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Sample records for high flux neutron source facility

  1. Modernization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to Provide a Cold Neutron Source and Experimentation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, Benjamin G.; Farrar, Mike B.

    2009-01-01

    In June 1961, construction was started on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facility inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the recommendation of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Division of Research. Construction was completed in early 1965 with criticality achieved on August 25, 19651. From the first full power operating cycle beginning in September 1966, the HFIR has achieved an outstanding record of service to the scientific community. In early 1995, the ORNL deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the HFIR following the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project by DOE. This group indicated that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR to produce cold neutrons for neutron scattering research uses. Cold neutrons have long wavelengths in the range of 4-12 angstroms. Cold neutrons are ideal for research applications with long length-scale molecular structures such as polymers, nanophase materials, and biological samples. These materials require large scale examination (and therefore require a longer wavelength neutron). These materials represent particular areas of science are at the forefront of current research initiatives that have a potentially significant impact on the materials we use in our everyday lives and our knowledge of biology and medicine. This paper discusses the installation of a cold neutron source at HFIR with respect to the project as a modernization of the facility. The paper focuses on why the project was required, the scope of the cold source project with specific emphasis on the design, and project management information.

  2. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH 2 cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept

  3. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  4. The new high flux neutron source FRM-2 in Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.J.; Wierheim, G.

    2002-01-01

    Quite some years ago in 1974 to be exact, the first consideration on a new neutron source started at the technical university of Munich (Germany). 27 years later the new high flux neutron source (FRM-2) was read for hot operation, now delayed by a refused approval for its third partial license by the federal government of Germany despite a wide support from the scientific community. FRM-2 is a tank-type research reactor cooled by water, moderated by heavy water and whose thermal power was limited to 20 MW maximum. The extreme compact core together with the applied inverse flux principle led to a neutron flux design value of 8.10 18 n/m 2 .s at the reflector peak. 10 beam tubes will allow an optimized use of the high neutron flux. A hot neutron source with graphite at about 2200 Celsius degrees and a cold neutron source with liquid D 2 at about 25 K will provide shifted energy spectra. The utilization of FRM-2 is many-fold: neutronography and tomography, medical irradiation, radio-nuclide production, doping of pure silicon, neutron activation analysis. (A.C.)

  5. Optimization of the testing volumes with respect to neutron flux levels in the two-target high flux D-Li neutron source for the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Varsamis, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    An economic and fusion-relevant source of high-energy neutrons is an essential element in the fusion nuclear technology and development program. This source can be generated by directing a high energy deuteron beam onto a flowing liquid lithium target, producing neutrons via the D-Lithium stripping reaction. Previous work on this type of source concentrated on a design employing one deuteron beam of modest amperage. This design was shown to have a relatively small testing volume with high flux gradients and was therefor considered somewhat unattractive from a materials testing standpoint. A design using two lithium targets and two high-amperage beams has recently been proposed. This two beam design has been examined in an effort to maximize the test volume while minimizing the flux gradients and minimizing the effect of radiation damage on one target due to the other. A spatial, energy and angle dependent neutron source modeling the D-Lithium source was developed. Using this source, a 3-dimensional map of uncollided flux within the test volume was calculated. The results showed that the target separation has little effect on the available experimental volume and that a testing volume of ∼35 liters is available with a volume averaged flux above 10 14 n/cm 2 /s. The collided flux within the test volume was then determined by coupling the source model with a Monte Carlo code. The spectral effects of the high-energy tail in the flux were examined and evaluated as to possible effects on materials response. Calculations comparing the radiation damage to materials from the D-Lithium source to that cause by a standard DT fusion first-wall neutron flux spectrum showed that the number of appm and dpa, as well as the ratio appm/dpa and dpa/MW/m 2 are within 30% for the two sources. 8 refs., 8 figs

  6. Three new nondestructive evaluation tools based on high flux neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.R.; Raine, D.; Peascoe, R.; Wright, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation methods and systems based on specific attributes of neutron interactions with materials are being developed. The special attributes of neutrons are low attenuation in most engineering materials, strong interaction with low Z elements, and epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The three methods under development at ORNL include neutron based tomography and radiography; through thickness, nondestructive texture mapping; and internal, noninvasive temperature measurement. All three techniques require high flux sources such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor, a steady state source, or the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, a pulsed neutron source. Neutrons are quite penetrating in most engineering materials and thus can be useful to detect internal flaws and features. Hydrogen atoms, such as in a hydrocarbon fuel, lubricant, or a metal hydride, are relatively opaque to neutron transmission and thus neutron based tomography/radiography is ideal to image their presence. Texture, the nonrandom orientation of crystalline grains within materials, can be mapped nondestructively using neutron diffraction methods. Epithermal neutron resonance absorption is being studied as a noncontacting temperature sensor. This paper highlights the underlying physics of the methods, progress in development, and the potential benefits for science and industry of the three facilities

  7. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  8. Numerical studies of the flux-to-current ratio method in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of a subcritical assembly has to be monitored continuously in order to assure its safe operation. In this paper, the flux-to-current ratio method has been studied as an approach to provide the on-line reactivity measurement of the subcritical system. Monte Carlo numerical simulations have been performed using the KIPT neutron source facility model. It is found that the reactivity obtained from the flux-to-current ratio method is sensitive to the detector position in the subcritical assembly. However, if multiple detectors are located about 12 cm above the graphite reflector and 54 cm radially, the technique is shown to be very accurate in determining the k eff this facility in the range of 0.75 to 0.975. (authors)

  9. Irradiation facilities at the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a facility, centered around a new 330MW(f) heavy-water cooled and reflected research reactor, proposed for construction at Oak Ridge. The main scientific justification for the new source is the United States' need for increased capabilities in neutron scattering and other neutron beam research, but the technical objectives of the project also cater for the need to replace the irradiation facilities at the aging High Flux Isotope Reactor and to provide other research capabilities to the scientific community. This document provides a description of the ANS facilities

  10. A continuously self regenerating high-flux neutron-generator facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. M.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, A. X.; Daub, B. H.; Goldblum, B. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Leung, K.-N.; Renne, P. R.; Waltz, C.

    2013-10-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being constructed at UC Berkeley. The current generator, designed around two RF-driven multicusp deuterium ion sources, is capable of producing a neutron output of >1011 n/s. A specially designed titanium-coated copper target located between the ion sources accelerates D+ ions up to 150 keV, generating 2.45 MeV neutrons through the d(d,3He)n fusion reaction. Deuterium in the target is self loaded and regenerating through ion implantation, enabling stable and continuous long-term operation. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40Ar/39Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science research including statistical model studies of radiative-strength functions and level densities, and education. An overview of the facility and its unique capabilities as well as first measurements from the HFNG commissioning will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-01

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  12. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one

  13. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A.

    2011-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  14. Recovery of spent high intensity neutron sources in Atalante Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, P.; Boyer Deslys, V.; Millet, A.; Solinhac, I.; Donnet, L.; Maillard, C.; Paillard, S.; Ranchoux, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Atalante facility is required by law to recover both neutron and gamma sources with activity levels exceeding 300 mCi. Most of the neutron sources consist of mixtures of alpha-emitters (238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am or 244Cm) and beryllium. Several processes now under consideration are based on routine chemical separation techniques (selective precipitation, extraction chromatography, ion exchange). The treatment produces an actinide oxide (which is used later for R and D studies) and solid beryllium nitrate, which is considered as a waste and transferred to a surface interim storage site if the overall activity of the package after 300 years is less than 50 MBq (ANDRA specifications). The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory of Atalante validate the residual alpha activity in the waste. The techniques used include alpha spectrometry and L-line X-ray fluorescence for alpha emitters, and plasma torch measurements (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) for beryllium analysis. Specific equipment for transport (B type cask), storage and treatment (hot shielded cells) are used for this activity. (Author)

  15. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, N. A., E-mail: namauro@noctrl.edu [Department of Physics, North Central College, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Vogt, A. J. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Derendorf, K. S. [Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kreyssig, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lokshin, K. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wang, Xun-Li [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); Egami, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  16. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  17. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project's maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes

  18. CUP-A New High-Flux Irradiation Position at the ANITA Neutron Facility at TSL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokofiev, A. V.; Passoth, E.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Majerle, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2014), s. 1929-1936 ISSN 0018-9499. [European Conference on Radiation and its Effects on Components and Systems (RADECS). Oxford, 23.09.2013-27.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : accelerated testing * integrated circuit radiation effects * neutron beams * neutron detectors * neutron radiation effects * radiation facilities * single event effects * soft error rates * terrestrial radiation environments * test facilities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2014

  19. An advanced fusion neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accelerator-based 14-MeV-neutron sources based on modifications of the original Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are currently under consideration for investigating the effects of high-fluence high-energy neutron irradiation on fusion-reactor materials. One such concept for a D-Li neutron source is based on recent advances in accelerator technology associated with the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator accelerator under construction at Argonne National Laboratory, associated superconducting technology, and advances in liquid-metal technology. In this paper a summary of conceptual design aspects based on improvements in technologies is presented

  20. Design of a new neutron delivery system for high flux source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boffy, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The building of new experimental neutron beam facilities as well as the renewal programmes under development at some of the already existing installations have pinpointed the urgent need to develop neutron guide technology in order to make such neutron transport devices more efficient and durable. In fact, a number of mechanical failures of neutron guides have been reported by several research centres. It is therefore important to understand the behaviour of the glass substrates on top of which the neutron optics mirrors are deposited, and how these materials degrade under radiation conditions. The case of the European Spallation Source (ESS), at present under construction at Lund, is a good example. It previews the deployment of neutron guides having more than 100 metres of length for most of the instruments. Also, the future renovation programme of the ILL, called Endurance, foresees the refurbishment of several beam lines. This Ph.D. thesis was the result of a collaboration agreement between the ILL and ESS-Bilbao, aiming to improve the performance and sustainability of future neutron delivery systems. Four different industrially produced alkali-borosilicate glasses were selected for this study: Borofloat, N-ZK7, N-BK7, and S-BSL7. The first three are well known within the neutron instrumentation community, as they have already been used in several installations; whereas the last one is, at present, considered a candidate for making future mirror substrates. All four glasses have a comparable content of boron oxide of about 10 mol.%. The presence of such a strong neutron absorption element is in fact a mandatory component for the manufacturing of neutron guides, because it provides a radiological shielding for the environment. This benefit is, however, somewhat counterbalanced, since the resulting 10 B(n,alpha) 7 Li reactions degrade the glass due to the deposited energy of 2.5 MeV by the α particle and the recoil nuclei. In fact, the brittleness of some of

  1. The secondary neutron sources for generation of particular neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracz, G.

    2007-07-01

    The foregoing paper presents the doctor's thesis entitled '' The secondary neutron sources for generation of particular neutron fluxes ''. Two secondary neutron sources have been designed, which exploit already existing primary sources emitting neutrons of energies different from the desired ones. The first source is devoted to boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The research reactor MARIA at the Institute of Atomic Energy in Swierk (Poland) is the primary source of the reactor thermal neutrons, while the secondary source should supply epithermal neutrons. The other secondary source is the pulsed source of thermal neutrons that uses fast 14 MeV neutrons from a pulsed generator at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krakow (Poland). The physical problems to be solved in the two mentioned cases are different. Namely, in order to devise the BNCT source the initial energy of particles ought to be increased, whilst in the other case the fast neutrons have to be moderated. Slowing down of neutrons is relatively easy since these particles lose energy when they scatter in media; the most effective moderators are the materials which contain light elements (mostly hydrogen). In order to increase the energy of neutrons from thermal to epithermal (the BNCT case) the so-called neutron converter should be exploited. It contains a fissile material, 235 U. The thermal neutrons from the reactor cause fission of uranium and fast neutrons are emitted from the converter. Then fissile neutrons of energy of a few MeV are slowed down to the required epithermal energy range. The design of both secondary sources have been conducted by means of Monte Carlo simulations, which have been carried out using the MCNP code. In the case of the secondary pulsed thermal neutron source, some of the calculated results have been verified experimentally. (author)

  2. Neutron activation analysis: Modelling studies to improve the neutron flux of Americium-Beryllium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Tajmouati, Jaouad; Bekkouri, Hassane [Advanced Technology and Integration System, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Science Dhar Mehraz, University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fez (Morocco); Jai, Otman [Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan (Morocco)

    2017-06-15

    Americium–beryllium (Am-Be; n, γ) is a neutron emitting source used in various research fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, archaeology, medicine, and environmental monitoring, as well as in the forensic sciences. It is a mobile source of neutron activity (20 Ci), yielding a small thermal neutron flux that is water moderated. The aim of this study is to develop a model to increase the neutron thermal flux of a source such as Am-Be. This study achieved multiple advantageous results: primarily, it will help us perform neutron activation analysis. Next, it will give us the opportunity to produce radio-elements with short half-lives. Am-Be single and multisource (5 sources) experiments were performed within an irradiation facility with a paraffin moderator. The resulting models mainly increase the thermal neutron flux compared to the traditional method with water moderator.

  3. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tairan, Liang [School of Physics and Electronic Information Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Zhiduo, Li [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Yin, E-mail: wenyin@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Fei, Shen [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Quanzhi, Yu [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Tianjiao, Liang [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-07-11

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm{sup 2}/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  4. Laser heated solenoid as a neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for a radiation test facility based on a laser heated plasma confined in a straight solenoid. The thin plasma column, a few meters in length and less than a centimeter in diameter, serves as a line source of neutrons. Test samples are located within or just behind the plasma tube, at a radius of 1-2 cm from the axis. The plasma is heated by an axially-directed powerful long-wavelength laser beam. The plasma is confined radially in the intense magnetic field supplied by a pulsed solenoid surrounding the plasma tube. The facility is pulsed many times a second to achieve a high time-averaged neutron flux on the test samples. Based on component performance achievable in the near term (e.g., magnetic field, laser pulse energy) and assuming classical physical processes, it appears that average fluxes of 10 13 to 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 -sec can be achieved in such a device. The most severe technical problems in such a facility appear to be rapid pulsing design and lifetime of some electrical and laser components

  5. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  6. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed

  7. Intense neutron source facility for the fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.; Emigh, C.R.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Intense Neutron Source Facility, INS, has been proposed to provide a neutronic environment similar to that anticipated in a fully operational fusion-power reactor. The neutron generator will produce an intense flux of 14-MeV neutrons greater than 10 14 neutrons per cm 2 /sec from the collision of two intersecting beams, one of 1.1 A of 270 keV tritium ions and the other of a supersonic jet of deuterium gas. Using either the pure 14-MeV primary neutron spectrum or by tailoring the spectrum with appropriate moderators, crucial radiation-damage effects which are likely to occur in fusion reactors can be thoroughly explored and better understood

  8. Neutron-irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I for fusion magnet materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The decommissioning of reactor-based neutron sources in the USA has led to the development of a new generation of neutron sources that employ high-energy accelerators. Among the accelerator-based neutron sources presently in operation, the highest-flux source is the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), a user facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Neutrons in this source are produced by the interaction of 400 to 500 MeV protons with either of two 238 U target systems. In the Radiation Effects Facility (REF), the 238 U target is surrounded by Pb for neutron generatjion and reflection. The REF has three separate irradiation thimbles. Two thimbles provide irradiation temperatures between that of liquid He and several hundred degrees centigrade. The third thimble operates at ambient temperature. The large irradiation volume, the neutron spectrum and flux, the ability to transfer samples without warm up, and the dedication of the facilities during the irradiation make this ideally suited for radiation damage studies on components for superconducting fusion magnets. Possible experiments for fusion magnet materials are discussed on cyclic irradiation and annealing of stabilizers in a high magnetic field, mechanical tests on organic insulation irradiated at 4 K, and superconductors measured in high fields after irradiation

  9. Neutron flux characterization of californium-252 Neutron Research Facility at the University of Texas - Pan American by nuclear analytical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Kareem; Sanchez, Patrick; Hannan, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    In the field of nuclear science, neutron flux is an intrinsic property of nuclear reaction facilities that is the basis for experimental irradiation calculations and analysis. In the Rio Grande Valley (Texas), the UTPA Neutron Research Facility (NRF) is currently the only neutron facility available for experimental research purposes. The facility is comprised of a 20-microgram californium-252 neutron source surrounded by a shielding cascade containing different irradiation cavities. Thermal and fast neutron flux values for the UTPA NRF have yet to be fully investigated and may be of particular interest to biomedical studies in low neutron dose applications. Though a variety of techniques exist for the characterization of neutron flux, neutron activation analysis (NAA) of metal and nonmetal foils is a commonly utilized experimental method because of its detection sensitivity and availability. The aim of our current investigation is to employ foil activation in the determination of neutron flux values for the UTPA NSRF for further research purposes. Neutron spectrum unfolding of the acquired experimental data via specialized software and subsequent comparison for consistency with computational models lends confidence to the results.

  10. Neutron and meson sources on the base of high-current cyclotron facilities (prospects of development)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrievskij, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is given and possible ways of development of neutron and meson generators on the basis of accelerating facilities are shown. The following conclusions are made: to combine two types of generators (neutron, meson) in one accelerated beam the deuteron beam for the energy 800-1000 MeV/nucleon should be accepted as the optimal one; accelerated beam energy distribution between mesocatalytic and emission branches of neutron generation is determined by the choice of mesocatalytic reactor target parameters; efficiency is the determining parameter of the accelerating facility (complex) when it is u sed for neutron or meson generators; a combination of linear and superconducting cyclic accelerators is the most perspective co mplex as to the efficiency

  11. Neutron scattering at the high-flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, J.W. Chakoumakos, B.C.; Dai, P.

