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Sample records for high gamma oscillations

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors Mediate Methamphetamine Induction of High Frequency Gamma Oscillations in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Morra, Joshua T.; Glick, Stanley D.; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients suffering from amphetamine---induced psychosis display repetitive behaviors, partially alleviated by antipsychotics, which are reminiscent of rodent stereotypies. Due to recent evidence implicating endocannabinoid involvement in brain disorders, including psychosis, we studied the effects of endocannabinoid signaling on neuronal oscillations of rats exhibiting methamphetamine stereotypy. Neuronal network oscillations were recorded with multiple single electrode arrays aimed at the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats. During the experiments, animals were dosed intravenously with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (0.3 mg/kg) or vehicle followed by an ascending dose regimen of methamphetamine (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 3 mg/kg; cumulative dosing). The effects of drug administration on stereotypy and local gamma oscillations were evaluated. Methamphetamine treatment significantly increased high frequency gamma oscillations (~ 80 Hz). Entrainment of a subpopulation of nucleus accumbens neurons to high frequency gamma was associated with stereotypy encoding in putative fast-spiking interneurons, but not in putative medium spiny neurons. The observed ability of methamphetamine to induce both stereotypy and high frequency gamma power was potently disrupted following CB1 receptor blockade. The present data suggest that CB1 receptor-dependent mechanisms are recruited by methamphetamine to modify striatal interneuron oscillations that accompany changes in psychomotor state, further supporting the link between endocannabinoids and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:22609048

  2. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  3. High gamma oscillations in medial temporal lobe during overt production of speech and gestures.

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Sowman, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    The study of the production of co-speech gestures (CSGs), i.e., meaningful hand movements that often accompany speech during everyday discourse, provides an important opportunity to investigate the integration of language, action, and memory because of the semantic overlap between gesture movements and speech content. Behavioral studies of CSGs and speech suggest that they have a common base in memory and predict that overt production of both speech and CSGs would be preceded by neural activity related to memory processes. However, to date the neural correlates and timing of CSG production are still largely unknown. In the current study, we addressed these questions with magnetoencephalography and a semantic association paradigm in which participants overtly produced speech or gesture responses that were either meaningfully related to a stimulus or not. Using spectral and beamforming analyses to investigate the neural activity preceding the responses, we found a desynchronization in the beta band (15-25 Hz), which originated 900 ms prior to the onset of speech and was localized to motor and somatosensory regions in the cortex and cerebellum, as well as right inferior frontal gyrus. Beta desynchronization is often seen as an indicator of motor processing and thus reflects motor activity related to the hand movements that gestures add to speech. Furthermore, our results show oscillations in the high gamma band (50-90 Hz), which originated 400 ms prior to speech onset and were localized to the left medial temporal lobe. High gamma oscillations have previously been found to be involved in memory processes and we thus interpret them to be related to contextual association of semantic information in memory. The results of our study show that high gamma oscillations in medial temporal cortex play an important role in the binding of information in human memory during speech and CSG production.

  4. High gamma oscillations in medial temporal lobe during overt production of speech and gestures.

    Lars Marstaller

    Full Text Available The study of the production of co-speech gestures (CSGs, i.e., meaningful hand movements that often accompany speech during everyday discourse, provides an important opportunity to investigate the integration of language, action, and memory because of the semantic overlap between gesture movements and speech content. Behavioral studies of CSGs and speech suggest that they have a common base in memory and predict that overt production of both speech and CSGs would be preceded by neural activity related to memory processes. However, to date the neural correlates and timing of CSG production are still largely unknown. In the current study, we addressed these questions with magnetoencephalography and a semantic association paradigm in which participants overtly produced speech or gesture responses that were either meaningfully related to a stimulus or not. Using spectral and beamforming analyses to investigate the neural activity preceding the responses, we found a desynchronization in the beta band (15-25 Hz, which originated 900 ms prior to the onset of speech and was localized to motor and somatosensory regions in the cortex and cerebellum, as well as right inferior frontal gyrus. Beta desynchronization is often seen as an indicator of motor processing and thus reflects motor activity related to the hand movements that gestures add to speech. Furthermore, our results show oscillations in the high gamma band (50-90 Hz, which originated 400 ms prior to speech onset and were localized to the left medial temporal lobe. High gamma oscillations have previously been found to be involved in memory processes and we thus interpret them to be related to contextual association of semantic information in memory. The results of our study show that high gamma oscillations in medial temporal cortex play an important role in the binding of information in human memory during speech and CSG production.

  5. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  6. The gamma oscillation: master or slave?

    Schroeder, Charles E; Lakatos, Peter

    2009-06-01

    The idea that gamma enhancement reflects a state of high neuronal excitability and synchrony, critical for active brain operations, sets gamma up as a "master" or executor process that determines whether an input is effectively integrated and an effective output is generated. However, gamma amplitude is often coupled to the phase of lower frequency delta or theta oscillations, which would make gamma a "slave" to lower frequency activity. Gamma enslavement is productive and typical during rhythmic mode brain operations; when a predictable rhythm is in play, low and mid-frequency oscillations can be entrained and their excitability fluctuations of put to work in sensory and motor functions. When there is no task relevant rhythm that the system can entrain to, low frequency oscillations become detrimental to processing. Then, a continuous (vigilance) mode of operation is implemented; the system's sensitivity is maximized by suppressing lower frequency oscillations and exploiting continuous gamma band oscillations. Each mode has costs and benefits, and the brain shifts dynamically between them in accord with task demands.

  7. Low and high gamma oscillations in rat ventral striatum have distinct relationships to behavior, reward, and spiking activity on a learned spatial decision task

    Matthijs A A Van Der Meer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Local field potential (LFP oscillations in the brain reflect organization thought to be important for perception, attention, movement, and memory. In the basal ganglia, including dorsal striatum, dysfunctional LFP states are associated with Parkinson’s disease, while in healthy subjects, dorsal striatal LFPs have been linked to decision-making processes. However, LFPs in ventral striatum have been less studied. We report that in rats running a spatial decision task, prominent gamma-50 (45-55 Hz and gamma-80 (70-85 Hz oscillations in ventral striatum had distinct relationships to behavior, task events, and spiking activity. Gamma-50 power increased sharply following reward delivery and before movement initiation, while in contrast, gamma-80 power ramped up gradually to reward locations. Gamma-50 power was low and contained little structure during early learning, but rapidly developed a stable pattern, while gamma-80 power was initially high before returning to a stable level within a similar timeframe. Putative fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs showed phase, firing rate, and coherence relationships with gamma-50 and gamma-80, indicating that the observed LFP patterns are locally relevant. Furthermore, in a number of FSIs such relationships were specific to gamma-50 or gamma-80, suggesting that partially distinct FSI populations mediate the effects of gamma-50 and gamma-80.

  8. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Chi-Ming A. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24 compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7 had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9. However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16 significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  9. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia.

    Chen, Chi-Ming A; Stanford, Arielle D; Mao, Xiangling; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Shungu, Dikoma C; Lisanby, Sarah H; Schroeder, Charles E; Kegeles, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case-control pilot study (N = 24) compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs) to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7) had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9). However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16) significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  10. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Chen, Chi-Ming A.; Stanford, Arielle D.; Mao, Xiangling; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Schroeder, Charles E.; Kegeles, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24) compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs) to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance ...

  11. In sync: gamma oscillations and emotional memory

    Drew Battenfield Headley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional experiences leave vivid memories that can last a lifetime. The emotional facilitation of memory has been attributed to the engagement of diffusely projecting neuromodulatory systems that enhance the consolidation of synaptic plasticity in regions activated by the experience. This process requires the propagation of signals between brain regions, and for those signals to induce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. Both of these demands are met by gamma oscillations, which reflect synchronous population activity on a fast timescale (35-120 Hz. Regions known to participate in the formation of emotional memories, such as the basolateral amygdala, also promote gamma-band activation throughout cortical and subcortical circuits. Recent studies have demonstrated that gamma oscillations are enhanced during emotional situations, coherent between regions engaged by salient stimuli, and predict subsequent memory for cues associated with aversive stimuli. Furthermore, neutral stimuli that come to predict emotional events develop enhanced gamma oscillations, reflecting altered processing in the brain, which may underpin how past emotional experiences color future learning and memory.

  12. In sync: gamma oscillations and emotional memory.

    Headley, Drew B; Paré, Denis

    2013-11-21

    Emotional experiences leave vivid memories that can last a lifetime. The emotional facilitation of memory has been attributed to the engagement of diffusely projecting neuromodulatory systems that enhance the consolidation of synaptic plasticity in regions activated by the experience. This process requires the propagation of signals between brain regions, and for those signals to induce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. Both of these demands are met by gamma oscillations, which reflect synchronous population activity on a fast timescale (35-120 Hz). Regions known to participate in the formation of emotional memories, such as the basolateral amygdala, also promote gamma-band activation throughout cortical and subcortical circuits. Recent studies have demonstrated that gamma oscillations are enhanced during emotional situations, coherent between regions engaged by salient stimuli, and predict subsequent memory for cues associated with aversive stimuli. Furthermore, neutral stimuli that come to predict emotional events develop enhanced gamma oscillations, reflecting altered processing in the brain, which may underpin how past emotional experiences color future learning and memory.

  13. In sync: gamma oscillations and emotional memory

    Drew Battenfield Headley; Denis ePare

    2013-01-01

    Emotional experiences leave vivid memories that can last a lifetime. The emotional facilitation of memory has been attributed to the engagement of diffusely projecting neuromodulatory systems that enhance the consolidation of synaptic plasticity in regions activated by the experience. This process requires the propagation of signals between brain regions, and for those signals to induce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. Both of these demands are met by gamma oscillations, which reflect synchr...

  14. Gamma oscillations: precise temporal coordination without a metronome.

    Nikolić, Danko; Fries, Pascal; Singer, Wolf

    2013-02-01

    Gamma oscillations in the brain should not be conceptualized as a sine wave with constant oscillation frequency. Rather, these oscillations serve to concentrate neuronal discharges to particular phases of the oscillation cycle and thereby provide the substrate for various, functionally relevant synchronization phenomena. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neocortical gamma oscillations in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Benedek, Krisztina; Berenyi, Antal; Gombkoto, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Absence seizures in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) may in part be explained by a decrease in phasic GABAA (type-A c-aminobutyric acid) receptor function, but the mechanisms are only partly understood. Here we studied the relation between ictal and interictal spike......-wave discharges (SWDs) and electroencephalography (EEG) gamma oscillatory activity (30-60 Hz) in patients with IGE. Methods: EEG recordings were obtained of 14 children with IGE (mean age, 8.5 +/- 5 years) and 14 age-and sex-matched controls. Time-frequency analysis of each seizure and seizure-free control epochs...... was performed and cross-coherences of neocortical gamma oscillations were calculated to describe interictal and ictal characteristics of generalized seizures. Results: SWDs were characterized with an abrupt increase of oscillatory activity of 34 and 13-60 Hz, peaking at 3-4 and 30-60 Hz, and with a simultaneous...

  16. L-Proline, GABA Synthesis and Gamma Oscillations in Schizophrenia

    Volk, David W.; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Lewis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Altered inhibition from parvalbumin-containing GABA neurons is thought to contribute to impaired gamma frequency oscillations and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Crabtree and colleagues report that proline dehydrogenase deficits produce excessive cytosolic levels of the GABA-mimetic L-proline which impairs GABA synthesis and gamma oscillations in a manner that mimics schizophrenia.

  17. Atypical Laterality of Resting Gamma Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Villalobos, Michele E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin; Kohls, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal brain oscillatory activity has been found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and proposed as a potential biomarker. While several studies have investigated gamma oscillations in ASD, none have examined resting gamma power across multiple brain regions. This study investigated resting gamma power using EEG in 15 boys with ASD and 18 age…

  18. Gamma Oscillations and Spontaneous Network Activity in the Hippocampus Are Highly Sensitive to Decreases in pO2 and Concomitant Changes in Mitochondrial Redox State

    Huchzermeyer, Ch.; Albus, K.; Gabriel, H.-J.; Otáhal, Jakub; Taubenberger, N.; Heinemann, U.; Kovács, R.; Kann, O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2008), s. 1153-1162 ISSN 0270-6474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gamma oscillations * pO2 * hippocampus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 7.452, year: 2008

  19. Optogenetically evoked gamma oscillations are disturbed by cocaine administration

    Jonathan E Dilgen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse have enormous societal impact by degrading the cognitive abilities, emotional state and social behavior of addicted individuals. Among other events involved in the addiction cycle, the study of a single exposure to cocaine, and the contribution of the effects of that event to the continuous and further use of drugs of abuse are fundamental. Gamma oscillations are thought to be important neural correlates of cognitive processing in the prefrontal cortex (PFC which include decision making, set shifting and working memory. It follows that cocaine exposure might modulate gamma oscillations, which could result in reduced cognitive ability. Parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons play an orchestrating role in gamma oscillation induction and it has been shown recently that gamma oscillations can be induced in an anesthetized animal using optogenetic techniques. We use a knock-in mouse model together with optogenetics and in vivo electrophysiology to study the effects of acute cocaine on PFC gamma oscillation as a step toward understanding the cortical changes that may underlie continuous use of stimulants. Our results show that acute cocaine administration increases entrainment of the gamma oscillation to the optogentically induced driving frequency. Our results also suggest that this modulation of gamma oscillations is driven trough activation of DAD1 receptors. The acute cocaine-mediated changes in mPFC may underlie the enhancement of attention and awareness commonly reported by cocaine users and may contribute to the further use and abuse of psychostimulants.

  20. l-Proline, GABA Synthesis and Gamma Oscillations in Schizophrenia.

    Volk, David W; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Lewis, David A

    2016-12-01

    Altered inhibition from parvalbumin-containing GABA neurons is thought to contribute to impaired gamma frequency oscillations and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Crabtree and colleagues report that proline dehydrogenase deficits produce excessive cytosolic levels of the GABA-mimetic l-proline which impairs GABA synthesis and gamma oscillations in a manner that mimics schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gamma oscillations and spontaneous network activity in the hippocampus are highly sensitive to decreases in pO2 and concomitant changes in mitochondrial redox state.

    Huchzermeyer, Christine; Albus, Klaus; Gabriel, Hans-Jürgen; Otáhal, Jakub; Taubenberger, Nando; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard; Kann, Oliver

    2008-01-30

    Gamma oscillations have been implicated in higher cognitive processes and might critically depend on proper mitochondrial function. Using electrophysiology, oxygen sensor microelectrode, and imaging techniques, we investigated the interactions of neuronal activity, interstitial pO2, and mitochondrial redox state [NAD(P)H and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence] in the CA3 subfield of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. We find that gamma oscillations and spontaneous network activity decrease significantly at pO2 levels that do not affect neuronal population responses as elicited by moderate electrical stimuli. Moreover, pO2 and mitochondrial redox states are tightly coupled, and electrical stimuli reveal transient alterations of redox responses when pO2 decreases within the normoxic range. Finally, evoked redox responses are distinct in somatic and synaptic neuronal compartments and show different sensitivity to changes in pO2. We conclude that the threshold of interstitial pO2 for robust CA3 network activities and required mitochondrial function is clearly above the "critical" value, which causes spreading depression as a result of generalized energy failure. Our study highlights the importance of a functional understanding of mitochondria and their implications on activities of individual neurons and neuronal networks.

  2. Representation of cognitive reappraisal goals in frontal gamma oscillations.

    Kang, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Ji Woon; Kim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Sang Hee; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2014-01-01

    Recently, numerous efforts have been made to understand the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive regulation of emotion, such as cognitive reappraisal. Many studies have reported that cognitive control of emotion induces increases in neural activity of the control system, including the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and increases or decreases (depending upon the regulation goal) in neural activity of the appraisal system, including the amygdala and the insula. It has been hypothesized that information about regulation goals needs to be processed through interactions between the control and appraisal systems in order to support cognitive reappraisal. However, how this information is represented in the dynamics of cortical activity remains largely unknown. To address this, we investigated temporal changes in gamma band activity (35-55 Hz) in human electroencephalograms during a cognitive reappraisal task that was comprised of three reappraisal goals: to decease, maintain, or increase emotional responses modulated by affect-laden pictures. We examined how the characteristics of gamma oscillations, such as spectral power and large-scale phase synchronization, represented cognitive reappraisal goals. We found that left frontal gamma power decreased, was sustained, or increased when the participants suppressed, maintained, or amplified their emotions, respectively. This change in left frontal gamma power appeared during an interval of 1926 to 2453 ms after stimulus onset. We also found that the number of phase-synchronized pairs of gamma oscillations over the entire brain increased when participants regulated their emotions compared to when they maintained their emotions. These results suggest that left frontal gamma power may reflect cortical representation of emotional states modulated by cognitive reappraisal goals and gamma phase synchronization across whole brain regions may reflect emotional regulatory efforts to achieve these goals

  3. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer’s disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs’ therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  4. Hippocampal deletion of BDNF gene attenuates gamma oscillations in area CA1 by up-regulating 5-HT3 receptor.

    Ying Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal area CA3 express high levels of BDNF, but how this BDNF contributes to oscillatory properties of hippocampus is unknown.Here we examined carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in hippocampal slices lacking BDNF gene in the area CA3. The power of oscillations was reduced in the hippocampal area CA1, which coincided with increases in the expression and activity of 5-HT3 receptor. Pharmacological block of this receptor partially restored power of gamma oscillations in slices from KO mice, but had no effect in slices from WT mice.These data suggest that BDNF facilitates gamma oscillations in the hippocampus by attenuating signaling through 5-HT3 receptor. Thus, BDNF modulates hippocampal oscillations through serotonergic system.

  5. Tinnitus intensity dependent gamma oscillations of the contralateral auditory cortex.

    Elsa van der Loo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-pulsatile tinnitus is considered a subjective auditory phantom phenomenon present in 10 to 15% of the population. Tinnitus as a phantom phenomenon is related to hyperactivity and reorganization of the auditory cortex. Magnetoencephalography studies demonstrate a correlation between gamma band activity in the contralateral auditory cortex and the presence of tinnitus. The present study aims to investigate the relation between objective gamma-band activity in the contralateral auditory cortex and subjective tinnitus loudness scores. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In unilateral tinnitus patients (N = 15; 10 right, 5 left source analysis of resting state electroencephalographic gamma band oscillations shows a strong positive correlation with Visual Analogue Scale loudness scores in the contralateral auditory cortex (max r = 0.73, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Auditory phantom percepts thus show similar sound level dependent activation of the contralateral auditory cortex as observed in normal audition. In view of recent consciousness models and tinnitus network models these results suggest tinnitus loudness is coded by gamma band activity in the contralateral auditory cortex but might not, by itself, be responsible for tinnitus perception.

  6. From perception to action: phase-locked gamma oscillations correlate with reaction times in a speeded response task

    Körner Ursula

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phase-locked gamma oscillations have so far mainly been described in relation to perceptual processes such as sensation, attention or memory matching. Due to its very short latency (≈90 ms such oscillations are a plausible candidate for very rapid integration of sensory and motor processes. Results We measured EEG in 13 healthy participants in a speeded reaction task. Participants had to press a button as fast as possible whenever a visual stimulus was presented. The stimulus was always identical and did not have to be discriminated from other possible stimuli. In trials in which the participants showed a fast response, a slow negative potential over central electrodes starting approximately 800 ms before the response and highly phase-locked gamma oscillations over central and posterior electrodes between 90 and 140 ms after the stimulus were observed. In trials in which the participants showed a slow response, no slow negative potential was observed and phase-locked gamma oscillations were significantly reduced. Furthermore, for slow response trials the phase-locked gamma oscillations were significantly delayed with respect to fast response trials. Conclusion These results indicate the relevance of phase-locked gamma oscillations for very fast (not necessarily detailed integration processes.

  7. Frequency of gamma oscillations in humans is modulated by velocity of visual motion

    Butorina, Anna V.; Sysoeva, Olga V.; Prokofyev, Andrey O.; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Yu.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are generated in networks of inhibitory fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons and pyramidal cells. In animals, gamma frequency is modulated by the velocity of visual motion; the effect of velocity has not been evaluated in humans. In this work, we have studied velocity-related modulations of gamma frequency in children using MEG/EEG. We also investigated whether such modulations predict the prominence of the “spatial suppression” effect (Tadin D, Lappin JS, Gilroy LA, Blake R. Nature 424: 312-315, 2003) that is thought to depend on cortical center-surround inhibitory mechanisms. MEG/EEG was recorded in 27 normal boys aged 8–15 yr while they watched high-contrast black-and-white annular gratings drifting with velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0°/s and performed a simple detection task. The spatial suppression effect was assessed in a separate psychophysical experiment. MEG gamma oscillation frequency increased while power decreased with increasing velocity of visual motion. In EEG, the effects were less reliable. The frequencies of the velocity-specific gamma peaks were 64.9, 74.8, and 87.1 Hz for the slow, medium, and fast motions, respectively. The frequency of the gamma response elicited during slow and medium velocity of visual motion decreased with subject age, whereas the range of gamma frequency modulation by velocity increased with age. The frequency modulation range predicted spatial suppression even after controlling for the effect of age. We suggest that the modulation of the MEG gamma frequency by velocity of visual motion reflects excitability of cortical inhibitory circuits and can be used to investigate their normal and pathological development in the human brain. PMID:25925324

  8. High-frequency plasma oscillations

    Akhiezer, A I; Fainberg, Y B; Sitenko, A G; Stepanov, K; Kurilko, V; Gorbatenko, M; Kirochkin, U [Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR (USSR)

    1958-07-01

    It is well known that the electrical conductivity of a plasma, the ion-electron equilibration time, and the time required to heat the electron component of the plasma all increase greatly with increasing temperature. Consequently, the usual method of Joule heating a plasma may be difficult to apply in the region of high temperatures (> 10{sup 6}K), especially if the plasma current alone, without any additional measures, is used to generate magnetic fields for the confinement of the plasma. Therefore, it is of interest to study methods of plasma heating that do not directly use Joule heat, especially methods by which energy is directly supplied to the ion component during the time between collisions. Some of these methods make use of ionic resonance as well as other resonance phenomena which can occur in plasma in an external magnetic field. This paper deals with certain aspects of the theory of high-frequency plasma oscillations.

  9. Endogenously generated gamma-band oscillations in early visual cortex: A neurofeedback study.

    Merkel, Nina; Wibral, Michael; Bland, Gareth; Singer, Wolf

    2018-04-26

    Human subjects were trained with neurofeedback (NFB) to enhance the power of narrow-band gamma oscillations in circumscribed regions of early visual cortex. To select the region and the oscillation frequency for NFB training, gamma oscillations were induced with locally presented drifting gratings. The source and frequency of these induced oscillations were determined using beamforming methods. During NFB training the power of narrow band gamma oscillations was continuously extracted from this source with online beamforming and converted into the pitch of a tone signal. We found that seven out of ten subjects were able to selectively increase the amplitude of gamma oscillations in the absence of visual stimulation. One subject however failed completely and two subjects succeeded to manipulate the feedback signal by contraction of muscles. In all subjects the attempts to enhance visual gamma oscillations were associated with an increase of beta oscillations over precentral/frontal regions. Only successful subjects exhibited an additional marked increase of theta oscillations over precentral/prefrontal and temporal regions whereas unsuccessful subjects showed an increase of alpha band oscillations over occipital regions. We argue that spatially confined networks in early visual cortex can be entrained to engage in narrow band gamma oscillations not only by visual stimuli but also by top down signals. We interpret the concomitant increase in beta oscillations as indication for an engagement of the fronto-parietal attention network and the increase of theta oscillations as a correlate of imagery. Our finding support the application of NFB in disease conditions associated with impaired gamma synchronization. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Acupuncture analgesia involves modulation of pain-induced gamma oscillations and cortical network connectivity.

    Hauck, Michael; Schröder, Sven; Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Lorenz, Jürgen; Friedrichs, Sunja; Nolte, Guido; Gerloff, Christian; Engel, Andreas K

    2017-11-24

    Recent studies support the view that cortical sensory, limbic and executive networks and the autonomic nervous system might interact in distinct manners under the influence of acupuncture to modulate pain. We performed a double-blind crossover design study to investigate subjective ratings, EEG and ECG following experimental laser pain under the influence of sham and verum acupuncture in 26 healthy volunteers. We analyzed neuronal oscillations and inter-regional coherence in the gamma band of 128-channel-EEG recordings as well as heart rate variability (HRV) on two experimental days. Pain ratings and pain-induced gamma oscillations together with vagally-mediated power in the high-frequency bandwidth (vmHF) of HRV decreased significantly stronger during verum than sham acupuncture. Gamma oscillations were localized in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), mid-cingulate cortex (MCC), primary somatosensory cortex and insula. Reductions of pain ratings and vmHF-power were significantly correlated with increase of connectivity between the insula and MCC. In contrast, connectivity between left and right PFC and between PFC and insula correlated positively with vmHF-power without a relationship to acupuncture analgesia. Overall, these findings highlight the influence of the insula in integrating activity in limbic-saliency networks with vagally mediated homeostatic control to mediate antinociception under the influence of acupuncture.

  11. Selective population rate coding: a possible computational role of gamma oscillations in selective attention.

    Masuda, Naoki

    2009-12-01

    Selective attention is often accompanied by gamma oscillations in local field potentials and spike field coherence in brain areas related to visual, motor, and cognitive information processing. Gamma oscillations are implicated to play an important role in, for example, visual tasks including object search, shape perception, and speed detection. However, the mechanism by which gamma oscillations enhance cognitive and behavioral performance of attentive subjects is still elusive. Using feedforward fan-in networks composed of spiking neurons, we examine a possible role for gamma oscillations in selective attention and population rate coding of external stimuli. We implement the concept proposed by Fries ( 2005 ) that under dynamic stimuli, neural populations effectively communicate with each other only when there is a good phase relationship among associated gamma oscillations. We show that the downstream neural population selects a specific dynamic stimulus received by an upstream population and represents it by population rate coding. The encoded stimulus is the one for which gamma rhythm in the corresponding upstream population is resonant with the downstream gamma rhythm. The proposed role for gamma oscillations in stimulus selection is to enable top-down control, a neural version of time division multiple access used in communication engineering.

  12. Gamma Oscillations and Neural Field DCMs Can Reveal Cortical Excitability and Microstructure

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how gamma oscillations can be combined with neural population models and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical excitability and microstructure. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. Neural field models are used to evaluate model evidence and obtain parameter estimates using invasive and non-invasive gamma recordings. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. We focus on model predictions of conductance and convolution based field models and show that these can yield spectral responses that are sensitive to biophysical properties of local cortical circuits like synaptic kinetics and filtering; we also consider two different mechanisms for this filtering: a nonlinear mechanism involving specific conductances and a linear convolution of afferent firing rates producing post synaptic potentials. In the second part of this paper, we use neural fields quantitatively—to fit empirical data recorded during visual stimulation. We present two studies of spectral responses obtained from the visual cortex during visual perception experiments: in the first study, MEG data were acquired during a task designed to show how activity in the gamma band is related to visual perception, while in the second study, we exploited high density electrocorticographic (ECoG data to study the effect of varying stimulus contrast on cortical excitability and gamma peak frequency.

  13. Increased power of resting-state gamma oscillations in autism spectrum disorder detected by routine electroencephalography

    van Diessen, Eric; Senders, Joeky; Jansen, Floor E.; Boersma, Maria; Bruining, Hilgo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest that increased resting-state power of gamma oscillations is associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To extend the clinical applicability of this finding, we retrospectively investigated routine electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of 19 patients with ASD and

  14. Formation of visual memories controlled by gamma power phase-locked to alpha oscillations

    Park, Hyojin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Hahm, Jarang; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Jiang, Haiteng; Gross, Joachim; Jensen, Ole

    2016-06-01

    Neuronal oscillations provide a window for understanding the brain dynamics that organize the flow of information from sensory to memory areas. While it has been suggested that gamma power reflects feedforward processing and alpha oscillations feedback control, it remains unknown how these oscillations dynamically interact. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data was acquired from healthy subjects who were cued to either remember or not remember presented pictures. Our analysis revealed that in anticipation of a picture to be remembered, alpha power decreased while the cross-frequency coupling between gamma power and alpha phase increased. A measure of directionality between alpha phase and gamma power predicted individual ability to encode memory: stronger control of alpha phase over gamma power was associated with better memory. These findings demonstrate that encoding of visual information is reflected by a state determined by the interaction between alpha and gamma activity.

  15. Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing within recurrent attractor networks

    Solanka, Lukas; van Rossum, Mark CW; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-01-01

    Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. We show that moderate intrinsic noise massively increases the range of synaptic strengths supporting gamma oscillations and grid computation. With moderate noise, variation in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic strength tunes the amplitude and frequency of gamma activity without disrupting grid firing. This beneficial role for noise results from disruption of epileptic-like network states. Thus, moderate noise promotes independent control of multiplexed firing rate- and gamma-based computational mechanisms. Our results have implications for tuning of normal circuit function and for disorders associated with changes in gamma oscillations and synaptic strength. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06444.001 PMID:26146940

  16. Altered modulation of gamma oscillation frequency by speed of visual motion in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Stroganova, Tatiana A; Butorina, Anna V; Sysoeva, Olga V; Prokofyev, Andrey O; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Yu; Tsetlin, Marina M; Orekhova, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies link autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with an altered balance between excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in cortical networks. The brain oscillations in high gamma-band (50-120 Hz) are sensitive to the E/I balance and may appear useful biomarkers of certain ASD subtypes. The frequency of gamma oscillations is mediated by level of excitation of the fast-spiking inhibitory basket cells recruited by increasing strength of excitatory input. Therefore, the experimental manipulations affecting gamma frequency may throw light on inhibitory networks dysfunction in ASD. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate modulation of visual gamma oscillation frequency by speed of drifting annular gratings (1.2, 3.6, 6.0 °/s) in 21 boys with ASD and 26 typically developing boys aged 7-15 years. Multitaper method was used for analysis of spectra of gamma power change upon stimulus presentation and permutation test was applied for statistical comparisons. We also assessed in our participants visual orientation discrimination thresholds, which are thought to depend on excitability of inhibitory networks in the visual cortex. Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD. The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants. Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

  17. High power RF oscillator with Marx generators

    Murase, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Izumi

    1980-01-01

    A method to maintain RF oscillation by using many Marx generators was proposed and studied experimentally. Many charging circuits were connected to an oscillator circuit, and successive pulsed charging was made. This successive charging amplified and maintained the RF oscillation. The use of vacuum gaps and high power silicon diodes improved the characteristics of RF current cut-off of the circuit. The efficiency of the pulsed charging from Marx generators to a condenser was theoretically investigated. The theoretical result showed the maximum efficiency of 0.98. The practical efficiency obtained by using a proposed circuit with a high power oscillator was in the range 0.50 to 0.56. The obtained effective output power of the RF pulses was 11 MW. The maximum holding time of the RF pulses was about 21 microsecond. (Kato, T.)

  18. The Coupling between Gamma and Theta Oscillation and Visuotactile Integration Process

    Noriaki Kanayama

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some researches revealed the relationship between multisensory integration and EEG oscillations. Previous studies revealed that the visuotactile integration process could be explained by gamma and theta band oscillation. In addition, recent studies have showed the possibility that a coupling between oscillations at the different frequency bands plays an important role on the multisensory integration system. This study aimed to investigate whether the gamma and theta oscillations show the coupling during the visuotactile integration. Using congruency effect paradigm only for left hand, we measured scalp EEG during simultaneous presentation of “spatially congruent” or “spatially incongruent” visuotactile stimuli. In Experiment 1, the proportion of the spatially congruent trials (80% vs 20% was changed across the experimental blocks. The results showed that the relationship between gamma power and theta phase at the parietal area was modulated by the proportion. In Experiment 2, the saliency of the vibration stimulus (0dB vs −20dB was changed across trials. The results showed that the relationship between gamma power and theta phase was immune to the saliency. These results suggest that multisensory integration process has a plasticity, which is modulated by the proportion of congruent trial, and the process could be explained by the coupling between gamma/theta oscillations.

  19. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  20. Gamma oscillation maintains stimulus structure-dependent synchronization in cat visual cortex.

    Samonds, Jason M; Bonds, A B

    2005-01-01

    Visual cortical cells demonstrate both oscillation and synchronization, although the underlying causes and functional significance of these behaviors remain uncertain. We simultaneously recorded single-unit activity with microelectrode arrays in supragranular layers of area 17 of cats paralyzed and anesthetized with propofol and N(2)O. Rate-normalized autocorrelograms of 24 cells reveal bursting (100%) and gamma oscillation (63%). Renewal density analysis, used to explore the source of oscillation, suggests a contribution from extrinsic influences such as feedback. However, a bursting refractory period, presumably membrane-based, could also encourage oscillatory firing. When we investigated the source of synchronization for 60 cell pairs we found only moderate correlation of synchrony with bursts and oscillation. We did, nonetheless, discover a possible functional role for oscillation. In all cases of cross-correlograms that exhibited oscillation, the strength of the synchrony was maintained throughout the stimulation period. When no oscillation was apparent, 75% of the cell pairs showed decay in their synchronization. The synchrony between cells is strongly dependent on similar response onset latencies. We therefore propose that structured input, which yields tight organization of latency, is a more likely candidate for the source of synchronization than oscillation. The reliable synchrony at response onset could be driven by spatial and temporal correlation of the stimulus that is preserved through the earlier stages of the visual system. Oscillation then contributes to maintenance of the synchrony to enhance reliable transmission of the information for higher cognitive processing.

  1. Histamine Enhances Theta-Coupled Spiking and Gamma Oscillations in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex Consistent With Successful Spatial Recognition.

    Chen, Quanhui; Luo, Fenlan; Yue, Faguo; Xia, Jianxia; Xiao, Qin; Liao, Xiang; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Bo; Gao, Dong; He, Chao; Hu, Zhian

    2017-06-07

    Encoding of spatial information in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (sMEC) involves theta-modulated spiking and gamma oscillations, as well as spatially tuned grid cells and border cells. Little is known about the role of the arousal-promoting histaminergic system in the modification of information encoded in the sMEC in vivo, and how such histamine-regulated information correlates with behavioral functions. Here, we show that histamine upregulates the neural excitability of a significant proportion of neurons (16.32%, 39.18%, and 52.94% at 30 μM, 300 μM, and 3 mM, respectively) and increases local theta (4-12 Hz) and gamma power (low: 25-48 Hz; high: 60-120 Hz) in the sMEC, through activation of histamine receptor types 1 and 3. During spatial exploration, the strength of theta-modulated firing of putative principal neurons and high gamma oscillations is enhanced about 2-fold by histamine. The histamine-mediated increase of theta phase-locking of spikes and high gamma power is consistent with successful spatial recognition. These results, for the first time, reveal possible mechanisms involving the arousal-promoting histaminergic system in the modulation of spatial cognition. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    Martinez C, T.; Galvan G, A.; Canizal, G.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  3. Reduced Gamma Oscillations in a Mouse Model of Intellectual Disability: A Role for Impaired Repetitive Neurotransmission?

    Powell, A. D.; Saintot, P.P.; Gill, K. K.; Bharathan, A.; Buck, S.C.; Morris, G.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2014), e95871 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : intellectual disability * gamma oscillations * synaptopathy * X-linked mental retardation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  4. Frontal eye fields control attentional modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations in contralateral occipitoparietal cortex

    Marshall, T.R.; O'Shea, J.; Jensen, O.; Bergmann, T.O.

    2015-01-01

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8-12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted

  5. Occipital Alpha and Gamma Oscillations Support Complementary Mechanisms for Processing Stimulus Value Associations

    Marshall, T.R.; Boer, Sebastiaan den; Cools, R.; Jensen, O.; Fallon, S.J.; Zumer, J.

    2018-01-01

    Selective attention is reflected neurally in changes in the power of posterior neural oscillations in the alpha (8–12 Hz) and gamma (40–100 Hz) bands. Although a neural mechanism that allows relevant information to be selectively processed has its advantages, it may lead to lucrative or dangerous

  6. Occipital Alpha and Gamma Oscillations Support Complementary Mechanisms for Processing Stimulus Value Associations.

    Marshall, Tom R; den Boer, Sebastiaan; Cools, Roshan; Jensen, Ole; Fallon, Sean James; Zumer, Johanna M

    2018-01-01

    Selective attention is reflected neurally in changes in the power of posterior neural oscillations in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and gamma (40-100 Hz) bands. Although a neural mechanism that allows relevant information to be selectively processed has its advantages, it may lead to lucrative or dangerous information going unnoticed. Neural systems are also in place for processing rewarding and punishing information. Here, we examine the interaction between selective attention (left vs. right) and stimulus's learned value associations (neutral, punished, or rewarded) and how they compete for control of posterior neural oscillations. We found that both attention and stimulus-value associations influenced neural oscillations. Whereas selective attention had comparable effects on alpha and gamma oscillations, value associations had dissociable effects on these neural markers of attention. Salient targets (associated with positive and negative outcomes) hijacked changes in alpha power-increasing hemispheric alpha lateralization when salient targets were attended, decreasing it when they were being ignored. In contrast, hemispheric gamma-band lateralization was specifically abolished by negative distractors. Source analysis indicated occipital generators of both attentional and value effects. Thus, posterior cortical oscillations support both the ability to selectively attend while at the same time retaining the ability to remain sensitive to valuable features in the environment. Moreover, the versatility of our attentional system to respond separately to salient from merely positively valued stimuli appears to be carried out by separate neural processes reflected in different frequency bands.

  7. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS.

  8. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake–sleep cycle

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E.; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake–sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  9. Gamma oscillations distinguish mere exposure from other likability effects.

    Kongthong, Nutchakan; Minami, Tetsuto; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2014-02-01

    Repeated exposure to neutral stimuli enhances liking for those, which is called mere exposure effect (MEE) (Zajonc, 1968). Its behavioral effects have been extensively investigated. However, the mechanism by which it is generated remains unclear. To elucidate the neural mechanism of the MEE, we recorded electroencephalograms while subjects indicated their preferences for face stimuli with and without MEE induction. According to behavioral data, participants were divided into two groups, one with, and one without MEE tendency. In participants with an MEE tendency, gamma activity (40-60 [Hz]) in the parieto-occipital area was significantly weaker for exposed faces than unexposed ones, indicating a repetition-suppression effect. Gamma activity from sites exhibiting peak repetition-suppression effects was significantly weaker in theoretically genuine MEE trials than non-MEE trials, indicating that emotion processing might influence the MEE. These results suggest that existing theories regarding mechanisms underlying the MEE, namely, fluency misattribution and apprehensiveness reduction might not be mutually exclusive. Moreover, gamma activity might be a potential indicator to distinguish the MEE from other likability effects, at least in the case of human face stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GABAergic modulation of visual gamma and alpha oscillations and its consequences for working memory performance.

    Lozano-Soldevilla, Diego; ter Huurne, Niels; Cools, Roshan; Jensen, Ole

    2014-12-15

    Impressive in vitro research in rodents and computational modeling has uncovered the core mechanisms responsible for generating neuronal oscillations. In particular, GABAergic interneurons play a crucial role for synchronizing neural populations. Do these mechanistic principles apply to human oscillations associated with function? To address this, we recorded ongoing brain activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy human subjects participating in a double-blind pharmacological study receiving placebo, 0.5 mg and 1.5 mg of lorazepam (LZP; a benzodiazepine upregulating GABAergic conductance). Participants performed a demanding visuospatial working memory (WM) task. We found that occipital gamma power associated with WM recognition increased with LZP dosage. Importantly, the frequency of the gamma activity decreased with dosage, as predicted by models derived from the rat hippocampus. A regionally specific gamma increase correlated with the drug-related performance decrease. Despite the system-wide pharmacological intervention, gamma power drug modulations were specific to visual cortex: sensorimotor gamma power and frequency during button presses remained unaffected. In contrast, occipital alpha power modulations during the delay interval decreased parametrically with drug dosage, predicting performance impairment. Consistent with alpha oscillations reflecting functional inhibition, LZP affected alpha power strongly in early visual regions not required for the task demonstrating a regional specific occipital impairment. GABAergic interneurons are strongly implicated in the generation of gamma and alpha oscillations in human occipital cortex where drug-induced power modulations predicted WM performance. Our findings bring us an important step closer to linking neuronal dynamics to behavior by embracing established animal models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Beta, but not gamma, band oscillations index visual form-motion integration.

    Charles Aissani

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological oscillations in different frequency bands co-occur with perceptual, motor and cognitive processes but their function and respective contributions to these processes need further investigations. Here, we recorded MEG signals and seek for percept related modulations of alpha, beta and gamma band activity during a perceptual form/motion integration task. Participants reported their bound or unbound perception of ambiguously moving displays that could either be seen as a whole square-like shape moving along a Lissajou's figure (bound percept or as pairs of bars oscillating independently along cardinal axes (unbound percept. We found that beta (15-25 Hz, but not gamma (55-85 Hz oscillations, index perceptual states at the individual and group level. The gamma band activity found in the occipital lobe, although significantly higher during visual stimulation than during base line, is similar in all perceptual states. Similarly, decreased alpha activity during visual stimulation is not different for the different percepts. Trial-by-trial classification of perceptual reports based on beta band oscillations was significant in most observers, further supporting the view that modulation of beta power reliably index perceptual integration of form/motion stimuli, even at the individual level.

  12. Do cortical gamma oscillations promote or suppress perception? An under-asked question with an over-assumed answer

    William eSedley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gamma oscillations occur alongside perceptual processes, and in proportion to perceptual salience. They have a number of properties that make them ideal candidates to explain perception, including incorporating synchronised discharges of neural assemblies, and their emergence over a fast timescale consistent with that of perception. These observations have led to widespread assumptions that gamma oscillations’ role is to cause or facilitate conscious perception (i.e. a ‘positive’ role. While the majority of the human literature on gamma oscillations is consistent with this interpretation, many or most of these studies could equally be interpreted as showing a suppressive or inhibitory (i.e. ‘negative’ role. For example, presenting a stimulus and recording a response of increased gamma oscillations would only suggest a role for gamma oscillations in the representation of that stimulus, and would not specify what that role were. For instance, if gamma oscillations were inhibitory, then they would become selectively activated in response to the stimulus they acted to inhibit.In this review, we consider two classes of gamma oscillations: broadband and narrowband, which have very different properties (and likely roles. We first discuss studies on gamma oscillations that are non-discriminatory, with respect to the role of gamma oscillations, followed by studies that specifically support specifically a positive or negative role. These include work on perception in healthy individuals, and in the pathological contexts of phantom perception and epilepsy. Reference is based as much as possible on magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG studies, but we also consider evidence from invasive recordings in humans and other animals. Attempts are made to reconcile findings within a common framework. We conclude with a summary of the pertinent questions that remain unanswered, and suggest how future studies might address

  13. Gamma and Beta Oscillations in Human MEG Encode the Contents of Vibrotactile Working Memory

    Alexander H. von Lautz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence suggests that oscillations in the beta band represent quantitative information about somatosensory features during stimulus retention. Visual and auditory working memory (WM research, on the other hand, has indicated a predominant role of gamma oscillations for active WM processing. Here we reconciled these findings by recording whole-head magnetoencephalography during a vibrotactile frequency comparison task. A Braille stimulator presented healthy subjects with a vibration to the left fingertip that was retained in WM for comparison with a second stimulus presented after a short delay. During this retention interval spectral power in the beta band from the right intraparietal sulcus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG monotonically increased with the to-be-remembered vibrotactile frequency. In contrast, induced gamma power showed the inverse of this pattern and decreased with higher stimulus frequency in the right IFG. Together, these results expand the previously established role of beta oscillations for somatosensory WM to the gamma band and give further evidence that quantitative information may be processed in a fronto-parietal network.

  14. Synchronisation hubs in the visual cortex may arise from strong rhythmic inhibition during gamma oscillations.

    Folias, Stefanos E; Yu, Shan; Snyder, Abigail; Nikolić, Danko; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2013-09-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex exhibit heterogeneity in feature selectivity and the tendency to generate action potentials synchronously with other nearby neurons. By examining visual responses from cat area 17 we found that, during gamma oscillations, there was a positive correlation between each unit's sharpness of orientation tuning, strength of oscillations, and propensity towards synchronisation with other units. Using a computational model, we demonstrated that heterogeneity in the strength of rhythmic inhibitory inputs can account for the correlations between these three properties. Neurons subject to strong inhibition tend to oscillate strongly in response to both optimal and suboptimal stimuli and synchronise promiscuously with other neurons, even if they have different orientation preferences. Moreover, these strongly inhibited neurons can exhibit sharp orientation selectivity provided that the inhibition they receive is broadly tuned relative to their excitatory inputs. These results predict that the strength and orientation tuning of synaptic inhibition are heterogeneous across area 17 neurons, which could have important implications for these neurons' sensory processing capabilities. Furthermore, although our experimental recordings were conducted in the visual cortex, our model and simulation results can apply more generally to any brain region with analogous neuron types in which heterogeneity in the strength of rhythmic inhibition can arise during gamma oscillations. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. High power green lasers for gamma source

    Durand, Magali; Sevillano, Pierre; Alexaline, Olivier; Sangla, Damien; Casanova, Alexis; Aubourg, Adrien; Saci, Abdelhak; Courjaud, Antoine

    2018-02-01

    A high intensity Gamma source is required for Nuclear Spectroscopy, it will be delivered by the interaction between accelerated electron and intense laser beams. Those two interactions lasers are based on a multi-stage amplification scheme that ended with a second harmonics generation to deliver 200 mJ, 5 ps pulses at 515 nm and 100 Hz. A t-Pulse oscillator with slow and fast feedback loop implemented inside the oscillator cavity allows the possibility of synchronization to an optical reference. A temporal jitter of 120 fs rms is achieved, integrated from 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Then a regenerative amplifier, based on Yb:YAG technology, pumped by fiber-coupled QCW laser diodes, delivers pulses up to 30 mJ. The 1 nm bandwidth was compressed to 1.5 ps with a good spatial quality: M2 of 1.1. This amplifier is integrated in a compact sealed housing (750 x 500 x 150 mm), which allows a pulse-pulse stability of 0.1 % rms, and a long-term stability of 1,9 % over 100 hours (with +/-1°C environment). The main amplification stage uses a cryocooled Yb:YAG crystal in an active mirror configuration. The crystal is cooled at 130 K via a compact and low-vibration cryocooler, avoiding any additional phase noise contribution, 340 mJ in a six pass scheme was achieved, with 0.9 of Strehl ratio. The trade off to the gain of a cryogenic amplifier is the bandwidth reduction, however the 1030 nm pulse was compressed to 4.4 ps. As for the regenerative amplifier a long-term stability of 1.9 % over 30 hours was achieved in an environment with +/-1°C temperature fluctuations The compression and Second Harmonics Generation Stages have allowed the conversion of 150 mJ of uncompressed infrared beam into 60 mJ at 515 nm.

  16. High frequency oscillations in brain hemodynamic response

    Akin, Ata; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2007-07-01

    Tight autoregulation of vessel tone guarantees proper delivery of nutrients to the tissues. This regulation is maintained at a more delicate level in the brain since any decrease in the supply of glucose and oxygen to neuronal tissues might lead to unrecoverable injury. Functional near infrared spectroscopy has been proposed as a new tool to monitor the cerebrovascular response during cognitive activity. We have observed that during a Stroop task three distinct oscillatory patterns govern the control of the cerebrovascular reactivity: very low frequency (0.02-0.05 Hz), low frequency (0.08-0.12 Hz) and high frequency (0.12-0.18 Hz). High frequency oscillations have been shown to be related to stress level of the subjects. Our findings indicate that as the stress level is increased so does the energy of the high frequency component indicating a higher stimulation from the autonomic nervous system.

  17. Oscillating thermionic conversion for high-density space power

    Jacobson, D.L.; Morris, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The compactness, maneuverability, and productive weight utilization of space nuclear reactors benefit from the use of thermionic converters at high temperature. Nuclear-thermionic-conversion power requirements are discussed, and the role of oscillations in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) history is examined. Proposed TEC oscillations are addressed, and the results of recent studies of TEC oscillations are reviewed. The possible use of high-frequency TEC oscillations to amplify low-frequency ones is considered. The accomplishments of various programs studying the use of high-temperature thermionic oscillators are examined. 16 references

  18. Dopamine D4 receptor activation increases hippocampal gamma oscillations by enhancing synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons.

