct adipose depots in mice in the development of obesity and emphasize the importance of selecting specific depots to study the effects of therapeutic

  15. Effects of consuming a high carbohydrate diet after eight weeks of exposure to a ketogenic diet

    OpenAIRE

    Kinzig Kimberly P; Davenport Brandon M; Honors Mary

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ketogenic diets have been utilized for weight loss and improvement in metabolic parameters. The present experiments examined the effects of returning to a chow diet after prolonged ingestion of a ketogenic diet. Methods Rats were maintained on chow (CH) or a ketogenic diet (KD) for 8 weeks, after which the KD rats were given access to chow only (KD:CH) for 8 additional weeks. Caloric intake, body weight, and plasma leptin, insulin and ghrelin were measured before and after...

  16. Selection of common bean lines with high grain yield and high grain calcium and iron concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerinéia Dalfollo Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of common bean nutritional quality has advantages in marketing and can contribute to society as a food source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability for grain yield, calcium and iron concentrations in grains of inbred common bean lines obtained by different breeding methods. For this, 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Pedigree method and 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Single-Seed Descent (SSD method. The lines showed genetic variability for grain yield, and concentrations of calcium and iron independently of the method of advancing segregating populations. The Pedigree method allows obtaining a greater number of lines with high grain yield. Selection using the SSD method allows the identification of a larger number of lines with high concentrations of calcium and iron in grains. Weak negative correlations were found between grain yield and calcium concentration (r = -0.0994 and grain yield and iron concentration (r = -0.3926. Several lines show genetic superiority for grain yield and concentrations of calcium and iron in grains and their selection can result in new common bean cultivars with high nutritional quality.

  17. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-05-21

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting.

  18. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron Compounds. CP van Wyk, DJ Robbins. Abstract. The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was studied in rats, in each case at 4 dietary iron levels ranging from 70 to 206 mg/100 g diet. In one of two series the basic diet was ...

  19. High-fat diet induces apoptosis of hypothalamic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana C Moraes

    Full Text Available Consumption of dietary fats is amongst the most important environmental factors leading to obesity. In rodents, the consumption of fat-rich diets blunts leptin and insulin anorexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus by a mechanism dependent on the in situ activation of inflammation. Since inflammatory signal transduction can lead to the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways, we evaluated the effect of high-fat feeding on the induction of apoptosis of hypothalamic cells. Here, we show that consumption of dietary fats induce apoptosis of neurons and a reduction of synaptic inputs in the arcuate nucleus and lateral hypothalamus. This effect is dependent upon diet composition, and not on caloric intake, since pair-feeding is not sufficient to reduce the expression of apoptotic markers. The presence of an intact TLR4 receptor, protects cells from further apoptotic signals. In diet-induced inflammation of the hypothalamus, TLR4 exerts a dual function, on one side activating pro-inflammatory pathways that play a central role in the development of resistance to leptin and insulin, and on the other side restraining further damage by controlling the apoptotic activity.

  20. High iron content and bioavailability in humans from four species of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casal, Maria N; Pereira, Ana C; Leets, Irene; Ramírez, José; Quiroga, Maria F

    2007-12-01

    Searching for economical, nonconventional sources of iron is important in underdeveloped countries to combat iron deficiency and anemia. Our objective was to study iron, vitamin C, and phytic acid composition and also iron bioavailability from 4 species of marine algae included in a rice-based meal. Marine algae (Ulva sp, Sargassum sp, Porphyra sp, and Gracilariopsis sp) were analyzed for monthly variations in iron and for ascorbic acid and phytic acid concentrations. A total of 96 subjects received rice-based meals containing the 4 species of marine algae in different proportions, raw or cooked. All meals contained radioactive iron. Absorption was evaluated by calculating the radioactive iron incorporation in subjects' blood. Iron concentrations in algae were high and varied widely, depending on the species and time of year. The highest iron concentrations were found in Sargassum (157 mg/100 g) and Gracilariopsis (196 mg/100 g). Phytates were not detected in the algae and ascorbic acid concentration fluctuated between 38 microg/g dry weight (Ulva) and 362 microg/g dry weight (Sargassum). Algae significantly increased iron absorption in rice-based meals. Cooking did not affect iron absorption compared with raw algae. Results indicate that Ulva sp, Sargassum sp, Porphyra sp, and Gracilariopsis sp are good sources of ascorbic acid and bioavailable iron. The percentage of iron absorption was similar among all algae tested, although Sargassum sp resulted in the highest iron intake. Based on these results, and on the high reproduction rates of algae during certain seasons, promoting algae consumption in some countries could help to improve iron nutrition.

  1. EFEK DIET TINGGI KARBOHIDRAT DAN DIET TINGGI LEMAK TERHADAP KADAR GLUKOSA DARAH DAN KEPADATAN SEL BETA PANKREAS PADA TIKUS WISTAR (EFFECT OF HIGH CARBOHYDRATE DIET AND HIGH FAT DIET ON BLOOD GLUCOSE AND BETA CELL PANCREAS DENSITY IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Mutiyani

    2014-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome includes the clustering of abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and obesity associated with the increasing risk of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and death both in less developed and developed countries in the world. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increasES every year. The aim of this study was to assess blood glucose level using Glucose Oksidase (GOD-PAP and beta cell pancreas density using microscope.  Blood glucose concentration and beta cell pancreas density were compared in rats fed isocalorically a high carbohydrate diet for 12 w (80,57% carbohydrate, 14% protein, and 5.41% fat or a high fat diet for 12 w (55,63% carbohydrate; 14,25% protein; and 30,10% fat. At the end of the study, high carbohydrate rats had higher blood glucose concentration than the high fat group (293.57 mg/dl. High carbohydrate and high fat diet both resulted in elevated beta cell pancreas density, but the density was seen lowest in high carbohydrate fed (45,06 mm2. The findings suggest that both high carbohydrate and high fat fed elevated blood glucose concentration and decreased the density of beta cell in rats. Keywords: high carbohydrate diet, high fat diet, blood glucose, beta cell pancreas density

  2. Vegetable relishes, high in β-carotene, increase the iron, zinc and β-carotene nutritive values from cereal porridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Johanita; Breynaert, Annelies; Pieters, Luc; Hermans, Nina

    2017-08-04

    Iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies are serious public health problems in sub-Saharan Africa, which can be alleviated by dietary diversification. The effects of adding cowpea leaf (CL) and orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) relishes to sorghum and maize porridges on iron, zinc and β-carotene contents and bioaccessibilities were determined. Despite the high iron content of the CL relish (14.59 mg/100 g), the vegetable relishes had little effect on the iron bioaccessibility from the cereal porridges. Importantly, the addition of the CL relish increased the percentage and amount of bioaccessible zinc 2- and 3-fold, respectively. Addition of CL and OFSP relishes resulted in β-carotene contents of 10-13 mg/100 g. The β-carotene from the OFSP relish meals was double as bioaccessible than that from the CL relish meals. Addition of the vegetable relishes has real potential to improve especially the vitamin A and zinc nutritive value of cereal diets.

  3. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  4. Effects of consuming a high carbohydrate diet after eight weeks of exposure to a ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honors, Mary Ann; Davenport, Brandon M; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2009-11-19

    Ketogenic diets have been utilized for weight loss and improvement in metabolic parameters. The present experiments examined the effects of returning to a chow diet after prolonged ingestion of a ketogenic diet. Rats were maintained on chow (CH) or a ketogenic diet (KD) for 8 weeks, after which the KD rats were given access to chow only (KD:CH) for 8 additional weeks. Caloric intake, body weight, and plasma leptin, insulin and ghrelin were measured before and after the dietary switch. After 8 weeks of consuming a ketogenic diet, KD rats had increased adiposity and plasma leptin levels, and reduced insulin, as compared to CH controls. One week after the diet switch, fat pad weight and leptin levels remained elevated, and were normalized to CH controls within 8 weeks of the dietary switch. Switching from KD to chow induced a transient hypophagia, such that KD:CH rats consumed significantly fewer calories during the first week after the dietary switch, as compared to calories consumed by CH rats. This hypophagia was despite significantly increased plasma ghrelin in KD:CH rats. Finally, KD:CH rats developed hyperphagia over time, and during weeks 6-8 after the diet switch consumed significantly more calories per day than did CH-fed controls and gained more weight than CH-fed controls. Collectively, these data demonstrate that returning to a carbohydrate-based diet after a period of consuming a ketogenic diet has post-diet effects on caloric intake, body weight gain, and insulin levels.

  5. Naringin Improves Diet-Induced Cardiovascular Dysfunction and Obesity in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Kauter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and fatty liver, together termed metabolic syndrome, are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Chronic feeding of a diet high in saturated fats and simple sugars, such as fructose and glucose, induces these changes in rats. Naturally occurring compounds could be a cost-effective intervention to reverse these changes. Flavonoids are ubiquitous secondary plant metabolites; naringin gives the bitter taste to grapefruit. This study has evaluated the effect of naringin on diet-induced obesity and cardiovascular dysfunction in high carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats. These rats developed increased body weight, glucose intolerance, increased plasma lipid concentrations, hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, liver inflammation and steatosis with compromised mitochondrial respiratory chain activity. Dietary supplementation with naringin (approximately 100 mg/kg/day improved glucose intolerance and liver mitochondrial dysfunction, lowered plasma lipid concentrations and improved the structure and function of the heart and liver without decreasing total body weight. Naringin normalised systolic blood pressure and improved vascular dysfunction and ventricular diastolic dysfunction in high carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats. These beneficial effects of naringin may be mediated by reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced oxidative stress, lowered plasma lipid concentrations and improved liver mitochondrial function in rats.

  6. High Neonatal Blood Iron Content Is Associated with the Risk of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nyholm Kyvsgaard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Iron requirement increases during pregnancy and iron supplementation is therefore recommended in many countries. However, excessive iron intake may lead to destruction of pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, we aim to test if higher neonatal iron content in blood is associated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D in childhood; (2 Methods: A case-control study was conducted, including 199 children diagnosed with T1D before the age of 16 years from 1991 to 2005 and 199 controls matched on date of birth. Information on confounders was available in 181 cases and 154 controls. Iron was measured on a neonatal single dried blood spot sample and was analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate if iron content in whole blood was associated with the risk of T1D; (3 Results: A doubling of iron content increased the odds of developing T1D more than two-fold (odds ratio (95% CI, 2.55 (1.04; 6.24. Iron content increased with maternal age (p = 0.04 and girls had higher content than boys (p = 0.01; (4 Conclusions: Higher neonatal iron content associates to an increased risk of developing T1D before the age of 16 years. Iron supplementation during early childhood needs further investigation, including the causes of high iron in neonates.

  7. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... not enough iron is taken in from the diet, blood levels will drop; thus, over time, the ...

  8. Electron Beam Welding Characteristics of Cast Iron and Bonding of Mild Steel to Cast Iron by using Iron-base Alloy of High Nickel Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatate, Minoru; Shiota, Toshio; Nagasaki, Yoichi; Abe, Nobuyuki; Amano, Masaharu; Tanaka, Toshio

    Bonding characteristics of mild steel to cast iron using electron beam welding (EBW) process are investigated from the viewpoint of microstructure and mechanical properties. When the electron beam is radiated to a cast iron, remelting of the surface and corresponding rapid cooling take place, and it results in formation of brittle fine-cementite structure whose hardness is over 700 Hv. As Ni is an alloying element that may prevent formation of cementite, we compare two kinds of welding methods with Ni addition. One method is EBW process, radiating the electron beam to a thin plate made of spheroidal graphite cast iron with a high Ni content after the plate inserts between cast iron and steel, and other one is a metal active gas (MAG) welding process using a Fe-Ni wire. Bonding tensile strength by EBW process is higher than that by MAG welding process. In case of welding of cast iron and other metallic material, EBW process is found to be more advantageous than MAG welding process.

  9. Nutritional and Metabolic Consequences of Feeding High-Fiber Diets to Swine: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Atta K. Agyekum; C. Martin Nyachoti

    2017-01-01

    At present, substantial amounts of low-cost, fibrous co-products are incorporated into pig diets to reduce the cost of raising swine. However, diets that are rich in fiber are of low nutritive value because pigs cannot degrade dietary fiber. In addition, high-fiber diets have been associated with reduced nutrient utilization and pig performance. However, recent reports are often contradictory and the negative effects of high-fiber diets are influenced by the fiber source, type, and inclusion ...

  10. High-fat diet action on adiposity, inflammation, and insulin sensitivity depends on the control low-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Bérengère; Plaisancié, Pascale; Awada, Manar; Géloën, Alain; Estienne, Monique; Capel, Frédéric; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne; Debard, Cyrille; Pesenti, Sandra; Morio, Béatrice; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Animal studies using a high-fat diet (HFD) have studied the effects of lipid overconsumption by comparing a defined HFD either with a natural-ingredient chow diet or with a defined low-fat diet (LFD), despite the dramatic differences between these control diets. We hypothesized that these differences in the control diet could modify the conclusions regarding the effects that an increase of fat in the diet has on several metabolic parameters. For 11 weeks, C57bl6/J mice were fed a low-fat chow diet (8% energy from fat), a typical semisynthetic LFD (12%), or a semisynthetic HFD (sy-HF) (40%). Conclusions about the effect of sy-HF on body weight gain, subcutaneous adipose tissue, insulin sensitivity, and adipose tissue inflammation were modified according to the control LFD. Conversely, conclusions about epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue; fat intake effects on liver and muscular lipids, cholesterol, free fatty acids, and markers of low-grade inflammation; and of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration were the same regardless of the use of low-fat chow diet or semisynthetic LFD. For some physiological outcomes, conflicting conclusions were even reached about the effects of increased fat intake according to the chosen low-fat control. Some deleterious effects of sy-HF may not be explained by lipid overconsumption but rather by the overall quality of ingredients in a semisynthetic diet. According to the control LFD chosen, conclusions on the lipid-related effects of HFDs must be formulated with great care because some end points are profoundly affected by the ingredient composition of the diet rather than by fat content. © 2013.

  11. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers adapted to highly oxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    carbon) while oxygen (O2) is the electron acceptor provided during the aeration process. Numerous previous studies have described neutrophilic iron oxidizers as a bacterial guild with a special niche preference, especially the transition zone between aerobic and anoxic regions, where abiotic chemical...... oxidation of iron would be retarded. For that reason, no attempts have been documented to describe the density and diversity of iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in oxic neutrophilic environments. Under low temperatures (5 to 10°C) conditions, as typically found in groundwater, extremely low rates of chemical...... iron oxidation (t1/2: 315min.) have been documented. This assumed slow chemical oxidation of Fe2 + in rapid sand filters may allow certain bacteria to oxidize iron concurrently with the ongoing slow chemical oxidation. Hence, we aimed to investigate the abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution...

  12. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  13. High speed turning of compacted graphite iron using controlled modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalbaum, Tyler Paul

    Compacted graphite iron (CGI) is a material which emerged as a candidate material to replace cast iron (CI) in the automotive industry for engine block castings. Its thermal and mechanical properties allow the CGI-based engines to operate at higher cylinder pressures and temperatures than CI-based engines, allowing for lower fuel emissions and increased fuel economy. However, these same properties together with the thermomechanical wear mode in the CGI-CBN system result in poor machinability and inhibit CGI from seeing wide spread use in the automotive industry. In industry, machining of CGI is done only at low speeds, less than V = 200 m/min, to avoid encountering rapid wear of the cutting tools during cutting. Studies have suggested intermittent cutting operations such as milling suffer less severe tool wear than continuous cutting. Furthermore, evidence that a hard sulfide layer which forms over the cutting edge in machining CI at high speeds is absent during machining CGI is a major factor in the difference in machinability of these material systems. The present study addresses both of these issues by modification to the conventional machining process to allow intermittent continuous cutting. The application of controlled modulation superimposed onto the cutting process -- modulation-assisted machining (MAM) -- is shown to be quite effective in reducing the wear of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools when machining CGI at high machining speeds (> 500 m/min). The tool life is at least 20 times greater than found in conventional machining of CGI. This significant reduction in wear is a consequence of reduction in the severity of the tool-work contact conditions with MAM. The propensity for thermochemical wear of CBN is thus reduced. It is found that higher cutting speed (> 700 m/min) leads to lower tool wear with MAM. The MAM configuration employing feed-direction modulation appears feasible for implementation at high speeds and offers a solution to this challenging

  14. Ketogenic Diets for Adults With Highly Refractory Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tanya J. W.

    2017-01-01

    The current review highlights the evidence supporting the use of ketogenic diets in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy and status epilepticus in adults. Ketogenic diet variants are compared and advantages and potential side effects of diet therapy are discussed. PMID:29217974

  15. Paternal allele influences high fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Sumiyo; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Arai, Yuji; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2014-01-01

    C57BL/6J (B6) mice are susceptible to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and have been used in metabolism research for many decades. However, the genetic component of HFD-induced obesity has not yet been elucidated. This study reports evidence for a paternal transmission of HFD-induced obesity and a correlated expression of Igf2 and Peg3 (paternal expressed gene 3) imprinted genes. We found that PWK mice are resistant to HFD-induced obesity compared to C57BL/6J mice. Therefore, we generated and analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice, namely; (PWK×B6) F1 progeny with B6 father and (B6×PWK) F1 progeny with PWK father. The (PWK×B6) F1 mice were more sensitive to diet-induced obesity compared to (B6×PWK) F1 mice, suggesting a paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity. Expression analysis of imprinted genes in adipocytes revealed that HFD influences the expression of some of the imprinted genes in adipose tissue in B6 and PWK mice. Interestingly, Igf2 and Peg3, which are paternally expressed imprinted genes involved in the regulation of body fat accumulation, were down-regulated in B6 and (PWK×B6) F1 mice, which are susceptible to HFD-induced obesity, but not in PWK and (B6×PWK) F1 mice, which are resistant. Furthermore, in vitro analysis showed that Igf2, but not Peg3, had an anti-inflammatory effect on TNF-α induced MCP-1 expression in adipocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that the down-regulation of Igf2 and Peg3 imprinted genes in adipocytes may be involved in the paternal transmission of HFD-induced obesity.

  16. Postweaning low-calcium diet promotes later-life obesity induced by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong-Han; Li, Song-Tao; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, Guan; He, Ying; Liao, Xi-Lu; Sun, Chang-Hao; Li, Ying

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a postweaning low-calcium diet on later obesity and explore the underlying mechanisms. Ninety-six male rats were weaned at 3 weeks of age, fed standard (STD: 0.50% calcium, n=48) and low-calcium (LC: 0.15% calcium, n=48) diets for 3 weeks, and then fed the standard diet for a 3-week washout period successively. Finally, the STD rats were divided into STD control and high-fat diet (HFD) groups, and the LC ones into LC control and LC+HFD (LCHF) groups. The STD and LC rats were fed the standard diet, while the HFD control and LCFD ones were fed a high-fat diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity. During the three feeding periods, adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its responsive proteins phospho-acetyl-coA carboxylase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and uncoupling protein 3 were persistently down-regulated in the LC group (decreased by 18%, 24%, 18% and 20%, respectively) versus the STD group, and these effects were significantly more pronounced in the LCHFD group (decreased by 21%, 30%, 23% and 25%, respectively) than the HFD group by a later high-fat stimuli, causing more fat and body weight in adulthood. However, lipolysis enzymes, serum leptin, insulin and lipids were not significantly affected until the body weight and fat content changed at 15 weeks of age. The results suggest that the low-calcium diet after weaning promotes rat adult-onset obesity induced by high-fat diet, which might be achieved by programming expressions of genes involved in AMPK pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver Fatty Acid Composition and Inflammation in Mice Fed with High-Carbohydrate Diet or High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Gimenez da Silva-Santi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Both high-carbohydrate diet (HCD and high-fat diet (HFD modulate liver fat accumulation and inflammation, however, there is a lack of data on the potential contribution of carbohydrates and lipids separately. For this reason, the changes in liver fatty acid (FA composition in male Swiss mice fed with HCD or HFD were compared, at the time points 0 (before starting the diets, and after 7, 14, 28 or 56 days. Activities of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1, ∆-6 desaturase (D6D, elongases and de novo lipogenesis (DNL were estimated. Liver mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1 was evaluated as an additional indicator of the de novo lipogenesis. Myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide (NO production, and mRNA expressions of F4/80, type I collagen, interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were measured as indication of the liver inflammatory state. The HCD group had more intense lipid deposition, particularly of saturated fatty acids (SFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs. This group also showed higher DNL, SCD-1, and D6D activities associated with increased NO concentration, as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Livers from the HFD group showed higher elongase activity, stored more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and had a lower omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid (n-6/n-3 ratio. In conclusion, liver lipid accumulation, fatty acids (FA composition and inflammation were modulated by the dietary composition of lipids and carbohydrates. The HCD group had more potent lipogenic and inflammatory effects in comparison with HFD.

  18. The comparison of effects of high protein-low fat diet, and standard diet on weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ebrahim Falahi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is one of the most important problems in the world. Suitable low calorie diets are among the best ways for weight loss. The aim of this study was to determine the effects and comparison of two kinds of low-calorie diets on weight loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy- six health women (20-55 yrs old were randomly divided into two groups for 3 months: 39 subjects in standard diet group (SD (carbohydrate 55%, fat 30%, protein 15%, and 37 persons in high protein-low fat diet group (HPD (carbohydrate 55%, fat 20%, protein 25%. Energy intake was 1000 kcal less than the daily needs in the two groups. In the beginning and at the end of each month the subjects were visited and food diet energy was adjusted. In the beginning and finally BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist to hip ratio were measured. Results: BMI decreased 4. 43±0.96 v. s 4. 15±0.76 in SD and HPD groups, respectively. The amount of weight loss was 10. 89 2.04 in SD and 10. 48 1.73 in HPD. Waist to hip ratio decreased 0. 02±0.014 v. s 0. 018±0. 014 in SD and HPD, respectively. For all variables there was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: Both low calorie diets (SD and HPD decreased weight and other obesity indices. Therefore, HPD may be a suitable substitution for standard diet.

  19. Melter Throughput Enhancements for High-Iron HLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Gan, Hoa [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Chaudhuri, Malabika [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-26

    This report describes work performed to develop and test new glass and feed formulations in order to increase glass melting rates in high waste loading glass formulations for HLW with high concentrations of iron. Testing was designed to identify glass and melter feed formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts to assess melt rate using a vertical gradient furnace system and to develop new formulations with enhanced melt rate. Testing evaluated the effects of waste loading on glass properties and the maximum waste loading that can be achieved. The results from crucible-scale testing supported subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass and feed formulations on waste processing rate and product quality. The DM100 was selected as the platform for these tests due to its extensive previous use in processing rate determination for various HLW streams and glass compositions.

  20. Effects of consuming a high carbohydrate diet after eight weeks of exposure to a ketogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinzig Kimberly P

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ketogenic diets have been utilized for weight loss and improvement in metabolic parameters. The present experiments examined the effects of returning to a chow diet after prolonged ingestion of a ketogenic diet. Methods Rats were maintained on chow (CH or a ketogenic diet (KD for 8 weeks, after which the KD rats were given access to chow only (KD:CH for 8 additional weeks. Caloric intake, body weight, and plasma leptin, insulin and ghrelin were measured before and after the dietary switch. Results After 8 weeks of consuming a ketogenic diet, KD rats had increased adiposity and plasma leptin levels, and reduced insulin, as compared to CH controls. One week after the diet switch, fat pad weight and leptin levels remained elevated, and were normalized to CH controls within 8 weeks of the dietary switch. Switching from KD to chow induced a transient hypophagia, such that KD:CH rats consumed significantly fewer calories during the first week after the dietary switch, as compared to calories consumed by CH rats. This hypophagia was despite significantly increased plasma ghrelin in KD:CH rats. Finally, KD:CH rats developed hyperphagia over time, and during weeks 6-8 after the diet switch consumed significantly more calories per day than did CH-fed controls and gained more weight than CH-fed controls. Conclusion Collectively, these data demonstrate that returning to a carbohydrate-based diet after a period of consuming a ketogenic diet has post-diet effects on caloric intake, body weight gain, and insulin levels.

  1. Effect of high levels of dietary iron, iron injection, and dietary vitamin E on the oxidative stability of turkey meat during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartov, I; Kanner, J

    1996-08-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the combined effect of excess Fe, supplied either in the diets (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) or by injection (Experiment 4), and various levels of dietary vitamin E on the oxidative stability of the thigh muscle of turkeys stored at -18 C for various periods. Iron was added to a commercial diet that already contained 20 mg/kg supplemental Fe, at concentrations of 0, 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg as ferrous sulfate or injected as Fe-dextran to the left drumstick muscle (total amount of 1.2 g per turkey). Vitamin E was added to the experimental diets not already supplemented with this vitamin, at levels of 0, 28, and 150 mg/kg. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of the meat gradually increased as its storage duration increased from about 15 to 120 d. Increasing dietary Fe supplementation from 0 to 500 mg/kg tended to decrease TBARS values in one experiment only; otherwise, this variable was not affected by dietary Fe level. Injection of Fe significantly (P meat from the injected side. The TBARS values of the meat up to about 30 d of storage were significantly lower due to the supplementation of the diet with vitamin E at a level of 28 mg/kg in one out of three experiments and at a level of 150 mg/kg in two out of two experiments. The protective effect of the higher level of vitamin E remained evident after about 108 d of storage. No interaction was observed between Fe and vitamin E treatments in their effect on TBARS values. Blood hemoglobin concentrations were significantly increased by the supplementation of the diet with the high levels of Fe, in one experiment only. This variable was consistently and significantly increased from about 10 to 23 wk of age. The results show that high levels of dietary Fe do not adversely affect the oxidative stability of thigh meat of turkey; however, stability might be reduced by injected Fe. Dietary vitamin E, at a level of 150 mg/kg, consistently increased this stability.

  2. Nicotine plus a high-fat diet triggers cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Friedman, Theodore C; Falz, Mark; Chalfant, Victor; Hasan, Mohammad Kamrul; Espinoza-Derout, Jorge; Lee, Desean L; Sims, Carl; Tran, Peter; Mahata, Sushil K; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P

    2017-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The health risk associated with smoking can be aggravated by obesity. Smoking might also trigger cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis. Given that CM apoptosis has been implicated as a potential mechanism in the development of cardiomyopathy and heart failure, we characterize the key signaling pathways in nicotine plus high-fat diet (HFD)-induced CM apoptosis. Adult C57BL6 male mice were fed a normal diet (ND) or HFD and received twice-daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections of nicotine (0.75 mg/kg body weight [BW]) or saline for 16 weeks. An additional group of nicotine-treated mice on HFD received twice-daily IP injections of mecamylamine (1 mg/kg BW), a non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, for 16 weeks. Nicotine when combined with HFD led to a massive increase in CM apoptosis that was fully prevented by mecamylamine treatment. Induction of CM apoptosis was associated with increased oxidative stress and activation of caspase-2-mediated intrinsic pathway signaling coupled with inactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Furthermore, nicotine treatment significantly (P nicotine, when combined with HFD, triggers CM apoptosis through the generation of oxidative stress and inactivation of AMPK together with the activation of caspase-2-mediated intrinsic apoptotic signaling independently of FGF21 and SIRT1.

  3. High- cholesterol diet does not alter gut microbiota composition in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimova, Lidiya G.; Zlatkov, Nikola; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Western diet containing both saturated fat and cholesterol impairs cardio- metabolic health partly by modulating diversity and function of the microbiota. While diet containing only high fat has comparable effects, it is unclear how diets only enriched in cholesterol impact the

  4. High fat, low carbohydrate diet limit fear and aggression in Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Annika Maria Juul; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Sandøe, Peter

    2014-01-01

    High fat, low carbohydrate diets have become popular, as short-term studies show that such diets are effective for reducing body weight, and lowering the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. There is growing evidence from both humans and other animals that diet affects behaviour and intak...

  5. A High-Saturated-Fat, High-Sucrose Diet Aggravates Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Chun-Mei; Cao, Si-Si; Zhou, Li-Ping; Wong, Man-Sau

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency in women and high-saturated fat, high-sucrose (HFS) diets have both been recognized as risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Studies on the combined actions of these 2 detrimental factors on the bone in females are limited. We sought to determine the interactive actions of estrogen deficiency and an HFS diet on bone properties and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Six-month-old Sprague Dawley sham or ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pair fed the same amount of either a low-saturated-fat, low-sucrose (LFS) diet (13% fat calories; 15% sucrose calories) or an HFS diet (42% fat calories; 30% sucrose calories) for 12 wk. Blood, liver, and bone were collected for correspondent parameters measurement. Ovariectomy decreased bone mineral density in the tibia head (TH) by 62% and the femoral end (FE) by 49% (P loss in OVX rats by an additional 41% in the TH and 37% in the FE (P loss in the HFS-OVX rats was accompanied by increased urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations by 28% (P < 0.05). The HFS diet induced cathepsin K by 145% but reduced osteoprotegerin mRNA expression at the FE of the HFS-sham rats by 71% (P < 0.05). Ovariectomy significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression by 136% and 170% at the FE of the LFS- and HFS-OVX rats, respectively (P < 0.05). The HFS diet aggravated ovariectomy-induced lipid deposition and oxidative stress (OS) in rat livers (P < 0.05). Trabecular bone mineral density at the FE was negatively correlated with rat liver malondialdehyde concentrations (R(2) = 0.39; P < 0.01). The detrimental actions of the HFS diet and ovariectomy on bone properties in rats occurred mainly in cancellous bones and were characterized by a high degree of bone resorption and alterations in OS. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. High temperature hardness of steels and iron-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, H., E-mail: torres@ac2t.at; Varga, M.; Ripoll, M. Rodríguez

    2016-08-01

    Hot hardness, related to the mechanical strength and wear resistance of materials at high temperatures, has been measured from room temperature up to 800 °C for a comprehensive set of iron-based alloys having different microstructures and chemical compositions. The results obtained suggest the existence of several softening regimes with increasing temperatures, also with a massive hardness drop observed to begin at temperatures close to 0.5 times the melting temperature for most of the chosen alloys. Austenitic steel grades were also observed to show a significant softening behaviour at moderate temperatures compared to ferritic and martensitic alloys, attributed to the dislocation dynamics of face cubic centred alloys. The exact nature of the temperature dependence shown by hardness has been proposed to adopt the form of an exponential Arrhenius equation. Another model suggested in the available literature is also discussed within this context. Additionally, the role of alloying elements has been correlated to the softening behaviour. Molybdenum or boron were found to slow down the softening behaviour, while carbide-forming elements such as vanadium and tungsten were found to be beneficial for room temperature hardness.

  7. Synchronous Upgrading Iron and Phosphorus Removal from High Phosphorus Oolitic Hematite Ore by High Temperature Flash Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deqing Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an effective method was developed to remove phosphorus and upgrade iron from high phosphorus oolitic hematite ore by high temperature flash reduction—a wet magnetic separation process. A thermodynamic analysis of iron and phosphorus mineral reactions and experiments with Fe-P separation process were performed, and the mechanism of phosphorus removal and beneficiation of iron is discussed as well. The results show that under the proper conditions, a final metallic iron powder assaying over 91% Fe and 0.25% P was obtained with iron recovery of 90% and phosphorus removal rate of 91.79% using the new process, indicating that the high temperature flash reduction process is a feasible and efficient way to process this kind of complex and refractory iron ore. Moreover, sodium sulfate is found to be capable of improving the removal of phosphorus and the upgrading of iron, as well as enhancing the growth of metallic iron grains significantly for higher recovery of iron.

  8. Pubertal high fat diet: effects on mammary cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies linking dietary fat intake and obesity to breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. This may be due to the difficulty of dissociating fat intake from obesity, and/or the lack of defined periods of exposure in these studies. The pubertal mammary gland is highly sensitive to cancer-causing agents. We assessed how high fat diet (HFD) affects inflammation, proliferative, and developmental events in the pubertal gland, since dysregulation of these can promote mammary tumorigenesis. To test the effect of HFD initiated during puberty on tumorigenesis, we utilized BALB/c mice, for which HFD neither induces obesity nor metabolic syndrome, allowing dissociation of HFD effects from other conditions associated with HFD. Methods Pubertal BALB/c mice were fed a low fat diet (12% kcal fat) or a HFD (60% kcal fat), and subjected to carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumorigenesis. Results HFD elevated mammary gland expression of inflammatory and growth factor genes at 3 and 4 weeks of diet. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), robustly induced at 4 weeks, has direct mitogenic activity in mammary epithelial cells and, as a potent inducer of NF-κB activity, may induce inflammatory genes. Three weeks of HFD induced a transient influx of eosinophils into the mammary gland, consistent with elevated inflammatory factors. At 10 weeks, prior to the appearance of palpable tumors, there were increased numbers of abnormal mammary epithelial lesions, enhanced cellular proliferation, increased growth factors, chemokines associated with immune-suppressive regulatory T cells, increased vascularization, and elevated M2 macrophages. HFD dramatically reduced tumor latency. Early developing tumors were more proliferative and were associated with increased levels of tumor-related growth factors, including increased plasma levels of HGF in tumor-bearing animals. Early HFD tumors also had increased

  9. Red and processed meat, nitrite, and heme iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Sinha, Rashmi; Gierach, Gretchen L; Ward, Mary H

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations between red and processed meat intake and breast cancer risk. N-nitroso compounds and heme iron have been hypothesized as contributing factors. We followed 193,742 postmenopausal women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and identified 9,305 incident breast cancers (1995-2006). Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. We adjusted daily intakes of meat, nitrite and heme iron for energy intake using the nutrient density method. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by quintiles of dietary exposures for all breast cancer, by stage (in-situ, localized, regional/distant) and by estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status using Cox proportional hazards regression. Total red meat intake was positively associated with risk of regional/distant cancer (p-trend = 0.02). The risk was 25% higher in the highest vs. lowest intake quintile (95% CI = 1.03-1.52). Higher processed red meat intake (Q5 vs. Q1) was associated with 27% higher risk of localized breast cancer (95% CI = 1.01-1.27, p-trend = 0.03) and a 19% higher risk of regional/distant cancer (95% CI = 0.98-1.44, p-trend = 0.10). In addition, higher nitrite intake from processed red meat was positively associated with localized cancer (HR for Q5 vs. Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.09-1.39, p-trend cancer risk overall and all cancer stages (p-trend = 0.02-0.05). No heterogeneity was observed in risk associations by hormone receptor status. Our findings suggest that high consumption of red meat and processed meat may increase risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Added nitrite and heme iron may partly contribute to these observed associations. © Published 2015. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.

  10. Studies on high iron content in water resources of Moradabad district (UP, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The overload of iron may cause severe health problems such as liver cancer, diabetes, cirrhosis of liver, diseases related to heart and central nervous system, infertility etc. The presence of high concentration of iron leads to adverse changes in colour, odour and taste of water and it also stains clothes and utensils. However, the local health authority's records are not available.

  11. Determination of iron in highly-saline matrices by FIA-ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    species were subsequently eluted by hydrochloric acid and analysed by ICP-MS. During the FIA step of preconcentration, a high degree of salinity did not influence the adsorption mechanism of iron, which may be related to formation of iron-hydroxide complexes at the sites of amide moieties of the nylon...

  12. Breakfast intake is associated with nutritional status, Mediterranean diet adherence, serum iron and fasting glucose: the CYFamilies study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Chrystalleni; Matalas, Antonia-Leda

    2015-05-01

    To assess the association of breakfast intake with Mediterranean diet adherence, physical activity levels, obesity, selected cardiovascular risk markers and Fe status. Cross-sectional study. BMI, body fat percentage and waist circumference were assessed. Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer and diet quality was evaluated by applying the KIDMED index. Blood tests to assess blood lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, serum Fe and ferritin, as well as Hb, were performed. Primary-school children of the Troodos mountainous area in Cyprus. Eighty-three Cypriot children (mean age 9·2 (sd 1·7) years). Compared with breakfast skippers, regular breakfast eaters were 40 % more likely to have a KIDMED score higher by one point on average (OR=1·41; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·84) after accounting for obesity levels and other confounders. Breakfast skippers, on the other hand, were by about 14 % more likely to have a body fat percentage value higher by one unit, as well as higher values for both BMI and waist circumference. The relationship was significantly strengthened when combining body fat percentage and waist circumference into a composite variable (OR=0·20; 95 % CI 0·06, 0·69). Fasting glucose was inversely correlated to breakfast intake in descriptive analyses, whereas serum Fe was positively correlated to breakfast intake after considering age, gender and diet quality. The latter relationship disappeared, however, after considering physical activity levels. Cypriot children who take breakfast regularly exhibit a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet and have higher serum Fe concentrations and lower BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage and fasting glucose levels, compared with children who skip breakfast. Public health professionals, educators and parents should prioritize on actions that will motivate children to regularly eat breakfast.

  13. Effect of a high monounsaturated fatty acids diet and a Mediterranean diet on serum lipids and insulin sensitivity in adults with mild abdominal obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Dijk, van S.J.; Hoelen, D.; Siebelink, E.; Heijligenberg, R.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims - Diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) such as a Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases by improving insulin sensitivity and serum lipids. Besides being high in MUFA, a Mediterranean diet also contains abundant plant foods, moderate wine and

  14. High fat diet accelerates cartilage repair in DBA/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wu; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M; Suijkerbuijk, Mathijs; Kops, Nicole; Bos, Pieter K; Verhaar, Jan A N; Zuurmond, Anne-Marie; Dell'Accio, Francesco; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis, but it is unknown what it does on cartilage repair. Here we investigated whether a high fat diet (HFD) influences cartilage repair in a mouse model of cartilage repair. We fed DBA/1 mice control or HFD (60% energy from fat). After 2 weeks, a full thickness cartilage defect was made in the trochlear groove. Mice were sacrificed, 1, 8, and 24 weeks after operation. Cartilage repair was evaluated on histology. Serum glucose, insulin and amyloid A were measured 24 h before operation and at endpoints. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on synovium and adipose tissue to evaluate macrophage infiltration and phenotype. One week after operation, mice on HFD had defect filling with fibroblast-like cells and more cartilage repair as indicated by a lower Pineda score. After 8 weeks, mice on a HFD still had a lower Pineda score. After 24 weeks, no mice had complete cartilage repair and we did not detect a significant difference in cartilage repair between diets. Bodyweight was increased by HFD, whereas serum glucose, amyloid A and insulin were not influenced. Macrophage infiltration and phenotype in adipose tissue and synovium were not influenced by HFD. In contrast to common wisdom, HFD accelerated intrinsic cartilage repair in DBA/1 mice on the short term. Resistance to HFD induced inflammatory and metabolic changes could be associated with accelerated cartilage repair. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1258-1264, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. High-protein diet suppresses corpus atrophic gastritis in Helicobacter pylori infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Keiko; Kamada, Tomoari; Sugiu, Kuniaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Manabe, Noriaki; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Teramoto, Fusako; Haruma, Ken

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a high-protein diet on corpus atrophic gastritis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils, H. pylori was administered orally to 5-wk-old Mongolian gerbils; and the animals were then fed a control diet (Group C); a high-fat diet (Group F: 40% fat); a high-protein diet (Group P: 32% protein); or a high-fat, high-protein diet (Group FP: 40% fat, 32% protein) for 50 wk beginning at 7 wk of age. In uninfected animals, the mucosal thickness of the corpus was significantly greater in Group P and Group FP than in Group C (P diet suppresses corpus atrophic gastritis in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

  16. Tocotrienols Reverse Cardiovascular, Metabolic and Liver Changes in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Weng-Yew Wong; Hemant Poudyal; Leigh C. Ward; Lindsay Brown

    2012-01-01

    Tocotrienols have been reported to improve lipid profiles, reduce atherosclerotic lesions, decrease blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin concentrations, normalise blood pressure in vivo and inhibit adipogenesis in vitro, yet their role in the metabolic syndrome has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) on high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic, cardiovascular and liver dysfunction in rats. Rats fed a high carboh...