    1995-01-01

    The title facilities offer the brightest source of neutrons in the national user program. Neutron scattering experiments probe the structure and dynamics of materials in unique and complementary ways as compared to x-ray scattering methods and provide fundamental data on materials of interest to solid state physicists, chemists, biologists, polymer scientists, colloid scientists, mineralogists, and metallurgists. Instrumentation at the High- Flux Isotope Reactor includes triple-axis spectrometers for inelastic scattering experiments, a single-crystal four diffractometer for crystal structural studies, a high-resolution powder diffractometer for nuclear and magnetic structure studies, a wide-angle diffractometer for dynamic powder studies and measurements of diffuse scattering in crystals, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument used primarily to study structure-function relationships in polymers and biological macromolecules, a neutron reflectometer for studies of surface and thin-film structures, and residual stress instrumentation for determining macro- and micro-stresses in structural metals and ceramics. Research highlights of these areas will illustrate the current state of neutron science to study the physical properties of materials

  12. Application of the INS facility as a high-flux benchmark for neutron dosimetry and for radiation damage studies in D--T fusion spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, R.; Emigh, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    An Intense Neutron Source facility (INS), is presently under construction at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This facility is being built by the Energy Research and Development Administration for the radiation damage program in magnetic fusion energy. The facility will contain two D-T neutron sources, both producing about 10 15 primary 14-MeV neutrons per second on a continuous basis. One source will be used to produce a ''pure'' 14-MeV spectrum while the other will be surrounded by a multiplying blanket converter to produce a fusion-like spectrum with a total of about 10 16 neutrons per second

  13. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, A.; Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C.; Chabod, S.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  14. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabod, S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Breaud, S.; Oriol, L. [DEN/DER/SPEX, CEA-Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  15. Neutron activation analysis: Modelling studies to improve the neutron flux of Americium–Beryllium source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Didi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Americium–beryllium (Am-Be; n, γ is a neutron emitting source used in various research fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, archaeology, medicine, and environmental monitoring, as well as in the forensic sciences. It is a mobile source of neutron activity (20 Ci, yielding a small thermal neutron flux that is water moderated. The aim of this study is to develop a model to increase the neutron thermal flux of a source such as Am-Be. This study achieved multiple advantageous results: primarily, it will help us perform neutron activation analysis. Next, it will give us the opportunity to produce radio-elements with short half-lives. Am-Be single and multisource (5 sources experiments were performed within an irradiation facility with a paraffin moderator. The resulting models mainly increase the thermal neutron flux compared to the traditional method with water moderator.

  16. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  17. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. → Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. → New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. → Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is ∼360 kW including the fission power of ∼260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  18. High flux, beamed neutron sources employing deuteron-rich ion beams from D2O-ice layered targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Krygier, A. G.; Ahmed, H.; Morrison, J. T.; Clarke, R. J.; Fuchs, J.; Green, A.; Green, J. S.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Notley, M.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Freeman, R. R.; Kar, S.

    2017-06-01

    A forwardly-peaked bright neutron source was produced using a laser-driven, deuteron-rich ion beam in a pitcher-catcher scenario. A proton-free ion source was produced via target normal sheath acceleration from Au foils having a thin layer of D2O ice at the rear side, irradiated by sub-petawatt laser pulses (˜200 J, ˜750 fs) at peak intensity ˜ 2× {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The neutrons were preferentially produced in a beam of ˜70° FWHM cone along the ion beam forward direction, with maximum energy up to ˜40 MeV and a peak flux along the axis ˜ 2× {10}9 {{n}} {{sr}}-1 for neutron energy above 2.5 MeV. The experimental data is in good agreement with the simulations carried out for the d(d,n)3He reaction using the deuteron beam produced by the ice-layered target.

  19. Pulsed neutron source and instruments at neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Morii, Yukio; Watanabe, Noboru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    We report the results of design studies on the optimal target shape, target - moderator coupling, optimal layout of moderators, and neutron instruments for a next generation pulsed spallation source in JAERI. The source utilizes a projected high-intensity proton accelerator (linac: 1.5 GeV, {approx}8 MW in total beam power, compressor ring: {approx}5 MW). We discuss the target neutronics, moderators and their layout. The sources is designed to have at least 30 beam lines equipped with more than 40 instruments, which are selected tentatively to the present knowledge. (author)

  20. Investigating The Neutron Flux Distribution Of The Miniature Neutron Source Reactor MNSR Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Hai; Do Quang Binh

    2011-01-01

    Neutron flux distribution is the important characteristic of nuclear reactor. In this article, four energy group neutron flux distributions of the miniature neutron source reactor MNSR type versus radial and axial directions are investigated in case the control rod is fully withdrawn. In addition, the effect of control rod positions on the thermal neutron flux distribution is also studied. The group constants for all reactor components are generated by the WIMSD code, and the neutron flux distributions are calculated by the CITATION code. The results show that the control rod positions only affect in the planning area for distribution in the region around the control rod. (author)

  1. Neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  2. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, P., E-mail: marini@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Mathieu, L. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Acosta, L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, México D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  3. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2001-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis, close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 litres of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10deg from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very importable during the life time of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H2) to the deuterium (D2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. The new reactor will have 13 beam tubes, 4 of which are looking at the cold neutron source (CNS), including two for very cold (VCN) and ultra-cold neutron (UCN) production. The latter will take place in the horizontal beam tube SR4, which will house an additional cryogenic moderator (e.g. solid deuterium). More than 60% of the experiments foreseen in the new neutron research facility will use cold neutrons from the CNS. The mounting of the hardware components of the CNS into the reactor has started in the spring of 2000. The CNS will go into trial operation in the end of year 2000. (J.P.N.)

  4. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobrecht, K.

    1999-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D 2 O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis, close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4000 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 litres of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10 deg from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very improbable during the life time of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H 2 ) to the deuterium (D 2 ) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. A long term change of the hydrogen content in the deuterium is avoided be storing the mixture not in a gas buffer volume but as a metal hydride at low pressure. The metal hydride storage system contains two getter beds, one with 250 kg of LaCo 3 Ni 2 , the other one with 150 kg of ZrCo(0.8)Ni(0.2). Each bed can take the total gas inventory, both beds together can absorb the total gas inventory in less than 6 minutes at a pressure < 3 bar. The new reactor will have 13 beam tubes, 4 of which are looking at the cold neutron source (CNS), including two for very cold (VCN) and ultra-cold neutron (UCN

  5. The applied research program of the High Flux Neutron Generator at the National Nuclear Center, Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, G.; Martin, G.; Ceballos, C.; Padron, I.; Shtejer, K.; Perez, N.; Guibert, R.; Ledo, L.M.; Cruz Inclan, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The Havana High Flux Neutron Generator facility is an intense neutron source based on a 20 mA duoplasmatron ion source and a 250 kV high voltage power supply. It has been installed in the Neutron Generator Laboratory at the Center of Applied Technologies and Nuclear Research in 1997. This paper deal outlined the future applied program to be carried out in this facility in the next years. The Applied Research Program consists on install two nuclear analytic techniques: the PELAN technique which uses the neutron generator in the pulse mode and the Low Energy PIXE technique which uses the same facility as a low energy proton accelerator for PIXE analysis. (author)

  6. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  7. Calculation of neutron flux in the presence of a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchard, J.

    1993-09-01

    Neutron sources are introduced into the reactors to initiate the chain reaction. For safety reasons, we have to know the distribution and evolution of the flux throughout the startup phase. The flux is calculated iteratively but convergence of the process can slow down arbitrarily as we approach criticality. A calculation method is presented, with a convergence speed which does not depend on the negative reactivity when it is small. (author). 7 refs

  8. Neutron Flux Distribution on Neutron Radiography Facility After Fixing the Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supandi; Parikin; Mohtar; Sunardi; Roestam, S

    1996-01-01

    The Radiography Neutron Facility consists of an inner collimator, outer collimator, main shutter, second shutter and the sample chamber with 300 mm in diameter. Neutron beam quality depends on the neutron flux intensities distribution, L/D ratio Cd ratio, neutron/gamma ratio. The results show that the neutron flux intensity was 2.83 x 107 n cm-2.s-1, with deviation of + 7.8 % and it was distributed homogeneously at the sample position of 200 mm diameter. The beam characteristics were L/D ratio 98 and Rod 8, and neutron gamma ratio 3.08 x 105n.cm-2.mR-1 and Reactor Power was 20 MW. This technique can be used to examine sample with diameter of < 200 mm

  9. Intense neutron source facility for the fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.; Emigh, C.R.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The intense neutron source is based on the ability of a supersonic flow of gas to dissipate an enormous quantity of heat generated in the neutron-producing target by multiple Coulomb collisions. A description is given of the principles involved in forming the supersonic jet, in forming the intense tritium-ion beam, in the vacuum systems, and in the tritium handling systems. An overview of the entire facility is included. It is believed that the facility can be operated with high reliability, ensuring a productive radiation damage program. (U.S.)

  10. High energy neutron source for materials research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odera, M.

    1989-01-01

    Requirements for neutron source for nuclear materials research are reviewed and ESNIT, Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test facility proposed by JAERI is discussed. Its principal aims of a wide neutron energy tunability and spectra peaking at each energy to enable characterization of material damage process are demanding but attractive goals which deserve detailed study. It is also to be noted that the requirements make a difference in facility design from those of FMIT, IFMIF and other high energy intense neutron sources built or planned to date. Areas of technologies to be addressed to realize the ESNIT facility are defined and discussed. In order to get neutron source having desired spectral characteristics keeping moderate intensity, projectile and target combinations must be examined including experimentation if necessary. It is also desired to minimize change of flux density and energy spectrum according to location inside irradiation chamber. Extended target or multiple targets configuration might be a solution as well as specimen rotation and choice of combination of projectile and target which has minimum velocity of the center of mass. Though relevant accelerator technology exists, it is to be stressed that considerable efforts must be paid, especially in the area of target and irradiation devices to get ESNIT goal. Design considerations to allow hands-on maintenance and future upgrading possibility are important either, in order to exploit the facility fully for nuclear materials research and development. (author)

  11. Reactor cold neutron source facility, the first in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, Masahiko; Maeda, Yutaka; Kawai, Takeshi; Tashiro, Tameyoshi; Sakakibara, Shoji; Katada, Minoru.

    1986-01-01

    In the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the first cold neutron source facility for the reactor in Japan was installed, and various tests are carried out outside the reactor. Nippon Sanso K.K. had manufactured it. After the prescribed tests outside the reactor, this facility will be installed soon in the reactor, and its outline is described on this occasion. Cold neutrons are those having very small energy by being cooled to about-250 deg C. Since the wavelength of the material waves of cold neutrons is long, and their energy is small, they are very advantageous as an experimental means for clarifying the structure of living body molecules and polymers, the atom configuration in alloys, and atomic and molecular movements by neutron scattering and neutron diffraction. The basic principle of the cold neutron source facility is to irradiate thermal neutrons on a cold moderator kept around 20 K, and to moderate and cool the neutrons by nuclear scattering to convert to cold neutrons. The preparatory research on cold neutrons and hydrogen liquefaction, the basic design to put the cold neutron source facility in the graphite moderator facility, the safety countermeasures, the manufacture and quality control, the operation outside the reactor and the performance are reported. The cold neutron source facility comprises a cold moderator tank and other main parts, a deuterium gas tank, a helium refrigerator and instrumentation. (Kako, I.)

  12. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2002-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universität München, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D 2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 l of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two-phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10° from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very improbable during the lifetime of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H 2) to the deuterium (D 2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. A long-term change of the hydrogen content in the deuterium is avoided by storing the mixture not in a gas buffer volume but as a metal hydride at low pressure. The metal hydride storage system contains two getter beds, one with 250 kg of LaCo 3Ni 2, the other one with 150 kg of ZrCo 0.8Ni 0.2. Each bed can take the total gas inventory, both beds together can absorb the total gas inventory in cold (VCN) and ultra-cold neutron (UCN) production. The latter will take place in the horizontal beam tube SR4, which will house an additional cryogenic moderator (e.g. solid deuterium). More than 60% of the experiments

  13. Methods and applications in high flux neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhausen, H.

    2007-01-01

    This treatise develops new methods for high flux neutron radiography and high flux neutron tomography and describes some of their applications in actual experiments. Instead of single images, time series can be acquired with short exposure times due to the available high intensity. To best use the increased amount of information, new estimators are proposed, which extract accurate results from the recorded ensembles, even if the individual piece of data is very noisy and in addition severely affected by systematic errors such as an influence of gamma background radiation. The spatial resolution of neutron radiographies, usually limited by beam divergence and inherent resolution of the scintillator, can be significantly increased by scanning the sample with a pinhole-micro-collimator. This technique circumvents any limitations in present detector design and, due to the available high intensity, could be successfully tested. Imaging with scattered neutrons as opposed to conventional total attenuation based imaging determines separately the absorption and scattering cross sections within the sample. For the first time even coherent angle dependent scattering could be visualized space-resolved. New applications of high flux neutron imaging are presented, such as materials engineering experiments on innovative metal joints, time-resolved tomography on multilayer stacks of fuel cells under operation, and others. A new implementation of an algorithm for the algebraic reconstruction of tomography data executes even in case of missing information, such as limited angle tomography, and returns quantitative reconstructions. The setup of the world-leading high flux radiography and tomography facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin is presented. A comprehensive appendix covers the physical and technical foundations of neutron imaging. (orig.)

  14. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  15. Modelisation and distribution of neutron flux in radium-beryllium source (226Ra-Be)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didi, Abdessamad; Dadouch, Ahmed; Jai, Otman

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP-6), to analyze the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, of 3 millicuries of radium-beryllium, for determine the qualitative and quantitative of many materials, using method of neutron activation analysis. Radium-beryllium source of neutron is established to practical work and research in nuclear field. The main objective of this work was to enable us harness the profile flux of radium-beryllium irradiation, this theoretical study permits to discuss the design of the optimal irradiation and performance for increased the facility research and education of nuclear physics.

  16. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Papka, P.; Dobson, R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of 6 Li and 12 C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  17. Existing and projected neutron sources and low-temperature irradiation facilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a contribution given at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute to the temporal meeting on the design of the facilities for high flux, low temperature irradiation is summarized. The following five subjects were discussed. The project of modernizing the swimming pool type research reactor FRM with 4 MW power at Munich is to achieve relatively high thermal neutron flux, and an extremely compact core is designed. The existing low temperature irradiation facility (LTIF) of the FRM is the most powerful in the world, and has been successfully operated more than 20 years. The fast and thermal neutron fluxes are 2.9 x 10 13 and 3.5 x 10 13 /cm 2 sec, respectively. The experimental techniques in the LTIF of the FRM, such as a measuring cryostat, the mounting of irradiated samples and so on, are described. The installation of new LTIFs in connection with the projects of advanced neutron sources in Germany is likely to be made in the modernized FRM at Garching, in the spallation neutron source SNQ at KFA Juelich and so on. The interesting problems in fundamental and applied researches with LTIFs, and the unusual application of LTIFs are shown. (Kako, I.)

  18. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5x10 19 m -2 ·sec -1 . Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities

  19. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other trace elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  20. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.; Bowman, W.W.; Zeh, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, which is sponsored and funded by the United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  1. Fast neutron flux and intracranial dose distribution at a neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Aizawa, Otohiko; Nozaki, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    A head phantom filled with water was used to measure the fast neutron flux using 115 In(n, n')sup(115m)In and 103 Rh(n, n')sup(103m)Rh reactions. γ-ray from sup(115m)In and x-ray from sup(103m)Rh were detected by a Ge(Li) and a Na(Tl)I counter, respectively. TLD was used to investigate the γ-dose rate distribution inside the phantom. Flux of fast neutron inside the phantom was about 1 x 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, which was 3 order smaller than that of thermal neutron. The fast neutron flux decreased to 1/10 at 15 cm depth, and γ-dose rate was about 200 R/h at 100 kW inside the phantom. Total dose at the surface was 350 rad/h, to which, fast neutrons contributed more than γ-rays. The rate of fast neutron dose was about 10% of thermal neutron's in Kerma dose unit (rad), however, the rate was highly dependent on RBE value. (Nakanishi, T.)

  2. High energy neutrinos: sources and fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark DE 19716 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We discuss briefly the potential sources of high energy astrophysical neutrinos and show estimates of the neutrino fluxes that they can produce. A special attention is paid to the connection between the highest energy cosmic rays and astrophysical neutrinos.

  3. Shielding calculations for the Intense Neutron Source Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battat, M.E.; Henninger, R.J.; Macdonald, J.L.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1978-06-01

    Results of shielding calculations for the Intnse Neutron Source (INS) facility are presented. The INS facility is designed to house two sources, each of which will produce D--T neutrons with intensities in the range from 1 to 3 x 10 15 n/s on a continuous basis. Topics covered include the design of the biological shield, use of two-dimensional discrete-ordinates results to specify the source terms for a Monte Carlo skyshine calculation, air activation, and dose rates in the source cell (after shutdown) due to activation of the biological shield

  4. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  5. Localisation of a neutron source using measurements and calculation of the neutron flux and its gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, P; Dahl, B; Pázsit, I; Por, G

    1999-01-01

    We have performed laboratory measurements of the neutron flux and its gradient in a static model experiment, similar to a model problem proposed in Pazsit (Ann. Nucl. Energy 24 (1997) 1257). The experimental system consists of a radioactive neutron source located in a water tank. The measurements are performed using a recently developed very small optical fibre detector. The measured values of the flux and its gradient are then used to test the possibility of localising the source. The results show that it is possible to measure the flux on the circumference of a circle and from this calculate the flux gradient vector. Then, by comparison of the measured quantities with corresponding MCNP calculations, both the direction and the distance to the source are found and thus the position of the source can be determined.

  6. Analysis of the Photoneutron Yield and Thermal Neutron Flux in an Unreflected Electron Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Gregory E.; Gahl, John M.