    Richard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gamma oscillations are electric activity patterns of the mammalian brain hypothesized to serve attention, sensory perception, working memory and memory encoding. They are disrupted or altered in schizophrenic patients with associated cognitive deficits, which persist in spite of treatment with antipsychotics. Because cognitive symptoms are a core feature of schizophrenia it is relevant to explore signaling pathways that potentially regulate gamma oscillations. Dopamine has been reported to decrease gamma oscillation power via D1-like receptors. Based on the expression pattern of D4 receptors (D4R in hippocampus, and pharmacological effects of D4R ligands in animals, we hypothesize that they are in a position to regulate gamma oscillations as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this hypothesis we use rat hippocampal slices and kainate-induced gamma oscillations. Local field potential recordings as well as intracellular recordings of pyramidal cells, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking interneurons were carried out. We show that D4R activation with the selective ligand PD168077 increases gamma oscillation power, which can be blocked by the D4R-specific antagonist L745,870 as well as by the antipsychotic drug Clozapine. Pyramidal cells did not exhibit changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic current amplitudes, but inhibitory currents became more coherent with the oscillations after application of PD168077. Fast-spiking, but not non-fast spiking, interneurons, increase their action potential phase-coupling and coherence with regard to ongoing gamma oscillations in response to D4R activation. Among several possible mechanisms we found that the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 also blocks the D4R mediated increase in gamma oscillation power. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that D4R activation affects fast-spiking interneuron synchronization and thereby increases gamma power by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. This

  19. Spontaneous high-frequency (10-80 Hz) oscillations during up states in the cerebral cortex in vitro.

    Compte, Albert; Reig, Ramon; Descalzo, Vanessa F; Harvey, Michael A; Puccini, Gabriel D; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2008-12-17

    High-frequency oscillations in cortical networks have been linked to a variety of cognitive and perceptual processes. They have also been recorded in small cortical slices in vitro, indicating that neuronal synchronization at these frequencies is generated in the local cortical circuit. However, in vitro experiments have hitherto necessitated exogenous pharmacological or electrical stimulation to generate robust synchronized activity in the beta/gamma range. Here, we demonstrate that the isolated cortical microcircuitry generates beta and gamma oscillations spontaneously in the absence of externally applied neuromodulators or synaptic agonists. We show this in a spontaneously active slice preparation that engages in slow oscillatory activity similar to activity during slow-wave sleep. beta and gamma synchronization appeared during the up states of the slow oscillation. Simultaneous intracellular and extracellular recordings revealed synchronization between the timing of incoming synaptic events and population activity. This rhythm was mechanistically similar to pharmacologically induced gamma rhythms, as it also included sparse, irregular firing of neurons within the population oscillation, predominant involvement of inhibitory neurons, and a decrease of oscillation frequency after barbiturate application. Finally, we show in a computer model how a synaptic loop between excitatory and inhibitory neurons can explain the emergence of both the slow (network. We therefore conclude that oscillations in the beta/gamma range that share mechanisms with activity reported in vivo or in pharmacologically activated in vitro preparations can be generated during slow oscillatory activity in the local cortical circuit, even without exogenous pharmacological or electrical stimulation.

  20. Fast gamma oscillations are generated intrinsically in CA1 without the involvement of fast-spiking basket cells.

    Craig, Michael T; McBain, Chris J

    2015-02-25

    Information processing in neuronal networks relies on the precise synchronization of ensembles of neurons, coordinated by the diverse family of inhibitory interneurons. Cortical interneurons can be usefully parsed by embryonic origin, with the vast majority arising from either the caudal or medial ganglionic eminences (CGE and MGE). Here, we examine the activity of hippocampal interneurons during gamma oscillations in mouse CA1, using an in vitro model where brief epochs of rhythmic activity were evoked by local application of kainate. We found that this CA1 KA-evoked gamma oscillation was faster than that in CA3 and, crucially, did not appear to require the involvement of fast-spiking basket cells. In contrast to CA3, we also found that optogenetic inhibition of pyramidal cells in CA1 did not significantly affect the power of the oscillation, suggesting that excitation may not be essential for gamma genesis in this region. We found that MGE-derived interneurons were generally more active than CGE interneurons during CA1 gamma, although a group of CGE-derived interneurons, putative trilaminar cells, were strongly phase-locked with gamma oscillations and, together with MGE-derived axo-axonic and bistratified cells, provide attractive candidates for being the driver of this locally generated, predominantly interneuron-driven model of gamma oscillations. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353616-09$15.00/0.

  1. Ih tunes theta/gamma oscillations and cross-frequency coupling in an in silico CA3 model.

    Samuel A Neymotin

    Full Text Available Ih channels are uniquely positioned to act as neuromodulatory control points for tuning hippocampal theta (4-12 Hz and gamma (25 Hz oscillations, oscillations which are thought to have importance for organization of information flow. contributes to neuronal membrane resonance and resting membrane potential, and is modulated by second messengers. We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells, contained type-appropriate isoforms of . Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via 's ability to set pyramidal excitability. Our model predicts that in vivo neuromodulatory control of allows flexibly controlling CFC and the timing of gamma discharges at particular theta phases.

  2. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit I: Theory

    Toutounji, Mohamad, E-mail: Mtoutounji@uaeu.ac.ae

    2017-02-15

    In an earlier work of the author the time evolution of Morse oscillator was studied analytically and exactly at low temperatures whereupon optical correlation functions were calculated using Morse oscillator coherent states were employed. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit is derived and a closed form of its corresponding canonical partition function is obtained. Both diagonal and off-diagonal forms of Morse oscillator propagator are derived in the high temperature limit. Partition functions of diatomic molecules are calculated. - Highlights: • Derives the quantum propagator of Morse oscillator in the high temperature limit. • Uses the resulting diagonal propagator to derive a closed form of Morse oscillator partition function. • Provides a more sophisticated formula of the quantum propagator to test the accuracy of the herein results.

  3. High activity gamma irradiators developed in Hungary

    Stenger, V.

    1997-01-01

    The development of high activity Gamma irradiators began in Hungary already in the early years of 60s. The very first designs were serving research in irradiation chemistry, radiation physics, food and agricultural research, radiation sterilization, plastic radiation chemistry, radiobiology, cancer therapy, personal and high dose dosimetry, following the international trends. Domestic and new international demands forced us to design and construct High Activity Gamma Irradiators: Multipurpose Pilot, Portable and Large scale bulk, Multipurpose Industrial scale types

  4. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  5. Parkinsonian Rest Tremor Is Associated With Modulations of Subthalamic High-Frequency Oscillations.

    Hirschmann, Jan; Butz, Markus; Hartmann, Christian J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Özkurt, Tolga E; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-10-01

    High frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) have been observed in the basal ganglia of PD patients and were shown to be modulated by the administration of levodopa and voluntary movement. The objective of this study was to test whether the power of high-frequency oscillations in the STN is associated with spontaneous manifestation of parkinsonian rest tremor. The electromyogram of both forearms and local field potentials from the STN were recorded in 11 PD patients (10 men, age 58 [9.4] years, disease duration 9.2 [6.3] years). Patients were recorded at rest and while performing repetitive hand movements before and after levodopa intake. High-frequency oscillation power was compared across epochs containing rest tremor, tremor-free rest, or voluntary movement and related to the tremor cycle. We observed prominent slow (200-300 Hz) and fast (300-400 Hz) high-frequency oscillations. The ratio between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power increased when tremor became manifest. This increase was consistent across nuclei (94%) and occurred in medication ON and OFF. The ratio outperformed other potential markers of tremor, such as power at individual tremor frequency, beta power, or low gamma power. For voluntary movement, we did not observe a significant difference when compared with rest or rest tremor. Finally, rhythmic modulations of high-frequency oscillation power occurred within the tremor cycle. Subthalamic high-frequency oscillation power is closely linked to the occurrence of parkinsonian rest tremor. The balance between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power combines information on motor and medication state. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. High-Frequency Network Oscillations in Cerebellar Cortex

    Middleton, Steven J.; Racca, Claudia; Cunningham, Mark O.; Traub, Roger D.; Monyer, Hannah; Knöpfel, Thomas; Schofield, Ian S.; Jenkins, Alistair; Whittington, Miles A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Both cerebellum and neocortex receive input from the somatosensory system. Interaction between these regions has been proposed to underpin the correct selection and execution of motor commands, but it is not clear how such interactions occur. In neocortex, inputs give rise to population rhythms, providing a spatiotemporal coding strategy for inputs and consequent outputs. Here, we show that similar patterns of rhythm generation occur in cerebellum during nicotinic receptor subtype activation. Both gamma oscillations (30–80 Hz) and very fast oscillations (VFOs, 80–160 Hz) were generated by intrinsic cerebellar cortical circuitry in the absence of functional glutamatergic connections. As in neocortex, gamma rhythms were dependent on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition, whereas VFOs required only nonsynaptically connected intercellular networks. The ability of cerebellar cortex to generate population rhythms within the same frequency bands as neocortex suggests that they act as a common spatiotemporal code within which corticocerebellar dialog may occur. PMID:18549787

  7. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  8. Δ9-THC Disrupts Gamma (γ)-Band Neural Oscillations in Humans.

    Cortes-Briones, Jose; Skosnik, Patrick D; Mathalon, Daniel; Cahill, John; Pittman, Brian; Williams, Ashley; Sewell, R Andrew; Ranganathan, Mohini; Roach, Brian; Ford, Judith; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-08-01

    Gamma (γ)-band oscillations play a key role in perception, associative learning, and conscious awareness and have been shown to be disrupted by cannabinoids in animal studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether cannabinoids disrupt γ-oscillations in humans and whether these effects relate to their psychosis-relevant behavioral effects. The acute, dose-related effects of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) were studied in humans (n=20) who completed 3 test days during which they received intravenous Δ(9)-THC (placebo, 0.015, and 0.03 mg/kg) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced design. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded while subjects listened to auditory click trains presented at 20, 30, and 40 Hz. Psychosis-relevant effects were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome scale (PANSS). Δ(9)-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced intertrial coherence (ITC) in the 40 Hz condition compared with 0.015 mg/kg and placebo. No significant effects were detected for 30 and 20 Hz stimulation. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between 40 Hz ITC and PANSS subscales and total scores under the influence of Δ(9)-THC. Δ(9)-THC (0.03 mg/kg) reduced evoked power during 40 Hz stimulation at a trend level. Recent users of cannabis showed blunted Δ(9)-THC effects on ITC and evoked power. We show for the first time in humans that cannabinoids disrupt γ-band neural oscillations. Furthermore, there is a relationship between disruption of γ-band neural oscillations and psychosis-relevant phenomena induced by cannabinoids. These findings add to a growing literature suggesting some overlap between the acute effects of cannabinoids and the behavioral and psychophysiological alterations observed in psychotic disorders.

  9. Chronic ketamine reduces the peak frequency of gamma oscillations in mouse prefrontal cortex ex vivo

    James M. McNally

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in EEG gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30-80 Hz serve as a prominent biomarker of schizophrenia (Sz, associated with positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Chronic, subanesthetic administration of antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR, such as ketamine, elicits behavioral effects and alterations in cortical interneurons similar to those observed in Sz. However, the chronic effects of ketamine on neocortical GBO are poorly understood. Thus, here we examine the effects of chronic (5 daily i.p. injections application of ketamine (5 and 30 mg/kg and the more specific NMDAR antagonist, MK-801 (0.02, 0.5, and 2 mg/kg, on neocortical GBO ex vivo. Oscillations were generated by focal application of the glutamate receptor agonist, kainate, in coronal brain slices containing the prelimbic cortex. This region constitutes the rodent analogue of the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain region strongly implicated in Sz-pathophysiology. Here we report the novel finding that chronic ketamine elicits a reduction in the peak oscillatory frequency of kainate-elicited oscillations (from 47 to 40 Hz at 30 mg/kg. Moreover, the power of GBO in the 40-50 Hz band was reduced. These findings are reminiscent of both the reduced resonance frequency and power of cortical oscillations observed in Sz clinical studies. Surprisingly, MK-801 had no significant effect, suggesting care is needed when equating Sz-like behavioral effects elicited by different NMDAR antagonists to alterations in GBO activity. We conclude that chronic ketamine in the mouse mimics GBO abnormalities observed in Sz patients. Use of this ex vivo slice model may be useful in testing therapeutic compounds which rescue these GBO abnormalities.

  10. The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) and recent results

    Tonchev, A.P. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States)]. E-mail: tonchev@tunl.duke.edu; Boswell, M. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Karwowski, H.J. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and TUNL, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [North Carolina State University and TUNL, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Tornow, W. [Duke University and TUNL, Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 0308 (United States); Wu, Y.K. [Duke University and Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0319 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The high intensity {gamma}-ray source (HI{gamma}S) utilizes intra-cavity backscattering of free electron laser photons from the Duke electron storage ring to produce a unique monoenergetic beam of high-flux {gamma}-rays with high polarization and selectable energy resolution. At present, {gamma}-ray beams with energies from 2 to 58 MeV are available with intensities as high as 10{sup 5}-5 x 10{sup 6} {gamma}/s, energy spreads of 3% or better, and nearly 100% linear polarization. The quality and intensity of the {gamma}-ray beams at HI{gamma}S are responsible for the unprecedented performance of this facility in a broad range of research programs in nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear applications. Recent results from excitation of isomeric states in ({gamma}, n) reactions and parity assignments of dipole states determined via the ({gamma}, {gamma}') reaction are presented.

  11. Locus coeruleus phasic discharge is essential for stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in the prefrontal cortex.

    Neves, Ricardo M; van Keulen, Silvia; Yang, Mingyu; Logothetis, Nikos K; Eschenko, Oxana

    2018-03-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic (NE) neuromodulatory system is critically involved in regulation of neural excitability via its diffuse ascending projections. Tonic NE release in the forebrain is essential for maintenance of vigilant states and increases the signal-to-noise ratio of cortical sensory responses. The impact of phasic NE release on cortical activity and sensory processing is less explored. We previously reported that LC microstimulation caused a transient desynchronization of population activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), similar to noxious somatosensory stimuli. The LC receives nociceptive information from the medulla and therefore may mediate sensory signaling to its forebrain targets. Here we performed extracellular recordings in LC and mPFC while presenting noxious stimuli in urethane-anesthetized rats. A brief train of foot shocks produced a robust phasic response in the LC and a transient change in the mPFC power spectrum, with the strongest modulation in the gamma (30-90 Hz) range. The LC phasic response preceded prefrontal gamma power increase, and cortical modulation was proportional to the LC excitation. We also quantitatively characterized distinct cortical states and showed that sensory responses in both LC and mPFC depend on the ongoing cortical state. Finally, cessation of the LC firing by bilateral local iontophoretic injection of clonidine, an α 2 -adrenoreceptor agonist, completely eliminated sensory responses in the mPFC without shifting cortex to a less excitable state. Together, our results suggest that the LC phasic response induces gamma power increase in the PFC and is essential for mediating sensory information along an ascending noxious pathway. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our study shows linear relationships between locus coeruleus phasic excitation and the amplitude of gamma oscillations in the prefrontal cortex. Results suggest that the locus coeruleus phasic response is essential for mediating sensory information

  12. Simulation of Oscillations in High Power Klystrons

    Ko, K

    2003-01-01

    Spurious oscillations can seriously limit a klystron's performance from reaching its design specifications. These are modes with frequencies different from the drive frequency, and have been found to be localized in various regions of the tube. If left unsuppressed, such oscillations can be driven to large amplitudes by the beam. As a result, the main output signal may suffer from amplitude and phase instabilities which lead to pulse shortening or reduction in power generation efficiency, as observed during the testing of the first 150MW S-band klystron, which was designed and built at SLAC as a part of an international collaboration with DESY. We present efficient methods to identify suspicious modes and then test their possibility of oscillation. In difference to [3], where each beam-loaded quality-factor Qbl was calculated by time-consuming PIC simulations, now only tracking-simulations with much reduced cpu-time and less sensitivity against noise are applied. This enables the determination of Qbl for larg...

  13. Impaired cognitive discrimination and discoordination of coupled theta-gamma oscillations in Fmr1 knockout mice

    Radwan, Basma; Dvorak, Dino; Fenton, André

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) patients do not make the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Absence of FMRP causes dysregulated translation, abnormal synaptic plasticity and the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. But FMRP loss has minimal effects on memory itself, making it difficult to understand why absence of FMRP impairs memory discrimination and increases risk of autistic symptoms in patients, such as exaggerated responses to environmental changes. While Fmr1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice perform cognitive discrimination tasks, we find abnormal patterns of coupling between theta and gamma oscillations in perisomatic and dendritic hippocampal CA1 local field potentials of the KO. Perisomatic CA1 theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) decreases with familiarity in both the WT and KO, but activating an invisible shock zone, subsequently changing its location, or turning it off, changes the pattern of oscillatory events in the LFPs recorded along the somato-dendritic axis of CA1. The cognition-dependent changes of this pattern of neural activity are relatively constrained in WT mice compared to KO mice, which exhibit abnormally weak changes during the cognitive challenge caused by changing the location of the shock zone and exaggerated patterns of change when the shock zone is turned off. Such pathophysiology might explain how dysregulated translation leads to intellectual disability in FXS. These findings demonstrate major functional abnormalities after the loss of FMRP in the dynamics of neural oscillations and that these impairments would be difficult to detect by steady-state measurements with the subject at rest or in steady conditions. PMID:26792400

  14. From neural oscillations to reasoning ability: Simulating the effect of the theta-to-gamma cycle length ratio on individual scores in a figural analogy test.

    Chuderski, Adam; Andrelczyk, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    Several existing computational models of working memory (WM) have predicted a positive relationship (later confirmed empirically) between WM capacity and the individual ratio of theta to gamma oscillatory band lengths. These models assume that each gamma cycle represents one WM object (e.g., a binding of its features), whereas the theta cycle integrates such objects into the maintained list. As WM capacity strongly predicts reasoning, it might be expected that this ratio also predicts performance in reasoning tasks. However, no computational model has yet explained how the differences in the theta-to-gamma ratio found among adult individuals might contribute to their scores on a reasoning test. Here, we propose a novel model of how WM capacity constraints figural analogical reasoning, aimed at explaining inter-individual differences in reasoning scores in terms of the characteristics of oscillatory patterns in the brain. In the model, the gamma cycle encodes the bindings between objects/features and the roles they play in the relations processed. Asynchrony between consecutive gamma cycles results from lateral inhibition between oscillating bindings. Computer simulations showed that achieving the highest WM capacity required reaching the optimal level of inhibition. When too strong, this inhibition eliminated some bindings from WM, whereas, when inhibition was too weak, the bindings became unstable and fell apart or became improperly grouped. The model aptly replicated several empirical effects and the distribution of individual scores, as well as the patterns of correlations found in the 100-people sample attempting the same reasoning task. Most importantly, the model's reasoning performance strongly depended on its theta-to-gamma ratio in same way as the performance of human participants depended on their WM capacity. The data suggest that proper regulation of oscillations in the theta and gamma bands may be crucial for both high WM capacity and effective complex

  15. High Power Room Temperature Terahertz Local Oscillator, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a high-power, room temperature compact continuous wave terahertz local oscillator for driving heterodyne receivers in the 1-5 THz frequency...

  16. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple Observatory High Resolution Camera will be used in a vigorous program of observations to search for new sources of very-high-energy gamma rays. In addition, a search for antimatter using the moon-earth system as an ion spectrometer will be begun. The first phase of GRANITE, the new 37-element 11-m camera, will be concluded with first light scheduled for September, 1991. The two cameras will operate in support of the Gamma Ray Observatory mission in the winter of 1991/2

  17. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Weekes, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Current interest in gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 100 GeV comes from the identification of Cygnus X-3 and other X-ray binaries as sources. In addition there are reports of emission from radio pulsars and a variety of other objects. The statistical significance of many of the observations is not high and many reported effects await confirmation, but there are a sufficient number of independent reports that very high energy gamma-ray astronomy must now be considered to have an observational basis. The observations are summarized with particular emphasis on those reported since 1980. The techniques used - the detection of small air showers using the secondary photons and particles at ground level - are unusual and are described. Future prospects for the field are discussed in relation to new ground-based experiments, satellite gamma-ray studies and proposed neutrino astronomy experiments. (orig.) With 296 refs

  18. Frontal eye fields control attentional modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations in contralateral occipitoparietal cortex.

    Marshall, Tom R; O'Shea, Jacinta; Jensen, Ole; Bergmann, Til O

    2015-01-28

    Covertly directing visuospatial attention produces a frequency-specific modulation of neuronal oscillations in occipital and parietal cortices: anticipatory alpha (8-12 Hz) power decreases contralateral and increases ipsilateral to attention, whereas stimulus-induced gamma (>40 Hz) power is boosted contralaterally and attenuated ipsilaterally. These modulations must be under top-down control; however, the control mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the causal contribution of the human frontal eye field (FEF) by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with subsequent magnetoencephalography. Following inhibitory theta burst stimulation to the left FEF, right FEF, or vertex, participants performed a visual discrimination task requiring covert attention to either visual hemifield. Both left and right FEF TMS caused marked attenuation of alpha modulation in the occipitoparietal cortex. Notably, alpha modulation was consistently reduced in the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, leaving the ipsilateral hemisphere relatively unaffected. Additionally, right FEF TMS enhanced gamma modulation in left visual cortex. Behaviorally, TMS caused a relative slowing of response times to targets contralateral to stimulation during the early task period. Our results suggest that left and right FEF are causally involved in the attentional top-down control of anticipatory alpha power in the contralateral visual system, whereas a right-hemispheric dominance seems to exist for control of stimulus-induced gamma power. These findings contrast the assumption of primarily intrahemispheric connectivity between FEF and parietal cortex, emphasizing the relevance of interhemispheric interactions. The contralaterality of effects may result from a transient functional reorganization of the dorsal attention network after inhibition of either FEF. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351638-10$15.00/0.

  19. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  20. Delta, theta, beta, and gamma brain oscillations index levels of auditory sentence processing.

    Mai, Guangting; Minett, James W; Wang, William S-Y

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of studies indicate that multiple ranges of brain oscillations, especially the delta (δ, processing. It is not clear, however, how these oscillations relate to functional processing at different linguistic hierarchical levels. Using scalp electroencephalography (EEG), the current study tested the hypothesis that phonological and the higher-level linguistic (semantic/syntactic) organizations during auditory sentence processing are indexed by distinct EEG signatures derived from the δ, θ, β, and γ oscillations. We analyzed specific EEG signatures while subjects listened to Mandarin speech stimuli in three different conditions in order to dissociate phonological and semantic/syntactic processing: (1) sentences comprising valid disyllabic words assembled in a valid syntactic structure (real-word condition); (2) utterances with morphologically valid syllables, but not constituting valid disyllabic words (pseudo-word condition); and (3) backward versions of the real-word and pseudo-word conditions. We tested four signatures: band power, EEG-acoustic entrainment (EAE), cross-frequency coupling (CFC), and inter-electrode renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC). The results show significant effects of band power and EAE of δ and θ oscillations for phonological, rather than semantic/syntactic processing, indicating the importance of tracking δ- and θ-rate phonetic patterns during phonological analysis. We also found significant β-related effects, suggesting tracking of EEG to the acoustic stimulus (high-β EAE), memory processing (θ-low-β CFC), and auditory-motor interactions (20-Hz rPDC) during phonological analysis. For semantic/syntactic processing, we obtained a significant effect of γ power, suggesting lexical memory retrieval or processing grammatical word categories. Based on these findings, we confirm that scalp EEG signatures relevant to δ, θ, β, and γ oscillations can index phonological and semantic/syntactic organizations

  1. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S. [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi, E-mail: santhavi@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E{sub GABA}). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g{sub GABA-extra}) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g{sub GABA-extra} and E{sub GABA} influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g{sub GABA-extra} reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E{sub GABA} was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average

  2. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E GABA ). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g GABA-extra ) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g GABA-extra and E GABA influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g GABA-extra reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E GABA was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average FS-BC frequency when E GABA

  3. Electron diode oscillators for high-power RF generation

    Humphries, S.

    1989-01-01

    Feedback oscillators have been used since the invention of the vacuum tube. This paper describes the extension of these familiar circuits to the regime of relativistic electron beam diodes. Such devices have potential application for the generation of high power RF radiation in the range 50-250 MHz, 1-10 GW with 20-60% conversion efficiency. This paper reviews the theory of the oscillator and the results of a design study. Calculations for the four-electrode diode with EGUN and EBQ show that good modulations of 30 kA electron beam at 600 kV can be achieved with moderate field stress on the electrodes. Conditions for oscillation have been studied with an in-house transmission line code. A design for a 7.5 GW oscillator at 200 MHz with 25% conversion efficiency is presented

  4. Alpha and gamma oscillations characterize feedback and feedforward processing in monkey visual cortex.

    van Kerkoerle, Timo; Self, Matthew W; Dagnino, Bruno; Gariel-Mathis, Marie-Alice; Poort, Jasper; van der Togt, Chris; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2014-10-07

    Cognitive functions rely on the coordinated activity of neurons in many brain regions, but the interactions between cortical areas are not yet well understood. Here we investigated whether low-frequency (α) and high-frequency (γ) oscillations characterize different directions of information flow in monkey visual cortex. We recorded from all layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) and found that γ-waves are initiated in input layer 4 and propagate to the deep and superficial layers of cortex, whereas α-waves propagate in the opposite direction. Simultaneous recordings from V1 and downstream area V4 confirmed that γ- and α-waves propagate in the feedforward and feedback direction, respectively. Microstimulation in V1 elicited γ-oscillations in V4, whereas microstimulation in V4 elicited α-oscillations in V1, thus providing causal evidence for the opposite propagation of these rhythms. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptors, thought to be involved in feedback processing, suppressed α while boosting γ. These results provide new insights into the relation between brain rhythms and cognition.

  5. Neutrino Oscillations within the Induced Gravitational Collapse Paradigm of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Becerra, L.; Guzzo, M. M.; Rossi-Torres, F.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.; Uribe, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The induced gravitational collapse paradigm of long gamma-ray bursts associated with supernovae (SNe) predicts a copious neutrino–antineutrino (ν \\bar{ν }) emission owing to the hypercritical accretion process of SN ejecta onto a neutron star (NS) binary companion. The neutrino emission can reach luminosities of up to 1057 MeV s‑1, mean neutrino energies of 20 MeV, and neutrino densities of 1031 cm‑3. Along their path from the vicinity of the NS surface outward, such neutrinos experience flavor transformations dictated by the neutrino-to-electron-density ratio. We determine the neutrino and electron on the accretion zone and use them to compute the neutrino flavor evolution. For normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies and within the two-flavor formalism ({ν }e{ν }x), we estimate the final electronic and nonelectronic neutrino content after two oscillation processes: (1) neutrino collective effects due to neutrino self-interactions where the neutrino density dominates, and (2) the Mikheyev–Smirnov–Wolfenstein effect, where the electron density dominates. We find that the final neutrino content is composed by ∼55% (∼62%) of electronic neutrinos, i.e., {ν }e+{\\bar{ν }}e, for the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The results of this work are the first step toward the characterization of a novel source of astrophysical MeV neutrinos in addition to core-collapse SNe and, as such, deserve further attention.

  6. Gamma band oscillations: a key to understanding schizophrenia symptoms and neural circuit abnormalities.

    McNally, James M; McCarley, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    We review our current understanding of abnormal γ band oscillations in schizophrenia, their association with symptoms and the underlying cortical circuit abnormality, with a particular focus on the role of fast-spiking parvalbumin gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the disease state. Clinical electrophysiological studies of schizophrenia patients and pharmacological models of the disorder show an increase in spontaneous γ band activity (not stimulus-evoked) measures. These findings provide a crucial link between preclinical and clinical work examining the role of γ band activity in schizophrenia. MRI-based experiments measuring cortical GABA provides evidence supporting impaired GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia patients, which is correlated with γ band activity level. Several studies suggest that stimulation of the cortical circuitry, directly or via subcortical structures, has the potential to modulate cortical γ activity, and improve cognitive function. Abnormal γ band activity is observed in patients with schizophrenia and disease models in animals, and is suggested to underlie the psychosis and cognitive/perceptual deficits. Convergent evidence from both clinical and preclinical studies suggest the central factor in γ band abnormalities is impaired GABAergic neurotransmission, particularly in a subclass of neurons which express parvalbumin. Rescue of γ band abnormalities presents an intriguing option for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Recognition of abstract objects via neural oscillators: interaction among topological organization, associative memory and gamma band synchronization.

    Ursino, Mauro; Magosso, Elisa; Cuppini, Cristiano

    2009-02-01

    Synchronization of neural activity in the gamma band is assumed to play a significant role not only in perceptual processing, but also in higher cognitive functions. Here, we propose a neural network of Wilson-Cowan oscillators to simulate recognition of abstract objects, each represented as a collection of four features. Features are ordered in topological maps of oscillators connected via excitatory lateral synapses, to implement a similarity principle. Experience on previous objects is stored in long-range synapses connecting the different topological maps, and trained via timing dependent Hebbian learning (previous knowledge principle). Finally, a downstream decision network detects the presence of a reliable object representation, when all features are oscillating in synchrony. Simulations performed giving various simultaneous objects to the network (from 1 to 4), with some missing and/or modified properties suggest that the network can reconstruct objects, and segment them from the other simultaneously present objects, even in case of deteriorated information, noise, and moderate correlation among the inputs (one common feature). The balance between sensitivity and specificity depends on the strength of the Hebbian learning. Achieving a correct reconstruction in all cases, however, requires ad hoc selection of the oscillation frequency. The model represents an attempt to investigate the interactions among topological maps, autoassociative memory, and gamma-band synchronization, for recognition of abstract objects.

  8. Hearing and seeing meaning in noise: Alpha, beta, and gamma oscillations predict gestural enhancement of degraded speech comprehension.

    Drijvers, Linda; Özyürek, Asli; Jensen, Ole

    2018-05-01

    During face-to-face communication, listeners integrate speech with gestures. The semantic information conveyed by iconic gestures (e.g., a drinking gesture) can aid speech comprehension in adverse listening conditions. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we investigated the spatiotemporal neural oscillatory activity associated with gestural enhancement of degraded speech comprehension. Participants watched videos of an actress uttering clear or degraded speech, accompanied by a gesture or not and completed a cued-recall task after watching every video. When gestures semantically disambiguated degraded speech comprehension, an alpha and beta power suppression and a gamma power increase revealed engagement and active processing in the hand-area of the motor cortex, the extended language network (LIFG/pSTS/STG/MTG), medial temporal lobe, and occipital regions. These observed low- and high-frequency oscillatory modulations in these areas support general unification, integration and lexical access processes during online language comprehension, and simulation of and increased visual attention to manual gestures over time. All individual oscillatory power modulations associated with gestural enhancement of degraded speech comprehension predicted a listener's correct disambiguation of the degraded verb after watching the videos. Our results thus go beyond the previously proposed role of oscillatory dynamics in unimodal degraded speech comprehension and provide first evidence for the role of low- and high-frequency oscillations in predicting the integration of auditory and visual information at a semantic level. © 2018 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Portable high energy gamma ray imagers

    Guru, S.V.; Squillante, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    To satisfy the needs of high energy gamma ray imagers for industrial nuclear imaging applications, three high energy gamma cameras are presented. The RMD-Pinhole camera uses a lead pinhole collimator and a segmented BGO detector viewed by a 3 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). This pinhole gamma camera displayed an energy resolution of 25.0% FWHM at the center of the camera at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 6.2 FWHM at 412 keV. The fixed multiple hole collimated camera (FMCC), used a multiple hole collimator and a continuous slab of NaI(Tl) detector viewed by the same PSPMT. The FMCC displayed an energy resolution of 12.4% FWHM at 662 keV at the center of the camera and an angular resolution of 6.0 FWHM at 412 keV. The rotating multiple hole collimated camera (RMCC) used a 180 antisymmetric rotation modulation collimator and CsI(Tl) detectors coupled to PIN silicon photodiodes. The RMCC displayed an energy resolution of 7.1% FWHM at 662 keV and an angular resolution of 4.0 FWHM at 810 keV. The performance of these imagers is discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  10. INDUCED EEG GAMMA OSCILLATION ALIGNMENT IMPROVES DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN AUTISM AND ADHD GROUP RESPONSES IN A FACIAL CATEGORIZATION TASK.

    Gross, Eric; El-Baz, Ayman S; Sokhadze, Guela E; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often lack the ability to recognize and properly respond to emotional stimuli. Emotional deficits also characterize children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in addition to exhibiting limited attention span. These abnormalities may effect a difference in the induced EEG gamma wave burst (35-45 Hz) peaked approximately 300-400 milliseconds following an emotional stimulus. Because induced gamma oscillations are not fixed at a definite point in time post-stimulus, analysis of averaged EEG data with traditional methods may result in an attenuated gamma burst power. METHODS: We used a data alignment technique to improve the averaged data, making it a better representation of the individual induced EEG gamma oscillations. A study was designed to test the response of a subject to emotional stimuli, presented in the form of emotional facial expression images. In a four part experiment, the subjects were instructed to identify gender in the first two blocks of the test, followed by differentiating between basic emotions in the final two blocks (i.e. anger vs. disgust). EEG data was collected from ASD (n=10), ADHD (n=9), and control (n=11) subjects via a 128 channel EGI system, and processed through a continuous wavelet transform and bandpass filter to isolate the gamma frequencies. A custom MATLAB code was used to align the data from individual trials between 200-600 ms post-stimulus, EEG site, and condition by maximizing the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between trials. The gamma power for the 400 ms window of maximum induced gamma burst was then calculated and compared between subject groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Condition (anger/disgust recognition, gender recognition) × Alignment × Group (ADHD, ASD, Controls) interaction was significant at most of parietal topographies (e.g., P3-P4, P7-P8). These interactions were better manifested in the aligned data set

  11. Photoinduced High-Frequency Charge Oscillations in Dimerized Systems

    Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    Photoinduced charge dynamics in dimerized systems is studied on the basis of the exact diagonalization method and the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a one-dimensional spinless-fermion model at half filling and a two-dimensional model for κ-(bis[ethylenedithio]tetrathiafulvalene)2X [κ-(BEDT-TTF)2X] at three-quarter filling. After the application of a one-cycle pulse of a specifically polarized electric field, the charge densities at half of the sites of the system oscillate in the same phase and those at the other half oscillate in the opposite phase. For weak fields, the Fourier transform of the time profile of the charge density at any site after photoexcitation has peaks for finite-sized systems that correspond to those of the steady-state optical conductivity spectrum. For strong fields, these peaks are suppressed and a new peak appears on the high-energy side, that is, the charge densities mainly oscillate with a single frequency, although the oscillation is eventually damped. In the two-dimensional case without intersite repulsion and in the one-dimensional case, this frequency corresponds to charge-transfer processes by which all the bonds connecting the two classes of sites are exploited. Thus, this oscillation behaves as an electronic breathing mode. The relevance of the new peak to a recently found reflectivity peak in κ-(BEDT-TTF)2X after photoexcitation is discussed.

  12. Low-frequency oscillations at high density in JFT-2

    Maeno, Masaki; Katagiri, Masaki; Suzuki, Norio; Fujisawa, Noboru

    1977-12-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in a plasma were measured with magnetic probes and Si surface-barrier detectors, and behaviour of the high density plasmas was studied. The plasma current profile in the phase of decreasing density after the interruption of gas input is more peaked than during gas input. The introduction of hydrogen during a discharge results in a reduction of the impurities flux. The increase of density by fast gas input is limited with a negative voltage spike. Immediately before a negative voltage spike, oscillations of m=1,2 grow, leading to the spike. (auth.)

  13. Consciousness and arousal effects on emotional face processing as revealed by brain oscillations. A gamma band analysis.

    Balconi, Michela; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    It remains an open question whether it is possible to assign a single brain operation or psychological function for facial emotion decoding to a certain type of oscillatory activity. Gamma band activity (GBA) offers an adequate tool for studying cortical activation patterns during emotional face information processing. In the present study brain oscillations were analyzed in response to facial expression of emotions. Specifically, GBA modulation was measured when twenty subjects looked at emotional (angry, fearful, happy, and sad faces) or neutral faces in two different conditions: supraliminal (10 ms) vs subliminal (150 ms) stimulation (100 target-mask pairs for each condition). The results showed that both consciousness and significance of the stimulus in terms of arousal can modulate the power synchronization (ERD decrease) during 150-350 time range: an early oscillatory event showed its peak at about 200 ms post-stimulus. GBA was enhanced by supraliminal more than subliminal elaboration, as well as more by high arousal (anger and fear) than low arousal (happiness and sadness) emotions. Finally a left-posterior dominance for conscious elaboration was found, whereas right hemisphere was discriminant in emotional processing of face in comparison with neutral face.

  14. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  15. Attenuation of beta and gamma oscillations in schizophrenia spectrum patients following hand posture perturbation

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Mørup, Morten; Thalbitzer, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Several electroencephalographic (EEG) studies in schizophrenia report that the patients have reduced evoked gamma activity following visual and auditory stimulation. Somatosensory gamma activity has not previously been examined. It has been suggested that a dysfunction basic to schizophrenia spec...

  16. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Weekes, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    It is apparent that very high gamma-ray astronomy, at the very end of the electromagnetic spectrum, is just at the threshold of becoming an important channel of astronomical information. The author discusses how, to fully develop, it requires telescopes with improved minimum flux sensitivity; development of techniques that characterize the nature of the primary; more overlapping observations to remove any question of the reality of the detected phenomenon; more consistency in the application of statistics among experimenters and more openness about methods used; development of models that will predict the phenomenon to be expected rather than explain what has been observed; and more accurate calibrations to determine absolute fluxes and energies

  17. Laboratory of High resolution gamma spectrometry

    Mendez G, A.; Giber F, J.; Rivas C, I.; Reyes A, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Experimentation of the Nuclear Systems Management requests the collaboration of the Engineering unit for the supervision of the execution of the work of the High resolution Gamma spectrometry and low bottom laboratory, using the hut of the sub critic reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. This laboratory has the purpose of determining the activity of special materials irradiated in nuclear power plants. In this report the architecture development, concepts, materials and diagrams for the realization of this type of work are presented. (Author)

  18. High-frequency oscillations in distributed neural networks reveal the dynamics of human decision making

    Adrian G Guggisberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relative timing of numerous brain regions involved in human decisions that are based on external criteria, learned information, personal preferences, or unconstrained internal considerations. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG and advanced signal analysis techniques, we were able to non-invasively reconstruct oscillations of distributed neural networks in the high-gamma frequency band (60–150 Hz. The time course of the observed neural activity suggested that two-alternative forced choice tasks are processed in four overlapping stages: processing of sensory input, option evaluation, intention formation, and action execution. Visual areas are activated fi rst, and show recurring activations throughout the entire decision process. The temporo-occipital junction and the intraparietal sulcus are active during evaluation of external values of the options, 250–500 ms after stimulus presentation. Simultaneously, personal preference is mediated by cortical midline structures. Subsequently, the posterior parietal and superior occipital cortices appear to encode intention, with different subregions being responsible for different types of choice. The cerebellum and inferior parietal cortex are recruited for internal generation of decisions and actions, when all options have the same value. Action execution was accompanied by activation peaks in the contralateral motor cortex. These results suggest that high-gamma oscillations as recorded by MEG allow a reliable reconstruction of decision processes with excellent spatiotemporal resolution.

  19. High dose gamma-ray standard

    Macrin, R.; Moraru, R.

    1999-01-01

    The high gamma-ray doses produced in a gamma irradiator are used, mainly, for radiation processing, i.e. sterilization of medical products, processing of food, modifications of polymers, irradiation of electronic devices, a.s.o. The used absorbed doses depend on the application and cover the range 10 Gy to 100 MGy. The regulations in our country require that the response of the dosimetry systems, used for the irradiation of food and medical products, be calibrated and traceable to the national standards. In order to be sure that the products receive the desired absorbed dose, appropriate dosimetric measurements must be performed, including the calibration of the dosemeters and their traceability to the national standards. The high dose gamma-ray measurements are predominantly based on the use of reference radiochemical dosemeters. Among them the ferrous sulfate can be used as reference dosemeter for low doses (up to 400 Gy) but due to its characteristics it deserves to be considered a standard dosemeter and to be used for transferring the conventional absorbed dose to other chemical dosemeters used for absorbed doses up to 100 MGy. The study of the ferrous sulfate dosemeter consisted in preparing many batches of solution by different operators in quality assurance conditions and in determining for all batches the linearity, the relative intrinsic error, the repeatability and the reproducibility. The principal results are the following: the linear regression coefficient: 0.999, the relative intrinsic error: max.6 %, the repeatability (for P* = 95 %): max.3 %, the reproducibility (P* = 95%): max.5 %. (authors)

  20. A 60-GHz interferometer with a local oscillator integrated antenna array for divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10/PDX

    Kohagura, J., E-mail: kohagura@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, M.; Shima, Y.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Wang, X. [Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ito, N. [National Institute of Technology, Ube College, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    In conventional multichannel/imaging microwave diagnostics of interferometry, reflectometry, and electron cyclotron emission measurements, a local oscillator (LO) signal is commonly supplied to a receiver array via irradiation using LO optics. In this work, we present a 60-GHz interferometer with a new eight-channel receiver array, called a local oscillator integrated antenna array (LIA). An outstanding feature of LIA is that it incorporates a frequency quadrupler integrated circuit for LO supply to each channel. This enables simple and uniform LO supply to the receiver array using only a 15-GHz LO source and a coaxial cable transmission line instead of using an expensive 60-GHz source, LO optics, and a waveguide transmission line. The new interferometer system is first applied to measure electron line-averaged density inside the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) on GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror device.

  1. Investigation of density-wave oscillation in parallel boiling channels under high pressure

    Ming Xiao; Xuejun Chen; Mingyuan Zhang

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on density-wave instability in parallel boiling channels. Experiments have been done in a high pressure steam-water loop. Different types of two-phase flow instabilities have been observed, including density-wave oscillation, pressure-drop type oscillation, thermal oscillation and secondary density-wave oscillation. The secondary density-wave oscillation appears at very low exit steam quality (less than 0.1) and at the positive portion of Δ P-G curves with both channels' flow rate oscillating in phase. Density-wave oscillation can appear at pressure up to 192 bar and disappear over 207 bar. (6 figures) (Author)

  2. GABAergic modulation of visual gamma and alpha oscillations and its consequences for working memory performance

    Lozano Soldevilla, D.; Huurne, N.; Cools, R.; Jensen, O.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impressive in vitro research in rodents and computational modeling has uncovered the core mechanisms responsible for generating neuronal oscillations. In particular, GABAergic interneurons play a crucial role for synchronizing neural populations. Do these mechanistic principles apply to

  3. High energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions

    Pinston, J.A.; Nifenecker, H.; Nifenecker, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental techniques used to study high energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions are reviewed. High energy photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. Semi-classical descriptions of the nucleus-nucleus gamma reactions are introduced. Nucleon-nucleon gamma cross sections are considered, including theoretical aspects and experimental data. High energy gamma ray production in proton-nucleus reactions is explained. Theoretical explanations of photon emission in nucleus-nucleus collisions are treated. The contribution of charged pion currents to photon production is mentioned

  4. Decrease in early right alpha band phase synchronization and late gamma band oscillations in processing syntax in music.

    Ruiz, María Herrojo; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigated the neural correlates associated with the processing of music-syntactical irregularities as compared with regular syntactic structures in music. Previous studies reported an early ( approximately 200 ms) right anterior negative component (ERAN) by traditional event-related-potential analysis during music-syntactical irregularities, yet little is known about the underlying oscillatory and synchronization properties of brain responses which are supposed to play a crucial role in general cognition including music perception. First we showed that the ERAN was primarily represented by low frequency (music-syntactical irregularities as compared with music-syntactical regularities, were associated with (i) an early decrease in the alpha band (9-10 Hz) phase synchronization between right fronto-central and left temporal brain regions, and (ii) a late ( approximately 500 ms) decrease in gamma band (38-50 Hz) oscillations over fronto-central brain regions. These results indicate a weaker degree of long-range integration when the musical expectancy is violated. In summary, our results reveal neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing that operate at different levels of cortical integration, ranging from early decrease in long-range alpha phase synchronization to late local gamma oscillations. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Cutting-Edge High-Power Ultrafast Thin Disk Oscillators

    Thomas Südmeyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of applications in science and industry are currently pushing the development of ultrafast laser technologies that enable high average powers. SESAM modelocked thin disk lasers (TDLs currently achieve higher pulse energies and average powers than any other ultrafast oscillator technology, making them excellent candidates in this goal. Recently, 275 W of average power with a pulse duration of 583 fs were demonstrated, which represents the highest average power so far demonstrated from an ultrafast oscillator. In terms of pulse energy, TDLs reach more than 40 μJ pulses directly from the oscillator. In addition, another major milestone was recently achieved, with the demonstration of a TDL with nearly bandwidth-limited 96-fs long pulses. The progress achieved in terms of pulse duration of such sources enabled the first measurement of the carrier-envelope offset frequency of a modelocked TDL, which is the first key step towards full stabilization of such a source. We will present the key elements that enabled these latest results, as well as an outlook towards the next scaling steps in average power, pulse energy and pulse duration of such sources. These cutting-edge sources will enable exciting new applications, and open the door to further extending the current performance milestones.

  6. A high energy gamma ray astronomy experiment

    Hofstadter, R.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes work involving NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). GRO exemplifies the near zero principle because it investigates new gamma ray phenomena by relying on the space program to take us into the region of zero interference above the earth's atmosphere. In its present form GRO has four experiments

  7. Benign prostatic hypertrophy with high levels of gamma-seminoprotein (gamma-Sm), prostate specific antigen: report of two cases

    浅川, 正純; 安本, 亮二; 上水流, 雅人; 前川, 正信

    1988-01-01

    gamma-Seminoprotein (gamma-Sm) is recently being noted as a tumor marker of prostatic cancer. However, since gamma-Sm is a specific antigen against the prostatic tissue, high levels are also observed in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). In this report, two patients with BPH who had high levels of gamma-Sm were studied.

  8. $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ and $\\gamma$-p events at high energies

    Schuler, Gerhard A.; Gerhard A Schuler; Torbjorn Sjostrand

    1994-01-01

    A real photon has a complicated nature, whereby it may remain unresolved or fluctuate into a vector meson or a perturbative q-qbar pair. Based on this picture, we previously presented a model for gamma-p events that is based on the presence of three main event classes: direct, VMD and anomalous. In gamma-gamma events, a natural generalization gives three-by-three combinations of the nature of the two incoming photons, and thus six distinct event classes. The properties of these classes are constrained by the choices already made, in the gamma-p model, of cut-off procedures and other aspects. It is therefore possible to predict the energy-dependence of the cross section for each of the six components separately. The total cross section thus obtained is in good agreement with data, and also gives support to the idea that a simple factorized ansatz with a pomeron and a reggeon term can be a good approximation. Event properties undergo a logical evolution from p-p to gamma-p to gamma-gamma events, with larger cha...

  9. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors on parvalbumin interneurons

    Isabella eFerando

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gammaoscillations (30-120 Hz, an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs and the principal (pyramidal cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABAARs (-GABAARs and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS, such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO, modulate the expression of δ-GABAARs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABAARs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs express δ-GABAARs, expression of δ-GABAARs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 hours postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABAARs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABAAR expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  10. Oscillations dans la bande de fréquence gamma dans des modèles de rongeurs pour la schizophrénie

    Anderson , Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating mental disorder that is characterised by a breakdown in normal thought processes, blunted emotional responses and a variety of cognitive difficulties. Gamma frequency (30 – 80 Hz) oscillations are associated with many processes that are disrupted in people with schizophrenia memory, perception and attention. This thesis aimed to develop methods and tools to investigate the basic mechanisms that underlie the alterations in gamma frequency brain activity that are...