  17. Diet-induced impulsivity: Effects of a high-fat and a high-sugar diet on impulsive choice in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catherine C; Pirkle, Jesseca R A; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Impulsive choice is a common charactertistic among individuals with gambling problems, obesity, and substance abuse issues. Impulsive choice has been classified as a trans-disease process, and understanding the etiology of trait impulsivity could help to understand how diseases and disorders related to impulsive choice are manifested. The Western diet is a possible catalyst of impulsive choice as individuals who are obese and who eat diets high in fat and sugar are typically more impulsive. However, such correlational evidence is unable to discern the direction and causal nature of the relationship. The present study sought to determine how diet may directly contribute to impulsive choice. After 8 weeks of dietary exposure (high-fat, high-sugar, chow), the rats were tested on an impulsive choice task, which presented choices between a smaller-sooner reward (SS) and a larger-later reward (LL). Then, the rats were transferred to a chow diet and retested on the impulsive choice task. The high-sugar and high-fat groups made significantly more impulsive choices than the chow group. Both groups became more self-controlled when they were off the diet, but there were some residual effects of the diet on choice behavior. These results suggest that diet, specifically one high in processed fat or sugar, induces impulsive choice. This diet-induced impulsivity could be a precursor to other disorders that are characterized by impulsivity, such as diet-induced obesity, and could offer potential understanding of the trans-disease nature of impulsive choice.

  18. Effect of high-fat diet on hepatic proteomics of hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Chung; Lin, Ya-Lin; Kuo, Chia-Feng

    2015-02-18

    A high-fat diet contributes to the etiology of metabolic diseases. As the liver plays a crucial role in metabolism, an insight into the hepatic proteomics will help to illustrate the physiological effect of a high-fat diet. Fourteen nine-week old male Syrian hamsters were maintained on either control (C) or high-fat (HF) diets (0.2% cholesterol +22% fat) for 8 weeks. Hamsters were chosen because they show close similarity to human lipid metabolism. At the end of study, blood and livers were collected for analysis. Liver proteins were fractionated by electrophoresis, digested by trypsin, and then separated by label-free nano-LC/MS/MS. The TurboSequest algorithm was used to identify the peptide sequences against the hamster database in Universal Proteins Resource Knowledgebase (UniProt). The results indicate that 1191 hepatic proteins were identified and 135 of them were expressed differentially in the high-fat group (p diet had significantly (p diet also had significantly (p diet (p diet (p diet (p diet, including carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthase (ASS), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase 1 (ARG 1). Post-translational modifications (PTM) of ANXA3, ANXA5, and XDH were also analyzed. A set of differentially expressed proteins were identified as molecular markers for elucidating the pathological mechanism of high-fat diet.

  19. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, Angélique; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the effects of high protein intake on the development of fat deposition and partitioning in response to high-fat and/or HS feeding. A total of thirty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to one of the six dietary regimens with low and high protein, sucrose and fat contents for 5 weeks. Body weight (BW) and food intake were measured weekly. Oral glucose tolerance tests and meal tolerance tests were performed after 4th and 5th weeks of the regimen, respectively. At the end of the study, the rats were killed 2 h after ingestion of a calibrated meal. Blood, tissues and organs were collected for analysis of circulating metabolites and hormones, body composition and mRNA expression in the liver and adipose tissues. No changes were observed in cumulative energy intake and BW gain after 5 weeks of dietary treatment. However, high-protein diets reduced by 20 % the adiposity gain induced by HS and high-sucrose high-fat (HS-HF) diets. Gene expression and transcriptomic analysis suggested that high protein intake reduced liver capacity for lipogenesis by reducing mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase (fasn), acetyl-CoA carboxylase a and b (Acaca and Acacb) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1c (Srebf-1c). Moreover, ketogenesis, as indicated by plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels, was higher in HS-HF-fed mice that were also fed high protein levels. Taken together, these results suggest that high-protein diets may reduce adiposity by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating ketogenesis in the liver.

  20. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  1. High fat, low carbohydrate diet limit fear and aggression in Göttingen minipigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Maria Juul Haagensen

    Full Text Available High fat, low carbohydrate diets have become popular, as short-term studies show that such diets are effective for reducing body weight, and lowering the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. There is growing evidence from both humans and other animals that diet affects behaviour and intake of fat has been linked, positively and negatively, with traits such as exploration, social interaction, anxiety and fear. Animal models with high translational value can help provide relevant and important information in elucidating potential effects of high fat, low carbohydrate diets on human behaviour. Twenty four young, male Göttingen minipigs were fed either a high fat/cholesterol, low carbohydrate diet or a low fat, high carbohydrate/sucrose diet in contrast to a standard low fat, high carbohydrate minipig diet. Spontaneous behaviour was observed through video recordings of home pens and test-related behaviours were recorded during tests involving animal-human contact and reaction towards a novel object. We showed that the minipigs fed a high fat/cholesterol, low carbohydrate diet were less aggressive, showed more non-agonistic social contact and had fewer and less severe skin lesions and were less fearful of a novel object than minipigs fed low fat, high carbohydrate diets. These results found in a porcine model could have important implications for general health and wellbeing of humans and show the potential for using dietary manipulations to reduce aggression in human society.

  2. Citrus flavanones prevent systemic inflammation and ameliorate oxidative stress in C57BL/6J mice fed high fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    It was investigated the preventive effects of the flavanones hesperidin, eriocitrin and eriodictyol on the oxidative stress and systemic inflammation induced by high-fat diet in C57BL/6J mice. The mice received a standard diet (9.5% kcal from fat), high-fat diet (45% kcal from fat) or high fat diet ...

  3. Metabolic risk factors in mice divergently selected for BMR fed high fat and high carb diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julita Sadowska

    Full Text Available Factors affecting contribution of spontaneous physical activity (SPA; activity associated with everyday tasks to energy balance of humans are not well understood, as it is not clear whether low activity is related to dietary habits, precedes obesity or is a result of thereof. In particular, human studies on SPA and basal metabolic rates (BMR, accounting for >50% of human energy budget and their associations with diet composition, metabolic thrift and obesity are equivocal. To clarify these ambiguities we used a unique animal model-mice selected for divergent BMR rates (the H-BMR and L-BMR line type presenting a 50% between-line type difference in the primary selected trait. Males of each line type were divided into three groups and fed either a high fat, high carb or a control diet. They then spent 4 months in individual cages under conditions emulating human "sedentary lifestyle", with SPA followed every month and measurements of metabolic risk indicators (body fat mass %, blood lipid profile, fasting blood glucose levels and oxidative damage in the livers, kidneys and hearts taken at the end of study. Mice with genetically determined high BMR assimilated more energy and had higher SPA irrespective of type of diet. H-BMR individuals were characterized by lower dry body fat mass %, better lipid profile and lower fasting blood glucose levels, but higher oxidative damage in the livers and hearts. Genetically determined high BMR may be a protective factor against diet-induced obesity and most of the metabolic syndrome indicators. Elevated spontaneous activity is correlated with high BMR, and constitutes an important factor affecting individual capability to sustain energy balance even under energy dense diets.

  4. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology and Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI), CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Wani, Mohan R. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Bhat, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... about a healthy diet and food choices that will help your child get enough iron. Your child's ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that ... pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, your doctor may prescribe iron ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... also checks the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in your blood. Abnormal ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may ... the strength of a few medicines and how well they work. Other fruits rich in vitamin C ...

  11. Differential modulation of cytosolic lipases activities in liver and adipose tissue by high-carbohydrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Angélica Heringer; Moreira, Carolina Campos Lima; Mario, Érica Guilhen; de Souza Cordeiro, Letícia Maria; Avelar, Gleide Fernandes; Botion, Leida Maria; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a high-fructose (FRUC) diet induces metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, known as the metabolic syndrome, which are characterised by obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. In this study, the effect of a FRUC diet (60 % fructose) for 8 weeks on the metabolism of lipids in liver and epididymal adipose tissue from Wistar rats was compared with the AIN-93M diet and the effects of the AIN-93M diet were compared with a chow diet. The FRUC diet induced marked increases in both hepatocyte lipid droplet volume and postprandial serum levels of triacylglycerol (TAG), but reduced the postprandial serum levels of insulin. The AIN-93M diet induced marked increases in the hepatocyte lipid droplet volume and the serum levels of insulin, without affecting the serum levels of TAG. We found that isocaloric substitution of cornstarch, dextrinised cornstarch and sucrose (AIN-93M diet) for fructose did not affect the hepatic VLDL-TAG secretion and adipose tissue glucose uptake, lipolysis and cytosolic lipases activities in rats. However, the high-fructose diet induced a severe steatosis in liver accompanied by a decrease in cytosolic lipases activities. In adipose tissue, the FRUC diet induced a decrease in the lipoprotein lipase activity, and an increase in lipogenesis. FRUC and AIN-93M diets induced changes in lipid homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue by distinct biochemical mechanisms.

  12. Do high iron concentrations in rewetted rich fens hamper restoration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aggenbach, C.J.S.; Backx, H.; Emsens, W.J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Stuyfzand, P.J.; Wołejko, L.; Diggelen, R. van

    In this study we address the question of the extent to which iron may be a limiting factor in restoring rich fens in the temperate climate zone of Europe. Rewetted fens that were heavily degraded in the past by draining over a long period, were compared with pristine fens or fens with slightly

  13. Structures, bonding and reactivity of iron and manganese high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iron and manganese ions with terminal oxo and hydroxo ligands are discovered as key intermediates in several synthetic and biochemical catalytic cycles. Since many of these species possess vigorous catalytic abilities, they are extremely transient in nature and experiments which probe the structure and bonding on such ...

  14. Highly Coordinated Iron and Cobalt Nitrides Synthesized at High Pressures and High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ken; Terabe, Toshiki; Kato, Daiki; Takayama, Shin; Kato, Masahiko; Soda, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Masashi

    2017-06-05

    Highly coordinated iron and cobalt nitrides were successfully synthesized via direct chemical reaction between a transition metal and molecular nitrogen at pressures above approximately 30 GPa using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The synthesized novel transition metal nitrides were found to crystallize into the NiAs-type or marcasite-type structure. NiAs-type FeN could be quenched at ambient pressure, although it was gradually converted to the ZnS-type structure after the pressure was released. On the other hand, CoN was recovered with ZnS-type structure through a phase transition from NiAs-type structure at approximately a few gigapascals during decompression. Marcasite-type CoN2 was also synthesized at pressures above approximately 30 GPa. High-pressure in situ X-ray diffraction measurement showed that the zero-pressure bulk modulus of marcasite-type CoN2 is 216(18) GPa, which is comparable to that of RhN2. This indicates that the interatomic distance of the N-N dimer in marcasite-type CoN2 is short because of weak orbital interaction between cobalt and nitrogen atoms, as in RhN2. Surprisingly, a first-principles electronic band calculation suggests that the NiAs-type FeN and CoN and marcasite-type CoN2 exhibit metallic characteristics with magnetic moments of 3.4, 0.6, and 1.2 μB, respectively. The ferromagnetic NiAs-type structure originates from the anisotropic arrangement of transition atoms stacked along the c axis.

  15. High-Fat-Diet-Induced Deficits in Dopamine Terminal Function Are Reversed by Restoring Insulin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordahl, Steve C; Jones, Sara R

    2017-02-15

    Systemically released insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to insulin receptors on several neural cell types, including dopaminergic neurons. Insulin has been shown to decrease dopamine neuron firing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but potentiate release and reuptake at dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here we show that prolonged consumption of a high fat diet blocks insulin's effects in the NAc, but insulin's effects are restored by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which supports insulin receptor signaling. Mice fed a high fat diet (60% kcals from fat) displayed significantly higher fasting blood glucose 160 mg/dL, compared to 101 mg/dL for control-diet-fed mice, and high-fat-diet-fed mice showed reduced blood glucose clearance after an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry to measure electrically evoked dopamine in brain slices containing the NAc core, high-fat-diet-fed mice exhibited slower dopamine reuptake compared to control-diet-fed mice (2.2 ± 0.1 and 2.67 ± 0.15 μM/s, respectively). Moreover, glucose clearance rate was negatively correlated with Vmax. Insulin (10 nM to 1 μM) dose dependently increased reuptake rates in control-diet-fed mice compared with in the high-fat-diet group; however, the small molecule insulin receptor sensitizing agent, TCS 401 (300 nM), restored reuptake in high-fat-diet-fed mice to control-diet levels, and a small molecule inhibitor of the insulin receptor, BMS 536924 (300 nM), attenuated reuptake, similar to high-fat-diet-fed mice. These data show that a high-fat diet impairs dopamine reuptake by attenuating insulin signaling at dopamine terminals.

  16. Methyl Donor Supplementation Blocks the Adverse Effects of Maternal High Fat Diet on Offspring Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Jesselea Carlin; Robert George; Reyes, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal consumption of a high fat diet during pregnancy increases the offspring risk for obesity. Using a mouse model, we have previously shown that maternal consumption of a high fat (60%) diet leads to global and gene specific decreases in DNA methylation in the brain of the offspring. The present experiments were designed to attempt to reverse this DNA hypomethylation through supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors, and to determine whether methyl donor supplementation cou...

  17. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2010-01-01

    Background Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Almost 25% of the world's population is affected by iron deficiency, a leading cause of anemia. In plants, iron deficiency leads to chlorosis and reduced yield. Both animals and plants may suffer from iron deficiency when...... their diet or environment lacks bioavailable iron. A sustainable way to reduce iron malnutrition in humans is to develop staple crops with increased content of bioavailable iron. Knowledge of where and how iron accumulates in seeds of crop plants will increase the understanding of plant iron metabolism...... and will assist in the production of staples with increased bioavailable iron. Results Here we reveal the distribution of iron in seeds of three Phaseolus species including thirteen genotypes of P. vulgaris, P. coccineus, and P. lunatus. We showed that high concentrations of iron accumulate in cells surrounding...

  18. Iron status and dietary iron intake of vegetarian children from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, Daiva; Prescha, Anna; Szeremeta, Karolina; Jankowski, Adam

    2013-01-01

    In Poland, vegetarian diets are becoming more and more popular. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of iron intake on iron status in vegetarian children. Dietary iron intake, iron food sources, blood count, serum iron, ferritin level and total iron-binding capacity were estimated in two groups of children, namely vegetarians (n = 22) and omnivores (n = 18) of both sexes, aged from 2 to 18 years. Seven-day food records were used to assess their diet. Dietary iron intake in vegetarians and omnivores was low (up to 65.0 and 60.1% of the recommended dietary allowance). A significantly higher intake of vitamin C was observed in vegetarians compared with omnivores (p = 0.019). The main sources of iron in vegetarians were cereal products, followed by vegetables and mushroom products, then fruit. The prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) was higher in the vegetarian group (p = 0.023). The serum ferritin level and mean corpuscular volume in the vegetarians were also lower than in the omnivores (p = 0.01 and p = 0.014, respectively). Children who follow a vegetarian diet may suffer from ID in spite of having a high vitamin C intake. This indicates the need to introduce dietary education and iron status monitoring. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The efficacy of a local ascorbic acid-rich food in improving iron absorption from Mexican diets: a field study using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Margarita; Rosado, Jorge L; Allen, Lindsay H; Abrams, Steve; García, Olga P

    2003-09-01

    One potentially sustainable approach to improving iron status at the community level is to encourage the consumption of local ascorbic acid-rich foods, in conjunction with meals high in nonheme iron. The study, conducted in rural Mexico, measured stable isotopes of iron to evaluate the effect on iron absorption of the addition of 25 mg ascorbic acid as agua de limón (limeade) to 2 typical meals per day for 2 wk. Fifteen nonpregnant, nonlactating, iron-deficient (ferritin < 12 microg/L) women (x +/- SD age: 28.3 +/- 7.7 y) fasted overnight and were brought to a community clinic. After an initial blood sample, subjects consumed 0.25 mg (57)Fe with both breakfast and lunch for 14 d. On day 29, another blood sample was taken, and a reference dose of 2.7 mg (58)Fe with 25 mg ascorbic acid was given. For the following 15 d, participants consumed 0.25 mg (57)Fe added to both breakfast and lunch with 25 mg ascorbic acid added to each meal as limeade. A final blood sample was taken on day 59. Iron absorption was calculated from recovery of isotopes in blood obtained 14 d after administration of each isotope. When 25 mg ascorbic acid as limeade was added to test meals twice a day for 2 wk, iron absorption increased significantly (P < 0.001) in every subject: the mean absorption rose from 6.6 +/- 3.0% to 22.9 +/- 12.6%. The consumption of 25 mg ascorbic acid as limeade twice daily with meals substantially improved iron absorption and may improve the iron status of nonpregnant, nonlactating, iron-deficient women.

  20. META060 protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in a high-fat–diet fed mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, I.O.C.M.; Diepen, J.A. van; Berg, S.A. van den; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Darland, G.; Konda, V.; Tripp, M.L.; Bland, J.S.; Voshol, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether a reduced iso-α acid derived from an extract of Humulus lupulus L., META060, had an effect on weight gain, body composition, and metabolism in a high-fat–diet (HFD) fed mouse model. Methods: Weight gain was monitored for up to 20 wk in mice receiving a low-fat

  1. META060 protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in a high-fat-diet fed mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, I.O.; Diepen, J.A. van; Berg, S.A. van den; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Darland, G.; Konda, V.; Tripp, M.L.; Bland, J.S.; Voshol, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether a reduced iso-alpha acid derived from an extract of Humulus lupulus L., META060, had an effect on weight gain, body composition, and metabolism in a high-fat-diet (HFD) fed mouse model. METHODS: Weight gain was monitored for up to 20 wk in mice receiving a low-fat

  2. Effects of exercise and diet change on cognition function and synaptic plasticity in high fat diet induced obese rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woo, Jinhee; Shin, Ki Ok; Park, So Young; Jang, Ki Soeng; Kang, Sunghwun

    2013-01-01

    .... This study was performed on Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with 13-weeks of high fat diet-induced obesity in connection to the effects of regular exercise and dietary control for 8 weeks on the synaptic plasticity and cognitive abilities of brain...

  3. Reproductive parameters and oxidative stress status of male rats fed with low and high salt diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle O Iranloye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiency of minerals and micronutrients has been reported to impair the process of spermatogenesis. Historically, salt has been used by women on their husbands to increase their libido, however, the role of salt diet on sperm parameters are yet to be ascertained. AIM: The present study was designed to determine the effect of low and high salt diet on sperm parameters, oxidative status and reproductive hormone levels of male rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 rats were divided into three groups: Group I: (control received 0.3% salt diet, Group II: low salt (received 0.14% salt diet and Group III: high salt (received 8% salt diet. All animals were treated for 6 weeks; after which epididymal sperm parameters; oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase in the testes and epididymal tissues, as well as follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and testosterone levels were determined. Results: The results showed decreased sperm count in the low salt diet rats while increased sperm count was observed in the high salt diet treated rats. Both low salt and high salt diet fed rats exhibited increased abnormal sperm cells and increased epididymal oxidative stress when compared with their respective control. FSH and testosterone levels were increased in the high salt fed rats while LH level was decreased when compared with the control values. Conclusion: This study suggests that both low and high salt diet play a negative role in the fertility of male rats.

  4. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  5. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. A low-fat diet has a higher potential than energy restriction to improve high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muurling, M.; Jong, M.C.; Mensink, R.P.; Hornstra, G.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Pijl, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that energy restriction (ER) or low-fat (LF) diets have beneficial effects on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. However, comparison between ER and low-fat diet regarding the effect on insulin resistance and lipid metabolism has not

  7. Histologic and Metabolic Derangement in High-Fat, High-Fructose, and Combination Diet Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Sun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We used high-fat (HF, high-fructose (HFr, and combination diets to create a dietary animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Comparison of both clinical phenotypes has not been well defined. The purpose of this study was to compare histologic and metabolic characteristics between diets in an animal model of NAFLD. Methods. NAFLD was induced in rats by feeding them HF, HFr, and combination (HF + HFr diets for 20 weeks. The degree of intrahepatic fat accumulation, inflammation, and oxidative stress was evaluated. Metabolic derangements were assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test and the intrahepatic insulin signal pathway. Results. Body weight gain and intrahepatic fat accumulation were more prominent in the HF feeding group than in the HFr group. The expressions of NOX-4 and TLR-4 were higher in the HF and HFr combination groups than in the HF-only group. Other intrahepatic inflammatory markers, MCP-1, TNF-α, and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, were the highest in the HF + HFr combination group. Although intrahepatic fat deposition was less prominent in the HFr diet model, intrahepatic inflammation was noted. Conclusions. Intrahepatic inflammation and metabolic derangements were more prominent in the HF and HFr combination model than in the HF monodiet model.

  8. Intravenous Iron Carboxymaltose as a Potential Therapeutic in Anemia of Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Lofruthe

    Full Text Available Intravenous iron supplementation is an effective therapy in iron deficiency anemia (IDA, but controversial in anemia of inflammation (AI. Unbound iron can be used by bacteria and viruses for their replication and enhance the inflammatory response. Nowadays available high molecular weight iron complexes for intravenous iron substitution, such as ferric carboxymaltose, might be useful in AI, as these pharmaceuticals deliver low doses of free iron over a prolonged period of time. We tested the effects of intravenous iron carboxymaltose in murine AI: Wild-type mice were exposed to the heat-killed Brucella abortus (BA model and treated with or without high molecular weight intravenous iron. 4h after BA injection followed by 2h after intravenous iron treatment, inflammatory cytokines were upregulated by BA, but not enhanced by iron treatment. In long term experiments, mice were fed a regular or an iron deficient diet and then treated with intravenous iron or saline 14 days after BA injection. Iron treatment in mice with BA-induced AI was effective 24h after iron administration. In contrast, mice with IDA (on iron deficiency diet prior to BA-IA required 7d to recover from AI. In these experiments, inflammatory markers were not further induced in iron-treated compared to vehicle-treated BA-injected mice. These results demonstrate that intravenous iron supplementation effectively treated the murine BA-induced AI without further enhancement of the inflammatory response. Studies in humans have to reveal treatment options for AI in patients.

  9. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  10. Cocos nucifera water improves metabolic functions in offspring of high fat diet fed Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunle-Alabi, Olufadekemi T; Akindele, Opeyemi O; Raji, Yinusa

    2017-10-09

    Maternal high fat diet has been implicated in the aetiology of metabolic diseases in their offspring. The hypolipidaemic actions of Cocos nucifera water improve metabolic indices of dams consuming a high fat diet during gestation. This study investigated the effects of C. nucifera water on metabolism of offspring of dams exposed to high fat diet during gestation. Four groups of pregnant Wistar rat dams (n=6) were treated orally from Gestation Day (GD) 1 to GD 21 as follows: standard rodent feed+10 mL/kg distilled water (Control), standard rodent feed+10 mL/kg C. nucifera water, high fat feed+10 mL/kg distilled water (high fat diet), and high fat feed+10 mL/kg C. nucifera water (high fat diet+C. nucifera water). The feeds were given ad libitum and all dams received standard rodent feed after parturition. Fasting blood glucose was measured in offspring before being euthanized on Postnatal Day (PND) 120. Serum insulin, leptin, lipid profile and liver enzymes were measured. Serum total cholesterol (TC), insulin, alanine transaminase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly increased (pfat diet offspring compared with controls. Similar changes were not observed in high fat diet+C. nucifera water offspring. Results suggest that the adverse effects of maternal high fat diet on offspring's metabolism can be ameliorated by C. nucifera water.

  11. Effects of a high-fat, low- versus high-glycemic index diet: retardation of insulin resistance involves adipose tissue modulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Schothorst, E.M; Bunschoten, A; Schrauwen, P; Mensink, R.P; Keijer, J

    Beneficial effects of low glycemic index (GI) diets in rodents have been studied using healthy low-fat diets, while the effects might be different on high-fat diets inducing progression of insulin resistance...

  12. Antioxidative Diet Supplementation Reverses High-Fat Diet-Induced Increases of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Vargas-Robles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that is characterized not only by excessive fat deposition but also by systemic microinflammation, high oxidative stress, and increased cardiovascular risk factors. While diets enriched in natural antioxidants showed beneficial effects on oxidative stress, blood pressure, and serum lipid composition, diet supplementation with synthetic antioxidants showed contradictive results. Thus, we tested in C57Bl/6 mice whether a daily dosage of an antioxidative mixture consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (corabion would affect cardiovascular risk factors associated with obesity. Obese mice showed increased serum triglyceride and glucose levels and hypertension after eight weeks of being fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Importantly, corabion ameliorated all of these symptoms significantly. Oxidative stress and early signs of systemic microinflammation already developed after two weeks of high-fat diet and were significantly reduced by daily doses of corabion. Of note, the beneficial effects of corabion could not be observed when applying its single antioxidative components suggesting that a combination of various nutrients is required to counteract HFD-induced cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, daily consumption of corabion may be beneficial for the management of obesity-related cardiovascular complications.

  13. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  14. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  15. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortman, Guus AM; Mulder, Michelle LM; Richters, Thijs JW; Shanmugam, Nanda KN; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal-iron, or high-iron diets and after two weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron-deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high-iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26046550

  16. Health Benefits of Dietary Tree Peony Seed Oil in a High Fat Diet Hamster Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhiqiang Zheng; Jigang Han; Yingyi Mao; Xue Tang; Yan Guan; Yonghong Hu

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, we experimentally investigated benefits of dietary tree peony seed oil(PSO) in dyslipidemia-associated metabolic diseases using a high fat diet hamster model.Methods:High fat diets(HFD)containing 15 % coconut oil(CO...

  17. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.; Keijer, J.

    2011-01-01

    A low vs. high glycemic index of a high-fat (HF) diet (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in adult male C57BL/6J mice, as shown recently (Van Schothorst EM, Bunschoten A, Schrauwen P, Mensink RP, Keijer J. FASEB J 23: 1092–1101, 2009). The LGI diet enhanced

  18. The effect of long-term high-fibre diets in diabetic outpatients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diets containing large amounts of dietary fibre have been shown to be beneficial in improving diabetic control. We -investigated the practical aspects of administering a high-fibre diet to diabetic outpa- tients in Cape Town, using readily avaifable, low- cost fO':Jdstuffs with a high dietary fibre content. Ten patients were ...

  19. The effect of long-term high-fibre diets in diabetic outpatients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diets containing large amounts of dietary fibre have been shown to be beneficial in improving diabetic control. We -investigated the practical aspects of administering a high-fibre diet to diabetic outpatients in Cape Town, using readily available, lowcost foodstuffs with a high dietary fibre content. Ten patients were followed ...

  20. Diets with high or low protein content and glycemic index for weight-loss maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Baak, Marleen van

    2010-01-01

    Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power.......Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power....

  1. Caralluma fimbriata and metformin protection of rat pancreas from high fat diet induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakara, G; Mallaiah, P; Rajendran, R; Saralakumari, D

    2018-02-01

    A high fat diet promotes oxidative stress, which contributes to the development of pancreatic fibrosis. We compared the protective effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of Caralluma fimbriata (CFE) to metformin (Met) in the pancreas of Wistar rats fed a high fat diet. The experimental animals were divided into five groups: control (C), treated with CFE (C + CFE), treated with high fat diet (HFD), high fat diet treated with CFE (HFD + CFE), and high fat diet treated with metformin (Met) (HFD + Met). CFE was administered orally to groups C + CFE and HFD + CFE rats for 90 days. Met was given to the HFD + Met group. After 90 days, oxidative stress markers in the pancreas including reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid oxidation (LO), protein oxidation (PO), and activities of antioxidant and polyol pathway enzymes, aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) were assayed and tissue histology was examined. Establishment of oxidative stress in high fat diet fed rats was verified by elevated LO and PO, decreased GSH, decreased activities of antioxidants and increased activities of polyol pathway enzymes. Oxidative stress was prevented in HFD + CFE and HFD + Met groups. Group C + CFE exhibited improved antioxidant status compared to group C. CFE treatment prevented high fat diet induced acinar cell degeneration, necrosis, edema and hemorrhage. CFE could be used as adjuvant therapy for preventing or managing high fat diet induced pancreatic damage.

  2. Consumption of diets high in prebiotic fiber or protein during growth influences the response to a high fat and sucrose diet in adulthood in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early dietary exposure can influence susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life. We examined the lasting effects of a high protein or high prebiotic fiber weaning diet when followed by a high energy diet in adulthood. Methods At birth, litters of Wistar rats were culled to 10 pups. At 21 d pups were weaned onto control (C, high prebiotic fiber (HF or high protein (HP diet. Rats consumed the experimental diets until 14 wk when they were switched to a high fat/sucrose (HFHS diet for 6 wk. Body composition and energy intake were measured and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT performed. Blood was analyzed for satiety hormones and tissues collected for real-time PCR. Results Weight gain was attenuated in male rats fed HF from 12 wk until study completion. In females there were early reductions in body weight that moderated until the final two wk of HFHS diet wherein HF females weighed less than HP. Final body weight was significantly higher following the high fat challenge in male and female rats that consumed HP diet from weaning compared to HF. Lean mass was higher and fat mass lower with HF compared to HP and compared to C in males. Energy intake was highest in HP rats, particularly at the start of HFHS feeding. Plasma glucose was higher in HP rats compared to HF during an OGTT. Plasma amylin was higher in HF females compared to C and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 was higher in HF rats during the OGTT. Leptin was higher in HP rats during the OGTT. HF upregulated GLUT 5 mRNA expression in the intestine and downregulated hepatic hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Male rats fed HP had higher hepatic triglyceride content than C or HF. Conclusion These data suggest that while a long-term diet high in protein predisposes to an obese phenotype when rats are given a high energy diet in adulthood, consumption of a high fiber diet during growth may provide some protection.

  3. Nanocrystalline Iron-Cobalt Alloys for High Saturation Indutance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    film deposited just like the pick-up of a turn-table music player. The contact pads provide the electrical contacts to the starting and end point of...anisotropy using the geometry of the thin toroid. We have shown experimentally that the thin film toroid calculations may be applicable to up to millimeter...thin film as well as bulk devices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Micromagnetic Calculations, Nanocrystalline cobalt-iron, Thin Film Toroids 16. SECURITY

  4. Deregulation of arginase induces bone complications in high-fat/high-sucrose diet diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Anil; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Toque, Haroldo A; Cain, Michael; Wong, Abby; Howie, Nicole; Shinde, Rahul; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yao, Lin; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monty; Caldwell, Ruth B; Isales, Carlos; Caldwell, R William; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-02-15

    A balanced diet is crucial for healthy development and prevention of musculoskeletal related diseases. Diets high in fat content are known to cause obesity, diabetes and a number of other disease states. Our group and others have previously reported that activity of the urea cycle enzyme arginase is involved in diabetes-induced dysregulation of vascular function due to decreases in nitric oxide formation. We hypothesized that diabetes may also elevate arginase activity in bone and bone marrow, which could lead to bone-related complications. To test this we determined the effects of diabetes on expression and activity of arginase, in bone and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We demonstrated that arginase 1 is abundantly present in the bone and BMSCs. We also demonstrated that arginase activity and expression in bone and bone marrow is up-regulated in models of diabetes induced by HFHS diet and streptozotocin (STZ). HFHS diet down-regulated expression of healthy bone metabolism markers (BMP2, COL-1, ALP, and RUNX2) and reduced bone mineral density, bone volume and trabecular thickness. However, treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH) prevented these bone-related complications of diabetes. In-vitro study of BMSCs showed that high glucose treatment increased arginase activity and decreased nitric oxide production. These effects were reversed by treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH). Our study provides evidence that deregulation of l-arginine metabolism plays a vital role in HFHS diet-induced diabetic complications and that these complications can be prevented by treatment with arginase inhibitors. The modulation of l-arginine metabolism in disease could offer a novel therapeutic approach for osteoporosis and other musculoskeletal related diseases. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Electronic structure of iron in magnesium silicate glasses at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chen; Catalli, Krystle; Grocholski, Brent; Gao, Lili; Alp, Ercan; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Cynn, Hyunchae; Evans, William J.; Shim, Sang-Heon

    2012-12-01

    A recent study attributed the source of an iron partitioning change between silicate melt and minerals at deep mantle conditions to a high-spin to low-spin change in iron, which was found in a Fe-diluted Mg-silicate glass at a similar pressure. We conducted X-ray emission spectroscopy and nuclear forward scattering on iron-rich Mg-silicate glasses at high pressure and 300 K in the diamond-anvil cell: Al-free glass up to 135 GPa and Al-bearing glass up to 93 GPa. In both glasses, the spin moment decreases gradually from 1 bar and does not reach a complete low-spin state even at the peak pressures of this study. The gradual change may be due to the existence of diverse coordination environments for iron in the glasses and continuous structural adjustment of the disordered system with pressure. If the result can be extrapolated to iron in mantle melts, the small, gradual changes in the spin state of iron may not be the dominant factor explaining the reported sudden change in the partitioning behavior of iron between silicate melt and minerals at lower-mantle pressures.

  6. RNA-Sequencing of Drosophila melanogaster Head Tissue on High-Sugar and High-Fat Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, Wayne; Rivera, Osvaldo; Talbert, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to increase risk for cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. In addition, it has been implicated in aggravation of neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, a physiological state mimicking diet-induced obesity can be induced by subjecting fruit flies to a solid medium disproportionately higher in sugar than protein, or that has been supplemented with a rich source of saturated fat. These flies can exhibit increased circulating glucose levels, increased triglyceride content, insulin-like peptide resistance, and behavior indicative of neurological decline. We subjected flies to variants of the high-sugar diet, high-fat diet, or normal (control) diet, followed by a total RNA extraction from fly heads of each diet group for the purpose of Poly-A selected RNA-Sequencing. Our objective was to identify the effects of obesogenic diets on transcriptome patterns, how they differed between obesogenic diets, and identify genes that may relate to pathogenesis accompanying an obesity-like state. Gene ontology analysis indicated an overrepresentation of affected genes associated with immunity, metabolism, and hemocyanin in the high-fat diet group, and CHK, cell cycle activity, and DNA binding and transcription in the high-sugar diet group. Our results also indicate differences in the effects of the high-fat diet and high-sugar diet on expression profiles in head tissue of flies, despite the reportedly similar phenotypic impacts of the diets. The impacted genes, and how they may relate to pathogenesis in the Drosophila obesity-like state, warrant further experimental investigation. PMID:29141990

  7. RNA-Sequencing of Drosophila melanogaster Head Tissue on High-Sugar and High-Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Hemphill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been shown to increase risk for cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. In addition, it has been implicated in aggravation of neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, a physiological state mimicking diet-induced obesity can be induced by subjecting fruit flies to a solid medium disproportionately higher in sugar than protein, or that has been supplemented with a rich source of saturated fat. These flies can exhibit increased circulating glucose levels, increased triglyceride content, insulin-like peptide resistance, and behavior indicative of neurological decline. We subjected flies to variants of the high-sugar diet, high-fat diet, or normal (control diet, followed by a total RNA extraction from fly heads of each diet group for the purpose of Poly-A selected RNA-Sequencing. Our objective was to identify the effects of obesogenic diets on transcriptome patterns, how they differed between obesogenic diets, and identify genes that may relate to pathogenesis accompanying an obesity-like state. Gene ontology analysis indicated an overrepresentation of affected genes associated with immunity, metabolism, and hemocyanin in the high-fat diet group, and CHK, cell cycle activity, and DNA binding and transcription in the high-sugar diet group. Our results also indicate differences in the effects of the high-fat diet and high-sugar diet on expression profiles in head tissue of flies, despite the reportedly similar phenotypic impacts of the diets. The impacted genes, and how they may relate to pathogenesis in the Drosophila obesity-like state, warrant further experimental investigation.

  8. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  9. Iron Supplementation Consumption in High School Students: A Cross- Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khammarnia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Girls are one of the high risk groups for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplementation program is a preventive strategy for female students in high schools in Iran. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of iron supplements consumption among high school students in the southeast of Iran. Methods: A quantitative study was conducted in Zahedan (the capital of Sistan and Balochestan province in the southeast of Iran in 2015. The sample size was 400 high school students from different areas of Zahedan who were randomly selected. A standard questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software through descriptive statistics, one way ANOVA and Chi-square. Results: In total, 68.2% of the students did not administer any tablets whether regularly or irregularly during the past 16 weeks. About 41 third grade students did not take any tablets in 16 weeks. There were a statistically significant correlation between lack of taking tablet and their grade point average of the last year (P=0.003, F=1.078; also, it had a significant association with school grade of students (P=0.009. Conclusion: Most of the students did not use iron supplementation in Zahedan high schools. Measures should be taken to increase the culture of consuming iron tablets by providing appropriate environmental conditions; it seems that iron supplementation programs will have positive impacts on the students.