    2005-01-01

    There are several potential uses for a high-flux thermal neutron source in both industrial and clinical applications. The viable commercial implementation of these applications requires a low-cost, high-flux thermal neutron generator suitable for installation in industrial and clinical environments. This paper describes the Monte Carlo for N-Particle modeling results of a high-flux thermal neutron source driven with an electron accelerator. An electron linear accelerator (linac), fitted with a standard X-ray converter, can produce high neutron yields in materials with low photonuclear threshold energies, such as D and 9 Be. Results indicate that a 10-MeV, 10-kW electron linac can produce on the order of 10 12 n/s in a heavy water photoneutron target. The thermal neutron flux in an unreflected heavy water target is calculated to be on the order of 10 10 n.cm -2 .s. The sensitivity of these answers to heavy water purity is also investigated, specifically the dilution of heavy water with light water. It is shown that the peak thermal neutron flux is not adversely effected by dilution up to a light water weight fraction of 35%

  7. Reactor physics experiments in PURNIMA sub critical facility coupled with 14 MeV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Degweker, S.B.; Patel, Tarun; Bishnoi, Saroj; Adhikari, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADSS) are attracting increasing worldwide attention due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product waste and energy production. A number of countries around the world have drawn up roadmaps/programs for development of ADSS. Indian interest in ADSS has an additional dimension, which is related to the planned utilization of our large thorium reserves for future nuclear energy generation. A programme for development of ADSS is taken up at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in India. This includes R and D activities for high current proton accelerator development, target development and Reactor Physics studies. As part of the ADSS Reactor Physics research programme, a sub-critical facility is coming up in BARC which will be coupled with an existing D-D/D-T neutron generator. Two types of cores are planned. In one of these, the sub-critical reactor assembly consists of natural uranium moderated by high density polyethylene (HDP) and reflected by BeO. The other consists of natural uranium moderated by light water. The maximum neutron yield of the neutron source with tritium target is around 10 10 neutron per sec. Various reactor physics experiments like measurement of the source strength, neutron flux distribution, buckling estimation and sub-critical source multiplication are planned. Apart from this, measurement of the total fission power and neutron spectrum will also be carried out. Mainly activation detectors will be used in all in-core neutron flux measurement. Measurement of the degree of sub-criticality by various deterministic and noise methods is planned. Helium detectors with advanced data acquisition card will be used for the neutron noise experiments. Noise characteristics of ADSS are expected to be different from that of traditional reactors due to the non-Poisson statistical features of the source. A new theory incorporating these features has been

  8. Development of an anthropomorfic simulator for simulation and measurements of neutron dose and flux the facility for BNCT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Rafael Oliveira Rondon

    2010-01-01

    IPEN facility for researches in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) uses IEA-R1 reactor's irradiation channel number 3, where there is a mixed radiation field - neutrons and gamma. The researches in progress require the radiation fields, in the position of the irradiation of sample, to have in its composition maximized thermal neutrons component and minimized, fast and epithermal neutron flux and gamma radiation. This work was developed with the objective of evaluating whether the present radiation field in the facility is suitable for BNCT researches. In order to achieve this objective, a methodology for the dosimetry of thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in mixed fields of high doses, which was not available in IPEN, was implemented in the Center of Nuclear Engineering of IPEN, by using thermoluminescent dosimeters - TLDs 400, 600 and 700. For the measurements of thermal and epithermal neutron flux, activation detectors of gold were used applying the cadmium ratio technique. A cylindrical phantom composed by acrylic discs was developed and tested in the facility and the DOT 3.5. computational code was used in order to obtain theoretical values of neutron flux and the dose along phantom. In the position corresponding to about half the length of the cylinder of the phantom, the following values were obtained: thermal neutron flux (2,52 ± 0,06).10 8 n/cm 2 s, epithermal neutron flux (6,17 ± 0,26).10 7 .10 6 n/cm 2 s, absorbed dose due to thermal neutrons (4,2 ± 1,8)Gy and (10,1 ± 1,3)Gy due to gamma radiation. The obtained values show that the fluxes of thermal and epithermal neutrons flux are appropriate for studies in BNCT, however, the dose due to gamma radiation is high, indicating that the facility should be improved. (author)

  9. Neutron energy spectrum flux profile of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogbadji, R.B.M.; Abrefah, R.G.; Ampomah-Amoako, E.; Agbemava, S.E.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The total neutron flux spectrum of the compact core of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor was studied. → Using 20,484 energy grids, the thermal, slowing down and fast neutron energy regions were studied. - Abstract: The total neutron flux spectrum of the compact core of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor was understudied using the Monte Carlo method. To create small energy groups, 20,484 energy grids were used for the three neutron energy regions: thermal, slowing down and fast. The moderator, the inner irradiation channels, the annulus beryllium reflector and the outer irradiation channels were the region monitored. The thermal neutrons recorded their highest flux in the inner irradiation channel with a peak flux of (1.2068 ± 0.0008) x 10 12 n/cm 2 s, followed by the outer irradiation channel with a peak flux of (7.9166 ± 0.0055) x 10 11 n/cm 2 s. The beryllium reflector recorded the lowest flux in the thermal region with a peak flux of (2.3288 ± 0.0004) x 10 11 n/cm 2 s. The peak values of the thermal energy range occurred in the energy range (1.8939-3.7880) x 10 -08 MeV. The inner channel again recorded the highest flux of (1.8745 ± 0.0306) x 10 09 n/cm 2 s at the lower energy end of the slowing down region between 8.2491 x 10 -01 MeV and 8.2680 x 10 -01 MeV, but was over taken by the moderator as the neutron energies increased to 2.0465 MeV. The outer irradiation channel recorded the lowest flux in this region. In the fast region, the core, where the moderator is found, the highest flux was recorded as expected, at a peak flux of (2.9110 ± 0.0198) x 10 08 n/cm 2 s at 6.961 MeV. The inner channel recorded the second highest while the outer channel and annulus beryllium recorded very low flux in this region. The flux values in this region reduce asymptotically to 20 MeV.

  10. Planned upgrade to the coaxial plasma source facility for high heat flux plasma flows relevant to tokamak disruption simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caress, R.W.; Mayo, R.M.; Carter, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma disruptions in tokamaks remain serious obstacles to the demonstration of economical fusion power. In disruption simulation experiments, some important effects have not been taken into account. Present disruption simulation experimental data do not include effects of the high magnetic fields expected near the PFCs in a tokamak major disruption. In addition, temporal and spatial scales are much too short in present simulation devices to be of direct relevance to tokamak disruptions. To address some of these inadequacies, an experimental program is planned at North Carolina State University employing an upgrade to the Coaxial Plasma Source (CPS-1) magnetized coaxial plasma gun facility. The advantages of the CPS-1 plasma source over present disruption simulation devices include the ability to irradiate large material samples at extremely high areal energy densities, and the ability to perform these material studies in the presence of a high magnetic field. Other tokamak disruption relevant features of CPS-1U include a high ion temperature, high electron temperature, and long pulse length

  11. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  12. High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH 2 moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project

  13. Accelerator-driven sub-critical research facility with low-enriched fuel in lead matrix: Neutron flux calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The H5B is a concept of an accelerator-driven sub-critical research facility (ADSRF being developed over the last couple of years at the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia. Using well-known computer codes, the MCNPX and MCNP, this paper deals with the results of a tar get study and neutron flux calculations in the sub-critical core. The neutron source is generated by an interaction of a proton or deuteron beam with the target placed inside the sub-critical core. The results of the total neutron flux density escaping the target and calculations of neutron yields for different target materials are also given here. Neutrons escaping the target volume with the group spectra (first step are used to specify a neutron source for further numerical simulations of the neutron flux density in the sub-critical core (second step. The results of the calculations of the neutron effective multiplication factor keff and neutron generation time L for the ADSRF model have also been presented. Neutron spectra calculations for an ADSRF with an uranium tar get (highest values of the neutron yield for the selected sub-critical core cells for both beams have also been presented in this paper.

  14. Advanced neutron source design: burnout heat flux correlation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambill, W.R.; Mochizuki, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the advanced neutron source reactor (ANSR) fuel element region, heat fluxes will be elevated. Early designs corresponded to average and estimated hot-spot fluxes of 11 to 12 and 21 to 22 MW/m 2 , respectively. Design changes under consideration may lower these values to ∼ 9 and 17 MW/m 1 . In either event, the development of a satisfactory burnout heat flux correlation is an important element among the many thermal-hydraulic design issues, since the critical power ratio will depend in part on its validity. Relatively little work in the area of subcooled-flow burnout has been published over the past 12 yr. The authors have compared seven burnout correlations and modifications therefore with several sets of experimental data, of which the most relevant to the ANS core are those referenced. The best overall agreement between the correlations tested and these data is currently provided by a modification of Thorgerson et al. correlation. The variable ranges of the experimental data are outlined and the results of the correlation comparisons are summarized

  15. Cryogenic technology review of cold neutron source facility for localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hun Cheol; Park, D. S.; Moon, H. M.; Soon, Y. P. [Daesung Cryogenic Research Institute, Ansan (Korea); Kim, J. H. [United Pacific Technology, Inc., Ansan (Korea)

    1998-02-01

    This Research is performed to localize the cold neutron source(CNS) facility in HANARO and the report consists of two parts. In PART I, the local and foreign technology for CNS facility is investigated and examined. In PART II, safety and licensing are investigated. CNS facility consists of cryogenic and warm part. Cryogenic part includes a helium refrigerator, vacuum insulated pipes, condenser, cryogenic fluid tube and moderator cell. Warm part includes moderator gas control, vacuum equipment, process monitoring system. Warm part is at high level as a result of the development of semiconductor industries and can be localized. However, even though cryogenic technology is expected to play a important role in developing the 21st century's cutting technology, it lacks of specialists and the research facility since the domestic market is small and the research institutes and government do not recognize the importance. Therefore, it takes a long research time in order to localize the facility. The safety standard of reactor for hydrogen gas in domestic nuclear power regulations is compared with that of the foreign countries, and the licensing method for installation of CNS facility is examined. The system failure and its influence are also analyzed. 23 refs., 59 figs., 26 tabs. (Author)

  16. Neutron flux enhancement at LASREF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physiscs Facility produces a 1 mA beam of protons at an energy of 800 MeV. Since 1985, the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has made use of the neutron flux that is generated as the incident protons interact with the targets and a copper beam stop. A variety of basic and applied experiments in radiation damage and radiation effects have been completed. Recent studies indicate that the flux at LASREF can be increased by at least a factor of 10 from the present level of about 5 E + 17 m -2 s -1 . This requires changing the beam stop material from Cu to W and optimizing the geometry of the beam-target interaction region. These studies are motivated by the need for a large volume, high energy, and high intensity neutron source in the development of materials for advanced energy concepts such as fusion reactors. (orig.)

  17. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefánik, Milan; Bém, Pavel; Götz, Miloslav; Katovsky, K.; Majerle, Mitja; Novák, Jan; Šimečková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, NOV (2014), s. 306-309 ISSN 0969-806X. [1st International Conference on Dosimetry and its Applications (ICDA). Prague, 23.6.2013-28.6.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron generator * accelerator * dosimetry foils activation method * neutron spectrometry * Gamma-spectrometry * reaction rate Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2014

  18. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yan; Wei, Thomas Y.; Grelle, Austin L.; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  19. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of high-flux 14 MeV neutron source based on muon catalyzed fusion using a high-power 50 MW deuteron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, M [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Karmanov, F I [Inst. of Nuclear Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Latysheva, L N; Pshenichnov, I A [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research

    1997-12-31

    The results Monte Carlo simulations of an intense neutron source based on muon catalyzed fusion process are presented. A deuteron beam is directed onto a cylindrical carbon target, located in vacuum converter chamber with a strong solenoidal magnetic field. The produced pions and muons which originate from pion decay are guided along magnetic field to a DT-synthesizer. Pion production in the primary target is simulated by means of Intranuclear and Internuclear cascade codes developed in INR, Moscow, while pion and muon transport process is studied by using a Monte Carlo code originated at CERN. The main purpose of the work is to calculate the pion and muon utilization efficiency taking into account the pion absorption in the primary target as well as all other losses of pions and muons in the converter and DT-cell walls. Preliminary estimations demonstrate the possibility to reach the level of 1014 n/s/cm{sup 2} for the neutron flux. (J.U.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 8 refs.

  1. The neutronic design and performance of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christopher M.

    Neutron scattering research is performed primarily at large-scale facilities. However, history has shown that smaller scale neutron scattering facilities can play a useful role in education and innovation while performing valuable materials research. This dissertation details the design and experimental validation of the LENS TMR as an example for a small scale accelerator driven neutron source. LENS achieves competitive long wavelength neutron intensities by employing a novel long pulse mode of operation, where the neutron production target is irradiated on a time scale comparable to the emission time of neutrons from the system. Monte Carlo methods have been employed to develop a design for optimal production of long wavelength neutrons from the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies ranging from 7 to 13 MeV proton energy. The neutron spectrum was experimentally measured using time of flight, where it is found that the impact of the long pulse mode on energy resolution can be eliminated at sub-eV neutron energies if the emission time distribution of neutron from the system is known. The emission time distribution from the TMR system is measured using a time focussed crystal analyzer. Emission time of the fundamental cold neutron mode is found to be consistent with Monte Carlo results. The measured thermal neutron spectrum from the water reflector is found to be in agreement with Monte Carlo predictions if the scattering kernels employed are well established. It was found that the scattering kernels currently employed for cryogenic methane are inadequate for accurate prediction of the cold neutron intensity from the system. The TMR and neutronic modeling have been well characterized and the source design is flexible, such that it is possible for LENS to serve as an effective test bed for future work in neutronic development. Suggestions for improvements to the design that would allow increased neutron flux into the instruments are provided.

  2. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Department of Reactor Materials, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-04-15

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  3. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.; Milasin, N.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  4. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10 7 . Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays

  5. Proton induction linacs as high-intensity neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Hoyer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Proton induction linacs are explored as high intensity neutron sources. The induction linac - concept, properties, experience with electrons, and possibilities - and its limitations for accelerating ions are reviewed. A number of proton induction linac designs are examined with the LIACEP program and general conclusions are given. Results suggest that a proton induction accelerator of the lowest voltage, consistent with good neutron flux, is preferred and could well be cost competitive with the usual rf linac/storage ring designs. (orig.)

  6. The Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux (φ th ∼ 9·10 19 m -2 ·s -1 ) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux (φ th ∼ 8 x 10 19 m -2 ·s -1 ) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research

  8. Fissile material detection and control facility with pulsed neutron sources and digital data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romodanov, V.L.; Chernikova, D.N.; Afanasiev, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    of a radioisotope source operation. Those include impossibility to shut down the neutron flux during the downtime and transportation of the facility, as well as the necessity to guard the source. In addition, the measurement chamber of the facility is insufficiently large to inspect fissile materials samples placed in protective A T-400 type containers; also, in case the source is damaged, the premises could be contaminated. Elimination of these disadvantages concurrently with increasing the information capability of the coincidence count systems can be achieved by the use of digital technology to detect the response of fissile materials neutrons and photons in fast scintillation systems, and application of a DD neutron generator. The use of scintillators allows detecting also fission photons, beside neutrons, which increases the multiplicity of particles, and hence, efficiency of the facility.

  9. Technical design report of spallation neutron source facility in J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Shinichi

    2012-02-01

    One of the experimental facilities in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF), where high-intensity neutron beams are used as powerful probes for basic research on materials and life science, as well as research and development in industrial engineering. Neutrons are generated with nuclear spallation reaction by bombarding a mercury target with high-intensity proton beams. The neutrons are slowed down with supercritical hydrogen moderators and then extracted as beams to each experimental apparatus. The principal design of the spallation neutron source is compiled in this comprehensive report. (author)

  10. A fission ionization detector for neutron flux measurements at a spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Balestrini, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Brown, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Haight, R.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Laymon, C.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Lee, T.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Lisowski, P.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); McCorkle, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Nelson, R.O. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Parker, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Hill, N.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-11-15

    The construction of a neutron flux monitor that can measure absolute neutron intensities in the neutron energy range from below 1 MeV to over 500 MeV is described. The detector consists of an ionization chamber with several thin deposits of fissionable material. The ionization chamber is thin enough that it does not significantly affect the neutron beam and may be left in the neutron flight path during experimental measurements to continuously monitor the beam flux. The use of this monitor at the continuous-energy spallation neutron source at the WNR target area at LAMPF is described. (orig.)

  11. A fission ionization detector for neutron flux measurements at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Balestrini, S.; Brown, A.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Lee, T.M.; Lisowski, P.W.; McCorkle, W.; Nelson, R.O.; Parker, W.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-01-01

    The construction of a neutron flux monitor that can measure absolute neutron intensities in the neutron energy range from below 1 MeV to over 500 MeV is described. The detector consists of an ionization chamber with several thin deposits of fissionable material. The ionization chamber is thin enough that it does not significantly affect the neutron beam and may be left in the neutron flight path during experimental measurements to continuously monitor the beam flux. The use of this monitor at the continuous-energy spallation neutron source at the WNR target area at LAMPF is described. (orig.)

  12. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  13. Electron accelerator shielding design of KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhao Peng; Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of the Ukraine have been collaborating on the design, development and construction of a neutron source facility at Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100-MeV electrons. The facility was designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building was designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 5.0e-03 mSv/h during operation. The main source of the biological dose for the accelerator building is the photons and neutrons generated from different interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and the accelerator sections with the surrounding components and materials. The Monte Carlo N-particle extended code (MCNPX) was used for the shielding calculations because of its capability to perform electron-, photon-, and neutron-coupled transport simulations. The photon dose was tallied using the MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is very small, ∼0.01 neutron for 100-MeV electron and even smaller for lower-energy electrons. This causes difficulties for the Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation resources for tallying the neutron dose outside the shield boundary with an acceptable accuracy. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were utilized for this study. The generated neutrons were banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron dose. The weight windows variance reduction technique was also utilized for both neutron and photon dose

  14. The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), slated for construction start in 1994, will be a multipurpose neutron research laboratory serving academic and industrial users in chemistry, biology, condensed matter physics, nuclear and fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, and many other fields. It will be centered on the world's highest flux neutron beam reactor, operating at 330 MW, with careful design integration between the neutron source and the experiment systems. Many instruments will be situated in low backgrounds at distances up to 80 m from the reactor, using neutron guides with tailored neutron optical coatings for beam transport. Apart from the many stations for neutron scattering research, specialized stations will also be provided for isotope separation on-line, experiments with liquid hydrogen targets, neutron optical techniques such as interferometry, activation analysis, depth profiling, and positron production. Careful consideration has been given to providing a good research environment for visiting scientists, including easy access to the experimental areas, while maintaining a highly secure nuclear facility. This paper will describe the reactor and experimental facilities and give some examples of the types of research for which ANS has been designed

  15. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations for neutron flux in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Y.S.; Mishra, Abhishek; Singh, Tej

    2016-06-01

    Dhruva is a 100 MW th tank type research reactor with natural metallic uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector. The reactor is utilized for production of a large variety of radioisotopes for fulfilling growing demands of various applications in industrial, agricultural and medicinal sectors, and neutron beam research in condensed matter physics. The core consists of two on-power tray rods for radioisotope production and fifteen experimental beam holes for neutron beam research. Recently, a self-serve facility has also been commissioned in one of the through tubes in the reactor for carrying out short term irradiations. To get accurate information about neutron flux spectrum, measurements have been carried out in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor. The present report describes measurement method, analysis technique and results. Theoretical estimations for neutron flux were also carried out and a comparison between theoretical and experimental results is made. (author)

  16. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  17. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99 Mo is the parent isotope of 99m Tc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  18. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  19. Neutron resonance transmission spectroscopy with high spatial and energy resolution at the J-PARC pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Ooi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kamiyama, T.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Shiota, Y. [Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8 Kita-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2014-05-11

    The sharp variation of neutron attenuation at certain energies specific to particular nuclides (the lower range being from ∼1 eV up to ∼1 keV), can be exploited for the remote mapping of element and/or isotope distributions, as well as temperature probing, within relatively thick samples. Intense pulsed neutron beam-lines at spallation sources combined with a high spatial, high-timing resolution neutron counting detector, provide a unique opportunity to measure neutron transmission spectra through the time-of-flight technique. We present the results of experiments where spatially resolved neutron resonances were measured, at energies up to 50 keV. These experiments were performed with the intense flux low background NOBORU neutron beamline at the J-PARC neutron source and the high timing resolution (∼20 ns at epithermal neutron energies) and spatial resolution (∼55 µm) neutron counting detector using microchannel plates coupled to a Timepix electronic readout. Simultaneous element-specific imaging was carried out for several materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼150 µm. The high timing resolution of our detector combined with the low background beamline, also enabled characterization of the neutron pulse itself – specifically its pulse width, which varies with neutron energy. The results of our measurements are in good agreement with the predicted results for the double pulse structure of the J-PARC facility, which provides two 100 ns-wide proton pulses separated by 600 ns, broadened by the neutron energy moderation process. Thermal neutron radiography can be conducted simultaneously with resonance transmission spectroscopy, and can reveal the internal structure of the samples. The transmission spectra measured in our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of mapping elemental distributions using this non-destructive technique, for those elements (and in certain cases, specific isotopes), which have resonance energies below a few keV, and with lower

  20. Calculation of fast neutron flux in reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, P. C. [Canadian General Electric (Canada)

    1968-07-15

    The computer program EPITHET was used to calculate the fast neutron flux (>1 MeV) in several reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities in order to compare the fast neutron flux in the different cases and to provide a self-consistent set of flux values which may be used to relate creep strain to fast neutron flux . The facilities considered are shown below together with the calculated fast neutron flux (>1 MeV). Fast flux 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}s: NPD 1.14, Douglas Point 2.66, Pickering 2.89, Gentilly 2.35, SGHWR 3.65, NRU U-1 and U-2 3.25'' pressure tube - 19 element fuel 3.05, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 28 element fuel 3.18, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 18 element fuel 2.90, NRX X-5 0.88, PRTR Mk I fuel 2.81, PRTR HPD fuel 3.52, WR-1 2.73, Mk IV creep machine (NRX) 0.85, Mk VI creep machine (NRU) 2.04, Biaxial creep insert (NRU U-49) 2.61.