  11. High resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    Giles, J.R.; Dooley, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. The absolute counting efficiencies of the GSLS detectors were determined using cylindrical reference sources. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software and correction factors were developed based on relative gamma-ray fluence rates. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, and as the formation saturation ratio decreases, relative gamma-ray fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Correction factors for iron and water cylindrical shields were found to agree well with correction factors determined during previous studies allowing for the development of correction factors for type-304 stainless steel and low-carbon steel casings. Regression analyses of correction factor data produced equations for determining correction factors applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs acquired under non-standard borehole conditions

  12. High-energy gamma-ray emission in compact binaries

    Cerutti, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Four gamma-ray sources have been associated with binary systems in our Galaxy: the micro-quasar Cygnus X-3 and the gamma-ray binaries LS I +61 degrees 303, LS 5039 and PSR B1259-63. These systems are composed of a massive companion star and a compact object of unknown nature, except in PSR B1259-63 where there is a young pulsar. I propose a comprehensive theoretical model for the high-energy gamma-ray emission and variability in gamma-ray emitting binaries. In this model, the high-energy radiation is produced by inverse Compton scattering of stellar photons on ultra-relativistic electron-positron pairs injected by a young pulsar in gamma-ray binaries and in a relativistic jet in micro-quasars. Considering anisotropic inverse Compton scattering, pair production and pair cascade emission, the TeV gamma-ray emission is well explained in LS 5039. Nevertheless, this model cannot account for the gamma-ray emission in LS I +61 degrees 303 and PSR B1259-63. Other processes should dominate in these complex systems. In Cygnus X-3, the gamma-ray radiation is convincingly reproduced by Doppler-boosted Compton emission of pairs in a relativistic jet. Gamma-ray binaries and micro-quasars provide a novel environment for the study of pulsar winds and relativistic jets at very small spatial scales. (author)

  13. Theta and gamma oscillations predict encoding and retrieval of declarative memory

    Osipova, D.; Takashima, A.; Oostenveld, R.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Maris, E.G.G.; Jensen, O.

    2006-01-01

    Although studies in animals and patients have demonstrated that brain oscillations play a role in declarative memory encoding and retrieval, little has been done to investigate the temporal dynamics and sources of brain activity in healthy human subjects performing such tasks. In a

  14. Theta and gamma oscillations predict encoding and retrieval of declarative memory.

    Osipova, D.; Takashima, A.; Oostenveld, R.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Maris, E.G.G.; Jensen, O.

    2006-01-01

    Although studies in animals and patients have demonstrated that brain oscillations play a role in declarative memory encoding and retrieval, little has been done to investigate the temporal dynamics and sources of brain activity in healthy human subjects performing such tasks. In a

  15. High frequency oscillations evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

    Biller, S; Simon, L; Fiedler, P; Strohmeier, D; Haueisen, J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and / or fields (SEF) is a well-established and important tool for investigating the functioning of the peripheral and central human nervous system. A standard technique to evoke SEPs / SEFs is the stimulation of the median nerve by using a bipolar electrical stimulus. We aim at an alternative stimulation technique enabling stimulation of deep nerve structures while reducing patient stress and error susceptibility. In the current study, we apply a commercial transcranial magnetic stimulation system for peripheral magnetic stimulation of the median nerve. We compare the results of simultaneously recorded EEG signals to prove applicability of our technique to evoke SEPs including low frequency components (LFC) as well as high frequency oscillations (HFO). Therefore, we compare amplitude, latency and time-frequency characteristics of the SEP of 14 healthy volunteers after electric and magnetic stimulation. Both low frequency components and high frequency oscillations were detected. The HFOs were superimposed onto the primary cortical response N20. Statistical analysis revealed significantly lower amplitudes and increased latencies for LFC and HFO components after magnetic stimulation. The differences indicate the inability of magnetic stimulation to elicit supramaximal responses. A psycho-perceptual evaluation showed that magnetic stimulation was less unpleasant for 12 out of the 14 volunteers. In conclusion, we showed that LFC and HFO components related to median nerve stimulation can be evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

  16. {gamma}*{gamma}*->{rho}{rho} at very high energy

    Pire, B. [CPhT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland) and Universite de Liege, B4000 Liege (Belgium); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite d' Orsay, F 91405-Orsay (France); UMR 8627 du CNRS (France)

    2005-06-13

    The next generation of e{sup +}e{sup -}-colliders will offer a possibility of clean testing of QCD dynamics in the Regge limit. Recent progress in the theoretical description of exclusive processes permits for many of them a consistent use of the perturbative QCD methods. We advocate that the exclusive diffractive production of two {rho} mesons from virtual photons at very high energies should be measurable at the future linear collider (LC)

  17. The opacity of the universe for high and very high energy {gamma}-rays

    Meyer, Manuel

    2013-08-15

    }{sub {gamma}{gamma}}<1 to {tau}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}{>=}2 is investigated. The absorption-corrected spectra consistently show an upturn at high optical depths, significant at the 4{sigma} level. A source intrinsic effect is unlikely to produce such a feature, since the transition to the {tau}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}{>=}2 regime occurs at different energies for each source. Systematic uncertainties that could mimic the effect are studied but found unlikely as a possible explanation. A similar study is conducted for photons detected with the Fermi-LAT. To this end, the number of expected photons in the optical thick regime is compared to the number of photons observed with the LAT. Above {tau}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}{>=}2, three photons are associated with AGN with high confidence. Under the assumption of certain EBL models, extrapolating the unattenuated spectrum from low to high energies results in a probability of 1.2 x 10{sup -4} to observe these photons. However, the probability for detecting the high optical depth photons when all LAT detected AGN with known redshift are considered sensitively depends on the choice of the intrinsic spectral model. The indication for a reduced opacity might be explained by the oscillation of photons into hypothetical axion-like particles (ALPs) in ambient magnetic fields. Such particles propagate unimpeded over cosmological distances, thereby reducing the {gamma}-ray opacity. Photon-ALP conversions are studied in different magnetic field configurations, including intracluster and intergalactic magnetic fields, as well as the field of the Milky Way. Optimistic values of the field strength and coherence length result in lower limits on the photon-ALP coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}>or similar 10{sup -12} GeV{sup -1}. For more realistic magnetic field parameters, couplings above g{sub a{gamma}}>or similar 2 x 10{sup 11} GeV{sup -1} are necessary to explain the indication for the reduced opacity. The lower limits are in reach of future dedicated ALP

  18. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    Brown, D.A.; Johnson, M.; Navratil, P.

    2007-01-01

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved

  19. High spin rotations of nuclei with the harmonic oscillator potential

    Cerkaski, M.; Szymanski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum have been performed recently. They are based on the liquid drop model of a nucleus and/or on the assumption of the single particle shell structure of the nucleonic motion. The calculations are usually complicated and involve long computer codes. In this article we shall discuss general trends in fast rotating nuclei in the approximation of the harmonic oscillator potential. We shall see that using the Bohr Mottelson simplified version of the rigorous solution of Valatin one can perform a rather simple analysis of the rotational bands, structure of the yrast line, moments of inertia etc. in the rotating nucleus. While the precision fit to experimental data in actual nuclei is not the purpose of this paper, one can still hope to reach some general understanding within the model of the simple relations resulting in nuclei at high spin. (author)

  20. Gamma and Xray spectroscopy at high performance

    Borchert, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The author determines that for many interesting problems in gamma and Xray spectroscopy it is necessary to use crystal diffractometers. The basic features of such instruments are discussed and the special performance of crystal spectrometers is demonstrated by means of typical examples of various applications

  1. Neural rhythmic symphony of human walking observation: Upside-down and Uncoordinated condition on cortical theta, alpha, beta and gamma oscillations.

    David eZarka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological motion observation has been recognized to produce dynamic change in sensorimotor activation according to the observed kinematics. Physical plausibility of the spatial-kinematic relationship of human movement may play a major role in the top-down processing of human motion recognition. Here, we investigated the time course of scalp activation during observation of human gait in order to extract and use it on future integrated brain-computer interface using virtual reality (VR. We analyzed event related potentials (ERP, the event related spectral perturbation (ERSP and the inter-trial coherence (ITC from high-density EEG recording during video display onset (-200 to 600 ms and the steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP inside the video of human walking 3D-animation in three conditions: Normal; Upside-down (inverted images; and Uncoordinated (pseudo-randomly mixed images. We found that early visual evoked response P120 was decreased in Upside-down condition. The N170 and P300b amplitudes were decreased in Uncoordinated condition. In Upside-down and Uncoordinated conditions, we found decreased alpha power and theta phase-locking. As regards gamma oscillation, power was increased during the Upside-down animation and decreased during the Uncoordinated animation. An SSVEP-like response oscillating at about 10 Hz was also described showing that the oscillating pattern is enhanced 300 ms after the heel strike event only in the Normal but not in the Upside-down condition. Our results are consistent with most of previous point-light display studies, further supporting possible use of virtual reality for neurofeedback applications.

  2. High Reliability Oscillators for Terahertz Systems, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Terahertz sources based on lower frequency oscillators and amplifiers plus a chain of frequency multipliers are the workhorse technology for NASA's terahertz...

  3. Gamma band oscillations under influence of bromazepam during a sensorimotor integration task: an EEG coherence study.

    Minc, Daniel; Machado, Sergio; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Cagy, Mauricio; Budde, Henning; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2010-01-18

    The goal of the present study was to explore the dynamics of the gamma band using the coherence of the quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) in a sensorimotor integration task and the influence of the neuromodulator bromazepam on the band behavior. Our hypothesis is that the needs of the typewriting task will demand the coupling of different brain areas, and that the gamma band will promote the binding of information. It is also expected that the neuromodulator will modify this coupling. The sample was composed of 39 healthy subjects. We used a randomized double-blind design and divided subjects into three groups: placebo (n=13), bromazepam 3mg (n=13) and bromazepam 6 mg (n=13). The two-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a main effect for the factors condition (i.e., C4-CZ electrode pair) and moment (i.e., C3-CZ, C3-C4 and C4-CZ pairs of electrodes). We propose that the gamma band plays an important role in the binding among several brain areas in complex motor tasks and that each hemisphere is influenced in a different manner by the neuromodulator. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multidimensional analysis of high resolution. gamma. -ray data

    Flibotte, S.; Huettmeier, U.J.; France, G. de; Haas, B.; Romain, P.; Theisen, C.; Vivien, J.P.; Zen, J. (Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Bednarczyk, P. (Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland))

    1992-08-15

    Algorithms are developed to analyze high-fold {gamma}-ray coincidences. Performances of the programs have been tested in 3, 4 and 5 dimensions using events generated with a Monte Carlo simulation. (orig.).

  5. Twin peak high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations as a spectral imprint of dual oscillation modes of accretion tori

    Bakala, P.; Goluchová, K.; Török, G.; Šrámková, E.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Vincent, F. H.; Mazur, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    Context. High-frequency (millisecond) quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) are observed in the X-ray power-density spectra of several microquasars and low-mass X-ray binaries. Two distinct QPO peaks, so-called twin peak QPOs, are often detected simultaneously exhibiting their frequency ratio close or equal to 3:2. A widely discussed class of proposed QPOs models is based on oscillations of accretion toroidal structures orbiting in the close vicinity of black holes or neutron stars. Aims: Following the analytic theory and previous studies of observable spectral signatures, we aim to model the twin peak QPOs as a spectral imprint of specific dual oscillation regime defined by a combination of the lowest radial and vertical oscillation mode of slender tori. We consider the model of an optically thick slender accretion torus with constant specific angular momentum. We examined power spectra and fluorescent Kα iron line profiles for two different simulation setups with the mode frequency relations corresponding to the epicyclic resonance HF QPOs model and modified relativistic precession QPOs model. Methods: We used relativistic ray-tracing implemented in the parallel simulation code LSDplus. In the background of the Kerr spacetime geometry, we analyzed the influence of the distant observer inclination and the spin of the central compact object. Relativistic optical projection of the oscillating slender torus is illustrated by images in false colours related to the frequency shift. Results: We show that performed simulations yield power spectra with the pair of dominant peaks that correspond to the frequencies of radial and vertical oscillation modes and with the peak frequency ratio equal to the proper value 3:2 on a wide range of inclinations and spin values. We also discuss exceptional cases of a very low and very high inclination, as well as unstable high spin relativistic precession-like configurations that predict a constant frequency ratio equal to 1:2. We

  6. High energy photons and neutrinos from gamma ray bursts

    Dar, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble space telescope has recently discovered thousands of gigantic comet-like objects in a ring around the central star in the nearest planetary nebula. It is suggested that such circumstellar rings exist around most of stars. Collisions of the relativistic debris from gamma ray bursts in dense stellar regions with such gigantic comet-like objects, which have been stripped off from the circumstellar rings by gravitational perturbations, produce detectable fluxes of high energy gamma-rays and neutrinos from gamma ray bursts

  7. Very high energy gamma ray astronomy from Hanle

    Chitnis, Varsha R.

    2015-01-01

    Over a past decade very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy has emerged as a major astronomical discipline. In India, we have a long tradition of experiments in this field. Few years ago, multi-institutional Himalayan Gamma Ray Observatory (HiGRO) collaboration was formed to set up VHE gamma rays experiments at Hanle, a high altitude location in Himalayas. HAGAR, the first phase of this collaboration is operational since 2008. HAGAR has successfully detected VHE gamma ray emission from some of the extragalactic objects like Mrk 421, Mrk 501 as well as galactic sources including Crab nebula/pulsar. Details of HAGAR telescope system and results obtained will be discussed. HiGRO is now gearing up for the next phase, i.e. 21 m diameter MACE telescope, which is being installed at Hanle at present. Details of MACE telescope system and future plans will be discussed. (author)

  8. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cerenkov camera has detected TeV radiation from four galactic sources: the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and 4U0115+63. Recent simulations encourage the view that unwanted cosmic-ray background showers may be suppressed by a large factor. Emphasis in the coming year will be on determining optimum selection criteria for enhancing gamma-ray signals and in developing a prototype camera with finer angular resolution as a first step towards implementation of the HERCULES concept

  9. Excitation of high numbers harmonics by flows of oscillators in a periodic potential

    Buts, V.A.; Marekha, V.I.; Tolstoluzhsky, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the maximum of radiation spectrum of nonrelativistic oscillators, which move into a periodically inhomogeneous potential, can be in the region of high numbers harmonics. Spectrum of such oscillators radiation becomes similar to the radiation spectrum of relativistic oscillators. The equations, describing the non-linear self-consistent theory of excitations, of high numbers harmonics by ensemble of oscillators are formulated and its numerical analysis is conducted. The numerical analysis has confirmed the capability of radiation of high numbers of harmonics. Such peculiarity of radiation allows t expect of creation of nonrelativistic FEL

  10. Multi-photon Rabi oscillations in high spin paramagnetic impurity

    Bertaina, S; Groll, N; Chen, L; Chiorescu, I

    2011-01-01

    We report on multiple photon monochromatic quantum oscillations (Rabi oscillations) observed by pulsed EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) of Mn 2+ (S = 5/2) impurities in MgO. We find that when the microwave magnetic field is similar or large than the anisotropy splitting, the Rabi oscillations have a spectrum made of many frequencies not predicted by the S = l/2 Rabi model. We show that these new frequencies come from multiple photon coherent manipulation of the multi-level spin impurity. We develop a model based on the crystal field theory and the rotating frame approximation, describing the observed phenomenon with a very good agreement.

  11. Cosmic very high-energy {gamma}-rays

    Plaga, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article gives a brief overview, aimed at nonspecialists, about the goals and selected recent results of the detection of very-high energy {gamma}-rays (energies above 100 GeV) with ground based detectors. The stress is on the physics questions, specially the origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays and the emission of TeV {gamma}-radiation from active galaxies. Moreover some particle-physics questions which are addressed in this area are discussed.

  12. Gamma-Ray Imager With High Spatial And Spectral Resolution

    Callas, John L.; Varnell, Larry S.; Wheaton, William A.; Mahoney, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma-ray instrument developed to enable both two-dimensional imaging at relatively high spatial resolution and spectroscopy at fractional-photon-energy resolution of about 10 to the negative 3rd power in photon-energy range from 10 keV to greater than 10 MeV. In its spectroscopic aspect, instrument enables identification of both narrow and weak gamma-ray spectral peaks.

  13. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1990-02-01

    Our scientific goal is to discover and study by means of gamma-ray astronomy those regions of the universe where particles are accelerated to extreme energies. The atmospheric Cherenkov technique provides a unique and potentially sensitive window in the region of 10 11 to approximately 10 14 eV for this purpose. The Whipple Observatory Collaboration is currently engaged in the development of a Cherenkov camera which has the ultimate capability of distinguishing gamma-ray showers from the numerous cosmic-ray background showers by imaging the Cherenkov light from each shower. We have recently demonstrated the potential of the imaging technique with our 18 sigma detection of TeV photons from the Crab Nebula using a camera of 10 elements, pixel spacing 0.25 degrees. This detection represents a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity compared to a non-imaging detector. The next step in the development of the detector is to obtain a second large reflector, similar to the present 10 meter instrument, for stereoscopic viewing of showers. This project, named GRANITE, is now approved by DOE. With GRANITE it should be possible to probe more deeply in space by a factor of 7, and to fully investigate the possibility of new physics which has been suggested by reports of anomalous radiation from Hercules X-1. 18 refs

  14. Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation footprint on global high cloud cover

    Vaideanu, Petru; Dima, Mihai; Voiculescu, Mirela

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of the physical processes responsible for cloud formation and to the relatively short satellite database of continuous data records, cloud behavior in a warming climate remains uncertain. Identifying physical links between climate modes and clouds would contribute not only to a better understanding of the physical processes governing their formation and dynamics, but also to an improved representation of the clouds in climate models. Here, we identify the global footprint of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) on high cloud cover, with focus on the tropical and North Atlantic, tropical Pacific and on the circum-Antarctic sector. In the tropical band, the sea surface temperature (SST) and high cloud cover (HCC) anomalies are positively correlated, indicating a dominant role played by convection in mediating the influence of the AMO-related SST anomalies on the HCC field. The negative SST-HCC correlation observed in North Atlantic could be explained by the reduced meridional temperature gradient induced by the AMO positive phase, which would be reflected in less storms and negative HCC anomalies. A similar negative SST-HCC correlation is observed around Antarctica. The corresponding negative correlation around Antarctica could be generated dynamically, as a response to the intensified upward motion in the Ferrel cell. Despite the inherent imperfection of the observed and reanalysis data sets, the AMO footprint on HCC is found to be robust to the choice of dataset, statistical method, and specific time period considered.

  15. Modulation of alpha and gamma oscillations related to retrospectively orienting attention within working memory.

    Poch, Claudia; Campo, Pablo; Barnes, Gareth R

    2014-07-01

    Selective attention mechanisms allow us to focus on information that is relevant to the current behavior and, equally important, ignore irrelevant information. An influential model proposes that oscillatory neural activity in the alpha band serves as an active functional inhibitory mechanism. Recent studies have shown that, in the same way that attention can be selectively oriented to bias sensory processing in favor of relevant stimuli in perceptual tasks, it is also possible to retrospectively orient attention to internal representations held in working memory. However, these studies have not explored the associated oscillatory phenomena. In the current study, we analysed the patterns of neural oscillatory activity recorded with magnetoencephalography while participants performed a change detection task, in which a spatial retro-cue was presented during the maintenance period, indicating which item or items were relevant for subsequent retrieval. Participants benefited from retro-cues in terms of accuracy and reaction time. Retro-cues also modulated oscillatory activity in the alpha and gamma frequency bands. We observed greater alpha activity in a ventral visual region ipsilateral to the attended hemifield, thus supporting its suppressive role, i.e., a functional disengagement of task-irrelevant regions. Accompanying this modulation, we found an increase in gamma activity contralateral to the attended hemifield, which could reflect attentional orienting and selective processing. These findings suggest that the oscillatory mechanisms underlying attentional orienting to representations held in working memory are similar to those engaged when attention is oriented in the perceptual space. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Plutonium characterisation with prompt high energy gamma-rays from (n,gamma) reactions for nuclear warhead dismantlement verification

    Postelt, Frederik; Gerald, Kirchner [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker-Centre for Science and Peace Research, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of neutron induced gammas allow the characterisation of fissile material (i.e. plutonium and uranium), despite self- and additional shielding. Most prompt gamma-rays from radiative neutron capture reactions in fissile material have energies between 3 and 6.5 MeV. Such high energy photons have a high penetrability and therefore minimise shielding and self-absorption effects. They are also isotope specific and therefore well suited to determine the isotopic composition of fissile material. As they are non-destructive, their application in dismantlement verification is desirable. Disadvantages are low detector efficiencies at high gamma energies, as well as a high background of gammas which result from induced fission reactions in the fissile material, as well as delayed gammas from both, (n,f) and(n,gamma) reactions. In this talk, simulations of (n,gamma) measurements and their implications are presented. Their potential for characterising fissile material is assessed and open questions are addressed.

  17. Disinfection of wastewaters: high-energy electron vs gamma irradiation

    Farooq, S [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Kurucz, C N; Waite, T D [Miami Univ., Coral Gables, FL (United States); Cooper, W J [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Drinking Water Research Center

    1993-07-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the sensitivity of a wastewater population of coliphage, total coliforms and total flora present in raw sewage and secondary effluent after irradiating with similar doses delivered by a high-energy electron beam and [gamma]-radiation. The electron beam study was conducted on a large scale at the Virginia Key Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami, Florida. The facility is equipped with a 1.5 MeV, 50 mA electron accelerator, with a wastewater flow rate of 8ls[sup -1]. Concurrent [gamma]-radiation studies were conducted at laboratory scale using a 5000 Ci, [sup 60]Co [gamma]-source. Three logs reduction of all three test organisms were observed at an electron beam dose of 500 krads, while at least four logs reduction were observed at the same dose utilizing the [gamma]'source. (Author).

  18. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  19. ISPA - a high accuracy X-ray and gamma camera Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    2000-01-01

    ISPA offers ... Ten times better resolution than Anger cameras High efficiency single gamma counting Noise reduction by sensitivity to gamma energy ...for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

  20. Active auditory experience in infancy promotes brain plasticity in Theta and Gamma oscillations

    Gabriella Musacchia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Language acquisition in infants is driven by on-going neural plasticity that is acutely sensitive to environmental acoustic cues. Recent studies showed that attention-based experience with non-linguistic, temporally-modulated auditory stimuli sharpens cortical responses. A previous ERP study from this laboratory showed that interactive auditory experience via behavior-based feedback (AEx, over a 6-week period from 4- to 7-months-of-age, confers a processing advantage, compared to passive auditory exposure (PEx or maturation alone (Naïve Control, NC. Here, we provide a follow-up investigation of the underlying neural oscillatory patterns in these three groups. In AEx infants, Standard stimuli with invariant frequency (STD elicited greater Theta-band (4–6 Hz activity in Right Auditory Cortex (RAC, as compared to NC infants, and Deviant stimuli with rapid frequency change (DEV elicited larger responses in Left Auditory Cortex (LAC. PEx and NC counterparts showed less-mature bilateral patterns. AEx infants also displayed stronger Gamma (33–37 Hz activity in the LAC during DEV discrimination, compared to NCs, while NC and PEx groups demonstrated bilateral activity in this band, if at all. This suggests that interactive acoustic experience with non-linguistic stimuli can promote a distinct, robust and precise cortical pattern during rapid auditory processing, perhaps reflecting mechanisms that support fine-tuning of early acoustic mapping.

  1. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of the soft gamma repeater J1550–5418

    Huppenkothen, D.; D' Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; Van der Klis, M.; Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, C. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y. [SabancıUniversity, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Von Kienlin, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Younes, G., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550–5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ∼93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  2. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  3. Determining the true polarity and amplitude of synaptic currents underlying gamma oscillations of local field potentials.

    Gonzalo Martín-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in successive waves of oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs reflect the ongoing processing of neuron populations. However, their amplitude, polarity and synaptic origin are uncertain due to the blending of electric fields produced by multiple converging inputs, and the lack of a baseline in standard AC-coupled recordings. Consequently, the estimation of underlying currents by laminar analysis yields spurious sequences of inward and outward currents. We devised a combined analytical/experimental approach that is suitable to study laminated structures. The approach was essayed on an experimental oscillatory LFP as the Schaffer-CA1 gamma input in anesthetized rats, and it was verified by parallel processing of model LFPs obtained through a realistic CA1 aggregate of compartmental units. This approach requires laminar LFP recordings and the isolation of the oscillatory input from other converging pathways, which was achieved through an independent component analysis. It also allows the spatial and temporal components of pathway-specific LFPs to be separated. While reconstructed Schaffer-specific LFPs still show spurious inward/outward current sequences, these were clearly stratified into distinct subcellular domains. These spatial bands guided the localized delivery of neurotransmitter blockers in experiments. As expected, only Glutamate but not GABA blockers abolished Schaffer LFPs when applied to the active but not passive subcellular domains of pyramidal cells. The known chemical nature of the oscillatory LFP allowed an empirical offset of the temporal component of Schaffer LFPs, such that following reconstruction they yield only sinks or sources at the appropriate sites. In terms of number and polarity, some waves increased and others decreased proportional to the concomitant inputs in native multisynaptic LFPs. Interestingly, the processing also retrieved the initiation time for each wave, which can be used to discriminate

  4. NMDA receptor antagonist-enhanced high frequency oscillations: are they generated broadly or regionally specific?

    Olszewski, Maciej; Dolowa, Wioleta; Matulewicz, Pawel; Kasicki, Stefan; Hunt, Mark J

    2013-12-01

    Systemic administration of NMDA receptor antagonists, used to model schizophrenia, increase the power of high-frequency oscillations (130-180Hz, HFO) in a variety of neuroanatomical and functionally distinct brain regions. However, it is unclear whether HFO are independently and locally generated or instead spread from a distant source. To address this issue, we used local infusion of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to distinct brain areas to determine how accurately HFO recorded after injection of NMDAR antagonists reflect the activity actually generated at the electrode tip. Changes in power were evaluated in local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex and caudate and in electrocorticograms (ECoGs) from visual and frontal areas. HFO recorded in frontal and visual cortices (ECoGs) or in the prefrontal cortex, caudate (LFPs) co-varied in power and frequency with observed changes in the NAc. TTX infusion to the NAc immediately and profoundly reduced the power of accumbal HFO which correlated with changes in HFO recorded in distant cortical sites. In contrast, TTX infusion to the prefrontal cortex did not change HFO power recorded locally, although gamma power was reduced. A very similar result was found after TTX infusion to the caudate. These findings raise the possibility that the NAc is an important neural generator. Our data also support existing studies challenging the idea that high frequencies recorded in LFPs are necessarily generated at the recording site. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioresistance increase in polymers at high pressures. [. gamma. rays

    Milinchuk, V; KIRJUKHIN, V; KLINSHPONT, E

    1977-06-01

    The effect was studied of very high pressures ranging within 100 and 2,700 MPa on the radioresistance of polytetrafluoroethylene, polypropylene and polyethylene in gamma irradiation. For experiments industrial polymers in the shape of blocks, films and fibers were used. It is shown that in easily breakable polymers, such as polytetrafluoroethylene and polypropylene, 1.3 to 2 times less free radicals are formed as a result of gamma irradiation and a pressure of 150 MPa than at normal pressure. The considerably reduced radiation-chemical formation of radicals and the destruction suppression by cross-linking in polymers is the evidence of the polymer radioresistance in irradiation at high pressures.

  6. Very High Frequency Interleaved Self-Oscillating Resonant SEPIC Converter

    Kovacevic, Milovan; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    interconnection network between the switches which provides self-oscillating and interleaved operation. A design approach to ensure zero voltage switching (ZVS) condition of the MOSFET devices is provided. To verify the proposed method, an 11 W, 50 MHz prototype was built using low-cost VDMOS devices...

  7. On the possible effects of gluon number fluctuations on {gamma}{gamma} collisions at high energies

    Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We investigate the effects of the fluctuations on the total {gamma}{gamma}, {gamma}*{gamma}* cross sections and the real photon structure function F{sup {gamma}}{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}), considering a saturation phenomenological model for the dipole-dipole cross section and scattering amplitude with fluctuations included.

  8. Ultra high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    Wdowczyk, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental data on ultra high energy γ-rays are reviewed and a comparison of the properties of photon and proton initiated shower is made. The consequences of the existence of the strong ultra high energy γ-ray sources for other observations is analysed and possible mechanisms for the production of ultra high energy γ-rays in the sources are discussed. It is demonstrated that if the γ-rays are produced via cosmic ray interactions the sources have to produce very high fluxes of cosmic ray particles. In fact it is possible that a small number of such sources can supply the whole Galactic cosmic ray flux

  9. Cosmic gamma radiation of ultra high energy of primordial origin

    Aquino Filho, F.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    The quantum mechanical effects near a collapsing black hole as shown by Stephen W.Hawking in 1974 to produce streaming particles through tunneling effect was explored in the context of cosmic gamma ray production. In this thesis, we show the possible production of gamma rays of high energies (ν approx 10 41 Hz) in the initial stages of the formation of the Universe by the explosion of primordial mini black holes. These mini black hole explosions happening at 10 -43 s to 10 -37 s after the start perhaps may account for the existing universal cosmic background radiation of 2.7 0 K. (Author) [pt

  10. The alterations in high density polyethylene properties with gamma irradiation

    Zaki, M. F.; Elshaer, Y. H.; Taha, Doaa. H.

    2017-10-01

    In the present investigation, high density polyethylene (HDPE) polymer has been used to study the alterations in its properties under gamma-irradiation. Physico-chemical properties have been investigated with different spectroscopy techniques, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), biocompatibility properties, as well as, mechanical properties change. The FT-IR analysis shows the formation of new band at 1716 cm-1 that is attributed to the oxidation of irradiated polymer chains, which is due to the formation of carbonyl groups (C˭O). XRD patterns show that a decrease in the crystallite size and increase in the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). This means that the crystallinity of irradiated samples is decreased with increase in gamma dose. The contact angle measurements show an increase in the surface free energy as the gamma irradiation increases. The measurements of mechanical properties of irradiated HDPE samples were discussed.

  11. CELESTE: an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    Paré, E.; Balauge, B.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bergeret, H.; Berny, F.; Briand, N.; Bruel, P.; Cerutti, M.; Collon, J.; Cordier, A.; Cornbise, P.; Debiais, G.; Dezalay, J. P.; Dumora, D.; Durand, E.; Eschstruth, P.; Espigat, P.; Fabre, B.; Fleury, P.; Gilly, J.; Gouillaud, J. C.; Gregory, C.; Hérault, N.; Holder, J.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Incerti, S.; Jouenne, A.; Kalt, L.; LeGallou, R.; Lott, B.; Manigot, P.; Neveu, J.; Olive, J. F.; Palatka, Miroslav; Perez, A.; Rebii, A.; Rob, L.; Sans, J. L.; Schovánek, Petr; Villard, G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 490, - (2002), s. 71-89 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : gamma-ray astronopy * atmospheric Cherenkov detector Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2002

  12. [Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high T c superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect

  13. Spectra of gamma-ray bursts at high energies

    Matz, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1980 February and 1983 August the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) observed 71 gamma-ray bursts. These events form a representative subset of the class of classical gamma-ray bursts. Since their discovery more than 15 years ago, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts have been detected; however, most observations have been limited to an energy range of roughly 30 keV-1 MeV. The large sensitive area and spectral range of the GRS allow, for the first time, an investigation of the high energy (>1 MeV) behavior of a substantial number of gamma-ray bursts. It is found that high-energy emission is seen in a large fraction of all events and that the data are consistent with all bursts emitting to at least 5 MeV with no cut-offs. Further, no burst spectrum measured by GRS has a clear high-energy cut-off. The high-energy emission can be a significant part of the total burst energy on the average about 30% of the observed energy above 30 keV is contained in the >1 MeV photons. The fact that the observations are consistent with the presence of high-energy emission in all events implies a limit on the preferential beaming of high-energy photons, from any mechanism. Single-photon pair-production in a strong magnetic field produces such beaming; assuming that the low-energy emission is isotropic, the data imply an upper limit of 1 x 10 12 G on the typical magnetic field at burst radiation sites

  14. High energy particles from {gamma}-ray bursts

    Waxman, E [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2001-11-15

    A review is presented of the fireball model of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs), and of the production in GRB fireballs of high energy protons and neutrinos. Constraints imposed on the model by recent afterglow observations, which support the association of GRB and ultra-high energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources, are discussed. Predictions of the GRB model for UHECR production, which can be tested with planned large area UHECR detectors and with planned high energy neutrino telescopes, are reviewed. (author)

  15. Spin Torque Oscillator for High Performance Magnetic Memory

    Rachid Sbiaa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A study on spin transfer torque switching in a magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is presented. The switching current can be strongly reduced under a spin torque oscillator (STO, and its use in addition to the conventional transport in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ should be considered. The reduction of the switching current from the parallel state to the antiparallel state is greater than in  the opposite direction, thus minimizing the asymmetry of the resistance versus current in the hysteresis loop. This reduction of both switching current and asymmetry under a spin torque oscillator occurs only during the writing process and does not affect the thermal stability of the free layer.

  16. High Reynolds number oscillations of a circular cylinder

    Hirata, Miguel H.; Pereira, Luiz Antonio A.; Recicar, Jan N.; Moura, Washington H. de

    2008-01-01

    This paper concerns the numerical simulation of the flow around an oscillating circular cylinder, which moves with constant velocity in a quiescent Newtonian fluid with constant properties. For each time step of the simulation a number of discrete Lamb vortices is placed close to the body surface; the intensity of each of these is determined such as to satisfy the no-slip boundary condition. The aerodynamic loads acting on the surface of cylinder are computed using the integral formulation de...

  17. Seismic probing of solar flows using high-degree oscillations

    Haber, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Employing solar-oscillation modes of degree 50 ≤ l ≤ 850, the author estimated the equatorial rotation rate with depth, searched for possible anisotropies in power for modes travelling in different directions, and examined the influence of a major flare on the oscillations. Motivated by the need in studying solar rotation for accurate frequency splittings between individual modes, different spatial-filtering methods were evaluated to determine which yield the most-accurate frequencies. A filtering method based on spherical-harmonic projection of the data is found to be superior in this regard. The various filtering techniques are applied to three days of concatenated Doppler-velocity data taken on a long, narrow grid centered on the solar disk. An inversion procedure is then performed to determine the equatorial solar rotation in the upper convection zone. The rotation rate is found to increase to a depth of about 2 Mm before decreasing over the next 14 Mm. Power in sectoral modes traveling along the equator (equatorial modes) is compared to that in poleward-traveling sectoral modes (polar modes). Full-disk Doppler velocities observed before and after a major white-light flare are compared to detect any influence of the flare on the 5-minute oscillations

  18. Studies Of Submicron 3He Slabs Using A High Precision Torsional Oscillator

    Corcoles, Antonio; Casey, Andrew; Cowan, Brian; Saunders, John; Parpia, Jeevak; Bowley, Roger

    2006-01-01

    A high precision torsional oscillator has been used to study 3He films of thickness in the range 100 to 350 nm. In previous work we found that the films decoupled from the oscillator motion below 60 mK, in the Knudsen limit. This precluded observation of the superfluid transition. Here we report measurements using a torsional oscillator whose highly polished inner surfaces have been decorated with a low density of silver particles to act as random elastic scattering centres. This modification locks the normal film to the surface. A superfluid transition of the film is observed

  19. Self-oscillations in large storages of highly mineralized brines

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Tsiberkin, Kirill; Parshakova, Yanina

    2014-05-01

    One of the stages of the production process at large enrichment plants is settling of aqueous solutions in large technological storages. The present work is devoted to the modeling of hydrodynamic regimes of large storage of highly mineralized brines. The density of brines in these objects depends not only on the content of dissolved macrocomponents, but also on the concentration of fine particulate matter. This leads to the need to consider the dynamics of the suspended sediment under significant density stratification, which greatly complicates the problem. Because of that it is important to develop hydrodynamical models of these objects. A peculiarity of these systems is the possibility of self-oscillatory regimes the mechanism of which is as follows. In warm sunny days, with high solar insolation, the heating of the sediments and bottom water takes place. The bottom water warming and the decrease of its density give rise to flow. The slurry particles composing the sediments are involved in the flow. The heated particles entrained by the flow transfer the heat to the surrounding liquid and increase the absorption of the solar radiation in the volume, which leads to equalization of temperature and convective flow damping. After the particle settling on the bottom the process is repeated. We study the stability of equilibrium of the horizontal liquid layer containing heavy insoluble particles in the presence of evaporation from the free surface and solar radiation absorption by insoluble particles. The time-dependent solution of heat transfer problem is obtained and used for estimate of time of instability onset. It is found that for the layer of saturated brines of potassium chloride of the thickness about 10 m the time for instability onset is about one hour. By using analytical estimates based on the empirical model of turbulence by Prandtl we confirmed the time for the onset of instability and obtained the estimates for the period of self-oscillations

  20. Circuit oscillations in odor perception and memory.

    Kay, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory system neural oscillations as seen in the local field potential have been studied for many decades. Recent research has shown that there is a functional role for the most studied gamma oscillations (40-100Hz in rats and mice, and 20Hz in insects), without which fine odor discrimination is poor. When these oscillations are increased artificially, fine discrimination is increased, and when rats learn difficult and highly overlapping odor discriminations, gamma is increased in power. Because of the depth of study on this oscillation, it is possible to point to specific changes in neural firing patterns as represented by the increase in gamma oscillation amplitude. However, we know far less about the mechanisms governing beta oscillations (15-30Hz in rats and mice), which are best associated with associative learning of responses to odor stimuli. These oscillations engage every part of the olfactory system that has so far been tested, plus the hippocampus, and the beta oscillation frequency band is the one that is most reliably coherent with other regions during odor processing. Respiratory oscillations overlapping with the theta frequency band (2-12Hz) are associated with odor sniffing and normal breathing in rats. They also show coupling in some circumstances between olfactory areas and rare coupling between the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The latter occur in specific learning conditions in which coherence strength is negatively or positively correlated with performance, depending on the task. There is still much to learn about the role of neural oscillations in learning and memory, but techniques that have been brought to bear on gamma oscillations (current source density, computational modeling, slice physiology, behavioral studies) should deliver much needed knowledge of these events. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  2. Stereotyped high-frequency oscillations discriminate seizure onset zones and critical functional cortex in focal epilepsy.

    Liu, Su; Gurses, Candan; Sha, Zhiyi; Quach, Michael M; Sencer, Altay; Bebek, Nerses; Curry, Daniel J; Prabhu, Sujit; Tummala, Sudhakar; Henry, Thomas R; Ince, Nuri F

    2018-01-30

    High-frequency oscillations in local field potentials recorded with intracranial EEG are putative biomarkers of seizure onset zones in epileptic brain. However, localized 80-500 Hz oscillations can also be recorded from normal and non-epileptic cerebral structures. When defined only by rate or frequency, physiological high-frequency oscillations are indistinguishable from pathological ones, which limit their application in epilepsy presurgical planning. We hypothesized that pathological high-frequency oscillations occur in a repetitive fashion with a similar waveform morphology that specifically indicates seizure onset zones. We investigated the waveform patterns of automatically detected high-frequency oscillations in 13 epilepsy patients and five control subjects, with an average of 73 subdural and intracerebral electrodes recorded per patient. The repetitive oscillatory waveforms were identified by using a pipeline of unsupervised machine learning techniques and were then correlated with independently clinician-defined seizure onset zones. Consistently in all patients, the stereotypical high-frequency oscillations with the highest degree of waveform similarity were localized within the seizure onset zones only, whereas the channels generating high-frequency oscillations embedded in random waveforms were found in the functional regions independent from the epileptogenic locations. The repetitive waveform pattern was more evident in fast ripples compared to ripples, suggesting a potential association between waveform repetition and the underlying pathological network. Our findings provided a new tool for the interpretation of pathological high-frequency oscillations that can be efficiently applied to distinguish seizure onset zones from functionally important sites, which is a critical step towards the translation of these signature events into valid clinical biomarkers.awx374media15721572971001. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on

  3. DC-link voltage oscillations reduction during unbalanced grid faults for high power wind turbines

    Delpino, Hernan Anres Miranda; Teodorescu, Remus; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    During unbalanced grid voltage faults the Power injected to the grid experiences 100Hz oscillations as a result of interactions between positive and negative sequence components of three-phase voltages and currents. These oscillations can become as high as %50 percent of the rated power....... In this article an improved controller is proposed which present different behavior during normal operation and faults to keep track of non-sinusoidal current reference signals. The reference signals are calculated to obtain zero power oscillations. Reconfigurable resonant controllers are used for this purpose...

  4. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  5. Supramodal Theta, Gamma, and Sustained Fields Predict Modality-specific Modulations of Alpha and Beta Oscillations during Visual and Tactile Working Memory.

    van Ede, Freek; Jensen, Ole; Maris, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Flexible control over currently relevant sensory representations is an essential feature of primate cognition. We investigated the neurophysiological bases of such flexible control in humans during an intermodal working memory task in which participants retained visual or tactile sequences. Using magnetoencephalography, we first show that working memory retention engages early visual and somatosensory areas, as reflected in the sustained load-dependent suppression of alpha and beta oscillations. Next, we identify three components that are also load dependent but modality independent: medial prefrontal theta synchronization, frontoparietal gamma synchronization, and sustained parietal event-related fields. Critically, these domain-general components predict (across trials and within load conditions) the modality-specific suppression of alpha and beta oscillations, with largely unique contributions per component. Thus, working memory engages multiple complementary frontoparietal components that have discernible neuronal dynamics and that flexibly modulate retention-related activity in sensory areas in a manner that tracks the current contents of working memory.

  6. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago

    2017-01-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm -1 and 3271 cm -1 , with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  7. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago, E-mail: elisete.cunha@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Oliveira, Cristiana M.; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm{sup -1} and 3271 cm{sup -1}, with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  8. New stage in high-energy gamma-ray studies with GAMMA-400 after Fermi-LAT

    Topchiev N.P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermi-LAT has made a significant contribution to the study of high-energy gamma-ray diffuse emission and the observations of 3000 discrete sources. However, one third of all gamma-ray sources (both galactic and extragalactic are unidentified, the data on the diffuse gamma-ray emission should be clarified, and signatures of dark matter particles in the high-energy gamma-ray range are not observed up to now. GAMMA-400, the currently developing gamma-ray telescope, will have angular (∼0.01∘ at 100 GeV and energy (∼1% at 100 GeV resolutions in the energy range of 10–1000 GeV which are better than Fermi-LAT (as well as ground gamma-ray telescopes by a factor of 5–10. It will observe some regions of the Universe (such as the Galactic Center, Fermi Bubbles, Crab, Cygnus, etc. in a highly elliptic orbit (without shading the telescope by the Earth continuously for a long time. It will allow us to identify many discrete sources, to clarify the structure of extended sources, to specify the data on the diffuse emission, and to resolve gamma rays from dark matter particles.

  9. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations between highly excited Stark states of potassium

    He Yonglin

    2011-01-01

    We have applied a nonperturbative resonant theory to study the Rabi frequency of microwave multiphoton transitions between two Rydberg states of potassium in a static electric field. The Stark electric dipole moments used to calculate the Rabi frequency are determined by the Stark states' wave functions, which are obtained by the diagonalization method. The frequencies of the Rabi oscillations are in good agreement with either experimental ones or ones calculated by the time-dependent close-coupling method and the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we are able to show that the size of avoided crossings between the (n+2)s and (n,3) states can be predicted from the Stark electric dipole moment and the difference of the two Stark states' energy at a given resonance.

  10. Experimental high power plasma-filled backward wave oscillator results

    Minami, K.; Lou, W.R.; Destler, W.W.; Kehs, R.A.; Granatstein, V.L.; Carmel, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Previous results have indicated that a background gas can be used to increase the output microwave power of relativistic backward wave oscillators (BWOs) two or three times the vacuum case. In their experiments, two methods of plasma production are investigated in detail: the use of the electron beam to ionize a background gas, and the use of a plasma gun to inject a background plasma into the slow-wave structure of a BWO. It is found in the first case that there was a resonant increase in microwave power at a particular pressure of the background gas by a factor of ten. In the second case, power also increased compared with power production in vacuum. Detailed results are presented and the relative merits of the two approaches is discussed and compared with theoretical expectations

  11. Laboratory of High resolution gamma spectrometry; Laboratorio de espectrometria gamma de alta resolucion

    Mendez G, A.; Giber F, J.; Rivas C, I.; Reyes A, B

    1992-01-15

    The Department of Nuclear Experimentation of the Nuclear Systems Management requests the collaboration of the Engineering unit for the supervision of the execution of the work of the High resolution Gamma spectrometry and low bottom laboratory, using the hut of the sub critic reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. This laboratory has the purpose of determining the activity of special materials irradiated in nuclear power plants. In this report the architecture development, concepts, materials and diagrams for the realization of this type of work are presented. (Author)

  12. Dendritic calcium conductances generate high-frequency oscillation in thalamocortical neurons

    Pedroarena, Christine; Llinás, Rodolfo

    1997-01-01

    Cortical-projecting thalamic neurons, in guinea pig brain slices, display high-frequency membrane potential oscillations (20–80 Hz), when their somata are depolarized beyond −45 mV. These oscillations, preferentially located at dendritic sites, are supported by the activation of P/Q type calcium channels, as opposed to the expected persistent sodium conductance responsible for such rhythmic behavior in other central neurons. Short hyperpolarizing pulses reset the phase and transiently increas...

  13. Neuromagnetic beta and gamma oscillations in the somatosensory cortex after music training in healthy older adults and a chronic stroke patient.

    Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Extensive rehabilitation training can lead to functional improvement even years after a stroke. Although neuronal plasticity is considered as a main origin of such ameliorations, specific subtending mechanisms need further investigation. Our aim was to obtain objective neuromagnetic measures sensitive to brain reorganizations induced by a music-supported training. We applied 20-Hz vibrotactile stimuli to the index finger and the ring finger, recorded somatosensory steady-state responses with magnetoencephalography, and analyzed the cortical sources displaying oscillations synchronized with the external stimuli in two groups of healthy older adults before and after musical training or without training. In addition, we applied the same analysis for an anecdotic report of a single chronic stroke patient with hemiparetic arm and hand problems, who received music-supported therapy (MST). Healthy older adults showed significant finger separation within the primary somatotopic map. Beta dipole sources were more anterior located compared to gamma sources. An anterior shift of sources and increases in synchrony between the stimuli and beta and gamma oscillations were observed selectively after music training. In the stroke patient a normalization of somatotopic organization was observed after MST, with digit separation recovered after training and stimulus induced gamma synchrony increased. The proposed stimulation paradigm captures the integrity of primary somatosensory hand representation. Source position and synchronization between the stimuli and gamma activity are indices, sensitive to music-supported training. Responsiveness was also observed in a chronic stroke patient, encouraging for the music-supported therapy. Notably, changes in somatosensory responses were observed, even though the therapy did not involve specific sensory discrimination training. The proposed protocol can be used for monitoring changes in neuronal organization during training and will improve

  14. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  15. Application of the Oslo method to high resolution gamma spectra

    Simon, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Beausang, C. W.; Humby, P.

    2015-10-01

    Hauser-Feshbach statistical model is a widely used tool for calculation of the reaction cross section, in particular for astrophysical processes. The HF model requires as an input an optical potential, gamma-strength function (GSF) and level density (LD) to properly model the statistical properties of the nucleus. The Oslo method is a well established technique to extract GSFs and LDs from experimental data, typically used for gamma-spectra obtained with scintillation detectors. Here, the first application of the Oslo method to high-resolution data obtained using the Ge detectors of the STARLITER setup at TAMU is discussed. The GSFs and LDs extracted from (p,d) and (p,t) reactions on 152154 ,Sm targets will be presented.