  10. Effects of exercise and diet change on cognition function and synaptic plasticity in high fat diet induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jinhee; Shin, Ki Ok; Park, So Young; Jang, Ki Soeng; Kang, Sunghwun

    2013-10-08

    Nutritional imbalance-induced obesity causes a variety of diseases and in particular is an important cause of cognitive function decline. This study was performed on Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with 13-weeks of high fat diet-induced obesity in connection to the effects of regular exercise and dietary control for 8 weeks on the synaptic plasticity and cognitive abilities of brain. Four weeks-old SD rats were adopted classified into normal-normal diet-sedentary (NNS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-sedentary (OHS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-training (OHT, n = 8), obesity-normal diet-sedentary (ONS, n = 8) and obesity- normal diet-training (ONT, n = 8). The exercise program consisted of a treadmill exercise administered at a speed of 8 m/min for 1-4 weeks, and 14 m/min for 5-8 weeks. The Western blot method was used to measure the expression of NGF, BDNF, p38MAPK and p-p38MAPK proteins in hippocampus of the brain, and expressions of NGF, BDNF, TrkA, TrkB, CREB and synapsin1 mRNA were analyzed through qRT-PCR. The results suggest cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression to be significantly decreased in the hippocampus of obese rats, and synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors were also significantly decreased. In addition, 8-weeks exercises and treatment by dietary change had induced significant increase of cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression as well as synaptic plasticity and cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors in obese rats. In particular, the combined treatment had presented even more positive effect. Therefore, it was determined that the high fat diet-induced obesity decreases plasticity and cognitive function of the brain, but was identified as being improved by exercises and dietary changes. In particular, it is considered that regular exercise has positive effects on memory span and learning capacity unlike dietary control.

  11. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  12. Low-Carbohydrate-High-Fat Diet: Can it Help Exercise Performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chen-Kang; Borer, Katarina; Lin, Po-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Low-carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diets have been used as a means of weight loss and control of symptoms in several clinical conditions. There is emerging evidence that the metabolic changes induced by LCHF diets enhance endurance performance. The aims of this review are to examine the evidence of LCHF diets in improving various aspects of athletic performance. Long-term LCHF dietary intake may help control body weight and fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in athletes in weigh...

  13. OMASAL MORPHOLOGY OF DAIRY COWS FED WITH HIGH OR LOW GRAIN CONTENT DIET PRIOR PARTURITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Oliveira Rocha Bhering Santoro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Little is known about the morphological response of the omasum in dairy cows that consume a high-energy diet pre-partum. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a transitional diet with high grain content is able to induce changes in omasum morphology. Six weeks before the expected calving, four Holstein cows were fed a standardization diet, and four weeks before delivery, the cows were fed a diet with high grain content (HGC or low (LGC grain content. After calving, all of the cows were fed a high energy lactation diet. The cows that were fed the HGC diet pre-partum had higher dry matter and nutrient intake than the cows that were fed the LGC diet. The mitotic index of the omasum epithelium was higher than the mitotic index in the rumen, but apparently the response to the diet stimuli was slower. In the cows that were fed the HGC diet, the omasum papillae were taller one week before parturition and two weeks post-partum. Cows that were fed the HGC diet had a thinner epithelium due to thinner non-keratinized layers of the omasum epithelium. We conclude that the omasum mucosa of dairy cows responds to the stimuli of a pre-partum HGC diet, which was indicated by the greater height of the omasum papillae and by the reduced thickness of the omasum epithelium. It seems that the mitotic index responds a little more slowly, but the response to the diet stimuli is stronger in the omasum epithelium than in the rumen.

  14. Effects of a high-fat, low- versus high-glycemic index diet: retardation of insulin resistance involves adipose tissue modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Schrauwen, P.; Mensink, R.P.; Keijer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Beneficial effects of low glycemic index (GI) diets in rodents have been studied using healthy low-fat diets, while the effects might be different on high-fat diets inducing progression of insulin resistance. We fed C57BL/6J male mice high-fat low/high-GI (LGI/HGI) diets for 13 wk. Glucose and

  15. High Levels of Avenanthramides in Oat-Based Diet Further Suppress High Fat Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Ldlr-/-Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael; Kim, Sharon; Guo, Weimin; Collins, F William; Wise, Mitchell L; Meydani, Mohsen

    2018-01-17

    Oats, in addition to cholesterol-lowering properties, contain unique antioxidants called avenanthramides (Avns), which inhibit both inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in endothelial cells in culture. This study evaluated the effects of Avns of oats on atherosclerosis in Ldlr -/- mice, one of the most commonly used atherosclerosis mouse models with their similar cholesterol distributions to humans. The Ldlr -/- mice were fed a low fat, high fat, high fat containing regular oat brans with low levels of Avns (HFLA), or high fat containing regular oat brans with high levels of Avns (HFHA) diet. After 16 weeks of intervention, blood cholesterol and extent of aortic lesions were evaluated. We found that both oat-based diets reduced high fat diet-induced atheroma lesions in the aortic valve (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the effects of oat-based diets are more profound in HFHA mice than mice fed HFLA. Total plasma cholesterol levels were similarly reduced in both oat-supplemented mice. We concluded that oat bran diets reduce atheroma lesions and higher levels of Avns further reduce aortic lesions compared to regular oat bran. These preliminary in vivo data indicate that consumption of oats bran, with high Avns, has demonstrable beneficial effects on prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  16. High-fat diet determines the composition of the murine gut microbiome independently of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Marie A; Hoffmann, Christian; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Keilbaugh, Sue A; Hamady, Micah; Chen, Ying-Yu; Knight, Rob; Ahima, Rexford S; Bushman, Frederic; Wu, Gary D

    2009-11-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome is affected by host phenotype, genotype, immune function, and diet. Here, we used the phenotype of RELMbeta knockout (KO) mice to assess the influence of these factors. Both wild-type and RELMbeta KO mice were lean on a standard chow diet, but, upon switching to a high-fat diet, wild-type mice became obese, whereas RELMbeta KO mice remained comparatively lean. To investigate the influence of diet, genotype, and obesity on microbiome composition, we used deep sequencing to characterize 25,790 16S rDNA sequences from uncultured bacterial communities from both genotypes on both diets. We found large alterations associated with switching to the high-fat diet, including a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in both Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. This was seen for both genotypes (ie, in the presence and absence of obesity), indicating that the high-fat diet itself, and not the obese state, mainly accounted for the observed changes in the gut microbiota. The RELMbeta genotype also modestly influenced microbiome composition independently of diet. Metagenomic analysis of 537,604 sequence reads documented extensive changes in gene content because of a high-fat diet, including an increase in transporters and 2-component sensor responders as well as a general decrease in metabolic genes. Unexpectedly, we found a substantial amount of murine DNA in our samples that increased in proportion on a high-fat diet. These results demonstrate the importance of diet as a determinant of gut microbiome composition and suggest the need to control for dietary variation when evaluating the composition of the human gut microbiome.

  17. Maternal obesity is necessary for programming effect of high-fat diet on offspring

    OpenAIRE

    White, Christy L.; Purpera, Megan N.; Christopher D. Morrison

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that maternal consumption of dietary fat, independent from obesity, increases serum leptin in neonatal pups and predisposes them to adult obesity. Female rats either were fed a high-fat (HF) diet or a low-fat (LF) diet or were fed the HF diet but pair fed (PF) to the caloric intake of the LF group for 4 wk before breeding and throughout gestation and lactation. Dams consuming the HF diet had increased adiposity and were hyperphagic. At weaning, pups born to obese dams...

  18. Phlorizin Supplementation Attenuates Obesity, Inflammation, and Hyperglycemia in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Kyung Shin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, along with its related complications, is a serious health problem worldwide. Many studies reported the anti-diabetic effect of phlorizin, while little is known about its anti-obesity effect. We investigated the beneficial effects of phlorizin on obesity and its complications, including diabetes and inflammation in obese animal. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups and fed their respective experimental diets for 16 weeks: a normal diet (ND, 5% fat, w/w, high-fat diet (HFD, 20% fat, w/w, or HFD supplemented with phlorizin (PH, 0.02%, w/w. The findings revealed that the PH group had significantly decreased visceral and total white adipose tissue (WAT weights, and adipocyte size compared to the HFD. Plasma and hepatic lipids profiles also improved in the PH group. The decreased levels of hepatic lipids in PH were associated with decreased activities of enzymes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, cholesterol synthesis and esterification. The PH also suppressed plasma pro-inflammatory adipokines levels such as leptin, adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-γ, and interleukin-6, and prevented HFD-induced collagen accumulation in the liver and WAT. Furthermore, the PH supplementation also decreased plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels. In conclusion, phlorizin is beneficial for preventing diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as insulin resistance.

  19. Effects of high fibre diets on gut fill, behaviour and productivity in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfeldt, Sanna; Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    2011-01-01

    diets compared to feed A was detectable in the intestinal contents, with high fibre feed staying longer in the digestive system. Birds fed fibre diets displayed more dustbathing and less stereotypic behaviour. Egg production did not differ between the diet treatments. The onset of lay was delayed......, but the hens reached maximum lay sooner than industry guidelines indicates. The results show that high fibre diets prolong the passage of feed and reduce stereotypic behaviour, indicating an improvement in the well-being of the birds, who may experience less hunger than commercially fed broiler breeders. Key...... at 19 weeks. From 19-30 weeks all groups were fed the same commercial pre-layer and layer diets. Similar growth rates were obtained on different quantities of food (eg. 75, 100, 110 and 92 g feed/bird/d in week 16 for A, B, C and D, respectively). The higher amounts of food offered on the high fibre...

  20. The effects of high protein diets on thermogenesis, satiety and weight loss: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Thomas L; Hu, Frank B

    2004-10-01

    For years, proponents of some fad diets have claimed that higher amounts of protein facilitate weight loss. Only in recent years have studies begun to examine the effects of high protein diets on energy expenditure, subsequent energy intake and weight loss as compared to lower protein diets. In this study, we conducted a systematic review of randomized investigations on the effects of high protein diets on dietary thermogenesis, satiety, body weight and fat loss. There is convincing evidence that a higher protein intake increases thermogenesis and satiety compared to diets of lower protein content. The weight of evidence also suggests that high protein meals lead to a reduced subsequent energy intake. Some evidence suggests that diets higher in protein result in an increased weight loss and fat loss as compared to diets lower in protein, but findings have not been consistent. In dietary practice, it may be beneficial to partially replace refined carbohydrate with protein sources that are low in saturated fat. Although recent evidence supports potential benefit, rigorous longer-term studies are needed to investigate the effects of high protein diets on weight loss and weight maintenance.

  1. High iron requirement for growth, photosynthesis, and low-light acclimation in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eSunda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron limits carbon fixation in much of the modern ocean due to the very low solubility of ferric iron in oxygenated ocean waters. We examined iron limitation of growth rate under varying light intensities in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris, a descendent of the oxygenic phototrophs that evolved ca. 3 billion years ago when the ocean was reducing and iron was present at much higher concentrations as soluble Fe(II. Decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C ratio needed to support a given growth rate, indicating that iron and light may co-limit the growth of Synechococcus in the ocean, as shown previously for eukaryotic phytoplankton. The cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher than ratios for coastal eukaryotic algae growing under the same light conditions. The higher iron requirements for growth in the coastal cyanobacterium may be largely caused by the high demand for iron in photosynthesis, and to higher ratios of iron-rich photosystem I to iron-poor photosystem II in Synechococcus than in eukaryotic algae. This high iron requirement may also be vestigial and represent an adaptation to the much higher iron levels in the ancient reducing ocean. Due to the high cellular iron requirement for photosynthesis and growth, and for low light acclimation, Synechococcus may be excluded from many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean’s deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM where iron and light levels are low, and lower-iron requiring picoeukaryotes typically dominate the biomass of phytoplankton community within the mid to lower DCM.

  2. High iron requirement for growth, photosynthesis, and low-light acclimation in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, William G; Huntsman, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Iron limits carbon fixation in much of the modern ocean due to the very low solubility of ferric iron in oxygenated ocean waters. We examined iron-limitation of growth rate under varying light intensities in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris, a descendent of the oxygenic phototrophs that evolved ca. 3 billion years ago when the ocean was reducing and iron was present at much higher concentrations as soluble Fe(II). Decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C) ratio needed to support a given growth rate, indicating that iron and light may co-limit the growth of Synechococcus in the ocean, as shown previously for eukaryotic phytoplankton. The cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher than ratios for coastal eukaryotic algae growing under the same light conditions. The higher iron requirements for growth in the coastal cyanobacterium may be largely caused by the high demand for iron in photosynthesis, and to higher ratios of iron-rich photosystem I to iron-poor photosystem II in Synechococcus than in eukaryotic algae. This high iron requirement may also be vestigial and represent an adaptation to the much higher iron levels in the ancient reducing ocean. Due to the high cellular iron requirement for photosynthesis and growth, and for low light acclimation, Synechococcus may be excluded from many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean's deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) where iron and light levels are low, and lower-iron requiring picoeukaryotes typically dominate the biomass of phytoplankton community within the mid to lower DCM.

  3. High sugar diet disrupts gut homeostasis though JNK and STAT pathways in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyue; Jin, Qiuxia; Jin, Li Hua

    2017-06-10

    The incidence of diseases associated with a high sugar diet has increased in the past years, and numerous studies have focused on the effect of high sugar intake on obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, how a high sugar diet influences gut homeostasis is still poorly understood. In this study, we used Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism and supplemented a culture medium with 1 M sucrose to create a high sugar condition. Our results indicate that a high sugar diet promoted differentiation of intestinal stem cells through upregulation of the JNK pathway and downregulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Moreover, the number of commensal bacteria decreased in the high sugar group. Our data suggests that the high caloric diet disrupts gut homeostasis and highlights Drosophila as an ideal model system to explore gastrointestinal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of a high-animal- and a high-vegetable-protein diet on mineral balance and bowel function of young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokkum, W. van; Wesstra, A.; Luyken, R.; Hermus, R.J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve young men were given for periods of 20 d, each of three mixed diets, namely a low-protein (LP) diet (9% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin), a high-animal-protein (HA) diet (16% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin) and a high-vegetable-protein (HV) diet (16% total energy

  5. A maternal high salt diet disturbs cardiac and vascular function of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; Van Vliet, Bruce N; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2015-09-01

    High salt intake is an environmental factor that promotes increased blood pressure. We previously demonstrated that high salt diet causes aggravation of hypertension and impaired vasodilation in response to nitric oxide (NO) in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which exhibit low sensitivity to salt in adulthood. Changes in offspring blood pressure and cardiovascular structures have been reported. However, it remains unclear to what extent a maternal high salt intake may affect cardiac and/or vascular function in offspring. Therefore, we investigated influence of exposure to a maternal high salt diet during gestation and lactation on offspring's cardiac and arterial functions in SHR. SHR dams were fed either a high salt diet or a control diet. After weaning, the offspring were fed the high salt diet or control diet for 8weeks. Compared with offspring of control diet-fed dams, at 12weeks of age, offspring of the high-salt diet-fed dams had lower blood pressure, heart rate, indices of both left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, and a decreased aortic vasodilation response to NO. Postnatal high salt intake did not affect blood pressure, vasodilatory response, or cardiac function in offspring of high-salt diet-fed dams. Neither maternal nor postnatal dietary salt altered levels of lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase, or angiotensinogen mRNA in serum and ventricle of the offspring. Exposure to high maternal dietary salt induces cardiac and vascular dysfunction in offspring. These results point to the possible importance of avoiding excess dietary salt during gestation and lactation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron carbonyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2015-06-07

    We apply high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to study iron carbonyl complexes. Mono-, bi-, and tri-nuclear carbonyl complexes and pure carbonyl complexes as well as carbonyl complexes containing hydrocarbon ligands are considered. The HERFD-XANES spectra reveal multiple pre-edge peaks with individual signatures for each complex, which could not be detected previously with conventional XANES spectroscopy. These peaks are assigned and analysed with the help of TD-DFT calculations. We demonstrate that the pre-edge peaks can be used to distinguish the different types of iron-iron interactions in carbonyl complexes. This opens up new possibilities for applying HERFD-XANES spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of iron catalysts.

  7. Soil consumed by chacma baboons is low in bioavailable iron and high in clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebsworth, Paula A; Seim, Gretchen L; Huffman, Michael A; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad; Young, Sera L

    2013-03-01

    Despite widespread consumption of soil among animals, the role of geophagy in health maintenance remains an enigma. It has been hypothesized that animals consume soil for supplementation of minerals and protection against toxins. Most studies determine only the total elemental composition of soil, which may not reflect the amount of minerals available to the consumer. Our aim was to test these hypotheses by evaluating the bioavailability of iron in soil consumed by chacma baboons, using a technique that simulates digestion and adsorption. Our results indicate that, despite variation in absolute iron concentration of soil samples, actual iron bioavailability was low while clay content was quite high. This suggests that iron supplementation is unlikely to be the primary motivation for geophagy in this population, and that detoxification is a plausible explanation. This study demonstrates that more research on bioavailability and clay composition is needed to determine the role geophagy plays in health maintenance.

  8. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni

    2017-10-12

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  9. Boron enhances strength and alters mineral composition of bone in rabbits fed a high energy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, Sema S; Dundar, Niyazi; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Hakki, Erdogan E; Hamurcu, Mehmet; Kerimoglu, Ulku; Baspinar, Nuri; Basoglu, Abdullah; Nielsen, Forrest H

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was performed to determine whether boron had a beneficial effect on bone strength and composition in rabbits with apparent adiposity induced by a high energy diet. Sixty female New Zealand rabbits, aged 8 months, were randomly divided into five groups with the following treatments for seven months: control 1, fed alfalfa hay only (5.91 MJ/kg); control 2, high energy diet (11.76 MJ and 3.88 mg boron/kg); B10, high energy diet+10 mg/kg body weight boron gavage/96 h; B30, high energy diet+30 mg/kg body weight boron gavage/96 h; B50, high energy diet+50mg/kg body weight boron gavage/96 h. Bone boron concentrations were lowest in rabbits fed the high energy diet without boron supplementation, which suggested an inferior boron status. Femur maximum breaking force was highest in the B50 rabbits. Tibia compression strength was highest in B30 and B50 rabbits. All boron treatments significantly increased calcium and magnesium concentrations, and the B30 and B50 treatments increased the phosphorus concentration in tibia of rabbits fed the high energy diet. The B30 treatment significantly increased calcium, phosphorus and magnesium concentrations in femur of rabbits fed the high energy diet. Principal component analysis of the tibia minerals showed that the three boron treatments formed a separate cluster from controls. Discriminant analysis suggested that the concentrations of the minerals in femur could predict boron treatment. The findings indicate boron has beneficial effects on bone strength and mineral composition in rabbits fed a high energy diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiovascular function in male and female JCR:LA-cp rats: effect of high-fat/high-sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ian; Soler, Amanda; Joseph, Gregory; Hutcheson, Brenda; Bradford, Chastity; Zhang, Frank Fan; Potter, Barry; Proctor, Spencer; Rocic, Petra

    2017-04-01

    Thirty percent of the world population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. High-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet (Western diet) correlates with metabolic syndrome prevalence. We characterized effects of the HF/HS diet on vascular (arterial stiffness, vasoreactivity, and coronary collateral development) and cardiac (echocardiography) function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a rat model of metabolic syndrome (JCR rats). Furthermore, we determined whether male versus female animals were affected differentially by the Western diet. Cardiovascular function in JCR male rats was impaired versus normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. HF/HS diet compromised cardiovascular (dys)function in JCR but not SD male rats. In contrast, cardiovascular function was minimally impaired in JCR female rats on normal chow. However, cardiovascular function in JCR female rats on the HF/HS diet deteriorated to levels comparable to JCR male rats on the HF/HS diet. Similarly, oxidative stress was markedly increased in male but not female JCR rats on normal chow but was equally exacerbated by the HF/HS diet in male and female JCR rats. These results indicate that the Western diet enhances oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and eliminates the protective effect of female sex on cardiovascular function, implying that both males and females with metabolic syndrome are at equal risk for cardiovascular disease.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Western diet abolished protective effect of sex against cardiovascular disease (CVD) development in premenopausal animals with metabolic syndrome. Western diet accelerates progression of CVD in male and female animals with preexisting metabolic syndrome but not normal animals. Exacerbation of baseline oxidative stress correlates with accelerated progression of CVD in metabolic syndrome animals on Western diet. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Effects of diet energy concentration and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance of weanling pigs fed diets containing canola meal produced from high protein or conventional canola seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, T F; Liu, Y; Stein, H H

    2016-12-01

    The objectives were to determine effects of diet NE and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance and physiological parameters of weanling pigs fed a corn-soybean meal (SBM) diet or diets containing high protein canola meal (CM-HP) or conventional canola meal (CM-CV). A total of 492 pigs (initial BW: 9.15 ± 0.06 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design with 12 dietary treatments and 9 pens per treatment. A control diet based on corn and SBM and 4 diets containing 20% or 30% CM-HP or 20% or 30% CM-CV were formulated to a similar NE by adjusting inclusion of choice white grease. Four additional diets also contained 20% or 30% CM-HP or 20% or 30% CM-CV, but no additional choice white grease, and NE in these diets, therefore, was less than in the control diet. The control diet and the diets containing 30% CM-HP or CM-CV without increased choice white grease were also formulated with inclusion of an exogenous carbohydrase. Pigs were fed experimental diets for 22 d and 1 pig per pen was sacrificed at the conclusion of the experiment. Results indicated that compared with the control diet, there was no impact of canola meal on final BW, ADG, ADFI, or G:F, but pigs fed CM-CV had greater ( diets with reduced NE had greater ( diets with constant NE. Only minor effects of CM-HP or CM-CV on intestinal weight, gut fill, digesta pH, cecal VFA concentrations, and serum concentrations of urea N, total N, or albumin were observed, but the weight of the thyroid gland increased ( diets without the carbohydrase, but that was not the case if the carbohydrase was included in the diet (interaction, ( diets fed to weanling pigs from 2 wk postweaning did not impact growth performance compared with pigs fed a corn-SBM diet, and NE in diets containing canola meal does not have to be similar to that of corn-SBM diets. However, inclusion of CM-CV containing 4.43 µmol/g glucosinolates in the diets resulted in improved growth performance compared with inclusion of CM

  12. Effect of High-Fat Diet upon Inflammatory Markers and Aortic Stiffening in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Bento Chaves Santana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lifestyle such as increase in high-fat food consumption are an important cause for vascular diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of ACE and TGF-β in the aorta stiffness induced by high-fat diet. C57BL/6 male mice were divided in two groups according to their diet for 8 weeks: standard diet (ST and high-fat diet (HF. At the end of the protocol, body weight gain, adipose tissue content, serum lipids and glucose levels, and aorta morphometric and biochemical measurements were performed. Analysis of collagen fibers by picrosirius staining of aorta slices showed that HF diet promoted increase of thin (55% and thick (100% collagen fibers deposition and concomitant disorganization of these fibers orientations in the aorta vascular wall (50%. To unravel the mechanism involved, myeloperoxidase (MPO and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE were evaluated by protein expression and enzyme activity. HF diet increased MPO (90% and ACE (28% activities, as well as protein expression of ACE. TGF-β was also increased in aorta tissue of HF diet mice after 8 weeks. Altogether, we have observed that the HF diet-induced aortic stiffening may be associated with increased oxidative stress damage and activation of the RAS in vascular tissue.

  13. Impact of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Metabolic Parameters in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2017-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), whether dietary carbohydrates have beneficial or detrimental effects on cardiometabolic risk factors has drawn attention. Although a high-carbohydrate (HC) diet and a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet have gained popularity for several decades, there is scarce review focusing on the effects of HC diet on glucose, lipids and body weight in patients with T2DM. In this review, we examined recently-published literature on the effects of HC diets on metabolic parameters in T2DM. HC diets are at least as effective as LC diets, leading to significant weight loss and a reduction in plasma glucose, HbA1c and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. The major concern is that HC diets may raise serum triglyceride levels and reduce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, these untoward effects were not a persistent consequence and may be ameliorated with the consumption of a low glycemic index (GI)/low glycemic load (GL) and high fiber. Carbohydrate intake should be individualized, and low caloric intake remains a crucial factor to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce body weight; however, an HC diet, rich in fiber and with a low GI/GL, may be recommendable in patients with T2DM. PMID:28338608

  14. Impact of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Metabolic Parameters in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2017-03-24

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), whether dietary carbohydrates have beneficial or detrimental effects on cardiometabolic risk factors has drawn attention. Although a high-carbohydrate (HC) diet and a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet have gained popularity for several decades, there is scarce review focusing on the effects of HC diet on glucose, lipids and body weight in patients with T2DM. In this review, we examined recently-published literature on the effects of HC diets on metabolic parameters in T2DM. HC diets are at least as effective as LC diets, leading to significant weight loss and a reduction in plasma glucose, HbA1c and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. The major concern is that HC diets may raise serum triglyceride levels and reduce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, these untoward effects were not a persistent consequence and may be ameliorated with the consumption of a low glycemic index (GI)/low glycemic load (GL) and high fiber. Carbohydrate intake should be individualized, and low caloric intake remains a crucial factor to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce body weight; however, an HC diet, rich in fiber and with a low GI/GL, may be recommendable in patients with T2DM.

  15. Fat supplementation of diets containing a high level of oats for growing-finishing swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, R O; Combs, G E

    1991-12-01

    Two 2 x 2 factorial arrangement trials were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of fat supplementation in improving the energy value of diets containing a high level of a fibrous feedstuff (oats) for growing-finishing swine. Corn-soybean meal-based diets were used that contained either 0 or 40% ground oats and either 0 or 3% added fat. Each trial used 120 pigs (27 kg) with each treatment assigned to five pens of six pigs each. Growing diets (.80% lysine for basal diet) were given from 27 to 55 kg live weight and finishing diets (.64% lysine) from 55 to 102 kg. Diets were formulated to a constant calculated ME to lysine ratio within the growing and finishing phases. Apparent digestibilities of DM and energy were determined for the growing and finishing diets by the indigestible marker (chromic oxide) method. The inclusion of oats in the diets resulted in poorer (P less than .01) feed conversion efficiency and reduced (P less than .01) apparent DM and energy digestibilities. The addition of fat improved (P less than .01) feed conversion efficiency but had no effect (P greater than .10) on DM or energy digestibility. The improvements noted for feed conversion efficiency were similar (P greater than .10) regardless of the dietary oat content. The 3% dietary fat supplementation was equally effective in improving feed conversion efficiency whether the diets did contain or did not contain ground oats for growing-finishing swine.

  16. Hypothyroidism Exacerbates Thrombophilia in Female Rats Fed with a High Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, Harald; Prüller, Florian; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Pailer, Sabine; Kieslinger, Petra; Haybaeck, Johannes; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Cvirn, Gerhard; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-07-10

    Clotting abnormalities are discussed both in the context with thyroid dysfunctions and obesity caused by a high fat diet. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hypo-, or hyperthyroidism on the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), a master indicator of clotting activation, on Sprague Dawley rats fed a normal or high fat diet. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66) were grouped into normal diet (ND; n = 30) and high-fat diet (HFD; n = 36) groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3) treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment ETP, body weight and food intake were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunction was shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunction was accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight. In detail, compared to euthyroid controls, hypothyroid rats showed significantly increased-and hyperthyroid animals significantly decreased-ETP levels. High fat diet potentiated these effects in both directions. In summary, we are the first to show that hypothyroidism and high fat diet potentiate the thrombotic capacity of the clotting system in Sprague Dawley rats. This effect may be relevant for cardiovascular disease where thyroid function is poorly understood as a pathological contributor in the context of clotting activity and obesogenic nutrition.

  17. Hypothyroidism Exacerbates Thrombophilia in Female Rats Fed with a High Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Mangge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clotting abnormalities are discussed both in the context with thyroid dysfunctions and obesity caused by a high fat diet. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hypo-, or hyperthyroidism on the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP, a master indicator of clotting activation, on Sprague Dawley rats fed a normal or high fat diet. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66 were grouped into normal diet (ND; n = 30 and high-fat diet (HFD; n = 36 groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3 treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment ETP, body weight and food intake were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunction was shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunction was accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight. In detail, compared to euthyroid controls, hypothyroid rats showed significantly increased—and hyperthyroid animals significantly decreased—ETP levels. High fat diet potentiated these effects in both directions. In summary, we are the first to show that hypothyroidism and high fat diet potentiate the thrombotic capacity of the clotting system in Sprague Dawley rats. This effect may be relevant for cardiovascular disease where thyroid function is poorly understood as a pathological contributor in the context of clotting activity and obesogenic nutrition.

  18. Fresh garlic amelioration of high-fat-diet induced fatty liver in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Aisha; Siddiqui, Asma; Kumar, Hemant

    2015-10-01

    To observe the effect of fresh garlic on high-fat-diet-induced fatty liver changes. The experimental study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from October to November 2008, and comprised adult albino rats weighing 200-240g each. The rats were divided into 5 groups according to dietary regimen for eight weeks each. Group A received control diet; Group B received high saturated fat diet; Group C received high unsaturated fat diet; Group D received high saturated fat diet with fresh garlic; and Group E received high unsaturated fat diet with garlic for 8 weeks. Liver tissue slides were stained with Oil red-O and haematoxylin and Periodic acid-Schiff-haematoxylin. The 50 rats in the study were divided into five groups of 10(20%) each. There was marked deposition of fat in hepatocyte along with marked decrease in glycogen content in liver of rats in Groups B and C, with Group B showing more marked changes. The changes in fat and glycogen content were reversed and ameliorated close to Group A in rats belonging to Groups D and E. Fresh garlic minimised the high-fat-diet-induced fatty liver changes in rats.

  19. TO SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL SCHEME OF SOFTENING HEAT TREATMENT FOR HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Efremenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. High chromium cast irons with austenitic matrix have low machinability. The aim of work is search of new energy-saving modes of preliminary softening heat treatment enhancing the machinability of castings by forming an optimum microstructure. Methodology. Metallographic analysis, hardness testing and machinability testing are applied. Findings. It was found out that high temperature annealing with continuous cooling yields to martensite-austenite matrix in cast iron 270Х15Г2Н1MPhT, which abruptly affects the machinability of cast iron. Significant improvement of machinability is achieved by forming of structure "ferrite + granular carbides" and by decline of hardness to 37-39 HRC in the case of two-stage isothermal annealing in the subcritical temperature range or by the use of quenching and tempering (two-step or cyclic. Originality. It was found that the formation of the optimal structure of the matrix and achievement of desired hardness level needed for improving machinability of high chromium cast iron containing 3 % austenite-forming elements, can be obtained: 1 due to pearlite original austenite followed by spherodization eutectoid carbides, and 2 by getting predominantly martensite structure followed by the decay of martensite and carbides coagulation at high-temperature tempering. Practical value. The new energy-saving schemes of softening heat treatment to ensure the growth of machinability of high chromium cast iron, alloyed by higher quantity of austenite forming elements, are proposed.

  20. Impact of high iron intake on cognition and neurodegeneration in humans and in animal models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonal; Berggren, Kiersten L; Marks, Eileen; Fox, Jonathan H

    2017-06-01

    Accumulation of brain iron is linked to aging and protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. High iron intake may influence important brain health outcomes in later life. The aim of this systematic review was to examine evidence from animal and human studies of the effects of high iron intake or peripheral iron status on adult cognition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration. MEDLINE, Scopus, CAB Abstracts, the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials, and OpenGrey databases were searched. Studies investigating the effect of elevated iron intake at all postnatal life stages in mammalian models and humans on measures of adult brain health were included. Data were extracted and evaluated by two authors independently, with discrepancies resolved by discussion. Neurodegenerative disease diagnosis and/or behavioral/cognitive, biochemical, and brain morphologic findings were used to study the effects of iron intake or peripheral iron status on brain health. Risk of bias was assessed for animal and human studies. PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews were followed. Thirty-four preclinical and 14 clinical studies were identified from database searches. Thirty-three preclinical studies provided evidence supporting an adverse effect of nutritionally relevant high iron intake in neonates on brain-health-related outcomes in adults. Human studies varied considerably in design, quality, and findings; none investigated the effects of high iron intake in neonates/infants. Human studies are needed to verify whether dietary iron intake levels used in neonates/infants to prevent iron deficiency have effects on brain aging and neurodegenerative disease outcomes.

  1. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-04

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  2. Dispersive high-energy spin excitations in iron pnictide superconductors investigated with RIXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten; Zhou, Kejin; Monney, C.; Strocov, V.N. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Huang, Y.B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); IOP, CAS, Beijing (China); Brink, J. van den [IFW Dresden (Germany); Ding, H. [IOP, CAS, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-01

    The discovery of iron-based high temperature superconductivity has triggered tremendous research efforts in searching for novel high-T{sub c} superconductors. Unlike cuprates, which have long-range ordered antiferromagnetic Mott insulators as parent compounds, the parent compounds of iron-based superconductors are spin-density wave metals with delocalized electronic structure and more itinerant magnetism. Recent developments of the high-resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) technique have enabled investigations of magnetic excitations in cuprates, which show excellent agreement with results from Inelastic Neutron Scattering. In this presentation we demonstrate that RIXS can be used to measure collective magnetic excitations in iron-based superconductors despite their much stronger itinerancy compared to cuprates. The persistence of high-energy spin excitations even in optimally doped pnictide superconductors in a wide range of temperatures strongly suggests a spin-mediated Cooper pairing mechanism as proposed in cuprate superconductors.

  3. Limited efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of highly refractory epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaun A; Shin, Ji Hyun; Shih, Evan J; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika; Kezele, Michele E; Sankar, Raman; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet is effective in the treatment of epileptic spasms, even in refractory cases. However, there has been very limited demonstration of prompt and complete (video-EEG confirmed) response. We set out to describe our center's experience with the ketogenic diet in the treatment of children with highly refractory epileptic spasms, with rigorous seizure outcome assessment. Children treated with the ketogenic diet for epileptic spasms between April, 2010 and June, 2014 were retrospectively identified. Seizure burden was tabulated at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12-months of ketogenic diet exposure. Adverse events were similarly ascertained. We identified a cohort of 22 consecutive patients who received ketogenic diet therapy, with median age of onset of epileptic spasms of 5.2 (IQR 2.0-9.0) months, with diet initiation beginning a median of 26.4 (12.5-38.7) months after onset, and following a median of 7 (IQR 5-7) treatment failures. Only 2 patients exhibited a complete response during ketogenic diet exposure, and response was more reasonably attributed to alternative therapies in both cases. A modest early reduction in seizure frequency was not sustained beyond 1 month of diet exposure. The diet was well tolerated, and continued in 6 patients with subjective and/or partial response. In contrast to prior studies reporting substantial efficacy of the ketogenic diet, our findings suggest limited efficacy, albeit in a highly refractory cohort. Prospective studies in both refractory and new-onset populations, with both video-EEG confirmation of response and rigorous cognitive outcome assessment, would be of great value to more clearly define the utility of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Raspberry seed flour attenuates high-sucrose diet-mediated hepatic stress and adipose tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Inhae; Espín, Juan Carlos; Carr, Timothy P; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Chung, Soonkyu

    2016-06-01

    Chronic intake of high sucrose (HS) diet exacerbates high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and its associated metabolic complications. Previously, we have demonstrated that ellagic acid (EA), an abundant polyphenol found in some fruits and nuts, exerts distinct lipid-lowering characteristics in hepatocytes and adipocytes. In this study, we hypothesized that EA supplementation inhibits HS diet-mediated hepatic toxicity and its accompanied metabolic dysregulation. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 male mice were randomly assigned to three isocaloric HF diets (41% calories from fat) containing either no-sucrose (HF), high-sucrose (HFHS), or high-sucrose plus EA (HFHS-R) from raspberry seed flour (RSF, equivalent to 0.03% of EA), and fed for 12weeks. The inclusion of EA from RSF significantly improved HFHS diet-mediated dyslipidemia and restored glucose homeostasis levels similar to the HF diet-fed mice. Despite marginal difference in hepatic triglyceride content, the addition of EA substantially reversed the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative damage triggered by HFHS diet in the liver. These effects of EA were further confirmed in human hepatoma cells by reducing ER stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, HFHS-R diet significantly decreased visceral adipocyte hypertrophy and adipose tissue inflammation evidenced by reduced proinflammatory gene expression and macrophage infiltration. In summary, EA supplementation from RSF was effective in reducing HFHS diet-mediated metabolic complication by attenuating hepatic ER and oxidative stresses as well as adipocyte inflammation. Our results suggest that the inclusion of EA in diets may normalize metabolic insults triggered by HS consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of cafeteria diet and high fat diet intake on anxiety, learning and memory in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Renata Tavares Beschizza; Ferreira do Vales, Lucas Duarte Manhas; Braga Costa, Telma Maria; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa

    2017-09-01

    The effects of cafeteria and high fat diets were investigated on animal models of behavior. Male Wistar rats were treated with Control (C), Cafeteria (CD) and High Fat (FD) diets and tested in the Elevated Plus-Maze (EPM) and Morris Water Maze (MWM) procedures. Body weight, length, abdominal circumference, retroperitoneal and epididymal adipose tissues were recorded. Physical parameters, weight of tissues, EPM, and MWM data were subjected to ANOVA followed by Newman-Keuls test (P < 0.05). There were no differences on weight and length parameters between CD and C rats up to 98 days of age. However, abdominal circumferences were higher in CD as compared to C at 35 and 70 days of age, respectively, the 5th and the 7th weeks. FD presented lower measures of weight and abdominal circumference; nevertheless there was an increase on those parameters at the end of the nutritional treatment. Even without an apparent weight gain of CD and FD these animals presented a greater accumulation of retroperitoneal and epididymal adipose tissues. In addition, CD and FD demonstrated behaviors that can suggest lower anxiety. CD showed a better learning performance and FD showed better recall of previous learned information in the memory retention test. According to those data it was concluded that hypercaloric diet ingestion was capable of triggering metabolic alterations and possibly lowering anxiety associated to learning or memory improvement on a spatial task.

  6. A short-term high fat diet increases exposure to midazolam and omeprazole in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterbergh, Roos; Lammers, Laureen A; van Nierop, Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Mathôt, Ron A A; Romijn, Johannes A

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of factors contributing to variation in drug metabolism is of vital importance to optimize drug treatment. This study assesses the effects of a short-term hypercaloric high fat diet on metabolism of five oral drugs, which are each specific for a single P450 isoform: midazolam (CYP3A4), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), S-warfarin (CYP2C9) and caffeine (CYP1A2). In 9 healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetics of the five drugs were assessed after an overnight fast at two separate occasions: after a regular diet and after 3 days of a hypercaloric high fat diet (i.e. regular diet supplemented with 500 mL cream [1715 kcal, 35% fat]). Pharmacokinetic parameters (mean [SEM]) were estimated by non-compartmental analysis. The high fat diet increased exposure to midazolam by 19% from 24.7 (2.6) to 29.5 (3.6) ng ml-1h-1 (p=0.04) and exposure to omeprazole by 31% from 726 (104) to 951 (168) ng ml-1h-1 (p=0.05). Exposure to metoprolol, caffeine and S-warfarin was not affected by the high fat diet. A short-term hypercaloric high fat diet increases exposure to midazolam and omeprazole, possibly reflecting modulation of CYP3A4 and CYP2C19.