  1. The Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multipurpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotope production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The ANS will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high-intensity research reactor. But this reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users from all parts of the nation and the world, placed in a stimulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use

  2. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world's best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world's best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using 64 Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet

  3. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux at n{sub T}OF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Sezione di Bari, INFN, Bari (Italy); Guerrero, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Tarrio, D.; Duran, I.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Altstadt, S.; Goebel, K.; Langer, C.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [Uniwersytet Lodzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Leong, L.S.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Becares, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Belloni, F.; Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Papaevangelou, T. [Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Billowes, J.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bosnar, D.; Zugec, P. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Riego, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Sarmento, R.; Vaz, P. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Sabate-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Giubrone, G.; Tain, J.L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dzysiuk, N.; Mastinu, P.F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Rome (Italy); Eleftheriadis, C.; Manousos, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ganesan, S.; Gurusamy, P.; Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wien (AT); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Jenkins, D.G.; Vermeulen, M.J. [University of York, Heslington, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (DE); Koehler, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge (US); Lederer, C. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Massimi, C.; Mingrone, F.; Vannini, G. [Universita di Bologna (IT); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (IT); Mengoni, A.; Ventura, A. [Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l' energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Bologna (IT); Milazzo, P.M. [Sezione di Trieste, INFN, Trieste (IT); Mirea, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Mondalaers, W.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, European Commission JRC, Geel (BE); Pavlik, A.; Wallner, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Rauscher, T. [University of Basel, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Basel (CH); Roman, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (IT); Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE)

    2013-12-15

    The neutron flux of the n{sub T}OF facility at CERN was measured, after installation of the new spallation target, with four different systems based on three neutron-converting reactions, which represent accepted cross sections standards in different energy regions. A careful comparison and combination of the different measurements allowed us to reach an unprecedented accuracy on the energy dependence of the neutron flux in the very wide range (thermal to 1 GeV) that characterizes the n{sub T}OF neutron beam. This is a pre-requisite for the high accuracy of cross section measurements at n{sub T}OF. An unexpected anomaly in the neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U is observed in the energy region between 10 and 30keV, hinting at a possible overestimation of this important cross section, well above currently assigned uncertainties. (orig.)

  4. Small accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, Richard C.

    1997-09-01

    Small neutron sources could be used by individual researchers with the convenience of an adequate local facility. Although these sources would produce lower fluxes than the national facilities, for selected applications, the convenience and availability may overcome the limitations on source strength. Such sources might also be useful for preliminary testing of ideas before going to a larger facility. Recent developments in small, high-current pulsed accelerators makes possible such a local source for pulsed cold neutrons.

  5. The advanced neutron source facility: Safety philosophy and studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is currently the only new civilian nuclear reactor facility proposed for construction in the United States. Even though the thermal power of this research-oriented reactor is a relatively low 300 MW, the design will undoubtedly receive intense scrutiny before construction is allowed to proceed. Safety studies are already under way to ensure that the maximum degree of safety in incorporated into the design and that the design is acceptable to the Department of Energy (DOE) and can meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This document discusses these safety studies

  6. Very high flux steady state reactor and accelerator based sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Simos, N.; Shapiro, S.; Hastings, J.

    2004-01-01

    With the number of steady state neutron sources in the US declining (including the demise of the Bnl HFBR) the remaining intense sources are now in Europe (i.e. reactors - ILL and FMR, accelerator - PSI). The intensity of the undisturbed thermal flux for sources currently in operation ranges from 10 14 n/cm 2 *s to 10 15 n/cm 2 *s. The proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) was to be a high power reactor (about 350 MW) with a projected undisturbed thermal flux of 7*10 15 n/cm 2 *s but never materialized. The objective of the current study is to explore the requirements and implications of two source concepts with an undisturbed flux of 10 16 n/cm 2 *s. The first is a reactor based concept operating at high power density (10 MW/l - 15 MW/l) and a total power of 100 MW - 250 MW, depending on fissile enrichment. The second is an accelerator based concept relying on a 1 GeV - 1.5 GeV proton Linac with a total beam power of 40 MW and a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic target. In the reactor source study, the effects of fissile material enrichment, coolant temperature and pressure drop, and estimates of pressure vessel stress levels will be investigated. The fuel form for the reactor will be different from all other operating source reactors in that it is proposed to use an infiltrated graphitic structure, which has been developed for nuclear thermal propulsion reactor applications. In the accelerator based source the generation of spallation products and their activation levels, and the material damage sustained by the beam window will be investigated. (authors)

  7. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  8. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment.

  9. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment

  10. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsmiedl, E.; Gobrecht, K.

    2001-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis, close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 litres of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10 from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very improbable during the life time of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H2) to the deuterium (D2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. A long term change of the hydrogen content in the deuterium is avoided be storing the mixture not in a gas buffer volume but as a metal hydride at low pressure. The metal hydride storage system contains two getter beds, one with 250 kg of LaCo3Ni2, the other one with 150 kg of ZrCo(0.8)Ni(0.2). Each bed can take the total gas inventory, both beds together can absorb the total gas inventory in less than 6 minutes at a pressure < 3 bar. (orig.)

  11. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Four energy group neutron flux distribution in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor using the WIMSD4 and CITATION code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D (R, θ , Z) neutronic model for the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) was developed earlier to conduct the reactor neutronic analysis. The group constants for all the reactor components were generated using the WIMSD4 code. The reactor excess reactivity and the four group neutron flux distributions were calculated using the CITATION code. This model is used in this paper to calculate the point wise four energy group neutron flux distributions in the MNSR versus the radius, angle and reactor axial directions. Good agreement is noticed between the measured and the calculated thermal neutron flux in the inner and the outer irradiation site with relative difference less than 7% and 5% respectively. (author)

  13. Thermal neutron source study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The value of intense neutron beams for condensed matter research is discussed with emphasis on the complementary nature of steady state and pulsed neutron sources. A large body of information on neutron sources, both existing and planned, is then summarized under four major headings: fission reactors, electron accelerators with heavy metal targets, pulsed spallation sources and 'steady state' spallation sources. Although the cost of a spallation source is expected to exceed that of a fission reactor of the same flux by a factor of two, there are significant advantages for a spallation device such as the proposed Electronuclear Materials Test Facility (EMTF)

  14. Advanced neutron source project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorynina, L.V.; Proskuryakov, S.F.; Tishchenko, V.A.; Uzhanova, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The project of the ANS improved neutron source intended for fundamental researches in nuclear physics and materials testing is considered. New superhigh-flux heavy-water 350 MW reactor is used for the source creation. The standard fuel is uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ). Reactor core volume equals 67.4 l and average power density is 4.9 MW/l. Neutron flux density is 10 16 neutron/(cm 2 xs). The facility construction begin is planned for 1996. The first experiments should be accomplished in 2000

  15. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergueiro, J.; Igarzabal, M.; Suarez Sandin, J.C.; Somacal, H.R.; Thatar Vento, V.; Huck, H.; Valda, A.A.; Repetto, M.

    2011-01-01

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  16. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergueiro, J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Igarzabal, M.; Suarez Sandin, J.C. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina); Somacal, H.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina); Thatar Vento, V. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Huck, H.; Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin (Argentina); Repetto, M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  17. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergueiro, J; Igarzabal, M; Sandin, J C Suarez; Somacal, H R; Vento, V Thatar; Huck, H; Valda, A A; Repetto, M; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Upgrade of the compact neutron spectrometer for high flux environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenko, M.; Bellucci, A.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; Gariano, G.; Gatti, F.; Girolami, M.; Minutoli, S.; Panza, F.; Pillon, M.; Ripani, M.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new version of the 6Li-based neutron spectrometer for high flux environments is described. The new spectrometer was built with commercial single crystal Chemical Vapour Deposition diamonds of electronic grade. These crystals feature better charge collection as well as higher radiation hardness. New metal contacts approaching ohmic conditions were deposited on the diamonds suppressing build-up of space charge observed in the previous prototypes. New passive preamplification of the signal at detector side was implemented to improve its resolution. This preamplification is based on the RF transformer not sensitive to high neutron flux. The compact mechanical design allowed to reduce detector size to a tube of 1 cm diameter and 13 cm long. The spectrometer was tested in the thermal column of TRIGA reactor and at the DD neutron generator. The test results indicate an energy resolution of 300 keV (FWHM), reduced to 72 keV (RMS) excluding energy loss, and coincidence timing resolution of 160 ps (FWHM). The measured data are in agreement with Geant4 simulations except for larger energy loss tail presumably related to imperfections of metal contacts and glue expansion.

  19. Temporal variation of the neutron flux in the carousel facility of a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacimovic, R.; Stegnar, P.; Trkov, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we focused on identifying quantitatively the temporal (time-dependent) variation of neutron flux in the carousel facility (CF) of TRIGA reactor at the 'Jozef Stefan' Institute (IJS) for core No. 176, set up in April 2002. The measurements are based on neutron detectors (ionisation chambers), which surround the graphite reflector of the reactor core. In principle, the variations of the neutron flux produce a systematic error in the results obtained by absolute or 'quasi' absolute measuring techniques (such as neutron activation analysis (NAA) by the k 0 -standardization method), which assume constant conditions during irradiation. The results of our study show that for typical irradiation of 20 hours in channels of the CF aligned in the direction of the ionisation chamber (safety channel) the time-dependent variation of the neutron flux is about 6-8%. In the k 0 method, which we are using for routine work at the IJS, this variation introduced a systematic error in the results up to 4.6%, depending on the half-life of investigated radionuclide. (author)

  20. Fundamental design of systems and facilities for cold neutron source in the Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I

    2006-01-15

    The CNS(Cold Neutron Source) development project has been carried out as the partial project of the reactor utilization R and D government enterprise since 2003. In the advantage of lower energy and long wave length for the cold neutron, it can be used with the essential tool in order to investigate the structure of protein, amino-acid, DNA, super lightweight composite and advanced materials in the filed of high technology. This report is mainly focused on the basic design of the systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source, performed during the second fiscal project year.

  1. Fundamental design of systems and facilities for cold neutron source in the Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I.

    2006-01-01

    The CNS(Cold Neutron Source) development project has been carried out as the partial project of the reactor utilization R and D government enterprise since 2003. In the advantage of lower energy and long wave length for the cold neutron, it can be used with the essential tool in order to investigate the structure of protein, amino-acid, DNA, super lightweight composite and advanced materials in the filed of high technology. This report is mainly focused on the basic design of the systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source, performed during the second fiscal project year

  2. Analysis of neutron propagation from the skyshine port of a fusion neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakisaka, M. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan); Kaneko, J. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: kin@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Fujita, F. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Yoshida, S. [Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hirastuka, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292 (Japan); Sawamura, T. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    The process of neutron leaking from a 14MeV neutron source facility was analyzed by calculations and experiments. The experiments were performed at the Fusion Neutron Source (FNS) facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Japan, which has a port on the roof for skyshine experiments, and a {sup 3}He counter surrounded with a polyethylene moderator of different thicknesses was used to estimate the energy spectra and dose distributions. The {sup 3}He counter with a 3-cm-thick moderator was also used for dose measurements, and the doses evaluated by the counter counts and the calculated count-to-dose conversion factor agreed with the calculations to within {approx}30%. The dose distribution was found to fit a simple analytical expression, D(r)=Q{sub D}exp(-r/{lambda}{sub D})r and the parameters Q{sub D} and {lambda}{sub D} are discussed.

  3. A high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Glossop, B.H.

    1981-06-01

    Commissioning tests involving deformation studies and tests to destruction as well as neutron diffraction measurements of a standard sample have been carried out on the SERC high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering studies. A detailed description of the pressurising equipment is given. (author)

  4. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Biewer, Theodore M.; Caughman, John B.; Chen, Guangye; Owen, Larry W.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

  5. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γ p 10 23 m -3 s -1 , and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of ∼10 MW/m 2 . An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to ∼0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10 19 m -3 in He and 2.5x10 19 m -3 in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  6. Dense granular Flows: a conceptual design of high-power neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-power neutron source system is very useful for multifunctional applications, such as material facilities for advanced nuclear power, space radiation studies, radiography and tomography. Here the idea of inclined dense granular flow is utilized and developed in a new conceptual design of a compact high-power target to produce a high-energy and high-flux neutron irradiation (the flux is up to 1015 n/cm2/s or even 1016. Comparing to the traditional solid and liquid heavy metal targets, this design has advantages in material choice, fluid stability, heat removal, etc. In this paper the natures of the granular flows in an inclined chute are investigated and preliminary experimental and numerical results are reported. Then the feasibility of this design is discussed.

  7. Neutron flux enhancement at LASREF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility produces a 1-mA beam of protons at an energy of 800 MeV. Since 1985, the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has made use of the neutron flux that is generated as the incident protons interact with the nuclei in targets and a copper beam stop. A variety of basic and applied experiments in radiation damage and radiation effects have been completed. Recent studies indicate that the flux at LASREF can be increased by at least a factor of ten from the present level of about 5 E+17 m -2 s -1 . This requires changing the beam-stop material from Cu to W and optimizing the geometry of the beam-target interaction region. These studies are motivated by the need for a large volume, high energy, and high intensity neutron source in the development of materials for advanced energy concepts such as fusion reactors. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Neutron flux enhancement at LASREF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Ferguson, P.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)); Wechsler, M.S. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physiscs Facility produces a 1 mA beam of protons at an energy of 800 MeV. Since 1985, the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has made use of the neutron flux that is generated as the incident protons interact with the targets and a copper beam stop. A variety of basic and applied experiments in radiation damage and radiation effects have been completed. Recent studies indicate that the flux at LASREF can be increased by at least a factor of 10 from the present level of about 5 E + 17 m[sup -2] s[sup -1]. This requires changing the beam stop material from Cu to W and optimizing the geometry of the beam-target interaction region. These studies are motivated by the need for a large volume, high energy, and high intensity neutron source in the development of materials for advanced energy concepts such as fusion reactors. (orig.).

  9. Characterization of a high repetition-rate laser-driven short-pulsed neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, J.; Nees, J. A.; Hammig, M. D.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a repetitive, high flux, short-pulsed laser-driven neutron source using a heavy-water jet target. We measure neutron generation at 1/2 kHz repetition rate using several-mJ pulse energies, yielding a time-averaged neutron flux of 2 × 105 neutrons s‑1 (into 4π steradians). Deuteron spectra are also measured in order to understand source characteristics. Analyses of time-of-flight neutron spectra indicate that two separate populations of neutrons, ‘prompt’ and ‘delayed’, are generated at different locations. Gamma-ray emission from neutron capture 1H(n,γ) is also measured to confirm the neutron flux.