  16. Performance characteristics of high resolution semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry system

    Naing, Ko Ko

    1994-05-01

    A high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector has been used in Nuclear Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yangon University for over fourteen years. Now it is still being used and it is coupled to new peripheral devices, such as spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter and computer fit-in S-100 multichannel analyser. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the important parameters: energy resolution, detecting efficiency and relative efficiency of the system. In the present work, these parameters were obtained by using mixed calibrated source. The results were compared to the data given by the manufacturer. Moreover, the parameters of another {gamma}-ray detecting system NaI(T1) were also determined. In conclusion the results obtained from the above two measurements were compared and discussed

  17. Thin-film piezoelectric-on-silicon resonators for high-frequency reference oscillator applications.

    Abdolvand, Reza; Lavasani, Hossein M; Ho, Gavin K; Ayazi, Farrokh

    2008-12-01

    This paper studies the application of lateral bulk acoustic thin-film piezoelectric-on-substrate (TPoS) resonators in high-frequency reference oscillators. Low-motional-impedance TPoS resonators are designed and fabricated in 2 classes--high-order and coupled-array. Devices of each class are used to assemble reference oscillators and the performance characteristics of the oscillators are measured and discussed. Since the motional impedance of these devices is small, the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) in the oscillator loop can be reduced to a single transistor and 3 resistors, a format that is very power-efficient. The lowest reported power consumption is approximately 350 microW for an oscillator operating at approximately 106 MHz. A passive temperature compensation method is also utilized by including the buried oxide layer of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate in the structural resonant body of the device, and a very small (-2.4 ppm/ degrees C) temperature coefficient of frequency is obtained for an 82-MHz oscillator.

  18. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dawn- Dusk Auroral Oval Oscillations Associated with High- Speed Solar Wind

    Liou, Kan; Sibeck, David G.

    2018-01-01

    We report evidence of global-scale auroral oval oscillations in the millihertz range, using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager on board the decommissioned Polar satellite and concurrent solar wind measurements. On the basis of two events (15 January 1999 and 6 January 2000) studied, it is found that (1) quasi-periodic auroral oval oscillations (approximately 3 megahertz) can occur when solar wind speeds are high at northward or southward interplanetary magnetic field turning, (2) the oscillation amplitudes range from a few to more than 10 degrees in latitudes, (3) the oscillation frequency is the same for each event irrespective of local time and without any azimuthal phase shift (i.e., propagation), (4) the auroral oscillations occur in phase within both the dawn and dusk sectors but 180 degrees out of phase between the dawn and dusk sectors, and (5) no micropulsations on the ground match the auroral oscillation periods. While solar wind conditions favor the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability on the magnetopause as often suggested, the observed wave characteristics are not consistent with predictions for K-H waves. The in-phase and out-of-phase features found in the dawn-dusk auroral oval oscillations suggest that wiggling motions of the magnetotail associated with fast solar winds might be the direct cause of the global-scale millihertz auroral oval oscillations. Plain Language Summary: We utilize global auroral image data to infer the motion of the magnetosphere and show, for the first time, the entire magnetospheric tail can move east-west in harmony like a windsock flapping in wind. The characteristic period of the flapping motion may be a major source of global long-period ULF (Ultra Low Frequency) waves, adding an extra source of the global mode ULF waves.

  20. Improved GAMMA 10 tandem mirror confinement in high density plasma

    Yatsu, K.; Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Ishimoto, Y.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Minami, R.; Nakashima, Y.; Numakura, T.; Saito, T.; Saosaki, S.; Takemura, Y.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2003-01-01

    GAMMA 10 experiments have advanced in high density experiments after the last IAEA fusion energy conference in 2000 where we reported the production of the high density plasma through use of ion cyclotron range of frequency heating at a high harmonic frequency and neutral beam injection in the anchor cells. However, the diamagnetic signal of the plasma decreased when electron cyclotron resonance heating was applied for the potential formation. Recently a high density plasma has been obtained without degradation of the diamagnetic signal and with much improved reproducibility than before. The high density plasma was attained through adjustment of the spacing of the conducting plates installed in the anchor transition regions. The potential confinement of the plasma has been extensively studied. Dependences of the ion confinement time, ion-energy confinement time and plasma confining potential on plasma density were obtained for the first time in the high density region up to a density of 4x10 18 m -3 . (author)

  1. Oscillator monitor

    McNeill, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Present high-speed data acquisition systems in nuclear diagnostics use high-frequency oscillators to provide timing references for signals recorded on fast, traveling-wave oscilloscopes. An oscillator's sinusoidal wave shape is superimposed on the recorded signal with each cycle representing a fixed time increment. During data analysis the sinusoid is stripped from the signal, leaving a clean signal shape with known timing. Since all signal/time relationships are totally dependant upon working oscillators, these critical devices must have remote verification of proper operation. This manual presents the newly-developed oscillator monitor which will provide the required verification

  2. Servo-controlled pneumatic pressure oscillator for respiratory impedance measurements and high-frequency ventilation.

    Kaczka, David W; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2004-04-01

    The ability to provide forced oscillatory excitation of the respiratory system can be useful in mechanical impedance measurements as well as high frequency ventilation (HFV). Experimental systems currently used for generating forced oscillations are limited in their ability to provide high amplitude flows or maintain the respiratory system at a constant mean pressure during excitation. This paper presents the design and implementation of a pneumatic pressure oscillator based on a proportional solenoid valve. The device is capable of providing forced oscillatory excitations to the respiratory system over a bandwidth suitable for mechanical impedance measurements and HVF. It delivers high amplitude flows (> 1.4 l/s) and utilizes a servo-control mechanism to maintain a load at a fixed mean pressure during simultaneous oscillation. Under open-loop conditions, the device exhibited a static hysteresis of approximately 7%, while its dynamic magnitude and phase responses were flat out to 10 Hz. Broad-band measurement of total harmonic distortion was approximately 19%. Under closed-loop conditions, the oscillator was able to maintain a mechanical test load at both positive and negative mean pressures during oscillatory excitations from 0.1 to 10.0 Hz. Impedance of the test load agreed closely with theoretical predictions. We conclude that this servo-controlled oscillator can be a useful tool for respiratory impedance measurements as well as HFV.

  3. High-energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts

    Dermer, Charles D.; Atoyan, Armen

    2003-01-01

    We treat high-energy neutrino production in gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Detailed calculations of photomeson neutrino production are presented for the collapsar model, where internal nonthermal synchrotron radiation is the primary target photon field, and the supranova model, where external pulsar-wind synchrotron radiation provides important additional target photons. Detection of > or approx. 10 TeV neutrinos from GRBs with Doppler factors > or approx. 200, inferred from γ-ray observations, would support the supranova model. Detection of or approx. 3x10 -4 erg cm -2 offer a realistic prospect for detection of ν μ

  4. High Reliability Oscillators for Terahertz Systems, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To develop reliable THz sources with high power and high DC-RF efficiency, Virginia Diodes, Inc. will develop a thorough understanding of the complex interactions...

  5. Beta activity measurements in high, variable gamma backgrounds

    Stanga, D.; Sandu, E.; Craciun, L.

    1997-01-01

    In many cases beta activity measurements must be performed in high and variable gamma backgrounds. In such instances it is necessary to use well-shielded detectors but this technique is limited to laboratory equipment and frequently insufficient. In order to perform in a simple manner beta activity measurements in high and variable backgrounds a software-aided counting technique have been developed and a counting system have been constructed. This technique combines the different counting techniques with traditional method of successive measurement of the sample and background. The counting system is based on a programmable multi-scaler which is endowed with appropriate software and allow all operations to be performed via keyboard in an interactive fashion. Two large - area proportional detectors were selected in order to have the same background and the same gamma response within 5%. A program has been developed for the counting data analysis and beta activity computing. The software-aided counting technique has been implemented for beta activity measurement in high and variable backgrounds. (authors)

  6. Characterization of tunable light source by optical parametric oscillator for high resolution spectroscopy

    Wu, J. W. [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea); Rhee, B. G. [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea); Park, S. W. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea); Noh, J. W. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    A tunable light source is developed by the optical parametric oscillator, which is very useful for a high resolution spectroscopy. The electronic structure of molecules and atoms can be examined by a proper coherent light source. Optical parametric oscillator provides light sources stable and widely tunable. In this work, the characteristics of the parametric optical generation are examined in the LiNbO{sub 3}. The theoretical analysis as well as the experimental measurement is performed. The pump laser is a second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser, and the parametric gain is measured. The characteristics of singly resonant oscillator and doubly resonant oscillator is studied as a function of temperature. It is found that 1mole% MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal provides the tunability from 0.6{mu}m to 3.0{mu}m wavelength. Both the critical and noncritical phase matching are studied. The optical damage occurring in a congruent LiNbO{sub 3} crystal was not observed in 1mole% MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal, opening a possibility for a high power optical parametric oscillation generation. The current work can be extended to an experiment employing the fundamental Nd:YAG as pump to provide a coherent light source for the study of molecular vibrations. 28 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  7. Observation and analysis of oscillations in linear accelerators

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following on oscillation in linear accelerators: Betatron Oscillations; Betatron Oscillations at High Currents; Transverse Profile Oscillations; Transverse Profile Oscillations at High Currents.; Oscillation and Profile Transient Jitter; and Feedback on Transverse Oscillations

  8. Some aspects related to the high performance in gamma spectrometry

    Vieru, Gheorghe; Mihaiu, Ramona; Nistor, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Gamma spectroscopy is the science (or art) of identification and/or quantification of radionuclides through gamma-ray energy spectrum analysis. It is a recognized technique, well illustrated by the following examples: environmental radioactivity monitoring, health physics personnel monitoring, reactor corrosion monitoring, nuclear materials safeguards and homeland security, as well as nuclear forensics, materials testing, nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals, and industrial process monitoring. Within the Reliability and Testing Laboratory of INR Pitesti there is now available such a detector of high performance that includes all aspects related to cooling, signal processing (with a high resolution) and the dedicated software applications. At the present time, taking into account the 'nuclear renaissance' the new experimental testing laboratories require complete set-up rather than laboratories having a mixture of the old equipment. The paper presents the mechanically cooled HPGe spectrometers with an undergoing rapid evolution, which eliminate traditional intensive liquid nitrogen management. Also, there are described the digital signal processing virtually by eliminating system drift, and, at the same time, requiring recalibrations much less frequently. Another important aspect presented is related to the software applications, which cover a broad spectrum of nuclear measurement techniques. (authors)

  9. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  10. Oscillation effects on high-energy neutrino fluxes from astrophysical hidden sources

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Razzaque, Soebur

    2007-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos are expected to be produced in a variety of astrophysical sources as well as in optically thick hidden sources. We explore the matter-induced oscillation effects on emitted neutrino fluxes of three different flavors from the latter class. We use the ratio of electron and tau induced showers to muon tracks, in upcoming neutrino telescopes, as the principal observable in our analysis. This ratio depends on the neutrino energy, density profile of the sources, and on the oscillation parameters. The largely unknown flux normalization drops out of our calculation and only affects the statistics. For the current knowledge of the oscillation parameters we find that the matter-induced effects are non-negligible and the enhancement of the ratio from its vacuum value takes place in an energy range where the neutrino telescopes are the most sensitive. Quantifying the effect would be useful to learn about the astrophysics of the sources as well as the oscillation parameters. If the neutrino telescopes mostly detect diffuse neutrinos without identifying their sources, then any deviation of the measured flux ratios from the vacuum expectation values would be most naturally explained by a large population of hidden sources for which matter-induced neutrino oscillation effects are important

  11. Oscillations in the hadron scattering amplitude at high energy and small momentum transfer

    Nicolescu, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique

    1997-12-31

    It is shown that the high precision dN/dt UA4/2 data at {radical}s = 541 GeV are compatible with the presence of Auberson - Kinoshita - Martin (AKM) type of oscillations at very small momentum transfers. These oscillations seem to be periodic in {radical}|t|, the corresponding period being {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup -2} GeV. The existence of such visible oscillations suggests a general mechanism of saturation of axiomatic bounds. As an illustration the consequences for extracting the parameter {rho} = ReF/ImF from dN/dt data are also discussed. The necessity of specific future experiments in the crucially interesting TeV region of energy - at Tevatron, RHIC and LHC - is underlined. (author) 8 refs.

  12. Dynamic force microscopy with quartz tuning forks at high oscillation amplitudes

    Labardi, M

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic force microscopy (DFM) with the self-oscillator (SO) method allows reasonably high scanning rates even with high Q-factors of the resonant force sensor, typical of cantilevers in ultra-high vacuum and of quartz tuning forks. However, due to simpler interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements, small oscillation amplitudes (sub-nm level) are generally preferred. In applications like 'apertureless' scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), oscillation amplitudes of the order of 5-10 nm are needed to increase optical sensitivity and to apply standard optical artefact suppression methods. This motivates the study of the behaviour of tuning forks driven at such high amplitudes, as compared to usual air-operated cantilevers. Both constant-excitation-amplitude (CE) and constant-oscillation-amplitude (CA) modes of SO-DFM are analysed, since the CA mode is more convenient for SNOM applications, denoting remarkable differences. In particular, possible instability effects, previously found in CE mode, are not anticipated for CA mode. It is shown how resonance and approach ('isophase') curves in both modes can be conveniently described in terms of the usual 'normalized frequency shift' γ and of a 'normalized gain' η, defined as a measurement of surface dissipation

  13. High-frequency oscillations and seizure activity and in the human anterior nucleus of the thalamus

    Rektor, I.; Doležalová, I.; Chrastina, J.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Brázdil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, S1 (2015), s. 29-30 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /31./. 05.09.2015-09.09.2015, Istanbul] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * anterior nucleus of the thalamus Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment

  14. Radiation Build-Up Of High Energy Gamma In Shielding Of High Atomic Number

    Yuliati, Helfi; Akhadi, Mukhlis

    2000-01-01

    Research to observe effect of radiation build-up factor (b) in iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for high energy gamma shielding from exp.137 Cs (E gamma : 662 keV) and exp.60 Co (E gamma : 1332 keV) sources has been carried out. Research was conducted bt counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI (TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are near to 1 (b∼1) both for Fe and Pb. Without inserting b in calculation, from the experiment it was obtained HVT value of Fe for high gamma radiation of 662 and 1332 keV were : (12,94 n 0,03) mm and (17,33 n 0,01) mm with their deviation standards were 0,2% and 0,06% respectively. Value of HVT for Pb with the same energy were : (6,31 n 0,03) mm and (11,86 n 0,03) mm with their deviation standars were : 0,48% and 0,25% respectively. HVL concept could be applied directly to estimate shielding thickness of high atomic number of high energy gamma radiation, without inserting correction of radiation build-up factor

  15. Some aspects of ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy

    De Jager, O.C.

    1983-11-01

    A short review of ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray astronomy (10 11 14 eV) as well as a description of a planned experiment to be erected at Potchefstroom is given in the introduction. This experiment will be the first and only one in the Southern Hemisphere and as such may play an important role in this new field of astronomy and astrophysics. In the first part the necessary infrastructure for astronomical observations of known celestial objects is developed. This embodies the special physical, mechanical and astronomical constraints in this type of astronomy, such as the definition of the various astronomical coordinate systems and transformations between them, the effect of precession and nutation on the source position etc. This leads to automatic observation schedules for the various applicable techniques of observation. In the second part the various effects which may influence the arrival time of a gamma ray at the telescope is investigated. It is found that dispersion and relativistic effects are negligible, given the special type of analysis used in this low counting rate system. The classic Doppler effect due to the motion of Earth as well as the configuration of the telescope does have a major effect and must be taken into consideration when analysing the data. A simple method, depending only on the movement of Earth around the sun, is developed to simplify the identification of pulsars at the planned observatory where computing facilities are limited

  16. High Energy Gamma-rays from FR I Jets

    Sikora, M

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to Hubble and Chandra telescopes, some of the large scale jets in extragalactic radio sources are now being observed at optical and X-ray frequencies. For the FR I objects the synchrotron nature of this emission is surely established, although a lot of uncertainties--connected for example with the particle acceleration processes involved--remain. In this paper we study production of high energy gamma-rays in FR I kiloparsec-scale jets by inverse-Compton emission of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. We consider different origin of seed photons contributing to the inverse-Compton scattering, including nuclear jet radiation as well as ambient, stellar and circumstellar emission of the host galaxies. We discuss how future detections or non-detections of the evaluated gamma-ray fluxes can provide constraints on the unknown large scale jet parameters, i.e. the magnetic field intensity and the jet Doppler factor. For the nearby sources Centaurus A and M 87, we find measurable fluxes of TeV photons resulting...

  17. The 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine potentiates the effects of donepezil on gamma oscillations in the frontal cortex of anesthetized and awake rats without affecting sleep-wake architecture.

    Amat-Foraster, Maria; Leiser, Steven C; Herrik, Kjartan F; Richard, Nelly; Agerskov, Claus; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bastlund, Jesper F; de Jong, Inge E M

    2017-02-01

    The 5-HT 6 receptor is a promising target for cognitive disorders, in particular for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The high affinity and selective 5-HT 6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine (Lu AE58054) is currently in development for mild-moderate AD as adjunct therapy to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). We studied the effects of idalopirdine alone and in combination with the AChEI donepezil on cortical function using two in vivo electrophysiological methods. Neuronal network oscillations in the frontal cortex were measured during electrical stimulation of the brainstem nucleus pontis oralis (nPO) in the anesthetized rat and by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in the awake, freely moving rat. In conjunction with the EEG study, we investigated the effects of idalopirdine and donepezil on sleep-wake architecture using telemetric polysomnography. Idalopirdine (2 mg/kg i.v.) increased gamma power in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during nPO stimulation. Donepezil (0.3 and 1 mg/kg i.v.) also increased cortical gamma power and pretreatment with idalopirdine (2 mg/kg i.v.) potentiated and prolonged the effects of donepezil. Similarly, donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg s.c.) dose-dependently increased frontal cortical gamma power in the freely moving rat and pretreatment with idalopirdine (10 mg/kg p.o.) augmented the effect of donepezil 1 mg/kg. Analysis of the sleep-wake architecture showed that donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg s.c.) dose-dependently delayed sleep onset and decreased the time spent in both REM and non REM sleep stages. In contrast, idalopirdine (10 mg/kg p.o.) did not affect sleep-wake architecture nor the effects of donepezil. In summary, we show that idalopirdine potentiates the effects of donepezil on frontal cortical gamma oscillations, a pharmacodynamic biomarker associated with cognition, without modifying the effects of donepezil on sleep. The increased cortical excitability may contribute to the procognitive effects of idalopirdine in donepezil

  18. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  19. Resonator as high frequency electromagnetic field oscillation generator

    Svoroba, O.V.; Scherbina, V.O.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of finding the u(x-vector) field potential in a specific waveguide with generalized corrugated core geometry is considered. The perturbation is brought to the system by high energy electron beam, injected in a waveguide. It is shown that the Neumann spectral problem can be reduced to finding Green approximation solution, and how it can be solved by the discretization technique. Considered parameterization allow to optimize the u(x-vector) field for specific frequency tuning. This method can be used as plasma heating method for thermonuclear temperature control

  20. Highly efficient capillary polymerase chain reaction using an oscillation droplet microreactor

    Liu Dayu; Liang Guangtie; Lei Xiuxia; Chen Bin; Wang Wei; Zhou Xiaomian

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: An oscillation-flow approach using a droplet reactor was developed to fully explore the potential of continuous-flow PCR. By fully utilizing interfacial chemistry, a water-in-oil (w/o) droplet was automatically generated by allowing an oil–water plug to flow through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillary. Due to the movement of aqueous phase relative to the oil phase, the droplet moves further into the middle of the oil plug with increase in migration distance. The resulting droplet was transported spanning the two heating zones and was employed as the reactor of oscillating-flow PCR. Highlights: ► Droplet formation in a capillary. ► Transport the droplet using oscillation-flow. ► Oscillation droplet PCR. ► Improved reaction efficiency. - Abstract: The current work presents the development of a capillary-based oscillation droplet approach to maximize the potential of a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Through the full utilization of interfacial chemistry, a water-in-oil (w/o) droplet was generated by allowing an oil–water plug to flow along a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillary. The w/o droplet functioned as the reactor for oscillating-flow PCR to provide a stable reaction environment, accelerate reagent mixing, and eliminate surface adsorption. The capillary PCR approach proposed in the current research offers high amplification efficiency, fast reaction speed, and easy system control attributable to the oscillation droplet reactor. Experimental results show that the droplet-based micro-PCR assay requires lower reaction volume (2 μL) and shorter reaction time (12 min) compared with conventional PCR methods. Taking the amplification of the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM-1) gene as an example, the present work demonstrates that the oscillation droplet PCR assay is capable of achieving high efficiency up to 89.5% and a detection limit of 10 DNA copies. The miniature PCR protocol developed in the current

  1. High performance ring oscillators from 10-nm wide silicon nanowire field-effect transistors

    Huang, Ruo-Gu; Tham, Douglas; Wang, Dunwei; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    We explore 10-nm wide Si nanowire (SiNW) field-effect transistors (FETs) for logic applications, via the fabrication and testing of SiNW-based ring oscillators. We report on SiNW surface treatments and dielectric annealing, for producing SiNW FETs that exhibit high performance in terms of large on/off-state current ratio (~108), low drain-induced barrier lowering (~30 mV) and low subthreshold swing (~80 mV/decade). The performance of inverter and ring-oscillator circuits fabricated from these nanowire FETs are also explored. The inverter demonstrates the highest voltage gain (~148) reported for a SiNW-based NOT gate, and the ring oscillator exhibits near rail-to-rail oscillation centered at 13.4 MHz. The static and dynamic characteristics of these NW devices indicate that these SiNW-based FET circuits are excellent candidates for various high-performance nanoelectronic applications. © 2011 Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. High performance ring oscillators from 10-nm wide silicon nanowire field-effect transistors

    Huang, Ruo-Gu

    2011-06-24

    We explore 10-nm wide Si nanowire (SiNW) field-effect transistors (FETs) for logic applications, via the fabrication and testing of SiNW-based ring oscillators. We report on SiNW surface treatments and dielectric annealing, for producing SiNW FETs that exhibit high performance in terms of large on/off-state current ratio (~108), low drain-induced barrier lowering (~30 mV) and low subthreshold swing (~80 mV/decade). The performance of inverter and ring-oscillator circuits fabricated from these nanowire FETs are also explored. The inverter demonstrates the highest voltage gain (~148) reported for a SiNW-based NOT gate, and the ring oscillator exhibits near rail-to-rail oscillation centered at 13.4 MHz. The static and dynamic characteristics of these NW devices indicate that these SiNW-based FET circuits are excellent candidates for various high-performance nanoelectronic applications. © 2011 Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. Unattented mode monitoring of high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    Smith, B.G.R.; Van Dyck, P.; Debraix, P.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope Monitoring System (IMS) for unattended spectrum acquisition is described. This consists of a simple low cost flexible software package running on a Compaq 80386 and controlling up to 4 Canberra Packard System 100 multi-channel analyzer (MCA) cards. The IMS permits the independent configuration of each of the 4 MCA cards for different monitoring cycles and for different spectrum acquisition cycles each being based upon different trigger criteria. In this way IMS is able to automatically identify events, time tag them, and acquire and store valid spectra corresponding to those event. An additional feature of IMS permits to run a Multigroup Analysis (MGA) software package for the determination of plutonium isotopic compositions in batch mode. One particular application is discussed which consists of 4 high resolution gamma-ray detector systems connected together to the IMS for unattended spectrum acquisition. The off-line batch mode analysis of the spectra using MGA is also discussed

  4. Performance characteristics of high resolution semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry system

    Ko Ko Naing

    1994-05-01

    A high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector has been used in Nuclear Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yangon University for over fourteen years. Now it is still being used and it is coupled to new peripheral devices, such as spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter and computer fit-in S-100 multichannel analyser. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the important parameters: energy resolution, detecting efficiency and relative efficiency of the system. In the present work, these parameters were obtained by using mixed calibrated source. The results were compared to the data given by the manufacturer. Moreover, the parameters of another γ-ray detecting system NaI(T1) were also determined. In conclusion the results obtained from the above two measurements were compared and discussed

  5. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  6. Oscillations of non-isothermal N/S boundary with a high frequency and large amplitude

    Bezuglyj, A.I.; Shklovskij, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the phenomenological approach based on the heat balance equation and the dependence of the critical temperature of the superconductor on the current value theoretically investigated the impact of high-frequency current of high amplitude and arbitrary shape on the non-isothermal balance of the oscillating N/S interface in a long superconductor. We introduce a self-consistent average temperature field of rapidly oscillating non-isothermal N/S boundary (heat kink), which allows to go beyond the well-known concept of mean-square heating and consider the impact of current waveform. With regard to experiments on the effects of microwave high-power radiation on the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of superconducting films, we give the classification of the families of the CVC for inhomogeneous superconductors which carry a current containing a high frequency component of large amplitude. Several characteristics have hysteresis of thermal nature.

  7. Chaotic oscillations in a low pressure two-phase natural circulation loop under low power and high inlet subcooling conditions

    Wu, C.Y.; Wang, S.B.; Pan, C.

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation characteristics of a low pressure two-phase natural circulation loop have been investigated experimentally in this study. Experimental results indicate that the characteristics of the thermal hydraulic oscillations can be periodic, with 2-5 fundamental frequencies, or chaotic, depending on the heating power and inlet subcooling. The number of fundamental frequencies of oscillation increases if the inlet subcooling is increased at a given heating power or the heating power is decreased at a given inlet subcooling; chaotic oscillations appear if the inlet subcooling is further increased and/or the heating power is further decreased. A map of the oscillation characteristics is thus established. The change in oscillation characteristics is evident from the time evolution and power spectrum of a thermal hydraulic parameter and the phase portraits of two thermal hydraulic parameters. These results reveal that a strange attractor exists in a low pressure two-phase natural circulation loop with low power and very high inlet subcooling. (orig.)

  8. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  9. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bursts of the Crab Nebula gamma-ray emission at high and ultra-high energies

    Lidvansky A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the flares of gamma rays detected from the Crab Nebula by the AGILE and Fermi-LAT satellite instruments are compared with those of a gamma ray burst recorded by several air shower arrays on February 23, 1989 and with one recent observation made by the ARGO-YBJ array. It is demonstrated that though pulsar-periodicity and energy spectra of emissions at 100 MeV (satellite gamma ray telescopes and 100 TeV (EAS arrays are different, their time structures seem to be similar. Moreover, maybe the difference between “flares” and “waves” recently found in the Crab Nebula emission by the AGILE team also exists at ultra-high energies.

  11. Resection of individually identified high-rate high-frequency oscillations region is associated with favorable outcome in neocortical epilepsy

    Cho, J.R.; Koo, D.L.; Joo, E.Y.; Seo, D.W.; Hong, S.-Ch.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Hong, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2014), s. 1872-1883 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14489 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : epilepsy surgery * high-frequency oscillations * neocortical epilepsy Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.571, year: 2014

  12. Elucidation of the origins of transport behaviour and quantum oscillations in high temperature superconducting cuprates

    Wilson, John A

    2009-01-01

    A detailed exposition is given of recent transport and 'quantum oscillation' results from high temperature superconducting (HTSC) systems covering the full carrier range from overdoped to underdoped material. This now very extensive and high quality data set is here interpreted within the framework developed by the author of local pairs and boson-fermion resonance, arising in the context of negative- U behaviour within an inhomogeneous electronic environment. The strong inhomogeneity comes with the mixed-valence condition of these materials, which when underdoped lie in close proximity to the Mott-Anderson transition. The observed intense scattering is presented as resulting from pair formation and from electron-boson collisions in the resonant crossover circumstance. The high level of scattering carries the systems to incoherence in the pseudogapped state, p c (= 0.183). In a high magnetic field the striped partition of the inhomogeneous charge distribution becomes much strengthened and regularized. Magnetization and resistance oscillations, of period dictated by the favoured positioning of the fluxon array within the real space environment of the diagonal 2D charge striping array, are demonstrated to be responsible for the recently reported behaviour hitherto widely attributed to the quantum oscillation response of a much more standard Fermi liquid condition. A detailed analysis embracing all the experimental data serves to reveal that in the given conditions of very high field, low temperature, 2D-striped, underdoped, d-wave superconducting, HTSC material the flux quantum becomes doubled to h/e.

  13. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, AZ 85287 (United States); Cucchiara, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F. (Mexico); Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  14. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z phot , of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z phot < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z phot in the ranges of 4 < z phot ≲ 8 and 9 < z phot < 10 and can robustly determine when z phot > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z phot < 4 when z sim > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  15. Anomalous quartic W W gamma gamma, Z Z gamma gamma, and trilinear WW gamma couplings in two-photon processes at high luminosity at the LHC

    Chapon, E.; Royon, C.; Kepka, Oldřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2010), 074003/1-074003/22 ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : anomalous coupling * LHC Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.964, year: 2010 http://arxiv.org/pdf/0912.5161

  16. Constraining properties of high-density matter in neutron stars with magneto-elastic oscillations

    Gabler, Michael; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Font, José A.; Müller, Ewald

    2018-05-01

    We discuss torsional oscillations of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars) using two-dimensional, magneto-elastic-hydrodynamical simulations. Our model is able to explain both the low- and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in magnetars. The analysis of these oscillations provides constraints on the breakout magnetic-field strength, on the fundamental QPO frequency, and on the frequency of a particularly excited overtone. By performing a new set of simulations, we are able to derive for the first time empirical relations for a self consistent model including a superfluid core which describe these constraints quantitatively. We use these relations to generically constrain properties of high-density matter in neutron stars, employing Bayesian analysis. In spite of current uncertainties and computational approximations, our model-dependent Bayesian posterior estimates for SGR 1806-20 yield a magnetic-field strength \\bar{B}˜ 2.1^{+1.3}_{-1.0}× 10^{15} G and a crust thickness of Δ r = 1.6^{+0.7}_{-0.6} km, which are both in remarkable agreement with observational and theoretical expectations, respectively (1σ error bars are indicated). Our posteriors also favour the presence of a superfluid phase in the core, a relatively low stellar compactness, M/R star, and high shear speeds at the base of the crust, cs > 1.4 × 108 cm s-1. Although the procedure laid out here still has large uncertainties, these constraints could become tighter when additional observations become available.

  17. High-data-transfer-rate read heads composed of spin-torque oscillators

    Mizushima, K; Kudo, K; Nagasawa, T; Sato, R

    2011-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the high-data-transfer-rate read heads beyond 3 Gbits/s composed of spin-torque oscillators (STOs) are calculated under the thermal magnetization fluctuations by using the recent nonlinear theories. The STO head senses the media field as a modulation in the oscillation frequency, enabling high signal transfer rates beyond the limit of ferromagnetic relaxation. The output (digital) signal is obtained by FM (frequency modulation) detection, which is commonly used in communication technologies. As the problem of rapid phase diffusion in STOs caused by the thermal fluctuations is overcome by employing a delay detection method, the sufficiently large SNRs are obtained even in nonlinear STOs less than 30 x 30 nm 2 in size.

  18. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  19. Overexpression of Dyrk1A, a Down Syndrome Candidate, Decreases Excitability and Impairs Gamma Oscillations in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    Ruiz-Mejias, Marcel; Martinez de Lagran, Maria; Mattia, Maurizio; Castano-Prat, Patricia; Perez-Mendez, Lorena; Ciria-Suarez, Laura; Gener, Thomas; Sancristobal, Belen; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Dierssen, Mara

    2016-03-30

    The dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A is a serine/threonine kinase involved in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and a major candidate of Down syndrome brain alterations and cognitive deficits. DYRK1A is strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex, and its overexpression leads to defective cortical pyramidal cell morphology, synaptic plasticity deficits, and altered excitation/inhibition balance. These previous observations, however, do not allow predicting how the behavior of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) network and the resulting properties of its emergent activity are affected. Here, we integrate functional, anatomical, and computational data describing the prefrontal network alterations in transgenic mice overexpressingDyrk1A(TgDyrk1A). Usingin vivoextracellular recordings, we show decreased firing rate and gamma frequency power in the prefrontal network of anesthetized and awakeTgDyrk1Amice. Immunohistochemical analysis identified a selective reduction of vesicular GABA transporter punctae on parvalbumin positive neurons, without changes in the number of cortical GABAergic neurons in the PFC ofTgDyrk1Amice, which suggests that selective disinhibition of parvalbumin interneurons would result in an overinhibited functional network. Using a conductance-based computational model, we quantitatively demonstrate that this alteration could explain the observed functional deficits including decreased gamma power and firing rate. Our results suggest that dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons might be central to the pathophysiology of Down syndrome. DYRK1Ais a major candidate gene in Down syndrome. Its overexpression results into altered cognitive abilities, explained by defective cortical microarchitecture and excitation/inhibition imbalance. An open question is how these deficits impact the functionality of the prefrontal cortex network. Combining functional, anatomical, and computational approaches, we identified

  20. Radio frequency regenerative oscillations in monolithic high-Q/V heterostructured photonic crystal cavities

    Yang, Jinghui; Gu, Tingyi; Zheng, Jiangjun; Wei Wong, Chee; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2014-01-01

    We report temporal and spectral domain observation of regenerative oscillation in monolithic silicon heterostructured photonic crystals cavities with high quality factor to mode volume ratios (Q/V). The results are interpreted by nonlinear coupled mode theory (CMT) tracking the dynamics of photon, free carrier population, and temperature variations. We experimentally demonstrate effective tuning of the radio frequency tones by laser-cavity detuning and laser power levels, confirmed by the CMT simulations with sensitive input parameters

  1. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  2. Intracerebrally recorded high frequency oscillations: Simple visual assessment versus automated detection

    Pail, M.; Halámek, Josef; Daniel, P.; Kuba, R.; Tyrlíková, I.; Chrastina, J.; Jurák, Pavel; Rektor, I.; Brázdil, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 10 (2013), s. 1935-1942 ISSN 1388-2457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : High frequency oscillations * Spikes * Ripples * Temporal lobe epilepsy * Extratemporal lobe epilepsy * Seizure onset zone * Epileptogenic zone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.979, year: 2013

  3. Are All Oscillators Created Equal? In vitro Performance Characteristics of Eight High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilators.

    Tingay, David G; John, Jubal; Harcourt, Edward R; Black, Don; Dargaville, Peter A; Mills, John F; Davis, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    The mode of waveform generation and circuit characteristics differ between high-frequency oscillators. It is unknown if this influences performance. To describe the relationships between set and delivered pressure amplitude (x0394;P), and the interaction with frequency and endotracheal tube (ETT) diameter, in eight high-frequency oscillators. Oscillators were evaluated using a 70-ml test lung at 1.0 and 2.0 ml/cm H2O compliance, with mean airway pressures (PAW) of 10 and 20 cm H2O, frequencies of 5, 10 and 15 Hz, and an ETT diameter of 2.5 and 3.5 mm. At each permutation of PAW, frequency and ETT, the set x0394;P was sequentially increased from 15 to 50 cm H2O, or from 20 to 100% maximum amplitude (10% increments) depending on the oscillator design. The x0394;P at the ventilator (x0394;PVENT), airway opening (x0394;PAO) and within the test lung (x0394;PTRACH), and tidal volume (V(T)) at the airway opening were determined at each set x0394;P. In two oscillators the relationships between set and delivered x0394;P were non-linear, with a plateau in x0394;P thresholds noted at all frequencies (Dräger Babylog 8000) or ≥10 Hz (Dräger VN500). In all other devices there was a linear relationship between x0394;PVENT, x0394;PAO and x0394;PTRACH (all r2 >0.93), with differing attenuation of the pressure wave. Delivered V(T) at the different settings tested varied between devices, with some unable to deliver V(T) >3 ml at 15 Hz, and others generating V(T)>20 ml at 5 Hz and a 1:1 inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio. Clinicians should be aware that modern high-frequency oscillators exhibit important differences in the delivered x0394;P and V(T). © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays and prompt TeV gamma rays from ...

    physics pp. 789-792. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays and prompt. TeV gamma rays from gamma ray bursts ... The origin of the observed ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) events with ... are proton and electron rest mass, respectively.

  5. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  6. Design of power oscillator for 500 keV/20 mA Cockroft-Walton high voltage supply

    Djasiman; Sudjatmoko; Suprapto

    1999-01-01

    A design of power oscillator for Cockroft-Walton high voltage supply was carried out. This high voltage supply would be used as the acceleration voltage supply of an electron beam machine designed to have 500 keV/20 mA capacity. The power oscillator design consisted of output specification, circuit diagram, power supply and oscillator main components determinations. The power oscillator output wave power, voltage and frequency designed according to voltage multiplier input requirements. The design results showed that the circuit was class-c tickler oscillator having an output specification of 12.1 kW, 15 kV and 40 kHz sinus wave. The main component was a ITK 15-2 triode tube. (author)

  7. Quantum oscillations in the parent magnetic phase of an iron arsenide high temperature superconductor

    Sebastian, Suchitra E; Gillett, J; Lau, P H C; Lonzarich, G G; Harrison, N; Mielke, C H; Singh, D J

    2008-01-01

    We report measurements of quantum oscillations in SrFe 2 As 2 -which is an antiferromagnetic parent of the iron arsenide family of superconductors-known to become superconducting under doping and the application of pressure. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of the oscillations between 20 and 55 T in the liquid helium temperature range suggest that the electronic excitations are those of a Fermi liquid. We show that the observed Fermi surface comprising small pockets is consistent with the formation of a spin-density wave. Our measurements thus demonstrate that high T c superconductivity can occur on doping or pressurizing a conventional metallic spin-density wave state. (fast track communication)

  8. Proposal to Measure Hadron Scattering with a Gaseous High Pressure TPC for Neutrino Oscillation Measurements

    Andreopoulos, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S; Brailsford, D; Brice, S; Catanesi, G; Chen-Wishart, Z; Denner, P; Dunne, P; Giganti, C; Gonzalez Diaz, D; Haigh, J; Hamacher-Baumann, P; Hallsjo, S; Hayato, Y; Irastorza, I; Jamieson, B; Kaboth, A; Korzenev, A; Kudenko, Y; Leyton, M; Luk, K-B; Ma, W; Mahn, K; Martini, M; McCauley, N; Mermod, P; Monroe, J; Mosel, U; Nichol, R; Nieves, J; Nonnenmacher, T; Nowak, J; Parker, W; Raaf, J; Rademacker, J; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Roth, S; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, F; Sgalaberna, D; Shitov, Y; Sobczyk, J; Soler, F; Touramanis, C; Valder, S; Walding, J; Ward, M; Wascko, M; Weber, A; Yokoyama, M; Zalewska, A; Ziembicki, M

    2017-01-01

    We propose to perform new measurements of proton and pion scattering on argon using a prototype High Pressure gas Time Projection Chamber (HPTPC) detector, and by doing so to develop the physics case for, and the technological readiness of, an HPTPC as a neutrino detector for accelerator neutrino oscillation searches. The motivation for this work is to improve knowledge of final state interactions, in order to ultimately achieve 1-2% systematic error on neutrino-nucleus scattering for oscillation measurements at 0.6 GeV and 2.5 GeV neutrino energy, as required for the Charge-Parity (CP) violation sensitivity projections by the Hyper-Kamiokande experiment (Hyper-K) and the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). The final state interaction uncertainties in neutrino-nucleus interactions dominate cross-section systematic errors, currently 5–10% at these energies, and therefore R&D is needed to explore new approaches to achieve this substantial improvement.

  9. Oscillator strengths for highly ionized atomic systems. Final report, May 1, 1977-December 31, 1979

    Fischer, C.F.

    1979-12-01

    Oscillator strengths (or f-values) for resonance transitions in highly ionized atoms have assumed importance in fusion plasma research. Beam-foil spectroscopy has been able to deduce some of these values but present experimental limitations restrict its applicability. A theoretical study of trends along an isoelectronic sequence has provided an alternative approach. The Multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method (MCHF) is a general theoretical method for determining wavefunctions for atomic states from which oscillator strengths can be computed. A first-order theory has been shown to yield reliable f-values provided the ionization energy is predicted with reasonable accuracy and the transition matrix element is not sensitive to cancellation effects. General computer programs have been developed for this method and extended to include the dominant relativistic effects

  10. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions.

  11. A Strategy for Magnifying Vibration in High-Energy Orbits of a Bistable Oscillator at Low Excitation Levels

    Wang Guang-Qing; Liao Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on how to maintain a high-energy orbit motion of a bistable oscillator when subjected to a low level excitation. An elastic magnifier (EM) positioned between the base and the bistable oscillator is used to magnify the base vibration displacement to significantly enhance the output characteristics of the bistable oscillator. The dimensionless electromechanical equations of the bistable oscillator with an EM are derived, and the effects of the mass and stiffness ratios between the EM and the bistable oscillator on the output displacement are studied. It is shown that the jump phenomenon occurs at a lower excitation level with increasing the mass and stiffness ratios. With the comparison of the displacement trajectories and the phase portraits obtained from experiments, it is validated that the bistable oscillator with an EM can effectively oscillate in a high-energy orbit and can generate a superior output vibration at a low excitation level as compared with the bistable oscillator without an EM. (paper)

  12. Impairment of cognitive function and synaptic plasticity associated with alteration of information flow in theta and gamma oscillations in melamine-treated rats.

    Xiaxia Xu

    Full Text Available Changes of neural oscillations at a variety of physiological rhythms are effectively associated with cognitive performance. The present study investigated whether the directional indices of neural information flow (NIF could be used to symbolize the synaptic plasticity impairment in hippocampal CA3-CA1 network in a rat model of melamine. Male Wistar rats were employed while melamine was administered at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Behavior was measured by the Morris water maze(MWMtest. Local field potentials (LFPs were recorded before long-term potentiation (LTP induction. Generalized partial directed coherence (gPDC and phase-amplitude coupling conditional mutual information (PAC_CMI were used to measure the unidirectional indices in both theta and low gamma oscillations (LG, ~ 30-50 Hz. Our results showed that melamine induced the cognition deficits consistent with the reduced LTP in CA1 area. Phase locking values (PLVs showed that the synchronization between CA3 and CA1 in both theta and LG rhythms was reduced by melamine. In both theta and LG rhythms, unidirectional indices were significantly decreased in melamine treated rats while a similar variation trend was observed in LTP reduction, implying that the effects of melamine on cognitive impairment were possibly mediated via profound alterations of NIF on CA3-CA1 pathway in hippocampus. The results suggested that LFPs activities at these rhythms were most likely involved in determining the alterations of information flow in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network, which might be associated with the alteration of synaptic transmission to some extent.

  13. Design optimization of high speed gamma-ray tomography

    Maad, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns research and development of efficient gamma-ray systems for high speed tomographic imaging of hydrocarbon flow dynamics with a particular focus on gas liquid imaging. The Bergen HSGT (High Speed Gamma-ray Tomograph) based on instant imaging with a fixed source-detector geometry setup, has been thoroughly characterized with a variety of image reconstruction algorithms and flow conditions. Experiments in flow loops have been carried out for reliable characterization and error analysis, static flow phantoms have been applied for the majority of experiments to provide accurate imaging references. A semi-empirical model has been developed for estimation of the contribution of scattered radiation to each HSGT detector and further for correction of this contribution prior to data reconstruction. The Bergen FGGT (Flexible Geometry Gamma-ray Tomograph) has been further developed, particularly on the software side. The system emulates any fan beam tomography. Based on user input of geometry and other conditions, the new software perform scanning, data acquisition and storage, and also weight matrix calculation and image reconstruction with the desired method. The FGGT has been used for experiments supporting those carried out with the HSGT, and in addition for research on other fan beam geometries suitable for hydrocarbon flow imaging applications. An instant no-scanning tomograph like the HSGT has no flexibility with respect to change of geometry, which usually is necessary when applying the tomograph for a new application. A computer controlled FGGT has been designed and built at the UoB. The software developed for the FGGT controls the scanning procedure, the data acquisition, calculates the weight matrix necessary for the image reconstruction, reconstructs the image using standard reconstruction algorithms, and calculates the error of the reconstructed image. The performance of the geometry has been investigated using a 100 mCi 241 Am disk source, a

  14. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  15. Influence of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 TIG weldments

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of magnetic arc oscillation and current pulsing on the microstructure and high temperature tensile strength of alloy 718 tungsten inert gas weldments. The magnetic arc oscillation technique resulted in refined Laves phase with lesser interconnectivity. The full benefits of current pulsing in breaking the dendrites could not be realized in the present study due to relatively higher heat input used in the welding process. In the direct aged condition weldments prepared using magnetic arc oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength due to the presence of refined and lesser-interconnected Laves particles. In the solution treated and aged condition, magnetic arc oscillated weldments exhibited lower tensile strength compared with the weldments made without arc oscillation due to the presence of large amounts of finer δ needles

  16. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS 2 , which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support

  17. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  18. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts.

  19. Nonlinear optical oscillation dynamics in high-Q lithium niobate microresonators.

    Sun, Xuan; Liang, Hanxiao; Luo, Rui; Jiang, Wei C; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Lin, Qiang

    2017-06-12

    Recent advance of lithium niobate microphotonic devices enables the exploration of intriguing nonlinear optical effects. We show complex nonlinear oscillation dynamics in high-Q lithium niobate microresonators that results from unique competition between the thermo-optic nonlinearity and the photorefractive effect, distinctive to other device systems and mechanisms ever reported. The observed phenomena are well described by our theory. This exploration helps understand the nonlinear optical behavior of high-Q lithium niobate microphotonic devices which would be crucial for future application of on-chip nonlinear lithium niobate photonics.

  20. Effect of fuel and nozzle geometry on the off-axis oscillation of needle in diesel injectors using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The diesel spray characteristics are strongly influenced by the flow dynamics inside the injector nozzle. Moreover, the off-axis oscillation of needle could lead to variation of orifice flow in the nozzle. In this paper, the needle oscillation was investigated using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging and quantitative image processing. The effects of fuel, injection pressure and nozzle geometry on the needle oscillation were analyzed. The results showed that the vertical and horizontal oscillation of needle was independent on the injection pressure. The maximum oscillation range of 14μ m was found. Biodiesel application slightly decreased the needle oscillation due to high viscosity. The needle oscillation range increased generally with increasing hole number. The larger needle oscillation in multi-hole injectors was dominated by the geometry problem or production issue at lower needle lift. In addition, the influence of needle oscillation on the spray morphology was also discussed.

  1. Effect of fuel and nozzle geometry on the off-axis oscillation of needle in diesel injectors using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.

    2016-05-01

    The diesel spray characteristics are strongly influenced by the flow dynamics inside the injector nozzle. Moreover, the off-axis oscillation of needle could lead to variation of orifice flow in the nozzle. In this paper, the needle oscillation was investigated using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging and quantitative image processing. The effects of fuel, injection pressure and nozzle geometry on the needle oscillation were analyzed. The results showed that the vertical and horizontal oscillation of needle was independent on the injection pressure. The maximum oscillation range of 14μ m was found. Biodiesel application slightly decreased the needle oscillation due to high viscosity. The needle oscillation range increased generally with increasing hole number. The larger needle oscillation in multi-hole injectors was dominated by the geometry problem or production issue at lower needle lift. In addition, the influence of needle oscillation on the spray morphology was also discussed.

  2. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166 degrees C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen

  3. High-energy gamma-ray beams from Compton-backscattered laser light

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1983-01-01

    Collisions of light photons with relativistic electrons have previously been used to produce polarized ..gamma..-ray beams with modest (-10%) resolution but relatively low intensity. In contrast, the LEGS project (Laser + Electron Gamma Source) at Brookhaven will produce a very high flux (>2 x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/) of background-free polarized ..gamma.. rays whose energy will be determined to a high accuracy (..delta..E = 2.3 MeV). Initially, 300(420)-MeV ..gamma.. rays will be produced by backscattering uv light from the new 2.5(3.0)-GeV X-ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The LEGS facility will operate as one of many passive users of the NSLS. In a later stage of the project, a Free Electron Laser is expectred to extend the ..gamma..-ray energy up to 700 MeV.