  7. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  8. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferramosca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group, a diet with 35% fat (HF group, or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group. The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  9. Residual feed intake is repeatable for lactating Holstein dairy cows fed high and low starch diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, S B; Boerman, J P; Lock, A L; Allen, M S; VandeHaar, M J

    2015-07-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is a tool to quantify feed efficiency in livestock and is commonly used to assess feed efficiency independent of production level, body weight (BW), or BW change. Lactating Holstein cows (n=109; 44 primiparous and 65 multiparous), averaging (mean ± standard deviation, SD) 665±77kg of BW, 42±9kg of milk/d, and 120±30 d postpartum, were fed diets of high (HI) or low (LO) starch content in 4 crossover experiments with two 28-d treatment periods. The LO diets were ~40% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and ~14% starch and the HI diets were ~26% NDF and ~30% starch. Individual dry matter intake (DMI) of a cow was modeled as a function of milk energy output, metabolic BW, body energy change, and fixed effects of parity, experiment, cohort nested within experiment, and diet nested within cohort and experiment; RFI for each cow was the residual error term. Cows were classified as high (>0.5 SD of the mean), medium (±0.5 SD of the mean), or low (energy output, metabolic BW, or body energy gain was associated with 0.35, 0.09, or 0.05kg increase in DMI, respectively. When compared with LO diets, HI diets increased energy partitioning to body energy gain and tended to increase DMI. The correlation between RFI when cows were fed HI diets and RFI when cows were fed LO diets was 0.73 and was similar across each parity and experiment. Fifty-six percent of cows maintained the same RFI classification (high, medium, or low RFI) and only 4 of 109 cows changed from high RFI to low RFI or vice versa when diets were changed. Milk:feed, income over feed cost, and DMI were also highly repeatable (r=0.72, 0.84, and 0.92, respectively). We achieved significant changes in milk yield and component concentration as well as energy partitioning between HI and LO diets and still determined RFI to be repeatable across diets. We conclude that RFI is reasonably repeatable for a wide range of dietary starch levels fed to mid-lactation cows, so that cows that have low RFI

  10. A high legume low glycemic index diet improves serum lipid profiles in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Lanza, Elaine; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Colburn, Nancy H; Bagshaw, Deborah; Rovine, Michael J; Ulbrecht, Jan S; Bobe, Gerd; Chapkin, Robert S; Hartman, Terryl J

    2010-09-01

    Clinical studies have shown that fiber consumption facilitates weight loss and improves lipid profiles; however, the beneficial effects of high fermentable fiber low glycemic index (GI) diets under conditions of weight maintenance are unclear. In the Legume Inflammation Feeding Experiment, a randomized controlled cross-over feeding study, 64 middle-aged men who had undergone colonoscopies within the previous 2 years received both a healthy American (HA) diet (no legume consumption, fiber consumption = 9 g/1,000 kcal, and GI = 69) and a legume enriched (1.5 servings/1,000 kcal), high fiber (21 g/1,000 kcal), low GI (GI = 38) diet (LG) in random order. Diets were isocaloric and controlled for macronutrients including saturated fat; they were consumed each for 4 weeks with a 2-4 week break separating dietary treatments. Compared to the HA diet, the LG diet led to greater declines in both fasting serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (P lipid profiles in men, compared to a healthy American diet. However, IR individuals do not achieve the full benefits of the same diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) lipid risk factors.

  11. Effects of tungsten on erosion-corrosion behavior of high chromium white cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi Anijdan, S.H. [Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering Department, McGill University, M.H. Wong Building, 3610 University Street, Montreal, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9944, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hashem.mousavi@mail.mcgill.ca; Bahrami, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Varahram, N. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9944, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davami, P. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9944, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-04-25

    In this study, effects of tungsten on wear resistance of high chromium white cast iron with and without tungsten in erosion-corrosion condition have been investigated. At the same time, the comparison between wear resistance of this grade of cast iron and low alloy steels with various contents of Cr which are used in industrial condition (in Sarcheshme Company, the greatest copper production company in the Middle East and with more than 4000 years historical cupper production background) was studied, while, copper concentrates have used for erosion particles. Results show that, because of higher hardness of matrix due to the tungsten, the wear resistance of high chromium cast iron increases. In addition to that, combine cutting and deformation wear mechanism and spalling mechanism were attributed in high chromium cast iron and low alloy steels, respectively. Subsequently, pitting mechanism in corrosion aspect was recognized because of inhomogeneity in chemical composition and sulfide inclusions content. Finally, the combine effects of erosion and corrosion (synergetic effect) were recognized in the high chromium white iron in industrial condition for the damaged samples.

  12. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect the skin cells against the harmful effects of UVA. In this work, we designed a mitochondria-targeted hexadentate (tricatechol-based) iron chelator linked to mitochondria-homing SS-like peptides. The photoprotective potential of this compound against UVA-induced oxidative damage and cell death was evaluated in cultured primary skin fibroblasts. Our results show that this compound provides unprecedented protection against UVA-induced mitochondrial damage, adenosine triphosphate depletion, and the ensuing necrotic cell death in skin fibroblasts, and this effect is fully related to its potent iron-chelating property in the organelle. This mitochondria-targeted iron chelator has therefore promising potential for skin photoprotection against the deleterious effects of the UVA component of sunlight. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia and dietary iron intake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increased prevalence of iron deficiency among infants can be attributed to the consumption of an iron deficient diet or a diet that interferes with iron absorption at the critical time of infancy, among other factors. The gradual shift from breast milk to other foods and liquids is a transition period which greatly contributes to ...

  14. Characterization of high-salt and high-fat diets on cardiac and vascular function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianli; Larson, Douglas F; Slayback, Denise; Lundeen, Tamara F; Baxter, Jeffrey H; Watson, Ronald R

    2004-01-01

    This study compared two established dietary formulations, high salt and high fat-high carbohydrate, separately or in combination on the induction cardiovascular dysfunction. One-month-old C57BL/6J mice were fed one of the following diets for 3 mo: (1) control diet consisting of a high fat-high sim-ple carbohydrate (HFHSC); (2) 8% NaCl diet (HS); or (3) HFHSC diet supplemented with 1% NaCl (HFHS). After 3 mo, the HFHSC mice demonstrated significantly increased end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume, specifically increases of 35% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.01) and a reduction of ventricular stiffness by 27% (p = 0.015). The HS mice exhibited arterial hyper-tension with an increase of 33% in maximum end-systolic pressure (p =.024) and a decrease of 44% in arterial elastance (p = 0.020), corroborated by an increase in the heart weight to body weight ratios (p = 0.002) and vascular types I and III collagen (p = 0.03 and p = 0.0008, respectively). The HFHS group revealed a striking response of 230% to the alpha1-adrenergic challenge (p = 0.00034). These data suggest that the HFHSC diet causes dilated cardio-myopathy, whereas the HS diet produces arterial hypertension and the HFHS diet causes a vascular dysfunctional state that was highly responsive to alpha-adrenergic stimulation.

  15. Linarin Enriched Extract Attenuates Liver Injury and Inflammation Induced by High-Fat High-Cholesterol Diet in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Jie Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the potential beneficial effects of linarin enriched Flos Chrysanthemi extract (Lin-extract on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH induced by high-fat high-cholesterol (HFHC diet in rats. SD rats received normal diet, HFHC diet, or HFHC diet plus different doses of Lin-extract. The liver content of triglyceride and total cholesterol markedly increased in HFHC diet-fed model rats while middle and high dose of Lin-extract lowered liver cholesterol significantly. The expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1 was upregulated by HFHC diet and further elevated by high dose Lin-extract. High dose of Lin-extract also markedly lowered the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST and inhibited the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK induced by HFHC in livers. The HFHC-increased mRNA levels of hepatic inflammation cytokines, including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1, were suppressed by Lin-extract dose-dependently. Furthermore, pathology evaluation showed that high dose Lin-extract greatly improved lobular inflammation. Our results suggest that Lin-extract could attenuate liver injury and inflammation induced by HFHC diet in rats. Its modulatory effect on lipid metabolism may partially contribute to this protective effect.

  16. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that a low versus high glycemic index (GI) diet on a high fat (30% kcal fat) background (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in C57BL/6J male mice. The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed high fat diet-induced

  17. Effect of a long-term high-protein diet on survival, obesity development, and gut microbiota in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiilerich, Pia; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even; Hao, Qin; Hugenholtz, Floor; Sonne, Si Brask; Derrien, Muriel; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Mortensen, Alicja; Licht, Tine Rask; Rømer, Maria Unni; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Waagbø, Linn Jeanette; Giallourou, Natasa; Feng, Qiang; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Chuan; Liaset, Bjørn; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a regular low-fat diet or high-fat diets combined with either high or low protein-to-sucrose ratios during their entire lifespan to examine the long-term effects on obesity development, gut microbiota, and survival. Intake of a high-fat diet with a low

  18. High-fat diets affect energy and bone metabolism in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macri, Elisa V; Gonzales Chaves, Macarena M; Rodriguez, Patricia N; Mandalunis, Patricia; Zeni, Susana; Lifshitz, Fima; Friedman, Silvia M

    2012-06-01

    High-fat diets are usually associated with greater weight (W) gain and body fat (BF). However, it is still unclear whether the type and amount of fat consumed influence BF. Additionally, dietary fat intake may also have consequences on skeletal health. To evaluate in healthy growing rats the effects of high-fat diets and type of dietary fat intake (saturated or vegetable oils) on energy and bone metabolism. At weaning, male Wistar rats (n = 50) were fed either a control diet (C; fat = 7% w/w) or a high-fat diet (20% w/w) containing either: soybean oil, corn oil (CO), linseed oil (LO), or beef tallow (BT) for 8 weeks. Zoometric parameters, BF, food intake and digestibility, and total and bone alkaline phosphatase (b-AP) were assessed. Total skeleton bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), BMC/W, spine BMD, and bone volume (static-histomorphometry) were measured. Animals fed BT diet achieved lower W versus C. Rats fed high-fat vegetable oil diets showed similar effects on the zoometric parameters but differed in BF. BT showed the lowest lipid digestibility and BMC. In contrast, high vegetable oil diets produced no significant differences in BMC, BMC/W, BMD, spine BMD, and bone volume. Marked differences were observed for LO and BT groups in b-AP and CO and BT groups in bone volume. BT diet rich in saturated fatty acids had decreased digestibility and adversely affected energy and bone metabolisms, in growing healthy male rats. There were no changes in zoometric and bone parameters among rats fed high vegetable oil diets.

  19. Effects of a High-Protein Diet on Regulation of Phosphorus Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Kratz, Mario; Weigle, David S.; Callahan, Holly S.; Purnell, Jonathan Q.; Horgan, Angela M.; de Boer, Ian H.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: High-protein diets, which are popular for weight loss, contain large quantities of phosphorus. Phosphorus excess and consequent changes in phosphorus regulatory hormones are implicated in vascular calcification and cardiovascular disease. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a moderate increase in dietary phosphorus during a high-protein diet leads to changes in phosphorus-responsive hormones. Design, Participants, and Setting: We conducted a post hoc analysis of a sequential dietary modification trial in 19 healthy volunteers in the general community. Intervention: Participants received 2 weeks of a weight-maintaining, low-protein (15%) diet, followed by 2 weeks of an isocaloric, high-protein (30%) diet, followed by 12 weeks of an ad libitum high-protein (30%) diet. Main Outcome Measures: Using previously collected samples, plasma concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), PTH, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were measured at 8 time points to assess 24-hour variability and in 24-hour pooled samples to delineate changes at the end of each diet period. Results: Mean dietary phosphorus intake during each study period was 1556, 2071, and 1622 mg/d, respectively. Plasma concentrations of FGF-23 and vitamin D metabolites varied in a diurnal pattern; plasma PTH concentrations varied in a bimodal pattern. After changing from a low- to high-protein isocaloric diet, plasma FGF-23 concentrations decreased slightly (mean −4.48 pg/mL, 95% confidence interval 1.88–7.07). There were no other statistically significant changes in phosphorus regulatory hormones in response to diet modifications. Conclusions: Among healthy people, an approximate 33% increase in dietary phosphorus after institution of a high-protein diet does not cause large changes in measured concentrations of phosphorus regulatory hormones. PMID:23393178

  20. Tocotrienols Reverse Cardiovascular, Metabolic and Liver Changes in High Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng-Yew Wong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienols have been reported to improve lipid profiles, reduce atherosclerotic lesions, decrease blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin concentrations, normalise blood pressure in vivo and inhibit adipogenesis in vitro, yet their role in the metabolic syndrome has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF on high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic, cardiovascular and liver dysfunction in rats. Rats fed a high carbohydrate, high fat diet for 16 weeks developed abdominal obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance with increased ventricular stiffness, lower systolic function and reduced liver function. TRF treatment improved ventricular function, attenuated cardiac stiffness and hypertension, and improved glucose and insulin tolerance, with reduced left ventricular collagen deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. TRF improved liver structure and function with reduced plasma liver enzymes, inflammatory cell infiltration, fat vacuoles and balloon hepatocytes. TRF reduced plasma free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations but only omental fat deposition was decreased in the abdomen. These results suggest that tocotrienols protect the heart and liver, and improve plasma glucose and lipid profiles with minimal changes in abdominal obesity in this model of human metabolic syndrome.

  1. Methyl donor supplementation blocks the adverse effects of maternal high fat diet on offspring physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesselea; George, Robert; Reyes, Teresa M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal consumption of a high fat diet during pregnancy increases the offspring risk for obesity. Using a mouse model, we have previously shown that maternal consumption of a high fat (60%) diet leads to global and gene specific decreases in DNA methylation in the brain of the offspring. The present experiments were designed to attempt to reverse this DNA hypomethylation through supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors, and to determine whether methyl donor supplementation could block or attenuate phenotypes associated with maternal consumption of a HF diet. Metabolic and behavioral (fat preference) outcomes were assessed in male and female adult offspring. Expression of the mu-opioid receptor and dopamine transporter mRNA, as well as global DNA methylation were measured in the brain. Supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors attenuated the development of some of the adverse effects seen in offspring from dams fed a high fat diet; including weight gain, increased fat preference (males), changes in CNS gene expression and global hypomethylation in the prefrontal cortex. Notable sex differences were observed. These findings identify the importance of balanced methylation status during pregnancy, particularly in the context of a maternal high fat diet, for optimal offspring outcome.

  2. Methyl donor supplementation blocks the adverse effects of maternal high fat diet on offspring physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesselea Carlin

    Full Text Available Maternal consumption of a high fat diet during pregnancy increases the offspring risk for obesity. Using a mouse model, we have previously shown that maternal consumption of a high fat (60% diet leads to global and gene specific decreases in DNA methylation in the brain of the offspring. The present experiments were designed to attempt to reverse this DNA hypomethylation through supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors, and to determine whether methyl donor supplementation could block or attenuate phenotypes associated with maternal consumption of a HF diet. Metabolic and behavioral (fat preference outcomes were assessed in male and female adult offspring. Expression of the mu-opioid receptor and dopamine transporter mRNA, as well as global DNA methylation were measured in the brain. Supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors attenuated the development of some of the adverse effects seen in offspring from dams fed a high fat diet; including weight gain, increased fat preference (males, changes in CNS gene expression and global hypomethylation in the prefrontal cortex. Notable sex differences were observed. These findings identify the importance of balanced methylation status during pregnancy, particularly in the context of a maternal high fat diet, for optimal offspring outcome.

  3. Fish Oil Decreases Hepatic Lipogenic Genes in Rats Fasted and Refed on a High Fructose Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela S. de Castro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP, fatty acid synthase (FAS and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP. Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet.

  4. Dietary calcium regulates ROS production in aP2-agouti transgenic mice on high-fat/high-sucrose diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X; Zemel, M B

    2006-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 promotes adipocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We have now evaluated whether decreasing 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 levels by increasing dietary calcium will decrease oxidative stress in vivo. We fed low-calcium (0.4% Ca) and high-calcium (1.2% Ca from CaCO3) obesity-promoting (high sucrose/high fat) diets to aP2-agouti transgenic mice and assessed regulation of ROS production in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Mice on the high-calcium diet gained 50% of the body weight (P=0.04) and fat (Pcalcium diet (0.4% Ca). The high-calcium diet significantly reduced adipose intracellular ROS production by 64 and 18% (Pphosphate oxidase expression by 49% (P=0.012) and 63% (P=0.05) in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. Adipocyte intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels were suppressed in mice on the high-calcium diet by 73-80% (Pcalcium diet also induced 367 and 191% increases in adipose mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) expression (Pcalcium diet also suppressed 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) expression in visceral adipose tissue by 39% (P=0.034). 11beta-HSD expression was markedly higher in visceral vs subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice on the low-calcium diet (P=0.034), whereas no difference was observed between the fat depots in mice on the high-calcium diet. These data support a potential role for dietary calcium in the regulation of obesity-induced oxidative stress.

  5. The production and shelf life of high-iron, pre-cooked rice porridge with ferrous sulphate and other high-iron materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowladda Teangpook

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The production and shelf life of high-iron, dried, pre-cooked rice porridge with ferrous sulphate and other high-iron materials was studied. Broken brown rice was soaked in water and ferrous sulphate was added at 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15% of the dried brown rice. The mixture was steamed for 20 min and dried in a double drum dryer. Green shallot, young ginger and cooked chicken fillet were dried in an electric cabinet dryer. Chicken blood and edible fern were dried in a double drum dryer and vacuum freezer respectively. The optimum ferrous sulphate added to the rice was 0.05% and the developed formulation of dried porridge consisted of ferrous sulphate rice (67.80%, chicken fillet (20%, chicken blood (3%, green shallot (0.7%, young ginger (1%, edible fern (0.5%, pepper powder (0.5%, sucrose (3%, salt (3% and monosodium glutamate (0.5%.The dried porridge had a high iron content of 10.18 mg/50 g and the shelf life was three months at room temperature when stored in either aluminum foil laminated bag or metalite bag.

  6. Catechins inhibit atherosclerosis in male rats on a high fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Susanti

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet increases eNOS expression, decreases PI3K expression, and increases p38 MAPK activity. Administration of catechin decreases eNOS expression, increases PI3K expression, and decreases p38 MAPK activity.

  7. Sirt1 Protects against High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul T. Pfluger; Daniel Herranz; Susana Velasco-Miguel; Manuel Serrano; Matthias H. Tschöp

    2008-01-01

    .... Mammalian Sirt1 is a protein deacetylase that has been involved in resveratrol-mediated protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic damage, but direct proof for the implication of Sirt1 has remained elusive...

  8. Ingested capsaicinoids can prevent low-fat-high-carbohydrate diet and high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating the NADPH oxidase and Nrf2 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Kazim; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ozdemir, Oguzhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicinoids (CAPs), most commonly found in chili peppers, have a multitude of pharmacological and physiological effects, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In the present study, we set out to investigate the hypothesis that CAPs mitigate obesity in rats and the possible mechanisms thereof. Rats were divided into six groups, including control (±10 mg CAPs/kg body weight [BW]), low-fat-high-sucrose diet (±10 mg CAPs/kg BW), and high-fat diet (±10 mg CAPs/kg BW). Blood samples and liver and aortic tissues were taken at the end of the study. CAPs supplementation significantly reduced hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia (P<0.001) and ameliorated oxidative damage by reducing malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and liver and by increasing total antioxidant capacity in serum induced by the low-fat-high-sucrose and high-fat diets (P<0.001 for all). CAPs also depressed levels of NFκB p65, gp91phox, and p22phox, essential components of NADPH oxidase, in the aorta of rats. However, levels of Nrf2, Sirt1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were significantly increased in the aorta. CAPs may at least partially reduce adverse effects due to high-fat diet and sucrose consumption through regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and proteins involved in vasoprotection.

  9. Ingested capsaicinoids can prevent low-fat–high-carbohydrate diet and high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating the NADPH oxidase and Nrf2 pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Kazim; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ozdemir, Oguzhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    Objective Capsaicinoids (CAPs), most commonly found in chili peppers, have a multitude of pharmacological and physiological effects, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In the present study, we set out to investigate the hypothesis that CAPs mitigate obesity in rats and the possible mechanisms thereof. Materials and methods Rats were divided into six groups, including control (±10 mg CAPs/kg body weight [BW]), low-fat–high-sucrose diet (±10 mg CAPs/kg BW), and high-fat diet (±10 mg CAPs/kg BW). Blood samples and liver and aortic tissues were taken at the end of the study. Results CAPs supplementation significantly reduced hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia (P<0.001) and ameliorated oxidative damage by reducing malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and liver and by increasing total antioxidant capacity in serum induced by the low-fat–high-sucrose and high-fat diets (P<0.001 for all). CAPs also depressed levels of NFκB p65, gp91phox, and p22phox, essential components of NADPH oxidase, in the aorta of rats. However, levels of Nrf2, Sirt1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were significantly increased in the aorta. Conclusion CAPs may at least partially reduce adverse effects due to high-fat diet and sucrose consumption through regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and proteins involved in vasoprotection. PMID:29180887

  10. Analysis of thermal expansivity of iron (Fe) metal at ultra high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the present investigation we have explained the thermal and compression properties of HCP iron (Fe) at high pressure with variable temperature (isobars) and at high temperature with variable pressure (isotherm). The usual Tait equation of state is modified by incorporating the effect of thermal pressure.

  11. Inulin oligofructose attenuates metabolic syndrome in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Senthil A; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Prebiotics alter bacterial content in the colon, and therefore could be useful for obesity management. We investigated the changes following addition of inulin oligofructose (IO) in the food of rats fed either a corn starch (C) diet or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet as a model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. IO did not affect food intake, but reduced body weight gain by 5·3 and 12·3 % in corn starch+inulin oligofructose (CIO) and high-carbohydrate, high-fat with inulin oligofructose (HIO) rats, respectively. IO reduced plasma concentrations of free fatty acids by 26·2 % and TAG by 75·8 % in HIO rats. IO increased faecal output by 93·2 %, faecal lipid excretion by 37·9 % and weight of caecum by 23·4 % and colon by 41·5 % in HIO rats. IO improved ileal morphology by reducing inflammation and improving the density of crypt cells in HIO rats. IO attenuated H diet-induced increases in abdominal fat pads (C 275 (sem 19), CIO 264 (sem 40), H 688 (sem 55), HIO 419 (sem 32) mg/mm tibial length), fasting blood glucose concentrations (C 4·5 (sem 0·1), CIO 4·2 (sem 0·1), H 5·2 (sem 0·1), HIO 4·3 (sem 0·1) mmol/l), systolic blood pressure (C 124 (sem 2), CIO 118 (sem 2), H 152 (sem 2), HIO 123 (sem 3) mmHg), left ventricular diastolic stiffness (C 22·9 (sem 0·6), CIO 22·9 (sem 0·5), H 27·8 (sem 0·5), HIO 22·6 (sem 1·2)) and plasma alanine transaminase (C 29·6 (sem 2·8), CIO 32·1 (sem 3·0), H 43·9 (sem 2·6), HIO 33·6 (sem 2·0) U/l). IO attenuated H-induced increases in inflammatory cell infiltration in the heart and liver, lipid droplets in the liver and plasma lipids as well as impaired glucose and insulin tolerance. These results suggest that increasing soluble fibre intake with IO improves signs of the metabolic syndrome by decreasing gastrointestinal carbohydrate and lipid uptake.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diet. Young children who drink a lot of cow's milk may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. ... her risk for iron-deficiency anemia. For example, cow's milk is low in iron. For this and other ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods in the diet. Too much milk also may prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. Children who have lead in their blood also may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lead can interfere with the body's ability to make hemoglobin. Lead may get into the body from ...

  14. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  15. High-fat high-sugar diet induces polycystic ovary syndrome in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jacob S; Perets, Ron A; Sarfert, Kathryn S; Bowman, John J; Ozark, Patrick A; Whitworth, Gregg B; Blythe, Sarah N; Toporikova, Natalia

    2017-01-27

    Obesity has been linked with a host of metabolic and reproductive disorders including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). While a clear association exists between obesity and PCOS, the exact nature of this relationship remains unexplained. The primary symptoms of PCOS include hyperandrogenism, anovulation, and polycystic ovaries. Most animal models utilize androgen treatments to induce PCOS. However, these models often fail to address the underlying causes of the disease and do not effectively reproduce key metabolic features such as hyperinsulinemia. Here, we present a novel rodent model of diet-induced obesity that recapitulates both the metabolic and reproductive phenotypes of human PCOS. Rats on a high-fat high-sugar (HFHS) diet not only demonstrated signs of metabolic impairment, but they also developed polycystic ovaries and experienced irregular estrous cycling. Though hyperandrogenism was not characteristic of HFHS animals as a group, elevated testosterone levels were predictive of high numbers of ovarian cysts. Alterations in steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis gene expression were also found via RNA sequencing of ovarian tissue. Importantly, the PCOS-like symptoms induced in these rats may share a similar etiology to PCOS in humans. Therefore, this model offers a unique opportunity to study PCOS at its genesis rather than following the development of disease symptoms.

  16. Impact of a combined high cholesterol diet and high glucose environment on vasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemin Wang

    Full Text Available AIMS: Vascular complications are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. However, proper animal models of diabetic vasculopathy that recapitulate the accelerated progression of vascular lesions in human are unavailable. In the present study, we developed a zebrafish model of diabetic vascular complications and the methodology for quantifying vascular lesion formation real-time in the living diabetic zebrafish. METHODS AND RESULTS: Wild type zebrafish (AB and transgenic zebrafish lines of fli1:EGFP, lyz:EGFP, gata1:dsRed, double transgenic zebrafish of gata1:dsRed/fli1:EGFP were exposed to high cholesterol diet and 3% glucose (HCD-HG for 10 days. The zebrafish model with HCD-HG treatment was characterized by significantly increased tissue levels of insulin, glucagon, glucose, total triglyceride and cholesterol. Confocal microscopic analysis further revealed that the diabetic larvae developed clearly thickened endothelial layers, distinct perivascular lipid depositions, substantial accumulations of inflammatory cells in the injured vasculature, and a decreased velocity of blood flow. Moreover, the vascular abnormalities were improved by the treatment of pioglitazone and metformin. CONCLUSION: A combination of high cholesterol diet and high glucose exposure induces a rapid onset of vascular complications in zebrafish similar to the early atherosclerotic vascular injuries in mammalian diabetic models, suggesting that zebrafish may be used as a novel animal model for diabetic vasculopathy.

  17. High saturated fat and low carbohydrate diet decreases lifespan independent of body weight in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Dietrich, Marcelo de Oliveira; Martimbianco de Assis, Adriano; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2013-06-03

    Obesity is a health problem that is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. We investigated the effects of a life-long high saturated fat and low carbohydrate (HF) diet on the body mass, glucose tolerance, cognitive performance and lifespan of mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed with a HF diet (60% kcal/fat) or control diets (15% kcal/fat) for 27 months. One-half of the mice on the HF diet developed obesity (diet-induced obese (DIO) mice), whereas the remaining mice were diet resistant (DR). At 8 months of age, both DIO and DR groups had increased hyperglycemic response during a glucose tolerance test, which was normalized in 16-month-old mice. At this latter time point, all groups presented similar performance in cognitive tests (Morris water maze and inhibitory avoidance). The survival curves of the HF and control diet groups started to diverge at 15 months of age and, after 27 months, the survival rate of mice in the DIO and DR groups was 40%, whereas in the control diet group it was 75%. AHFdiet decreased the survival of mice independent of bodyweight.

  18. High-Moisture Diet for Laboratory Rats: Nutrient Analysis, Growth, and Organ Weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battles, August H.; Knapka, Joseph T.; Lewis, Laura; Lang, Marie T.; Gruendel, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    A diet (KSC-25) to be sterilized by irradiation was formulated to contain 66% moisture and to provide the required nutrients for growing rats. Analyses of the irradiated dry diet provided data to evaluate its nutrient content. The diet was evaluated for its ability to supply all nutrients, including water, required by immature rats. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the high-moisture diet with or without access to a water bottle. Rats (n = 16) fed an irradiated purified diet in a meal form with access to a water bottle were the control animals. Feed efficiency, food and water consumption, and growth rate data were collected during the 28-day study. Organ weights were collected on day 28. The test diet met or exceeded the National Research Council (NRC) estimated nutritional requirements for immature laboratory rats. The 66% moisture KSC-25 diet provided all nutrients, including water, required by weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats for growth equivalent to the established purified diet.

  19. High levels of whole raw soya beans in dairy cow diets: digestibility and animal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, R V; Gandra, J R; Freitas Junior, J E; Verdurico, L C; Mingoti, R D; Bettero, V P; Benevento, B C; Vilela, F G; Rennó, F P

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of high levels of whole raw soya beans in the diets of lactating cows. Twelve Holstein dairy cows were used, randomized in three 4 ×  4 balanced and contemporary Latin squares and fed the following diets: (i) control (C), without including whole raw soya beans; (ii) 80 g/kg in DM of whole raw soya beans (G80); (iii) 160 g/kg in DM of whole raw soya beans (G160); and (iv) 240 g/kg in DM of whole raw soya beans (G240). There was significant reduction (p cows supplemented with G240 compared with C (23.8 vs. 25.3 respectively). G240 diets presented lower crude protein digestibility (g/kg) (p cows receiving control diet, compared to other diets. G240 diet resulted in significantly lower milk and protein yield (p dairy cow diets improves the unsaturated fatty acid profile in milk, and the diets (G80 and G160) led to minor alterations in the digestive processes and animal metabolism. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. A High Salt Diet Inhibits Obesity and Delays Puberty in the Female Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitynski-Miller, Dori; Ross, Micah; Schmill, Margaret; Schambow, Rachel; Fuller, Teresa; Flynn, Francis W.; Skinner, Donal C.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives Processed foods are considered major contributors to the worldwide obesity epidemic. In addition to high sugar and fat contents, processed foods contain large amounts of salt. Due to correlations with rising adiposity, salt has recently been proposed to be obesogenic. This study investigated three hypotheses: i) high salt contributes to weight gain and adiposity in juvenile female rats, ii) puberty onset would be altered because salt is known to affect neuronal systems involved in activating the reproductive system, and iii) enhanced adiposity will act synergistically with salt to drive early puberty onset. Design Female weanling rats (post-natal day 21, n=105) were fed a low fat/low salt diet, low fat/high salt diet, high fat/low salt diet, or a high salt/high fat diet for 24 days. Metabolic measures, including weight gain, food intake, fecal output, activity, and temperature were recorded in subsets of animals. Results Body weight, retroperitoneal and perirenal fat pad weight, and adipocyte size were all lower in animals fed high fat/high salt compared to animals fed high fat alone. Leptin levels were reduced in high fat/high salt fed animals compared to high fat/low salt fed animals. Daily calorie intake was higher initially but declined with adjusted food intake and was not different among groups after 5 days. Osmolality and corticosterone were not different among groups. Fecal analysis showed excess fat excretion and a decreased digestive efficiency in animals fed high fat/low salt but not in animals fed high fat/high salt. Although respiratory exchange ratio was reduced by high dietary fat or salt, aerobic resting metabolic rate was not affected by diet. High salt delayed puberty onset, regardless of dietary fat content. Conclusions Salt delays puberty and prevents the obesogenic effect of a high fat diet. The reduced weight gain evident in high salt fed animals is not due to differences in food intake or digestive efficiency. PMID

  1. A high salt diet inhibits obesity and delays puberty in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitynski-Miller, D; Ross, M; Schmill, M; Schambow, R; Fuller, T; Flynn, F W; Skinner, D C

    2017-11-01

    Processed foods are considered major contributors to the worldwide obesity epidemic. In addition to high sugar and fat contents, processed foods contain large amounts of salt. Owing to the correlations with rising adiposity, salt has recently been proposed to be obesogenic. This study investigated three hypotheses: (i) high salt contributes to weight gain and adiposity in juvenile female rats, (ii) puberty onset would be altered because salt is known to affect neuronal systems involved in activating the reproductive system, and (iii) enhanced adiposity will act synergistically with salt to drive early puberty onset. Female weanling rats (post-natal day 21, n=105) were fed a low fat/low salt diet, low fat/high salt diet, high fat/low salt diet or a high salt/high fat diet for 24 days. Metabolic measures, including weight gain, food intake, fecal output, activity and temperature were recorded in subsets of animals. Body weight, retroperitoneal and perirenal fat pad weight, and adipocyte size were all lower in animals fed high fat/high salt compared with animals fed high fat alone. Leptin levels were reduced in high fat/high salt fed animals compared with high fat/low salt-fed animals. Daily calorie intake was higher initially but declined with adjusted food intake and was not different among groups after 5 days. Osmolality and corticosterone were not different among groups. Fecal analysis showed excess fat excretion and a decreased digestive efficiency in animals fed high fat/low salt but not in animals fed high fat/high salt. Although respiratory exchange ratio was reduced by high dietary fat or salt, aerobic-resting metabolic rate was not affected by the diet. High salt delayed puberty onset, regardless of dietary fat content. Salt delays puberty and prevents the obesogenic effect of a high fat diet. The reduced weight gain evident in high salt-fed animals is not due to differences in food intake or digestive efficiency.

  2. A high-fat, ketogenic diet induces a unique metabolic state in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Adam R; Pissios, Pavlos; Otu, Hasan; Roberson, Russell; Xue, Bingzhong; Asakura, Kenji; Furukawa, Noburu; Marino, Frank E; Liu, Fen-Fen; Kahn, Barbara B; Libermann, Towia A; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2007-06-01

    Ketogenic diets have been used as an approach to weight loss on the basis of the theoretical advantage of a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. To evaluate the physiological and metabolic effects of such diets on weight we studied mice consuming a very-low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (KD). This diet had profound effects on energy balance and gene expression. C57BL/6 mice animals were fed one of four diets: KD; a commonly used obesogenic high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HF); 66% caloric restriction (CR); and control chow (C). Mice on KD ate the same calories as mice on C and HF, but weight dropped and stabilized at 85% initial weight, similar to CR. This was consistent with increased energy expenditure seen in animals fed KD vs. those on C and CR. Microarray analysis of liver showed a unique pattern of gene expression in KD, with increased expression of genes in fatty acid oxidation pathways and reduction in lipid synthesis pathways. Animals made obese on HF and transitioned to KD lost all excess body weight, improved glucose tolerance, and increased energy expenditure. Analysis of key genes showed similar changes as those seen in lean animals placed directly on KD. Additionally, AMP kinase activity was increased, with a corresponding decrease in ACC activity. These data indicate that KD induces a unique metabolic state congruous with weight loss.