  10. Final report of the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] irradiation facilities improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987

  11. A deuteron linac for a high-intensity neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Lancaster, H.; Main, R.; Selph, F.; Smith, L.; Voelker, F.; Yourd, R.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary design of an accelerator suitable to meet the flux and neutron energy requirements of a CTR materials test facility is presented. The specifications of such a facility call for a neutron flux of 10 14 n/cm 2 -sec distributed over an area of about 10 2 cm 2 with a neutron spectrum similar to that anticipated from a fusion reactor. A 30 MeV deuteron linac producing a CW beam of 125 mA, upgradable to 40 MeV at 250 mA at a later date, would produce the relatively broad spectrum of neutrons at the required intensity. Attention to the low-energy beam intercept on the drift tubes and diffusive losses producing neutrons and attendant activation problems are discussed

  12. Beam plug replacement and alignment under high radiation conditions for cold neutron facilities at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeong-Garp, Cho; Jin-Won, Shin; Jung-Hee, Lee; Jeong-Soo, Ryu

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of a 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating for 15 years since its initial criticality in February 1995. The beam port assigned for the cold neutron at HANARO had been used for an 8-m SANS without neutron guides until it was replaced by a cold neutron guide system in 2008. It was developed a cold neutron guide system for the delivery of cold neutrons from the cold neutron source in the reactor to the neutron scattering instruments in the guide hall. Since the HANARO has been operated from 1995, it was a big challenge to replace the existing plug and shutter with the new facilities under high radiation conditions. When the old plug was removed from the beam port in 2008, the radiation level was 230 mSv/hr at the end of beam port. In addition to that, there were more difficult situations such as the poor as-built dimensions of the beam port, limited work space and time constraint due to other constructions in parallel in the reactor hall. Before the removal of the old plug the level of the radiation was measured coming out through a small hole of the plug to estimate the radiation level during the removal of the old plug and installation of a new plug. Based on the measurement and analysis results, special tools and various shielding facilities were developed for the removal of old in-pile plug and the installation of the new in-pile plug assembly safely. In 2008, the old plug and shutter were successfully replaced by the new plug and shutter as shown in this article with a minimum exposure to the workers. A laser tracker system was also one of the main factors in our successful installation and alignment under high radiation conditions and limited work space. The laser tracker was used to measure and align all the mechanical facilities and the neutron guides with a minimum radiation exposure to workers. The alignment of all the guides and accessories were possible during reactor operation because

  13. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  14. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  15. High energy neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  16. Irradiation facilities at the spallation neutron source SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.; Ledermann, J.; Aebersold, H.; Kuehne, G.; Kohlik, K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Four independent experiments for sample irradiation are under construction and in preparation for operational tests at the spallation source SINQ. Three of them are located inside a thermal beam port with end positions inside or near the moderator tank. The other experiment will be established at the end position of a super mirror lined neutron guide for applications with cold neutrons. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  17. The advanced neutron source - A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The advanced neutron source (ANS) is a new facility being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is based on a heavy-water-moderated reactor and extensive experiment and user-support facilities. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide world-class facilities for neutron scattering research, isotope production, and materials irradiation in the United States. The neutrons provided by the reactor will be thermalized to produce sources of hot, thermal, cold, very cold, and ultracold neutrons usable at the experiment stations. Beams of cold neutrons will be directed into a large guide hall using neutron guide technology, greatly enhancing the number of research stations possible in the project. Fundamental and nuclear physics, materials analysis, and other research pro- grams will share the neutron beam facilities. Sufficient laboratory and office space will be provided to create an effective user-oriented environment

  18. Spallation Neutron Sources For Science And Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Facilities Increasing interest has been noticed in spallation neutron sources (SNS) during the past 20 years. The system includes high current proton accelerator in the GeV region and spallation heavy metal target in the Hg-Bi region. Among high flux currently operating SNSs are: ISIS in UK (1985), SINQ in Switzerland (1996), JSNS in Japan (2008), and SNS in USA (2010). Under construction is the European spallation source (ESS) in Sweden (to be operational in 2020). The intense neutron beams provided by SNSs have the advantage of being of non-reactor origin, are of continuous (SINQ) or pulsed nature. Combined with state-of-the-art neutron instrumentation, they have a diverse potential for both scientific research and diverse applications. Why Neutrons? Neutrons have wavelengths comparable to interatomic spacings (1-5 A) Neutrons have energies comparable to structural and magnetic excitations (1-100 meV) Neutrons are deeply penetrating (bulk samples can be studied) Neutrons are scattered with a strength that varies from element to element (and isotope to isotope) Neutrons have a magnetic moment (study of magnetic materials) Neutrons interact only weakly with matter (theory is easy) Neutron scattering is therefore an ideal probe of magnetic and atomic structures and excitations Neutron Producing Reactions Several nuclear reactions are capable of producing neutrons. However the use of protons minimises the energetic cost of the neutrons produced solid state physics and astrophysics Inelastic neutron scattering

  19. Deuteron beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1996-01-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (≥14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities. (orig.)

  20. Deuteron beam interaction with Li jet for a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1995-09-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (>14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities

  1. Status of spallation neutron source program in High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and High Energy Accelerator Organization are jointly designing a 1 MW spallation neutron source as one of the research facilities planned in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project. The spallation neutron source is driven by 3 GeV proton beam with a mercury target and liquid hydrogen moderators. The present status of design for these spallation source and relevant facility is overviewed. (author)

  2. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ~100 keV. The characteristics of these sources

  3. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ∼100 keV. The characteristics of these sources, and

  4. TMI-2 source and intermediate range neutron flux monitors data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    This is a report on the preparation of data from the TMI-2 excore source and intermediate range neutron flux monitors for inclusion into the TMI Data Base. The sources of the as-recorded data are discussed as well as the process of transforming these data into digital form. The corrections to the as-recorded data are given and the data quality classification and uncertainty are established. The identifiers attached to each data set in the TMI Data Base are given

  5. High energy cosmic rays: sources and fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the production of a unique energy spectrum of the high energy cosmic rays detected with air showers by shifting the energy estimates of different detectors. After such a spectrum is generated we fit the spectrum with three or four populations of cosmic rays that might be accelerated at different cosmic ray sources. We also present the chemical composition that the fits of the spectrum generates and discuss some new data sets presented this summer at the ICRC in Rio de Janeiro that may require new global fits.

  6. Intense fusion neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  7. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  8. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6 MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The 6 MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e-{gamma} target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in {gamma}-n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium at different scattering angles. Angular distribution of neutron flux indicates that the flux decreases with increase in the angle and are in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  9. Measurement of the neutron flux distributions, epithermal index, Westcott thermal neutron flux in the irradiation capsules of hydraulic conveyer (Hyd) and pneumatic tubes (Pn) facilities of the KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Hiroshi

    2001-05-01

    The reactions of Au(n, γ) 198 Au and Ti(n, p) 47 or 48 Sc were used for the measurements of the thermal and epithermal (thermal + epithermal) and the fast neutron flux distributions, respectively. In the case of Hyd (Hydraulic conveyer), the thermal + epithermal and fast neutron flux distributions in the horizontal direction in the capsule are especially flat; the distortion of the fluxes are 0.6% and 5.4%, respectively. However, these neutron fluxes in the vertical direction are low at the top and high at the bottom of the capsule. These differences between the top and bottom are 14% for both distributions. On the other hand, in polyethylene capsules of Pn-1, 2, 3 (Pneumatic tubes Nos. 1, 2, 3), in contrast with Hyd, these neutron flux distributions in the horizontal direction have gradients of 8 - 18% per 2.5 cm diameter, and those on the vertical axis have a distortion of approximately 5%. The strength of the epithermal dE/E component relative to the neutron density including both thermal and epithermal neutrons, i.e., the epithermal index, for the hydraulic conveyer (Hyd) and pneumatic tube No.2 (Pn-2), in which the irradiation experiments can be achieved, are determined by the multiple foil activation method using the reactions of Au(n, γ) 198 Au and Co(n, γ) 60(m+g) Co. The epithermal index observed in an aluminum capsule of Hyd is 0.034-0.04, and the Westcott thermal neutron flux is 1.2x10 14 cm -2 sec -1 at approximately 1 cm above the bottom. The epithermal index in a Pn-2 polyethylene capsule was measured by not only the multiple foil activation method but also the Cd-ratio method in which the Au(n, γ) 198 Au reaction in a cadmium cover is also used. The epithermal index is 0.045 - 0.055, and the thermal neutron flux is 1.8x10 13 cm -2 sec -1 . (J.P.N.)

  10. The increase of the subthermal neutron flux by using a cold neutron source at the FRG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, A.; Turgut, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The increase of the subthermal neutron flux (wavelength range 4-6 A by a cold neutron source (CNS) at a radial beam tube of the FRG-1 reactor is investigated in combination with different reflectors (H 2 O, C, Be, D 2 O). Advantage factors on the basis of the directed neutron flux, resulting from the use of the CNS, are calculated for various configurations. In addition, the influence of different scattering models (gas, Koppel/Young) for the CNS, group structure, and structural materials are described. Finally, the CNS assembly which is going to be installed at the FRG-1 is treated in detail. For the calculations the transport code NEUTRA and the spectral code GGC-4 are used. (orig.) [de

  11. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium

  12. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H., E-mail: hannes@adelphitech.com [Adelphi Technology, 2003 E Bayshore Rd, Redwood City, CA 94063 (United States); Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K. [Adelphi Technology, 2003 E Bayshore Rd, Redwood City, CA 94063 (United States); Jones, Glenn [G& J Jones Enterprice, 7486 Brighton Ct, Dublin, CA 94568 (United States); Pantell, Richard H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3–5 · 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 10{sup 10} n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  13. Radiation protection aspects of a high flux, fast neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M.; Torti, R.P.; Chenevert, G.M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Kelsey, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    During the development and operation of a gas target, DT neutron generator for use in cancer therapy, two radiation hazards were routinely encountered - personnel exposure to neutrons and to tritium. The principal hazard was irradiation by fast neutrons. By assembling the source below ground level, adding shielding and the use of a controlled access, key identification interlock, the neutron hazard has been reduced. With the present source strength of 2 x 10 12 n/sec, an average neutron dose rate in the control room of 20 mrem/hr was measured- a level compatible with a limited run schedule. The second hazard was exposure to tritium in both gaseous and solid forms. A target inventory of 90 Ci, and overall inventory of 500 Ci, and the need to modify and repair the generator present significant potential hazard due to tritium exposure. The use of protective gloves, wipe tests, urine assays, continuous room air monitoring, and equipment decontamination minimized personnel exposure and effectively confined contamination. The dose due to tritium has been ∼ 0.5 rem/year and negligible spread of contamination has occurred

  14. Transmutation studies of minor actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fioni, G.; Bolognese, T.; Cribier, M.; Marie, F.; Roettger, S.; Faust, H.; Leconte, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    Integral measurements of nuclear data and of the transmutation potential in specific neutron fluxes, constitute the fastest and essential way to overcome to the large uncertainties present in the nuclear data libraries. In the frame of the activities of the Directorate for Science of Matter (DSM) of the French Atomic Energy Authority (CEA), a new project is proposed so as to carry out integral measurements relevant for nuclear waste transmutation systems. A new beam tube will be installed to irradiate actinides and fission fragment samples at different distances from the fuel element of the ILL reactor. Variable neutron energy spectra could then be obtained by choosing the distance between the sample and the fuel element, opening the way to the determination of the ideal physical conditions to incinerate nuclear waste in hybrid transmutation systems. (author)

  15. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  16. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T., E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  17. NECTAR—A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/ D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  18. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Using high current, c.w. linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the Accelerator Based Neutron Research Facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 10 16 n/cm 2 .s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of multi-beam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  19. Preliminary considerations of an intense slow positron facility based on a 78Kr loop in the high flux isotopes reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.; Peretz, F.J.; Montgomery, B.H.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Suggestions have been made to the National Steering Committee for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) by Mills that provisions be made to install a high intensity slow positron facility, based on a 78 Kr loop, that would be available to the general community of scientists interested in this field. The flux of thermal neutrons calculated for the ANS is E + 15 sec -1 m -2 , which Mills has estimated will produce 5 mm beam of slow positrons having a current of about 1 E + 12 sec -1 . The intensity of such a beam will be a least 3 orders of magnitude greater than those presently available. The construction of the ANS is not anticipated to be complete until the year 2000. In order to properly plan the design of the ANS, strong considerations are being given to a proof-of-principle experiment, using the presently available High Flux Isotopes Reactor, to test the 78 Kr loop technique. The positron current from the HFIR facility is expected to be about 1 E + 10 sec -1 , which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than any other available. If the experiment succeeds, a very valuable facility will be established, and important formation will be generated on how the ANS should be designed. 3 refs., 1 fig

  20. High-current negative-ion sources for pulsed spallation neutron sources: LBNL workshop, October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high-power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 kW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H- source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The I to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. The Workshop reported on here, held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H- source technologies, and identified necessary R ampersand D efforts to bridge the gap

  1. The neutron small-angle camera D11 at the high-flux reactor, Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    The neutron small-angle scattering system at the high-flux reactor in Grenoble consists of three major parts: the supply of cold neutrons via bent neutron guides; the small-angle camera D11; and the data handling facilities. The camera D11 has an overall length of 80 m. The effective length of the camera is variable. The full length of the collimator before the fixed sample position can be reduced by movable neutron guides; the second flight path of 40 m full length contains detector sites in various positions. Thus a large range of momentum transfers can be used with the same relative resolution. Scattering angles between 5 x 10 -4 and 0.5 rad and neutron wavelengths from 0.2 to 2.0 nm are available. A large-area position-sensitive detector is used which allows simultaneous recording of intensities scattered at different angles; it is a multiwire proportional chamber. 3808 elements of 1 cm 2 are arranged in a two-dimensional matrix. (Auth.)

  2. Neutron flux and gamma dose measurement in the BNCT irradiation facility at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Ferrari, M.; Postuma, I.; Fatemi, S.; Prata, M.; Ballarini, F.; Carante, M. P.; Farias, R.; González, S. J.; Marrale, M.; Gallo, S.; Bartolotta, A.; Iacoviello, G.; Nigg, D.; Altieri, S.

    2018-01-01

    University of Pavia is equipped with a TRIGA Mark II research nuclear reactor, operating at a maximum steady state power of 250 kW. It has been used for many years to support Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. An irradiation facility was constructed inside the thermal column of the reactor to produce a sufficient thermal neutron flux with low epithermal and fast neutron components, and low gamma dose. In this irradiation position, the liver of two patients affected by hepatic metastases from colon carcinoma were irradiated after borated drug administration. The facility is currently used for cell cultures and small animal irradiation. Measurements campaigns have been carried out, aimed at characterizing the neutron spectrum and the gamma dose component. The neutron spectrum has been measured by means of multifoil neutron activation spectrometry and a least squares unfolding algorithm; gamma dose was measured using alanine dosimeters. Results show that in a reference position the thermal neutron flux is (1.20 ± 0.03) ×1010 cm-2 s-1 when the reactor is working at the maximum power of 250 kW, with the epithermal and fast components, respectively, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal component. The ratio of the gamma dose with respect to the thermal neutron fluence is 1.2 ×10-13 Gy/(n/cm2).

  3. Pulsed neutron sources for epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how accelerator based neutron sources, giving a fast neutron pulse of short duration compared to the neutron moderation time, promise to open up a new field of epithermal neutron scattering. The three principal methods of fast neutron production: electrons, protons and fission boosters will be compared. Pulsed reactors are less suitable for epithermal neutrons and will only be briefly mentioned. The design principle of the target producing fast neutrons, the moderator and reflector to slow them down to epithermal energies, and the cell with its beam tubes and shielding will all be described with examples taken from the new Harwell electron linac to be commissioned in 1978. A general comparison of pulsed neutron performance with reactors is fraught with difficulties but has been attempted. Calculation of the new pulsed source fluxes and pulse widths is now being performed but we have taken the practical course of basing all comparisons on extrapolations from measurements on the old 1958 Harwell electron linac. Comparisons for time-of-flight and crystal monochromator experiments show reactors to be at their best at long wavelengths, at coarse resolution, and for experiments needing a specific incident wavelength. Even existing pulsed sources are shown to compete with the high flux reactors in experiments where the hot neutron flux and the time-of-flight methods can be best exploited. The sources under construction can open a new field of inelastic neutron scattering based on energy transfer up to an electron volt and beyond

  4. Accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Iwasa, Hirokatsu; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    1979-01-01

    An accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron source was constructed. The accelerator is a 35 MeV electron linear accelerator with 1 kW average beam power. The cold neutron beam intensity at a specimen is equivalent to that of a research reactor of 10 14 n/cm 2 .s thermal flux in the case of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. In spite of some limitations to the universal uses, it has been demonstrated by this facility that the modest capacity accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron source is a highly efficient cold neutron source with low capital investment. Design philosophy, construction details, performance and some operational experiences are described. (author)

  5. High heat flux components with Be armour before and after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodato, A.; Derz, H.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium/copper mock-ups produced by different joining techniques have been tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH (Juelich Divertor Test Facility in Hot Cells) at Forschungszentrum Juelich. The experiments described in this paper represent the conclusive part of a test program started in 1994. The properties of non-irradiated Be/Cu joints have been characterised in a previous test campaign. Post-irradiation tests are now being carried out to investigate the neutron damage on the joints. The neutron irradiation on selected mock-ups has been carried out in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten (The Netherlands). Parametric finite element thermal analyses have been carried out to establish the allowable heat flux value to be applied during the tests. Screening tests up to power densities of ∼7 MW/m 2 and thermal fatigue tests up to 1000 cycles have been performed. None of these mock-ups showed any indication of failure. Post-mortem analyses (metallography, SEM) have also been conducted

  6. Proposal for the design of a small-angle neutron scattering facility at a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kley, W.

    1980-01-01

    The intensity-resolution-background considerations of an optimized small angle neutron scattering facility are reviewed for the special case of a pulsed neutron source. In the present proposal we conclude that for 'true elastic scattering experiments' filters can be used instead of expensive neutron guide tubes since low background conditions can be achieved by a combined action of filters as well as a proper time gating of the twodimensional detector. The impinging neutron beam is monochromatized by phasing a disk chopper to the neutron source pulses and in the scattered beam a second disk chopper is used to eliminate the inelastically scattered neutrons. Therefore, no time of fligh analysis is necessary for the scattered neutron intensity and true-elastic conditions are obtained by simply gating the two-dimensional detector. Considering a 4 m thick shield for the pulsed neutron source and choosing for optimum conditions a detector area element of (2.5 cm) 2 and a sample area of (1.25 cm) 2 , than for a minimum sample-detector-distance of 1.5 m, a maximum neutron source diameter of 6.67 cm is required in order to maintain always the optimum intensity- and resolution requirements

  7. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, Ronald E.; DeVan, B.; Munro, John K. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  8. Monitoring the fast neutrons in a high flux: The case for 242Pu fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Oriol, L.; Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.