  4. High gamma dose response of the electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate thin films

    Radwan, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with gamma rays, have been investigated. The PET films were irradiated with high gamma dose levels in the range from 100 to 2000 kGy. The changes in the DC (σ DC ) and the ac (σ ac ) conductivities, with the dose, have been performed. The effect of gamma irradiation on the dielectric constant (ε') and loss (ε'') has been determined. Also, the dose dependence of the frequency exponent index (S), the resonance frequency (Fc) and the hopping frequency (ω P ) have been obtained. The obtained results show that increasing gamma dose leads to slight increase in σ DC , σ ac and ε', while no change was observed in ε'' value. Meanwhile, S, Fc and ω P are inversely proportional to the dose. Accordingly, the study suggests the possibility of using PET films in electronic components (capacitors, resistors, etc.), especially that operate at high gamma dose environments for the frequency independent applications

  5. Gamma-ray spectrometer system with high efficiency and high resolution

    Moss, C.E.; Bernard, W.; Dowdy, E.J.; Garcia, C.; Lucas, M.C.; Pratt, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Our gamma-ray spectrometer system, designed for field use, offers high efficiency and high resolution for safeguards applications. The system consists of three 40% high-purity germanium detectors and a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system that calculates a composite spectrum for the three detectors. The LeCroy 3500 mainframe can be operated remotely from the detector array with control exercised through modems and the telephone system. System performance with a mixed source of 125 Sb, 154 Eu, and 155 Eu confirms the expected efficiency of 120% with the overall resolution showing little degradation over that of the worst detector

  6. High Doses Gamma Radiolysis of PVC: Mechanisms of Degradation

    Colombani, J.

    2006-01-01

    PVC radiolysis leads to the formation of various degradation products: radicals, gas, oxidized products or polyenes. In order to predict the formation of the degradation products with regard to irradiation and ageing parameters, it is important to improve the understanding of the radiolysis mechanisms of PVC. Thus, we used several analytical techniques (Electron Spin Resonance, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Size Exclusion Chromatography) to get information on PVC samples irradiated at high doses (up to 4MGy) under different conditions. Gamma irradiation induces the formation of various radicals into PVC. Older studies were generally focused on the effect of low dose and/or low temperature irradiations on PVC. We present here ESR signals of PVC irradiated at high doses and at room temperature. We show that peroxyl radicals are producted by radiolysis under aerobe conditions and that polyenyl radicals are formed under anaerobe conditions. PVC radiolysis induces gas production and especially hydrogen chloride. Production of hydrogen chloride is well known until 1 MGy. We have studied by FTIR, the evolution of the quantity of HCl produced until 4 MGy. We show that higher irradiation dose leads to the lower radiolytic yield of HCl (G(HCl)). Moreover, G(HCl) obtained in aerobe conditions is about fourfold as great as G(HCl) observed in anaerobe radiolysis. Propagation and termination reactions induce degradation products: polyene sequences and crosslinking reactions are observed under anaerobe conditions; oxidized products with addition of chain scissions are formed under aerobe conditions. Although the literature about PVC radiolysis is rich, the main reacting pathways are not well established. Moreover the high doses studies are almost non-existent. We show by FTIR that aerobe radiolysis induces formation of ketons and acids. NMR experiments confirme these results but also focuse on small acids formed (with 2, 3 or 4 carbons). The

  7. A Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Spectrum of 1ES 2344+514

    Schroedter, M.; Badran, H. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Gordo, J. Bussons; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Duke, C.; Fegan, D. J.; Fegan, S. F.; Finley, J. P.; Gillanders, G. H.; Grube, J.; Horan, D.; Kenny, G. E.; Kertzman, M.; Kosack, K.

    2005-01-01

    The BL Lacertae (BL Lac) object 1ES 2344+514 (1ES 2344), at a redshift of 0.044, was discovered as a source of very high energy (VHE) gamma rays by the Whipple Collaboration in 1995 \\citep{2344Catanese98}. This detection was recently confirmed by the HEGRA Collaboration \\citep{2344Hegra03}. As is typical for high-frequency peaked blazars, the VHE gamma-ray emission is highly variable. On the night of 20 December, 1995, a gamma-ray flare of 5.3-sigma significance was detected, the brightest ou...

  8. Sub-100 fs high average power directly blue-diode-laser-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator

    Rohrbacher, Andreas; Markovic, Vesna; Pallmann, Wolfgang; Resan, Bojan

    2016-03-01

    Ti:sapphire oscillators are a proven technology to generate sub-100 fs (even sub-10 fs) pulses in the near infrared and are widely used in many high impact scientific fields. However, the need for a bulky, expensive and complex pump source, typically a frequency-doubled multi-watt neodymium or optically pumped semiconductor laser, represents the main obstacle to more widespread use. The recent development of blue diodes emitting over 1 W has opened up the possibility of directly diode-laser-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillators. Beside the lower cost and footprint, a direct diode pumping provides better reliability, higher efficiency and better pointing stability to name a few. The challenges that it poses are lower absorption of Ti:sapphire at available diode wavelengths and lower brightness compared to typical green pump lasers. For practical applications such as bio-medicine and nano-structuring, output powers in excess of 100 mW and sub-100 fs pulses are required. In this paper, we demonstrate a high average power directly blue-diode-laser-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator without active cooling. The SESAM modelocking ensures reliable self-starting and robust operation. We will present two configurations emitting 460 mW in 82 fs pulses and 350 mW in 65 fs pulses, both operating at 92 MHz. The maximum obtained pulse energy reaches 5 nJ. A double-sided pumping scheme with two high power blue diode lasers was used for the output power scaling. The cavity design and the experimental results will be discussed in more details.

  9. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ...

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... large angular momentum using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reactions ... Gamma detector array (GDA) [6,7], at Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) is .... used in the present work has improved the quality of coincidence ...

  10. The AKM theorem and oscillations in the hadron scattering amplitude at high energy and small momentum transfer

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Selyugin, O.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    1996-10-01

    It is shown that the high precision UA4/2 data for differential cross sections p-barp scattering are compatible with the presence of Auberson -Kinoshita - Martin (AKM) type of oscillations at very small momentum transfers. These oscillations seem to be periodic in {radical}|t|. The existence of such visible oscillations suggests a general mechanism of saturation of axiomatic bounds. As an illustration the consequences for extracting the parameter {rho} = ReF/ImF from dN/dt data are also discussed. (K.A.). 19 refs.

  11. Optical properties and laser oscillations of highly neodymium-doped YAG ceramics

    Shoji, Ichiro; Kurimura, Sunao; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori [Laser Research Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Ikesue, Akio [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Yoshida, Kunio [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Diode-pumped microchip laser oscillation of highly Nd{sup 3+}-doped polycrystalline YAG ceramics has been succeeded. It is found that the loss of a 2.4 at. % neodymium-doped ceramic YAG is as low as that of a 0.9 at. % Nd:YAG single crystal. From a 4.8 at. % Nd:YAG ceramic microchip, 2.3 times higher laser output power is obtained than that from a 0.9 at. % Nd:YAG single crystal microchip. (author)

  12. Optical properties and laser oscillations of highly neodymium-doped YAG ceramics

    Shoji, Ichiro; Kurimura, Sunao; Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori; Ikesue, Akio; Yoshida, Kunio

    2000-01-01

    Diode-pumped microchip laser oscillation of highly Nd 3+ -doped polycrystalline YAG ceramics has been succeeded. It is found that the loss of a 2.4 at. % neodymium-doped ceramic YAG is as low as that of a 0.9 at. % Nd:YAG single crystal. From a 4.8 at. % Nd:YAG ceramic microchip, 2.3 times higher laser output power is obtained than that from a 0.9 at. % Nd:YAG single crystal microchip. (author)

  13. Sound produced by an oscillating arc in a high-pressure gas

    Popov, Fedor K.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2017-08-01

    We suggest a simple theory to describe the sound generated by small periodic perturbations of a cylindrical arc in a dense gas. Theoretical analysis was done within the framework of the non-self-consistent channel arc model and supplemented with time-dependent gas dynamic equations. It is shown that an arc with power amplitude oscillations on the order of several percent is a source of sound whose intensity is comparable with external ultrasound sources used in experiments to increase the yield of nanoparticles in the high pressure arc systems for nanoparticle synthesis.

  14. Born order study of {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *} {yields} {rho}{rho} at very high energy

    Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Liege Univ. (Belgium); Wallon, S. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Physique Theorique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    We calculate the cross-section for the diffractive exclusive process {gamma}{sub L}{sup *}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sub L}{sup *}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}) {yields} {rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}, in view of its study in the future high energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider. The Born order approximation of the amplitude is completely calculable in the hard region Q{sub 1}{sup 2},Q{sub 2}{sup 2} >> {lambda}{sup 2}(QCD). The resulting cross-section is large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q{sub 1}{sup 2} and Q{sub 2}{sup 2} in the range of a few GeV{sup 2}. (authors)

  15. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  16. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    Yasin, Zafar, E-mail: zafar.yasin@eli-np.ro; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian [Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics / Horia Hulubei National Institute for R& D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2016-03-25

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  17. GNSS Signal Tracking Performance Improvement for Highly Dynamic Receivers by Gyroscopic Mounting Crystal Oscillator.

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, the efficiency of the gyroscopic mounting method is studied for a highly dynamic GNSS receiver's reference oscillator for reducing signal loss. Analyses are performed separately in two phases, atmospheric and upper atmospheric flights. Results show that the proposed mounting reduces signal loss, especially in parts of the trajectory where its probability is the highest. This reduction effect appears especially for crystal oscillators with a low elevation angle g-sensitivity vector. The gyroscopic mounting influences frequency deviation or jitter caused by dynamic loads on replica carrier and affects the frequency locked loop (FLL) as the dominant tracking loop in highly dynamic GNSS receivers. In terms of steady-state load, the proposed mounting mostly reduces the frequency deviation below the one-sigma threshold of FLL (1σ(FLL)). The mounting method can also reduce the frequency jitter caused by sinusoidal vibrations and reduces the probability of signal loss in parts of the trajectory where the other error sources accompany this vibration load. In the case of random vibration, which is the main disturbance source of FLL, gyroscopic mounting is even able to suppress the disturbances greater than the three-sigma threshold of FLL (3σ(FLL)). In this way, signal tracking performance can be improved by the gyroscopic mounting method for highly dynamic GNSS receivers.

  18. Absolute peak detection efficiencies of a Ge(Li) detector for high gamma-ray energies

    Katagiri, Masaki

    1985-11-01

    Absolute peak detection efficiencies of a Ge(Li) detector for gamma-rays of 3.5 MeV to 12 MeV were measured using four (p,γ) reactions and a (n,γ) reaction. Two-line-method was used to obtaine peak detection efficiencies. The efficiencies with the both cases are agreed very well. Utilization of (n,γ) reaction is, therefore, effective for measuring these efficiencies, because high energy gamma-rays can be generated easily by using a neutron source. These results were applied to calibration of a gamma-ray standard source, emitting 6.13 MeV gamma-rays, and of intensities of 56 Co standard gamma-ray source. (author)

  19. Controlling nonlinear longitudinal space charge oscillations for high peak current bunch train generation

    P. Musumeci

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of picosecond modulations of the longitudinal profile of an electron beam generated in an rf photoinjector is analyzed and optimized with the goal of obtaining high peak current electron bunch trains at very high frequencies (≥THz. Taking advantage of nonlinear longitudinal space charge forces, it is found that more than 500 A peak current 1 THz bunch trains can be generated using a standard 1.6 cell SLAC/UCLA/BNL rf gun. Postacceleration is used to freeze the longitudinal phase space dynamics after one half plasma oscillation. Applications range from tunable narrow bandwidth THz radiation generation to drivers for high frequency high gradient accelerators.

  20. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts with precursor supernovae.

    Razzaque, Soebur; Mészáros, Peter; Waxman, Eli

    2003-06-20

    The high energy neutrino signature from proton-proton and photo-meson interactions in a supernova remnant shell ejected prior to a gamma-ray burst provides a test for the precursor supernova, or supranova, model of gamma-ray bursts. Protons in the supernova remnant shell and photons entrapped from a supernova explosion or a pulsar wind from a fast-rotating neutron star remnant provide ample targets for protons escaping the internal shocks of the gamma-ray burst to interact and produce high energy neutrinos. We calculate the expected neutrino fluxes, which can be detected by current and future experiments.

  1. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    Miller, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  2. High-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts

    Nolan, P.L.; Share, G.H.; Matz, S.; Chupp, E.L.; Forrest, D.J.; Rieger, E.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss broad-band continuum spectroscopy of 17 gamma-ray bursts above 0.3 MeV. The spectra were fitted by 3 trial functions, none of which provided an adequate fit to all the spectra. Most were too hard for a thermal bremsstarhlung function. Harder functional forms, such as thermal synchrotron or power-law, provide better fits for most of the spectra. The strong emission observed above 1 MeV raises some interesting theoretical questions

  3. High-frequency Oscillations in Small Magnetic Elements Observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Solanki, S. K.; Cameron, R. H.; Danilovic, S.; Stangalini, M.; Steiner, O.

    2017-01-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca ii H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, though overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450 ± 100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. This value, together with the determined short travel times of the transverse and longitudinal waves provide us with phase speeds of 29 ± 2 km s −1 and 31 ± 2 km s −1 , respectively. We speculate that these phase speeds may not reflect the true propagation speeds of the waves. Thus, effects such as the refraction of fast longitudinal waves may contribute to an overestimate of the phase speed.

  4. Interplay of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in the generation of high-frequency oscillations in interneuronal networks with irregular spiking.

    Fabiano Baroni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii the membrane potential distribution, and iii the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs. For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i and ii, respectively, which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead

  5. Interplay of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in the generation of high-frequency oscillations in interneuronal networks with irregular spiking.

    Baroni, Fabiano; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2014-05-01

    High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz) have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF) or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF) neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i) the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii) the membrane potential distribution, and iii) the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs). For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii)) exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i) and ii), respectively), which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead of

  6. Angular spectrum characters of high gain non-critical phase match optical parametric oscillators

    Liu Jian-Hui; Liu Qiang; Gong Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    The angular spectrum gain characters and the power magnification characters of high gain non-walk-off colinear optical parametric oscillators have been studied using the non-colinear phase match method for the first time. The experimental results of the KTiOAsO 4 and the KTiOPO 4 crystals are discussed in detail. At the high energy single resonant condition, low reflective ratio of the output mirror for the signal and long non-linear crystal are beneficial for small divergence angles. This method can also be used for other high gain non-walk-off phase match optical parametric processes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  7. Characteristics and Mechanisms of Zonal Oscillation of Western Pacific Subtropical High in Summer

    Guan, W.; Ren, X.; Hu, H.

    2017-12-01

    The zonal oscillation of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) influences the weather and climate over East Asia significantly. This study investigates the features and mechanisms of the zonal oscillation of the WPSH during summer on subseasonal time scales. The zonal oscillation index of the WPSH is defined by normalized subseasonal geopotential height anomaly at 500hPa averaged over the WPSH's western edge (110° - 140°E, 10° - 30°N). The index shows a predominant oscillation with a period of 10-40 days. Large positive index indicates a strong anticyclonic anomaly over East Asia and its coastal region south of 30°N at both 850hPa and 500hPa. The WPSH stretches more westward accompanied by warmer SST anomalies beneath the western edge of the WPSH. Meanwhile, above-normal precipitation is seen over the Yangtze-Huaihe river basin and below-normal precipitation over the south of the Yangtze River. Negative index suggests a more eastward position of WPSH. The anomalies in circulation and SST for negative index are almost the mirror image of those for the positive index. In early summer, the zonal shift of the WPSH is affected by both the East Asia/Pacific (EAP) teleconnection pattern and the Silk road pattern (SRP). The positive (negative) phase of the EAP pattern is characterized by a low-level anticyclonic (cyclonic) anomaly over the subtropical western Pacific, indicating the western extension (eastward retreat) of the WPSH. Comparing with the EAP pattern, the SRP forms an upper-level anticyclonic (cyclonic) anomaly in mid-latitudes of East Asia, and then leads to the westward (eastward) movement of the WPSH. In late summer, the zonal shift of the WPSH is mainly affected by the EAP pattern, because the EAP pattern in late summer is stronger than that in early summer. The zonal shift of the WPSH is also influenced by the subseasonal air-sea interaction locally. During the early stage of WPSH's westward stretch, the local SST anomaly in late summer is

  8. The dynamic range of ultra-high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers

    Ali, Shafinaz [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Terracol, Stephane F. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Drury, Owen B. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Friedrich, Stephan [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)]. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov

    2006-04-15

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to a multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensor (TES). The energy resolution of a detector with a 1x1x0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber is 50-90 eV FWHM for {gamma}-rays up to 100 keV, and it decreases for larger absorbers. Here, we present the detector performance for different absorber volumes, and discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range.

  9. Geant4 simulation of a 3D high resolution gamma camera

    Akhdar, H.; Kezzar, K.; Aksouh, F.; Assemi, N.; AlGhamdi, S.; AlGarawi, M.; Gerl, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a 3D gamma camera with high position resolution and sensitivity relying on both distance/absorption and Compton scattering techniques and without using any passive collimation. The proposed gamma camera is simulated in order to predict its performance using the full benefit of Geant4 features that allow the construction of the needed geometry of the detectors, have full control of the incident gamma particles and study the response of the detector in order to test the suggested geometries. Three different geometries are simulated and each configuration is tested with three different scintillation materials (LaBr3, LYSO and CeBr3)

  10. Highly Stable Wideband Microwave Extraction by Synchronizing Widely Tunable Optoelectronic Oscillator with Optical Frequency Comb

    Hou, D.; Xie, X. P.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wu, J. T.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs), based on mode-locked lasers (MLLs), have attracted considerable attention in many fields over recent years. Among the applications of OFCs, one of the most challenging works is the extraction of a highly stable microwave with low phase noise. Many synchronisation schemes have been exploited to synchronise an electronic oscillator with the pulse train from a MLL, helping to extract an ultra-stable microwave. Here, we demonstrate novel wideband microwave extraction from a stable OFC by synchronising a single widely tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) with an OFC at different harmonic frequencies, using an optical phase detection technique. The tunable range of the proposed microwave extraction extends from 2 GHz to 4 GHz, and in a long-term synchronisation experiment over 12 hours, the proposed synchronisation scheme provided a rms timing drift of 18 fs and frequency instabilities at 1.2 × 10-15/1 s and 2.2 × 10-18/10000 s.

  11. Demonstration Of 3D Effects With High Gain And Efficiency In A UV FEL Oscillator

    Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, James; Legg, Robert; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Watson, Anne; Williams, Gwyn; Wilson, Frederick; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-01-01

    We report on the performance of a high gain UV FEL oscillator operating on an energy recovery linac at Jefferson Lab. The high brightness of the electron beam leads to both gain and efficiency that cannot be reconciled with a one-dimensional model. Three-dimensional simulations do predict the performance with reasonable precision. Gain in excess of 100% per pass and an efficiency close to 1/2NW, where NW is the number of wiggler periods, is seen. The laser mirror tuning curves currently permit operation in the wavelength range of 438 to 362 nm. Another mirror set allows operation at longer wavelengths in the red with even higher gain and efficiency.

  12. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  13. The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

  14. CELESTE an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    Paré, E; Bazer-Bachi, R; Bergeret, H; Berny, F; Briand, N; Bruel, P; Cerutti, M; Collon, J; Cordier, A; Cornebise, P; Debiais, G; Dezalay, J P; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P T; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Gilly, J; Gouillaud, J C; Gregory, C; Herault, N; Holder, J; Hrabovsky, M; Incerti, S; Jouenne, A; Kalt, L; Legallou, R; Lott, B; Lodygensky, O; Manigot, P; Manseri, H; Manitaz, H; Martin, M; Morano, R; Morineaud, G; Muenz, F; Musquere, A; Naurois, M D; Neveu, J; Noppe, J M; Olive, J F; Palatka, M; Pérez, A; Quebert, J; Rebii, A; Reposeur, T; Rob, L; Roy, P; Sans, J L; Sako, T; Schovanek, P; Smith, D A; Snabre, P; Villard, G

    2002-01-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m sup 2) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic gamma-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  15. Application of the image calorimeter in the high energy gamma astronomy

    Casolino, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata`, Rome (Italy); Carlson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Fuglesang, C. [ESA-EAC, Cologne (Germany); Ozerov, Yu.V.; Zemskov, V.M.; Zverev, V.G.; Galper, A.M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The capability of registration of the primary high energy cosmic ray gamma emission by a gamma-telescope made of an image calorimeter is shown in this paper. The problem of triggering and off-line identification of primary particles by the analysis of the electromagnetic showers induced in the calorimeter is under consideration. The estimations of the background flux of delayed secondaries induced by nuclear interactions are presented too.

  16. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  17. High-$\\gamma$ Beta Beams within the LAGUNA design study

    Orme, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Within the LAGUNA design study, seven candidate sites are being assessed for their feasibility to host a next-generation, very large neutrino observatory. Such a detector will be expected to feature within a future European accelerator neutrino programme (Superbeam or Beta Beam), and hence the distance from CERN is of critical importance. In this article, the focus is a $^{18}$Ne and $^{6}$He Beta Beam sourced at CERN and directed towards a 50 kton Liquid Argon detector located at the LAGUNA sites: Slanic (L=1570 km) and Pyh\\"{a}salmi (L=2300 km). To improve sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering, these baselines are then combined with a concurrent run with the same flux directed towards a large Water \\v{C}erenkov detector located at Canfranc (L=650 km). This degeneracy breaking combination is shown to provide comparable physics reach to the conservative Magic Baseline Beta Beam proposals. For $^{18}$Ne ions boosted to $\\gamma=570$ and $^{6}$He ions boosted to $\\gamma=350$, the correct mass ordering can be...

  18. ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES

    Erkut, M. Hakan

    2011-01-01

    We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency κ to the orbital frequency Ω the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches Ω + κ and Ω to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio (Ω + κ)/(Ω) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

  19. Localization and Retrieval of an Eyelid Metallic Foreign Body With an Oscillating Magnet and High-Resolution Ultrasonography.

    Yoo, Sylvia H; Rootman, Dan B; Goh, Alice; Savar, Aaron; Goldberg, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    A patient was found to have a metallic foreign body in the left anterior orbit on CT imaging, but the foreign body was not evident on clinical examination. On high-resolution ultrasonography, an object was identified in the left upper eyelid; however, the typical shadow with metallic foreign bodies was not seen. A high-power oscillating magnet was then applied to the eyelid, which revealed a subcutaneous metallic foreign body in the left upper eyelid. When used in conjunction, the high-resolution ultrasound and oscillating magnet successfully localized and facilitated retrieval of the metallic foreign body from the left upper eyelid.

  20. Temporal Characteristics of High-Frequency Lower-Limb Oscillation during Freezing of Gait in Parkinson’s Disease

    Don A. Yungher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cardinal feature of freezing of gait (FOG is high frequency (3–8 Hz oscillation of the legs, and this study aimed to quantify the temporal pattern of lower-body motion prior to and during FOG. Acceleration data was obtained from sensors attached to the back, thighs, shanks, and feet in 14 Parkinson’s disease patients performing timed-up-and-go tasks, and clinical assessment of FOG was performed by two experienced raters from video. A total of 23 isolated FOG events, defined as occurring at least 5 s after gait initiation and with no preceding FOG, were identified from the clinical ratings. The corresponding accelerometer records were analyzed within a 4 s window centered at the clinical onset of freezing. FOG-related high-frequency oscillation (an increase in power in the 3–8 Hz band >3 SD from baseline followed a distal to proximal onset pattern, appearing at the feet, shanks, thighs, and then back over a period of 250 ms. Peak power tended to decrease as the focus of oscillation moved from feet to back. There was a consistent delay (mean 872 ms between the onset of high frequency oscillation at the feet and clinical onset of FOG. We infer that FOG is characterized by high frequency oscillation at the feet, which progresses proximally and is mechanically damped at the torso.

  1. High performance gamma measurements of equipment retrieved from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    Troyer, G.L.

    1997-03-17

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to 90% saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  2. High performance gamma measurements of equipment retrieved from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    Troyer, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to 90% saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed

  3. Investigation into the Effects of the Variable Displacement Mechanism on Swash Plate Oscillation in High-Speed Piston Pumps

    Xu Fang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available High-speed, pressure-compensated variable displacement piston pumps are widely used in aircraft hydraulic systems for their high power density. The swash plate is controlled by the pressure-compensated valve, which uses pressure feedback so that the instantaneous output flow of the pump is exactly enough to maintain a presetting pressure. The oscillation of the swash plate is one of the major excitation sources in the high-speed piston pump, which may cause lower efficiency, shorter service life, and even serious damage. This paper presents an improved model to investigate the influence of the variable displacement mechanism on the swash plate oscillation and introduces some feasible ways to reduce oscillation of the swash plate. Most of the variable structural parameters of the variable displacement mechanism are taken into consideration, and their influences on swash plate oscillation are discussed in detail. The influence of the load pipe on the oscillation of the swash plate is considered in the improved model. A test rig is built and similarities between the experiments and simulated results prove that the simulation model can effectively predict the variable displacement mechanism state. The simulation results show that increasing the volume of the outlet chamber, the spring stiffness of the control valve, the action area of the actuator piston, and offset distance of the actuator piston can significantly reduce the oscillation amplitude of the swash plate. Furthermore, reducing the diameter of the control valve spool and the dead volume of the actuator piston chamber can also have a positive effect on oscillation amplitude reduction.

  4. Fast oscillations in cortical-striatal networks switch frequency following rewarding events and stimulant drugs.

    Berke, J D

    2009-09-01

    Oscillations may organize communication between components of large-scale brain networks. Although gamma-band oscillations have been repeatedly observed in cortical-basal ganglia circuits, their functional roles are not yet clear. Here I show that, in behaving rats, distinct frequencies of ventral striatal local field potential oscillations show coherence with different cortical inputs. The approximately 50 Hz gamma oscillations that normally predominate in awake ventral striatum are coherent with piriform cortex, whereas approximately 80-100 Hz high-gamma oscillations are coherent with frontal cortex. Within striatum, entrainment to gamma rhythms is selective to fast-spiking interneurons, with distinct fast-spiking interneuron populations entrained to different gamma frequencies. Administration of the psychomotor stimulant amphetamine or the dopamine agonist apomorphine causes a prolonged decrease in approximately 50 Hz power and increase in approximately 80-100 Hz power. The same frequency switch is observed for shorter epochs spontaneously in awake, undrugged animals and is consistently provoked for reward receipt. Individual striatal neurons can participate in these brief high-gamma bursts with, or without, substantial changes in firing rate. Switching between discrete oscillatory states may allow different modes of information processing during decision-making and reinforcement-based learning, and may also be an important systems-level process by which stimulant drugs affect cognition and behavior.

  5. Quantum oscillations and key theoretical issues in high temperature superconductors from the perspective of density waves

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    2011-01-01

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors remains an unsolved problem in theoretical physics. The same statement can also be made about a number of other superconductors that have been dubbed novel. What makes these superconductors so elusive is an interesting question in itself. This paper focuses on the recent magnetic oscillation experiments and how they fit into the broader picture. Many aspects of these experiments can be explained by Fermi liquid theory; the key issue is the extent to which this is true. If true, the entire paradigm developed over the past three decades must be reexamined. A critical analysis of this issue has necessitated a broader analysis of questions about distinct ground states of matter, which may be useful in understanding other novel superconductors.

  6. High-frequency Oscillations in Small Magnetic Elements Observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Solanki, S. K.; Cameron, R. H.; Danilovic, S. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Stangalini, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy); Steiner, O., E-mail: shahin.jafarzadeh@astro.uio.no [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca ii H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, though overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450 ± 100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. This value, together with the determined short travel times of the transverse and longitudinal waves provide us with phase speeds of 29 ± 2 km s{sup −1} and 31 ± 2 km s{sup −1}, respectively. We speculate that these phase speeds may not reflect the true propagation speeds of the waves. Thus, effects such as the refraction of fast longitudinal waves may contribute to an overestimate of the phase speed.

  7. Synchronization and chaos in spin-transfer-torque nano-oscillators coupled via a high-speed operational amplifier

    Sanid, C; Murugesh, S

    2014-01-01

    We propose a system of two coupled spin-torque nano-oscillators (STNOs), one driver and another response, and demonstrate using numerical studies the synchronization of the response system to the frequency of the driver system. To this end we use a high-speed operational amplifier in the form of a voltage follower, which essentially isolates the drive system from the response system. We find the occurrence of 1 : 1 as well as 2 : 1 synchronization in the system, wherein the oscillators show limit cycle dynamics. An increase in power output is noticed when the two oscillators are locked in 1 : 1 synchronization. Moreover in the crossover region between these two synchronization dynamics we show the existence of chaotic dynamics in the slave system. The coupled dynamics under periodic forcing, using a small ac input current in addition to that of the dc part, is also studied. The slave oscillator is seen to retain its qualitative identity in the parameter space in spite of being fed in, at times, a chaotic signal. Such electrically coupled STNOs will be highly useful in fabricating commercial spin-valve oscillators with high power output, when integrated with other spintronic devices. (paper)

  8. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  9. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-01-01

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  10. [Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    1989-01-01

    There are four areas where major progress has occurred this year. We have applied the Fourier-transform method of describing and analyzing Moessbauer effect (ME) line shapes to make measurements of the temperature dependence of the recoilless fraction in tungsten. We have carried out quasi-elastic measurements of the gamma scattering from viscous liquids, learning about diffusive motion in polydimethylsiloxane, pentadecane, and glycerol. We have made major progress in fundamental physics, having shown for the first time how to determine precise quantum interference parameters, obtaining experimental results on the 46.5 keV line of 183 W and the 129 keV line of 191 Ir. Finally, we have continued our development of MICE detectors, with a theoretical analysis of the MICE lineshape and its relation to the lineshape of conventional transmission ME spectroscopy. 12 refs

  11. Characterization of Compton-suppressed TIGRESS detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    Kshetri, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.S.; Galinski, N.; Ball, G.C.; Djongolov, M.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Hackman, G.; Orce, J.N.; Pearson, C.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S.J.; Drake, T.; Smalley, D.; Svensson, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape- Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) will consist of 12 large-volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors. Each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented Compton suppression shield. For performing discrete gamma-ray spectroscopy of light mass nuclei with TIGRESS, we need information about full energy peak efficiency, resolution and lineshape of full energy peaks for high energy gamma-rays. However, suitable radioactive sources having decay gamma-rays of energies greater than ∼ 3.5 MeV are not easily available. So the characteristics of gamma spectrometers at energies higher than 3.5 MeV are usually determined from simulation data. Predictions from GEANT4 simulations (experimentally validated from 0.3 to 3 MeV) indicate that TIGRESS will be capable for single 10 MeV gamma-rays of absolute detection efficiency of 1.5% for backward configuration of the array. It has been observed experimentally that simulation results work well up to certain energies and might deviate at higher energies. So, it is essential to check the validity of simulation results for energies above 3.3 MeV. We have investigated the high energy performance of seven TIGRESS detectors up to 8 MeV

  12. High Affinity IgE-Fc Receptor alpha and gamma Subunit Interactions

    Rashid, A.; Housden, J. E. M.; Sabban, S.; Helm, B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationships between the subunits (alpha, beta and gamma) of the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc and RI) and its ability to mediate transmembrane signaling. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, UK, from 2008 to 2009. Methodology: The approach employed was to create a chimera (human alpha-gamma-gamma) using the extracellular (EC) domain of the human high affinity IgE receptor. The alpha subunit (huFc and RIalpha) of IgE receptor was spliced onto the rodent gamma TM and cytoplasmic domain (CD). This was transfected into the Rat Basophilic Leukemia cell line in order to assess the possibility of selectively activating cells transfected with this single pass construct for antigen induced mediator release. Results: The RBLs cell lines transfected with the huFc and RIalpha/gamma/gamma cDNA constructs were assessed for the cell surface expression of the huFc and RIalpha subunit and the response to the antigenic stimulus by looking for degranulation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilisation. The results obtained showed the absence of huFc and RIalpha subunit expression on the surface of transfected cells as seen by flowcytometric studies, beta-hexosaminidase assays and intracellular calcium mobilisation studies. Conclusion: In the present study the grounds for non-expression of huFc and RIalpha/gamma/gamma cDNA remains elusive but may be due to the fact that the human-rodent chimeric receptors are assembled differently than the endogenous rodent receptors as seen in study in which COS 7 cells were transfected with human/rat chimeric complexes. (author)

  13. Silicon detectors for x and gamma-ray with high radiation resistance

    Cimpoca, Valerica; Popescu, Ion V.; Ruscu, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Silicon detectors are widely used in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy for direct detection or coupled with scintillators in high energy nuclear physics (modern collider experiments are representative), medicine and industrial applications. In X and gamma dosimetry, a low detection limit (under 6 KeV) with silicon detectors becomes available. Work at the room temperature is now possible due to the silicon processing evolution, which assures low reverse current and high life time of carriers. For several years, modern semiconductor detectors have been the primary choice for the measurement of nuclear radiation in various scientific fields. Nowadays the recently developed high resolution silicon detectors found their way in medical applications. As a consequence many efforts have been devoted to the development of high sensitivity and radiation hardened X and gamma-ray detectors for the energy range of 5 - 150 keV. The paper presents some results concerning the technology and behaviour of X and Gamma ray silicon detectors used in physics research, industrial and medical radiography. The electrical characteristics of these detectors, their modification after exposure to radiation and the results of spectroscopic X and Gamma-ray measurements are discussed. The results indicated that the proposed detectors enables the development of reliable silicon detectors to be used in controlling the low and high radiation levels encountered in a lot of application

  14. Relative thermoluminescent efficiencies proton/gamma and helium/gamma of peaks of high temperature in TLD-100 dosemeters

    Flores M, E.

    2007-01-01

    The increase of the applications of ion beams in radiotherapy treatments has generated interest in the study of the thermoluminescent materials (TL) that allow to determine the applied doses. A way to quantify the TL response from these materials to ions is by means of the relative thermoluminescent efficiency. In the group of Thermoluminescent dosimetry of the Institute of Physics of the UNAM (IFUNAM) the thermoluminescent response of the TLD-100 dosemeters has been studied, which present a glow curve characteristic with several peaks that correspond to traps and luminescent centers in the material. The stable peaks know each other as 4, 5, 6a, 6b, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The efficiencies should be measured using the response so much to the radiation of interest (in this case protons and helium ions) as the response to gamma radiation. In previous works with ions of low energy taken place in the Pelletron accelerator of the IFUNAM was only measured the TL efficiency for the peak 5 and the total signal. It had not been possible to measure the efficiency of the peaks of high temperature (6a-10) because, for the gamma radiation, the peaks of high temperature show very small signals; however, recently Massillon carries out measures of efficiency TL of peaks of high temperature for ions of intermediate energy using a protocol special of reading and of deconvolution that allows to measure the signals coming from the peaks of high temperature. In this work is implemented this same protocol to complete the study of TL efficiencies at low energy of protons and helium and to determine if the values of efficiency depend on the used reading protocol. For it is reported it measures of the relative efficiency of the peaks of high temperature from the TLD-100 exposed to protons of 1.5 MeV and nuclei of helium of 3 and 7.5 MeV. (Author)

  15. Chemical modification of high molecular weight polyethylene through gamma radiation for biomaterials applications

    Raposo, Matheus P.; Rocha, Marisa C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene has been used in the medical field due to its high mechanical properties compared to the other polymers. Its main application is in the development of orthopedic implants, which requires high resistance to abrasion. One of the most used methods is the introduction of crosslinks in the polymer through gamma irradiation. In order to prevent oxidation reactions, studies have been developed using tacoferol (vitamin E) as an antioxidant for the material. The ascorbic acid (vitamin C), however, has been appointed as a viable alternative for vitamin E. In this work, a high molecular weight polyethylene grade (HMWPE) and polyethylene samples formulated with vitamin C were submitted to gamma radiation. Thermodynamic-mechanical methods and gel content determinations were used to characterize the samples obtained. The sample containing 1% of vitamin C and irradiated with 50 KGy of gamma radiation presented the highest content of crosslinks. (author)

  16. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  17. High-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations induced by heating in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat

    Shintani, Seine A.; Oyama, Kotaro [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Fukuda, Norio, E-mail: noriof@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Cell Physiology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ishiwata, Shin’ichi, E-mail: ishiwata@waseda.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); WASEDA Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABIOS) (Singapore)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We tested the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on cardiac sarcomere dynamics. • A rise in temperature (>∼38 °C) induced high-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations. • These oscillations occurred with and without blockade of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores. • Cardiac sarcomeres can play a role as a temperature-dependent rhythm generator. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on sarcomere dynamics in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat. A rapid increase in temperature to >∼38 °C induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-independent high-frequency (∼5–10 Hz) sarcomeric auto-oscillations (Hyperthermal Sarcomeric Oscillations; HSOs). In myocytes with the intact sarcoplasmic reticular functions, HSOs coexisted with [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent spontaneous beating in the same sarcomeres, with markedly varying frequencies (∼10 and ∼1 Hz for the former and latter, respectively). HSOs likewise occurred following blockade of the sarcoplasmic reticular functions, with the amplitude becoming larger and the frequency lower in a time-dependent manner. The present findings suggest that in the mammalian heart, sarcomeres spontaneously oscillate at higher frequencies than the sinus rhythm at temperatures slightly above the physiologically relevant levels.

  18. Properties of a large NaI(Tl) spectrometer for the energy measurement of high-energy gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Hughes, E.B.; Finman, L.C.; Hofstadter, R.; Lepetich, J.E.; Lin, Y.C.; Mattox, J.R.; Nolan, P.L.; Parks, R.; Walker, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    A large NaI(T1) spectrometer is expected to play a crucial role in the measurement of the energy spectra from an all-sky survey of high-energy celestial gamma rays on the Gamma Ray Observatory. The crystal size and requirements of space flight have resulted in a novel crystal-packaging and optics combination. The structure of this spectrometer and the operating characteristics determined in a test program using high energy positrons are described

  19. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    Lee Jongwon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous physiological studies and represented by an electrical circuit analogue, was used for simulation of in vivo protocol that shows the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. Besides, airflow was measured during use of HFCC. We compared the simulation results to either the measured data or the previous research, to understand and explain the observations. Results and discussion We could observe two important phenomena during respiration pertaining to the airflow signal oscillation generated by HFCC. The amplitudes of HFCC airflow signals varied depending on spontaneous airflow signals. We used the simulation results to investigate how the nonlinearity of airway resistance, lung capacitance, and inertance of air characterized the respiratory airflow. The simulation results indicated that lung capacitance or the inertance of air is also not a factor in the non-uniformity of HFCC airflow signals. Although not perfect, our circuit analogue model allows us to effectively simulate the nonlinear characteristics of the respiratory system. Conclusion We found that the amplitudes of HFCC airflow signals behave as a function of spontaneous airflow signals. This is due to the nonlinearity of the respiratory system, particularly variations in airway resistance.

  20. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit II: Quantum dynamics and spectroscopy

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of Paper I (Toutounji, 2017) of which motivation was testing the applicability of Morse oscillator propagator whose analytical form was derived by Duru (1983). This is because the Morse oscillator propagator was reported (Duru, 1983) in a triple-integral form of a functional of modified Bessel function of the first kind, which considerably limits its applicability. For this reason, I was prompted to find a regime under which Morse oscillator propagator may be simplified and hence be expressed in a closed-form. This was well accomplished in Paper I. Because Morse oscillator is of central importance and widely used in modelling vibrations, its propagator applicability will be extended to applications in quantum dynamics and spectroscopy as will be reported in this paper using the off-diagonal propagator of Morse oscillator whose analytical form is derived.

  1. Gamma rays induced bold seeded high yielding mutant in chickpea

    Wani, A.A.; Anis, M.

    2001-01-01

    In pulses especially in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), genetic variability has been exhausted due to natural selection and hence conventional breeding methods are not very fruitful. Mutation techniques are the best methods to enlarge the genetically conditioned variability of a species within a short time and have played a significant role in the development of many crop varieties. Investigations on the effects of ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens in induction of macro-mutations have received much attention owing to their utmost importance in plant breeding. The present study reports a bold seeded mutant in chickpea, the most dominating pulse crop on the Indian subcontinent. Fresh seeds of chickpea variety 'Pusa-212' were procured from IARI, New Delhi and treated with different doses/concentrations of gamma rays ( 60 Co source at NBRI, Lucknow) and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), individually as well as in combination, to raise the M1 generation. Seeds of M 1 plants were sown to raise M2 plant progenies. A bold seeded mutant was isolated from 400 Gy gamma ray treatments. The mutant was confirmed as true bred, all the mutant seeds gave rise to morphologically similar plants in M 3 , which were quite distinct from the control. The bold seeded mutant showed 'gigas' characteristics and vigorous growth. The plant remained initially straight but later on attained a trailing habit due to heavy secondary branching. The leaves, petioles, flowers, pods and seeds were almost double that of the parent variety, in size. The flowering occurred 10 days later than the parent and maturity was also delayed accordingly. Observations were recorded on various quantitative traits. Plant height and number of primary branches showed a significant improvement over the parent. It is interesting to note that the number of pods and number of seeds per pod significantly decreased. However, the hundred seed weight (31.73±0.59g) in the mutant plants was more than double in the parent

  2. Very high-frequency gravitational waves from magnetars and gamma-ray bursts

    Wen, Hao; Li, Fang-Yu; Li, Jin; Fang, Zhen-Yun; Beckwith, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Extremely powerful astrophysical electromagnetic (EM) systems could be possible sources of high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs). Here, based on properties of magnetars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we address “Gamma-HFGWs” (with very high-frequency around 1020 Hz) caused by ultra-strong EM radiation (in the radiation-dominated phase of GRB fireballs) interacting with super-high magnetar surface magnetic fields (˜1011 T). By certain parameters of distance and power, the Gamma-HFGWs would have far field energy density Ω gw around 10-6, and they would cause perturbed signal EM waves of ˜10-20 W/m2 in a proposed HFGW detection system based on the EM response to GWs. Specially, Gamma-HFGWs would possess distinctive envelopes with characteristic shapes depending on the particular structures of surface magnetic fields of magnetars, which could be exclusive features helpful to distinguish them from background noise. Results obtained suggest that magnetars could be involved in possible astrophysical EM sources of GWs in the very high-frequency band, and Gamma-HFGWs could be potential targets for observations in the future. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605015, 11375279, 11205254, 11647307) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (106112017CDJXY300003, 106112017CDJXFLX0014)

  3. Synthetic Pulse Dilation - PMT Model for high bandwidth gamma measurements

    Geppert-Kleinrath, H.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Meaney, K. D.; Lopez, F. E.; Khater, H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, T.; Milnes, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Cherenkov mechanism used in Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) is exceptionally fast. However, the temporal resolution of GCDs, such as the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH), is limited by the current state-of-the-art photomultiplier tube (PMT) to 100 ps. The new pulse dilation - PMT (PD-PMT) for NIF allows for a temporal resolution comparable to that of the gas cell, or of 10ps. Enhanced resolution will contribute to the quest for ignition in a crucial way through precision measurement of reaction history and areal density (ρ R) history, leading to better constrained models. Features such as onset of alpha heating, shock reverberations and burn truncation due to dynamically evolving failure modes will become visible for the first time. PD-PMT will be deployed on GCD-3 at NIF in 2018. Our synthetic PD-PMT model evaluates the capabilities of these future measurements, as well as minimum yield requirements for measurements performed in a well at 3.9 m from target chamber center (TCC), and within a diagnostic inserter at 0.2m from TCC.

  4. High energy eye-safe and mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator

    Liu, J; Liu, Q; Huang, L; Gong, M

    2010-01-01

    A high energy eye-safe and mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is demonstrated. The nonlinear media is a Y-cut KTA crystal with the length of 20 mm, which is pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. Both eye-safe and mid-infrared laser are output with high energy. When the pump energy is 1 J and the pulse duration is 10 ns, we get 53 mJ idler at 3.632 μm and 151 mJ signal at 1.505 μm. As we know, the idler energy is the highest at the wavelength beyond 3.5 μm and the signal energy is the highest with Y-cut KTA. The results prove that the Y-cut KTA crystal can produce the signal and idler with the energies as high as these in the paper. We have tested the temperature-tuning characters and the coefficient of the idler is 0.26 nm/°C

  5. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  6. A high power picosecond Nd:YVO4 master oscillator power amplifier system pumped by 880 nm diodes

    Yan, S; Yan, X; Yu, H; Zhang, L; Guo, L; Sun, W; Hou, W; Lin, X

    2013-01-01

    We present a high power 880 nm diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YVO 4 oscillator, followed by an 880 nm diode-pumped Nd:YVO 4 amplifier. In the oscillator, a maximum power of 8.7 W was obtained with a repetition rate of 63 MHz and pulse duration of 32 ps, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 36%. The beam quality factors M 2 were measured to be M x 2 =1.2 and M y 2 =1.1 9, respectively. The amplifier generated up to 19.1 W output power with the pulse width and repetition rate remaining unaltered after amplification. (paper)

  7. A survey of strong high-frequency sea level oscillations along the US East Coast between 2006 and 2011

    S. Pasquet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A systematic survey of high-frequency sea level oscillations (<6 h measured between 2006 and 2011 along the US East Coast is performed. Raw 1-min resolution sea level data is used. After performing a data quality check, the nine most intense events, with maximum recorded wave heights ranging from 40 to 100 cm, are identified. Focusing on three of these events enables us to recognize two different generation mechanisms: (i topographically-trapped edge waves which are found to be a significant contributor to the strongest observed oscillations, and (ii standing waves, which occur over enclosed shallow waters and may result in significant wave heights of up to 100 cm. A reproduction of the observed oscillations is a part of a future work, which will include an assessment of a generating force in the atmosphere, allowing for a better prevention of potential flooding along the US East Coast.

  8. CeBr3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan Ding; Reed, Alexis; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr 3 ) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr 3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr 3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr 3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr 3 :Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  9. Search for Very High-energy Gamma Rays from the Northern Fermi Bubble Region with HAWC

    Abeysekara, AU; Albert, A; Alfaro, R; Alvarez, C; Alvarez, JD; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, JC; Ayala Solares, HA; Barber, AS; Bautista-Elivar, N; Becerril, A; Belmont-Moreno, E; BenZvi, SY; Berley, D; Braun, J

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. We present a search for very high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Northern Fermi Bubble region using data collected with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory. The size of the data set is 290 days. No significant excess is observed in the Northern Fermi Bubble region, so upper limits above 1 TeV are calculated. The upper limits are between and . The upper limits disfavor a proton injection spectrum that exten...

  10. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Hui [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Jia, Nan; Duan, Yaoyong [The Chinese People' s Armed Police Force Academy, Hebei (China); Li, Zheng-Hong [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, CAEP, Mianyang (China); Cheng, Hui [Microwave Department, Sichuan Jiuzhou Electric Appliance Group Co., Ltd., Mianyang (China); Yang, Xiao-Chuan [Computational Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang (China)

    2016-07-15

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  11. Combined wide pump tuning and high power of a continuous-wave, singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    Herpen, M.M.J.W. van; Bisson, S.E.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new singly resonant, single-frequency optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has been developed for the 2.6-4.7 mum infrared wavelength region, using a high power (>20 W), widely tunable (1024-1034 nm) Yb:YAG pump source. With the OPO frequency stabilized with an intracavity etalon, the OPO achieved

  12. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates with a prototype High Purity Germanium detector

    Cooper, R. J.; Amman, M.; Vetter, K.

    2018-04-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are required for applications in nuclear safeguards, emergency response, and fundamental nuclear physics. To overcome one of the shortcomings of conventional High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, we have developed a prototype device capable of achieving high event throughput and high energy resolution at very high count rates. This device, the design of which we have previously reported on, features a planar HPGe crystal with a reduced-capacitance strip electrode geometry. This design is intended to provide good energy resolution at the short shaping or digital filter times that are required for high rate operation and which are enabled by the fast charge collection afforded by the planar geometry crystal. In this work, we report on the initial performance of the system at count rates up to and including two million counts per second.