  3. Diets with High or Low Protein Content and Glycemic Index for Weight-Loss Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; van Baak, Marleen; Jebb, Susan A.; Papadaki, Angeliki; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Kunešová, Marie; Pihlsgård, Mats; Stender, Steen; Holst, Claus; Saris, Wim H.M.; Astrup, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power. Methods We enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a 3.3-MJ (800-kcal) low-calorie diet. Participants were randomly assigned, in a two-by-two factorial design, to one of five ad libitum diets to prevent weight regain over a 26-week period: a low-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a low-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, or a control diet. Results A total of 1209 adults were screened (mean age, 41 years; body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 34), of whom 938 entered the low-calorie-diet phase of the study. A total of 773 participants who completed that phase were randomly assigned to one of the five maintenance diets; 548 completed the intervention (71%). Fewer participants in the high-protein and the low-glycemic-index groups than in the low-protein–high-glycemic-index group dropped out of the study (26.4% and 25.6%, respectively, vs. 37.4%; P = 0.02 and P = 0.01 for the respective comparisons). The mean initial weight loss with the low-calorie diet was 11.0 kg. In the analysis of participants who completed the study, only the low-protein–high-glycemic-index diet was associated with subsequent significant weight regain (1.67 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 2.87). In an intention-to-treat analysis, the weight regain was 0.93 kg less (95% CI, 0.31 to 1.55) in the groups assigned to a high-protein diet than in those assigned to a low-protein diet (P = 0.003) and 0.95 kg less (95% CI, 0.33 to 1.57) in the groups assigned to a low-glycemic-index diet than in those assigned to a high-glycemic-index diet (P = 0.003). The analysis involving

  4. Diets with high or low protein content and glycemic index for weight-loss maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; van Baak, Marleen; Jebb, Susan A; Papadaki, Angeliki; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Martinez, J Alfredo; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Kunešová, Marie; Pihlsgård, Mats; Stender, Steen; Holst, Claus; Saris, Wim H M; Astrup, Arne

    2010-11-25

    Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power. We enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a 3.3-MJ (800-kcal) low-calorie diet. Participants were randomly assigned, in a two-by-two factorial design, to one of five ad libitum diets to prevent weight regain over a 26-week period: a low-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a low-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, or a control diet. A total of 1209 adults were screened (mean age, 41 years; body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 34), of whom 938 entered the low-calorie-diet phase of the study. A total of 773 participants who completed that phase were randomly assigned to one of the five maintenance diets; 548 completed the intervention (71%). Fewer participants in the high-protein and the low-glycemic-index groups than in the low-protein-high-glycemic-index group dropped out of the study (26.4% and 25.6%, respectively, vs. 37.4%; P=0.02 and P=0.01 for the respective comparisons). The mean initial weight loss with the low-calorie diet was 11.0 kg. In the analysis of participants who completed the study, only the low-protein-high-glycemic-index diet was associated with subsequent significant weight regain (1.67 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 2.87). In an intention-to-treat analysis, the weight regain was 0.93 kg less (95% CI, 0.31 to 1.55) in the groups assigned to a high-protein diet than in those assigned to a low-protein diet (P=0.003) and 0.95 kg less (95% CI, 0.33 to 1.57) in the groups assigned to a low-glycemic-index diet than in those assigned to a high-glycemic-index diet (P=0.003). The analysis involving participants who completed the intervention

  5. High Fat High Sugar Diet Reduces Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice Independent of Sex Hormone Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellers, Heather L.; Letsinger, Ayland C.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Granados, Jorge Z.; Lightfoot, J. Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Indirect results in humans suggest that chronic overfeeding decreases physical activity with few suggestions regarding what mechanism(s) may link overfeeding and decreased activity. The primary sex hormones are known regulators of activity and there are reports that chronic overfeeding alters sex hormone levels. Thepurpose of this study was to determine if chronic overfeeding altered wheel running through altered sex hormone levels. Materials and Methods: C57BL/6J mice were bred and the pups were weaned at 3-weeks of age and randomly assigned to either a control (CFD) or high fat/high sugar (HFHS) diet for 9–11 weeks depending on activity analysis. Nutritional intake, body composition, sex hormone levels, and 3-day and 2-week wheel-running activity were measured. Additionally, groups of HFHS animals were supplemented with testosterone (males) and 17β-estradiol (females) to determine if sex hormone augmentation altered diet-induced changes in activity. Results: 117 mice (56♂, 61♀) were analyzed. The HFHS mice consumed significantly more calories per day than CFD mice (male: p < 0.0001; female: p < 0.0001) and had significantly higher body fat (male: p < 0.0001; female: p < 0.0001). The HFHS diet did not reduce sex hormone levels, but did significantly reduce acute running-wheel distance in male (p = 0.05, 70 ± 28%) and female mice (p = 0.02, 57 ± 26%). In animals that received hormone supplementation, there was no significant effect on activity levels. Two-weeks of wheel access was not sufficient to alter HFHS-induced reductions in activity or increases in body fat. Conclusion: Chronic overfeeding reduces wheel running, but is independent of the primary sex hormones. PMID:28890701

  6. Programming Effects of Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure with a Postnatal High-Fat Diet in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Hsieh, Chih-Sung; Tain, You-Lin; Li, Shih-Wen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Miao-Meng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-04-08

    Increasing evidence has shown that many chronic diseases originate from early life, even before birth, through what are termed as fetal programming effects. Glucocorticoids are frequently used prenatally to accelerate the maturation of the lungs of premature infants. High-fat diets are associated with insulin resistance, but the effects of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure plus a postnatal high-fat diet in diabetes mellitus remain unclear. We administered pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats' intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at gestational days 14-20. Male offspring were administered a normal or high-fat diet starting from weaning. We assessed the effects of prenatal steroid exposure plus postnatal high-fat diet on the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat at postnatal day 120. At 15 and 30 min, sugar levels were higher in the dexamethasone plus high-fat diet (DHF) group than the vehicle plus high-fat diet (VHF) group in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Serum insulin levels at 15, 30 and 60 min were significantly higher in the VHF group than in the vehicle and normal diet group. Liver insulin receptor and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase mRNA expressions and protein levels were lower in the DHF group. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA expressions were lower in the epididymal adipose tissue in the VHF and DHF groups. "Programming" of liver or epididymal adipose tissue resulted from prenatal events. Prenatal steroid exposure worsened insulin resistance in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  7. Programming Effects of Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure with a Postnatal High-Fat Diet in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Ming Sheen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that many chronic diseases originate from early life, even before birth, through what are termed as fetal programming effects. Glucocorticoids are frequently used prenatally to accelerate the maturation of the lungs of premature infants. High-fat diets are associated with insulin resistance, but the effects of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure plus a postnatal high-fat diet in diabetes mellitus remain unclear. We administered pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats’ intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg body weight or vehicle at gestational days 14–20. Male offspring were administered a normal or high-fat diet starting from weaning. We assessed the effects of prenatal steroid exposure plus postnatal high-fat diet on the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat at postnatal day 120. At 15 and 30 min, sugar levels were higher in the dexamethasone plus high-fat diet (DHF group than the vehicle plus high-fat diet (VHF group in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT. Serum insulin levels at 15, 30 and 60 min were significantly higher in the VHF group than in the vehicle and normal diet group. Liver insulin receptor and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase mRNA expressions and protein levels were lower in the DHF group. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA expressions were lower in the epididymal adipose tissue in the VHF and DHF groups. “Programming” of liver or epididymal adipose tissue resulted from prenatal events. Prenatal steroid exposure worsened insulin resistance in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  8. High-Fat Diet Changes Fungal Microbiomes and Interkingdom Relationships in the Murine Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Timothy; Montassier, Emmanuel; Johnson, Abigail; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel; Lin, Yi-Wei; Wei, Li-Na; Knights, Dan; Gale, Cheryl A

    2017-01-01

    Dietary fat intake and shifts in gut bacterial community composition are associated with the development of obesity. To date, characterization of microbiota in lean versus obese subjects has been dominated by studies of gut bacteria. Fungi, recently shown to affect gut inflammation, have received little study for their role in obesity. We sought to determine the effects of high-fat diet on fungal and bacterial community structures in a mouse model using the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria. Mice fed a high-fat diet had significantly different abundances of 19 bacterial and 6 fungal taxa than did mice fed standard chow, with high-fat diet causing similar magnitudes of change in overall fungal and bacterial microbiome structures. We observed strong and complex diet-specific coabundance relationships between intra- and interkingdom microbial pairs and dramatic reductions in the number of coabundance correlations in mice fed a high-fat diet compared to those fed standard chow. Furthermore, predicted microbiome functional modules related to metabolism were significantly less abundant in high-fat-diet-fed than in standard-chow-fed mice. These results suggest a role for fungi and interkingdom interactions in the association between gut microbiomes and obesity. IMPORTANCE Recent research shows that gut microbes are involved in the development of obesity, a growing health problem in developed countries that is linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. However, studies showing links between microbes and metabolism have been limited to the analysis of bacteria and have ignored the potential contribution of fungi in metabolic health. This study provides evidence that ingestion of a high-fat diet is associated with changes to the fungal (and bacterial) microbiome in a mouse model. In addition, we find that interkingdom structural and functional relationships exist between fungi and bacteria

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HIGH-CHROMIUM CAST IRONS ON THE MACHINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This research is aimed to obtain the regression dependence of the machinability on the chemical composition of pig iron (C, Cr, Mn and Ni in cast state. Methodology. The method of active experiment planning was used to build a mathematical model. Cast irons of composition 1.09…3.91 % С; 11.43…25.57 % Cr; 0.6…5.4 % Mn; 0.19…3.01 % Ni were studied. Cutting tools with plates 10х10 mm out of ВК8 according to State Standard 19051-80 were used for turning. Cutting modes: cutting depth – 0.8 mm, longitudinal feed – 0.15 mm/rot., spindle’s rotation frequency during turning – 200…360 rot./min. Lubricating and cooling liquids were not applied. Evaluation of iron workability was produced by determining the linear tool flank wear per unit length of the cutting path. Findings. Mathematically probabilistic equation of the regression dependence of the cutting tool’s wear on the C, Cr, Mn and Ni content in the machined cast iron were obtained. It was established that with the increase of Cr content in the cast iron to 14.8 % the cutting tool’s wear decreased as a result of formation of carbide eutectic which destroyed the doped ledeburite continuous frame. Further increase of chromium content promoted appearing of chromic carbides with high microhardness which considerably increased the tool’s wear. The conducted research shown that the minimum cutting tool’s wear 0,18 mkm/m was observed during the machining of cast iron containing: 1.09 % C, 14.8 % Cr, 2.3 % Mn and 1.2 % Ni; and the maximum wear is 48,96 mkm/m – when the content was: 3.91 % C, 11.43 % Cr, 5.4 % Mn and 0.19 % Ni. The tool’s wear reached 47.61 mkm/m during the treatment of cast iron containing 3.91 % C, 25.57 % Cr, 5.4 % Mn and 0.19 % Ni. Originality. Mathematically probabilistic model of the dependence of the cutting tool’s wear on the C, Cr, Mn and Ni content in the machined cast iron has been elaborated by the author. Practical value. The model

  10. Optimization of a phytase-containing micronutrient powder with low amounts of highly bioavailable iron for in-home fortification of complementary foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troesch, B.; Egli, I.; Zeder, C.; Hurrell, R.F.; Pee, de S.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In-home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient powders containing low amounts of iron may be potentially safer than powders containing high amounts of iron. However, low iron doses have little nutritional effect, unless iron absorption is high. Objective: The objective

  11. The effect of high-fat--high-fructose diet on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetics in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Coppola, Paola; Mazzoli, Arianna; Cigliano, Luisa; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect of isoenergetic administration to adult rats of high-fat or high-fat--high-fructose diet for 2 weeks on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetic. Body and skeletal muscle composition, energy balance, plasma lipid profile and glucose tolerance were measured, together with mitochondrial functionality, oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. Rats fed high-fat--high-fructose diet exhibited significantly higher plasma triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids, together with significantly higher plasma glucose and insulin response to glucose load. Skeletal muscle triglycerides and ceramide were significantly higher in rats fed high-fat--high-fructose diet. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetic efficiency and uncoupling protein 3 content were significantly higher, while adenine nucleotide translocase content was significantly lower, in rats fed high-fat or high-fat--high-fructose diet. The results suggest that a high-fat--high-fructose diet even without hyperphagia is able to increase lipid flow to skeletal muscle and mitochondrial energetic efficiency, with two detrimental effects: (a) energy sparing that contributes to the early onset of obesity and (b) reduced oxidation of fatty acids and lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle, which could generate insulin resistance.

  12. Effects of diet energy concentration and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance of weanling pigs fed diets containing canola meal produced from high protein or conventional canola seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Friis; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives were to determine effects of diet NE and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance and physiological parameters of weanling pigs fed a corn-soybean meal (SBM) diet or diets containing high protein canola meal (CM-HP) or conventional canola meal (CM-CV). A total of 492 pigs...... with inclusion of an exogenous carbohydrase. Pigs were fed experimental diets for 22 d and 1 pig per pen was sacrificed at the conclusion of the experiment. Results indicated that compared with the control diet, there was no impact of canola meal on final BW, ADG, ADFI, or G:F, but pigs fed CM-CV had greater (P...... N, total N, or albumin were observed, but the weight of the thyroid gland increased (P canola meal increased. Serum concentrations of IgG were reduced if canola meal was included in the diets without the carbohydrase, but that was not the case...

  13. High phenolics Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce improves glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Diana M; Roopchand, Diana E; Poulev, Alexander; Kuhn, Peter; Armas, Isabel; Johnson, William D; Oren, Andrew; Ribnicky, David; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Raskin, Ilya

    2016-11-01

    The ability of high phenolic Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce (RSL) to attenuate metabolic syndrome and gut dysbiosis was studied in very high fat diet (VHFD)-fed mice. Phenolic absorption was assessed in vivo and in a gastrointestinal tract model. Mice were fed VHFD, VHFD supplemented with RSL (RSL-VHFD) or store-purchased green lettuce (GL-VHFD), or low-fat diet (LFD) for 13 weeks. Compared to VHFD or GL-VHFD-fed groups, RSL-VHFD group showed significantly improved oral glucose tolerance (pphenolics chlorogenic acid, quercetin-3-glucoside, and quercetin-malonyl-glucoside were bioaccessible in the TIM-1 digestion model, but had relatively low recovery. RSL phenolics contributed to attenuation of post-prandial hyperglycemia. Changes in gut microbiota were likely due to microbiota accessible carbohydrates in RSL and GL rather than RSL phenolics, which may be metabolized, absorbed, or degraded before reaching the colon. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparative effects of high oleic acid vs high mixed saturated fatty acid obesogenic diets upon PUFA metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklo, Matthew J; Idso, Joseph; Seeger, Drew R; Aukema, Harold M; Murphy, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the fatty acid composition of obesogenic diets influences physiologic outcomes. There are scant data regarding how the content of non-essential fatty acids like monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) impact the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this work, we tested the hypothesis that obesogenic diets enriched in oleic acid (OA; 18:1n-9) reduce polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels vs an obesogenic diet enriched in SFAs. Adult male mice were fed for eight weeks either (1) a control 16% fat energy (en) diet with 5.7% en OA and 4.4% en SFA, (2) a 50% fat en diet with 33% en OA and 9.9% en SFA, or (3) a 50% en diet with a high SFA diet with 33% en SFA and 9.1% en OA. Dietary levels and intake of linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) were constant between the experimental groups. Several peripheral organs (liver, heart, kidney, and adipose) were analyzed for lipid composition and oxylipin analysis was performed for liver and adipose. Our data demonstrate that a high OA diet reduced tissue content of LA and ALA (≥30%) in phospholipid and neutral lipid fractions, reduced the content of some LA-derived and ALA-derived oxylipins in liver and adipose, and conversely, elevated hepatic content of PGF 2α . In all tissues examined, except for adipose, levels of arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) were either elevated or unaffected by the obesogenic diets. Our data indicate that the non-essential fatty content of obesogenic diets impacts PUFA content in peripheral tissues and influences the levels of bioactive oxylipins. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Dietary energy restriction reduces high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary energy restriction on high-fat diet-enhanced spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an AIN93G diet or a high-fat diet (16% or 45% of energy fro...

  16. Effects of low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets on apparent digestibility of minerals and trace elements in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommelt, Lena; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Menhofer, Dominik; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Kienzle, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Ketogenic low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diets reduce growth and bone mineral density in children with epilepsy and in rats. Part of this effect might be due to a reduced availability of calcium in high-fat diets. The aim of this study was to determine mineral digestibility by total collection method in LCHF diets compared with a chow diet and a standard high-fat diet (HFD, high in fat and carbohydrates). Twelve-wk-old male Wistar rats were pair-fed isoenergetic amounts of either six different LCHF diets based on tallow and casein (crude fat 75%-50%, crude protein 10%-35%), with chow or with a HFD diet. Mineral-to-energy ratio was matched in all diets. Circulating parathyroid hormone was measured by immunoassay. The apparent digestibility of calcium was reduced in all HFDs (high-fat diets, LCHF diets and the HFD diet) by at least 30% compared with the chow diet (P diet. The alteration of apparent calcium and phosphorus digestibility may affect the impact of HFDs on bone metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schothorst, Evert M; Bunschoten, Annelies; Verlinde, Eline; Schrauwen, Patrick; Keijer, Jaap

    2011-08-16

    A low vs. high glycemic index of a high-fat (HF) diet (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in adult male C57BL/6J mice, as shown recently (Van Schothorst EM, Bunschoten A, Schrauwen P, Mensink RP, Keijer J. FASEB J 23: 1092-1101, 2009). The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed HF diet-induced body and white adipose tissue (WAT) weight gain, resulting in significantly reduced serum leptin and resistin levels and increased adiponectin levels. We questioned how WAT is modulated and characterized the molecular mechanisms underlying the glycemic index-mediated effects using whole genome microarrays. This showed that the LGI diet mainly exerts its beneficial effects via substrate metabolism, especially fatty acid metabolism. In addition, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling showed reduced expression, in line with lower WAT mass. An important transcription factor showing enhanced expression is PPAR-γ. Furthermore, serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and HDL- and LDL-cholesterol were all significantly reduced by LGI diet, and simultaneously muscle insulin sensitivity was significantly increased as analyzed by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation. Cumulatively, even though these mice were fed an HF diet, the LGI diet induced significantly favorable changes in metabolism in WAT. These effects suggest a partial overlap with pharmacological approaches by thiazolidinediones to treat insulin resistance and statins for hypercholesterolemia. It is therefore tempting to speculate that such a dietary approach might beneficially support pharmacological treatment of insulin resistance or hypercholesterolemia in humans.

  18. Non-fasting factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:C) increased by high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Marckmann, P; Sandström, B

    1994-01-01

    :Bt/FVII:Am (a measure of FVII activation) increased from fasting levels on both diets, but most markedly on the high-fat diet. In contrast, FVII:Am (a measure of FVII protein) tended to decrease from fasting levels on both diets. FVII:C rose from fasting levels on the high-fat diet, but not on the low-fat diet......Preliminary observations have suggested that non-fasting factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:C) may be related to the dietary fat content. To confirm this, we performed a randomised cross-over study. Seventeen young volunteers were served 2 controlled isoenergetic diets differing in fat content (20......% or 50% of energy). The 2 diets were served on 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at 8.00 h, 16.30 h and 19.30 h, and analysed for triglycerides, FVII coagulant activity using human (FVII:C) or bovine thromboplastin (FVII:Bt), and FVII amidolytic activity (FVII:Am). The ratio FVII...

  19. Combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast imaging for high resolution quantitative iron mapping in inflamed cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramaccioni, C.; Procopio, A.; Farruggia, G.; Malucelli, E.; Iotti, S.; Notargiacomo, A.; Fratini, M.; Yang, Y.; Pacureanu, A.; Cloetens, P.; Bohic, S.; Massimi, L.; Cutone, A.; Valenti, P.; Rosa, L.; Berlutti, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2017-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) is a powerful technique to detect and localize elements in cells. To derive information useful for biology and medicine, it is essential not only to localize, but also to map quantitatively the element concentration. Here we applied quantitative XRFM to iron in phagocytic cells. Iron, a primary component of living cells, can become toxic when present in excess. In human fluids, free iron is maintained at 10-18 M concentration thanks to iron binding proteins as lactoferrin (Lf). The iron homeostasis, involving the physiological ratio of iron between tissues/secretions and blood, is strictly regulated by ferroportin, the sole protein able to export iron from cells to blood. Inflammatory processes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial pathoge inhibit ferroportin synthesis in epithelial and phagocytic cells thus hindering iron export, increasing intracellular iron and bacterial multiplication. In this respect, Lf is emerging as an important regulator of both iron and inflammatory homeostasis. Here we studied phagocytic cells inflamed by bacterial LPS and untreated or treated with milk derived bovine Lf. Quantitative mapping of iron concentration and mass fraction at high spatial resolution is obtained combining X-ray fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and synchrotron phase contrast imaging.

  20. Low hepcidin levels in severely anemic malawian children with high incidence of infectious diseases and bone marrow iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femkje A M Jonker

    Full Text Available A reliable diagnostic biomarker of iron status is required for severely anemic children living in malarious areas because presumptive treatment with iron may increase their infection risk if they are not iron deficient. Current biomarkers are limited because they are altered by host inflammation. In this study hepcidin concentrations were assessed in severely anemic children living in a highly malarious area of Malawi and evaluated against bone marrow iron in order to determine the usefulness of hepcidin as a point of care test.207 severely anemic children were assessed for levels of hepcidin, ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, hematological indices, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, malaria parasites and HIV infection. Deficiency of bone marrow iron stores was graded and erythroblast iron incorporation estimated. Interaction of covariates was assessed by structural-equation-modeling.Hepcidin was a poor predictor of bone marrow iron deficiency (sensitivity 66.7%; specificity 48.5%, and of iron incorporation (sensitivity 54.2%; specificity 61.8%, and therefore would have limitations as a point of care test in this category of children. As upregulation of hepcidin by inflammation and iron status was blunted by erythropoietin in this population, enhanced iron absorption through the low hepcidin values may increase infection risk. Current recommendations to treat all severely anemic children living in malarious areas with iron should therefore be reconsidered.

  1. Serum lipids, apoproteins and nutrient intake in rural Cretan boys consuming high-olive-oil diets.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aravanis, C.; Mensink, R.P.; Karalias, N.; Christodoulou, B.; Kafatos, A.; Katan, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    A high intake of olive oil has produced high levels of high-density and low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in short-term dietary trials. To investigate long-term effects of olive oil we have studied the diet and serum lipids of boys in Crete, where a high olive oil consumption is the

  2. Effects of Diet High in Palmitoleic Acid on Serum Lipid Levels and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    sources for the high SFA diet was butter and coconut oil . Additionally four unit foods were provided as snacks. These were in the form of 100 kcal...with monounsaturated fatty acids, using a diet based on macadamia nuts and oil , can accomplish significant reductions in total and LDL cholesterol ...Effects on PEANCLT OIL (PO)LOVVER TOTAL CHOLESTEROL ITCI AND LDL.C Serum Lipids and Lipoproteins I D (7-rb. G, Ressi D kbbo~t. MENTICALLYsTO A STEP 21 DIET

  3. Nutritional and Metabolic Consequences of Feeding High-Fiber Diets to Swine: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta K. Agyekum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At present, substantial amounts of low-cost, fibrous co-products are incorporated into pig diets to reduce the cost of raising swine. However, diets that are rich in fiber are of low nutritive value because pigs cannot degrade dietary fiber. In addition, high-fiber diets have been associated with reduced nutrient utilization and pig performance. However, recent reports are often contradictory and the negative effects of high-fiber diets are influenced by the fiber source, type, and inclusion level. In addition, the effects of dietary fiber on pig growth and physiological responses are often confounded by the many analytical methods that are used to measure dietary fiber and its components. Several strategies have been employed to ameliorate the negative effects associated with the ingestion of high-fiber diets in pigs and to improve the nutritive value of such diets. Exogenous fiber-degrading enzymes are widely used to improve nutrient utilization and pig performance. However, the results of research reports have not been consistent and there is a need to elucidate the mode of action of exogenous enzymes on the metabolic and physiological responses in pigs that are fed high-fiber diets. On the other hand, dietary fiber is increasingly used as a means of promoting pig gut health and gestating sow welfare. In this review, dietary fiber and its effects on pig nutrition, gut physiology, and sow welfare are discussed. In addition, areas that need further research are suggested to gain more insight into dietary fiber and into the use of exogenous enzymes to improve the utilization of high-fiber diets by pigs.

  4. Synthesis of high saturation magnetic iron oxide nanomaterials via low temperature hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhavani, P.; Rajababu, C.H. [Department of Materials Science & Nanotechnology, Yogivemana University, Vemanapuram 516003, Kadapa (India); Arif, M.D. [Environmental Magnetism Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG), Navi Mumbai 410218, Mumbai (India); Reddy, I. Venkata Subba [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad Campus, Rudraram, Medak 502329 (India); Reddy, N. Ramamanohar, E-mail: manoharphd@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science & Nanotechnology, Yogivemana University, Vemanapuram 516003, Kadapa (India)

    2017-03-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized through a simple low temperature hydrothermal approach to obtain with high saturation magnetization properties. Two series of iron precursors (sulfates and chlorides) were used in synthesis process by varying the reaction temperature at a constant pH. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the inverse spinel structure of the synthesized IONPs. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the particles prepared using iron sulfate were consisting a mixer of spherical (16–40 nm) and rod (diameter ~20–25 nm, length <100 nm) morphologies that synthesized at 130 °C, while the IONPs synthesized by iron chlorides are found to be well distributed spherical shapes with size range 5–20 nm. On other hand, the IONPs synthesized at reaction temperature of 190 °C has spherical (16–46 nm) morphology in both series. The band gap values of IONPs were calculated from the obtained optical absorption spectra of the samples. The IONPs synthesized using iron sulfate at temperature of 130 °C exhibited high saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 103.017 emu/g and low remanant magnetization (M{sub r}) of 0.22 emu/g with coercivity (H{sub c}) of 70.9 Oe{sub ,} which may be attributed to the smaller magnetic domains (d{sub m}) and dead magnetic layer thickness (t). - Highlights: • Comparison of iron oxide materials prepared with Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sup +3} sulfates and chlorides at different temperatures. • We prepared super-paramagnetic and soft ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles. • We report higher saturation magnetization with lower coercivity.

  5. Effect of high-fat diet during gestation, lactation, or postweaning on physiological and behavioral indexes in borderline hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Anaya; Alvers, Kristin M.; Crump, Erica M.; Rowland, Neil E.

    2008-01-01

    Maternal obesity is becoming more prevalent. We used borderline hypertensive rats (BHR) to investigate whether a high-fat diet at different stages of development has adverse programming consequences on metabolic parameters and blood pressure. Wistar dams were fed a high- or low-fat diet for 6 wk before mating with spontaneously hypertensive males and during the ensuing pregnancy. At birth, litters were fostered to a dam from the same diet group as during gestation or to the alternate diet con...

  6. Association between predominantly plant-based diets and iron status in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Shen, Xin; Fang, Aiping; Song, Jie; Li, He; Guo, Meihan; Li, Keji

    2016-11-01

    Current evidence of the relationship between diets and Fe status is mostly derived from studies in developed countries with Western diets, which may not be translatable to Chinese with a predominantly plant-based diet. We extracted data that were nationally sampled from the 2009 wave of China Health and Nutrition Survey; dietary information was collected using 24-h recalls combined with a food inventory for 3 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected to quantify Fe status, and log-ferritin, transferrin receptor and Hb were used as Fe status indicators. In total, 2905 (1360 males and 1545 females) adults aged 18-50 years were included for multiple linear regression and stratified analyses. The rates of Fe deficiency and Fe-deficiency anaemia were 1·6 and 0·7 % for males and 28·4 and 10·7 % for females, respectively. As red meat and haem Fe consumption differed about fifteen to twenty times throughout the five groups, divided by quintiles of animal protein intake per 4·2 MJ/d, only Fe status as indicated by log-ferritin (P=0·019) and transferrin receptor (P=0·024) concentrations in males was shown to be higher as intakes of animal foods increased. Log-ferritin was positively associated with intakes of red meat (B=0·3 %, P=0·01) and haem Fe (B=12·3 %, P=0·010) in males and with intake of non-haem Fe in females (B=2·2 %, P=0·024). We conclude that diet has a very limited association with Fe status in Chinese adults consuming a traditional Chinese diet, and a predominantly plant-based diet may not be necessarily responsible for poor Fe status.

  7. Obesity, but not high-fat diet, promotes murine pancreatic cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick B; Ziegler, Kathryn M; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Wang, Sue S; Lillemoe, Keith D; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    Obesity accelerates pancreatic cancer growth; the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. This study evaluated the hypothesis that obesity, rather than high-fat diet, is responsible for accelerated pancreatic cancer growth. Male C57BL/6J mice were studied after 19 weeks of high-fat (60 % fat; n = 20) or low-fat (10 % fat; n = 10) diet and 5 weeks of Pan02 murine pancreatic cancer growth (flank). By two-way ANOVA, diet did not (p = 0.58), but body weight, significantly influenced tumor weight (p = 0.01). Tumor weight correlated positively with body weight (R (2) = 0.562; p pancreatic cancer growth observed in this model of diet-induced obesity. Decreased tumor apoptosis appears to play an important mechanistic role in this process. The concept that decreased apoptosis is potentiated by hypoadiponectinemia (seen in obesity) deserves further investigation.

  8. [Effects of rilmenidine on rats made insulin resistant and hypertensive by a high fructose diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthault, M F; Morin, J; Dubar, M; Ktorza, A; Ferré, P; Pénicaud, L

    1996-08-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effects of rilmenidine, an hypertensive drug, in an animal model of hypertension associated with insulin resistance, i.e. rats fed on a high fructose diet. Wistar rats were fed during four weeks either on a standard diet (S) or on a high fructose diet (F, 34.5% de fructose). In half of the F groups, rilmenidine (1 mg/kg/day) was added to the drinking water during the two last weeks of the diet (FR). Arterial blood pressure as well as insulin efficiency were determined at the end of the four weeks. Body weight gain was higher in F than in S rats (66 +/- 8 g versus 45 +/- 8 g; p metabolic disorders such as syndrom X and obesity.

  9. The soluble "high potential" type iron-sulfur protein from mitochondria is aconitase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, F J; Beinert, H

    1978-04-25

    Properties of soluble high potential type iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from beef heart mitochondria were compared to those of aconitase from pig heart. The two proteins when purified to homogeneity by the criteria of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide electrophoresis show identical light absorption characteristics. EPR signals of the HiPIP type centered at g = 2.01 when oxidized, isoelectric points at pH 8.5 to 8.6, are inseparable by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis, and exhibit aconitase activity when activated by reducing agents in the presence of ferrous iron. The requirement for activation goes parallel to the intensity of the signal from the oxidized iron-sulfur cluster, i.e. the cluster is reduced in the active enzyme. We conclude that the soluble mitochondrial HiPIP is identical with aconitase. The relationships of iron to labile sulfide, molecular weight and unpaired spins in the EPR signal, and implications of our findings for the role of iron in aconitase are discussed.

  10. High-fiber diet promotes weight loss and affects maternal behavior in vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Lynn A; Blau, Karin; Jorgensen, Matthew J

    2010-03-01

    The dramatic increase in obesity in western societies has shifted the emphasis in nutrition research from the problems of undernutrition to the adverse consequences of being overweight. As with humans, Old World monkeys are at increased risk for type II diabetes and other chronic diseases when they gain excessive weight. To prevent overweight and obesity, promote animal health, and provide a more natural level of fiber in the diet, the standard commercial monkey chow diet at a vervet monkey breeding colony was changed to a higher fiber formulation in 2004. The new diet was also higher in protein and lower in carbohydrate and energy density than the standard diet. Because maternal behavior is known to be sensitive to differences in resource availability, data on weight and mother-infant interactions for 147 mothers with 279 infants born from 2000 through 2006 were assessed for effects of the diet change. The results showed that, even though food was provided ad libitum, the mean body weight of breeding females was 10% lower after the transition to the high-fiber diet. Behaviorally, mothers on the high-fiber diet were significantly more rejecting to their infants, and their infants had to play a greater role in maintaining ventral contact in the first few months of their lives. The effects of the diet change on maternal rejection were significantly related to the mother's body weight, with lower-weight mothers scoring higher in maternal rejection. These results demonstrate that maternal behavior is responsive to changes in maternal condition, and that beneficial changes in the diet may have unintended consequences on behavior. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Effect on Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Muzafar A.K.; Rashidi M.M.; Mahadzir I.; Shayfull Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an attempt to study the effect of manganese addition and heat treatment on higher carbon austenitic cast iron to form high manganese austenitic cast iron with reduced nickel content (Mn-Ni-resist) on mechanical properties. The combination on microstructure (microsegregation), mechanical properties and the relationship of heat treatment on the alloy were analyzed. For this purpose Mn-Ni-resist (4.50C, 2.64Si, 6.0 Mn, 10 Ni) was melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pie...

  12. Understanding the management of iron deficiency anaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (erythrocyte loss during haemodialysis). • Patients receiving erythropoietin. • Patients that suffer from chronic blood loss - menstruating women, bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Diet affects iron status. Unlike haem iron, a vegetarian diet decreases total iron stores as iron from ...

  13. Electronic environments of ferrous iron in rhyolitic and basaltic glasses at high pressure: Silicate Glasses at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomatova, Natalia V. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena California USA; Jackson, Jennifer M. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena California USA; Sturhahn, Wolfgang [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena California USA; Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena California USA; Roskosz, Mathieu [IMPMC-Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle-CNRS, Paris France

    2017-08-01

    The physical properties of silicate melts within Earth's mantle affect the chemical and thermal evolution of its interior. Chemistry and coordination environments affect such properties. We have measured the hyperfine parameters of iron-bearing rhyolitic and basaltic glasses up to ~120 GPa and ~100 GPa, respectively, in a neon pressure medium using time domain synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The spectra for rhyolitic and basaltic glasses are well explained by three high-spin Fe2+-like sites with distinct quadrupole splittings. Absence of detectable ferric iron was confirmed with optical absorption spectroscopy. The sites with relatively high and intermediate quadrupole splittings are likely a result of fivefold and sixfold coordination environments of ferrous iron that transition to higher coordination with increasing pressure. The ferrous site with a relatively low quadrupole splitting and isomer shift at low pressures may be related to a fourfold or a second fivefold ferrous iron site, which transitions to higher coordination in basaltic glass, but likely remains in low coordination in rhyolitic glass. These results indicate that iron experiences changes in its coordination environment with increasing pressure without undergoing a high-spin to low-spin transition. We compare our results to the hyperfine parameters of silicate glasses of different compositions. With the assumption that coordination environments in silicate glasses may serve as a good indicator for those in a melt, this study suggests that ferrous iron in chemically complex silicate melts likely exists in a high-spin state throughout most of Earth's mantle.

  14. Direct visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and its iron distribution using high-resolution susceptibility mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Neumann, J.; Wharton, S.; Mietke, A.; Bowtell, R.; Turner, R.

    2012-01-01

    Histological studies have shown a relatively high iron concentration in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). T2- and T2*-weighted sequences have previously been used to visualize the STN in vivo. The phase information of gradient-echo images reflects the magnetic tissue properties more directly, e.g.,

  15. Influence of Titanium on Crystallization and Wear Resistance of High Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the results of studies on primary crystallization and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron inoculated with ferrotitanium intended for work in abrasive conditions. Primary crystallization was examined with use of TDA method, wear tests of the samples were conducted using the modified pin-on-disk method.

  16. Influence of Titanium on Crystallization and Wear Resistance of High Chromium Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Studnicki A.; Dojka R.; Gromczyk M.; Kondracki M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper presents the results of studies on primary crystallization and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron inoculated with ferrotitanium intended for work in abrasive conditions. Primary crystallization was examined with use of TDA method, wear tests of the samples were conducted using the modified pin-on-disk method.

  17. The Althoff-Radtke Test Adapted for High Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the possibility of adapting the Althoff-Radtke test for High Chromium Cast Iron. The Althoff-Radtke test is a clump attempt used for steel. The Althoff-Radtke test has four different lengths of clamp which qualifies it as a test to quantitatively take into account different kinds of shrinkage ΔL. The length of the slot of the cracked corner and the length of each staple (50 - 350 mm are the parameters tendency to cast cracks. Castings of white cast iron have a high tendency to hot cracking due to the large range of solidification temperatures, unfavorable kinetics parameters of shrinkage, and especially a lack of expansion before shrinkage. Shrinkage of high chromium white cast iron is similar to the shrinkage of cast steel, and is approximately 2%. Therefore it is important to test susceptibility to hot cracks. Research was carried out under industrial conditions. Four melts were performed, one of the initial chemical composition and the other three modified by different amounts of Fe-Ti, respectively, 0.25%, 0.5% and 0.75% Fe-Ti. The propensity for hot cracking was based on the observation of the dark surface in the corner of the sample. The study shows that the Althoff-Radtke test can be adapted to determine the tendency for hot cracking of high chromium cast iron. It should however be noted that the test results cannot be compared with those for other alloys.

  18. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  19. Downregulation of Cellular Protective Factors of Rumen Epithelium in Goats Fed High Energy Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Manfred Hollmann; Ingrid Miller; Karin Hummel; Sonja Sabitzer; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Ebrahim Razzazi-Fazeli; Qendrim Zebeli

    2013-01-01

    Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 sp...

  20. Adipokine production in mice fed high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study compared high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats with various levels of linoleic acid (18:2n6, LA) and a-linolenic acid (18:3n3, ALA) on adipokine production in male C57BL/6 mice. Three-week old mice were fed AIN93G diet (15% of energy from corn oil, control) or ...

  1. Metabolic and transcriptional response to a high-fat diet in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrichsen, ET; Zhang, H; Robinson, JE; Ngo, J; Diop, S; Bodmer, R; Joiner, WJ; Metallo, CM; Haddad, GG

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has dramatically increased in prevalence, making it essential to understand its accompanying metabolic changes. Modeling diet-induced obesity in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies), we elucidated transcriptional and metabolic changes in w 1118 flies on a high-fat diet (HFD). Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics revealed altered fatty acid, amino acid, and carbohydrate metabolism with HFD. Microarray analysis uncovered transcriptional changes in nitrogen metabolism, including CG9510...

  2. A Micronutrient Powder with Low Doses of Highly Absorbable Iron and Zinc Reduces Iron and Zinc Deficiency and Improves Weight-For-Age Z-Scores in South African Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troesch, B.; Stuijvenberg, van M.E.; Smuts, C.M.; Salome Kruger, H.; Biebinger, R.; Hurrell, R.F.; Baumgartner, J.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Micronutrient powders (MNP) are often added to complementary foods high in inhibitors of iron and zinc absorption. Most MNP therefore include high amounts of iron and zinc, but it is no longer recommended in malarial areas to use untargeted MNP that contain the Reference Nutrient Intake for iron in

  3. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-05-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) μ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Simultaneous introduction of a novel high fat diet and wheel running induces anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpace, E T; Matheny, M; Strehler, K Y E; Shapiro, A; Cheng, K Y; Tümer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2012-02-28

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) is a form of physical activity in rodents that influences ingestive behavior. The present report describes an anorexic behavior triggered by the simultaneous introduction of a novel diet and WR. This study examined the sequential, compared with the simultaneous, introduction of a novel high-fat (HF) diet and voluntary WR in rats of three different ages and revealed a surprising finding; the simultaneous introduction of HF food and voluntary WR induced a behavior in which the animals chose not to eat although food was available at all times. This phenomenon was apparently not due to an aversion to the novel HF diet because introduction of the running wheels plus the HF diet, while continuing the availability of the normal chow diet did not prevent the anorexia. Moreover, the anorexia was prevented with prior exposure to the HF diet. In addition, the anorexia was not related to extent of WR but dependent on the act of WR. The introduction a HF diet and locked running wheels did not induce the anorexia. This voluntary anorexia was accompanied by substantial weight loss, and the anorexia was rapidly reversed by removal of the running wheels. Moreover, the HF/WR-induced anorexia is preserved across the age span despite the intrinsic decrease in WR activity and increased consumption of HF food with advancing age. The described phenomenon provides a new model to investigate anorexia behavior in rodents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-fat diets: modeling the metabolic disorders of human obesity in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Roland; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Bollheimer, L Cornelius

    2007-04-01

    High-fat (HF) diet feeding can induce obesity and metabolic disorders in rodents that resemble the human metabolic syndrome. However, this dietary intervention is not standardized, and the HF-induced phenotype varies distinctly among different studies. The question which HF diet type is best to model the metabolic deterioration seen in human obesity remains unclear. Therefore, in this review, metabolic data obtained with different HF diet approaches are compiled. Both whole-body and organ-specific diet effects are analyzed. On the basis of these results, we conclude that animal fats and omega-6/omega-9-containing plant oils can be used to generate an obese and insulin-resistant phenotype in rodents, whereas fish oil-fed animals do not develop these disorders. Looking at the present data, it does not seem possible to define an ideal HF diet, and an exact definition of diet composition and a thorough metabolic characterization of the HF diet effects in a researcher's specific laboratory setting remains essential for metabolic studies with this model.