    2009-01-01

    Fission chambers are widely used for on-line monitoring of neutron fluxes in irradiation reactors. A selective measurement of a component of interest of the neutron flux is possible in principle thanks to a careful choice of the deposit material. However, measuring the fast component is challenging when the flux is high (up to 10 15 n/cm 2 /s) with a significant thermal component. The main problem is that the isotopic content of a material selected for its good response to fast neutrons evolves with irradiation, so that the material is more and more sensitive to thermal neutrons. Within the framework of the FNDS (Fast Neutron Detector System) project, we design tools that simulate the evolution of the isotopic composition and fission rate for several deposits under any given flux. In the case of a high flux with a significant thermal component, 242 Pu is shown after a comprehensive study of all possibilities to be the best choice for measuring the fast component, as long as its purity is sufficient. If an estimate of the thermal flux is independently available, one can correct the signal for that component. This suggests a system of two detectors, one of which being used for such a correction. It is of very high interest when the detectors must be operated up to a high neutron fluence. (authors)

  9. Monitoring the fast neutrons in a high flux: The case for {sup 242}Pu fission chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Oriol, L.; Geslot, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/SPEX/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2009-07-01

    Fission chambers are widely used for on-line monitoring of neutron fluxes in irradiation reactors. A selective measurement of a component of interest of the neutron flux is possible in principle thanks to a careful choice of the deposit material. However, measuring the fast component is challenging when the flux is high (up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s) with a significant thermal component. The main problem is that the isotopic content of a material selected for its good response to fast neutrons evolves with irradiation, so that the material is more and more sensitive to thermal neutrons. Within the framework of the FNDS (Fast Neutron Detector System) project, we design tools that simulate the evolution of the isotopic composition and fission rate for several deposits under any given flux. In the case of a high flux with a significant thermal component, {sup 242}Pu is shown after a comprehensive study of all possibilities to be the best choice for measuring the fast component, as long as its purity is sufficient. If an estimate of the thermal flux is independently available, one can correct the signal for that component. This suggests a system of two detectors, one of which being used for such a correction. It is of very high interest when the detectors must be operated up to a high neutron fluence. (authors)

  10. Development of the RRR Cold Neutron Source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masriera, N.; Lecot, C.; Hergenreder, D.; Lovotti, O.; Serebrov, A.; Zakharov, A.; Mityukhlyaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspects of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself and the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions. The RRR-CNS has liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation Thermosiphon loop. The Thermosiphon is surrounded by a CNS Vacuum Containment made of zirconium alloy, that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The applied design approach allows ensuring that the RRR-CNS, in spite of being innovative, will meet all the design, performance and quality requirements. (author)

  11. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, J.T.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Harris, Jack L.; Williams, David J.; Jones, Glenn E.; Vainionpaa, J.H.; Fuller, Michael J.; Rothbart, George H.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Gough, R.A.; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-01-01

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  12. Utilization of cold neutron beams at intermediate flux reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of cold neutron beam (CNB) facilities at U.S. reactors [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1991; Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin, anticipated in 1992], it is appropriate to reexamine the types of research for which they are likely to be best suited or uniquely suited. With the exception of a small-angle neutron scattering facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, there has been no prior experience in the United States with such beams, but they have been extensively used at European reactors where cold neutron sources and neutron guides were developed some years age. This paper does not discuss specialized cases such as ultracold neutrons or very high flux facilities such as the Institute Laue-Langevin ractor and the proposed advanced neutron source. Instead, it concentrates on potential utilization of CNBs at intermediate-flux reactors such as at Cornell and Texas, i.e., in the 1-MW range and operated <24 h a day

  13. Determination of Neutron Flux Parameter f and α and k0 Factor in Irradiation Facility of RSG GA Siwabessy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Determination of neutron flux thermal to epithermal ratio f and parameter α and k 0 factor has been done in irradiation facility of RSG G.A. Siwabessy reactor. Those parameters are needed to determine the concentration of an element in a sample using k 0 NAA method. Parameters f was measured using foil activation method and α parameter was obtained from power function fitting at epithermal neutron spectrum. Based on the fitting method the a parameter was determined of 0.0267,0.0255 and -0.0346 at system rabbit, IP2 and CIP irradiation position. The k 0 factor is depended on absolute gamma fraction. The neutron flux thermal to epithermal ratio f at all rabbit system is closed to 40. (author)

  14. Safety techniques in the change of nuclear systems. Radiation protection at spallation neutron sources and transmutation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuenighoff, Kay

    2009-01-01

    To push the boundary towards higher neutron fluxes concepts based on spallation reactions have been discussed. Here neutrons are produced by bombarding a heavy metal target (e.g. mercury, tungsten, or tantalum) with high energetic protons. Up to now such facilities could not be realised because of the high power particle accelerators needed. Recent developments of the accelerator technology open the possibility of construction and operating proton accelerators in the MW region. This is demonstrated by construction and commissioning of two MW spallation neutron sources, namely SNS (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) with a power of 1.4 MW and J-PARC (Japan) with 1 MW. The realisation of proton accelerators at this power level will open the way towards energy amplifiers, as proposed e.g. by Carlo Rubbia. Such a facility will not only produce electric power. Furthermore longliving radionuclides can be transmutated into shortlived or even stable nuclides by neutron induced nuclear reactions. A mitigation of the problem of nuclear waste disposal. The above discussed developments prove that accelerators are not only constructed for research, moreover application of these technology became state of the art. With the emergence of particle accelerators in the MW region, radiation protection is confronted with new kind of problems to be solved. Especially the higher kinetic energies of the primary beam particles requires modification and expansion of computer programs well known in nuclear engineering. In contrast to nuclear reactors with kinetic energies up to 2-3 MeV, in spallation reaction secondary particles up to the incident energy in the GeV region will be produced. Problems related to radiation protection have to be considered in an energy range three orders of magnitude higher than known from nuclear reactors. In this thesis existing computer codes are compared and validated with data from selected experiments. Questions concerning radiation protection covers a broad range

  15. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux in the new experimental area nTOF-EAR2 at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate-Gilarte, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain); Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Damone, L.; Belloni, F.; Mastromarco, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Gunsing, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Diakaki, M.; Papaevangelou, T.; Dupont, E. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CEA Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zugec, P.; Bosnar, D. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cardella, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Montesano, S.; Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chen, Y.H.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Stamatopoulos, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Guerrero, C.; Quesada, J.M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain); Villacorta, A. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Piscopo, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica, Catania (Italy); Andrzejewski, J.; Gawlik, A.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Becares, V.; Balibrea, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Bacak, M.; Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Baccomi, R.; Milazzo, P.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Barros, S.; Ferreira, P.; Goncalves, I.F.; Vaz, P. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Beinrucker, C.; Goebel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M.; Wolf, C. [Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Billowes, J.; Frost, R.J.W.; Ryan, J.A.; Smith, A.G.; Warren, S.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Caamano, M.; Deo, K.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C.; Robles, M.S. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Calvino, F.; Casanovas, A.; Riego-Perez, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Castelluccio, D.M.; Lo Meo, S. [Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie (ENEA), Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cortes, G.; Mengoni, A. [Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie (ENEA), Bologna (Italy); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J.L. [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Heinitz, S.; Kivel, N.; Maugeri, E.A.; Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villingen (Switzerland); Furman, V.; Sedyshev, P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Mirea, M.; Oprea, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Goverdovski, A.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Kavrigin, P.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Harada, H.; Kimura, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura (Japan); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Heyse, J.; Schillebeeckx, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Geel (BE); Jenkins, D.G. [University of York, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (DE); Katabuchi, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (JP); Lederer, C.; Lonsdale, S.J.; Woods, P.J. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (GB); Licata, M.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (IT); Mastinu, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Legnaro, Legnaro (IT); Matteucci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (IT); Universita di Trieste, Dipartimento di Astronomia, Trieste (IT); Mingrone, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (DE); Palomo-Pinto, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros, Sevilla (ES); Patronis, N. [University of Ioannina, Ioannina (GR); Pavlik, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Porras, J.I. [University of Granada, Granada (ES); Praena, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (ES); University of Granada, Granada (ES); Rajeev, K.; Rout, P.C.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Rauscher, T. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, Hatfield (GB); University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (CH); Tarifeno-Saldivia, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (ES); Ventura, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Wallner, A. [Australian National University, Canberra (AU)

    2017-10-15

    A new high flux experimental area has recently become operational at the nTOF facility at CERN. This new measuring station, nTOF-EAR2, is placed at the end of a vertical beam line at a distance of approximately 20 m from the spallation target. The characterization of the neutron beam, in terms of flux, spatial profile and resolution function, is of crucial importance for the feasibility study and data analysis of all measurements to be performed in the new area. In this paper, the measurement of the neutron flux, performed with different solid-state and gaseous detection systems, and using three neutron-converting reactions considered standard in different energy regions is reported. The results of the various measurements have been combined, yielding an evaluated neutron energy distribution in a wide energy range, from 2 meV to 100 MeV, with an accuracy ranging from 2%, at low energy, to 6% in the high-energy region. In addition, an absolute normalization of the nTOF-EAR2 neutron flux has been obtained by means of an activation measurement performed with {sup 197}Au foils in the beam. (orig.)

  16. A conceptual design of neutron tumor therapy reactor facility with a YAYOI based fast neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; An, Shigehiro.

    1983-01-01

    Fast neutron is known as one of useful radiations for radiation therapy of tumors. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of tumors which makes use of 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction of 10 B compounds selectively attached to tumor cells with thermal and intermediate neutrons is another way of neutron based radiation therapy which is, above all, attractive enough to kill tumor cells selectively sparing normal tissue. In Japan, BNCT has already been applied and leaned to be effective. After more than a decade operational experiences and the specific experiments designed for therapeutical purposes, in this paper, a conceptual design of a special neutron therapy reactor facility based on YAYOI - fast neutron source reactor of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo - modified to provide an upward beam of fast and intermediate neutrons is presented. Emphasis is placed on the in-house nature of facility and on the coordinating capability of biological and physical researches as well as maintenances of the facility. (author)

  17. Use of CITATION code for flux calculation in neutron activation analysis with voluminous sample using an Am-Be source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifi, R.; Idiri, Z.; Bode, P.

    2002-01-01

    The CITATION code based on neutron diffusion theory was used for flux calculations inside voluminous samples in prompt gamma activation analysis with an isotopic neutron source (Am-Be). The code uses specific parameters related to the energy spectrum source and irradiation system materials (shielding, reflector). The flux distribution (thermal and fast) was calculated in the three-dimensional geometry for the system: air, polyethylene and water cuboidal sample (50x50x50 cm). Thermal flux was calculated in a series of points inside the sample. The results agreed reasonably well with observed values. The maximum thermal flux was observed at a distance of 3.2 cm while CITATION gave 3.7 cm. Beyond a depth of 7.2 cm, the thermal flux to fast flux ratio increases up to twice and allows us to optimise the detection system position in the scope of in-situ PGAA

  18. Power Burst Reactor Facility as an epithermal neutron source for brain cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor is considered for modification to provide an intense, clean source of intermediate-energy (epithermal) neutrons desirable for clinical studies of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for malignant tumors. The modifications include partial replacement of the reflector, installation of a neutron-moderating, shifting region, additional shielding, and penetration of the present concrete shield with a collimating (and optionally) filtering region. The studies have indicated that the reactor, after these modifications, will be safely operable at full power (28 MW) within the acceptable limits of the plant protection systems. The neutron beam exiting from the collimator port is predicted to be of sufficient intensity (approx.10 10 neutrons/cm 2 -s) to provide therapeutic doses in very short irradiation times. The beam would be relatively free of undesirable fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays. The calculated neutron energy spectrum and associated gamma rays in the beam were provided as input in simulation studies that used a computer model of a patient with a brain tumor to determine predicted dose rates to the tumor and healthy tissue. The results of this conceptual study indicate an intense, clean beam of epithermal neutrons for NCT clinical trials is attainable in the PBF facility with properly engineered design modifications. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  19. The cold neutron source in DR 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.; Leth, j.A.

    1980-09-01

    A description of the cold neutron source in DR 3 is given. The moderator of the cold neutron source is supercritical hydrogen at about 30degK and 15 bar abs. The necessary cooling capacity is supplied by two Philips Stirling B20 cryogenerators. The hydrogen is circulated between the cryogenerators and the in-pile moderator chamber by small fans. The safety of the facility is based on the use of triple containment preventing contact between hydrogen and air. The triple containment is achieved by enclosing the high vacuum system, surrounging the hydrogen system, in a helium blanket. The achieved spectrum of the thermal neutron flux and the gain factor are given as well as the experience from more than 5 years of operation. Finally some work on extension of the facility to operate two cold sources is reported. (author)

  20. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H 2 moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ''tails'' on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H 2 moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H 2 moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D 2 moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller

  1. Investigation of some possible changes in Am-Be neutron source configuration in order to increase the thermal neutron flux using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, H.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.

    2018-01-01

    Am-Be neutrons source is based on (α, n) reaction and generates neutrons in the energy range of 0-11 MeV. Since the thermal neutrons are widely used in different fields, in this work, we investigate how to improve the source configuration in order to increase the thermal flux. These suggested changes include a spherical moderator instead of common cylindrical geometry, a reflector layer and an appropriate materials selection in order to achieve the maximum thermal flux. All calculations were done by using MCNP1 Monte Carlo code. Our final results indicated that a spherical paraffin moderator, a layer of beryllium as a reflector can efficiently increase the thermal neutron flux of Am-Be source.

  2. Activation analysis of stainless steel flux monitors using 252Cf neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.G.; Newton, T.H. Jr.; Cogburn, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    Activation analysis was performed on stainless steel beads from a chain which is used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance experiments at the Arkansas Power and Light Company reactors. The beads allow monitoring of two fast and three thermal neutron induced reactions: 58 Ni(n,p) 58 Co, 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn, 58 Fe(n,γ) 59 Fe, 59 Co(n,γ) 60 Co and 50 Cr(n,γ) 51 Cr. The analysis was performed using 12 beads from various positions along 5 different batches of chain and standard materials in an H 2 O moderator tank using two intense californium sources which had a total neutron emission rate of 3.97 x 10 10 /s. Semiconductor gamma spectrometers were used to count the products of the above reactions in the specimens. The percentage by weight of the iron, chromium and cobalt in the beads were found to be 62.1%, 20.2% and 0.120%, respectively. The excellent uniformity found in the bead compositions demonstrates the reproducibility of the experimental techniques and enhances considerably the value of the beads as neutron flux montitors

  3. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility

  4. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility.

  5. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced Neutron Source overview and status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The new Advanced Neutron Source is a research facility centered around a new research reactor of unprecedented flux. Unique core and cooling system designs provide many inherent or passive safety features. The combination of a relatively high power level and a small core places special requirements on the response time of the reactor control system, and especially on the scram function. Similar requirements have been faced before on research reactors, and successfully met. The ANS design have evolved from those other reactors

  7. The WNR facility - a pulsed spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Lisowski, P.W.; King, N.S.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is the first operating example of a new class of pulsed neutron sources using the X(p,n)Y spallation reaction. At present, up to 10 microamperes of 800-MeV protons from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) linear accelerator bombard a Ta target to produce an intense white-neutron spectrum from about 800 MeV to 100 keV. The Ta target can be coupled with CH 2 and H 2 O moderators to produce neutrons of lower energy. The time structure of the WNR proton beam may be varied to optimize neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements covering the energy range from several hundred MeV to a few meV. The neutronics of the WNR target and target/moderator configurations have been calculated from 800 MeV to 0.5 eV. About 11 neutrons per proton are predicted for the existing Ta target. Some initial neutron TOF data are presented and compared with calculations

  8. Status of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Existing and planned facilities using proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source are reviewed. These include new project of neutron science proposed from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present status of facility requirement and accelerator technology leads us to new era of neutron science such as neutron scattering research and nuclear transmutation study using very intense neutron source. (author)

  9. Final environmental impact statement, construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source Facility. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    DOE proposes to construct and operate a state-of-the-art, short-pulsed, spallation neutron source comprised of an ion source, a linear accelerator, a proton accumulator ring, and an experiment building containing a liquid mercury target and a suite of neutron scattering instrumentation. The proposed Spallation Neutron Source would be designed to operate at a proton beam power of 1 megawatt. The design would accommodate future upgrades to a peak operating power of 4 megawatts. These upgrades may include construction of a second proton accumulator ring and a second target. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts from the proposed action and the alternatives. The analysis assumes a facility operating at a power of 1 MW and 4 MW over the life of the facility. The two primary alternatives analyzed in this FEIS are: the proposed action (to proceed with building the Spallation Neutron Source) and the No-Action Alternative. The No-Action Alternative describes the expected condition of the environment if no action were taken. Four siting alternatives for the Spallation Neutron Source are evaluated: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, (preferred alternative); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  10. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  11. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  12. Methods and applications in high flux neutron imaging; Methoden und Anwendungen fuer bildgebende Verfahren mit hohen Neutronenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballhausen, H.

    2007-02-07

    This treatise develops new methods for high flux neutron radiography and high flux neutron tomography and describes some of their applications in actual experiments. Instead of single images, time series can be acquired with short exposure times due to the available high intensity. To best use the increased amount of information, new estimators are proposed, which extract accurate results from the recorded ensembles, even if the individual piece of data is very noisy and in addition severely affected by systematic errors such as an influence of gamma background radiation. The spatial resolution of neutron radiographies, usually limited by beam divergence and inherent resolution of the scintillator, can be significantly increased by scanning the sample with a pinhole-micro-collimator. This technique circumvents any limitations in present detector design and, due to the available high intensity, could be successfully tested. Imaging with scattered neutrons as opposed to conventional total attenuation based imaging determines separately the absorption and scattering cross sections within the sample. For the first time even coherent angle dependent scattering could be visualized space-resolved. New applications of high flux neutron imaging are presented, such as materials engineering experiments on innovative metal joints, time-resolved tomography on multilayer stacks of fuel cells under operation, and others. A new implementation of an algorithm for the algebraic reconstruction of tomography data executes even in case of missing information, such as limited angle tomography, and returns quantitative reconstructions. The setup of the world-leading high flux radiography and tomography facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin is presented. A comprehensive appendix covers the physical and technical foundations of neutron imaging. (orig.)