  13. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations in high-mobility semimetal LuPtBi

    Xu, Guizhou; Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Enke; Xi, X; Xu, Feng; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Wang, Wenhong

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of ultrahigh mobility and large positive magnetoresistance in topologically non-trivial Half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi provides a unique playground for studying exotic physics and significant perspective for device applications. As an fcc-structured electron-hole-compensated semimetal, LuPtBi theoretically exhibits six symmetrically arranged anisotropic electron Fermi pockets and two nearly-spherical hole pockets, offering the opportunity to explore the physics of Fermi surface with a simple angle-related magnetotransport properties. In this work, through the angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance measurements, in combination with high-field SdH quantum oscillations, we achieved to map out a Fermi surface with six anisotropic pockets in the high-temperature and low-field regime, and furthermore, identify a possible magnetic field driven Fermi surface change at lower temperatures. Reasons account for the Fermi surface change in LuPtBi are discussed in terms of the field-induced electron evacuation due to Landau quantization.

  14. High efficiency fourth-harmonic generation from nanosecond fiber master oscillator power amplifier

    Mu, Xiaodong; Steinvurzel, Paul; Rose, Todd S.; Lotshaw, William T.; Beck, Steven M.; Clemmons, James H.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high power, deep ultraviolet (DUV) conversion to 266 nm through frequency quadrupling of a nanosecond pulse width 1064 nm fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The MOPA system uses an Yb-doped double-clad polarization-maintaining large mode area tapered fiber as the final gain stage to generate 0.5-mJ, 10 W, 1.7- ns single mode pulses at a repetition rate of 20 kHz with measured spectral bandwidth of 10.6 GHz (40 pm), and beam qualities of Mx 2=1.07 and My 2=1.03, respectively. Using LBO and BBO crystals for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fourth-harmonic generation (FHG), we have achieved 375 μJ (7.5 W) and 92.5 μJ (1.85 W) at wavelengths of 532 nm and 266 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest narrowband infrared, green and UV pulse energies obtained to date from a fully spliced fiber amplifier. We also demonstrate high efficiency SHG and FHG with walk-off compensated (WOC) crystal pairs and tightly focused pump beam. An SHG efficiency of 75%, FHG efficiency of 47%, and an overall efficiency of 35% from 1064 nm to 266 nm are obtained.

  15. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations in high-mobility semimetal LuPtBi

    Xu, Guizhou

    2017-03-14

    The recent discovery of ultrahigh mobility and large positive magnetoresistance in topologically non-trivial Half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi provides a unique playground for studying exotic physics and significant perspective for device applications. As an fcc-structured electron-hole-compensated semimetal, LuPtBi theoretically exhibits six symmetrically arranged anisotropic electron Fermi pockets and two nearly-spherical hole pockets, offering the opportunity to explore the physics of Fermi surface with a simple angle-related magnetotransport properties. In this work, through the angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance measurements, in combination with high-field SdH quantum oscillations, we achieved to map out a Fermi surface with six anisotropic pockets in the high-temperature and low-field regime, and furthermore, identify a possible magnetic field driven Fermi surface change at lower temperatures. Reasons account for the Fermi surface change in LuPtBi are discussed in terms of the field-induced electron evacuation due to Landau quantization.

  16. Fermi observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080916C.

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Burrows, D; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, A; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Deklotz, M; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hernando Morat, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgrò, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-03-27

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  17. Modulated High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from the Micro-quasar Cygnus X-3

    Abdo, A.A.; Cheung, C.C.; Dermer, C.D.; Grove, J.E.; Johnson, W.N.; Lovellette, M.N.; Makeev, A.; Ray, P.S.; Strickman, M.S.; Wood, K.S.; Abdo, A.A.; Cheung, C.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Cameron, R.A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Digel, S.W.; Silva, E.D.E.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Focke, W.B.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Hayashida, M.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kamae, T.; Kocian, M.L.; Lande, J.; Madejski, G.M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M.E.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P.L.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Rochester, L.S.; Romani, R.W.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J.B.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T.L.; Waite, A.P.; Wang, P.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Cameron, R.A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Digel, S.W.; Silva, E.D.E.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Focke, W.B.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Hayashida, M.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kamae, T.; Kocian, M.L.; Lande, J.; Madejski, G.M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M.E.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P.L.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Rochester, L.S.; Romani, R.W.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J.B.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T.L.; Waite, A.P.; Wang, P.; Axelsson, M.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Axelsson, M.; Conrad, J.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Jackson, M.S.; Meurer, C.; Ryde, F.; Ylinen, T.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chaty, S.; Corbel, S.; Grenier, I.A.; Koerding, E.; Rodriguez, J.; Starck, J.L.; Tibaldo, L.

    2009-01-01

    Micro-quasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and micro-quasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets. (authors)

  18. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  19. Portable gamma-ray holdup and attributes measurements of high- and variable-burnup plutonium

    Wenz, T.R.; Russo, P.A.; Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Takahashi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoki, I.

    1991-01-01

    High burnup-plutonium holdup has been assayed quantitatively by low resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The assay was calibrated with four plutonium standards representing a range of fuel burnup and 241 Am content. Selection of a calibration standard based on its qualitative spectral similarity to gamma-ray spectra of the process material is partially responsible for the success of these holdup measurements. The spectral analysis method is based on the determination of net counts in a single spectral region of interest (ROI). However, the low-resolution gamma-ray assay signal for the high-burnup plutonium includes unknown amounts of contamination from 241 Am. For most needs, the range of calibration standards required for this selection procedure is not available. A new low-resolution gamma-ray spectral analysis procedure for assay of 239 Pu has been developed. The procedure uses the calculated isotope activity ratios and the measured net counts in three spectral ROIs to evaluate and remove the 241 Am contamination from the 239 Pu assay signal on a spectrum-by-spectrum basis. The calibration for the new procedure requires only a single plutonium standard. The procedure also provides a measure of the burnup and age attributes of holdup deposits. The new procedure has been demonstrated using portable gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment for a wide range of plutonium standards and has also been applied to the assay of 239 Pu holdup in a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Design of high density gamma-phase uranium alloys for LEU dispersion fuel applications

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Ray, Allison E.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium alloys are candidates for the fuel phase in aluminium matrix dispersion fuels requiring high uranium loading. Certain uranium alloys have been shown to have good irradiation performance at intermediate burnup. previous studies have shown that acceptable fission gas swelling behavior and fuel-aluminium interaction is possible only if the fuel alloy can be maintained in the high temperature body-centered-cubic γ-phase during fabrication and irradiation, at temperatures at which αU is the equilibrium phase. transition metals in Groups V through VIII are known to allow metastable retention of the gamma phase below the equilibrium isotherm. These metals have varying degrees of effectiveness in stabilizing the gamma phase. Certain alloys are metastable for very long times at the relatively low fuel temperatures seen in research operation. In this paper, the existing data on the gamma stability of binary and ternary uranium alloys is analysed. The mechanism and kinetics of decomposition of the gamma phase are assessed with the help of metal alloy theory. Alloys with the highest possible uranium content, good gamma-phase stability, and good neutronic performance are identified for further metallurgical studies and irradiation tests. Results from theory will be compared with experimentally generated data. (author)

  1. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from 16O*

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the 16 O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non-intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the 19 F(p,α) 16 O* reaction. Resonances in 19 F(p,α) 16 O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of (γ, n) and (γ, fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources

  2. Open high-level data formats and software for gamma-ray astronomy

    Deil, Christoph; Boisson, Catherine; Kosack, Karl; Perkins, Jeremy; King, Johannes; Eger, Peter; Mayer, Michael; Wood, Matthew; Zabalza, Victor; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Hassan, Tarek; Mohrmann, Lars; Ziegler, Alexander; Khelifi, Bruno; Dorner, Daniela; Maier, Gernot; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Rosado, Jaime; Contreras, José Luis; Lefaucheur, Julien; Brügge, Kai; Servillat, Mathieu; Terrier, Régis; Walter, Roland; Lombardi, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    In gamma-ray astronomy, a variety of data formats and proprietary software have been traditionally used, often developed for one specific mission or experiment. Especially for ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), data and software are mostly private to the collaborations operating the telescopes. However, there is a general movement in science towards the use of open data and software. In addition, the next-generation IACT instrument, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), will be operated as an open observatory. We have created a Github organisation at https://github.com/open-gamma-ray-astro where we are developing high-level data format specifications. A public mailing list was set up at https://lists.nasa.gov/mailman/listinfo/open-gamma-ray-astro and a first face-to-face meeting on the IACT high-level data model and formats took place in April 2016 in Meudon (France). This open multi-mission effort will help to accelerate the development of open data formats and open-source software for gamma-ray astronomy, leading to synergies in the development of analysis codes and eventually better scientific results (reproducible, multi-mission). This write-up presents this effort for the first time, explaining the motivation and context, the available resources and process we use, as well as the status and planned next steps for the data format specifications. We hope that it will stimulate feedback and future contributions from the gamma-ray astronomy community.

  3. The role of high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy surgery planning.

    Gloss, David; Nevitt, Sarah J; Staba, Richard

    2017-10-05

    Epilepsy is a serious brain disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Approximately two-thirds of seizures can be controlled with antiepileptic medications (Kwan 2000). For some of the others, surgery can completely eliminate or significantly reduce the occurrence of disabling seizures. Localization of epileptogenic areas for resective surgery is far from perfect, and new tools are being investigated to more accurately localize the epileptogenic zone (the zone of the brain where the seizures begin) and improve the likelihood of freedom from postsurgical seizures. Recordings of pathological high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) may be one such tool. To assess the ability of HFOs to improve the outcomes of epilepsy surgery by helping to identify more accurately the epileptogenic areas of the brain. For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (25 July 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 25 July 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 25 July 2016), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost, 25 July 2016), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, 25 July 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (25 July 2016), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (25 July 2016). We included studies that provided information on the outcomes of epilepsy surgery for at least six months and which used high-frequency oscillations in making decisions about epilepsy surgery. The primary outcome of the review was the Engel Class Outcome System (class I = no disabling seizures, II = rare disabling seizures, III = worthwhile improvement, IV = no worthwhile improvement). Secondary outcomes were responder rate, International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) epilepsy surgery outcome, frequency of adverse events from any source and quality of life outcomes. We intended to analyse outcomes via an aggregated data fixed-effect model meta-analysis. Two studies representing

  4. Linear optical absorption response of poly(vinylidene fluoride - trifluoroethylene) copolymers to high gamma dose

    Medeiros, Adriana S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] is a semicrystalline linear homopolymer composed by the repetition of CH 2 - CF 2 monomers. The Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] is a copolymer which is obtained with the random introduction of fluorinated CHF-CF 2 monomers in the PVDF main chain. PVDF, and also its copolymers with TrFE contents ranging from 18 to 63 wt. %, have long been studied for their striking ferroelectric properties and their applications in actuators, transducers and ferroelectric memory. Recent research work around the world have demonstrated that, for TrFE contents ranging from with 30 to 50 wt. %, the copolymer can have its ferroelectric properties modified by high doses of ionizing radiation, with the appearing of radio-induced relaxor ferroelectric features. These studies have lead us to investigate the possible use of these copolymers as high dose dosemeters, once the reported amount of induced C=C conjugated bonds after X-ray, UV and gamma irradiation seems to be a function of the delivered radiation dose. In a first investigation for doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 kGy we found out a linear relation between the gamma radiation dose and the absorption peak intensities in the UV region of the spectrum, i.e., at 223 and 274 nm. The absorption peak at 223 nm is the most sensitive to gamma rays and can be used for detecting gamma doses ranging from 0.3 to 75 kGy. Simultaneously, the absorption peak at 274 nm can be used for doses ranging from 1 to 100 kGy. Now, in the present work, we extended the investigation to gamma doses up to 3 MGy. Particularly, this study is focused in the optical absorption peak at 274 nm, corresponding to the radio-induction of triplets of conjugated C=C double bonds. The investigation revealed a linear correlation between the gamma dose and peak intensity at 274 nm for gamma doses ranging from 0.1 to more than 750 KGy, with a huge extension of the original usable dose range. Calorimetric data revealed a

  5. High frequency spin torque oscillators with composite free layer spin valve

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Arumugam, Brinda; Rajamani, Amuda

    2016-01-01

    We report the oscillations of magnetic spin components in a composite free layer spin valve. The associated Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert–Slonczewski (LLGS) equation is studied by stereographically projecting the spin on to a complex plane and the spin components were found. A fourth order Runge–Kutta numerical integration on LLGS equation also confirms the similar trajectories of the spin components. This study establishes the possibility of a Spin Torque Oscillator in a composite free layer spin valve, where the exchange coupling is ferromagnetic in nature. In-plane and out-of-plane precessional modes of magnetization oscillations were found in zero applied magnetic field and the frequencies of the oscillations were calculated from Fast Fourier Transform of the components of magnetization. Behavior of Power Spectral Density for a range of current density is studied. Finally our analysis shows the occurrence of highest frequency 150 GHz, which is in the second harmonics for the specific choice of system parameters.

  6. Observable N–¯N oscillation, high-scale see-saw and origin of matter

    Department of Physics and Center for String and Particle Theory, University of ... oscillation to be quite plausible theoretically if small neutrino masses are to be ..... S L Glashow, The future of elementary particle physics, in Proceedings of the ...

  7. High frequency spin torque oscillators with composite free layer spin valve

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Arumugam, Brinda; Rajamani, Amuda

    2016-07-15

    We report the oscillations of magnetic spin components in a composite free layer spin valve. The associated Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert–Slonczewski (LLGS) equation is studied by stereographically projecting the spin on to a complex plane and the spin components were found. A fourth order Runge–Kutta numerical integration on LLGS equation also confirms the similar trajectories of the spin components. This study establishes the possibility of a Spin Torque Oscillator in a composite free layer spin valve, where the exchange coupling is ferromagnetic in nature. In-plane and out-of-plane precessional modes of magnetization oscillations were found in zero applied magnetic field and the frequencies of the oscillations were calculated from Fast Fourier Transform of the components of magnetization. Behavior of Power Spectral Density for a range of current density is studied. Finally our analysis shows the occurrence of highest frequency 150 GHz, which is in the second harmonics for the specific choice of system parameters.

  8. Analysis of highly nonlinear oscillation systems using He's max–min ...

    Min–max method; nonlinear oscillation; duffing equation; homo- .... where c and ε are the linear and cubic stiffness which do not need to be small in the ..... an easy and direct procedure for determining approximations to the periodic solutions.

  9. Oscillations in the hadron scattering amplitude at high energy and small momentum transfer; Oscillations dans l`amplitude de diffusion hadronique a haute energie et petites moments de transfer

    Gauron, Pierre; Basarab Nicolescu [Theoretical Physics Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Selyugin, O.V. [Lab. of Theoretical Physics, Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1999-10-01

    We show that the high precision dN/dt UA4/2 data at {radical} = 541 GeV are compatible with the presence of Auberson-Kinoshita-Martin (AKM) type of oscillations at very small momentum transfer. These oscillations seem to be periodic in {radical}|t|, the corresponding period being {approx_equal} 2 {center_dot}10{sup -2} GeV. The existence of such visible oscillations suggests a general mechanism of saturation of axiomatic bounds. As an illustration the consequences for extracting the parameter {rho} = ReF/ImF from dN/dt data are also discussed. (authors) 1 ref., 2 figs.

  10. Buildup factor and mechanical properties of high-density cement mixed with crumb rubber and prompt gamma ray study

    Aim-O, P.; Wongsawaeng, D.; Tancharakorn, S.; Sophon, M.

    2017-09-01

    High-density cement mixed with crumb rubber has been studied to be a gamma ray and neutron shielding material, especially for photonuclear reactions that may occur from accelerators where both types of radiation exist. The Buildup factors from gamma ray scattering, prompt and secondary gamma ray emissions from neutron capture and mechanical properties were evaluated. For buildup factor studies, two different geometries were used: narrow beam and broad beam. Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) was carried out to determine the prompt and secondary gamma ray emissions. The compressive strength of samples was evaluated by using compression testing machine which was central point loading crushing test. The results revealed that addition of crumb rubber increased the buildup factor. Gamma ray spectra following PGNAA revealed no prompt or secondary gamma ray emission. Mechanical testing indicated that the compressive strength of the shielding material decreased with increasing volume percentage of crumb rubber.

  11. Spontaneous high frequency diameter oscillations of larger retinal arterioles are reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Bek, Toke; Jeppesen, Peter; Kanters, Jørgen K.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by morphological changes in the retina secondary to disturbances in retinal blood flow. Vasomotion is a mechanism for regulating blood flow by spontaneous oscillations in the diameter of retinal resistance arterioles, and has been shown to be disturbed outside...... the eye in diabetic patients. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to characterize spontaneous oscillations in the diameter of retinal arterioles in normal persons and in persons with different severity of diabetic retinopathy....

  12. The M-current contributes to high threshold membrane potential oscillations in a cell type-specific way in the pedunculopontine nucleus of mice

    Csilla eBordas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pedunculopontine nucleus is known as a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system, participating in regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Besides cholinergic neurons, it consists of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons as well. According to classical and recent studies, more subgroups of neurons were defined. Groups based on the neurotransmitter released by a neuron are not homogenous, but can be further subdivided.The PPN neurons do not only provide cholinergic and non-cholinergic inputs to several subcortical brain areas but they are also targets of cholinergic and other different neuromodulatory actions. Although cholinergic neuromodulation has been already investigated in the nucleus, one of its characteristic targets, the M-type potassium current has not been described yet.Using slice electrophysiology, we provide evidence in the present work that cholinergic neurons possess M-current, whereas GABAergic neurons lack it. The M-current contributes to certain functional differences of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, as spike frequency adaptation, action potential firing frequency or the amplitude difference of medium afterhyperpolarizations. Furthermore, we showed that high threshold membrane potential oscillation with high power, around 20 Hz frequency is a functional property of almost all cholinergic cells, whereas GABAergic neurons have only low amplitude oscillations. Blockade of the M-current abolished the oscillatory activity at 20 Hz, and largely diminished it at other frequencies.Taken together, the M-current seems to be characteristic for PPN cholinergic neurons. It provides a possibility for modulating gamma band activity of these cells, thus contributing to neuromodulatory regulation of the reticular activating system.

  13. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays. Ot...

  14. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays...

  15. Design of a high efficiency relativistic backward wave oscillator with low guiding magnetic field

    Li, Xiaoze; Song, Wei; Tan, Weibing; Zhang, Ligang; Su, Jiancang; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Hu, Xianggang; Shen, Zhiyuan; Liang, Xu; Ning, Qi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2016-07-15

    A high efficiency relativistic backward wave oscillator working at a low guiding magnetic field is designed and simulated. A trapezoidal resonant reflector is used to reduce the modulation field in the resonant reflector to avoid overmodulation of the electron beam which will lead to a large momentum spread and then low conversion efficiency. The envelope of the inner radius of the slow wave structure (SWS) increases stepwise to keep conformal to the trajectory of the electron beam which will alleviate the bombardment of the electron on the surface of the SWS. The length of period of the SWS is reduced gradually to make a better match between phase velocity and electron beam, which decelerates continually and improves the RF current distribution. Meanwhile the modulation field is reduced by the introduction of nonuniform SWS also. The particle in cell simulation results reveal that a microwave with a power of 1.8 GW and a frequency of 14.7 GHz is generated with an efficiency of 47% when the diode voltage is 620 kV, the beam current 6.1 kA, and the guiding magnetic field 0.95 T.

  16. Redox oscillation affecting mercury mobility from highly contaminated coastal sediments: a mesocosm incubation experiment

    Emili A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg mobility at the sediment-water interface was investigated during a laboratory incubation experiment on highly contaminated sediments (up to 23 μg g−1 of the Gulf of Trieste. Undisturbed sediment was collected in front of the Isonzo River mouth, which inflows Hg-rich suspended material originating from the Idrija (NW Slovenia mining district. Since hypoxic and anoxic conditions at the bottom are frequently observed, a redox oscillation was simulated in the laboratory at in situ temperature, using a dark flux chamber. Temporal variations of several parameters were monitored simultaneously: dissolved Hg and methylmercury (MeHg, O2, NH4+, NO3−+NO2−, PO43−, H2S, dissolved Fe and Mn, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC. Benthic fluxes of Hg and MeHg were higher under anoxic conditions while re-oxygenation caused concentrations of MeHg and Hg to rapidly drop, probably due to re-adsorption onto Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and enhanced demethylation. Hence, during anoxic events, sediments of the Gulf of Trieste may be considered as an important source of dissolved Hg species for the water column. However, re-oxygenation of the bottom compartment mitigates Hg and MeHg release from the sediment, thus acting as a natural “defence” from possible interaction between the metal and the aquatic organisms.

  17. Decreased Modulation of EEG Oscillations in High-Functioning Autism During a Motor Control Task

    Joshua Benjamin Ewen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are thought to result in part from altered cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance; this pathophysiology may impact the generation of oscillations on EEG. We investigated premotor-parietal cortical physiology associated with praxis, which has strong theoretical and empirical associations with ASD symptomatology. 25 children with high-functioning ASD (HFA and 33 controls performed a praxis task involving the pantomiming of tool use, while EEG was recorded. We assessed task-related modulation of signal power in alpha and beta frequency bands. Compared with controls, subjects with HFA showed 27% less left central (motor/premotor beta (18-22 Hz event-related desynchronization (ERD (p = 0.030, as well as 24% less left parietal alpha (7-13 Hz ERD (p = 0.046. Within the HFA group, blunting of central ERD attenuation was associated with impairments in clinical measures of praxis imitation (r = -0.4; p = 0.04 and increased autism severity (r = 0.48; p = 0.016. The modulation of central beta activity is associated, among other things, with motor imagery, which may be necessary for imitation. Impaired imitation has been associated with core features of ASD. Altered modulation of oscillatory activity may be mechanistically involved in those aspects of motor network function that relate to the core symptoms of ASD.

  18. Humidification during high-frequency oscillation ventilation is affected by ventilator circuit and ventilatory setting.

    Chikata, Yusuke; Imanaka, Hideaki; Onishi, Yoshiaki; Ueta, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaji

    2009-08-01

    High-frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV) is an accepted ventilatory mode for acute respiratory failure in neonates. As conventional mechanical ventilation, inspiratory gas humidification is essential. However, humidification during HFOV has not been clarified. In this bench study, we evaluated humidification during HFOV in the open circumstance of ICU. Our hypothesis is that humidification during HFOV is affected by circuit design and ventilatory settings. We connected a ventilator with HFOV mode to a neonatal lung model that was placed in an infant incubator set at 37 degrees C. We set a heated humidifier (Fisher & Paykel) to obtain 37 degrees C at the chamber outlet and 40 degrees C at the distal temperature probe. We measured absolute humidity and temperature at the Y-piece using a rapid-response hygrometer. We evaluated two types of ventilator circuit: a circuit with inner heating wire and another with embedded heating element. In addition, we evaluated three lengths of the inspiratory limb, three stroke volumes, three frequencies, and three mean airway pressures. The circuit with embedded heating element provided significantly higher absolute humidity and temperature than one with inner heating wire. As an extended tube lacking a heating wire was shorter, absolute humidity and temperature became higher. In the circuit with inner heating wire, absolute humidity and temperature increased as stroke volume increased. Humidification during HFOV is affected by circuit design and ventilatory settings.

  19. Anoxic oscillating MBR for photosynthetic bacteria harvesting and high salinity wastewater treatment.

    Qin, Lei; Liu, Qiuhua; Meng, Qin; Fan, Zheng; He, Jinzhe; Liu, Tao; Shen, Chong; Zhang, Guoliang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) were first harvested by MBR with pendulum type oscillation (PTO) hollow fiber module in succession and on a large scale. Based on unique properties of PSB, PSB/MBR was successfully applied for high-salinity wastewater treatment. Compared with control PSB-MBR (CMBR), PSB/PTO-MBR exhibited more excellent organics removal, which was mainly attributed to much higher biomass production for utilization. Meanwhile, the influence of light irradiation and aeration on activity of PSB was investigated in detail. Results showed that PTO-MBR with 12h light irradiation proved to be a promising and economical alternative. The cycle of dark/light and anoxic had a positive effect on PSB cultivating. Moreover, PTO-MBR exhibited much higher flux than CMBR even if large amounts of biomass existed, which demonstrated that the strong shear stress on interface of liquid-membrane played important roles on membrane fouling reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of 3 He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors

  1. Real-time image parameterization in high energy gamma-ray astronomy using transputers

    Punch, M.; Fegan, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, significant advances in Very-High-Energy gamma-ray astronomy have been made by parameterization of the Cherenkov images arising from gamma-ray initiated showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A prototype system to evaluate the use of Transputers as a parallel-processing elements for real-time analysis of data from a Cherenkov imaging camera is described in this paper. The operation of and benefits resulting from such a system are described, and the viability of an applicaiton of the prototype system is discussed

  2. Comparative effects of exposure to high-energy electrons and gamma radiation on active avoidance behaviour

    Hunt, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of two types of ionizing radiation was examined on active avoidance behaviour. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to avoid footshock by jumping onto a retractable ledge. When irradiated with high-energy electrons or gamma photons, their performance was degraded in a dose-dependent manner. However, electrons were 1.6 times as effective as gamma photons with ED50s of 62 and 102 Gy, respectively. All animals recovered within 24 min for all doses used. The data suggest that different types of ionizing radiation may not be equivalent when assessing their effect on behaviour. (author)

  3. The Dynamic Range of Ultra-High Resolution Cryogenic Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    Ali, S; Terracol, S F; Drury, O B; Friedrich, S

    2005-01-01

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensors (TES). The energy resolution achieved with a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm 3 Sn absorber is 50 -90eV for γ-rays up to 100 keV and it decreases for large absorber sizes. We discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range, as well as development of TES arrays for higher count rates and better sensitivity

  4. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements

  5. High-energy {gamma}-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Department of Economy of Academy of Management and Administration in Opole, 18 Niedzialkowski Str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Kozyukhin, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, Leninsky Pr. 31, Moscow 199991 (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2009-09-01

    Effect of Co{sup 60} {gamma}-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} glasses (5 {<=} x {<=} 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This {gamma}-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 {<=} x {<=} 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with {gamma}-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  6. Analysis of waste compounds of Gauzama Crinita and high density PET reinforced by gamma radiation

    Gago, Javier; Ramos, Victor; Hernandez, Yuri; Montoya, Eduardo; Lopez, Alcides; Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima; Acevedo, Moises

    2013-01-01

    The reinforcing effects of gamma radiation in a high density polyethylene and wood waste white Bolaina (Guazuma crinita) compounds from Pucallpa region are presented. Samples were mixed with maleic anhydride and extruded at a temperature between 170 and 200 °C, yielding small cylindrical pellets; were subsequently pressed through thermic process between 180 and 200 °C, in a time range between 15 to 20 minutes. The produced samples were exposed to gamma radiation between 50 and 300 kGy, and then subjected to mechanical testing of hardness and roughness. It was observed that the hardness and the roughness increases in direct proportion to the increase of the dose of gamma radiation, but the samples subjected to doses in the range of 100 to 150 kGy, had a slight inverse behavior. (authors).

  7. High dose effect of gamma and neutrons on the N-JFET electronic components

    Assaf, Jamal-Eddin

    2006-11-01

    Two types of N-JFET components have been irradiated by high doses of thermal neutrons and gamma rays up to 2000x10 12 n/cm 2 and 1000 kGy, respectively. The static tests show a decrease of the g m and I d s parameters. The behaviour of electronic noise on the output was the principal dynamic test after irradiation. The result of this test gives an increase of the noise with radiation dose increasing. The noise was described as the Equivalent Noise of Charge (ENC) at the output of the measurements set-up. The quantities and the qualities of the noise depend on the N-JEET type and the type of radiation (neutrons or gamma). Other tests were carried out like the relaxation or recovery phenomena after radiation, and the superposed effects of gamma and neutrons.(author)

  8. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  9. A model problem for restricted-data gamma ray emission tomography of highly active nuclear waste

    Cattle, Brian A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops the work of Cattle et al. [Cattle, B.A., Fellerman, A.S., West, R.M., 2004. On the detection of solid deposits using gamma ray emission tomography with limited data. Measurement Science and Technology 15, 1429-1439] by considering a generalization of the model employed therein. The focus of the work is the gamma ray tomographic analysis of high-level waste processing. The work in this paper considers a two-dimensional model for the measurement of gamma ray photon flux, as opposed to the previous one-dimensional analysis via the integrated Beer-Lambert law. The mathematical inverse problem that arises in determining physical quantities from the photon count measurements is tackled using Bayesian statistical methods that are implemented computationally using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. In a further new development, the effect of the degree of collimation of the detector on the reliability of the solutions is also considered

  10. Statistical modeling in phenomenological description of electromagnetic cascade processes produced by high-energy gamma quanta

    Slowinski, B.

    1987-01-01

    A description of a simple phenomenological model of electromagnetic cascade process (ECP) initiated by high-energy gamma quanta in heavy absorbents is given. Within this model spatial structure and fluctuations of ionization losses of shower electrons and positrons are described. Concrete formulae have been obtained as a result of statistical analysis of experimental data from the xenon bubble chamber of ITEP (Moscow)

  11. On-Line High Dose-rate Gamma Irradiation Test of the Profibus/DP module

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Koo, In Soo; Hong, Seok Boong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The field bus data communication is considered for application in nuclear environments. The nuclear facilities, including nuclear power plants, high radioactivity waste disposals, reprocessing plants and thermonuclear fusion installations can benefit from the unique advantages of the field bus communication network for the smart field instruments and controls. A major problem which arises when dealing with one in these nuclear environments, in special circumstances such as the RCS (reactor coolant system) area, is the presence of high gamma-ray irradiation fields. Radioactive constraints for the DBA(design basis accident) qualification of the RTD transmitter installed in the inside of the RCS pump are typically on the order of 4kGy/h with total doses up to 10kGy. In order to use an industrial field bus communication network as an ad-hoc sensor data link in the vicinity of the RCS area of the nuclear power plant, the robust survivability of these system in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore needs to be verified. We have conducted high dose-rate (up to 4kGy) gamma irradiation experiments on a profibus/DP communication module. In this paper we describe the evolution of its basic characteristics with high dose-rate gamma irradiation and shortly explain the observed phenomena.

  12. Correlation between X-ray and high energy gamma-ray emission form Cygnus X-3

    Weekes, T.C.; Danaher, S.; Fegan, D.J.; Porter, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    In May-June 1980, the 4.8 hour modulated X-ray flux from Cygnus X-3 underwent a significant change in the shape of the light curve; this change correlates with the peak in the high-energy (E > 2 x 10 12 eV) gamma ray emission at the same epoch. (orig.)

  13. High gamma-ray measurement using optical emission of ceramic material

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Yamagishi, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the fluorescence phenomena in Zr-O ceramic under expose to high gamma-ray and fission neutron source. In addition, the paper also discusses the possibility of ionizing radiation detection in the core region of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  14. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  15. An efficiency study of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer

    Marti Climent, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the different curves for the efficiency fit of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer was made. These curves are used to fit the efficiency of our detector system. In order to study the goodness of the different fits various standards were used, and the ICRP GAM-83 exercise results were employed. (author)

  16. Cholinergic enhancement of visual attention and neural oscillations in the human brain.

    Bauer, Markus; Kluge, Christian; Bach, Dominik; Bradbury, David; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon

    2012-03-06

    Cognitive processes such as visual perception and selective attention induce specific patterns of brain oscillations. The neurochemical bases of these spectral changes in neural activity are largely unknown, but neuromodulators are thought to regulate processing. The cholinergic system is linked to attentional function in vivo, whereas separate in vitro studies show that cholinergic agonists induce high-frequency oscillations in slice preparations. This has led to theoretical proposals that cholinergic enhancement of visual attention might operate via gamma oscillations in visual cortex, although low-frequency alpha/beta modulation may also play a key role. Here we used MEG to record cortical oscillations in the context of administration of a cholinergic agonist (physostigmine) during a spatial visual attention task in humans. This cholinergic agonist enhanced spatial attention effects on low-frequency alpha/beta oscillations in visual cortex, an effect correlating with a drug-induced speeding of performance. By contrast, the cholinergic agonist did not alter high-frequency gamma oscillations in visual cortex. Thus, our findings show that cholinergic neuromodulation enhances attentional selection via an impact on oscillatory synchrony in visual cortex, for low rather than high frequencies. We discuss this dissociation between high- and low-frequency oscillations in relation to proposals that lower-frequency oscillations are generated by feedback pathways within visual cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Induction of high yielding and high protein containing chickpea mutant variety through gamma radiation

    Hassan, S.; Javed, M.A.; Khan, A.J.; Tariq, M.

    1997-01-01

    Pure seeds of a blight susceptible but high yielding chickpea variety 6153 were irradiated at 20 Kr(0.2 kGy) dose of gamma radiation and the mutant line CMN-446-4 was selected in M3 generation on the basis of high yield and disease resistance. After confirmation of its resistance to blight in M4 and M5, the mutant line CMN-446-4 along with other promising chickpea mutants were evaluated in various yield trials at different locations. The mutant line CMN-446-4 was got evaluated in chickpea national uniform yield trial conducted over two locations in the country during 1993-94. The mutant line, on average, ranked 3rd by producing significantly higher yield of 1528 kg/ha as compared to the two checked varieties Punjab-91 and Paidar-91 which yielded 1316 and 1391 kg/ha respectively. The mutant CMN-446-4 has significantly greater percentage of protein content (25.22%) compared to its parental variety having (20.12%). (author)

  18. Oscillations and Stability of Plasma in an External High-Frequency Electric Field

    Aliev, Ju.M.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Silin, V.P.; Uotson, H.

    1966-01-01

    A theory is developed for the oscillations and stability of plasma in a strong external HF electric field. The kinetic equation with self-congruent reciprocity is linearized for weak deviations from the ground state. Since the latter depends on an external HF field, the linearized equation obtained has coefficients with a periodic time dependence. From this equation and also from Maxwell's equations there is derived a dispersion equation for plasma oscillations that represents the zero value of the infinite order determinant, and that is solved both for external field frequencies considerably exceeding the electron Langmuir frequency and for frequencies that are less. The external HF field changes the oscillation branches in a plasma without an external field, and also leads to a new low-frequency oscillation branch. Movement of particles in the HF field gives spatial dispersion. If the frequency of the field exceeds the election Langmuir frequency, the plasma oscillations are stable. At frequencies less than this level there occurs a build-up of low-frequency oscillations. Here the maximum of the build-up occurs when the external field frequencies approach the electron Langmuir frequency and is equal to the product of the Langmuir frequency and the one-third power of the electron-ion mass ratio. Away from the resonance, -the increment of build-up has the same order of magnitude as the ion Langmuir frequency. An external magnetic field increases the number of possible natural plasma oscillations and thereby increases the possibility of resonance with the external HF field. Allowance for the thermal motion of the particles enables one to determine the attenuation of the oscillations in question. Expressions for the decrements are derived. The effect of the external HF field on a plasma in which there are beams is also discussed. An HF field has a destabilizing effect on a system of this kind, since on the one hand there can be a build-up of fresh, low

  19. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics: Progress report, May 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    Lamb, R.G.; Lewis, D.A.

    1988-02-01

    The Whipple observatory Gamma Ray Collaboration has continued to make steady progress in its development of a highly sensitive stereoscopic imaging gamma-ray telescope (known as the HERCULES project). The milestones in this year's development include: the demonstration of the success of the imaging concept with a single camera by the detection of a very weak flux of gamma rays from the Crab Nebula at a high level of statistical significance (7 sigma), the confirmation of our detection of an anomalous pulsed flux from Hercules X-1 in the summer of 1986 by two other groups; this result has serious implications for the mechanism for gamma-ray emission in this binary source. The construction and installation of the new high resolution camera on the 10 m reflector; the realistic simulation of the sensitivity of this camera as well as that of the full HERCULES system was also undertaken. These, and other highlights of this year's program at the Iowa State University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, are discussed in this paper. 6 figs

  20. Resection of ictal high-frequency oscillations leads to favorable surgical outcome in pediatric epilepsy

    Fujiwara, Hisako; Greiner, Hansel M.; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Holland-Bouley, Katherine D.; Seo, Joo Hee; Arthur, Todd; Mangano, Francesco T.; Leach, James L.; Rose, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) is performed as part of an epilepsy surgery evaluation when noninvasive tests are incongruent or the putative seizure-onset zone is near eloquent cortex. Determining the seizure-onset zone using intracranial EEG has been conventionally based on identification of specific ictal patterns with visual inspection. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, >80 Hz) have been recognized recently as highly correlated with the epileptogenic zone. However, HFOs can be difficult to detect because of their low amplitude. Therefore, the prevalence of ictal HFOs and their role in localization of epileptogenic zone on intracranial EEG are unknown. Methods We identified 48 patients who underwent surgical treatment after the surgical evaluation with intracranial EEG, and 44 patients met criteria for this retrospective study. Results were not used in surgical decision making. Intracranial EEG recordings were collected with a sampling rate of 2,000 Hz. Recordings were first inspected visually to determine ictal onset and then analyzed further with time-frequency analysis. Forty-one (93%) of 44 patients had ictal HFOs determined with time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG. Key Findings Twenty-two (54%) of the 41 patients with ictal HFOs had complete resection of HFO regions, regardless of frequency bands. Complete resection of HFOs (n = 22) resulted in a seizure-free outcome in 18 (82%) of 22 patients, significantly higher than the seizure-free outcome with incomplete HFO resection (4/19, 21%). Significance Our study shows that ictal HFOs are commonly found with intracranial EEG in our population largely of children with cortical dysplasia, and have localizing value. The use of ictal HFOs may add more promising information compared to interictal HFOs because of the evidence of ictal propagation and followed by clinical aspect of seizures. Complete resection of HFOs is a favorable prognostic indicator for surgical outcome. PMID

  1. Search for very-high-energy emission from Gamma-ray Bursts using the first 18 months of data from the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    The HAWC collaboration; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Barber, A. S.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.

    2017-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-ray Observatory is an extensive air shower detector operating in central Mexico, which has recently completed its first two years of full operations. If for a burst like GRB 130427A at a redshift of 0.34 and a high-energy component following a power law with index -1.66, the high-energy component is extended to higher energies with no cut-off other than from extragalactic background light attenuation, HAWC would observe gamma rays with a peak ene...

  2. Anterior Thalamic High Frequency Band Activity Is Coupled with Theta Oscillations at Rest

    Catherine M. Sweeney-Reed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-frequency coupling (CFC between slow and fast brain rhythms, in the form of phase–amplitude coupling (PAC, is proposed to enable the coordination of neural oscillatory activity required for cognitive processing. PAC has been identified in the neocortex and mesial temporal regions, varying according to the cognitive task being performed and also at rest. PAC has also been observed in the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN during memory processing. The thalamus is active during the resting state and has been proposed to be involved in switching between task-free cognitive states such as rest, in which attention is internally-focused, and externally-focused cognitive states, in which an individual engages with environmental stimuli. It is unknown whether PAC is an ongoing phenomenon during the resting state in the ATN, which is modulated during different cognitive states, or whether it only arises during the performance of specific tasks. We analyzed electrophysiological recordings of ATN activity during rest from seven patients who received thalamic electrodes implanted for treatment of pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. PAC was identified between theta (4–6 Hz phase and high frequency band (80–150 Hz amplitude during rest in all seven patients, which diminished during engagement in tasks involving an external focus of attention. The findings are consistent with the proposal that theta–gamma coupling in the ATN is an ongoing phenomenon, which is modulated by task performance.

  3. Inspection of high density materials by means of X and gamma radiography and X and gamma radioscopy

    Deleuze, M.

    1985-11-01

    We present the tests carried out on uranium for a comparative evaluation of the capabilities and limitations of gamma radiography and X and gamma radioscopy. The following comparison subjects are: the exposure and inspection times of uranium pieces from exposure charts, the radiographic contrast, the sensitivity of defect detection, the choice of radiation source. Theses tests made it possible to determine the limiting thicknesses of uranium able to be inspected by these two techniques. Accordingly, we decided to exchange 192 Ir gamma radiography for a 420 kV X radioscopy and radiography

  4. Experimental investigation of a reacting transverse jet in a high pressure oscillating vitiated crossflow

    Fugger, Christopher A.

    Staged combustion is one design approach in a gas turbine engine to reduce pollutant emission levels. In axially staged combustion, portions of the air and fuel are injected downstream of a lean premixed low NOx primary combustion zone. The gas residence time at elevated temperatures is decreased resulting in lower thermal NOx, and the reduced oxygen and high temperature vitiated primary zone flow further help to reduce pollutant emissions and quickly complete combustion. One implementation of axially staged combustion is transverse fuel jet injection. An important consideration for staged combustion systems, though, is how the primary and secondary combustion zones can couple through the acoustic resonances of the chamber. These couplings can lead to additional source terms that pump energy into the resonant acoustic field and help sustain the high-amplitude combustor pressure oscillations. An understanding of these couplings is important so that it may be possible to design a secondary combustion system that provides inherent damping to the combustor system. To systematically characterize the coupling of a reacting jet in unsteady crossflow in detail, the effects of an an unsteady pressure flowfield and an unsteady velocity flowfield are separately investigated. An optically accessible resonant combustion chamber was designed and built as part of this work to generate a standing wave unsteady vitiated crossflow at a chamber pressure of 0.9 MPa. The location of transverse jet injection corresponds to one of two locations, where one location is the pressure node and the other location the pressure anti-node of the resonant chamber acoustic mode. The injection location is optically accessible, and the dynamic interactions between the transverse jet flow and the 1st and 2nd axial combustor modes are measured using 10 kHz OH-PLIF and 2D PIV. This document analyzes five test cases: two non-reacting jets and three reacting jets. All cases correspond to jet injection

  5. The energy demand of fast neuronal network oscillations: insights from brain slice preparations

    Oliver eKann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast neuronal network oscillations in the gamma range (30-100 Hz in the cerebral cortex have been implicated in higher cognitive functions such as sensual perception, working memory, and, perhaps, consciousness. However, little is known about the energy demand of gamma oscillations. This is mainly caused by technical limitations that are associated with simultaneous recordings of neuronal activity and energy metabolism in small neuronal networks and at the level of mitochondria in vivo. Thus recent studies have focused on brain slice preparations to address the energy demand of gamma oscillations in vitro. Here, reports will be summarized and discussed that combined electrophysiological recordings, oxygen sensor microelectrodes and live-cell fluorescence imaging in acutely prepared slices and organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus from both, mouse and rat. These reports consistently show that gamma oscillations can be reliably induced in hippocampal slice preparations by different pharmacological tools. They suggest that gamma oscillations are associated with high energy demand, requiring both rapid adaptation of oxidative energy metabolism and sufficient supply with oxygen and nutrients. These findings might help to explain the exceptional vulnerability of higher cognitive functions during pathological processes of the brain, such as circulatory disturbances, genetic mitochondrial diseases, and neurodegeneration.

  6. Digital approach to high rate gamma-ray spectrometry

    Korolczuk, Stefan; Mianowski, Slawomir; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szewinski, Jaroslaw; Zychor, Izabella [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Basic concepts and preliminary results of creating high rate digital spectrometry system using efficient ADCs and latest FPGA are presented as well as a comparison with commercially available devices. The possibility to use such systems, coupled to scintillators, in plasma experiments is discussed. (authors)

  7. Neutron detection in a high gamma-ray background with EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.

    2012-01-01

    Using a fast digitizer, the neutron–gamma discrimination capability of the new liquid scintillator EJ-309 is compared with that obtained using standard EJ-301. Moreover the capability of both the scintillation detectors to identify a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background is demonstrated. The probability of neutron detection is PD=95% at 95% confidence level for a gamma-ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 μSv/h.

  8. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  9. Time course of gamma-band oscillation associated with face processing in the inferior occipital gyrus and fusiform gyrus: A combined fMRI and MEG study.

    Uono, Shota; Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2017-04-01

    Debate continues over whether the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) or the fusiform gyrus (FG) represents the first stage of face processing and what role these brain regions play. We investigated this issue by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) in normal adults. Participants passively observed upright and inverted faces and houses. First, we identified the IOG and FG as face-specific regions using fMRI. We applied beamforming source reconstruction and time-frequency analysis to MEG source signals to reveal the time course of gamma-band activations in these regions. The results revealed that the right IOG showed higher gamma-band activation in response to upright faces than to upright houses at 100 ms from the stimulus onset. Subsequently, the right FG showed greater gamma-band response to upright faces versus upright houses at around 170 ms. The gamma-band activation in the right IOG and right FG was larger in response to inverted faces than to upright faces at the later time window. These results suggest that (1) the gamma-band activities occurs rapidly first in the IOG and next in the FG and (2) the gamma-band activity in the right IOG at later time stages is involved in configuration processing for faces. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2067-2079, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A low-cost, Nist-traceable, high performance dielectric resonator Master Oscillator

    Doolittle, L.R.; Hovater, C.; Merminga, L.; Musson, J.; Wiseman, W.

    1999-01-01

    The current CEBAF Master Oscillator (MO) uses a quartz-based 10 MHz reference to synthesize 70 MHz and 499 MHz, which are then distributed to each of the klystron galleries on site. Due to the specialized nature of CEBAF's MO requirements, it has been determined that an in-house design and fabrication would provide a cost-effective alternative to purchasing or modifying vendor equipment. A Global Positioning System (GPS) disciplined, Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) based MO is proposed which incorporates low-cost consumer RF components, designed for cellular communications. A 499 MHz Dielectric Resonant Oscillator (DRO) Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is phase-locked to a GPS-disciplined 10 MHz reference, and micro-tuned via a DDS, in an effort to achieve the lowest phase noise possible

  11. High energy gamma ray response of liquid scintillator

    Shigyo, N.; Ishibashi, K.; Matsufuji, N.; Nakamoto, T.; Numajiri, M.

    1994-01-01

    We made the experiment on the spallation reaction. NE213 organic liquid scintillators were used for measuring neutrons and γ rays. To produce the γ ray emission cross section, we used the response functions by EGS4 code. The response functions look like uniform above γ ray energies of 60 MeV. The experimental data of the γ ray emission cross section are different from the data of High Energy Transport Code. (author)

  12. A superhydrophobic EP/PDMS nanocomposite coating with high gamma radiation stability

    Zhang, Yan; Ren, Fule; Liu, Yujian

    2018-04-01

    The superhydrophobic coatings with high gamma radiation stability were prepared by using epoxy/polydimethylsiloxane (EP/PDMS) resins as the matrix and silica nanoparticles as the fillers. The nanocomposite coatings exhibit superhydrophobicity with a high water contact angle (WCA) of 154° and a low sliding angle of 7°. With the amount of SiO2 increasing from 0 to 30%, the surface shows the hierarchically structure gradually and its roughness raised from 4 nm to 278 nm. And little change in the WCA of the coatings (from 155° to 149°) was observed when the pH of the droplets varied from 2 to 14. In addition, the coatings also show good adhesion grade (5B), high hardness (6H) and outstanding stability for high dose gamma radiation.

  13. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  14. Aging of magnesium stearate under high doses gamma irradiation and oxidative conditions

    Lebeau, D.; Beuvier, L.; Cornaton, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tabarant, M. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LISL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferry, M., E-mail: muriel.ferry@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, LRMO, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Magnesium stearate was radio-oxidized at very high doses using gamma-rays. • H{sub 2} emission was estimated as a function of the integrated dose. • Modifications in the organic solid were followed as a function of the integrated dose. • A non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate was proposed. - Abstract: In nuclear waste packages conditioning processes, magnesium stearate is widely used because of its high lubricating properties. For safety purposes, the radiolytic degradation of these organic materials has to be better understood to be able to predict their aging in repository conditions. This study reports the radiolytic degradation of magnesium stearate, using gamma-rays at room temperature and under air. Modifications were followed using different analytical tools (XPS, ATR-FTIR, ICP-AES, ATG and mass spectrometry). It has been observed that molecules mainly formed up to 1000 kGy of gamma irradiation dose under radio-oxidation are alkanes, hydroperoxides, double bonds in the aliphatic chain, carboxylates with aliphatic chain shorter than the one of stearate and ketones. At a dose of 4000 kGy, dicarboxylic acids are observed: the formation of these molecules needs a dose of at least 1000 kGy to be created under radio-oxidation. These observations allow us to propose a non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate under gamma-irradiation at room temperature and under air.