  6. Wheel running reduces high-fat diet intake, preference and mu-opioid agonist stimulated intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nu-Chu; Bello, Nicholas T.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2015-01-01

    The ranges of mechanisms by which exercise affects energy balance remain unclear. One potential mechanism may be that exercise reduces intake and preference for highly palatable, energy dense fatty foods. The current study used a rodent wheel running model to determine whether and how physical activity affects HF diet intake/preference and reward signaling. Experiment 1 examined whether wheel running affected the ability of intracerebroventricular (ICV) µ opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) to increase HF diet intake. Experiment 2 examined the effects of wheel running on the intake of and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. We also assessed the effects of wheel running and diet choice on mesolimbic dopaminergic and opioidergic gene expression. Experiment 1 revealed that wheel running decreased the ability of ICV DAMGO administration to stimulate HF diet intake. Experiment 2 showed that wheel running suppressed weight gain and reduced intake and preference for a previously preferred HF diet. Furthermore, the mesolimbic gene expression profile of wheel running rats was different from that of their sedentary paired-fed controls but similar to that of sedentary rats with large HF diet consumption. These data suggest that alterations in preference for palatable, energy dense foods play a role in the effects of exercise on energy homeostasis. The gene expression results also suggest that the hedonic effects of exercise may substitute for food reward to limit food intake and suppress weight gain. PMID:25668514

  7. The effect of bonding environment on iron isotope fractionation between minerals at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2017-01-01

    Central to understanding the processes that drive stable isotope fractionation in nature is their quantification under controlled experimental conditions. The polyvalent element iron, given its abundance in terrestrial rocks, exerts controls on the structural and chemical properties of minerals and melts. The iron isotope compositions of typical high temperature minerals are, however, poorly constrained and their dependence on intensive (e.g. fO2) and extensive (e.g. compositional) variables is unknown. In this work, experiments involving a reference phase, 2 M FeCl2·4H2O(l), together with an oxide mix corresponding to the bulk composition of the chosen mineral were performed in a piston cylinder in Ag capsules. The oxide mix crystallised in situ at 1073 K and 1 GPa, in equilibrium with the iron chloride, and was held for 72 h. In order to characterise the effect of co-ordination and oxidation state on the isotope composition independently, exclusively Fe2+ minerals were substituted in: VIII-fold almandine, VI-fold ilmenite, fayalite and IV-fold chromite and hercynite. Δ57FeMin-FeCl2 increases in the order VIII iron being the smaller, ferric ion. The composition of the VIFe2+-bearing minerals is similar to that of the aqueous FeCl2 fluid. To the degree that this represents the speciation of iron in fluids exsolving from magmas, the fractionation between them should be small, unless the iron is hosted in magnetite. By contrast, predominantly Fe2+-bearing mantle garnets should preserve a much lighter δ57Fe than their lower pressure spinel counterparts, a signature that may be reflected in partial melts from these lithologies. As the Fe-O bond lengths in fayalite and ilmenite are comparable, their isotope compositions overlap, suggesting that high Ti mare basalts acquired their heavy isotopic signature from ilmenite that crystallised late during lunar magma ocean solidification.

  8. Abiotic transformation of high explosives by freshly precipitated iron minerals in aqueous FeII solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Comfort, Steve D; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Szecsody, Jim E; Grossl, Paul R; Shea, Patrick J

    2010-05-01

    Zerovalent iron barriers have become a viable treatment for field-scale cleanup of various ground water contaminants. While contact with the iron surface is important for contaminant destruction, the interstitial pore water within and near the iron barrier will be laden with aqueous, adsorbed and precipitated Fe(II) phases. These freshly precipitated iron minerals could play an important role in transforming high explosives (HE). Our objective was to determine the transformation of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) by freshly precipitated iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) minerals. This was accomplished by quantifying the effects of initial Fe(II) concentration, pH, and the presence of aquifer solids (Fe(III) phases) on HE transformation rates. Results showed that at pH 8.2, freshly precipitated iron minerals transformed RDX, HMX, and TNT with reaction rates increasing with increasing Fe(II) concentrations. RDX and HMX transformations in these solutions also increased with increasing pH (5.8-8.55). By contrast, TNT transformation was not influenced by pH (6.85-8.55) except at pH values Geochemical modeling also predicted Fe(II) activity would likely be controlled by green rust and magnetite. These results illustrate the important role freshly precipitated Fe(II)/Fe(III) minerals in aqueous Fe(II) solutions play in the transformation of high explosives.

  9. Increased susceptibility of post-weaning rats on high-fat diet to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong Sheng; Ton, So Ha; Phang, Sonia Chew Wen; Tan, Joash Ban Lee; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of the types of high-calorie diets (high-fat and high-fat-high-sucrose diets) and two different developmental stages (post-weaning and young adult) on the induction of metabolic syndrome. Male, post-weaning and adult (3- and 8-week old, respectively) Sprague Dawley rats were given control, high-fat (60% kcal), and high-fat-high-sucrose (60% kcal fat + 30% sucrose water) diets for eight weeks (n = 6 to 7 per group). Physical, biochemical, and transcriptional changes as well as liver histology were noted. Post-weaning rats had higher weight gain, abdominal fat mass, fasting glucose, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, faster hypertension onset, but lower circulating advanced glycation end products compared to adult rats. This is accompanied by upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ in the liver and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the visceral adipose tissue. Post-weaning rats on high-fat diet manifested all phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and increased hepatic steatosis, which are linked to increased hepatic and adipocyte PPARγ expression. Adult rats on high-fat-high-sucrose diet merely became obese and hypertensive within the same treatment duration. Thus, it is more effective and less time-consuming to induce metabolic syndrome in male post-weaning rats with high-fat diet compared to young adult rats. As male rats were selectively included into the study, the results may not be generalisable to all post-weaning rats and further investigation on female rats is required.

  10. Conversion of high and low pollen protein diets into protein in worker honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualdo, M; Barragán, S; Vanagas, L; García, C; Solana, H; Rodríguez, E; Bedascarrasbure, E

    2013-08-01

    Adequate protein levels are necessary to maintain strong honey bee [Apis mellifera (L.)] colonies. The aim of this study was to quantify how pollens with different crude protein contents influence protein stores within individual honey bees. Caged bees were fed one of three diets, consisting of high-protein-content pollen, low-protein-content pollen, or protein-free diet as control; measurements were made based on protein content in hemolymph and fat body, fat body weight, and body weight. Vitellogenin in hemolymph was also measured. Bees fed with high crude protein diet had significantly higher levels of protein in hemolymph and fat bodies. Caged bees did not increase pollen consumption to compensate for the lower protein in the diet, and ingesting approximately 4 mg of protein per bee could achieve levels of 20 microg/microl protein in hemolymph. Worker bees fed with low crude protein diet took more time in reaching similar protein content of the bees that were fed with high crude protein diet. The data showed that fat bodies and body weight were not efficient methods of measuring the protein status of bees. The determination of total protein or vitellogenin concentration in the hemolymph from 13-d-old bees and protein concentration of fat bodies from 9-d-old bees could be good indicators of nutritional status of honey bees.

  11. Ordered mesoporous ferrosilicate materials with highly dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles and investigation of their unique magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasu, Pavuluri; Suresh, Koppoju; Datt, Gopal; Abhayankar, Ashutosh C; Rao, Pothuraju Nageswara; Lakshmi Kantam, Mannepalli; Bhargava, Suresh K; Tang, Jing; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-11-07

    Ordered mesoporous ferrosilicate materials with highly dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles are directly synthesized through a hydrothermal approach under acidic conditions. The obtained samples possess a high surface area (up to 1236 m(2) g(-1)) and a large pore volume (up to 1.1 cm(3) g(-1)). By changing the amount of iron content, the magnetic properties can be tuned.

  12. Is red meat required for the prevention of iron deficiency among children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Savvas C; Kafatos, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency remains the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide despite the fact that global prevention is a high priority. Recent guidelines suggest intake of red meat both in infants and toddlers to prevent iron deficiency. However frequent consumption of red and processed meat may be associated with an increased risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Evidence also suggests that even in vegetarian diets or diets with little consumption of white or red meat, iron status may not be adversely affected. The Eastern Orthodox Christian Church dietary recommendations which is a type of periodic vegetarian diet, has proved beneficial for the prevention of iron deficiency and avoidance of excess iron intake. This paper aims to provide examples of meals for children and adolescents that may be sufficient to meet age specific iron requirements without consumption of red meat beyond the recommended consumption which is once or twice per month.

  13. Short time synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes with high rates by CVD of methane on continuously emerged iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Behnam, E-mail: bahrami@email.sc.edu [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaieli, Mohamad [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We report the variation of yield and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron oxide-MgO at 900-1000 deg. C for 1-60 min. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation of MgO powder with iron nitrate, dried, and calcined at 300 deg. C. As calcined and unreduced catalyst in quartz reactor was brought to the synthesis temperature in helium flow in a few minutes, and then the flow was switched to methane. The iron oxide was reduced to iron nanoparticles in methane, while the CNTs were growing. TEM micrographs, in accordance with Raman RBM peaks, indicate the formation of mostly single wall carbon nanotubes of about 1.0 nm size. High quality CNTs with I{sub G}/I{sub D} Raman peak ratio of 14.5 are formed in the first minute of CNTs synthesis with the highest rate. Both the rate and quality of CNTs degrades with increasing CNTs synthesis time. Also CNTs quality sharply declines with temperature in the range of 900-1000 deg. C, while the CNTs yield passes through a maximum at 950 deg. C. About the same CNTs lengths are formed for the whole range of the synthesis times. A model of continuous emergence of iron nanoparticle seeds for CNTs synthesis may explain the data. The data can also provide information for continuous production of CNTs in a fluidized bed reactor.

  14. Preparation of Highly Pure Vanadyl Sulfate from Sulfate Solutions Containing Impurities of Iron and Aluminum by Solvent Extraction Using EHEHPA

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Li; Desheng Chen; Guozhi Zhang; Hongxin Zhao; Tao Qi; Weijing Wang; Lina Wang; Yahui Liu

    2017-01-01

    The preparation of highly pure vanadyl sulfate from sulfate solutions containing impurities of iron and aluminumwas investigated by solvent extraction with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (EHEHPA) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as the phase modifier. The extraction and stripping conditions of vanadium (IV) and its separation from iron and aluminum were optimized. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the extraction of vanadium (IV) and iron were 68% and 53%, respectiv...

  15. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  16. High-fiber rye diet increases ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients compared with low-fiber wheat diet independent of meal frequency in ileostomy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Isaksson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole-grain foods and cereal dietary fiber intake is associated with lower body weight. This may partly result from lower energy utilization of high-fiber diets. Objective: In the present study, the impact on ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients in response to a rye bread high-fiber diet compared to a refined wheat low-fiber diet was investigated. Furthermore, the effect of meal frequency on apparent absorption of nutrients was studied for the first time. Design: Ten participants that had undergone ileostomy consumed standardized iso-caloric diets, including low-fiber wheat bread (20 g dietary fiber per day for 2 weeks followed by high-fiber rye bread (52 g dietary fiber per day for 2 weeks. The diets were consumed in an ordinary (three meals per day and a nibbling (seven meals per day meal frequency in a cross-over design. Ileal effluents were collected during 24 h at the third day of each of the four dietary periods and analyzed for gross energy and nutrient contents. Results: The results showed that intake of rye bread high-fiber diet compared to the refined wheat low-fiber diet caused an increase in ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients. The effect was independent of meal frequency. This suggests that a high intake of rye may result in lower availability of macronutrients for small intestinal digestion and absorption. A regular intake of rye may therefore have implications for weight management.

  17. The role of maternal diet and iron-folic acid supplements in influencing birth weight: evidence from India's National Family Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Nisha; Upadhyay, Ravi Prakash; Bhilwar, Meenakshi; Choy, Nicholas; Green, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    To examine the role of maternal diet in determining low birth weight (LBW) in Indian infants. Data from the National Family Health Survey (2005-06) were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the effect of maternal diet on infant birth weight. Infants whose mothers consumed milk and curd daily [odds ratio (OR), 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.29]; fruits daily (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.36) or weekly (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.24) had higher odds of not having a low birth weight baby. The daily consumption of pulses and beans (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.36) increased the odds while weekly consumption of fish (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) decreased the odds of not having a LBW infant. Intake of iron-folic acid supplements during pregnancy increased birth weight by 6.46 g per month. Improved intake of micronutrient-rich foods can increase birth weight. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Metabolic responses to high protein diet in Korean elite bodybuilders with high-intensity resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choue Ryowon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High protein diet has been known to cause metabolic acidosis, which is manifested by increased urinary excretion of nitrogen and calcium. Bodybuilders habitually consumed excessive dietary protein over the amounts recommended for them to promote muscle mass accretion. This study investigated the metabolic response to high protein consumption in the elite bodybuilders. Methods Eight elite Korean bodybuilders within the age from 18 to 25, mean age 21.5 ± 2.6. For data collection, anthropometry, blood and urinary analysis, and dietary assessment were conducted. Results They consumed large amounts of protein (4.3 ± 1.2 g/kg BW/day and calories (5,621.7 ± 1,354.7 kcal/day, as well as more than the recommended amounts of vitamins and minerals, including potassium and calcium. Serum creatinine (1.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl and potassium (5.9 ± 0.8 mmol/L, and urinary urea nitrogen (24.7 ± 9.5 mg/dl and creatinine (2.3 ± 0.7 mg/dl were observed to be higher than the normal reference ranges. Urinary calcium (0.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl, and phosphorus (1.3 ± 0.4 mg/dl were on the border of upper limit of the reference range and the urine pH was in normal range. Conclusions Increased urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and creatinine might be due to the high rates of protein metabolism that follow high protein intake and muscle turnover. The obvious evidence of metabolic acidosis in response to high protein diet in the subjects with high potassium intake and intensive resistance exercise were not shown in this study results. However, this study implied that resistance exercise with adequate mineral supplementation, such as potassium and calcium, could reduce or offset the negative effects of protein-generated metabolic changes. This study provides preliminary information of metabolic response to high protein intake in bodybuilders who engaged in high-intensity resistance exercise. Further studies will be needed to determine the effects of the intensity

  19. The chemical characteristics of organic iron sources and their relative bioavailabilities for broilers fed a conventional corn-soybean meal diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L Y; Lu, L; Zhang, L Y; Luo, X G

    2016-06-01

    Twenty-four organic Fe sources were evaluated by polarographic analysis and via solubility in buffers (pH 5 and 2) and deionized water. Organic Fe sources included 6 Fe-Met complexes (Fe-Met), 10 Fe-Gly complexes, 1 Fe-Lys complex, 4 Fe proteinates, and 3 Fe-AA complexes (Fe-AA). Sources varied considerably in chemical characteristics. Chelation strengths (quotient of formation [Q] values) ranged from weak (Q = 1.08) to extremely strong strength (Q = 8,590). A total of 1,170 1-d-old Arbor Acres male broilers were randomly allotted to 6 replicate cages (15 chicks/cage) for each of 13 treatments in a completely randomized design involving a 4 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments (4 Fe sources × 3 added Fe levels) plus a control with no added Fe. Dietary treatments included a corn-soybean meal basal diet (control; 55.8 mg Fe/kg) and the basal diet supplemented with 20, 40, or 60 mg Fe/kg as iron sulfate (FeSO∙7HO); an Fe-Met with weak chelation strength (Fe-Met W; Q = 1.37; 14.7% Fe); an iron proteinate with moderate chelation strength (Fe-Prot M; Q = 43.6; 14.2% Fe); or an iron proteinate with extremely strong chelation strength (Fe-Prot ES; Q = 8,590; 10.2% Fe). The growth performance, Fe concentrations, hematological indices, and activities and gene expressions of 2 Fe-containing enzymes in tissues of broilers at 7, 14, and 21 d of age were determined in the present study. Transferrin saturation in plasma on 14 d; bone Fe on d 7 and 14; liver Fe on d 7, 14, and 21; kidney Fe on d 14; succinate dehydrogenase activities in the liver on d 21 and in the kidney on d 7 and 21; mRNA levels in the kidney and heart on d 14; and mRNA levels in the liver and kidney on d 21 linearly increased ( sources were detected ( sources were closely related to their Q values and organic Fe sources with greater Q values showed higher Fe bioavailabilities.

  20. High Iron Requirement for Growth, Photosynthesis, and Low-light Acclimation in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, W. G.; Huntsman, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Iron is a critical nutrient in photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth in large regions of the ocean. Most of the iron in phytoplankton occurs in iron-containing proteins in the photosynthetic apparatus, and thus interactions among cellular iron, light, and growth rate are predicted. In agreement with this prediction, decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C) ratio needed to support a given growth rate by 2- to 3-fold in both a coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, and a coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris due to an increase in iron-containing photosynthetic units. However, although the light responses were similar, the cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher in the cyanobacterium than in the diatom, a pattern seen in other Syechococcus isolates and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Due to the high iron requirement for growth and low light acclimation, we might expect Synechococcus to be at a competitive disadvantage in many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean's deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), where iron and light levels are low and lower-iron requiring eukaryotic algae typically dominate the phytoplankton biomass in the mid to lower DCM.

  1. Synthesis and toxicity characterization of carbon coated iron oxide nanoparticles with highly defined size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rafael Gregorio; Koch, Britta; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; El-Gendy, Ahmed Aboud; Krupskaya, Yulia; Springer, Armin; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Oliver; Büchner, Bernd; Sanchez, Samuel; Rümmeli, Mark Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles hold great promise for future biomedical applications. To this end numerous studies on iron oxide nanoparticles have been conducted. One aspect these studies reveal is that nanoparticle size and shape can trigger different cellular responses through endocytic pathways, cell viability and early apoptosis. However, systematic studies investigating the size dependence of iron oxide nanoparticles with highly defined diameters across multiple cells lines are not available yet. Iron oxide nanoparticles with well-defined size distributions were prepared. All samples were thoroughly characterized and the cytotoxicity for four standard cell lines (HeLa Kyoto, human osteosarcoma (U2OS), mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and mouse macrophages (J7442)) where investigated. Our findings show that small differences in size distribution (ca. 10nm) of iron oxide nanoparticles do not influence cytotoxicity, while uptake is size dependent. Cytotoxicity is dose-dependent. Broad distributions of nanoparticles are more easily internalized as compared to the narrow distributions for two of the cell lines tested (HeLa Kyoto and mouse macrophages (J7442)). The data indicate that it is not feasible to probe changes in cytotoxicity within a small size range (10nm). However, TEM investigations of the nanoparticles indicate that cellular uptake is size dependent. The present work compares narrow and broad distributions for various samples of carbon-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The data highlights that cells differentiate between nanoparticle sizes as indicated by differences in cellular uptake. This information provides valuable knowledge to better understand the interaction of nanoparticles and cells. © 2013.

  2. Effect of high-fat diet on stress responsiveness in borderline hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A; Crump, E M; Alvers, K M; Robertson, K L; Rowland, N E

    2011-01-01

    Stress in combination with genetic susceptibility is a factor in the development of hypertension. We used borderline hypertensive rats to investigate whether exposure to high-fat and/or junk-food diet at different stages of ontogeny has programing consequences on stress responses. Wistar dams were fed a high- or low-fat diet for 6 weeks prior to mating with spontaneously hypertensive males, and during gestation. At birth, litters were fostered either to a dam in the same or an alternative diet condition as during gestation. After weaning, male offspring were fed either a control-chow diet or an intermittent junk food fatty diet. Between postnatal days 57-61, half of the rats in each dietary group received daily social defeat sessions using a resident-intruder protocol, and the other half were unstressed controls. Blood pressure was measured indirectly both before and after each defeat session. On the final day, rats were killed for physiological measures. Socially defeated rats showed large increases in serum corticosterone concentration and adrenal hypertrophy, indicating the effectiveness of this non-adapting stressor. Serum corticosterone level was also higher in rats fed with the junk-food diet post-weaning compared with those fed with chow only, but there were no significant effects of gestational or lactational dietary history.

  3. Maternal high-fat diet influences outcomes after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barks, John D; Liu, Yiqing; Shangguan, Yu; Djuric, Zora; Ren, Jianwei; Silverstein, Faye S

    2017-01-01

    The typical US diet has >30% calories from fat; yet, typical laboratory diets contain 17% calories from fat. This disparity could confound the clinical relevance of findings in cerebral ischemia models. We compared outcomes after neonatal brain injury in offspring of rat dams fed standard low-fat chow (17% fat calories) or a higher fat diet (34% fat calories) from day 7 of pregnancy. On postnatal day 7, hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced by right carotid ligation, followed by 60, 75 or 90 min 8% oxygen exposure. Sensorimotor function, brain damage, and serum and brain fatty acid content were compared 1 to 4 weeks later. All lesioned animals developed left forepaw placing deficits; scores were worse in the high-fat groups (p diet groups. Serum and brain docosahexaenoic acid fatty acid fractions were lower in high-fat progeny (p diet disrupted docosahexaenoic acid-dependent recovery mechanisms. These findings have significant implications both for refinement of neonatal brain injury models and for understanding the impact of maternal diet on neonatal neuroplasticity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Antihyperlipidemic Effects of Sesamum indicum L. in Rabbits Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Asgary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemic effects of sesame in a high-fat fed rabbit model. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of eight animals each for 60 days as follows: normal diet, hypercholesterolemic diet (1% cholesterol, hypercholesterolemic diet (1% cholesterol + sesame seed (10%, and hypercholesterolemic diet (1% cholesterol + sesame oil (5%. Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, apoA and apoB, SGOT, SGPT, glucose and insulin were measured at the end of supplementation period in all studied groups. Hypercholesterolemic feeding resulted in a significant elevation of TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, SGOT and SGPT as compared to the normocholesterolemic diet group (P0.05. In contrast, rabbits supplemented with sesame oil were found to have lower circulating concentrations of TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, SGOT and SGPT (P0.05. Supplementation with sesame oil, but not sesame seed, can ameliorate serum levels of lipids and hepatic enzymes in rabbits under a high-fat diet.

  5. Purified berry anthocyanins but not whole berries normalize lipid parameters in mice fed an obesogenic high fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male C57BL/6 mice received diets with either 10% of kcal from fat (LF), or a high fat diet [45% (HF45) or 60% (HF60) kcal from fat]. Diets were prepared with or without freeze dried powders (10%) from whole blueberries (BB), strawberries (SB), Concord grape (CG) or black raspberry (BRB). In the 2nd ...

  6. Expression of Selenoprotein Genes Is Affected by Obesity of Pigs Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Ke; Tang, Jia-Yong; Zhou, Ji-Chang; Wang, Kang-Ning; Xia, Xin-Jie; Lei, Xin Gen

    2015-07-01

    Relations of the 25 mammalian selenoprotein genes with obesity and the associated inflammation remain unclear. This study explored impacts of high-fat diet-induced obesity on inflammation and expressions of selenoprotein and obesity-related genes in 10 tissues of pigs. Plasma and 10 tissues were collected from pigs (n = 10) fed a corn-soy-based control diet or that diet containing 3-7% lard from weanling to finishing (180 d). Plasma concentrations (n = 8) of cytokines and thyroid hormones and tissue mRNA abundance (n = 4) of 25 selenoprotein genes and 16 obesity-related genes were compared between the pigs fed the control and high-fat diets. Stepwise regression was applied to analyze correlations among all these measures, including the previously reported body physical and plasma biochemical variables. The high-fat diet elevated (P high-fat diet up-regulated 12 selenoprotein genes in 6 tissues, down-regulated 13 selenoprotein genes in 7 tissues, and exerted no effect on 5 genes in any tissue. Body weights and plasma triglyceride concentrations of pigs showed the strongest regressions to tissue mRNA abundances of selenoprotein and obesity-related genes. Among the selenoprotein genes, selenoprotein V and I were ranked as the strongest independent variables for the regression of phenotypic and plasma measures. Meanwhile, agouti signaling protein, adiponectin, and resistin genes represented the strongest independent variables of the obesity-related genes for the regression of tissue selenoprotein mRNA. The high-fat diet induced inflammation in pigs and affected their gene expression of selenoproteins associated with thioredoxin and oxidoreductase systems, local tissue thyroid hormone activity, endoplasmic reticulum protein degradation, and phosphorylation of lipids. This porcine model may be used to study interactive mechanisms between excess fat intake and selenoprotein function. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Influence of muscle fiber type composition on early fat accumulation under high-fat diet challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ning; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yee, Grace M; Kitajima, Yoichiro; Katagiri, Sayaka; Kojima, Motoyasu; Anzai, Keizo; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Hamilton, James A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether differences in muscle fiber types affect early-stage fat accumulation, under high fat diet challenge in mice. Twelve healthy male C57BL/6 mice experienced with short-term (6 weeks) diet treatment for the evaluation of early pattern changes in muscular fat. The mice were randomly divided into two groups: high fat diet (n = 8) and normal control diet (n = 4). Extra- and intra-myocellular lipid (EMCL and IMCL) in lumbar muscles (type I fiber predominant) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (type II fiber predominant) were determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Correlation of EMCL, IMCL and their ratio between TA and lumbar muscles was evaluated. EMCL increased greatly in both muscle types after high fat diet. IMCL in TA and lumbar muscles increased to a much lower extent, with a slightly greater increase in TA muscles. EMCLs in the 2 muscles were positively correlated (r = 0.84, p = 0.01), but IMCLs showed a negative relationship (r = -0.84, p = 0.01). In lumbar muscles, high fat diet significantly decreased type I fiber while it increased type II fiber (all p≤0.001). In TA muscle, there was no significant fiber type shifting (p>0.05). Under short-time high fat diet challenge, lipid tends to initially accumulate extra-cellularly. In addition, compared to type II dominant muscle, Type I dominant muscle was less susceptible to IMCL accumulation but more to fiber type shifting. These phenomena might reflect compensative responses of skeletal muscle to dietary lipid overload in order to regulate metabolic homeostasis.

  8. Ruscogenin protects against high-fat diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hung-Jen; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju; Lin, Sheng Da; Yang, Cheng; Wu, Ming-Chang; Liu, I-Min

    2014-07-01

    The protective effects of ruscogenin on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in hamsters fed a high-fat diet were investigated. Ruscogenin (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg/day) was orally administered by gavage once daily for eight weeks. A high-fat diet induced increases in plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, while the degree of insulin resistance was lowered by ruscogenin. High-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis and necroinflammation were improved by ruscogenin. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB were also increased in the high-fat diet group, which were attenuted by ruscogenin. Ruscogenin decreased hepatic mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and its lipogenic target genes. The hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, together with its target genes responsible for fatty acid β-oxidation were upregulated by ruscogenin. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ruscogenin may attenuate high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis through anti-inflammatory mechanisms, reducing hepatic lipogenic gene expression, and upregulating proteins in the fatty acid oxidation process. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Role of high-fat diet in stress response of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erilynn T Heinrichsen

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with many diseases, one of the most common being obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, which in turn leads to blood gas disturbances, including intermittent hypoxia (IH. Obesity, OSA and IH are associated with metabolic changes, and while much mammalian work has been done, mechanisms underlying the response to IH, the role of obesity and the interaction of obesity and hypoxia remain unknown. As a model organism, Drosophila offers tremendous power to study a specific phenotype and, at a subsequent stage, to uncover and study fundamental mechanisms, given the conservation of molecular pathways. Herein, we characterize the phenotype of Drosophila on a high-fat diet in normoxia, IH and constant hypoxia (CH using triglyceride and glucose levels, response to stress and lifespan. We found that female flies on a high-fat diet show increased triglyceride levels (p<0.001 and a shortened lifespan in normoxia, IH and CH. Furthermore, flies on a high-fat diet in normoxia and CH show diminished tolerance to stress, with decreased survival after exposure to extreme cold or anoxia (p<0.001. Of interest, IH seems to rescue this decreased cold tolerance, as flies on a high-fat diet almost completely recovered from cold stress following IH. We conclude that the cross talk between hypoxia and a high-fat diet can be either deleterious or compensatory, depending on the nature of the hypoxic treatment.

  10. Neonatal overfeeding attenuates acute central pro-inflammatory effects of short-term high fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui eCai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal obesity predisposes individuals to obesity throughout life. In rats, neonatal overfeeding also leads to early accelerated weight gain that persists into adulthood. The phenotype is associated with dysfunction in a number of systems including paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN responses to psychological and immune stressors. However, in many cases weight gain in neonatally overfed rats stabilizes in early adulthood so the animal does not become more obese as it ages. Here we examined if neonatal overfeeding by suckling rats in small litters predisposes them to exacerbated metabolic and central inflammatory disturbances if they are also given a high fat diet in later life. In adulthood we gave the rats normal chow, 3 days, or 3 weeks high fat diet (45% kcal from fat and measured peripheral indices of metabolic disturbance. We also investigated hypothalamic microglial changes, as an index of central inflammation, as well as PVN responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Surprisingly, neonatal overfeeding did not predispose rats to the metabolic effects of a high fat diet. Weight changes and glucose metabolism were unaffected by the early life experience. However, short term (3 day high fat diet was associated with more microglia in the hypothalamus and a markedly exacerbated PVN response to LPS in control rats; effects not seen in the neonatally overfed. Our findings indicate neonatally overfed animals are not more susceptible to the adverse metabolic effects of a short-term high fat diet but may be less able to respond to the central effects.

  11. Antiobesity Effect of Codonopsis lanceolata in High-Calorie/High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Kyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiobesity effects of Codonopsis lanceolata (CL were evaluated in a high-calorie/high-fat-diet (HFD- induced obesity rat model and 3T3-L1 cells. The Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed a normal diet (ND or a HFD for a period of 12 weeks. The rats were subdivided into groups: ND, ND + wild Codonopsis lanceolata (wCL (900 mg/kg/day, p.o., ND + cultivated Codonopsis lanceolata (cCL (900 mg/kg/day, p.o., HFD, HFD + wCL (100, 300, or 900 mg/kg/day, p.o., HFD + cCL (100, 300, or 900 mg/kg/day, p.o., and HFD + sibutramine. The body weight gains of the administered HFD + CL (wCL or CCL were lower than those of the rats fed with only the HFD group. Moreover, the weight of adipose pads and the serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in the group administered HDL + CL were significantly lower than in the HFD group. The inhibitory effect of lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells was measured by Oil Red O staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with wCL inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. These results suggest that CL has a great potential as a functional food with anti-obesity effects and as a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of obesity.

  12. Effects of high fat diet on incidence of spontaneous tumors in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KRISTIANSEN, E.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Meyer, Otto A.

    1993-01-01

    . There was no difference in food consumption, body weight, weight gain, and longevity between the two groups. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumors in the high-fat group was seen in fibroadenoma of the mammae (female, p = 0.05). No statistically significant difference was seen when the incidence...... of benign mammary tumors (adenomas and fibroadenomas) was combined, just as the overall incidence of mammary tumors (adenomas, fibroadenomas, and adenocarcinomas) was not significantly different between the groups. A statistically significant decrease in the incidence of tumors in the high-fat group...... of cancer. It should be noted that, in our study, fat accounted for about 30% of the total energy in the high-fat diet. This is much below the amount of fat normally found in the western diet but corresponds well to the level recommended for human intake. In addition, the rats fed the high-fat diet did...

  13. Iron enrichment stimulates toxic diatom production in high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Charles G.; Bill, Brian D.; Cochlan, William P.; Wells, Mark L.; Trainer, Vera L.; Pickell, Lisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Oceanic high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll environments have been highlighted for potential large-scale iron fertilizations to help mitigate global climate change. Controversy surrounds these initiatives, both in the degree of carbon removal and magnitude of ecosystem impacts. Previous open ocean enrichment experiments have shown that iron additions stimulate growth of the toxigenic diatom genus Pseudonitzschia. Most Pseudonitzschia species in coastal waters produce the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), with their blooms causing detrimental marine ecosystem impacts, but oceanic Pseudonitzschia species are considered nontoxic. Here we demonstrate that the sparse oceanic Pseudonitzschia community at the high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll Ocean Station PAPA (50° N, 145° W) produces approximately 200 pg DA L−1 in response to iron addition, that DA alters phytoplankton community structure to benefit Pseudonitzschia, and that oceanic cell isolates are toxic. Given the negative effects of DA in coastal food webs, these findings raise serious concern over the net benefit and sustainability of large-scale iron fertilizations. PMID:20231473

  14. Low-temperature fracture of high purity iron and its relationship to the grain boundary character

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofuji, T. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering Daido Special Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)); Suzuki, S. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Materials Research Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Takai, S. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Materials Research); Kimura, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Materials Research)

    1992-02-01

    Mode of fracture and ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of high purity iron( 99.999% or higher ) was investigated by using two sets of specimens of different grain boundary character. The specimens having bamboo-type grain structure with high angle boundaries have fractured in the intergranular mode and their DBTT is between 110 and 125 K. Specimens with coarse grain structure have shown fractures in transgranular mode at and below 50 K. DBTT for intergranular fracture(IGF), if any, has been below 4.2 K and this has been in contrast with the the occurance of IGF even at 77K for less pure iron specimens(99.99 % or below). It has been concluded that DBTT for IGF, which has been the common fracture mode in pure iron depends strongly on the purity and grain boundary character of iron spocimens. DBTT has ranged from 125 to 4.2 K or below. Also, specimens of 99.99 % purity have been more susceptible to IGF than the specimens with 99.999 % purity. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The interactive effects of high-fat, high-fiber diets and ractopamine HCl on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass fat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, A B; Goodband, R D; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; DeRouchey, J M; Nitikanchana, S

    2014-10-01

    A total of 576 mixed-sex pigs (PIC 327 × 1,050; initial BW = 55.8 ± 5.5 kg) were used to determine the effects of corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and wheat middlings (midds) withdrawal 24 d before harvest in diets without or with ractopamine HCl (RAC) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass fat quality. From d 0 to 49, pigs were fed a corn-soybean meal-based diet (CS) or a diet high in unsaturated fat and crude fiber provided by 30% DDGS and 19% wheat midds (HFF) and not balanced for energy. On d 49, pens of pigs previously fed CS diets remained on the CS diet. Half of the HFF-fed pigs were switched to the CS-based diets, which served as the withdrawal regimen. Finally, half of the HFF-fed pigs remained on the same HFF diet. All 3 regimens were fed without or with 10 mg/kg RAC. There were 12 pens per treatment with 8 pigs per pen. No significant diet regimen × RAC interactions were observed. From d 0 to 49, pigs fed the CS diet had increased (P diet. Overall (d 0 to 73), pigs fed the CS diets throughout had greater (P diets throughout. Pigs fed the withdrawal diets had greater (P = 0.014) ADG, but similar G:F to those fed the HFF diets throughout. Pigs fed the CS diets throughout had greater (P = 0.025) carcass yield compared with pigs fed the HFF diets throughout, with those fed the withdrawal diets intermediate. Pigs fed RAC had greater (P diets, highest (P diets throughout, and intermediate for pigs fed the withdrawal diet. There were no differences in either full or rinsed intestine or organ weights between pigs that were fed CS diets throughout and pigs fed the withdrawal diet; however, pigs fed the HFF diets throughout the study had increased (P = 0.002) rinsed cecum and full large intestine weights (P = 0.003) compared with the pigs fed the withdrawal diets. Withdrawing the HFF diet and switching to a CS diet for the last 24 d before harvest partially mitigated negative effects on carcass yield and IV often associated

  16. Low-Carbohydrate-High-Fat Diet: Can it Help Exercise Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Kang; Borer, Katarina; Lin, Po-Ju

    2017-02-01

    Low-carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diets have been used as a means of weight loss and control of symptoms in several clinical conditions. There is emerging evidence that the metabolic changes induced by LCHF diets enhance endurance performance. The aims of this review are to examine the evidence of LCHF diets in improving various aspects of athletic performance. Long-term LCHF dietary intake may help control body weight and fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in athletes in weight-sensitive sports. LCHF-adapted endurance athletes can reach the maximal fat oxidation rate of approximately 1.5 g/min, with a lower carbohydrate oxidation rate and similar muscle glycogen content and a resynthesis rate compared to their counterparts consuming high-carbohydrate-low-fat (HCLF) diets. The elevated fat oxidation rate and glycogen sparing effect may improve performance in ultra-endurance events. These metabolic changes may also prevent the decline in performance in later stages of repeated high-intensity movements, in which the aerobic metabolism becomes more important. However, elevated blood concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids and ammonia during exercise after LCHF diets may lead to early development of central fatigue. It appears that at least several months of adaptation to a LCHF diet are required for the metabolic changes and restoration of muscle glycogen to occur. Further investigations on LCHF diets are needed regarding (1) performance after weight loss in weight-categorized sports; (2) repeated high-intensity exercise performance; (3) development of central fatigue during endurance events; (4) perceptual-motor performance during prolonged intermittent sports; and (5) ideal dietary fatty acid compositions.

  17. High spin ↔ low spin ultrafast excitation and relaxation of an isolated iron(II complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létard J.F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Picosecond and femtosecond time resolved pump-probe experiments make it possible to study both the low spin (LS to high spin (HS and high spin to low spin excitation and relaxation processes in the same isolated iron(II complex. We demonstrate that both LS → HS and HS → LS can be recorded by changing the pump wavelength and occur on the same time scale.

  18. Iron chromium potential to model high-chromium ferritic alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny, Giovanni; Pasianot, Roberto C; Terentyev, Dmitry; Malerba, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we present a Fe-Cr interatomic potential to model high-Cr ferritic steels. The potential is fitted to thermodynamic and point-defect properties obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments. The here developed potential is also benchmarked against other potentials available in literature. It shows particularly good agreement with the DFT obtained mixing enthalpy of the random alloy, the formation energy of intermetallics and exper...

  19. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratola D Vaziri

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammonia leading to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation; and restriction of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables which are common sources of fermentable fiber. Restriction of these foods leads to depletion of bacteria that convert indigestible carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids which are important nutrients for colonocytes and regulatory T lymphocytes. We hypothesized that a high resistant starch diet attenuates CKD progression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks to induce CKD. Rats were then fed diets supplemented with amylopectin (low-fiber control or high fermentable fiber (amylose maize resistant starch, HAM-RS2 for 3 weeks. CKD rats consuming low fiber diet exhibited reduced creatinine clearance, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, tubular damage, activation of NFkB, upregulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic molecules; impaired Nrf2 activity, down-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and disruption of colonic epithelial tight junction. The high resistant starch diet significantly attenuated these abnormalities. Thus high resistant starch diet retards CKD progression and attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of HAM-RS2 in CKD patients.

  20. High-fat Diet Promotes Cardiac Remodeling in an Experimental Model of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Fernando; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Souza, Albert Schiaveto de; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Oliveira-Junior, Silvio Assis de

    2015-11-01

    Although nutritional, metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities are commonly seen in experimental studies of obesity, it is uncertain whether these effects result from the treatment or from body adiposity. To evaluate the influence of treatment and body composition on metabolic and cardiovascular aspects in rats receiving high saturated fat diet. Sixteen Wistar rats were used, distributed into two groups, the control (C) group, treated with isocaloric diet (2.93 kcal/g) and an obese (OB) group, treated with high-fat diet (3.64 kcal/g). The study period was 20 weeks. Analyses of nutritional behavior, body composition, glycemia, cholesterolemia, lipemia, systolic arterial pressure, echocardiography, and cardiac histology were performed. High-fat diet associates with manifestations of obesity, accompanied by changes in glycemia, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and myocardial interstitial fibrosis. After adjusting for adiposity, the metabolic effects were normalized, whereas differences in morphometric changes between groups were maintained. It was concluded that adiposity body composition has a stronger association with metabolic disturbances in obese rodents, whereas the high-fat dietary intervention is found to be more related to cardiac morphological changes in experimental models of diet-induced obesity.