  13. Pulsed neutron sources at Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1960 the first world repetitively pulsed reactor IBR was put into operation. It was the beginning of the story how fission based pulsed neutron sources at Dubna have survived. The engineers involved have experienced many successes and failures in the course of new sources upgrading to finally come to possess the world's brightest neutron source - IBR-2. The details are being reviewed through the paper. The fission based pulsed neutron sources did not reach their final state as yet- the conceptual views of IBR prospects are being discussed with the goal to double the thermal neutron peak flux (up to 2x10 16 ) and to enhance the cold neutron flux by 10 times (with the present one being as high that of the ISIS cold moderator). (author)

  14. Consequences of the conversion of research reactor cores on experimental facilities at the example of a cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Goebs, H.; Stroemich, A.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences for and specifically the potential reduction of the performance of research reactors have been in discussions very often within the last five years as one of the draw-backs which has to be paid for the reduction of the proliferation risk at research reactor plants. Up to now and up to our knowledge the available results are restricted to unperturbated fluxes. Thus, this contribution makes the attempt to demonstrate the consequence of core conversion on an example of a real experimental facility and - at the same time - on one that is going to be used in the next decade a lot, i.e. a cold neutron source (CNS). (author)

  15. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  16. International fusion materials irradiation facility and neutronic calculations for its test modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a projected high intensity neutron source for material testing. Neutron transport calculations for the IFMIF project are performed for variety of here explained reasons. The results of MCNP neutronic calculations for IFMIF test modules with NaK and He cooled high flux test cells are presented in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Intense neutron source: high-voltage power supply specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    This report explains the need for and sets forth the electrical, mechanical and safety specifications for a high-voltage power supply to be used with the intense neutron source. It contains sufficient information for a supplier to bid on such a power supply

  18. The effect of temperature and the control rod position on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water and fuel temperature increase and changes in the control rod positions on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is discussed. The cross sections of all the reactor components at different temperatures are generated using the WIMSD4 code. These group constants are used then in the CITATION code to calculate the special neutron flux distribution using four energy groups. This work shows that water and fuel temperature increase in the reactor during the reactor daily operating time does not affect the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor. Changing the control rod position does not affect as well the spatial neutron flux distribution except in the region around the control rod position. This stability in the spatial neutron flux distribution, especially in the inner and outer irradiation sites, makes MNSR as a good tool for the neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique and production of radioisotopes with medium or short half lives during the reactor daily operating time. (author)

  19. Calculation of neutron flux and reactivity by perturbation theory at high order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, W.L.P. da; Silva, F.C. da; Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1982-01-01

    A high order pertubation theory is studied, independent of time, applied to integral parameter calculation of a nuclear reactor. A pertubative formulation, based on flux difference technique, which gives directy the reactivity and neutron flux up to the aproximation order required, is presented. As an application of the method, global pertubations represented by fuel temperature variations, are used. Tests were done aiming to verify the relevancy of the approximation order for several intensities of the pertubations considered. (E.G.) [pt

  20. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm 3 in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept. (author)

  1. First experiments with a liquid-lithium based high-intensity 25-keV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, M.

    2014-01-01

    A high-intensity neutron source based on a Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) and the 7 Li(p,n) reaction was developed at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility, Israel) and is used for nuclear astrophysics experiments. The setup was commissioned with a 1.3 mA proton beam at 1.91 MeV, producing a neutron yield of ~ 2 ×10 10 n/s, more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional 7 Li(p,n)-based neutron sources and peaked at ~25 keV. The LiLiT device consists of a high-velocity (> 4 m/s) vertical jet of liquid lithium (~200 °C) whose free surface is bombarded by the proton beam. The lithium jet acts both as the neutron-producing target and as a power beam dump. The target dissipates a peak power areal density of 2.5 kW/cm 2 and peak volume density of 0.5 MW/cm 3 with no change of temperature or vacuum regime in the vacuum chamber. Preliminary results of Maxwellian-averaged cross section measurements for stable isotopes of Zr and Ce, performed by activation in the neutron flux of LiLiT, and nuclear-astrophysics experiments in planning will be described. (author)

  2. Calculations of the thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor using the MCNP-4C code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, K; Sulieman, I

    2009-04-01

    The MCNP-4C code, based on the probabilistic approach, was used to model the 3D configuration of the core of the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR). The continuous energy neutron cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI library were used to calculate the thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the inner and outer irradiation sites of MNSR. The thermal fluxes in the MNSR inner irradiation sites were also measured experimentally by the multiple foil activation method ((197)Au (n, gamma) (198)Au and (59)Co (n, gamma) (60)Co). The foils were irradiated simultaneously in each of the five MNSR inner irradiation sites to measure the thermal neutron flux and the epithermal index in each site. The calculated and measured results agree well.

  3. Neutron flux density and secondary-particle energy spectra at the 184-inch synchrocyclotron medical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.R.; Schimmerling, W.; Henson, A.M.; Kanstein, L.L.; McCaslin, J.B.; Stephens, L.D.; Thomas, R.H.; Ozawa, J.; Yeater, F.W.

    1978-07-01

    Helium ions, with an energy of 920 MeV, produced by the 184-inch synchrocyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are now being used in a pilot series to determine their efficacy in the treatment of tumors of large volume. The techniques for production of the large uniform radiation fields required for these treatments involve the use of beam-limiting collimators and energy degraders. Interaction of the primary beam with these beam components produces secondary charged particles and neutrons. The sources of neutron production in the beam transport system of the alpha-particle beam have been identified and their magnitudes have been determined. Measurements with activation detectors and pulse counters of differing energy responses have been used to determine secondary particle spectra at various locations on the patient table. These spectra are compared to a calculation of neutron production based on best estimates derived from published cross sections. Agreement between the calculated spectra and those derived from experimental measurements is obtained (at the 10 to 20% level) when the presence of charged particles is taken into account. The adsorbed dose in soft tissue is not very sensitive to the shape of the incident neutron energy spectrum, and the values obtained from unfolding the experimental measurements agree with the values obtained from the calculated spectra within the estimated uncertainty of +-25%. These values are about 3 x 10 -3 rad on the beam axis and about 1 x 10 -3 rad at 20 cm or more from the beam axis, per rad deposited by the incident alpha-particle beam. Estimates of upper limit dose to the lens of the eye and red bone marrow are approximately 10 rad and approximately 1 rad, respectively, for a typical treatment plan. The absorbed dose to the lens of the eye is thus well below the threshold value for cataractogenesis estimated for fission neutrons. An upper limit for the risk of leukemia is estimated to be approximately 0.04%

  4. High flux polarized neutrons triple-axis spectrometer: 2T (LLB-Saclay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, Ph.; Hennion, B.; Sidis, Y.; Boutrouille, Ph.; Baroni, P.

    1999-01-01

    A description of the performance of the newly designed thermal beam triple-axis spectrometer, 2T at LLB (Saclay) is given. The beam tube will be increased to 50 x 120 mm 2 (HxV) before the monochromator. A gain of about a factor 2 on the neutron flux at the monitor position is expected after this operation, scheduled on April/May 1999. Polarized neutrons beam option will be installed on this triple axis. The polarization is obtained using high quality heusler crystals recently grown at ILL. The size of both heusler monochromator and analyzer have been chosen to fully cover the beam size. The monochromator (analyzer) will be equipped with a vertical (horizontal) curvature. The flux of the polarized beam on the detector is then expected to be 5 times better than IN20 at ILL (best existing polarized neutrons triple-axis on thermal beam) with incident energy upto 75 MeV. (author)

  5. Options for a next generation neutron source for neutron scattering based on the projected linac facility at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.; Watanabe, Noboru; Niimura, Nobuo; Morii, Yukio; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi.

    1997-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has a project to construct a high intensity proton accelerator to promote wide basic science using neutrons and nuclear power technologies such as radioactive nuclide transmutation. One of the most important field for utilization of neutron beam is neutron scattering. The energy and the averaged current obtained by the proton accelerator are 1.5 GeV and 4-5.3 mA, respectively and these provide 6-8 MW power. The repetition frequency is 50-60 Hz. Evaluation of options for the use of accelerators for neutron production for neutron scattering research and investigation of the neutron research opportunities offered by sharing the superconducting linac planned at JAERI were discussed. There are two ways of the utilization of proton beams for neutron scattering experiment. One is for long pulse spallation source (LPSS) and the other is for short pulse spallation source (SPSS). Quantitative evaluation of instrument performance with LPSS and SPSS was examined in the intensive discussion, calculations, workshop on this topics with Prof. F. Mezei who stayed at JAERI from October 24 to November 6, 1996. A report of the collaborative workshop will be also published separately. (author)

  6. Assessment of the gas dynamic trap mirror facility as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) mirror machine has been proposed by the Budker Institute of nuclear physics, Novosibirsk, as a volumetric neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. On the basis of the GDT plasma confinement concept, 14 MeV neutrons are generated at high production rates in the two end sections of the axially symmetrical central mirror cell, serving as suitable irradiation test regions. In this paper, we present an assessment of the GDT as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. This includes comparisons to irradiation conditions in fusion reactor systems (ITER, Demo) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), as well as a conceptual design for a helium-cooled tubular test assembly elaborated for the largest of the two test zones taking proper account of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical aspects. This tubular test assembly incorporates ten rigs of about 200 cm length used for inserting instrumented test capsules with miniaturized specimens taking advantage of the 'small specimen test technology'. The proposed design allows individual temperatures in each of the rigs, and active heating systems inside the capsules ensures specimen temperature stability even during beam-off periods. The major concern is about the maximum achievable dpa accumulation of less than 15 dpa per full power year on the basis of the present design parameters of the GDT neutron source. A design upgrading is proposed to allow for higher neutron wall loadings in the material test regions

  7. Characterization of magnetic degradation mechanism in a high-neutron-flux environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib; Qiu, Jie [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Hattrick-Simpers, Jason; Dai-Hattrick, Liyang [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Zheng, Yuan F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Cao, Lei, E-mail: Cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent magnets can result in the failure of magnet-based devices operating in high-radiation environments. To understand the mechanism underlying demagnetization, Nd-Fe-B magnets were irradiated with fast and fast plus thermal neutrons at fluences of 10{sup 12}, 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. After irradiation, magnetic flux losses were shown to increase with the fluence. Compared with samples irradiated only with fast neutrons, the samples exposed to the fast plus thermal neutrons have higher magnetic flux losses, which is attributed to the thermal neutron capture reaction of boron. Hysteresis loops of the Nd-Fe-B magnets reveal a slightly increase in the coercivity after irradiation. Full remagnetization of the samples after irradiation was possible, which indicates that structural damage is unlikely an important factor in the demagnetization process at these levels of neutron flux and fluence. Finally, we performed a preliminary Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulation on a cube of ions to obtain a better understanding of the thermal spike mechanism.

  8. Replacement of the moderator cell unit of JRR-3's cold neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazawa, Tomoya; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2006-10-01

    The moderator cell of the JRR-3's cold neutron source (CNS) facility, converts thermal neutrons into cold neutrons by passing through liquid cold hydrogen. The cold neutrons are used for material and life science research such as the neutron scattering. The CNS has been operated since the start of JRR-3's in 1990. The moderator cell containing liquid hydrogen is made of stainless steel. The material irradiation lifetime is limited to 7 years due to irradiation brittleness. The first replacement was done by using a spare part made in France. This replacement work of 2006 was carried out by using the domestic moderator cell unit. The following technologies were developed for the moderator cell unit production. 1) Technical development of black treatment on moderator cell surface to increase radiation heat. 2) Development of bending technology of concentric triple tubes consisting from inside tube, Outside tube and Vacuum insulation tube. 3) Development of manufacturing technique of the moderator cell with complicated shapes. According to detail planed work procedures, replacement work was carried out. As results, the working days were reduced to 80% of old ones. The radiation dose was also reduced due to reduction of working days. It was verified by measurement of neutrons characteristics that the replaced moderator cell has the same performance as that of the old moderator cell. The domestic manufacturing of the moderator cell was succeeded. As results, the replacement cost was reduced by development of domestic production technology. (author)

  9. Simulation of e-{gamma}-n targets by FLUKA and measurement of neutron flux at various angles for accelerator based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    A 6 MeV Race track Microtron (an electron accelerator) based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. The bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by impinging 6 MeV electron on the e-{gamma} primary target, was made to fall on the {gamma}-n secondary target to produce neutrons. The optimisation of bremsstrahlung and neutron producing target along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium and the measured fluxes were 1.1878 x 10{sup 5}, 0.9403 x 10{sup 5}, 0.7428 x 10{sup 5}, 0.6274 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5659 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5210 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}/s at 0{sup o}, 30{sup o}, 60{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 115{sup o}, 140{sup o} respectively. The results indicate that the neutron flux was found to be decreased as increase in the angle and in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  10. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  11. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  12. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  13. An advanced hadron facility: A combined kaon factory and cold-neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    A design concept is presented for an advanced hadron facility consisting of a combined kaon factory and second generation spallation source. Our proposed facility consists of a 1.2 GeV superconducting H - linac to bring the LAMPF energy up to 2 GeV, a multi-ring 2 GeV compressor, a shared cold-neutron and stopped-pion neutrino source, a 60 GeV 25 μAmp 6 Hz proton synchrotron, and kaon and proton experimental areas. We discuss the considerations which led to this design concept. We summarize recent results of r and d work on components for rapid-cycling synchrotrons. Finally, we mention briefly a pion linac, which may be a good way to gain experience with superconducting cavities if advanced hadron facility funding is delayed

  14. Use of curium neutron flux from head-end pyroprocessing subsystems for the High Reliability Safeguards methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, R.A., E-mail: r.angelo.borrelli@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of nuclear energy systems (NESs) is expanding around the world. Nations are investing in NESs as a means to establish energy independence, grow national economies, and address climate change. Transitioning to the advanced nuclear fuel cycle can meet growing energy demands and ensure resource sustainability. However, nuclear facilities in all phases of the advanced fuel cycle must be ‘safeguardable,’ where safety, safeguards, and security are integrated into a practical design strategy. To this end, the High Reliability Safeguards (HRS) approach is a continually developing safeguardability methodology that applies intrinsic design features and employs a risk-informed approach for systems assessment that is safeguards-motivated. Currently, a commercial pyroprocessing facility is used as the example system. This paper presents a modeling study that investigates the neutron flux associated with processed materials. The intent of these studies is to determine if the neutron flux will affect facility design, and subsequently, safeguardability. The results presented in this paper are for the head-end subsystems in a pyroprocessing facility. The collective results from these studies will then be used to further develop the HRS methodology.

  15. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  16. Spectral flux of the p-7Li(C Q-M neutron source measured by proton recoil telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov S.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cyclotron-based fast neutron source at NPI produces mono-energetic neutron fields up to 35 MeV neutron energy using the p + 7Li(carbon backing reactions. To be applied for activation cross-section measurements, not only the intensity of neutron peak, but also the contribution of low-energy continuum in the spectra must be well determined. Simulations of the spectral flux from present source at a position of irradiated samples were performed using CYRIC TOF-data validated in the present work against LA150h by calculations with the transport Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Simulated spectra were tested by absolute measurements using a proton-recoil telescope technique. The recoil-proton spectrometer consisted of a shielded scattering chamber with polyethylene and carbon radiators and the ΔE1-ΔE2-E telescope of silicon-surface detectors located to the neutron beam axis at 45° in the laboratory system. Si-detectors were handled by usual data acquisition system. Dead-time – and pulse-overlap losses of events were determined from the count rate of pulse generator registered during duty cycle of accelerator operation. The proton beam charge and data were taken in the list mode for later replay and analysis. The calculations for 7Li(p,n and 12C(p,n reactions reasonably reproduce CYRIC TOF neutron source spectra. The influence of neutron source set-up (proton beam dimensions, 7Li-foil, carbon stopper, cooling medium, target support/chamber and the geometry-arrangement of irradiated sample on the spectral flux is discussed in details.

  17. Flux gain for a next-generation neutron reflectometer resulting from improved supermirror performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rehm, C

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation spallation neutron source facilities will offer instruments with unprecedented capabilities through simultaneous enhancement of source power and usage of advanced optical components. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and scheduled to be completed by 2006, will provide greater than an order of magnitude more effective source flux than current state-of-the-art facilities, including the most advanced research reactors. An additional order of magnitude gain is expected through the use of new optical devices and instrumentation concepts. Many instrument designs require supermirror neutron guides with very high critical angles for total reflection. In this contribution, we will discuss how the performance of a modern neutron-scattering instrument depends on the efficiency of these supermirrors. We summarize current limitations of supermirror coatings and outline ideas for enhancing their performance, particularly for improving the reflec...

  18. Advanced spallation neutron sources for condensed matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.; Stirling, G.C.

    1984-03-01

    Advanced spallation neutron sources afford significant advantages over existing high flux reactors. The effective flux is much greater than that currently available with reactor sources. A ten-fold increase in neutron flux will be a major benefit to a wide range of condensed matter studies, and it will realise important experiments that are marginal at reactor sources. Moreover, the high intensity of epithermal neutrons open new vistas in studies of electronic states and molecular vibrations. (author)

  19. Optimizing Laser-accelerated Ion Beams for a Collimated Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, C.L.; Fuchs, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-flux neutrons for imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator- and reactor-based neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultraintense (>1018W/cm2) lasers to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons from a dual target configuration. In this article, the production capabilities of present and upcoming laser facilities are estimated while independently maximizing neutron yields and minimizing beam divergence. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. Tailoring of the incident distribution via laser parameters and microlens focusing modifies the emerging neutrons. Projected neutron yields and distributions are compared to conventional sources, yielding comparable on-target fluxes per discharge, shorter time resolution, larger neutron energies and greater collimation.

  20. Spectrometers for compact neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J.; Böhm, S.; Dabruck, J. P.; Rücker, U.; Gutberlet, T.; Brückel, T.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the potential for neutron spectrometers at novel accelerator driven compact neutron sources. Such a High Brilliance Source (HBS) relies on low energy nuclear reactions, which enable cryogenic moderators in very close proximity to the target and neutron optics at comparably short distances from the moderator compared to existing sources. While the first effect aims at increasing the phase space density of a moderator, the second allows the extraction of a large phase space volume, which is typically requested for spectrometer applications. We find that competitive spectrometers can be realized if (a) the neutron production rate can be synchronized with the experiment repetition rate and (b) the emission characteristics of the moderator can be matched to the phase space requirements of the experiment. MCNP simulations for protons or deuterons on a Beryllium target with a suitable target/moderator design yield a source brightness, from which we calculate the sample fluxes by phase space considerations for different types of spectrometers. These match closely the figures of todays spectrometers at medium flux sources. Hence we conclude that compact neutron sources might be a viable option for next generation neutron sources.