  15. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  16. A high-power narrow-linewidth optical parametric oscillator based on PPMgLN

    Peng, Y F; Wei, X B; Xie, G; Gao, J R; Li, D M; Wang, W M

    2013-01-01

    A high-power and narrow-linewidth tunable optical parametric oscillator based on PPMgLN is presented. The phase matching type e → e + e is used to avoid the walk-off effect and utilize the maximum nonlinear coefficient d 33 (27.4 pm V −1 ) of the PPMgLN crystal (5 mol% MgO doped). When the pump power of the 1064 nm laser is 50 W and the temperature of the PPMgLN crystal is 100 °C, average output power of 15.8 W is obtained with a slope efficiency of 40.6%. The 1.655 μm signal and 2.98 μm idler output powers are 9.5 W and 6.3 W, respectively. The linewidth of the 1.655 μm signal laser is 1.00 nm before compression and 0.05 nm after compression. The compression ratio is 20. The linewidth of the 2.98 μm idler laser is within 0.30–0.63 nm based on theoretical analysis of the linewidth of the 1064 nm pump laser and 1.655 μm signal laser. The output wavelength can be tuned from 1.6 to 1.8 μm and from 3.1 to 2.7 μm by changing the temperature of the 31.2 μm PPMgLN crystal from 30 to 200 °C. (paper)

  17. Electrodiagnostic applications of somatosensory evoked high-frequency EEG oscillations: Technical considerations.

    Simpson, A J; Cunningham, M O; Baker, M R

    2018-03-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) embedded within the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) are not routinely recorded/measured as part of standard clinical SEPs. However, HFOs could provide important additional diagnostic/prognostic information in various patient groups in whom SEPs are tested routinely. One area is the management of patients with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, the sensitivity of standard clinical SEP recording techniques for detecting HFOs is unknown. SEPs were recorded using routine clinical methods in 17 healthy subjects (median nerve stimulation; 0.5 ms pulse width; 5 Hz; maximum 4000 stimuli) in an unshielded laboratory. Bipolar EEG recordings were acquired (gain 50 k; bandpass 3Hz-2 kHz; sampling rate 5 kHz; non-inverting electrode 2 cm anterior to C3/C4; inverting electrode 2 cm posterior to C3/C4). Data analysis was performed in MATLAB. SEP-HFOs were detected in 65% of controls using standard clinical recording techniques. In 3 controls without significant HFOs, experiments were repeated using a linear electrode array with higher spatial sampling frequency. SEP-HFOs were observed in all 3 subjects. Currently standard clinical methods of recording SEPs are not sufficiently sensitive to permit the inclusion of SEP-HFOs in routine clinical diagnostic/prognostic assessments. Whilst an increase in the number/density of EEG electrodes should improve the sensitivity for detecting SEP-HFOs, this requires confirmation. By improving and standardising clinical SEP recording protocols to permit the acquisition/analysis of SEP-HFOs, it should be possible to gain important insights into the pathophysiology of neurological disorders and refine the management of conditions such as HIE. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Detection of High Frequency Oscillations by Hybrid Depth Electrodes in Standard Clinical Intracranial EEG Recordings

    Efstathios D Kondylis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillations (HFOs have been proposed as a novel marker for epileptogenic tissue, spurring tremendous research interest into the characterization of these transient events. A wealth of continuously recorded intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG data is currently available from patients undergoing invasive monitoring for the surgical treatment of epilepsy. In contrast to data recorded on research-customized recording systems, data from clinical acquisition systems remain an underutilized resource for HFO detection in most centers. The effective and reliable use of this clinically obtained data would be an important advance in the ongoing study of HFOs and their relationship to ictogenesis. The diagnostic utility of HFOs ultimately will be limited by the ability of clinicians to detect these brief, sporadic, and low amplitude events in an electrically noisy clinical environment. Indeed, one of the most significant factors limiting the use of such clinical recordings for research purposes is their low signal to noise ratio, especially in the higher frequency bands. In order to investigate the presence of HFOs in clinical data, we first obtained continuous intracranial recordings in a typical clinical environment using a commercially available, commonly utilized data acquisition system and off the shelf hybrid macro/micro depth electrodes. This data was then inspected for the presence of HFOs using semi-automated methods and expert manual review. With targeted removal of noise frequency content, HFOs were detected on both macro- and micro-contacts, and preferentially localized to seizure onset zones. HFOs detected by the offline, semi-automated method were also validated in the clinical viewer, demonstrating that 1 this clinical system allows for the visualization of HFOs, and 2 with effective signal processing, clinical recordings can yield valuable information for offline analysis.

  19. Gamma and electron radiation effects on agricultural by-products with high fibre content

    Leonhardt, J.W.; Baer, M.; Nehring, K.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma and electron radiation effects on wheat straw, oat straw, barley straw, rye straw and dried green fodder are reported. In vitro and in vivo studies show that the digestibility of these agricultural by-products with high fibre content can be increased up to 80% and more at high doses. The increase of the digestibility is connected with a depolymerization of the cellulose and hemicellulose. (author)

  20. Electron-$\\gamma$ - perturbed angular correlation studies on high-T$_{C}$ superconductors

    Correia, J G; Marques, J G; Ramos, A R; Lourenço, A A; Amaral, V S; Galindo, V; Senateur, J P; Weiss, F; Wahl, U; Melo, A A; Soares, J C; Sousa, J B

    2000-01-01

    Recent results on the study of high-T$_{c}$ superconductors using the e$^-\\!-\\gamma$ perturbed angular correlation technique are presented. The basic features of the experimental equipment and its installation at the ISOLDE facility are briefly described. Results obtained from $^{197m}$Hg implanted into high quality Y$_{1}$Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{6+\\delta}$ epitaxy thin films are presented and discussed.

  1. High-energy gamma-rays from Cyg X-1

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Malyshev, Denys; Chernyakova, Maria; Pooley, Guy G.

    2017-11-01

    We have obtained a firm detection of Cyg X-1 during its hard and intermediate spectral states in the energy range of 40 MeV-60 GeV based on observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, confirming the independent results at ≥60 MeV of a previous work. The detection significance is ≃8σ in the 0.1-10 GeV range. In the soft state, we have found only upper limits on the emission at energies ≳0.1 MeV. However, we have found emission with a very soft spectrum in the 40-80 MeV range, not detected previously. This is likely to represent the high-energy cut-off of the high-energy power-law tail observed in the soft state. Similarly, we have detected a γ-ray soft excess in the hard state, which appears to be of similar origin. We have also confirmed the presence of an orbital modulation of the detected emission in the hard state, expected if the γ-rays are from Compton upscattering of stellar blackbody photons. However, the observed modulation is significantly weaker than that predicted if the blackbody upscattering were the dominant source of γ-rays. This argues for a significant contribution from γ-rays produced by the synchrotron self-Compton process. We have found that such strong contribution is possible if the jet is strongly clumped. We reproduce the observed hard-state average broad-band spectrum using a self-consistent jet model, taking into account all the relevant emission processes, e± pair absorption and clumping. This model also reproduces the amplitude of the observed orbital modulation.

  2. A PK-PD model of ketamine-induced high-frequency oscillations

    Flores, Francisco J.; Ching, ShiNung; Hartnack, Katharine; Fath, Amanda B.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Ketamine is a widely used drug with clinical and research applications, and also known to be used as a recreational drug. Ketamine produces conspicuous changes in the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals observed both in humans and rodents. In rodents, the intracranial ECoG displays a high-frequency oscillation (HFO) which power is modulated nonlinearly by ketamine dose. Despite the widespread use of ketamine there is no model description of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics (PK-PDs) of ketamine and the observed HFO power. Approach. In the present study, we developed a PK-PD model based on estimated ketamine concentration, its known pharmacological actions, and observed ECoG effects. The main pharmacological action of ketamine is antagonism of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which in rodents is accompanied by an HFO observed in the ECoG. At high doses, however, ketamine also acts at non-NMDAR sites, produces loss of consciousness, and the transient disappearance of the HFO. We propose a two-compartment PK model that represents the concentration of ketamine, and a PD model based in opposing effects of the NMDAR and non-NMDAR actions on the HFO power. Main results. We recorded ECoG from the cortex of rats after two doses of ketamine, and extracted the HFO power from the ECoG spectrograms. We fit the PK-PD model to the time course of the HFO power, and showed that the model reproduces the dose-dependent profile of the HFO power. The model provides good fits even in the presence of high variability in HFO power across animals. As expected, the model does not provide good fits to the HFO power after dosing the pure NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Significance. Our study provides a simple model to relate the observed electrophysiological effects of ketamine to its actions at the molecular level at different concentrations. This will improve the study of ketamine and rodent models of schizophrenia to better understand the wide and divergent

  3. Excitation of short wavelength Alfven oscillations by high energy ions in tokamak

    Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Lominadze, J.G.; Mikhailovskii, A.B.

    1975-08-01

    The excitation of Alfven waves by fast untrapped ions in axisymmetric tokamaks is described by the dispersion relation epsilon 11 - c 2 k/sub parallel bars/ 2 /ω 2 = 0. Using this relation a new class of instability connected with the excitation of Alfven oscillations is described. (U.S.)

  4. Megawatt dye laser oscillator-amplifier system for high resolution spectroscopy

    Drell, P; Chu, S

    1979-03-01

    Peak powers in excess of 4 MW in the visible and 1.3 MW in the uv with linewidths as narrow as 80 MHz are generated with three YAG pumped amplifier stages following a cw dye oscillator. The laser pulses are nearly Fourier transform limited in frequency space and diffraction limited in coordinate space.

  5. Pacific centre of the Arctic Oscillation: product of high local variability rather than teleconnectivity

    Huth, Radan

    58A, č. 5 (2006), s. 601-604 ISSN 0280-6495 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Arctic Oscillation * Pacific centre * principal component analysis Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2006

  6. Interictal high-frequency oscillations indicate seizure onset zone in patients with focal cortical dysplasia

    Brázdil, M.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Daniel, P.; Kuba, R.; Chrastina, J.; Novák, Z.; Rektor, I.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 90, 1-2 (2010), s. 28-32 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : epilepsy * hgh-frequency oscillations * intracerebral EEG Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2010

  7. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr2(PO4)3 at high gamma radiation doses

    Ordóñez-Regil, E.; Contreras-Ramírez, A.; Fernández-Valverde, S.M.; González-Martínez, P.R.; Carrasco-Ábrego, H.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exposed to gamma doses of 10, 30 and 50 MGy. •Gamma radiation produced growth of the crystal size of the NZP. •Morphology changes were reversible by heating. •Linear relationship between the thermoluminescence and the applied gamma dose. •This property could be useful for high-level gamma dosimetry. -- Abstract: This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10–50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported

  8. Multi-dimensional analysis of high resolution {gamma}-ray data

    Flibotte, S.; Huettmeier, U.J.; France, G. de; Haas, B.; Romain, P.; Theisen, Ch.; Vivien, J.P.; Zen, J. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires

    1992-12-31

    A new generation of high resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometers capable of recording high-fold coincidence events with a large efficiency will soon be available. Algorithms are developed to analyze high-fold {gamma}-ray coincidences. As a contribution to the software development associated with the EUROGAM spectrometer, the performances of computer codes designed to select multi-dimensional gates from 3-, 4- and 5-fold coincidence databases were tested. The tests were performed on events generated with a Monte Carlo simulation and also on real experimental triple data recorded with the 8{pi} spectrometer and with a preliminary version of the EUROGAM array. (R.P.) 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs.

  9. Gamma beams generation with high intensity lasers for two photon Breit-Wheeler pair production

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Ribeyre, Xavier; Jansen, Oliver; Esnault, Leo; Jequier, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Hulin, Sebastien; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alex; Toncian, Toma; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Linear Breit-Wheeler pair creation is the lowest threshold process in photon-photon interaction, controlling the energy release in Gamma Ray Bursts and Active Galactic Nuclei, but it has never been directly observed in the laboratory. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility to produce collimated gamma beams with high energy conversion efficiency using high intensity lasers and innovative targets. When two of these beams collide at particular angles, our analytical calculations demonstrate a beaming effect easing the detection of the pairs in the laboratory. This effect has been confirmed in photon collision simulations using a recently developed innovative algorithm. An alternative scheme using Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by next generation high repetition rate laser systems is also being explored and the results of first optimization campaigns in this regime will be presented.

  10. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, S.; DeWitt, D.; MacDonald, L.; Hunter, W. C. J.; Van Leemput, K.; Miyaoka, R.

    2018-04-01

    PET detectors use signal multiplexing to reduce the total number of electronics channels needed to cover a given area. Using measured thin-beam calibration data, we tested a principal component based multiplexing scheme for scintillation detectors. The highly-multiplexed detector signal is no longer amenable to standard calibration methodologies. In this study we report results of a prototype multiplexing circuit, and present a new method for calibrating the detector module with multiplexed data. A 50 × 50 × 10 mm3 LYSO scintillation crystal was affixed to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depth-estimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge of the crystal. The positioned events followed the expected Beer–Lambert depth distribution. The proposed calibration and positioning method exhibited a scattered photon rejection rate that was a 55% improvement over the summed signal energy-windowing method.

  11. In-situ high-resolution gamma-spectrometric survey of burial ground-monitoring wells

    Bowman, W.W.

    1981-09-01

    In situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with an intrinsic germanium detector assembly of special design surveyed the burial ground monitoring wells to locate and identify gamma emitters that may have migrated from the burial trenches toward the water table. Gamma-ray spectra were acquired as a function of depth in each well and recorded on magnetic tape. These spectra were reduced by a series of computer programs to produce count rate versus depth profiles for natural and man-made activities. The original spectra and the profiles have been archived on magnetic tape for comparison with similar future surveys. Large amounts of man-made activities were observed in some of the burial trenches; however, below the trench bottoms, only very low but detectable amounts of 60 Co and 137 Cs were observed in eleven wells. The highest level of man-made gamma activity observed below the trench bottoms has a count rate roughly equal to that observed for uranium daughter activities which are natural to the subsoil

  12. High-Frequency Oscillations Recorded on the Scalp of Patients With Epilepsy Using Tripolar Concentric Ring Electrodes.

    Besio, Walter G; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Gaitanis, John N; Blum, Andrew S; Fisher, Robert S; Medvedev, Andrei V

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most prevalent neurological disorder ([Formula: see text]% prevalence) affecting [Formula: see text] million people worldwide with up to 75% from developing countries. The conventional electroencephalogram is plagued with artifacts from movements, muscles, and other sources. Tripolar concentric ring electrodes automatically attenuate muscle artifacts and provide improved signal quality. We performed basic experiments in healthy humans to show that tripolar concentric ring electrodes can indeed record the physiological alpha waves while eyes are closed. We then conducted concurrent recordings with conventional disc electrodes and tripolar concentric ring electrodes from patients with epilepsy. We found that we could detect high frequency oscillations, a marker for early seizure development and epileptogenic zone, on the scalp surface that appeared to become more narrow-band just prior to seizures. High frequency oscillations preceding seizures were present in an average of 35.5% of tripolar concentric ring electrode data channels for all the patients with epilepsy whose seizures were recorded and absent in the corresponding conventional disc electrode data. An average of 78.2% of channels that contained high frequency oscillations were within the seizure onset or irritative zones determined independently by three epileptologists based on conventional disc electrode data and videos.

  13. High-Z Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposites for Gamma-Ray Scintillation Detectors

    Liu, Chao

    An affordable and reliable solution for spectroscopic gamma-ray detection has long been sought after due to the needs from research, defense, and medical applications. Scintillators resolve gamma energy by proportionally converting a single high-energy photon into a number of photomultiplier-tube-detectable low-energy photons, which is considered a more affordable solution for general purposes compared to the delicate semiconductor detectors. An ideal scintillator should simultaneously exhibit the following characteristics: 1) high atomic number (Z) for high gamma stopping power and photoelectron production; 2) high light yield since the energy resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of light yield; 3) short emission decay lifetime; and 4) low cost and scalable production. However, commercial scintillators made from either inorganic single crystals or plastics fail to satisfy all requirements due to their intrinsic material properties and fabrication limitations. The concept of adding high-Z constituents into plastic scintillators to harness high Z, low cost, and fast emission in the resulting nanocomposite scintillators is not new in and of itself. Attempts have been made by adding organometallics, quantum dots, and scintillation nanocrystals into the plastic matrix. High-Z organometallics have long been used to improve the Z of plastic scintillators; however, their strong spin-orbit coupling effect entails careful triplet energy matching using expensive triplet emitters to avoid severe quenching of the light yield. On the other hand, reported quantum dot- and nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites suffer from moderate Z and high optical loss due to aggregation and self-absorption at loadings higher than 10 wt%, limiting their potential for practical application. This dissertation strives to improve the performance of nanoparticle-based nanocomposite scintillators. One focus is to synthesize transparent nanocomposites with higher loadings of high

  14. A micro-machined retro-reflector for improving light yield in ultra-high-resolution gamma cameras

    Heemskerk, J.W.T.; Korevaar, M.A.N.; Kreuger, R.; Ligtvoet, C.M.; Schotanus, P.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of x-ray and gamma-ray distributions can be achieved with cameras that use charge coupled devices (CCDs) for detecting scintillation light flashes. The energy and interaction position of individual gamma photons can be determined by rapid processing of CCD images of

  15. High-resolution gamma-ray measurement systems using a compact electro- mechanically cooled detector system and intelligent software

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution gamma-ray measurements using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the field has been of limited practicality due to the need to use and maintain a supply of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ). This same constraint limits high-resolution gamma measurements in unattended safeguards or treaty Verification applications. We are developing detectors and software to greatly extend the applicability of high-resolution germanium-based measurements for these situations

  16. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency

  17. Determination of dose components in mixed gamma neutron fields by use of high pressure ionization chambers

    Golnik, N.; Pliszczynski, T.; Wysocka, A.; Zielczynski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The two ionization chamber method for determination of dose components in mixed γ-neutron field has been improved by increasing gas pressure in the chambers up to some milions pascals. Advantages of high pressure gas filling are the followings: 1) significant reduction of the ratio of neutron-to gamma sensitivity for the hydrogen-free chamber, 2) possibility of sensitivity correction for both chambers by application of appropriate voltage, 3) high sensitivity for small detectors. High-pressure, pen-like ionization chambers have been examined in fields of different neutron sources: a TE-chamber, filled with 0.2 MPa of quasi-TE-gas and a conductive PTFE chamber, filled with 3.1 MPa of CO 2 . The ratio of neutron-to-gamma sensitivity for the PTFE chamber, operated at electrical field strength below 100 V/cm, has not exceeded 0.01 for neutrons with energy below 8 MeV. Formula is presented for calculation of this ratio for any high-pressure, CO 2 -filled ionization chamber. Contribution of gamma component to total tissue dose in the field of typical neutron sources has been found to be 3 to 70%

  18. Direct electrical stimulation of human cortex evokes high gamma activity that predicts conscious somatosensory perception

    Muller, Leah; Rolston, John D.; Fox, Neal P.; Knowlton, Robert; Rao, Vikram R.; Chang, Edward F.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) is a clinical gold standard for human brain mapping and readily evokes conscious percepts, yet the neurophysiological changes underlying these percepts are not well understood. Approach. To determine the neural correlates of DES, we stimulated the somatosensory cortex of ten human participants at frequency-amplitude combinations that both elicited and failed to elicit conscious percepts, meanwhile recording neural activity directly surrounding the stimulation site. We then compared the neural activity of perceived trials to that of non-perceived trials. Main results. We found that stimulation evokes distributed high gamma activity, which correlates with conscious perception better than stimulation parameters themselves. Significance. Our findings suggest that high gamma activity is a reliable biomarker for perception evoked by both natural and electrical stimuli.

  19. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  20. High-z semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors for room-temperature gamma-ray spectrometry

    Bornand, Bernard; Friant, Alain.

    1978-09-01

    A bibliographical review (182 articles of periodicals, conferences, reports, thesis and french patents) is presented, as addendum of the report CEA-BIB-210 (1974) on high-Z semiconductor compounds used as materials for the gamma and X-ray detection and spectrometry. This publication reviews issues from 1974 to 1977. References and summaries (in french) are incorporated into 182 bibliograhical notices. Index for authors, corporate authors, documents and periodicals, and subjects is included [fr

  1. Neutron and gamma-ray sources in LWR high-level nuclear waste

    Dupree, S.A.

    1977-06-01

    Predictions of the composition of high-level waste from U-fueled LWRs have been used to calculate the neutron and gamma-ray sources in such waste at cooling times of 3 and 10 years. The results are intended for interim application to studies of waste shipping and storage pending the availability of more exact knowledge of fuel recycling and of waste concentration and solidification

  2. Point source search techniques in ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Biller, S.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X.Q.; Yodh, G.B.; Berley, D.; Goodman, J.A.; Haines, T.J.; Hoffman, C.M.; Horch, E.; Sinnis, C.; Zhang, W.

    1993-01-01

    Searches for point astrophysical sources of ultra high energy (UHE) gamma rays are plagued by large numbers of background events from isotropic cosmic rays. Some of the methods that have been used to estimate the expected number of background events coming from the direction of a possible source are found to contain biases. Search techniques that avoid this problem are described. There is also a discussion of how to optimize the sensitivity of a search to emission from a point source. (orig.)

  3. High-energy photons and neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts

    Dar, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has recently discovered thousands of gigantic cometlike objects in a ring around the central star in the nearest planetary nebula. It is assumed that such circumstellar rings exist around the majority of stars. Collisions of relativistic debris from gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in dense stellar regions with such gigantic cometlike objects, which have been stripped off from the circumstellar rings by gravitational perturbations, produce detectable fluxes of high energy γ rays and neutrinos from GRBs

  4. Reduction in Cortical Gamma Synchrony during Depolarized State of Slow Wave Activity in Mice

    EUNJIN eHWANG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available EEG gamma band oscillations have been proposed to account for the neural synchronization crucial for perceptual integration. While increased gamma power and synchronization is generally observed during cognitive tasks performed during wake, several studies have additionally reported increased gamma power during sleep or anesthesia, raising questions about the characteristics of gamma oscillation during impaired consciousness and its role in conscious processing. Phase-amplitude modulation has been observed between slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5–4 Hz and gamma oscillations during ketamine/xylazine anesthesia or sleep, showing increased gamma activity corresponding to the depolarized (ON state of SWA. Here we divided gamma activity into its ON and OFF (hyperpolarized state components based on the phase of SWA induced by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia and compared their power and synchrony with wake state levels in mice. We further investigated the state-dependent changes in both gamma power and synchrony across primary motor and primary somatosensory cortical regions and their interconnected thalamic regions throughout anesthesia and recovery. As observed previously, gamma power was as high as during wake specifically during the ON state of SWA. However, the synchrony of this gamma activity between somatosensory-motor cortical regions was significantly reduced compared to the baseline wake state. In addition, the somatosensory-motor cortical synchrony of gamma oscillations was reduced and restored in an anesthetic state-dependent manner, reflecting the changing depth of anesthesia. Our results provide evidence that during anesthesia changes in long-range information integration between cortical regions might be more critical for changes in consciousness than changes in local gamma oscillatory power.

  5. Relative thermoluminescent efficiencies proton/gamma and helium/gamma of peaks of high temperature in TLD-100 dosemeters; Eficiencias termoluminiscentes relativas proton/gamma y helio/gamma de picos de alta temperatura en dosimetros TLD-100

    Flores M, E. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The increase of the applications of ion beams in radiotherapy treatments has generated interest in the study of the thermoluminescent materials (TL) that allow to determine the applied doses. A way to quantify the TL response from these materials to ions is by means of the relative thermoluminescent efficiency. In the group of Thermoluminescent dosimetry of the Institute of Physics of the UNAM (IFUNAM) the thermoluminescent response of the TLD-100 dosemeters has been studied, which present a glow curve characteristic with several peaks that correspond to traps and luminescent centers in the material. The stable peaks know each other as 4, 5, 6a, 6b, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The efficiencies should be measured using the response so much to the radiation of interest (in this case protons and helium ions) as the response to gamma radiation. In previous works with ions of low energy taken place in the Pelletron accelerator of the IFUNAM was only measured the TL efficiency for the peak 5 and the total signal. It had not been possible to measure the efficiency of the peaks of high temperature (6a-10) because, for the gamma radiation, the peaks of high temperature show very small signals; however, recently Massillon carries out measures of efficiency TL of peaks of high temperature for ions of intermediate energy using a protocol special of reading and of deconvolution that allows to measure the signals coming from the peaks of high temperature. In this work is implemented this same protocol to complete the study of TL efficiencies at low energy of protons and helium and to determine if the values of efficiency depend on the used reading protocol. For it is reported it measures of the relative efficiency of the peaks of high temperature from the TLD-100 exposed to protons of 1.5 MeV and nuclei of helium of 3 and 7.5 MeV. (Author)

  6. High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Employing a SiC Based Ring Oscillator

    Meredith, Roger D.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Ponchak, George E.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Spry, David J.; Krawowski, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop harsh environment electronic and sensor technologies for aircraft engine safety and monitoring, we have used capacitive-based pressure sensors to shift the frequency of a SiC-electronics-based oscillator to produce a pressure-indicating signal that can be readily transmitted, e.g. wirelessly, to a receiver located in a more benign environment. Our efforts target 500 C, a temperature well above normal operating conditions of commercial circuits but within areas of interest in aerospace engines, deep mining applications and for future missions to the Venus atmosphere. This paper reports for the first time a ring oscillator circuit integrated with a capacitive pressure sensor, both operating at 500 C. This demonstration represents a significant step towards a wireless pressure sensor that can operate at 500 C and confirms the viability of 500 C electronic sensor systems.

  7. Oscillations of disks

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  8. Analysis on origin of oscillation of H moment in high-energy hh collision

    Wu Tao; Zhou Daicui

    2000-01-01

    Multiplicity distributions of negative binomial distribution (NBD) and modified (NBD are obtained from a birth process model with an immigration. The ratio of factorial cumulant moment to factorial moment, i.e., H moment is calculated from different multiplicity distributions of NBD, modified NBD and the three fireball model, which shows an oscillatory behavior when there is a truncation of multiplicity. The oscillation of H moment is related to the common character of the truncated multiplicity distributions

  9. The Generalized Gamma-DBN for High-Resolution SAR Image Classification

    Zhiqiang Zhao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increase of resolution, effective characterization of synthetic aperture radar (SAR image becomes one of the most critical problems in many earth observation applications. Inspired by deep learning and probability mixture models, a generalized Gamma deep belief network (g Γ-DBN is proposed for SAR image statistical modeling and land-cover classification in this work. Specifically, a generalized Gamma-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machine (gΓB-RBM is proposed to capture high-order statistical characterizes from SAR images after introducing the generalized Gamma distribution. After stacking the g Γ B-RBM and several standard binary RBMs in a hierarchical manner, a gΓ-DBN is constructed to learn high-level representation of different SAR land-covers. Finally, a discriminative neural network is constructed by adding an additional predict layer for different land-covers over the constructed deep structure. Performance of the proposed approach is evaluated via several experiments on some high-resolution SAR image patch sets and two large-scale scenes which are captured by ALOS PALSAR-2 and COSMO-SkyMed satellites respectively.

  10. Experimental techniques for the detection of the high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin

    Dumitrescu, Gh.; Angelescu, T.; Radu, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The observation of high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin in the early 90 by Volcano Ranch experiment opened a new direction of study in astrophysics. The very high energy and the very low flux of these gamma rays, posed numerous detection problems which in turn were the object of a very intense research activity. The present article tries to review the detection techniques for the high energy gamma rays of cosmic origin. In the 'Introduction' we summarize the specific problems involved in the detection of this type of radiation. 'Chapter 1' presents the classic technique based on the use of scintillation detectors. 'Chapter 2' includes the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) and the sampling wavefront technique. 'Chapter 3' is dedicated to the detection of the atmospheric nitrogen. 'Chapter 4' describes issues related to the calibration of the detectors, the cross checking of the experimental data, the use of the Monte Carlo simulations and the use of the density observed at a distance of 600 m S(600), in order to estimate the primary energy. The characteristics of some future developments of the above presented techniques are included in the last chapter. (authors)

  11. Improved yield of high resolution mercuric iodide gamma-ray spectrometers

    Gerrish, V.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) exhibits properties which make it attractive for use as a solid state nuclear radiation detector. The wide bandgap (E g = 2.1 eV) and low dark current allow room temperature operation, while the high atomic number provides a large gamma-ray cross section. However, poor hole transport has been a major limitation in the routine fabrication of high-resolution spectrometers using this material. This paper presents the results of gamma-ray response and charge transport parameter measurements conducted during the past year at EG ampersand G/EM on 96 HgI 2 spectrometers. The gamma-ray response measurements reveal that detector quality is correlated with the starting material used in the crystal growth. In particular, an increased yield of high-resolution spectrometers was obtained from HgI 2 which was synthesized by precipitation from an aqueous solution, as opposed to using material from commercial vendors. Data are also presented which suggest that better spectrometer performance is tied to improved hole transport. Finally, some initial results on a study of detector uniformity reveal spatial variations which may explain why the correlation between hole transport parameters and spectrometer performance is sometimes violated. 6 refs., 3 figs

  12. Coherent and intermittent ensemble oscillations emerge from networks of irregular spiking neurons.

    Hoseini, Mahmood S; Wessel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) recordings from spatially distant cortical circuits reveal episodes of coherent gamma oscillations that are intermittent, and of variable peak frequency and duration. Concurrently, single neuron spiking remains largely irregular and of low rate. The underlying potential mechanisms of this emergent network activity have long been debated. Here we reproduce such intermittent ensemble oscillations in a model network, consisting of excitatory and inhibitory model neurons with the characteristics of regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal neurons, and fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons. We find that fluctuations in the external inputs trigger reciprocally connected and irregularly spiking RS and FS neurons in episodes of ensemble oscillations, which are terminated by the recruitment of the LTS population with concurrent accumulation of inhibitory conductance in both RS and FS neurons. The model qualitatively reproduces experimentally observed phase drift, oscillation episode duration distributions, variation in the peak frequency, and the concurrent irregular single-neuron spiking at low rate. Furthermore, consistent with previous experimental studies using optogenetic manipulation, periodic activation of FS, but not RS, model neurons causes enhancement of gamma oscillations. In addition, increasing the coupling between two model networks from low to high reveals a transition from independent intermittent oscillations to coherent intermittent oscillations. In conclusion, the model network suggests biologically plausible mechanisms for the generation of episodes of coherent intermittent ensemble oscillations with irregular spiking neurons in cortical circuits. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Functional inactivation of hypocretin 1 receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex affects the pyramidal neuron activity and gamma oscillations: An in vivo multiple-channel single-unit recording study.

    He, C; Chen, Q-H; Ye, J-N; Li, C; Yang, L; Zhang, J; Xia, J-X; Hu, Z-A

    2015-06-25

    The hypocretin signaling is thought to play a critical role in maintaining wakefulness via stimulating the subcortical arousal pathways. Although the cortical areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), receive dense hypocretinergic fibers and express its receptors, it remains unclear whether the hypocretins can directly regulate the neural activity of the mPFC in vivo. In the present study, using multiple-channel single-unit recording study, we found that infusion of the SB-334867, a blocker for the Hcrtr1, beside the recording sites within the mPFC substantially exerted an inhibitory effect on the putative pyramidal neuron (PPN) activity in naturally behaving rats. In addition, functional blockade of the Hcrtr1 also selectively reduced the power of the gamma oscillations. The PPN activity and the power of the neural oscillations were not affected after microinjection of the TCS-OX2-29, a blocker for the Hcrtr2, within the mPFC. Together, these data indicate that endogenous hypocretins acting on the Hcrtr1 are required for the normal neural activity in the mPFC in vivo, and thus might directly contribute cortical arousal and mPFC-dependent cognitive processes. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sonochemical and high-speed optical characterization of cavitation generated by an ultrasonically oscillating dental file in root canal models.

    Macedo, R G; Verhaagen, B; Fernandez Rivas, D; Gardeniers, J G E; van der Sluis, L W M; Wesselink, P R; Versluis, M

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonically Activated Irrigation makes use of an ultrasonically oscillating file in order to improve the cleaning of the root canal during a root canal treatment. Cavitation has been associated with these oscillating files, but the nature and characteristics of the cavitating bubbles were not yet fully elucidated. Using sensitive equipment, the sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) around these files have been measured in this study, showing that cavitation occurs even at very low power settings. Luminol photography and high-speed visualizations provided information on the spatial and temporal distribution of the cavitation bubbles. A large bubble cloud was observed at the tip of the files, but this was found not to contribute to SCL. Rather, smaller, individual bubbles observed at antinodes of the oscillating file with a smaller amplitude were leading to SCL. Confinements of the size of bovine and human root canals increased the amount of SL and SCL. The root canal models also showed the occurrence of air entrainment, resulting in the generation of stable bubbles, and of droplets, near the air-liquid interface and leading eventually to a loss of the liquid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A data acquisition and control system for high-speed gamma-ray tomography

    Hjertaker, B. T.; Maad, R.; Schuster, E.; Almås, O. A.; Johansen, G. A.

    2008-09-01

    A data acquisition and control system (DACS) for high-speed gamma-ray tomography based on the USB (Universal Serial Bus) and Ethernet communication protocols has been designed and implemented. The high-speed gamma-ray tomograph comprises five 500 mCi 241Am gamma-ray sources, each at a principal energy of 59.5 keV, which corresponds to five detector modules, each consisting of 17 CdZnTe detectors. The DACS design is based on Microchip's PIC18F4550 and PIC18F4620 microcontrollers, which facilitates an USB 2.0 interface protocol and an Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) interface protocol, respectively. By implementing the USB- and Ethernet-based DACS, a sufficiently high data acquisition rate is obtained and no dedicated hardware installation is required for the data acquisition computer, assuming that it is already equipped with a standard USB and/or Ethernet port. The API (Application Programming Interface) for the DACS is founded on the National Instrument's LabVIEW® graphical development tool, which provides a simple and robust foundation for further application software developments for the tomograph. The data acquisition interval, i.e. the integration time, of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph is user selectable and is a function of the statistical measurement accuracy required for the specific application. The bandwidth of the DACS is 85 kBytes s-1 for the USB communication protocol and 28 kBytes s-1 for the Ethernet protocol. When using the iterative least square technique reconstruction algorithm with a 1 ms integration time, the USB-based DACS provides an online image update rate of 38 Hz, i.e. 38 frames per second, whereas 31 Hz for the Ethernet-based DACS. The off-line image update rate (storage to disk) for the USB-based DACS is 278 Hz using a 1 ms integration time. Initial characterization of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph using the DACS on polypropylene phantoms is presented in the paper.

  16. A data acquisition and control system for high-speed gamma-ray tomography

    Hjertaker, B T; Maad, R; Schuster, E; Almås, O A; Johansen, G A

    2008-01-01

    A data acquisition and control system (DACS) for high-speed gamma-ray tomography based on the USB (Universal Serial Bus) and Ethernet communication protocols has been designed and implemented. The high-speed gamma-ray tomograph comprises five 500 mCi 241 Am gamma-ray sources, each at a principal energy of 59.5 keV, which corresponds to five detector modules, each consisting of 17 CdZnTe detectors. The DACS design is based on Microchip's PIC18F4550 and PIC18F4620 microcontrollers, which facilitates an USB 2.0 interface protocol and an Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) interface protocol, respectively. By implementing the USB- and Ethernet-based DACS, a sufficiently high data acquisition rate is obtained and no dedicated hardware installation is required for the data acquisition computer, assuming that it is already equipped with a standard USB and/or Ethernet port. The API (Application Programming Interface) for the DACS is founded on the National Instrument's LabVIEW® graphical development tool, which provides a simple and robust foundation for further application software developments for the tomograph. The data acquisition interval, i.e. the integration time, of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph is user selectable and is a function of the statistical measurement accuracy required for the specific application. The bandwidth of the DACS is 85 kBytes s −1 for the USB communication protocol and 28 kBytes s −1 for the Ethernet protocol. When using the iterative least square technique reconstruction algorithm with a 1 ms integration time, the USB-based DACS provides an online image update rate of 38 Hz, i.e. 38 frames per second, whereas 31 Hz for the Ethernet-based DACS. The off-line image update rate (storage to disk) for the USB-based DACS is 278 Hz using a 1 ms integration time. Initial characterization of the high-speed gamma-ray tomograph using the DACS on polypropylene phantoms is presented in the paper

  17. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE

    S. S. Cota

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates.

  18. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics. Progress report, August 1, 1980-July 31, 1981

    Lamb, R.C.

    1981-04-01

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy gives insight into fundamental questions regarding the origins of cosmic rays and the types of particle acceleration mechanisms which operate in nature. VHE photons are detected by means of the Cerenkov light their secondaries produce in the atmosphere. During June - September 1981 the solar collectors at Edwards Air Force Base will be used to detect the Cerenkov light from the photons from Cygnus X-3 thus extending its observation into a previously unexplored region. The time of each detector event will be recorded to the nearest 0.5 ms. If Cygnus X-3 is the neutron star remnant of a recent (unseen) supernova, then the VHE gamma rays may be pulsed at its rotation rate, and the data obtained will allow a sensitive test of this possibility. The equipment for the summer observations is nearly ready and will be tested in May prior to any early run in June

  19. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Fission Product Migration Studies

    Forsyth, R S; Blackadder, W H; Ronqvist, N

    1967-04-15

    The migration of solid fission products, in particular caesium and ruthenium, in high temperature oxide fuel can create a severe problem during the application of non-destructive burn-up methods employing gamma spectrometry, since caesium-137 is otherwise the most convenient long-lived burn-up monitor and ruthenium-106 can be used to distinguish between fissions in U-235 and Pu-239. As part of an experimental programme to develop burn-up methods, gamma scanning experiments have been performed on slices of irradiated UO{sub 2} pellets using a lithium-drifted germanium detector. The usefulness of the technique for migration studies has been demonstrated by comparing the fission product distribution curves across the specimen diameters with the microstructure of the specimens after polishing and etching.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date

  1. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)

    Cota, S.S.; Vasconcelos, V.; Senne Junior, M.; Carvalho, L.L.; Rezende, D.B.; Correa, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates. (author)

  2. Natural rubber/high density polyethylene/ground rubber composites vulcanized by gamma irradiation

    Shaltout, N.A.; Abou zeid, M.M.; Khalil, A.M.; El Miligy, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) was blended mechanically with 50 phr high density polyethylene (HDPE). the mechanical, physical and thermal properties of NR/HDPE blend and its composites with different contents of ground tire rubber (GTR) before and after exposure to gamma irradiation to various doses up to 250 kGy were studied. Also, the change in structure morphology of irradiated NR/HDPE blend as well as NR/HDPE/GTR composites was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the substitution of a part of virgin NR with GTR decreases the mechanical and physical properties but not to the extent of deterioration . However, it was found that the mechanical and physical properties were improved after gamma irradiation . Composite of NR/GTR/HDPE (75/25/50) showed good properties. Scanning electron microscope showed homogeneity between the irradiated composites ingredients.

  3. The Multi-Messenger Approach to High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Paredes, Josep M; Torres, Diego F

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical and observational overview of the state of the art of gamma-ray astrophysics, and their impact and connection with the physics of cosmic rays and neutrinos. With the aim of shedding new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of the gamma-ray sources, particularly those yet unidentified, this book summarizes contributions to a workshop that continues with the series initiated by the meeting held at Tonantzintla in October 2000, and Hong-Kong in May 2004. This books will be of interest for all active researchers in the field of high energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics, as well as for graduate students entering into the subject.

  4. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  5. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  6. Active neutron and gamma-ray imaging of highly enriched uranium for treaty verification.

    Hamel, Michael C; Polack, J Kyle; Ruch, Marc L; Marcath, Matthew J; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara A

    2017-08-11

    The detection and characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) presents a large challenge in the non-proliferation field. HEU has a low neutron emission rate and most gamma rays are low energy and easily shielded. To address this challenge, an instrument known as the dual-particle imager (DPI) was used with a portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator to detect neutrons and gamma rays from induced fission in HEU. We evaluated system response using a 13.7-kg HEU sphere in several configurations with no moderation, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) moderation, and tungsten moderation. A hollow tungsten sphere was interrogated to evaluate the response to a possible hoax item. First, localization capabilities were demonstrated by reconstructing neutron and gamma-ray images. Once localized, additional properties such as fast neutron energy spectra and time-dependent neutron count rates were attributed to the items. For the interrogated configurations containing HEU, the reconstructed neutron spectra resembled Watt spectra, which gave confidence that the interrogated items were undergoing induced fission. The time-dependent neutron count rate was also compared for each configuration and shown to be dependent on the neutron multiplication of the item. This result showed that the DPI is a viable tool for localizing and confirming fissile mass and multiplication.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations of Ultra-High Energy Resolution Gamma Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards

    Robles, A.; Drury, O.B.; Friedrich, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high energy resolution superconducting gamma-ray detectors can improve the accuracy of non-destructive analysis for unknown radioactive materials. These detectors offer an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over conventional high purity germanium detectors. The increase in resolution reduces errors from line overlap and allows for the identification of weaker gamma-rays by increasing the magnitude of the peaks above the background. In order to optimize the detector geometry and to understand the spectral response function Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation package coded in C++, was used to model the detectors. Using a 1 mm 3 Sn absorber and a monochromatic gamma source, different absorber geometries were tested. The simulation was expanded to include the Cu block behind the absorber and four layers of shielding required for detector operation at 0.1 K. The energy spectrum was modeled for an Am-241 and a Cs-137 source, including scattering events in the shielding, and the results were compared to experimental data. For both sources the main spectral features such as the photopeak, the Compton continuum, the escape x-rays and the backscatter peak were identified. Finally, the low energy response of a Pu-239 source was modeled to assess the feasibility of Pu-239 detection in spent fuel. This modeling of superconducting detectors can serve as a guide to optimize the configuration in future spectrometer designs.

  8. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    Baerwald, Philipp

    2014-07-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  9. VERY HIGH ENERGY OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH STACEE

    Jarvis, A.; Ong, R. A.; Ball, J.; Carson, J. E.; Zweerink, J.; Williams, D. A.; Aune, T.; Covault, C. E.; Driscoll, D. D.; Fortin, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Kildea, J.; Lindner, T.; Mueller, C.; Ragan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions known in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments and radiation processes. Until recently, there were no observations during the first few minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and ∼1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope with an energy threshold of ∼150 GeV for sources at zenith. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide >150 GeV follow-up observations of GRBs as fast as three minutes after the burst alert. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by the HETE-2 and INTEGRAL satellites. Between 2002 June and 2007 July, STACEE made follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. Upper limits are placed on the high-energy gamma-ray fluxes from 21 of these bursts.

  10. Constraining the High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    Gehrels, Neil; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Racusin, J. L.; Sonbas, E.; Stamatikos, M.; Guirec, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine 288 GRBs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field-of-view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the nuF(sub v) spectra (E(sub pk)). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E(sub pk) than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cut-off in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to gamma gamma attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  11. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  12. Effects of high dose gamma irradiation on ITO thin film properties

    Alyamani, A. [National Nanotechnology Center, King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mustapha, N., E-mail: nazirmustapha@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physics, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P.O. Box 90950, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-07-29

    Transparent thin-film Indium Tin Oxides (ITO) were prepared on 0.7 mm thick glass substrates using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with average thickness of 150 nm. The samples were then exposed to high gamma γ radiation doses by {sup 60}Co radioisotope. The films have been irradiated by performing exposure cycles up to 250 kGy total doses at room temperature. The surface structures before and after irradiation were analysed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was performed on all samples before and after irradiation to investigate any change in the grain sizes, and also in the roughness of the ITO surface. We investigated the influence of γ irradiation on the spectra of transmittance T, in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrum using spectrophotometer measurements. Energy band gap E{sub g} was then calculated from the optical spectra for all ITO films. It was found that the optical band gap values decreased as the radiation dose was increased. To compare the effect of the irradiation on refractive index n and extinction coefficient k properties, additional measurements were done on the ITO samples before and after gamma irradiation using an ellipsometer. The optical constants n and k increased by increasing the irradiation doses. Electrical properties such as resistivity and sheet resistance were measured using the four-point probe method. The good optical, electrical and morphological properties maintained by the ITO films even after being exposed to high gamma irradiation doses, made them very favourable to be used as anodes for solar cells and as protective coatings in space windows. - Highlights: • Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. • Effects of Gamma irradiation were investigated. • Changes of optical transmission and electrical properties of ITO films were studied. • Intensity of the diffraction peaks and the film's structure changed with increasing irradiation doses.

  13. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  14. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Ferreto, H. F. R., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br [Center of Chemistry and Environment, Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research - IPEN (Brazil); Gaia, R., E-mail: renan-gaia7@hotmail.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  15. Nuclear-Mechanical Coupling: Small Amplitude Mechanical Vibrations and High Amplitude Power Oscillations in Nuclear Reactors

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2008-11-01

    The cores of nuclear reactors, including its structural parts and cooling fluids, are complex mechanical systems able to vibrate in a set of normal modes and frequencies, if suitable perturbed. The cyclic variations in the strain state of the core materials may produce changes in density. Changes in density modify the reactivity. Changes in reactivity modify thermal power. Modifications in thermal power produce variations in temperature fields. Variations in temperature produce variations in strain due to thermal-elastic effects. If the variation of the temperature field is fast enough and if the Doppler Effect and other stabilizing prompt effects in the fuel are weak enough, a fast oscillatory instability could be produced, coupled with mechanical vibrations of small amplitude. A recently constructed, simple mathematical model of nuclear reactor kinetics, that improves the one due to A.S. Thompson, is reviewed. It was constructed in order to study, in a first approximation, the stability of the reactor: a nonlinear nuclear-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to reactor point kinetics with thermal-elastic feedback and with frozen delayed neutron effects) is coupled nonlinearly with a linear mechanical-thermal oscillator (that corresponds to the first normal mode of mechanical vibrations excited by thermo-elastic effects). This mathematical model is studied here from the standpoint of mechanical vibrations. It is shown how, under certain conditions, a suitable mechanical perturbation could elicit fast and growing oscillatory instabilities in the reactor power. Applying the asymptotic method due to Krylov, Bogoliubov and Mitropolsky, analytical formulae that may be used in the calculation of the time varying amplitude and phase of the mechanical oscillations are given, as functions of the mechanical, thermal and nuclear parameters of the reactor. The consequences for the mechanical integrity of the reactor are assessed. Some conditions, mainly, but not exclusively

  16. High-energy master oscillator power amplifier with near-diffraction-limited output based on ytterbium-doped PCF fiber

    Li, Rao; Qiao, Zhi; Wang, Xiaochao; Fan, Wei; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-10-01

    With the development of fiber technologies, fiber lasers are able to deliver very high power beams and high energy pulses which can be used not only in scientific researches but industrial fields (laser marking, welding,…). The key of high power fiber laser is fiber amplifier. In this paper, we present a two-level master-oscillator power amplifier system at 1053 nm based on Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers. The system is used in the front-end of high power laser facility for the amplification of nano-second pulses to meet the high-level requirements. Thanks to the high gain of the system which is over 50 dB, the pulse of more than 0.89 mJ energy with the nearly diffraction-limited beam quality has been obtained.

  17. Full energy peak efficiency of composite detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    Kshetri, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radioactive beams demand high detection efficiencies. One of the ways to obtain high detection efficiency without deteriorating the energy resolution or timing characteristics is the use of composite detectors which are composed of standard HPGe crystals arranged in a compact way. Two simplest composite detectors are the clover and cluster detectors. The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) comprises of 16 large volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors, where each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented escape suppression shield (ESS)

  18. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  19. High irradiation and ageing properties of resistive Micromegas detectors at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    Andreou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas have been developed in recent years with the aim of making this technology usable in HEP experiments where the high sparking rate of classical Micromegas is not tolerable. A resistive Micromegas with four layers and an active surface of 0.5 m2 each, has been designed and built at CERN as prototype of the detectors to be used for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. The detector has been exposed to an intense gamma source of 16 TBq in order to study the effects of ageing and evaluate the detector behavior under high irradiation.