  1. High-fat Diet Promotes Cardiac Remodeling in an Experimental Model of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Although nutritional, metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities are commonly seen in experimental studies of obesity, it is uncertain whether these effects result from the treatment or from body adiposity.Objective:To evaluate the influence of treatment and body composition on metabolic and cardiovascular aspects in rats receiving high saturated fat diet.Methods:Sixteen Wistar rats were used, distributed into two groups, the control (C group, treated with isocaloric diet (2.93 kcal/g and an obese (OB group, treated with high-fat diet (3.64 kcal/g. The study period was 20 weeks. Analyses of nutritional behavior, body composition, glycemia, cholesterolemia, lipemia, systolic arterial pressure, echocardiography, and cardiac histology were performed.Results:High-fat diet associates with manifestations of obesity, accompanied by changes in glycemia, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and myocardial interstitial fibrosis. After adjusting for adiposity, the metabolic effects were normalized, whereas differences in morphometric changes between groups were maintained.Conclusion:It was concluded that adiposity body composition has a stronger association with metabolic disturbances in obese rodents, whereas the high-fat dietary intervention is found to be more related to cardiac morphological changes in experimental models of diet-induced obesity.

  2. High folic acid diet enhances tumour growth in PyMT-induced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mariann Fagernæs; Jensen, Sarah Østrup; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Martensen, Pia M

    2017-03-14

    The B-vitamin folate is among the most studied bioactive food compound, and a dietary intake meeting the daily requirements has been found to reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases as well as preventing neural tube defects during fetal development. Several countries have therefore introduced dietary fortification with folic acid. However, clinical and animal studies suggest that folic acid has a dual role in cancer development. During the period of initial tumour progression, MMTV-PyMT (MMTV-polyoma virus middle T) transgenic mice were fed with normal diet and high folic acid diet. We found that PyMT-induced breast tumours highly express the cancer-specific folate receptor (FR), a feature they share with several human epithelial cancers in which expression of FRα correlates with tumour grade. Mice receiving a high folic acid diet displayed a significantly increased tumour volume compared with mice receiving normal diet. In the largest tumours, only found in mice on high folic acid diet, STAT3 was activated. In primary cells from PyMT tumours, STAT3 was activated upon treatment with folic acid in culture. Our results offer a novel molecular explanation for folic acid-induced growth of existing tumours.

  3. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shu-Man; Lau, Wei Ling; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Farzaneh, Seyed H; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Adams, Sean H; Martin, Roy J

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammonia leading to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation; and restriction of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables which are common sources of fermentable fiber. Restriction of these foods leads to depletion of bacteria that convert indigestible carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids which are important nutrients for colonocytes and regulatory T lymphocytes. We hypothesized that a high resistant starch diet attenuates CKD progression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks to induce CKD. Rats were then fed diets supplemented with amylopectin (low-fiber control) or high fermentable fiber (amylose maize resistant starch, HAM-RS2) for 3 weeks. CKD rats consuming low fiber diet exhibited reduced creatinine clearance, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, tubular damage, activation of NFkB, upregulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic molecules; impaired Nrf2 activity, down-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and disruption of colonic epithelial tight junction. The high resistant starch diet significantly attenuated these abnormalities. Thus high resistant starch diet retards CKD progression and attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of HAM-RS2 in CKD patients.

  4. Sex-dependent effects of high-fat-diet feeding on rat pancreas oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, Yolanda; Gianotti, Magdalena; Lladó, Isabel; Proenza, Ana M

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether sex differences in oxidative stress-associated insulin resistance previously reported in rats could be attributed to a possible sex dimorphism in pancreas redox status. Fifteen-month-old male and female Wistar rats were fed a control diet or a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. Serum glucose, lipids, and hormone levels were measured. Insulin immunohistochemistry and morphometric analysis of islets were performed. Pancreas triglyceride content, oxidative damage, and antioxidant enzymatic activities were determined. Lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) levels were also measured. Male rats showed a more marked insulin resistance profile than females. In control female rats, pancreas Mn-superoxide dismutase activity and UCP2 levels were higher, and oxidative damage was lower compared with males. High-fat-diet feeding decreased pancreas triglyceride content in female rats and UCP2 levels in male rats. High-fat-diet female rats showed larger islets than both their control and sex counterparts. These results confirm the existence of a sex dimorphism in pancreas oxidative status in both control and high-fat-diet feeding situations, with female rats showing higher protection against oxidative stress, thus maintaining pancreatic function and contributing to a lower risk of insulin resistance.

  5. Effect of acarbose on postprandial blood glucose concentrations in healthy cats fed low and high carbohydrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranee; Rand, Jacquie S; Coradini, Marcia; Morton, John M

    2015-10-01

    Feeding a low carbohydrate diet is recommended for diabetic cats; however, some cats may require diets containing moderate-to-high carbohydrate and may benefit from the use of therapeutic agents to improve glycemic control. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on postprandial plasma glucose concentration when combined with commercially available feline diets high and low in carbohydrate. Twelve healthy, adult, non-obese, neutered cats were enrolled. Plasma glucose concentrations were assessed over 24 h after feeding high and low carbohydrate diets, with and without acarbose, during single and multiple meal tests, in a crossover study. Commercially available feline diets were used, which were high and low in carbohydrate (providing 51% and 7% of metabolizable energy, respectively). In cats fed the high carbohydrate diet as a single meal, mean 24 h glucose concentrations were lower when acarbose was administered. Mean glucose concentrations were lower in the first 12 h when acarbose was given once daily, whereas no significant difference was observed in mean results from 12-24 h. Acarbose had little effect in cats eating multiple meals. Compared with consumption of the high carbohydrate diet with acarbose, lower mean 24 h and peak glucose concentrations were achieved by feeding the low carbohydrate diet alone. In healthy cats meal-fed diets of similar composition to the diets used in this study, acarbose has minimal effect when a low carbohydrate diet is fed but reduces postprandial glucose concentrations over 24 h when a high carbohydrate diet is fed. However, mean glucose concentrations over 24 h are still higher when a high carbohydrate diet with acarbose is fed relative to the low carbohydrate diet without acarbose. Future studies in diabetic cats are warranted to confirm these findings. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  6. Equilibrium Iron Isotope Fractionation at Ultra-High Pressures: Focus on Mantle-Core Differentiation. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, V. B.

    2009-12-01

    Iron isotope fractionation studies provide an insight into chemical and phase transformations accompanying high-pressure core-mantle differentiation processes in planetary interiors. A method for determination of equilibrium iron isotope fractionation factors (β-factors) at wide range of pressures (up to ~ 150 GPa) was recently established (Polyakov et al., 2005, 2007; Polyakov 2009). The method consists in obtaining 57Fe partial vibration densities of states (PVDOS) at different pressures from synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonance x-ray scattering (INRXS) experiments followed by calculations of iron β-factors from the 57Fe PVDOS. Using INRXS-derived 57Fe PVDOS of Fe-metal (Mao et al., 2001), ferropericlase (FeP) (Lin et al., 2006), and postperovskite (PPV) (Mao et al., 2006), it was shown (Polyakov, 2009) that at high pressures FeP and PPV are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to Fe-metal contrary to the low-pressure iron isotope fractionation regularity. Earth's core may contain also Ni, Si, S, H, C, etc. along with iron. I estimated effect of these elements on iron β-factors using INRXS-derived 57Fe PVDOS for Fe0.92Ni0.08 and Fe0.85Si0.15 (Lin et al., 2003), FeS (Kobayashi et al., 2004), Fe3S (Lin et al., 2004), FeHx (Mao et al., 2004), Fe3C (Gao et al., 2008). Additions of Ni and Si to Fe-metal do not affect the iron β-factor contrary to additions of S, H, and C (see figure), which reduce the iron β-factors and aid in heavy iron isotope enrichment of silicate fraction during metal-silicate differentiation. This consits with the explanation of the observed enrichment (~ 0.1‰ for 57Fe/54Fe) of Earth's basalts in heavy isotopes with respect to those from Vesta and Mars (Poitrasson et al., 2004; Weyer et al., 2005; Shoenberg and von Blanckenburg, 2006) in terms of the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation processes as proposed in Polyakov (2009). Figure. Pressure dependence of 57Fe/54Fe β-factors. Open circles

  7. Mortality from different causes associated with meat, heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadi, Arash; Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H; Graubard, Barry I; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-05-09

    Objective  To determine the association of different types of meat intake and meat associated compounds with overall and cause specific mortality. Design  Population based cohort study. Setting  Baseline dietary data of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (prospective cohort of the general population from six states and two metropolitan areas in the US) and 16 year follow-up data until 31 December 2011. Participants  536 969 AARP members aged 50-71 at baseline. Exposures  Intake of total meat, processed and unprocessed red meat (beef, lamb, and pork) and white meat (poultry and fish), heme iron, and nitrate/nitrite from processed meat based on dietary questionnaire. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used with the lowest fifth of calorie adjusted intakes as reference categories. Main outcome measure  Mortality from any cause during follow-up. Results  An increased risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio for highest versus lowest fifth 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.29) and death due to nine different causes associated with red meat intake was observed. Both processed and unprocessed red meat intakes were associated with all cause and cause specific mortality. Heme iron and processed meat nitrate/nitrite were independently associated with increased risk of all cause and cause specific mortality. Mediation models estimated that the increased mortality associated with processed red meat was influenced by nitrate intake (37.0-72.0%) and to a lesser degree by heme iron (20.9-24.1%). When the total meat intake was constant, the highest fifth of white meat intake was associated with a 25% reduction in risk of all cause mortality compared with the lowest intake level. Almost all causes of death showed an inverse association with white meat intake. Conclusions  The results show increased risks of all cause mortality and death due to nine different causes associated with both processed and unprocessed red meat, accounted for, in part

  8. Mortality from different causes associated with meat, heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: population based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H; Graubard, Barry I; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of different types of meat intake and meat associated compounds with overall and cause specific mortality. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Baseline dietary data of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (prospective cohort of the general population from six states and two metropolitan areas in the US) and 16 year follow-up data until 31 December 2011. Participants 536 969 AARP members aged 50-71 at baseline. Exposures Intake of total meat, processed and unprocessed red meat (beef, lamb, and pork) and white meat (poultry and fish), heme iron, and nitrate/nitrite from processed meat based on dietary questionnaire. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used with the lowest fifth of calorie adjusted intakes as reference categories. Main outcome measure Mortality from any cause during follow-up. Results An increased risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio for highest versus lowest fifth 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.29) and death due to nine different causes associated with red meat intake was observed. Both processed and unprocessed red meat intakes were associated with all cause and cause specific mortality. Heme iron and processed meat nitrate/nitrite were independently associated with increased risk of all cause and cause specific mortality. Mediation models estimated that the increased mortality associated with processed red meat was influenced by nitrate intake (37.0-72.0%) and to a lesser degree by heme iron (20.9-24.1%). When the total meat intake was constant, the highest fifth of white meat intake was associated with a 25% reduction in risk of all cause mortality compared with the lowest intake level. Almost all causes of death showed an inverse association with white meat intake. Conclusions The results show increased risks of all cause mortality and death due to nine different causes associated with both processed and unprocessed red meat, accounted for, in part, by

  9. The Intra- or Extracellular Redox State Was Not Affected by a High vs. Low Glycemic Response Diet in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Amber S Kleckner; Siu Wong; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    A low glycemic response (LGR) vs. high glycemic response (HGR) diet helps curtail the development of obesity and diabetes, though the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that consumption of a HGR vs. a LGR diet would lead to a more oxidized circulating redox state and predicted that a HGR diet would increase fat accumulation, reduce insulin sensitivity, and impair metabolic acclimation to a high fat diet in a mouse model. Hence, male C57BL/6 mice consumed a HGR or LGR diet for 16 weeks an...

  10. GPRC6a is not required for the effects of a high-protein diet on body weight in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey-Jones, James S; Alamshah, Amin; McGavigan, Anne K; Spreckley, Eleanor; Banks, Katherine; Cereceda Monteoliva, Nicholas; Norton, Mariana; Bewick, Gavin A; Murphy, Kevin G

    2015-06-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) is activated by proteinogenic amino acids and may sense amino acids in the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. The study investigated whether GPRC6A was necessary for the effects of low- and high-protein diets on body weight and food intake in mice. The role of GPRC6A in mediating the effects of a low-protein diet on body weight was investigated in GPRC6a knockout (GPRC6a-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice fed a control diet (18% protein) or a low-protein diet (6% protein) for 9 days. The role of GPRC6A in mediating the effects of a high-protein diet on body weight was investigated in GPRC6a-KO and WT mice fed a control diet (18% protein) or a high-protein diet (50% protein) for 5 weeks. A high-protein diet reduced body weight gain and food intake compared with a control diet in both WT and GPRC6a-KO mice. A low-protein diet decreased body weight gain in GPRC6a-KO mice. GPRC6A was not necessary for the effects of a low- or high-protein diet on body weight and likely does not play a role in protein-induced satiety. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  11. Preparation of iron sulphides by high energy ball milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, R.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Larsen, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The reaction of a powder mixture consisting of 50 a.% Fe and 50 a.% S during high energy ball milling has been studied by x-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. After around 19 h of milling FeS2 and FeS havebeen formed. By further milling the FeS compound becomes dominating and only Fe......S with an average crystallite size of about 10 nm was observed after milling times longer than 67 h. Mossbauer spectra obtained with applied fields show that the particles are antiferromagnetic or have a strongly canted spin structure....

  12. Daming capsule restores endothelial dysfunction induced by high-fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daming capsule (DMC, a traditional Chinese formula, has a lipid-modulating action with reduced adverse side effects as compared with other lipid lowering compounds. Since endothelial dysfunction often accompanies the hyperlipidemic state, we hypothesize that DMC might restore endothelial dysfunction produced by a high-fat (HF diet. Importantly, we also investigate possible mechanisms involved in mediating the effects of DMC on vascular reactivity. Methods Rats were divided into four groups: control, HF diet, HF mixed DMC diet, HF mixed atorvastatin (ATV diet. After 30 days, the thoracic cavity was exposed to remove the thoracic aorta for (i histological examination; (ii measurement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS by western blot; and (iii tension study of thoracic aortic ring. Results HF diet induced significant attenuation in the contraction and relaxation of rat aortic rings. Treatment with DMC significantly improved the relaxation of the aortic rings as compared with those from HF rats (P + channels (KATP on the structure and/or function. DMC exerted the same protective effect as ATV, a positive control drug, on vascular injury produced by HF diet. Conclusion DMC partially protects the aorta from HF-induced endothelial dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of eNOS.

  13. High-fat diets and seizure control in myoclonic-astatic epilepsy: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard-Tremblay, Elisabeth; Berry, Patricia; Owens, Aaron; Cook, William Byron; Sittner, Haley R; Mazzanti, Marta; Huber, Jennifer; Warner, Molly; Shurtleff, Hillary; Saneto, Russell P

    2015-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of the Modified Atkins Diet (MAD) and Ketogenic Diet (KD) in seizure control within a population of myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE) patients. This was a retrospective, single center study evaluating the seizure control by high fat diets. Seizure diaries kept by the parents performed seizure counts. All patients met the clinical criteria for MAE. Nine patients met the clinical criteria. We found that both the MAD and KD were efficacious in complete seizure control and allowed other medications to be stopped in seven patients. Two patients had greater than 90% seizure control without medications, one on the KD and the other on the MAD. Seizure freedom has ranged from 13 to 36 months, and during this time four patients have been fully weaned off of diet management. One patient was found to have a mutation in SLC2A1. Our results suggest that strictly defined MAE patients respond to the MAD with prolonged seizure control. Some patients may require the KD for seizure freedom, suggesting a common pathway of increased requirement for fats. Once controlled, those fully responsive to the Diet(s) could be weaned off traditional seizure medications and in many, subsequently off the MAD or KD. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of sorghum tannins in sheep fed with high-concentrate diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L.S. Cabral Filho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional value of three sorghum cultivars with different concentrations of condensed tannins in sheep diets. Six adult sheep (LW=56kg with rumen and duodenal fistulas were assigned to experimental groups using two 3x3 Latin Square designs. The diets were formulated using three sorghum cultivars: LTC (low-tannin cultivar, MTC (medium-tannin cultivar and HTC (high-tannin cultivar. Microbial nitrogen (MN concentration in the duodenum was measured using a 15N trace technique. LTC, MTC and HTC diets presented values of 788, 722 and 747 (SE=20.6 g kg-1 for dry matter digestibility and 633, 535 and 530 (SE=35.8 g/kg for crude protein digestibility. The LTC diet was significantly different from the other diets (P0.05 between the diets. The presence of condensed tannins in the sorghum interfered with the sheep's nitrogen retention; however, the microbial protein supply to the duodenum of the animals was not inhibited.

  15. Purple Sweet Potato Attenuate Weight Gain in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ronghui; Zheng, Shujuan; Luo, Hongxia; Wang, Changgang; Duan, Lili; Sheng, Yao; Zhao, Changhui; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2017-03-01

    Purple sweet potato (PSP) is widely grown in Asia and considered as a healthy vegetable. The objective of the current study was to determine the anti-obesity effect of the PSP on high fat diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. The mice were administrated with high fat diet supplemented with the sweet potato (SP) or PSP at the concentration of 15% and 30% for 12 wk, respectively. The results showed that the supplementation of SP or PSP at 30% significantly ameliorated high fat diet induced obesity and its associated risk factors, including reduction of body weight and fat accumulation, improvement of lipid profile and modulation of energy expenditure. Moreover, PSP also posed beneficial effect on the liver and kidney functions. These results indicate that PSP and SP have anti-obesity effect and are effective to reduce the metabolic risk. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. PTPRT regulates high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiujing; Scott, Anthony; Wang, Yong; Wang, Lan; Zhao, Yiqing; Doerner, Stephanie; Satake, Masanobu; Croniger, Colleen M; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for many human diseases. However, the underlying molecular causes of obesity are not well understood. Here, we report that protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T (PTPRT) knockout mice are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Those mice avoid many deleterious side effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity, displaying improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, lower blood glucose and insulin levels. Compared to wild type littermates, PTPRT knockout mice show reduced food intake. Consistently, STAT3 phosphorylation is up-regulated in the hypothalamus of PTPRT knockout mice. These studies implicate PTPRT-modulated STAT3 signaling in the regulation of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

  17. Maternal obesity and high-fat diet program offspring metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mina; Jellyman, Juanita K; Han, Guang; Beall, Marie; Lane, Robert H; Ross, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    We determined the potential programming effects of maternal obesity and high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and/or lactation on offspring metabolic syndrome. A rat model of maternal obesity was created using an HF diet prior to and throughout pregnancy and lactation. At birth, pups were cross-fostered, thereby generating 4 paradigms of maternal diets during pregnancy/lactation: (1) control (Con) diet during pregnancy and lactation (Con/Con), (2) HF during pregnancy and lactation (HF/HF), (3) HF during pregnancy alone (HF/Con), and (4) HF during lactation alone (Con/HF). Maternal phenotype during pregnancy and the end of lactation evidenced markedly elevated body fat and plasma corticosterone levels in HF dams. In the offspring, the maternal HF diet during pregnancy alone programmed increased offspring adiposity, although with normal body weight, whereas the maternal HF diet during lactation increased both body weight and adiposity. Metabolic disturbances, particularly that of hyperglycemia, were apparent in all groups exposed to the maternal HF diet (during pregnancy and/or lactation), although differences were apparent in the manifestation of insulin resistant vs insulin-deficient phenotypes. Elevated systolic blood pressure was manifest in all groups, implying that exposure to an obese/HF environment is disadvantageous for offspring health, regardless of pregnancy or lactation periods. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanism may differ because offspring that experienced in utero HF exposure had increased corticosterone levels. Maternal obesity/HF diet has a marked impact on offspring body composition and the risk of metabolic syndrome was dependent on the period of exposure during pregnancy and/or lactation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prolonged high fat diet reduces dopamine reuptake without altering DAT gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson J Cone

    Full Text Available The development of diet-induced obesity (DIO can potently alter multiple aspects of dopamine signaling, including dopamine transporter (DAT expression and dopamine reuptake. However, the time-course of diet-induced changes in DAT expression and function and whether such changes are dependent upon the development of DIO remains unresolved. Here, we fed rats a high (HFD or low (LFD fat diet for 2 or 6 weeks. Following diet exposure, rats were anesthetized with urethane and striatal DAT function was assessed by electrically stimulating the dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and recording resultant changes in dopamine concentration in the ventral striatum using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We also quantified the effect of HFD on membrane associated DAT in striatal cell fractions from a separate group of rats following exposure to the same diet protocol. Notably, none of our treatment groups differed in body weight. We found a deficit in the rate of dopamine reuptake in HFD rats relative to LFD rats after 6 but not 2 weeks of diet exposure. Additionally, the increase in evoked dopamine following a pharmacological challenge of cocaine was significantly attenuated in HFD relative to LFD rats. Western blot analysis revealed that there was no effect of diet on total DAT protein. However, 6 weeks of HFD exposure significantly reduced the 50 kDa DAT isoform in a synaptosomal membrane-associated fraction, but not in a fraction associated with recycling endosomes. Our data provide further evidence for diet-induced alterations in dopamine reuptake independent of changes in DAT production and demonstrates that such changes can manifest without the development of DIO.

  19. A Preliminary Survey of Dieting, Body Dissatisfaction, and Eating Problems among High School Cheerleaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; Digsby, Sohailla

    2004-01-01

    Cheerleading, a staple of American schools, has received little attention in scholarly research. This sport is considered "high risk" for development of eating disorders; therefore, female, high school cheerleaders (n = 156, mean age = 15.43 years) from the southeastern region were surveyed in this preliminary study to determine rates of dieting,…

  20. Elimination of high-refined-sugar diet as treatment strategy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dietary intervention through the elimination of highly refined sugar as a treatment strategy to prevent and treat autism. Keywords: Neurotoxicity, Ampicillin, Propionic acid, Neurotransmitters, Cytokines, High-sucrose diet. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,.

  1. High-calorie diet exacerbates prostate neoplasia in mice with haploinsufficiency of Pten tumor suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehnan Liu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: High-calorie diet promotes prostate cancer progression in the genetically susceptible Pten haploinsufficient mouse while preserving insulin sensitivity. This appears to be partly due to increased inflammatory response to high-caloric intake in addition to increased ability of insulin to promote lipogenesis.

  2. The efficacy of a high protein/low glycemic index diet intervention in non-obese patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Astrup, Arne

    2018-01-01

    protein and low glycemic index (GI) diet and the effects on body composition. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Of the 149 subjects who were included in the study, 76 subjects (30 males) were randomized into either a diet group (n = 38) or a control group (n = 38) and included in the present analysis. The 8 week...... intervention consisted of a high protein and low GI diet whilst the control group continued habitual diet. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients in the diet and 34 in the control group completed the study. The diet group reduced their energy intake by ~20% and had high dietary compliance. Intake of fatty fish doubled...... protein-low GI diet resulted in a greater loss of fat mass among non-obese patients with asthma. The subjects were satisfactory and highly compliant with the dietary regimen....

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  4. Tissue levels of iron, copper, zinc and magnesium in iron deficient rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of iron deficiency on the levels of iron, copper, zinc and magnesium in the brain, liver, kidney, heart and lungs of albino rats (Rattus novergicus) was investigated. Forty rats were divided into two groups and the first group was fed a control diet containing 1.09g iron/kg diet while the test group was fed diet ...

  5. Myocardial Structural and Biological Anomalies Induced by High Fat Diet in Psammomys obesus Gerbils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Sahraoui

    Full Text Available Psammomys obesus gerbils are particularly prone to develop diabetes and obesity after brief period of abundant food intake. A hypercaloric high fat diet has been shown to affect cardiac function. Here, we sought to determine whether a short period of high fat feeding might alter myocardial structure and expression of calcium handling proteins in this particular strain of gerbils.Twenty Psammomys obesus gerbils were randomly assigned to receive a normal plant diet (controls or a high fat diet. At baseline and 16-week later, body weight, plasma biochemical parameters (including lipid and carbohydrate levels were evaluated. Myocardial samples were collected for pathobiological evaluation.Sixteen-week high fat dieting resulted in body weight gain and hyperlipidemia, while levels of carbohydrates remained unchanged. At myocardial level, high fat diet induced structural disorganization, including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, lipid accumulation, interstitial and perivascular fibrosis and increased number of infiltrating neutrophils. Myocardial expressions of pro-apoptotic Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α], intercellular (ICAM1 and vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM1 increased, while gene encoding cardiac muscle protein, the alpha myosin heavy polypeptide (MYH6, was downregulated. Myocardial expressions of sarco(endoplasmic calcium-ATPase (SERCA2 and voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cacna1c decreased, while protein kinase A (PKA and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK2D expressions increased. Myocardial expressions of ryanodine receptor, phospholamban and sodium/calcium exchanger (Slc8a1 did not change.We conclude that a relative short period of high fat diet in Psammomys obesus results in severe alterations of cardiac structure, activation of inflammatory and apoptotic processes, and altered expression of calcium-cycling determinants.

  6. Structure and thermal stability of nanostructured iron-doped zirconia prepared by high-energy ball milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    Fury stability cubic zirconia doped with iron oxide has been synthesized by high-energy ball milling from powder mixtures of monoclinic zirconia and hematite. It is found that the iron ions dissolved in cubic ZrO2 are in substitutional positions with a maximum solubility of approximately 18.5 mol...

  7. Perception of iron deficiency from oral mucosa alterations that show a high prevalence of Candida infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shin-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common cause of anemia. The aim of this study was to investigate patients with oral mucosa alterations as the initial manifestation of ID or ID anemia (IDA). Sixty-four patients (50 IDA and 14 ID) with a wide range of sore mouth were diagnosed and treated. The oral and physical manifestations as well as iron studies and anemia classification based on the mean and heterogeneity of red cell size were assessed. ID predisposed 64 patients to a high incidence of Candida infection (85%) and showed a variety of oral manifestations including angular cheilitis (63%), atrophic glossitis (AG; 59%), pseudomembranous candidosis (44%), erythematous candidosis (41%), median rhomboid glossitis (5%), chronic mucocutaneous candidosis (5%), papillary hyperplastic candidosis (3%), and cheilocandidosis (3%). Others included pale oral mucosa (31%), burning mouth (28%), and recurrent oral ulcers (6%). Colorectal cancers in two patients were diagnosed. The values of hemoglobin (Hb) in 64 ID patients varied from normal to life-threatening levels, but none had developed advanced systemic symptoms except fatigue. All had low serum iron and ferritin. Sixty (94%) patients had transferrin saturation oral mucosa alterations accompanying oral candidosis are a sensitive indicator of ID. All oral changes can be successfully ameliorated by iron therapy plus antifungals when candidosis exists. Investigating the origin of IDA is necessary, because it may be the first sign of a more serious disease, particularly malignancy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  9. Triticale Bran Alkylresorcinols Enhance Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

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    Rania Agil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triticale (× Triticosecale Whitm. is a cereal grain with high levels of alkyresorcinols (AR concentrated in the bran. These phenolic lipids have been shown to reduce or inhibit triglyceride accumulation and protect against oxidation; however, their biological effects have yet to be evaluated in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ARs extracted from triticale bran (TB added to a high–fat diet on the development of obesity and oxidative stress. CF-1 mice were fed a standard low-fat (LF diet, a 60% high-fat diet (HF and HF diets containing either 0.5% AR extract (HF-AR, 10% TB (HF-TB, or 0.5% vitamin E (HF-VE. Energy intake, weight gain, glucose tolerance, fasting blood glucose (FBG levels, and body composition were determined. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and glutathione (GSH assays were performed on mice liver and heart tissues. The findings suggest that ARs may serve as a preventative measure against risks of oxidative damage associated with high-fat diets and obesity through their application as functional foods and neutraceuticals. Future studies aim to identify the in vivo mechanisms of action of ARs and the individual homologs involved in their favorable biological effects.

  10. Influence of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E; von Unruh, G E; Hesse, A

    2008-09-01

    To compare quantitatively the effect of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion. Eight healthy volunteers (three men and five women, mean age 28.6+/-6.3) were studied. Each volunteer performed the [(13)C(2)]oxalate absorption test thrice on a low-oxalate mixed diet, thrice on a low-oxalate vegetarian diet and thrice on a high-oxalate vegetarian diet. For each test, the volunteers had to adhere to an identical diet and collect their 24-h urines. In the morning of the second day, a capsule containing [(13)C(2)]oxalate was ingested. On the low-oxalate vegetarian diet, mean intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly to 15.8+/-2.9% (P=0.012) and 0.414+/-0.126 mmol/day (P=0.012), compared to the mixed diet. On the high-oxalate vegetarian diet, oxalate absorption (12.5+/-4.6%, P=0.161) and urinary excretion (0.340+/-0.077 mmol/day, P=0.093) did not change significantly, compared to the mixed diet. A vegetarian diet can only be recommended for calcium oxalate stone patients, if the diet (1) contains the recommended amounts of divalent cations such as calcium and its timing of ingestion to a meal rich in oxalate is considered and (2) excludes foodstuffs with a high content of nutritional factors, such as phytic acid, which are able to chelate calcium.

  11. Calorie Restriction with a High-Fat Diet Effectively Attenuated Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress-Related Markers in Obese Tissues of the High Diet Fed Rats

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    Seungae Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity characterized by increased mass of adipose tissue leads to systemic inflammation. Calorie restriction (CR improves parameters associated with immune response and antioxidant defense. We hypothesized that CR with a high fat diet (HFCR regulates local and systemic inflammation and oxidative stress damage in a high fat diet induced obesity (HF group. We investigated effect of HFCR on inflammation and oxidative stress-related markers in liver and adipose tissues as well as adipokines in plasma. HFCR lowered liver triglyceride levels, total cholesterol levels, and the plasma leptin/adiponectin ratio to normal levels and improved glucose tolerance. HFCR also improved fatty liver and normalized adipocyte size and morphology. HFCR reduced lipid peroxidation and decreased the expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthetase, cyclooxygenase-2, NF-E2-related factor, and heme oxygenase-1 in the liver. Moreover, HFCR suppressed the expression levels of C- reactive protein and manganese superoxide dismutase in the adipose tissue in the HF group. These results suggest that HFCR may have beneficial effects on inflammation and oxidative stress as well as lipid profiles in the HF diet induced obesity. Moreover, HFCR may be a good way to increase compliance in obese patients and to prevent obesity induced complications without changes in dietary pattern.

  12. High-pressure Moessbauer study of perovskite iron oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakami, T; Sasaki, T; Kuzushita, K; Morimoto, S; Endo, S; Kawasaki, S; Takano, M

    2002-01-01

    The perovskite oxides CaFeO sub 3 and La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 FeO sub 3 have been investigated by high-pressure sup 5 sup 7 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The critical temperatures of the charge disproportionation (CD) and the magnetic order (MO) have been determined as a function of pressure. In CaFeO sub 3 the CD (2Fe sup 4 sup + -> Fe sup 3 sup + + Fe sup 5 sup +) occurs at an almost constant temperature of 290 K in the pressure range of 0-17 GPa. Above 20 GPa, the CD is suppressed. The MO temperature of 125 K at an ambient pressure rises to 300 K at 34 GPa. In La sub 1 sub / sub 3 Sr sub 2 sub / sub 3 FeO sub 3 the CD (3Fe sup 1 sup 1 sup / sup 3 sup + -> 2Fe sup 3 sup + + Fe sup 5 sup +) and the MO occur at the same temperature up to 21 GPa, which decreases from 207 to 165 K with increasing pressure. Above 25 GPa, however, the MO temperature rises above 400 K.

  13. Impaired mTORC2 signaling in catecholaminergic neurons exaggerates high fat diet-induced hyperphagia

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    Olga I. Dadalko

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Our data support a model in which mTORC2 signaling within catecholaminergic neurons constrains consumption of a high-fat diet, while disruption causes high-fat diet-specific exaggerated hyperphagia. In parallel, impaired mTORC2 signaling leads to aberrant striatal DA neurotransmission, which has been associated with obesity in human and animal models, as well as with escalating substance abuse. These data suggest that defects localized to the catecholaminergic pathways are capable of overriding homeostatic circuits, leading to obesity, metabolic impairment, and aberrant DA-dependent behaviors.

  14. High fat diet disrupts endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wires, Emily S; Trychta, Kathleen A; Bäck, Susanne; Sulima, Agnieszka; Rice, Kenner C; Harvey, Brandon K

    2017-11-01

    Disruption to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis has been implicated in obesity, however, the ability to longitudinally monitor ER calcium fluctuations has been challenging with prior methodologies. We recently described the development of a Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)-based reporter protein responsive to ER calcium depletion (GLuc-SERCaMP) and investigated the effect of a high fat diet on ER calcium homeostasis. A GLuc-based reporter cell line was treated with palmitate, a free fatty acid. Rats intrahepatically injected with GLuc-SERCaMP reporter were fed a cafeteria diet or high fat diet. The liver and plasma were examined for established markers of steatosis and compared to plasma levels of SERCaMP activity. Palmitate induced GLuc-SERCaMP release in vitro, indicating ER calcium depletion. Consumption of a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets correlated with alterations to hepatic ER calcium homeostasis in rats, shown by increased GLuc-SERCaMP release. Access to ad lib high fat pellets also led to a corresponding decrease in microsomal calcium ATPase activity and an increase in markers of hepatic steatosis. In addition to GLuc-SERCaMP, we have also identified endogenous proteins (endogenous SERCaMPs) with a similar response to ER calcium depletion. We demonstrated the release of an endogenous SERCaMP, thought to be a liver esterase, during access to a high fat diet. Attenuation of both GLuc-SERCaMP and endogenous SERCaMP was observed during dantrolene administration. Here we describe the use of a reporter for in vitro and in vivo models of high fat diet. Our results support the theory that dietary fat intake correlates with a decrease in ER calcium levels in the liver and suggest a high fat diet alters the ER proteome. Lay summary: ER calcium dysregulation was observed in rats fed a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets, with fluctuations in sensor release correlating with fat intake. Attenuation of sensor release, as well as food intake was observed during

  15. Comparative proteomic analyses of the parietal lobe from rhesus monkeys fed a high-fat/sugar diet with and without resveratrol supplementation, relative to a healthy diet: Insights into the roles of unhealthy diets and resveratrol on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swomley, Aaron M; Triplett, Judy C; Keeney, Jeriel T; Warrier, Govind; Pearson, Kevin J; Mattison, Julie A; de Cabo, Rafael; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2017-01-01

    A diet consisting of a high intake of saturated fat and refined sugars is characteristic of a Western-diet and has been shown to have a substantial negative effect on human health. Expression proteomics were used to investigate changes to the parietal lobe proteome of rhesus monkeys consuming either a high fat and sugar (HFS) diet, a HFS diet supplemented with resveratrol (HFS+RSV), or a healthy control diet for 2 years. Here we discuss the modifications in the levels of 12 specific proteins involved in various cellular systems including metabolism, neurotransmission, structural integrity, and general cellular signaling following a nutritional intervention. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which resveratrol functions through the up- or down-regulation of proteins in different cellular sub-systems to affect the overall health of the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tinospora crispa Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by High Fat Diet in Wistar Rats

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    Mohd Nazri Abu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic properties of Tinospora crispa, a local herb that has been used in traditional Malay medicine and rich in antioxidant, were explored based on obesity-linked insulin resistance condition. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely, the normal control (NC which received standard rodent diet, the high fat diet (HFD which received high fat diet only, the high fat diet treated with T. crispa (HFDTC, and the high fat diet treated with orlistat (HFDO. After sixteen weeks of treatment, blood and organs were harvested for analyses. Results showed that T. crispa significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the body weight (41.14 ± 1.40%, adiposity index serum levels (4.910 ± 0.80%, aspartate aminotransferase (AST: 161 ± 4.71 U/L, alanine aminotransferase (ALT: 100.95 ± 3.10 U/L, total cholesterol (TC: 18.55 ± 0.26 mmol/L, triglycerides (TG: 3.70 ± 0.11 mmol/L, blood glucose (8.50 ± 0.30 mmo/L, resistin (0.74 ± 0.20 ng/mL, and leptin (17.428 ± 1.50 ng/mL hormones in HFDTC group. The insulin (1.65 ± 0.07 pg/mL and C-peptide (136.48 pmol/L hormones were slightly decreased but within normal range. The histological results showed unharmed and intact liver tissues in HFDTC group. As a conclusion, T. crispa ameliorates insulin resistance-associated with obesity in Wistar rats fed with high fat diet.

  17. Effects of a plant-based high-carbohydrate/high-fiber diet versus high-monounsaturated fat/low-carbohydrate diet on postprandial lipids in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Natale, Claudia; Annuzzi, Giovanni; Bozzetto, Lutgarda; Mazzarella, Raffaella; Costabile, Giuseppina; Ciano, Ornella; Riccardi, Gabriele; Rivellese, Angela A

    2009-12-01

    To search for a better dietary approach to treat postprandial lipid abnormalities and improve glucose control in type 2 diabetic patients. According to a randomized crossover design, 18 type 2 diabetic patients (aged 59 +/- 5 years; BMI 27 +/- 3 kg/m(2)) (means +/- SD) in satisfactory blood glucose control on diet or diet plus metformin followed a diet relatively rich in carbohydrates (52% total energy), rich in fiber (28 g/1,000 kcal), and with a low glycemic index (58%) (high-carbohydrate/high-fiber diet) or a diet relatively low in carbohydrate (45%) and rich in monounsaturated fat (23%) (low-carbohydrate/high-monounsaturated fat diet) for 4 weeks. Thereafter, they shifted to the other diet for 4 more weeks. At the end of each period, plasma glucose, insulin, lipids, and lipoprotein fractions (separated by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation) were determined on blood samples taken at fasting and over 6 h after a test meal having a similar composition as the corresponding diet. In addition to a significant decrease in postprandial plasma glucose, insulin responses, and glycemic variability, the high-carbohydrate/high-fiber diet also significantly improved the primary end point, since it reduced the postprandial incremental areas under the curve (IAUCs) of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, in particular, chylomicrons (cholesterol IAUC: 0.05 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.08 +/- 0.02 mmol/l per 6 h; triglycerides IAUC: 0.71 +/- 0.35 vs. 1.03 +/- 0.58 mmol/l per 6 h, P fiber, essentially based on legumes, vegetables, fruits, and whole cereals, may be particularly useful for treating diabetic patients because of its multiple effects on different cardiovascular risk factors, including postprandial lipids abnormalities.