  20. A new digital method for high precision neutron-gamma discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    Nakhostin, M

    2013-01-01

    A new pulse-shape discrimination algorithm for neutron and gamma (n/γ) discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors has been developed, leading to a considerable improvement of n/γ separation quality. The method is based on triangular pulse shaping which offers a high sensitivity to the shape of input pulses, as well as, excellent noise filtering characteristics. A clear separation of neutrons and γ-rays down to a scintillation light yield of about 65 keVee (electron equivalent energy) with a dynamic range of 45:1 was achieved. The method can potentially operate at high counting rates and is well suited for real-time measurements.

  1. A possible very high energy gamma-ray burst from Hercules X-1

    Vishwanath, P.R.; Bhat, P.N.; Ramanamurthy, P.V.; Sreekantan, B.V.

    1989-01-01

    A large increase is observed in the trigger rate in the direction of Hercules X-1 in the Atmospheric Cerenkov array at Pachmarhi, India. The burst lasted from 2147 UT to 2201 UT on April 11, 1986. The accidental coincidence rate did not show any increase during the burst. Barring any electronic noise or celestial or terrestrial optical phenomenon with time structure similar to that of atmospheric Cerenkov phenomenon, the increase is ascribed to TeV gamma rays from Her X-1. The number of gamma-ray events during the burst amounted to about 54 percent of the cosmic-ray flux, resulting in a 42-sigma effect. This is the largest TeV gamma-ray signal seen from any source till now. The time-averaged flux for the burst period is 1.8 x 10 photons/sq cm per s above a threshold energy of 0.4 TeV, which results in a luminosity of 1.8 x 10 to the 37 ergs/s. The burst took place at the end of the 'high on' state in the 35-day cycle of the Her X-1 binary system indicating accretion disk as the possible production site. 14 refs

  2. BiI3 Crystals for High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Nino, Juan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Baciak, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Johns, Paul [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sulekar, Soumitra [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Totten, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nimmagadda, Jyothir [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    BiI3 had been investigated for its unique properties as a layered compound semiconductor for many decades. However, despite the exceptional atomic, physical, and electronic properties of this material, good resolution gamma ray spectra had never been reported for BiI3. The shortcomings that previously prevented BiI3 from reaching success as a gamma ray sensor were, through this project, identified and suppressed to unlock the performance of this promising compound. Included in this work were studies on a number of methods which have, for the first time, enabled BiI3 to exhibit spectral performance rivaling many other candidate semiconductors for room temperature gamma ray sensors. New approaches to crystal growth were explored that allow BiI3 spectrometers to be fabricated with up to 2.2% spectral resolution at 662 keV. Fundamental studies on trap states, dopant incorporation, and polarization were performed to enhance performance of this compound. Additionally, advanced detection techniques were applied to display the capabilities of high quality BiI3 spectrometers. Overall, through this work, BiI3 has been revealed as a potentially transformative material for nuclear security and radiation detection sciences.

  3. Diffuse galactic gamma rays at intermediate and high latitudes. Pt. 1. Constraints on the ISM properties

    Cholis, Ilias; Tavakoli, Maryam; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    We study the high latitude (vertical stroke b vertical stroke >10 ) diffuse {gamma}-ray emission in the Galaxy in light of the recently published data from the Fermi collaboration at energies between 100 MeV and 100 GeV. The unprecedented accuracy in these measurements allows to probe and constrain the properties of sources and propagation of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy, as well as confirming conventional assumptions made on the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the publicly available DRAGON code, that has been shown to reproduce local measurements of CRs, we study assumptions made in the literature on HI and H2 gas distributions in the ISM, and non spatially uniform models of diffusion in the Galaxy. By performing a combined analysis of CR and {gamma}-ray spectra, we derive constraints on the properties of the ISM gas distribution and the vertical scale height of galactic CR diffusion, which may have implications also on indirect Dark Matter detection. We also discuss some of the possible interpretations of the break at {proportional_to}230 GeV in CR protons and helium spectra, recently observed by PAMELA and their impact on {gamma}-rays. (orig.)

  4. On the high energy gamma ray spectrum and the particle production model

    Ohta, Itaru; Tezuka, Ikuo.

    1979-01-01

    A small emulsion chamber, 25 cm x 20 cm in area and 12 radiation lengths in thick, was exposed with JAL jet-cargo at an atmospheric depth of 260 g/cm 2 during 150 hrs. The gamma ray spectrum derived by combining data from X-ray films and nuclear emulsions is well represented by I sub(r) (>=Er) = (3.65 +- 0.30) x 10 -8 [E sub(r)/TeV]sup(-1.89+0.06-0.09)/cm 2 sr sec in the energy range 200 - 3,000 GeV. This result is in good agreement with those of several other groups. We discuss our data in terms of Feynman's and Koba-Nielsen-Olesen's scaling law of high energy particle production model. Interpreted in terms of an assumption of mild violation of the scaling law as x.d delta-s / delta-s indx = AE sup(2a)exp (-BE sup(a)x), our gamma ray spectrum results suggest an existence of a violation parameter of a = 0.18, which is consistent with results from gamma ray spectrum observations at great depth such as the mountain elevations. (author)

  5. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-01-01

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by 14 N of gammas produced using 13 C(p,γ) 14 N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H - tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results

  6. Fast effects of glucocorticoids on memory-related network oscillations in the mouse hippocampus.

    Weiss, E K; Krupka, N; Bähner, F; Both, M; Draguhn, A

    2008-05-01

    Transient or lasting increases in glucocorticoids accompany deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Recent data indicate that the formation and consolidation of declarative and spatial memory are mechanistically related to different patterns of hippocampal network oscillations. These include gamma oscillations during memory acquisition and the faster ripple oscillations (approximately 200 Hz) during subsequent memory consolidation. We therefore analysed the effects of acutely applied glucocorticoids on network activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Evoked field population spikes and paired-pulse responses were largely unaltered by corticosterone or cortisol, respectively, despite a slight increase in maximal population spike amplitude by 10 microm corticosterone. Several characteristics of sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations were affected by glucocorticoids, most prominently the frequency of spontaneously occurring sharp waves. At 0.1 microm, corticosterone increased this frequency, whereas maximal (10 microm) concentrations led to a reduction. In addition, gamma oscillations became slightly faster and less regular in the presence of high doses of corticosteroids. The present study describes acute effects of glucocorticoids on sharp wave-ripple complexes and gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices, revealing a potential background for memory deficits in the presence of elevated levels of these hormones.

  7. Effects of gamma irradiation on polypropylene, polypropylene + high density polyethylene and polypropylene + high density polyethylene + wood flour

    Reyes, J.; Albano, C.; Davidson, E.; Poleo, R. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela). Escuela de Quimica; Gonzalez, J.; Ichazo, M. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Dept. de Mecanica, Caracas (Venezuela); Chipara, M. [Research Institute for Electrotechnics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2001-04-01

    The effect of the gamma-irradiation on the mechanical properties of the composites, Polypropylene (PP), PP+high density Polyethylene (HDPE), PP+ HDPE+wood flour, where HDPE is virgin and recycled, was studied. This paper discusses the behavior of the composites after exposure to various doses of gamma irradiation (1-7 MRads) in the presence of oxygen. The dependence of mechanical properties on the integral dose for a constant dose rate of 0.48 MRads/h confirms the influence of the irradiation. Strong effects on the elongation at break and break strength is noticed. The mathematical analysis suggests for the PP+r-HDPE a bimolecular process of the elongation at break. On the order hand, for the PP+HDPE a complex process is represented for a three exponential equation. (orig.)

  8. Effects of gamma irradiation on polypropylene, polypropylene + high density polyethylene and polypropylene + high density polyethylene + wood flour

    Reyes, J.; Albano, C.; Davidson, E.; Poleo, R.; Chipara, M.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the gamma-irradiation on the mechanical properties of the composites, Polypropylene (PP), PP+high density Polyethylene (HDPE), PP+ HDPE+wood flour, where HDPE is virgin and recycled, was studied. This paper discusses the behavior of the composites after exposure to various doses of gamma irradiation (1-7 MRads) in the presence of oxygen. The dependence of mechanical properties on the integral dose for a constant dose rate of 0.48 MRads/h confirms the influence of the irradiation. Strong effects on the elongation at break and break strength is noticed. The mathematical analysis suggests for the PP+r-HDPE a bimolecular process of the elongation at break. On the order hand, for the PP+HDPE a complex process is represented for a three exponential equation. (orig.)

  9. Stabilising high energy orbit oscillations by the utilisation of centrifugal effects for rotating-tyre-induced energy harvesting

    Zhang, Yunshun; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2018-04-01

    Nonlinear energy harvesters are frequently considered in preference to linear devices because they can potentially overcome the narrow frequency bandwidth limitations inherent to linear variants; however, the possibility of variable harvesting efficiency is raised for the nonlinear case. This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester which may be fitted into an automobile tyre, with the advantage that it may broaden the rotating frequency bandwidth and simultaneously stabilise high-energy orbit oscillations. By consideration of the centrifugal effects due to rotation, the overall restoring force will potentially be increased for a cantilever implemented within the harvester, and this manifests as an increase in its equivalent elastic stiffness. In addition, this study reveals that the initial potential well barriers become as shallow as those for a bistable system. When the rotational frequency increases beyond an identifiable boundary frequency, the system transforms into one with a potential barrier of a typical monostable system. On this basis, the inter-well motion of the bistable system can provide sufficient kinetic energy so that the cantilever maintains its high-energy orbit oscillation for monostable hardening behaviour. Furthermore, in a vehicle drive experiment, it has been shown that the effective rotating frequency bandwidth can be widened from 15 km/h-25 km/h to 10 km/h-40 km/h. In addition, it is confirmed that the centrifugal effects can improve the harvester performance, producing a mean power of 61 μW at a driving speed of 40 km/h, and this is achieved by stabilising the high-energy orbit oscillations of the rotational harvester.

  10. Primate beta oscillations and rhythmic behaviors.

    Merchant, Hugo; Bartolo, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    The study of non-human primates in complex behaviors such as rhythm perception and entrainment is critical to understand the neurophysiological basis of human cognition. Next to reviewing the role of beta oscillations in human beat perception, here we discuss the role of primate putaminal oscillatory activity in the control of rhythmic movements that are guided by a sensory metronome or internally gated. The analysis of the local field potentials of the behaving macaques showed that gamma-oscillations reflect local computations associated with stimulus processing of the metronome, whereas beta-activity involves the entrainment of large putaminal circuits, probably in conjunction with other elements of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit, during internally driven rhythmic tapping. Thus, this review emphasizes the need of parametric neurophysiological observations in non-human primates that display a well-controlled behavior during high-level cognitive processes.

  11. Cantilever-detected high-frequency ESR measurement using a backward travelling wave oscillator

    Tokuda, Y; Hirano, S; Ohmichi, E; Ohta, H

    2012-01-01

    Our cantilever-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) technique is motivated for terahertz ESR spectroscopy of a tiny single crystal at low temperature. In this technique, ESR signal is detected as deflection of a sample-mounted cantilever, which is sensitively detected by built-in piezoresistors. So far, ESR detection at 315 GHz was succeeded using Gunn oscillator. In this study, we combine our ESR technique with a backward traveling wave oscillator (BWO), which can cover a wide frequency range 120-1200 GHz, to achieve better spectral resolution. Experiments were carried out at 4.2 K for a single crystal of Co Tutton salt with a newly constructed optical system. We successfully observed two ESR absorption lines in BWO frequencies up to 370 GHz. From multi-frequency measurements, the observed ESR lines shifted linearly with BWO frequency, being consistent with paramagnetic resonance. The estimated g values are g 1 = 3.00 and g 2 = 3.21. The spin sensitivity was estimated to ∼10 12 spins/gauss at 370 GHz.

  12. Oscillator strength of partially ionized high-Z atom on Hartree-Fock Slater model

    Nakamura, S.; Nishikawa, T.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock Slater (HFS) model has been solved for the partially ionized gold ions generated when an intense laser light is irradiated on a gold foil target. The resultant energy levels are compared with those obtained by a simple screened hydrogenic model with l-splitting effect (SHML). It is shown that the energy levels are poorly model by SHML as the ionization level becomes higher. The resultant wave functions are used to evaluate oscillator strength of important line radiations and compared with those obtained by a simple model using hydrogenic wave functions. Its demonstrated that oscillator strength of the 4p-4d and 4d-4f lines are well modeled by the simple method, while the 4-5 transitions such as 4f-5g, 4d-5f, 4p-5d, and 4f-5p forming the so-called N-band emission are poorly modeled and HFS results less strong line emissions. (author)

  13. Subsonic and transonic pressure measurements on a high-aspect-ratio supercritical-wing model with oscillating control surfaces

    Sandford, M. C.; Ricketts, R. H.; Watson, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A high aspect ratio supercritical wing with oscillating control surfaces is described. The semispan wing model was instrumented with 252 static orifices and 164 in situ dynamic pressure gases for studying the effects of control surface position and sinusoidal motion on steady and unsteady pressures. Data from the present test (this is the second in a series of tests on this model) were obtained in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.78 and are presented in tabular form.

  14. General oscillation damping analysis of the L-C filter circuit in the high-power rectifying power supply

    Xu Weihua; Chen Yonghao; Wu Junshuan; Kuang Guangli

    1998-06-01

    Rectifier circuit is the most popular converter. For the ripple demand of high-power load, the L-C filter with invert 'L' type has been used universally. Due to the influence of the second-order link, damped oscillation will occur with proper condition while the circuit state is changed. The ideal cascade damping condition and the parallel one can be obtained easily. Generally, the damping condition of the step response of the L-C filter circuit is induced, and the discussion is given

  15. Three-layer GSO depth-of-interaction detector for high-energy gamma camera

    Yamamoto, S.; Watabe, H.; Kawachi, N.; Fujimaki, S.; Kato, K.; Hatazawa, J.

    2014-01-01

    Using Ce-doped Gd 2 SiO 5 (GSO) of different Ce concentrations, three-layer DOI block detectors were developed to reduce the parallax error at the edges of a pinhole gamma camera for high-energy gamma photons. GSOs with Ce concentrations of 1.5 mol% (decay time ∼40 ns), 0.5 mol% crystal (∼60 ns), 0.4 mol% (∼80 ns) were selected for the depth of interaction (DOI) detectors. These three types of GSOs were optically coupled in the depth direction, arranged in a 22×22 matrix and coupled to a flat panel photomultiplier tube (FP-PMT, Hamamatsu H8500). Sizes of these GSO cells were 1.9 mm×1.9 mm×4 mm, 1.9 mm×1.9 mm×5 mm, and 1.9 mm×1.9 mm×6 mm for 1.5 mol%, 0.5 mol%, and 0.4 mol%, respectively. With these combinations of GSOs, all spots corresponding to GSO cells were clearly resolved in the position histogram. Pulse shape spectra showed three peaks for these three decay times of GSOs. The block detector was contained in a 2-cm-thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator with a 0.5-mm aperture was mounted. With pulse shape discrimination, we separated the point source images of the Cs-137 for each DOI layer. The point source image of the lower layer was detected at the most central part of the field-of-view, and the distribution was the smallest. The point source image of the higher layer was detected at the most peripheral part of the field-of-view, and the distribution was widest. With this information, the spatial resolution of the pinhole gamma camera can be improved. We conclude that DOI detection is effective for pinhole gamma cameras for high energy gamma photons

  16. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Chen, Y.; Yan, X.K.; Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of 60 Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of 60 Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0 -3 D 2 . Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy γ-irradiation from a supra-high dose 60 Co gamma-ray accident.

  17. Clinical outcomes of gamma knife radiosurgery in the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma.

    Elaimy, Ameer L; Mackay, Alexander R; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Demakas, John J; Fairbanks, Robert K; Cooke, Barton S; Lamm, Andrew F; Lee, Christopher M

    2013-12-01

    Previously published randomized evidence did not report a survival advantage for patients diagnosed with grade IV glioma who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery followed by external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy when compared to patients treated with external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone. In recent years, gamma knife radiosurgery has become increasingly popular as a salvage treatment modality for patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. The purpose of this article is to review the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery for patients who suffer from this malignancy. Retrospective, prospective, and randomized clinical studies published between the years 2000 and 2012 analyzing gamma knife radiosurgery for patients with high-grade glioma were reviewed. After assessing patient age, Karnofsky performance status, tumor histology, and extent of resection, gamma knife radiosurgery is a viable, minimally invasive treatment option for patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. The available prospective and retrospective evidence suggests that gamma knife radiosurgery provides patients with a high local tumor control rate and a median survival after tumor recurrence ranging from 13 to 26 months. Gamma knife radiosurgery followed by chemotherapy for recurrent high-grade glioma may provide select patients with increased levels of survival. However, further investigation into this matter is needed due to the limited number of published reports. Additional clinical research is also needed to analyze the efficacy and radiation-related toxicities of fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery due to its potential to limit treatment-associated morbidity. Gamma knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for select patients diagnosed with recurrent high-grade glioma. Although treatment outcomes have improved, further evidence in the form of phase III randomized trials is needed to assess the durability of treating

  18. THE 2010 VERY HIGH ENERGY gamma-RAY FLARE AND 10 YEARS OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF M 87

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernloehr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.

    2012-01-01

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3-6) x 10(9) M-circle dot) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE gamma-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, resu...

  19. Direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands -- {gamma} softness or coriolis coupling

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Narimatsu, Kanako; Ohtsubo, Shin-Ichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Recent measurements of direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands reveal severe break-down of the K-selection rule and pose the problem of how to understand the mechanism of such K-violation. The authors recent systematic calculations by using a simple {gamma}-tunneling model reproduced many of the observed hindrances, indicating the importance of the {gamma} softness. However, there are some data which cannot be explained in terms of the {gamma}-degree of freedom. In this talk, the authors also discuss the results of conventional Coriolis coupling calculations, which is considered to be another important mechanism.

  20. THE HIGH-ENERGY, ARCMINUTE-SCALE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    Chernyakova, M.; Malyshev, D.; Aharonian, F. A.; Crocker, R. M.; Jones, D. I.

    2011-01-01

    Employing data collected during the first 25 months of observations by the Fermi-LAT, we describe and subsequently seek to model the very high energy (>300 MeV) emission from the central few parsecs of our Galaxy. We analyze the morphological, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the central source, 1FGL J1745.6-2900. The data show a clear, statistically significant signal at energies above 10 GeV, where the Fermi-LAT has angular resolution comparable to that of HESS at TeV energies. This makes a meaningful joint analysis of the data possible. Our analysis of the Fermi data (alone) does not uncover any statistically significant variability of 1FGL J1745.6-2900 at GeV energies on the month timescale. Using the combination of Fermi data on 1FGL J1745.6-2900 and HESS data on the coincident, TeV source HESS J1745-290, we show that the spectrum of the central gamma-ray source is inflected with a relatively steep spectral region matching between the flatter spectrum found at both low and high energies. We model the gamma-ray production in the inner 10 pc of the Galaxy and examine cosmic ray (CR) proton propagation scenarios that reproduce the observed spectrum of the central source. We show that a model that instantiates a transition from diffusive propagation of the CR protons at low energy to almost rectilinear propagation at high energies can explain well the spectral phenomenology. We find considerable degeneracy between different parameter choices which will only be broken with the addition of morphological information that gamma-ray telescopes cannot deliver given current angular resolution limits. We argue that a future analysis performed in combination with higher-resolution radio continuum data holds out the promise of breaking this degeneracy.

  1. EJ-309 pulse shape discrimination performance with a high gamma-ray-to-neutron ratio and low threshold

    Kaplan, A.C., E-mail: Alexis.C.Kaplan@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Dolan, J.L.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Measuring neutrons in the presence of high gamma-ray fluence is a challenge with multi-particle detectors. Organic liquid scintillators such as the EJ-309 are capable of accurate pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) but the chance for particle misclassification is not negligible for some applications. By varying the distance from an EJ-309 scintillator to a strong-gamma-ray source and keeping a weak-neutron source at a fixed position, various gamma-to-neutron ratios can be measured and PSD performance can be quantified. Comparing neutron pulse-height distributions allows for pulse-height specific PSD evaluation, and quantification and visualization of deviation from {sup 252}Cf alone. Even with the addition of the misclassified gamma-rays, the PSD is effective in separating particles so that neutron count rate can be predicted with less than 10% error up to a gamma-to-neutron ratio of almost 650. For applications which can afford a reduction in neutron detection efficiency, PSD can be sufficiently effective in discriminating particles to measure a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background. -- Highlights: •We measure neutrons in a high photon background with EJ-309 liquid scintillators. •A low threshold is used to test the limits of particle discrimination. •A weak neutron signal is detectable with a gamma/neutron ratio as high as 770. •Photon pileup most commonly adds to error in classification of neutrons. •Neutron count rates are within 10% of expected rate under high gamma background.

  2. EJ-309 pulse shape discrimination performance with a high gamma-ray-to-neutron ratio and low threshold

    Kaplan, A.C.; Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Dolan, J.L.; Pozzi, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring neutrons in the presence of high gamma-ray fluence is a challenge with multi-particle detectors. Organic liquid scintillators such as the EJ-309 are capable of accurate pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) but the chance for particle misclassification is not negligible for some applications. By varying the distance from an EJ-309 scintillator to a strong-gamma-ray source and keeping a weak-neutron source at a fixed position, various gamma-to-neutron ratios can be measured and PSD performance can be quantified. Comparing neutron pulse-height distributions allows for pulse-height specific PSD evaluation, and quantification and visualization of deviation from 252 Cf alone. Even with the addition of the misclassified gamma-rays, the PSD is effective in separating particles so that neutron count rate can be predicted with less than 10% error up to a gamma-to-neutron ratio of almost 650. For applications which can afford a reduction in neutron detection efficiency, PSD can be sufficiently effective in discriminating particles to measure a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background. -- Highlights: •We measure neutrons in a high photon background with EJ-309 liquid scintillators. •A low threshold is used to test the limits of particle discrimination. •A weak neutron signal is detectable with a gamma/neutron ratio as high as 770. •Photon pileup most commonly adds to error in classification of neutrons. •Neutron count rates are within 10% of expected rate under high gamma background

  3. A High-Power Continuous-Wave Mid-Infrared Optical Parametric Oscillator Module

    Yichen Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate here a compact optical parametric oscillator module for mid-infrared generation via nonlinear frequency conversion. This module weighs only 2.5 kg and fits within a small volume of 220 × 60 × 55 mm3. The module can be easily aligned to various pump laser sources, and here we use a 50 W ytterbium (Yb-doped fiber laser as an example. With a two-channel MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate crystal (MgO:PPLN, our module covers a tuning range of 2416.17–2932.25 nm and 3142.18–3452.15 nm. The highest output power exceeds 10.4 W at 2.7 μm, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 24%. The measured power stability is 2.13% Root Meat Square (RMS for a 10 h duration under outdoor conditions.

  4. Results and analysis of free-electron-laser oscillation in a high-energy storage ring

    Couprie, M.E.; Velghe, M.; Prazeres, R.; Jaroszynski, D.; Billardon, M.

    1991-01-01

    A storage-ring free-electron laser at Orsay has been operating since 1989 in the visible wavelength range. In contrast with previous experiments, it operates with positrons and at higher energies (600--800 MeV), with the storage ring Super-ACO (ACO denotes Anneau de Collisions d'Orsay). The optical gain, the laser power, the transverse profile, and the macrotemporal structure of the laser are analyzed. In particular, we show that the gain matrix possesses many off-diagonal elements, which results in lasing on a combination of noncylindrical Gaussian modes. The eigenmode of the laser oscillation is a combination of one or two main Gaussian modes and several higher-order modes, which results in most of the power being extracted in these modes

  5. Measurement of mesoscopic high-T{sub c} superconductors using Si mechanical micro-oscillators

    Dolz, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)]. E-mail: mdolz@cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar; Antonio, D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Pastoriza, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2007-09-01

    In a superconducting mesoscopic sample, with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth, some properties are qualitatively different to those found in the bulk material. These properties include magnetization, vortex dynamics and ordering of the vortex lattice. In order to detect the small signals produced by this kind of samples, new instruments designed for the microscale are needed. In this work we use micromechanical oscillators to study the magnetic properties of a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} disk with a diameter of 13.5{mu}m and a thickness of 2.5{mu}m. The discussion of our results is based on the existence and contribution of inter and intra layer currents.

  6. Measurement of mesoscopic high-Tc superconductors using Si mechanical micro-oscillators

    Dolz, M.; Antonio, D.; Pastoriza, H.

    2007-01-01

    In a superconducting mesoscopic sample, with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth, some properties are qualitatively different to those found in the bulk material. These properties include magnetization, vortex dynamics and ordering of the vortex lattice. In order to detect the small signals produced by this kind of samples, new instruments designed for the microscale are needed. In this work we use micromechanical oscillators to study the magnetic properties of a Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ disk with a diameter of 13.5μm and a thickness of 2.5μm. The discussion of our results is based on the existence and contribution of inter and intra layer currents

  7. Conditioning the gamma spectrometer for activity measurement at very high background

    Yan, Weihua; Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Zhao; Xiao, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The application of a high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in determining the fuel element burnup in a future reactor is studied. The HPGe detector is exposed by a Co60 source with varying irradiation rate from 10 kcps to 150 kcps to simulate the input counting rate in real reactor environment. A Cs137 and a Eu152 source are positioned at given distances to generate certain event rate in the detector with the former being proposed as a labeling nuclide to measure the burnup of fuel ...

  8. Plastic nuclear track detectors as high x-ray and gamma dosimeters

    Chong Chon Sing

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies on the effects of high doses of x-ray and gamma ray on the track registration properties of several plastic track detectors is presented. The bulk etching rates and the etched track sizes have been found to increase with the dose in the range up to 100 Mrad. These results suggest that the changes in track registration characteristics can be employed as an index of the radiation dose in the megarad region. In particular, recent results on the effect of X-ray irradiation on two types of cellulose nitrate track detectors obtained in our laboratory are reported in this paper. (author)

  9. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  10. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed

  11. High spatial resolution gamma imaging detector based on a 5 inch diameter R3292 Hamamatsu PSPMT

    Wojcik, R.; Majewski, S.; Kross, B.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Steinbach, D.

    1998-01-01

    High resolution imaging gamma-ray detectors were developed using Hamamatsu's 5 inch diameter R3292 position sensitive PMT (PSPMT) and a variety of crystal scintillator arrays. Special readout techniques were used to maximize the active imaging area while reducing the number of readout channels. Spatial resolutions approaching 1 mm were obtained in a broad energy range from 20 to 511 keV. Results are also presented of coupling the scintillator arrays to the PMT via imaging light guides consisting of acrylic optical fibers

  12. Novel Gyroscopic Mounting for Crystal Oscillators to Increase Short and Medium Term Stability under Highly Dynamic Conditions.

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a gyroscopic mounting method for crystal oscillators to reduce the impact of dynamic loads on their output stability has been proposed. In order to prove the efficiency of this mounting approach, each dynamic load-induced instability has been analyzed in detail. A statistical study has been performed on the elevation angle of the g-sensitivity vector of Stress Compensated-cut (SC-cut) crystals. The analysis results show that the proposed gyroscopic mounting method gives good performance for host vehicle attitude changes. A phase noise improvement of 27 dB maximum and 5.7 dB on average can be achieved in the case of steady state loads, while under sinusoidal vibration conditions, the maximum and average phase noise improvement are as high as 24 dB and 7.5 dB respectively. With this gyroscopic mounting method, random vibration-induced phase noise instability is reduced 30 dB maximum and 8.7 dB on average. Good effects are apparent for crystal g-sensitivity vectors with low elevation angle φ and azimuthal angle β. under highly dynamic conditions, indicating the probability that crystal oscillator instability will be significantly reduced by using the proposed mounting approach.

  13. Radiation Build-Up In Shielding Of Low Activity High Energia Gamma Source

    Helfi-Yuliati; Mukhlis-Akhadi

    2003-01-01

    Research to observe radiation build-up factor (b) in aluminium (Al), iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for shielding of gamma radiation of high energy from 137 cs (E γ : 662 keV) source and 60 Co (E γ : 1332 keV) of low activity sources has been carried out. Al with Z =13 represent metal of low atomic number, Fe with Z =26 represent metal of medium atomic number, and Pb with Z = 82 represent metal of high atomic number. Low activity source in this research is source which if its dose rate decrease to 3 % of its initial dose rate became safe for the workers. Research was conducted by counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI(TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are close to 1 (b ∼ 1) for all kinds of metals. No radiation build-up factor is required in estimating the shielding thickness from several kinds of metals for low activity of high energy gamma source. (author)

  14. Limits to the Fraction of High-energy Photon Emitting Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-02-01

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  15. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-01-01

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  16. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ∼1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  18. Effect of high carbon dioxide storage and gamma irradiation on membrane deterioration in cauliflower florets

    Voisine, R.; Hombourger, C.; Willemot, C.; Castaigne, F.; Makhlouf, J.

    1993-01-01

    Controlled atmospheres and gamma irradiation are technologies which extend storage-life of fruits and vegetables. Separate and combined effects of high CO 2 storage and gamma irradiation on cell membranes from cauliflower florets (Brassica oleracea L., Botrytis group) were investigated. Storage of the florets for 8 days at 13°C, either under 15% carbon dioxide or in air after irradiation at 2 kGy, accelerated the deterioration of microsomal membranes during storage. Both treatments caused an early loss in lipid phosphate. Irradiation enhanced the free fatty acid content of the membranes during storage and caused an extensive protein loss. When irradiation and high CO 2 storage were combined, electrolyte leakage significantly increased while protein loss was considerably reduced. The results indicate that high CO 2 and irradiation accelerate membrane degradation through different mechanisms. The combined effects of the treatments were not additive, but membrane yield was apparently reduced. CO 2 protected the membranes from protein loss induced by irradiation. The apparent increase in electrolyte leakage after irradiation may be caused by the release of ions following cell wall deterioration

  19. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  20. Chromospheric oscillations

    Lites, B.W.; Rutten, R.J.; Thomas, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    We show results from SO/Sacramento Peak data to discuss three issues: (i)--the spatial occurrence of chromospheric 3--min oscillations; (ii)--the validity of Ca II H&K line-center Doppler Shift measurements; (iii)--the signi ?cance of oscillation power and phase at frequencies above 10 mHz.

  1. Inverted oscillator

    Yuce, C [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Kilic, A [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Coruh, A [Physics Department, Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    The inverted harmonic oscillator problem is investigated quantum mechanically. The exact wavefunction for the confined inverted oscillator is obtained and it is shown that the associated energy eigenvalues are discrete, and the energy is given as a linear function of the quantum number n.

  2. A high-energy, low-threshold tunable intracavity terahertz-wave parametric oscillator with surface-emitted configuration

    Wang, Y Y; Xu, D G; Jiang, H; Zhong, K; Yao, J Q

    2013-01-01

    A high-energy, low-threshold THz-wave output has been experimentally demonstrated with an intracavity terahertz-wave parametric oscillator based on a surface-emitted configuration, which was pumped by a diode-side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Different beam sizes and repetition rates of the pump light have been investigated for high-energy and high-efficiency THz-wave generation. The maximum THz-wave output energy of 283 nJ/pulse was obtained at 1.54 THz under an intracavity 1064 nm pump energy of 59 mJ. The conversion efficiency was 4.8 × 10 −6 , corresponding to a photon conversion efficiency of 0.088%. The pump threshold was 12.9 mJ/pulse. A continuously tunable range from 0.75 to 2.75 THz was realized. (paper)

  3. Some problems of the detection of the high energy gamma-radiation in space

    Fradkin, M. I.; Ginzburg, V. L.; Kurnosova, L. V.; Labensky, A. G.; Razorenov, L. A.; Rusakovich, M. A.; Topchiev, N. P.; Kaplin, V. A.; Runtso, M. F.; Gorchakov, E. V.; Ignatiev, P. P.

    1995-05-01

    Diffuse gamma radiation in the Galaxy has been measured with instruments onboard the COS-B and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellites from the tens of keV up to about 30 GeV. There is no experimental data at higher energies, but this data is very important for the spectrum of primary cosmic rays and the existence of neutralinos (hypothetical supersymmetrical particles which are supposed to constitute dark matter in the Galaxy and create gamma-quanta in the process of annihilation). The GAMMA-400 collaboration is working on the design of a telescope for gamma-ray measurements in the 10-1000 GeV range. The electronics of the GAMMA-400 eliminate some hindering effects, in particular the influence of backscattered gammas emitted by the very massive calorimeter (calorimeter albedo). The GAMMA-400 project may be realized in the near future if economic conditions in Russia are favorable.

  4. Gamma power is phase-locked to posterior alpha activity.

    Daria Osipova

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations in various frequency bands have been reported in numerous studies in both humans and animals. While it is obvious that these oscillations play an important role in cognitive processing, it remains unclear how oscillations in various frequency bands interact. In this study we have investigated phase to power locking in MEG activity of healthy human subjects at rest with their eyes closed. To examine cross-frequency coupling, we have computed coherence between the time course of the power in a given frequency band and the signal itself within every channel. The time-course of the power was calculated using a sliding tapered time window followed by a Fourier transform. Our findings show that high-frequency gamma power (30-70 Hz is phase-locked to alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz in the ongoing MEG signals. The topography of the coupling was similar to the topography of the alpha power and was strongest over occipital areas. Interestingly, gamma activity per se was not evident in the power spectra and only became detectable when studied in relation to the alpha phase. Intracranial data from an epileptic subject confirmed these findings albeit there was slowing in both the alpha and gamma band. A tentative explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system is inhibited during most of the alpha cycle whereas a burst of gamma activity at a specific alpha phase (e.g. at troughs reflects a window of excitability.

  5. Thermal-hydraulic oscillations in a low pressure two-phase natural circulation loop at low powers and high inlet subcoolings

    Wang, S.B.; Wu, J.Y.; Chin Pan; Lin, W.K.

    2004-01-01

    The stability of a natural circulation boiling loop is of great importance and interests for both academic researches and many industrial applications, such as next generation boiling water reactors. The present study investigated the thermal-hydraulic oscillation behavior in a low pressure two-phase natural circulation loop at low powers and high inlet subcoolings. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure with heating power ranging from 4 to 8 kW and inlet subcooling ranging from 27 to 75 deg. C. Significant oscillations in loop mass flow rate, pressure drop in each section, and heated wall and fluid temperatures are present for all the cases studied here. The oscillation is typically quasi-periodic and with flow reversal with magnitudes smaller than forward flows. The magnitude of wall temperature oscillation could be as high as 60 deg. C, which will be of serious concern for practical applications. It is found that the first fundamental oscillation (large magnitude oscillation) frequency increases with increase in heated power and with decrease in inlet subcooling. (author)

  6. Toward a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope. Proceedings

    Bloom, E.D.; Evans, L.L. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    It has been some time between the time of the first Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) workshop, Towards a Next Generation High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope, in late August 1994, and the publication of a partial proceedings of that meeting. Since then there has been considerable progress in both the technical and project development of GLAST. From its origins at SLAC/Stanford in early 1992, the collaboration has currently grown to more than 20 institutions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US, and is still growing. About half of these are astrophysics/astronomy institutions; the other half are high-energy physics institutions. About 100 astronomers, astrophysicists, and particle physicists are currently spending some fraction of their time on the GLAST R and D program. The late publication date of this proceedings has resulted in some additions to the original content of the meeting. The first paper is actually a brochure prepared for NASA by Peter Michelson in early 1996. Except for the appendix, the other papers in the proceedings were presented at the conference, and written up over the following two years. Some presentations were never written up.

  7. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  8. Towards a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope. Proceedings

    Bloom, E.D.; Evans, L.L.

    1997-03-01

    It has been some time between the time of the first Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) workshop, Towards a Next Generation High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope, in late August 1994, and the publication of a partial proceedings of that meeting. Since then there has been considerable progress in both the technical and project development of GLAST. From its origins at SLAC/Stanford in early 1992, the collaboration has currently grown to more than 20 institutions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US, and is still growing. About half of these are astrophysics/astronomy institutions; the other half are high-energy physics institutions. About 100 astronomers, astrophysicists, and particle physicists are currently spending some fraction of their time on the GLAST R and D program. The late publication date of this proceedings has resulted in some additions to the original content of the meeting. The first paper is actually a brochure prepared for NASA by Peter Michelson in early 1996. Except for the appendix, the other papers in the proceedings were presented at the conference, and written up over the following two years. Some presentations were never written up

  9. Gamma-ray detector based on high pressure xenon for radiation and environmental safety

    Kutny, V.E.; Rybka, A.V.; Davydov, L.N.; Pudov, A.O.; Sokolov, S.A.; Kholomeyev, G.A.; Melnikov, S.I.; Turchin, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometers based on compressed xenon gas assigned for monitoring the reactors and the radiation background at nuclear power plants, non-proliferation of radioactive materials, supervision and control over the radiation background in the environmentally disadvantaged areas, and other applications, are very promising detectors with excellent performance characteristics. This article reports on the results of the first stage of work on the creation of the portable gamma-spectrometer based on compressed xenon that is unique for Ukraine. In order to work with ultra-pure gases under pressure, the complex cryogenic installation for Xe purification and detector filling was designed and manufactured. The installation was made of specially cleaned components, equipped with a heating system for the degassing of the inner walls, and is able of maintaining high vacuum down to 2 centre dot 10"-"9 mbar. A prototype ionization chamber for the use in portable HP Xe detectors was developed and made. For the detector testing, a spectrometric channel based on high-quality electronic components was designed and manufactured. In the initial experiments, a study of the properties of the purified Xe mixed with the dopant H_2 was carried out. The assessment of the lifetime of charge carriers τ in the working gas at a pressure of 30 bar gave the value of τ > 150 μs

  10. Gamma radiation effects on the rheological properties of high and low density polyethylenes

    Rangel-Nafaile, C.; Garcia-Rejon, A.; Garcia Leon, A.

    1986-01-01

    High energy radiation of polymeric materials is a topic of considerable interest from commercial and scientific points of view. Within an inert atmosphere, irradiation of polyethylene yields a crosslinking effect with a consequent improvement in its mechanical properties in comparison to the virgin materials. Additionally, if irradiated specimens are melted and recrystallized, the radiation-induced crosslinking hinders their crystalline growth altering dramatically their flow properties such as the elasticity. This work portrays the effects of the gamma radiation on the rheological properties of high and low density polyethylenes manufactured by PEMEX and analyzes the implications of theoretical results derived from the Acierno's model when it is implemented with the rheological properties of high energy irradiated polyethylenes. (author)

  11. Search for $B^{0}_{s}-\\overline{B^{0}_{s}}$ oscillations in DELPHI using high-$p_{t}$ leptons

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations in the B0_s - anti-B0_s system were studied in events selected from about 4.3 million hadronic Z^0 decays registered by DELPHI between 1992 and 2000. This paper presents updates of two published analyses ([11,12]). The first analysis, which utilizes leptons emitted with large momentum transverse to a jet, was improved by means of a better algorithm for the vertex reconstuction and a new algorithm for flavour-tagging at production time. The second analysis, which utilizes D_s-lepton events, was improved by optimizing the treatment of proper time resolution. No signal of B0_s oscillations was observed and limits on the mass difference between the physical B0_s states were obtained to be: \\Delta m_s > 8.0 ps^{-1} at the 95% C.L. with a sensitivity of \\Delta m_s = 9.1 ps^{-1} in the high p_t lepton analysis and \\Delta m_s > 4.9 ps^{-1} at the 95% C.L. with a sensitivity of \\Delta m_s = 8.6 ps^{-1} in the D_s-lepton analysis. Previously published results on these analyses are superseed. The combinatio...

  12. High-power, continuous-wave, mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator based on MgO:sPPLT.

    Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-07-01

    We report a stable, high-power, cw, mid-IR optical parametric oscillator using MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically poled LiTaO₃ (MgO:sPPLT) pumped by a Yb fiber laser at 1064 nm. The singly resonant oscillator (SRO), based on a 30 mm long crystal, is tunable over 430 nm from 3032 to 3462 nm and can generate as much as 5.5 W of mid-IR output power, with >4 W of over 60% of the tuning range and under reduced thermal effects, enabling room temperature operation. Idler power scaling measurements at ~3.3 μm are compared with an MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO₃ cw SRO, confirming that MgO:sPPLT is an attractive material for multiwatt mid-IR generation. The idler output at 3299 nm exhibits a peak-to-peak power stability better than 12.8% over 5 h and frequency stability of ~1 GHz, while operating close to room temperature, and has a linewidth of ~0.2 nm, limited by the resolution of the wavemeter. The corresponding signal linewidth at 1570 nm is ~21 MHz.

  13. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Felis, I.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Saldana, M.; Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Lahmann, R.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Tselengidou, M.; Wagner, S.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Mathieu, A.; Vallee, C.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Toennis, C.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J.; Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E.; Biagi, S.; Coniglione, R.; Distefano, C.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A.; Bormuth, R.; Jong, M. de; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Michael, T.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E.; Bruijn, R.; Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Van Elewyck, V.; Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Tamburini, C.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y.; Donzaud, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Elsaesser, D.; Kadler, M.; Kreter, M.; Mueller, C.; Fusco, L.A.; Margiotta, A.; Pellegrino, C.; Spurio, M.; Giordano, V.; Haren, H. van; Hugon, C.; Taiuti, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Wilms, J.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marinelli, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Pradier, T.; Sanguineti, M.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vivolo, D.

    2017-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profiles are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level. (orig.)

  14. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Felis, I.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Saldana, M. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE-Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Anton, G.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Lahmann, R.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Tselengidou, M.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Mathieu, A.; Vallee, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Toennis, C.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM-Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Coniglione, R.; Distefano, C.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Bormuth, R.; Jong, M. de; Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Michael, T.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Chiarusi, T. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Circella, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Van Elewyck, V. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Geoazur, Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Donzaud, C. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dumas, A.; Gay, P. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Elsaesser, D.; Kadler, M.; Kreter, M.; Mueller, C. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Fusco, L.A.; Margiotta, A.; Pellegrino, C.; Spurio, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje, Texel (Netherlands); Hugon, C.; Taiuti, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (Italy); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouchner, A. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Kreykenbohm, I.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (Italy); Loucatos, S. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marinelli, A. [INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Migliozzi, P. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Moussa, A. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, Oujda (MA); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Sanguineti, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (IT); Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Vivolo, D. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (IT)

    2017-01-15

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profiles are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level. (orig.)

  15. Cosmic and solar gamma-ray x-ray and particle measurements from high altitude balloons in Antarctica

    Lin, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    For measurements of cosmic and solar gamma-rays, hard X-rays, and particles, Antarctica offers the potential for very long, 10--20 day, continuous, twenty-four-hour-a-day observations, with balloon flights circling the South Pole during austral summer. For X-ray/gamma-ray sources at high south latitude the overlying atmosphere is minimized, and for cosmic ray measurements the low geomagnetic cutoff permits entry of low rigidity particles. The first Antarctic flight of a heavy (∼2400 lb.) payload on a large (11.6x10 6 cu. ft.) balloon took place in January, 1988, to search for the gamma-ray lines of 56 Co produced in the new supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The long duration balloon flights presently planned from Antarctica include those for further gamma-ray/hard X-ray studies of SN 1987A and for the NASA Max '91 program for solar flare studies

  16. Development of a Watt-level gamma-ray source based on high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering

    Mihalcea, D.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-07-01

    A high-brilliance (~1022 photon s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 /0.1%) gamma-ray source experiment is currently being planned at Fermilab (Eγ≃1.1 MeV). The source implements a high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering by colliding electron bunches formed in a ~300-MeV superconducting linac with a high-intensity laser pulse. This paper describes the design rationale along with some of technical challenges associated to producing high-repetition-rate collision. The expected performances of the gamma-ray source are also presented.

  17. Low and high frequency Madden-Julian oscillations in austral summer: interannual variations

    Izumo, Takeshi [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); LOCEAN, IRD-CNRS-UPMC, Paris (France); Masson, Sebastien; Vialard, Jerome; Madec, Gurvan [LOCEAN, IRD-CNRS-UPMC, Paris (France); Boyer Montegut, Clement de [IFREMER, Brest (France); Behera, Swadhin K. [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); Takahashi, Keiko [Earth Simulator Center (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); Yamagata, Toshio [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the main component of intraseasonal variability of the tropical convection, with clear climatic impacts at an almost-global scale. Based on satellite observations, it is shown that there are two types of austral-summer MJO events (broadly defined as 30-120 days convective variability with eastward propagation of about 5 m/s). Equatorial MJO events have a period of 30-50 days and tend to be symmetric about the equator, whereas MJO events centered near 8 S tend to have a longer period of 55-100 days. The lower-frequency variability is associated with a strong upper-ocean response, having a clear signature in both sea surface temperature and its diurnal cycle. These two MJO types have different interannual variations, and are modulated by the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Following a negative IOD event, the lower-frequency southern MJO variability increases, while the higher-frequency equatorial MJO strongly diminishes. We propose two possible explanations for this change in properties of the MJO. One possibility is that changes in the background atmospheric circulation after an IOD favour the development of the low-frequency MJO. The other possibility is that the shallower thermocline ridge and mixed layer depth, by enhancing SST intraseasonal variability and thus ocean-atmosphere coupling in the southwest Indian Ocean (the breeding ground of southern MJO onset), favour the lower-frequency southern MJO variability. (orig.)

  18. High fidelity phase locked PIV measurements analysing the flow fields surrounding an oscillating piezoelectric fan

    Jeffers, Nicholas; Nolan, Kevin; Stafford, Jason; Donnelly, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric fans have been studied extensively and are seen as a promising technology for thermal management due to their ability to provide quiet, reliable cooling with low power consumption. The fluid mechanics of an unconfined piezoelectric fan are complex which is why the majority of the literature to date confines the fan in an attempt to simplify the flow field. This paper investigates the fluid mechanics of an unconfined fan operating in its first vibration frequency mode. The piezoelectric fan used in this study measures 12.7 mm × 70 mm and resonates at 92.5 Hz in air. A custom built experimental facility was developed to capture the fan's flow field using phase locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The phase locked PIV results are presented in terms of vorticity and show the formation of a horse shoe vortex. A three dimensional A2 criterion constructed from interpolated PIV measurements was used to identify the vortex core in the vicinity of the fan. This analysis was used to clearly identify the formation of a horse shoe vortex that turns into a hairpin vortex before it breaks up due to a combination of vortex shedding and flow along the fan blade. The results presented in this paper contribute to both the fluid dynamics and heat transfer literature concerning first mode fan oscillation.

  19. High-power broad-band tunable microwave oscillator, driven by REB in plasma

    Kuzelev, M V; Loza, O T; Ponomarev, A V; Rukhadze, A A; Strel` kov, P S; Shkvarunets, A G; Ulyanov, D K [General Physics Inst. of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The radiation spectra of a plasma relativistic broad-band microwave oscillator were measured. A hollow relativistic electron beam (REB) was injected into the plasma waveguide, consisting of annular plasma in a circular metal waveguide. The radiation spectra were measured by means of a calorimeter-spectrometer with a large cross section in the band of 3-39 GHz. The mean frequency was tunable in the band of 20-27 GHz, the spectrum width was 5-25 GHz with a power level of 40-85 MW. Calculations were carried out based on non-linear theory, taking into account electromagnetic noise amplification due to REB injection into the plasma waveguide. According to the theory the radiation regime should change from the single-particle regime to the collective regime when the plasma density and the gap between the annular plasma and REB are increased. Comparison of the experimental results with the non-linear theory explains some peculiarities of the measured spectrum. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  20. A Search for High Mass Photon Pairs in $p\\bar{p} \\to \\gamma\\gamma jj$ Events at 1.8-TeV

    Lauer, Bryan Adrian [Iowa State U.

    1997-01-01

    A search for new physics in the channel $p\\bar{p} \\to \\gamma\\gamma jj$ has been carried out. In some extended Higgs models, a light neutral scalar Higgs boson is produced with suppressed couplings to fermions and standard model(SM) strength couplings to vector bosons(bosonic Higgs), thus enhancing the $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ channel....