  18. Maternal High Fructose Intake Increases the Vulnerability to Post-Weaning High-Fat Diet-Induced Programmed Hypertension in Male Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Wei-Chia; Wu, Kay L H; Leu, Steve; Chan, Julie Y H

    2018-01-09

    Widespread consumption of high-fructose and high-fat diets relates to the global epidemic of hypertension. Hypertension may originate from early life by a combination of prenatal and postnatal nutritional insults. We examined whether maternal high-fructose diet increases vulnerability to post-weaning high-fructose or high-fat diets induced hypertension in adult offspring and determined the underlying mechanisms. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received regular chow (ND) or chow supplemented with 60% fructose (HFR) during the entire pregnancy and lactation periods. Male offspring were onto either the regular chow, 60% fructose, or high-fat diet (HFA) from weaning to 12 weeks of age and assigned to four groups: ND/ND, HFR/ND, HFR/HFR, and HFR/HFA. Maternal high-fructose diet exacerbates post-weaning high-fat diet-induced programmed hypertension. Post-weaning high-fructose and high-fat diets similarly reduced Sirt4, Prkaa2, Prkag2, Ppara, Pparb, and Ppargc1a mRNA expression in offspring kidneys exposed to maternal high-fructose intake. Additionally, post-weaning high-fat diet significantly reduced renal mRNA levels of Ulk1, Atg5, and Nrf2 and induced greater oxidative stress than did high-fructose diet. Although maternal high-fructose intake increases soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH) expression in the kidney, which was restored by post-weaning high-fructose and high-fat diets. Maternal high-fructose diet programs differential vulnerability to developing hypertension in male offspring in response to post-weaning high-fructose and high-fat diets. Our data implicated that specific therapy targeting on nutrient sensing signals, oxidative stress, and SEH may be a promising approach to prevent hypertension in children and mothers exposed to high-fructose and high-fat consumption.

  19. The intake of high-fat diets induces an obesogenic-like gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which is reverted by dieting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynés, Bàrbara; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are increasingly used for nutrigenomic studies. In this study, we aimed to identify whether these cells could reflect the development of an obesogenic profile associated with the intake of high-fat (HF) diets. We analysed, by real-time RT-PCR, the dietary response of key genes related to lipid metabolism, obesity and inflammation in PBMC of control rats, rats fed a cafeteria or a commercial HF diet and rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model). Cafeteria diet intake, which resulted in important overweight and related complications, altered the expressions of most of the studied genes in PBMC, evidencing the development of an obesogenic profile. Commercial HF diet, which produced metabolic alterations but in the absence of noticeably increased body weight, also altered PBMC gene expression, inducing a similar regulatory pattern as that observed for the cafeteria diet. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (Cpt1a) mRNA expression was of special interest; its expression reflected metabolic alterations related to the intake of both obesogenic diets (independently of increased body weight) even at an early stage as well as metabolic recovery in post-cafeteria animals. Thus, PBMC constitute an important source of biomarkers that reflect the increased adiposity and metabolic deregulation associated with the intake of HF diets. In particular, we propose an analysis of Cpt1a expression as a good biomarker to detect the early metabolic alterations caused by the consumption of hyperlipidic diets, and also as a marker of metabolic recovery associated to weight loss.

  20. High-salt diet combined with elevated angiotensin II accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Maria E; Bernberg, Evelina; Andersson, Irene J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: High-salt diet likely elevates blood pressure (BP), thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that a high-salt diet plays a critical role in subjects whose renin-angiotensin systems cannot adjust to variable salt intake, rendering them more susceptible to athe......-salt diet combined with fixed high Ang II levels accelerates atherogenesis synergistically, beyond the effect of BP....

  1. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  2. Effect of a very-high-fiber vegetable, fruit, and nut diet on serum lipids and colonic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D J; Kendall, C W; Popovich, D G; Vidgen, E; Mehling, C C; Vuksan, V; Ransom, T P; Rao, A V; Rosenberg-Zand, R; Tariq, N; Corey, P; Jones, P J; Raeini, M; Story, J A; Furumoto, E J; Illingworth, D R; Pappu, A S; Connelly, P W

    2001-04-01

    We tested the effects of feeding a diet very high in fiber from fruit and vegetables. The levels fed were those, which had originally inspired the dietary fiber hypothesis related to colon cancer and heart disease prevention and also may have been eaten early in human evolution. Ten healthy volunteers each took 3 metabolic diets of 2 weeks duration. The diets were: high-vegetable, fruit, and nut (very-high-fiber, 55 g/1,000 kcal); starch-based containing cereals and legumes (early agricultural diet); or low-fat (contemporary therapeutic diet). All diets were intended to be weight-maintaining (mean intake, 2,577 kcal/d). Compared with the starch-based and low-fat diets, the high-fiber vegetable diet resulted in the largest reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (33% +/- 4%, P vegetable diet (1.2 mg/g wet weight, P =.002). Maximum lipid reductions occurred within 1 week. Urinary mevalonic acid excretion increased (P =.036) on the high-vegetable diet reflecting large fecal steroid losses. We conclude that very high-vegetable fiber intakes reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease and possibly colon cancer. Vegetable and fruit fibers therefore warrant further detailed investigation. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  3. Effects of clay on toxin binding capacity, ruminal fermentation, diet digestibility, and growth of steers fed high-concentrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelo, D S; Lancaster, N A; Melnichenko, S; Muegge, C R; Schoonmaker, J P

    2017-10-01

    proportional adsorption was decreased to 35.5 and 91.1% at 5,200 μg/mL ( clay effectively binds ruminal toxins, decreases ruminal lactate, and improves performance only during adaptation to a high-concentrate feedlot diet.

  4. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women stratified by hormone replacement therapy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette

    2004-01-01

    randomly assigned to a diet high in protein ( 90 g/day) and sodium (180 mmol/day) ( calciuric diet) or a diet moderate in protein ( 70 g/day) and low in sodium ( 65 mmol/day) for 4 weeks followed by crossover to alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. The calciuric diet significantly (P......The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of a high-sodium, high-protein diet on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women ( aged 49 - 60 y) stratified by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a crossover trial, 18 women (n = 8 HRT users (+HRT) and n = 10 nonusers (-HRT)) were...

  5. A high-sugar diet produces obesity and insulin resistance in wild-type Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Palanker Musselman

    2011-11-01

    Insulin-resistant, ‘type 2’ diabetes (T2D results from a complex interplay between genes and environment. In particular, both caloric excess and obesity are strongly associated with T2D across many genetic backgrounds. To gain insights into how dietary excess affects insulin resistance, we studied the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae reared on a high-sugar diet were hyperglycemic, insulin resistant and accumulated fat – hallmarks of T2D – compared with those reared on control diets. Excess dietary sugars, but not fats or proteins, elicited insulin-resistant phenotypes. Expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and β-oxidation was upregulated in high-sugar-fed larvae, as were FOXO targets, consistent with known mechanisms of insulin resistance in humans. These data establish a novel Drosophila model of diet-induced insulin resistance that bears strong similarity to the pathophysiology of T2D in humans.

  6. A free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet induces glucose intolerance and insulin unresponsiveness to a glucose load not explained by obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Fleur, S E; Luijendijk, M C M; van Rozen, A J; Kalsbeek, A; Adan, R A H

    2011-04-01

    In diet-induced obesity, it is not clear whether impaired glucose metabolism is caused directly by the diet, or indirectly via obesity. This study examined the effects of different free-choice, high-caloric, obesity-inducing diets on glucose metabolism. In these free-choice diets, saturated fat and/or a 30% sugar solution are provided in an addition to normal chow pellets. In the first experiment, male rats received a free-choice high-fat high-sugar (HFHS), free-choice high-fat (HF) or a chow diet. In a second experiment, male rats received a free-choice high-sugar (HS) diet or chow diet. For both experiments, after weeks 1 and 4, an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed. Both the HFHS and HF diets resulted in obesity with comparable plasma concentrations of free fatty acids. Interestingly, the HF diet did not affect glucose metabolism, whereas the HFHS diet resulted in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and in glucose intolerance because of a diminished insulin response. Moreover, adiposity in rats on the HF diet correlated positively with the insulin response to the glucose load, whereas adiposity in rats on the HFHS diet showed a negative correlation. In addition, total caloric intake did not explain differences in glucose tolerance. To test whether sugar itself was crucial, we next performed a similar experiment in rats on the HS diet. Rats consumed three times as much sugar when compared with rats on the HFHS diet, which resulted in obesity with basal hyperinsulinemia. Glucose tolerance, however, was not affected. Together, these results suggest that not only obesity or total caloric intake, but the diet content also is crucial for the glucose intolerance that we observed in rats on the HFHS diet.

  7. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  8. Fabrication of High-Strength Gray Cast Iron Using Permanent Magnet Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seung-Yeon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed the manufacturing technology for high strength gray cast irons by using the spent permanent magnet scraps. The cast specimen inoculated by using a spent magnet scraps showed the excellent tensile strength up to 306MPa. This tensile strength value is 50MPa higher than that of the specimen cast without inoculation, and is similar to that of the specimen inoculated by using the expensive misch-metal. These superior mechanical properties are attributed to complex sulfides created during solidification that promote the formation and growth of Type-A graphite. It is therefore concluded that spent magnets scrap can provide an efficient and cost-effective inoculation agent for the fabrication of high-performance gray cast iron.

  9. Comparison of High-Protein, Intermittent Fasting Low-Calorie Diet and Heart Healthy Diet for Vascular Health of the Obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; He, Feng; Tinsley, Grant M; Pannell, Benjamin K; Ward, Emery; Arciero, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    It has been debated whether different diets are more or less effective in long-term weight loss success and cardiovascular disease prevention among men and women. To further explore these questions, the present study evaluated the combined effects of a high-protein, intermittent fasting, low-calorie diet plan compared with a heart healthy diet plan during weight loss, and weight loss maintenance on blood lipids and vascular compliance of obese individuals. The experiment involved 40 obese adults (men, n = 21; women, n = 19) and was divided into two phases: (a) 12-week high-protein, intermittent fasting, low-calorie weight loss diet comparing men and women (Phase 1) and (b) a 1-year weight maintenance phase comparing high-protein, intermittent fasting with a heart healthy diet (Phase 2). Body weight, body mass index (BMI), blood lipids, and arterial compliance outcomes were assessed at weeks 1 (baseline control), 12 (weight loss), and 64 (12 + 52 week; weight loss maintenance). At the end of weight loss intervention, concomitant reductions in body weight, BMI and blood lipids were observed, as well as enhanced arterial compliance. No sex-specific differences in responses were observed. During phase 2, the high-protein, intermittent fasting group demonstrated a trend for less regain in BMI, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and aortic pulse wave velocity than the heart healthy group. Our results suggest that a high-protein, intermittent fasting and low-calorie diet is associated with similar reductions in BMI and blood lipids in obese men and women. This diet also demonstrated an advantage in minimizing weight regain as well as enhancing arterial compliance as compared to a heart healthy diet after 1 year.

  10. Comparison of High-Protein, Intermittent-Fasting Low-Calorie Diet and Heart Healthy Diet for Vascular Health of the Obese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It has been debated whether different diets are more or less effective in long-term weight loss success and cardiovascular diseases among men and women. Thus, the present study evaluated the combined effects of a high-protein, intermittent-fasting, low-calorie diet plan compared with heart healthy diet plan during weight loss maintenance on blood lipids and vascular compliance of individuals with obesity. Methods: The experiment involved 40 adults with obesity (men, n = 21; women, n = 19 and was divided into two phases: (a 12-week high-protein, intermittent-fasting, low-calorie weight loss diet comparing men and women (Phase 1 and (b a 1-year (52-week weight loss maintenance comparing high-protein, intermittent-fasting with a heart healthy diet (Phase 2. Body weight, body mass index, blood lipids, and arterial compliance outcomes were assessed at weeks 1 (baseline control, 12 (weight loss, and 64 (12+52 week; weight loss maintenance.Results: At the end of weight loss intervention, concomitant with reductions in body weight, body mass index, blood lipids, and arterial compliance was enhanced (p < 0.05. No sex-specific differences were observed. During phase 2, high-protein, intermittent-fasting, low-calorie group demonstrated less weight regain and percentage change in aortic pulse wave velocity than heart healthy group (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our results suggest that high-protein, intermittent-fasting and low-calorie diet is associated with body weight loss and reduction in blood lipids. This diet also demonstrated a potential advantage in minimizing weight gain relapse as well as enhancing arterial compliance compared to the heart healthy diet in the long term.

  11. Knowledge of students attending a high school in Pretoria, South Africa, on diet, nutrition and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letlape, S V; Mokwena, K; Oguntibeju, O O

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the knowledge of students on the composition of a healthy diet, daily nutritional requirements and the importance of regular exercise. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire with closed and open-ended questions to assess students 'knowledge on diet, nutrition and exercise was conducted. The study group were students of Tswaing High School in Pretoria, South Africa, who were in attendance on a particular day when the study was conducted and who consented to participate in the study Only 500 students of the school participated in the study Results showed that 77% of the students do not have adequate knowledge on diet, nutrition and exercise while 23% of the students showed satisfactory knowledge. Approximately 26% and 16% of the students reported that they participated in rigorous and moderate exercise respectively The study also showed that the majority of the students were however not engaged in physical activities. Students at Tswaing High School do not have adequate knowledge on nutrition, diet and exercise. Their views on what exercise entails were found not to be satisfactory. Programmes/ information or seminars that could assist to inform students on the importance of diet and exercise are therefore suggested.

  12. High-fat maternal diet during pregnancy persistently alters the offspring microbiome in a primate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Prince, Amanda L.; Bader, David; Hu, Min; Ganu, Radhika; Baquero, Karalee; Blundell, Peter; Harris, R. Alan; Frias, Antonio E.; Grove, Kevin L.; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a unique ecosystem and an essential mediator of metabolism and obesity in mammals. However, studies investigating the impact of the diet on the establishment of the gut microbiome early in life are generally lacking, and most notably so in primate models. Here we report that a high-fat maternal or postnatal diet, but not obesity per se, structures the offspring’s intestinal microbiome in Macaca fuscata (Japanese macaque). The resultant microbial dysbiosis is only partially corrected by a low-fat, control diet after weaning. Unexpectedly, early exposure to a high-fat diet diminished the abundance of non-pathogenic Campylobacter in the juvenile gut, suggesting a potential role for dietary fat in shaping commensal microbial communities in primates. Our data challenge the concept of an obesity-causing gut microbiome, and rather provide evidence for a contribution of the maternal diet in establishing the microbiota, which in turn affects intestinal maintenance of metabolic health. PMID:24846660

  13. Effects of Persian leek (Allium ampeloprasum on hepatic lipids and the expression of proinflammatory gene in hamsters fed a high-fat/ high-cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Fatoorechi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Persian leek is one of the most widely used herbal foods among Iranians. In this study, effects of oral administration of Persian leek on plasma and liver lipids were examined in hamster. Materials and Methods: Male Syrian hamsters were randomly divided into three groups: control (standard diet, high fat control (high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, Persian leek (high-fat/high-cholesterol diet + 1% per weight of diet from dried powdered Persian leek for 14 weeks. Results: High fat diet increased plasma and liver lipids as compared to standard diet. Adding Persian leek to the high-fat/high-cholesterol diet resulted in no significant changes in the concentration of the plasma lipids or liver cholesterol. However, liver triglycerides (TG, plasma Alanine aminotransferase and gene expression of tumor necrosis factor- α were decreased in hamsters fed high-fat diet containing Persian leek as compared to high-fat diet only. Conclusion: Persian leek might be considered as a herbal food that can reduce liver TG accumulation induced by high fat diets.

  14. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M; Washington, M Kay; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Effect of High Intensity Interval and Continuous Swimming Training on Body Mass Adiposity Level and Serum Parameters in High-Fat Diet Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme L. da Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of interval and continuous training on the body mass gain and adiposity levels of rats fed a high-fat diet. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, standard diet and high-fat diet, and received their respective diets for a period of four weeks without exercise stimuli. After this period, the animals were randomly divided into six groups (n=8: control standard diet (CS, control high-fat diet (CH, continuous training standard diet (CTS, continuous training high-fat diet (CTH, interval training standard diet (ITS, and interval training high-fat diet (ITH. The interval and continuous training consisted of a swimming exercise performed over eight weeks. CH rats had greater body mass gain, sum of adipose tissues mass, and lower serum high density lipoprotein values than CS. The trained groups showed lower values of feed intake, caloric intake, body mass gain, and adiposity levels compared with the CH group. No significant differences were observed between the trained groups (CTS versus ITS and CTH versus ITH on body mass gains and adiposity levels. In conclusion, both training methodologies were shown to be effective in controlling body mass gain and adiposity levels in high-fat diet fed rats.

  16. Protective effect of doxycycline on germinal epithelial loss caused by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; García-Rivera, Alejandro; Madrigal-Pérez, M Violeta M; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Alejandrina; Lugo-Radillo, Agustin; Galvan-Salazar, Hector R; Soriano-Hernández, Alejandro D; Gómez-Tapia, Fernando; Martinez-Martinez, Rafael; Valdez-Velazquez, Laura L; Newton-Sanchez, Oscar A; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Rafael; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P; Melnikov, Valery; Lara-Esqueda, Agustin; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose

    2014-05-01

    A high-fat diet and male obesity are aspects associated with germinal epithelial alterations and male infertility. Some reports have shown that certain tetracyclines can protect the germinal epithelium from toxic drugs. The aim of the present study design was to evaluate the possible effect of doxycycline on testicular germ cells in individuals fed a Western diet (atherogenic), using a murine model. Two groups of male mice (BALB/c) were fed a high-fat Western diet (HFD). One of these two groups was given doxycycline at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day (HFD+Dox). A third group was fed a standard rodent diet (SD group). After 6 months, the mice were euthanized and morphologic and histopathologic analyses were performed. Germinal epithelial height was similar between the SD group (54 μm) and the HFD+Dox group (53 μm) (p = 0.26), and it was significantly reduced in the HFD group (47 μm) (p = 0.0001). The degree of germinal epithelial loss (DGEL) was significantly lower in the SD (10) and HFD+Dox (12.5) groups than in the HFD group (30) (p = 0.0001 and =0.007, respectively). There were no differences in the DGEL between the SD and HFD+Dox groups (p = 0.42). Doxycycline administration was shown to prevent germinal epithelial loss in the testes of mice fed a high-fat diet. Future studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical usefulness of doxycycline or its analogs in persons with a habitual high-fat diet.

  17. Analysis of inelasticity in high-damping Zn - Al alloys, gray irons, and iron alloys with internal friction of a magnetomechanical nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A. I.

    2012-09-01

    Results are presented from a comparative analysis of the main mechanisms of internal friction in high-damping alloys based on the Zn - Al system, cast iron with flaked graphite, and iron alloys that exhibit internal friction of a magnetomechanical nature. A study is made of the damping capacity of alloys Zn - 26% Al, SCh25, and Fe - 5% Cr - 3% Al and steel 45, which are typical representatives of the types of materials in question. Their set of physico-mechanical properties is determined with allowance for damping capacity.

  18. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron carbonyl complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, A.J.; Bauer, M; Jacob, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    We apply high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to study iron carbonyl complexes. Mono-, bi-, and tri-nuclear carbonyl complexes and pure carbonyl complexes as well as carbonyl complexes containing hydrocarbon ligands are considered. The HERFD-XANES spectra reveal multiple pre-edge peaks with individual signatures for each complex, which could not be detected previously with conventional XANES spectroscopy. These peaks are assigned...

  19. State of charge estimation of high power lithium iron phosphate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huria, T.; Ludovici, G.; Lutzemberger, G.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a state of charge (SOC) evaluation algorithm for high power lithium iron phosphate cells characterized by voltage hysteresis. The algorithm is based on evaluating the parameters of an equivalent electric circuit model of the cell and then using a hybrid technique with adequate treatment of errors, through an additional extended Kalman filter (EKF). The model algorithm has been validated in terms of effectiveness and robustness by several experimental tests.

  20. Investigation on Microstructure of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Muzafar A.K.; Rashidi M.M.; Mahadzir I.; Shayfull Z.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of manganese addition and annealing heat treatment on microstructure of austenitic cast irons with high manganese content (Mn-Ni-resist) were investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-resist was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. The annealing heat treatment was applied at 700°C up to 1000°C to investigate the effect of the annealing temperature on the micros...

  1. Effect of high-fat diet during gestation, lactation, or postweaning on physiological and behavioral indexes in borderline hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Anaya; Alvers, Kristin M; Crump, Erica M; Rowland, Neil E

    2009-01-01

    Maternal obesity is becoming more prevalent. We used borderline hypertensive rats (BHR) to investigate whether a high-fat diet at different stages of development has adverse programming consequences on metabolic parameters and blood pressure. Wistar dams were fed a high- or low-fat diet for 6 wk before mating with spontaneously hypertensive males and during the ensuing pregnancy. At birth, litters were fostered to a dam from the same diet group as during gestation or to the alternate diet condition. Female offspring were weaned on either control or "junk food" diets until about 6 mo of age. Rats fed the high-fat junk food diet were hyperphagic relative to their chow-fed controls. The junk food-fed rats were significantly heavier and had greater fat pad mass than those rats maintained on chow alone. Importantly, those rats suckled by high-fat dams had heavier fat pads than those suckled by control diet dams. Fasting serum leptin and insulin levels differed as a function of the gestational, lactational, and postweaning diet histories. Rats gestated in, or suckled by high-fat dams, or maintained on the junk food diet were hyperleptinemic compared with their respective controls. Indirect blood pressure did not differ as a function of postweaning diet, but rats gestated in the high-fat dams had lower mean arterial blood pressures than those gestated in the control diet dams. The postweaning dietary history affected food-motivated behavior; junk food-fed rats earned less food pellets on fixed (FR) and progressive (PR) ratio cost schedules than chow-fed controls. In conclusion, the effects of maternal high-fat diet during gestation or lactation were mostly small and transient. The postweaning effects of junk food diet were evident on the majority of the parameters measured, including body weight, fat pad mass, serum leptin and insulin levels, and operant performance.

  2. Decreased reproductive rates in sheep fed a high selenium diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    High Se-containing forages grow on seleniferous soils in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. Selenium is an essential trace element that is required for many physiological processes but can also be either acutely or chronically toxic to livestock. Anecdotal reports of decrease...

  3. High-fructose diet is as detrimental as high-fat diet in the induction of insulin resistance and diabetes mediated by hepatic/pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, M; Raji, L; Prabhu, D; Sathishkumar, C; Prabu, P; Mohan, V; Balasubramanyam, M

    2016-12-01

    In the context of high human consumption of fructose diets, there is an imperative need to understand how dietary fructose intake influence cellular and molecular mechanisms and thereby affect β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. While evidence exists for a relationship between high-fat-induced insulin resistance and metabolic disorders, there is lack of studies in relation to high-fructose diet. Therefore, we attempted to study the effect of different diets viz., high-fat diet (HFD), high-fructose diet (HFS), and a combination (HFS + HFD) diet on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in male Wistar rats compared to control animals fed with normal pellet diet. Investigations include oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, histopathology by H&E and Masson's trichrome staining, mRNA expression by real-time PCR, protein expression by Western blot, and caspase-3 activity by colorimetry. Rats subjected to high-fat/fructose diets became glucose intolerant, insulin-resistant, and dyslipidemic. Compared to control animals, rats subjected to different combination of fat/fructose diets showed increased mRNA and protein expression of a battery of ER stress markers both in pancreas and liver. Transcription factors of β-cell function (INSIG1, SREBP1c and PDX1) as well as hepatic gluconeogenesis (FOXO1 and PEPCK) were adversely affected in diet-induced insulin-resistant rats. The convergence of chronic ER stress towards apoptosis in pancreas/liver was also indicated by increased levels of CHOP mRNA & increased activity of both JNK and Caspase-3 in rats subjected to high-fat/fructose diets. Our study exposes the experimental support in that high-fructose diet is equally detrimental in causing metabolic disorders.

  4. Localization of iron in rice grain using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kyriacou, Bianca

    2014-03-01

    Cereal crops accumulate low levels of iron (Fe) of which only a small fraction (5-10%) is bioavailable in human diets. Extensive co-localization of Fe in outer grain tissues with phytic acid, a strong chelator of metal ions, results in the formation of insoluble complexes that cannot be digested by humans. Here we describe the use of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to map the distribution of Fe, zinc (Zn), phosphorus (P) and other elements in the aleurone and subaleurone layers of mature grain from wild-type and an Fe-enriched line of rice (Oryza sativa L.). The results obtained from both XFM and NanoSIMS indicated that most Fe was co-localized with P (indicative of phytic acid) in the aleurone layer but that a small amount of Fe, often present as "hotspots", extended further into the subaleurone and outer endosperm in a pattern that was not co-localized with P. We hypothesize that Fe in subaleurone and outer endosperm layers of rice grain could be bound to low molecular weight chelators such as nicotianamine and/or deoxymugineic acid. © 2014.

  5. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Evaluation of cutting force and surface roughness in high-speed milling of compacted graphite iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Suhaimi Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compacted Graphite Iron, (CGI is known to have outstanding mechanical strength and weight-to-strength ratio as compared to conventional grey cast iron, (CI. The outstanding characteristics of CGI is due to its graphite particle shape, which is presented as compacted vermicular particle. The graphite is interconnected with random orientation and round edges, which results in higher mechanical strength. Whereas, graphite in the CI consists of a smooth-surfaced flakes that easily propagates cracks which results in weaker and brittle properties as compared to CGI. Owing to its improved properties, CGI is considered as the best candidate material in substituting grey cast iron that has been used in engine block applications for years. However, the smooth implementation of replacing CI with CGI has been hindered due to the poor machinability of CGI especially at high cutting speed. The tool life is decreased by 20 times when comparing CGI with CI under the same cutting condition. This study investigates the effect of using cryogenic cooling and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL during high-speed milling of CGI (grade 450. Results showed that, the combination of internal cryogenic cooling and enhanced MQL improved the tool life, cutting force and surface quality as compared to the conventional flood coolant strategy during high-speed milling of CGI.

  7. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  9. The Effect of Addition of Titanium on The Structure and Properties of High Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of Ti-addition to High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI on the structure and selected mechanical properties. For this study casted two sets of cylinders with dimensions ø20 mm, ø15 mm × 250 mm, for the High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI and with the 4% by mass Ti-addition. Melts were performed in the induction furnace crucible capacity of 15 kg. During the heats the cup with installed S type thermocouple was poured to record the cooling curves. The cylinders were subjected to the static bending strength test. Samples for the test microstructure and Rockwell hardness were cut from the cylinders. The study shows that the addition of titanium had an impact on the structure and thus the properties of High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI. In subsequent studies, through an appropriate choice of chemical composition and proper process control, it is planned to obtain in the structure the titanium carbides TiC and chromium carbides with type (Cr, Fe7C3.

  10. Effects of puerarin on lipid accumulation and metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zheng

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the mechanisms by which puerarin from kudzu root extract regulates lipid metabolism, fifty mice were randomly assigned to five groups: normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD, and HFD containing 0.2%, 0.4% or 0.8% puerarin for 12 weeks. Body weight, intraperitioneal adipose tissue (IPAT weight, serum biochemical parameters, and hepatic and feces lipids were measured. Activity and mRNA and protein expressions of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes were analyzed. Compared with HFD, 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin significantly decreased body and IPAT weight. There was a significant decrease in the serum and hepatic concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and leptin in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets compared with HFD. Fatty acid synthase activity was suppressed in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets, while the activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, carnitine acyltransferase (CAT and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL were increased. mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ 2 (PPARγ 2 was down-regulated in liver of mice fed the 0.8% diet compared with HFD, while mRNA expression of CAT and HSL was considerably up-regulated by 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. The protein expression of PPARγ2 in liver was decreased and those of p-AMPK, HSL and p-HSL were increased in mice fed 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. These results suggest that > 0.4% puerarin influenced the activity, mRNA and protein levels of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes, decreasing serum and liver lipids, body weight gain and fat accumulation. Puerarin might be beneficial to prevent lifestyle-related diseases.

  11. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha S Ghosh

    Full Text Available A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD, exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx or WD (Nx+WD. The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control and WD (WD. To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM, a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU, a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD, was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively. Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency.

  12. Isoflavone and protein constituents of lactic acid-fermented soy milk combine to prevent dyslipidemia in rats fed a high cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Maki; Egusa, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    2014-12-10

    A high cholesterol diet induces dyslipidemia. This study investigated whether isoflavone aglycones in lactic acid-fermented soy milk (LFS) improve lipid metabolism in rats fed a high cholesterol diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged seven weeks were fed an AIN-93G diet, a 1% cholesterol diet (a high cholesterol diet), a high-cholesterol diet containing 4% isoflavone extract of LFS (LFS extract diet), a high-cholesterol diet containing 19.4% ethanol-washed LFS (ethanol-washed LFS diet, isoflavone-poor diet), or a high cholesterol diet containing 23.2% intact LFS (intact LFS diet) for five weeks. The plasma total cholesterol (TC) level was increased in the rats fed the LFS extract diet compared with those fed the high cholesterol diet. The TC level was decreased by the intact LFS and ethanol-washed LFS diets. The cholesterol-lowering effect was stronger in the rats fed the intact LFS diet than those fed the ethanol-washed LFS diet. The plasma triglyceride (TG) level was unchanged in the rats fed the LFS extract diet, but it decreased in rats fed the intact LFS and ethanol-washed LFS diets. Although, compared with the high cholesterol diet, the LFS extract and ethanol-washed LFS diets did not reduce hepatic cholesterol and TG, both levels were remarkably lowered by the intact LFS diet. These results suggest that the improvement in lipid metabolism of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet containing LFS isoflavone aglycones is not due to an independent effect but due to a cooperative effect with soy protein.

  13. Isoflavone and Protein Constituents of Lactic Acid-Fermented Soy Milk Combine to Prevent Dyslipidemia in Rats Fed a High Cholesterol Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Kobayashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A high cholesterol diet induces dyslipidemia. This study investigated whether isoflavone aglycones in lactic acid-fermented soy milk (LFS improve lipid metabolism in rats fed a high cholesterol diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged seven weeks were fed an AIN-93G diet, a 1% cholesterol diet (a high cholesterol diet, a high-cholesterol diet containing 4% isoflavone extract of LFS (LFS extract diet, a high-cholesterol diet containing 19.4% ethanol-washed LFS (ethanol-washed LFS diet, isoflavone-poor diet, or a high cholesterol diet containing 23.2% intact LFS (intact LFS diet for five weeks. The plasma total cholesterol (TC level was increased in the rats fed the LFS extract diet compared with those fed the high cholesterol diet. The TC level was decreased by the intact LFS and ethanol-washed LFS diets. The cholesterol-lowering effect was stronger in the rats fed the intact LFS diet than those fed the ethanol-washed LFS diet. The plasma triglyceride (TG level was unchanged in the rats fed the LFS extract diet, but it decreased in rats fed the intact LFS and ethanol-washed LFS diets. Although, compared with the high cholesterol diet, the LFS extract and ethanol-washed LFS diets did not reduce hepatic cholesterol and TG, both levels were remarkably lowered by the intact LFS diet. These results suggest that the improvement in lipid metabolism of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet containing LFS isoflavone aglycones is not due to an independent effect but due to a cooperative effect with soy protein.

  14. A highly concentrated diet increases biogas production and the agronomic value of young bull's manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça Costa, Mônica Sarolli Silva de; Lucas, Jorge de; Mendonça Costa, Luiz Antonio de; Orrico, Ana Carolina Amorim

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand for animal protein has driven significant changes in cattle breeding systems, mainly in feedlots, with the use of young bulls fed on diets richer in concentrate (C) than in forage (F). These changes are likely to affect animal manure, demanding re-evaluation of the biogas production per kg of TS and VS added, as well as of its agronomic value as a biofertilizer, after anaerobic digestion. Here, we determined the biogas production and agronomic value (i.e., the macronutrient concentration in the final biofertilizer) of the manure of young bulls fed on diets with more (80% C+20% F; 'HighC' diet) or less (65% C+35% F; 'LowC' diet) concentrate, evaluating the effects of temperature (25, 35, and 40°C) and the use of an inoculum, during anaerobic digestion. A total of 24 benchtop reactors were used, operating in a semi-continuous system, with a 40-day hydraulic retention time (HRT). The manure from animals given the HighC diet had the greatest potential for biogas production, when digested with the use of an inoculum and at 35 or 40°C (0.6326 and 0.6207m(3)biogas/kg volatile solids, or VS, respectively). We observed the highest levels of the macronutrients N, P, and K in the biofertilizer from the manure of animals given HighC. Our results show that the manure of young bulls achieves its highest potential for biogas production and agronomic value when animals are fed diets richer in concentrate, and that biogas production increases if digestion is performed at higher temperatures, and with the use of an inoculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children need a lot of ... the condition in these groups. Infants and Young Children A baby's diet can affect his or her ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a very low-fat diet over a long time. Some higher fat foods, like meat, are ... iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Infants and Young Children A baby's diet can affect his or her risk for iron-deficiency anemia. ... eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can affect the strength of a few medicines and how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child's diet. Young children who drink a lot of cow's milk may be at ... limit the amount of cow's milk your baby drinks. Also, babies need more iron as they grow ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children need ... can help prevent the condition in these groups. Infants and Young Children A baby's diet can affect ...

  1. Omega 3 Fatty Acids Promote Macrophage Reverse Cholesterol Transport in Hamster Fed High Fat Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Kasbi Chadli; Hassane Nazih; Michel Krempf; Patrick Nguyen; Khadija Ouguerram

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in hamster, a CETP-expressing species, fed omega 3 fatty acids (ω3PUFA) supplemented high fat diet (HFD). Three groups of hamsters (n = 6/group) were studied for 20 weeks: 1) control diet: Control, 2) HFD group: HF and 3) HFD group supplemented with ω3PUFA (EPA and DHA): HFω3. In vivo macrophage-to-feces RCT was assessed after an intraperitoneal injection of (3)H-cholesterol-labelled hamster primary macrop...

  2. Chronic high-fat diet in fathers programs ß-cell dysfunction in female rat offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Sheau-Fang; Lin, Ruby C Y; Laybutt, D Ross

    2010-01-01

    The global prevalence of obesity is increasing across most ages in both sexes. This is contributing to the early emergence of type 2 diabetes and its related epidemic. Having either parent obese is an independent risk factor for childhood obesity. Although the detrimental impacts of diet......-induced maternal obesity on adiposity and metabolism in offspring are well established, the extent of any contribution of obese fathers is unclear, particularly the role of non-genetic factors in the causal pathway. Here we show that paternal high-fat-diet (HFD) exposure programs ß-cell 'dysfunction' in rat F(1...

  3. Chronic Reduction of GIP Secretion Alleviates Obesity and Insulin Resistance Under High-Fat Diet Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nasteska, Daniela; Harada, Norio; Suzuki, Kazuyo; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Joo, Erina; Iwasaki, Kanako; Shibue, Kimitaka; Harada, Takanari; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-01-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) exhibits potent insulinotropic effects on β-cells and anabolic effects on bone formation and fat accumulation. We explored the impact of reduced GIP levels in vivo on glucose homeostasis, bone formation, and fat accumulation in a novel GIP-GFP knock-in (KI) mouse. We generated GIP-GFP KI mice with a truncated prepro-GIP gene. The phenotype was assessed in heterozygous and homozygous states in mice on a control fat diet and a high-fat diet (HFD) in vivo and...

  4. Increased physical activity ameliorates high fat diet-induced bone resorption in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been recognized that mechanical stresses associated with physical activity (PA) have beneficial effects on increasing bone mineral density (BMD) and improving bone quality. On the other hand, high fat diet (HFD) and obesity increase bone marrow adiposity leading to increased excretion of pro-...

  5. an evaluation of high lysine maize in the diets of broilers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    per ton of high lysine maize, would be a conservative estimate of the additional value of this improved maize variety. This confirms the result obtained by Nieuwoudt et al. (1978) regarding the value of opaque - 2 maue diets for broilers. Experiment 2. The gain in body mass over the 49 day period, together with food intake ...

  6. Role of high-fat diet in stress response of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichsen, Erilynn T; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is associated with many diseases, one of the most common being obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which in turn leads to blood gas disturbances, including intermittent hypoxia (IH). Obesity, OSA and IH are associated with metabolic changes, and while much mammalian work has been done, mechanisms underlying the response to IH, the role of obesity and the interaction of obesity and hypoxia remain unknown. As a model organism, Drosophila offers tremendous power to study a specific phenotype and, at a subsequent stage, to uncover and study fundamental mechanisms, given the conservation of molecular pathways. Herein, we characterize the phenotype of Drosophila on a high-fat diet in normoxia, IH and constant hypoxia (CH) using triglyceride and glucose levels, response to stress and lifespan. We found that female flies on a high-fat diet show increased triglyceride levels (pcold or anoxia (pcold tolerance, as flies on a high-fat diet almost completely recovered from cold stress following IH. We conclude that the cross talk between hypoxia and a high-fat diet can be either deleterious or compensatory, depending on the nature of the hypoxic treatment.

  7. Elimination of high-refined-sugar diet as treatment strategy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the potency of ampicillin in altering gut flora in the presence of a high-sucrose diet in rat pups, and to determine its effect on selected neurotransmitters and a cytokine as markers of the persistent autistic features repeatedly induced in orally administered propionic acid rat pups.. Methods: ...

  8. Impairment of mitochondrial function of rat hepatocytes by high fat diet and oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garnol, T.; Endlicher, R.; Kučera, O.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Červinková, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2014), s. 271-274 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) PRVOUK P37/02 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hepatocytes * high fat diet * mitochondrial activities * ROS Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  9. Rhinacanthus nasutus leaf improves metabolic abnormalities in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Wannasiri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first report on the impact of R. nasutus extract in improving the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice via stimulating the insulin sensitivity in the liver and adipose tissues.

  10. Elimination of high-refined-sugar diet as treatment strategy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the potency of ampicillin in altering gut flora in the presence of a high-sucrose diet in rat pups, ..... brain axis. Imbalances in the composition of gut microbiota in PPA or ampicillin-treated rats are observed as the overgrowth of K. pneumonia and P. vulgaris, ... groups demonstrated altered intestinal.

  11. Effect of inulin supplementation in male mice fed with high fat diet on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effects of inulin supplementation in Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) male mice fed with high fat diet. Methods: NMRI male mice (n = 36) were divided into three groups. Control (C1), obese (O1) and experimental mice (E1) were fed during 8 weeks as follows: C1 ...

  12. A short-term high fat diet increases exposure to midazolam and omeprazole in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, Roos; Lammers, Laureen A.; van Nierop, Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R.; Mathôt, Ron A. A.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of factors contributing to variation in drug metabolism is of vital importance to optimize drug treatment. This study assesses the effects of a short-term hypercaloric high fat diet on metabolism of five oral drugs, which are each specific for a single P450 isoform: midazolam (CYP3A4),

  13. Effect of inulin supplementation in male mice fed with high fat diet on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effects of inulin supplementation in Naval Medical. Research Institute (NMRI) male mice fed with high fat diet. Methods: NMRI male mice (n = 36) were divided into three groups. Control (C1), obese (O1) and experimental mice (E1) were fed during 8 weeks as follows: C1 ...