  1. Developments of high-performance moderator vessel for JRR-3 cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masaji; Tamura, Itaru; Hazawa, Tomoya

    2015-05-01

    The cold neutron source (CNS) facility converts thermal neutrons into cold neutrons to moderate neutrons with liquid hydrogen. The cold neutron beam at Japan Research Reactor No. 3 (JRR-3) is led to the beam experimental devices in the beam hall through neutron guide tubes. High intensities of the cold neutron beam are always demanded for increasing the experimental effectiveness and accuracy. In the Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, developments of high-performance CNS moderator vessel that can produce cold neutron intensity about two times higher compared to the existing vessel have been performed in the second medium term plans. We compiled this report about the technological development to solve several problems with the design and manufacture of new vessel. In the present study, design strength evaluation, mockup test, simulation for thermo-fluid dynamics of the liquid hydrogen and strength evaluation of the different-material-bonding were studied. By these evaluation results, we verified that the developed new vessel can be applied to CNS moderator vessel of JRR-3. (author)

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of semiconductor detectors for application in neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry in nuclear reactor and radiosurgical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this research is the dosimetric evaluation of semiconductor components (surface barrier detectors and PIN photodiodes) for applications in dose equivalent measurements on low dose fields (fast and thermal fluxes) using an AmBe neutron source, the IEA-R1 reactor neutrongraphy facility (epithermal and thermal fluxes) and the Critical Unit facility IPEN/MB-01 (fast fluxes). As moderator compound to fast neutrons flux from the AmBe source was used paraffin and boron and polyethylene as converter for thermal and fast neutrons measurements. The resulting fluxes were used to the irradiation of semiconductor components (SSB - Surface Barrier Detector and PIN photodiodes). A mixed converter made of a borated polyethylene foil (Kodak) was also used. Monte Carlo simulation methodology was employed to evaluate analytically the optimal paraffin thickness. The obtained results were similar to the experimental data and allowed the evaluation of emerging neutron flux from moderator, as well as the fast neutron flux reaching the polyethylene covering the semiconductor sensitive surface. Gamma radiation levels were evaluated covering the whole detector with cadmium foil 1 mm thick, allowing thermal neutrons blockage and gamma radiation measurements. The IPEN/MB-01 facility was employed to evaluate the detector response for high neutron flux. The results were in good agreement with other studies published. Using the obtained spectra an approach to dose equivalent calculation was established. (author)

  3. Advanced Neutron Source: The designer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research facility based on a 350 MW beam reactor, to be brought into service at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the century. The primary objective is to provide high-flux neutron beams and guides, with cold, thermal, hot, and ultra-cold neutrons, for research in many fields of science. Secondary objectives include isotopes production, materials irradiation and activation analysis. The design of the ANS is strongly influenced by the historical development of research and power reactor concepts, and of the regulatory infrastructure of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Current trends in reactor safety also impact the climate for the design of such a reactor

  4. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  5. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research

  6. Conceptual design of HANARO cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Sim, Cheul Muu; Park, K. N.; Choi, Y. H.

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the cold source is to increase the available neutron flux delivered to instruments at wavelength 4 ∼ 12 A. The major engineering targets of this CNS facility is established for a reach out of very high gain factors in consideration with the cold neutron flux, moderator, circulation loop, heat load, a simplicity of the maintenance of the facility, safety in the operation of the facility against the hydrogen explosion and a layout of a minimum physical interference with the present facilities. The cold source project has been divided into 5 phases: (1) pre-conceptual (2) conceptual design (3) Testing (4) detailed design and procurement (5) installation and operation. Although there is sometime overlap between the phases, in general, they are sequential. The pre-conceptual design and concept design of KCNS has been performed on elaborations of PNPI Russia and review by Technicatome, Air Liquid, CILAS France. In the design of cold neutron source, the characteristics of cold moderators have been studied to obtain the maximum gain of cold neutron, and the analysis for radiation heat, design of hydrogen system, vacuum system and helium system have been performed. The possibility for materialization of the concept in the proposed conceptual design has been reviewed in view of securing safety and installing at HANARO. Above all, the thermosiphon system to remove heat by circulation of sub-cooled two phase hydrogen has been selected so that the whole device could be installed in the reactor pool with the reduced volume. In order to secure safety, hydrogen safety has been considered on protection to prevent from hydrogen-oxygen reaction at explosion of hydrogen-oxygen e in the containment. A lay out of the installation, a maintenance and quality assurance program and a localization are included in this report. Requirements of user, regulatory, safety, operation, maintenance should be considered to be revised for detailed design, testing, installation

  7. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al{sup 27}, C{sup 12}, B{sup 11}, B{sup 10} and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B{sup 10} content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B{sup 10} content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10{sup 10} order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10{sup 8} order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B{sup 10} content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously.

  8. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 x 10 21 m -2 s -1 , ion fluence: 4 x 10 25 m -2 ) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  9. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  10. The development and medical applications of a simple facility for partial body in vivo neutron activation analysis using californium-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddy, K.

    1978-11-01

    A simple and cheap facility for partial body neutron activation analysis has been designed, based on the use of two 100 μg 252 Cf neutron sources. The results reported show that calcium can be measured in parts of the body such as the tibia with a precision as good as +- 1.6 % for a radiation dose of 2 rem. The uniformity of the thermal neutron flux density is better than +- 3 % over 10 cm. Some applications of this irradiation facility for studies of trace elements, in particular cadmium in liver and aluminium in liver or brain, have also been explored. However, the sensitivity attainable is not yet sufficient for the study of normal levels, but could be of interest in toxicological investigations

  11. Neutron calibration facility with an Am-Be source for pulse shape discrimination measurement of CsI(Tl) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.S.; Bhang, H.; Choi, J.H.; Choi, S.; Joo, H.W.; Kim, G.B.; Kim, K.W.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, S.K.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, J.K.; Myung, S.S.; Hahn, I.S.; Jeon, E.J.; Kang, W.G.; Kim, Y.D.; Kim, Y.H.; Li, J.; Kim, H.J.; Leonard, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a neutron calibration facility based on a 300-mCi Am-Be source in conjunction with a search for weakly interacting massive particle candidates for dark matter. The facility is used to study the response of CsI(Tl) crystals to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from the Am-Be source and comparing them with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton scattering of 662-keV γ-rays from a 137 Cs source. The measured results on pulse shape discrimination (PSD) between nuclear- and electron-recoil events are quantified in terms of quality factors. A comparison with our previous result from a neutron generator demonstrate the feasibility of performing calibrations of PSD measurements using neutrons from a Am-Be source

  12. Neutron spectrum determination of d(20)+Be source reaction by the dosimetry foils method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanik, Milan; Bem, Pavel; Majerle, Mitja; Novak, Jan; Simeckova, Eva

    2017-11-01

    The cyclotron-based fast neutron generator with the thick beryllium target operated at the NPI Rez Fast Neutron Facility is primarily designed for the fast neutron production in the p+Be source reaction at 35 MeV. Besides the proton beam, the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the NPI provides the deuterons in the energy range of 10-20 MeV. The experiments for neutron field investigation from the deuteron bombardment of thick beryllium target at 20 MeV were performed just recently. For the neutron spectrum measurement of the d(20)+Be source reaction, the dosimetry foils activation method was utilized. Neutron spectrum reconstruction from resulting reaction rates was performed using the SAND-II unfolding code and neutron cross-sections from the EAF-2010 nuclear data library. Obtained high-flux white neutron field from the d(20)+Be source is useful for the intensive irradiation experiments and cross-section data validation.

  13. Development opportunities for small and medium scale accelerator driven neutron sources. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    Neutron applications in the life sciences will be a rapidly growing research area in the near future, as neutrons can provide unique information on the reaction dynamics of complex biomolecular systems, complementing other analytical techniques such as electron microscopy, X rays and nuclear magnetic resonance. Small and medium power spallation neutron sources will become more important, as many small neutron producing research reactors are being phased out. Recent developments in accelerator technology have made it possible to produce useful neutron fluxes at accelerator facilities suitable for universities and industrial laboratories. In addition to basic research these alternative neutron sources will be important for educational and training purposes. In a wider perspective this technology should make it possible to introduce neutron research and applications to industrial and national research centres in IAEA Member States that are unable to afford a high energy spallation neutron source and have no access to a research reactor

  14. Lunar neutron source function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    The search for a quantitative neutron source function for the lunar surface region is justified because it contributes to our understanding of the history of the lunar surface and of nuclear process occurring on the moon since its formation. A knowledge of the neutron source function and neutron flux distribution is important for the interpretation of many experimental measurements. This dissertation uses the available pertinent experimental measurements together with theoretical calculations to obtain an estimate of the lunar neutron source function below 15 MeV. Based upon reasonable assumptions a lunar neutron source function having adjustable parameters is assumed for neutrons below 15 MeV. The lunar neutron source function is composed of several components resulting from the action of cosmic rays with lunar material. A comparison with previous neutron calculations is made and significant differences are discussed. Application of the results to the problem of lunar soil histories is examined using the statistical model for soil development proposed by Fireman. The conclusion is drawn that the moon is losing mass

  15. High power pulsed neutron source for electronuclear installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S.A.; Puzynin, I.V.; Samoilov, V.N.; Sissakian, A.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    The pulsed neutron source based on the reaction T(d,n)He is described in this report. The source consists of pulsed a pulsed Arkad`ev-Marx generator and a vacuum diode with explosive ion emission. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D. . E-mail-yb2@ornl.gov

    1998-01-01

    Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an 'approval in principle' of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP 1 A D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA 2 system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. Our present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on site during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000. (author)

  17. Preliminary assessment of the nuclide migration from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR

  18. Preliminary assessment of the nuclide migration from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR.

  19. Detailed studies of Minor Actinide transmutation-incineration in high-intensity neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringer, O.; Al Mahamid, I.; Blandin, C.; Chabod, S.; Chartier, F.; Dupont, E.; Fioni, G.; Isnard, H.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Mutti, P.; Oriol, L.; Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mini-INCA project is dedicated to the measurement of incineration-transmutation chains and potentials of minor actinides in high-intensity thermal neutron fluxes. In this context, new types of detectors and methods of analysis have been developed. The 241 Am and 232 Th transmutation-incineration chains have been studied and several capture and fission cross sections measured very precisely, showing some discrepancies with existing data or evaluated data. An impact study was made on different based-like GEN-IV reactors. It underlines the necessity to proceed to precise measurements for a large number of minor-actinides that contribute to these future incineration scenarios. (authors)

  20. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be isotopic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yücel, Haluk [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Budak, Mustafa Guray, E-mail: mbudak@gazi.edu.tr [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • An irradiation unit was installed using a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. • The source neutrons moderated by using both water and paraffin. • Irradiation unit was shielded by boron oxide and lead against neutrons and gammas. • There are two sites for irradiations, one of them has a pneumatic transfer system. • Cadmium ratio method was used for irradiation site characterization. - Abstract: For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (φ{sub th}) and epithermal neutron fluxes (φ{sub epi}), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be φ{sub th} = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 10{sup 3} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, φ{sub epi} = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 10{sup 1} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as φ{sub th} = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 10{sup 3} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, φ{sub epi} = (2.93 ± 0

  1. Technical review and evaluation for the installation of cold neutron source facility at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Mu Woong; Cho, Man Soon; Oh, Yun Woo; Park, Sun Hee; Park, Kuk Nam; Lee, Chang Hee

    1996-01-01

    The principle subjects of this study are to analyze the technical characteristics of cold neutron source(CNS) and take measures to cope with the matters regarding the installation of CNS facility at HANARO. This report, thus, reviews the current status of the CNS facilities that are now in operation worldwide and classifies the system and equipment to select the appropriate type for HANARO and provides advice and guidance for the future basic and detail design. As we have none of CNS facility here and very few experienced persons yet, this report provides some information for domestic users through the investigation of the utilization fields and experimental facilities of CNS, and presents the estimated total cost for the project based on JRR-3M. In addition, the work scope of the conceptual design, which will be performed in advance of the basic and detail design, and cooperative program with the countries having the advanced technology of CNS is presented in this report. 43 tabs., 57 figs., 22 refs. (Author)

  2. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  3. The new Munich neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Munich FRM II neutron source currently under construction is to replace the FRM I research reactor in Munich, also known as 'atomic egg'. The project is executed by the Free State of Bavaria as a construction project of the Munich Technical University and managed by the University. As main contractor for the construction project, Siemens AG is also co-applicant in the licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act for the construction phase. The project is carried out to build a modern high flux neutron source required for a broad range of applications in research and technology mainly with thermal and cold neutrons. The 'neutron gap' existing in Germany is to be closed with the FRM II. As a national research installation, the FRM II is available to all interested scientists from a variety of disciplines. (orig.) [de

  4. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Eiji; Tai, Ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the measuring accuracy and the reponse time within an allowable range in accordance with the change of neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Constitution: Neutron fluxes within a nuclear reactor pressure vessel are detected by detectors, converted into pulse signals and amplified in a range switching amplifier. The amplified signals are further converted through an A/D converter and digital signals from the converter are subjected to a square operation in an square operation circuit. The output from the circuit is inputted into an integration circuit to selectively accumulate the constant of 1/2n, 1 - 1/2n (n is a positive integer) respectively for two continuing signals to perform weighing. Then, the addition is carried out to calculate the integrated value and the addition number is changed by the chane in the number n to vary the integrating time. The integrated value is inputted into a control circuit to control the value of n so that the fluctuation and the calculation time for the integrated value are within a predetermined range and, at the same time, the gain of the range switching amplifier is controlled. (Seki, T.)

  5. Neutronic performance issues for the Spallation Neutron Source moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E.B.; Murphy, B.D.

    2001-01-01

    We continue to develop the neutronic models of the Spallation Neutron Source target station and moderators in order to better predict the neutronic performance of the system as a whole and in order to better optimize that performance. While we are not able to say that every model change leads to more intense neutron beams being predicted, we do feel that such changes are advantageous in either performance or in the accuracy of the prediction of performance. We have computationally and experimentally studied the neutronics of hydrogen-water composite moderators such as are proposed for the SNS Project. In performing these studies, we find that the composite moderator, at least in the configuration we have examined, does not provide performance characteristics desirable for the instruments proposed and being designed for this neutron scattering facility. The pulse width as a function of energy is significantly broader than for other moderators, limiting attainable resolution-bandwidth combinations. Furthermore, there is reason to expect that higher-energy (0.1-1 eV) applications will be significantly impacted by bimodal pulse shapes requiring enormous effort to parameterize. As a result of these studies, we have changed the SNS design, and will not use a composite moderator at this time. We have analyzed the depletion of a gadolinium poison plate in a hydrogen moderator at the Spallation Neutron Source, and found that conventional poison thicknesses will be completely unable to last the desired component lifetime of three operational years. A poison plate 300-600 μm thick will survive for the required length of time, but will somewhat degrade the intensity (by as much as 15% depending on neutron energy) and the consistency of the neutron source performance. Our results should scale fairly easily to other moderators on this or any other spallation source. While depletion will be important for all highly-absorbing materials in high-flux regions, we feel it likely that

  6. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1965-06-01

    This report contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procedures are presented in another report.

  7. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report

  8. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  9. A neutron beam facility at Spiral-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Ethvignot, T.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Andriamonje, S.; Dore, D.; Dupont, E.; Gunsing, F.; Ridikas, D.; Takibayev, A. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blideanu, V. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/Senac, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, 33 (France); Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC, 14 - Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G. [IPHC, 57 - Strasbourg (France); Bem, P.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J. [NPI, Rez (Czech Republic); Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Sweden); Fischer, U.; Herber, S.; Simakov, S.P. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jacquot, B.; Rejmund, F. [GANIL, 14 - Caen (France); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F.; Petrascu, M. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Oberstedt, S.; Plompen, A.J.M. [JRC/IRMM, Geel (Belgium); Shcherbakov, O. [PNPI, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fallot, M. [Subatech, 44 - Nantes (France); Smith, A.G.; Tsekhanovich, I. [Manchester Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Serot, O.; Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perrot, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [IPNO, 91 - Orsay (France); Caillaud, T.; Giot, L.; Landoas, O.; Ramillon, J.M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I. [CIMAP, 14 - Caen (France); Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.; Guillous, S.; Oberstedt, A. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    The future Spiral-2 facility, dedicated to the production of intense radioactive ion beams, is based on a high-power superconducting driver Linac, delivering high-intensity deuteron, proton and heavy ion beams. These beams are particularly well suited to the production of neutrons in the 100 keV- 40 MeV energy range, a facility called 'Neutrons for Science' (NFS) will be built in the LINAG Experimental Area (LEA). NFS, operational in 2012, will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for activation measurements and material studies. Thick C and Be converters and a deuteron beam will produce an intense continuous neutron spectrum, while a thin {sup 7}Li target and a proton beam allow to generate quasi-mono-energetic neutrons. In the present work we show how the primary ion beam characteristics (energy, time resolution and intensity) are adequate to create a neutron time-of-flight facility delivering intense neutron fluxes in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range. Irradiation stations for neutron, proton and deuteron reactions will also allow to perform cross-section measurements by means of the activation technique. Light-ion beams will be used to study radiation damage effects on materials for the nuclear industry. (authors)

  10. Experimental demonstration of a compact epithermal neutron source based on a high power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Raspino, D.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, L. A.; Armstrong, C.; Butler, N. M. H.; Clarke, R. J.; Higginson, A.; Kelleher, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Notley, M.; Rusby, D. R.; Schooneveld, E.; Borghesi, M.; McKenna, P.; Rhodes, N. J.; Neely, D.; Brenner, C. M.; Kar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Epithermal neutrons from pulsed-spallation sources have revolutionised neutron science allowing scientists to acquire new insight into the structure and properties of matter. Here, we demonstrate that laser driven fast (˜MeV) neutrons can be efficiently moderated to epithermal energies with intrinsically short burst durations. In a proof-of-principle experiment using a 100 TW laser, a significant epithermal neutron flux of the order of 105 n/sr/pulse in the energy range of 0.5-300 eV was measured, produced by a compact moderator deployed downstream of the laser-driven fast neutron source. The moderator used in the campaign was specifically designed, by the help of MCNPX simulations, for an efficient and directional moderation of the fast neutron spectrum produced by a laser driven source.

  11. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  12. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Lopez, A. Legrand [CEA, DEN, Saclay, SIREN/LECSI, F-91400 Saclay (France)

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  13. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Vermeeren, L.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-01-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  14. Mapping of the flux and estimate of the radiation source term of neutron fields generated by the GE PETtrace-8 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente Castillo, Jhonny Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The use of spectrometric techniques in a cyclotron facility is strongly advised for the complete characterization of the neutron radiation field. In recent years, several studies of neutron spectrometry have been carried out at the Cyclotron of the Development Center of Nuclear Technology (CDTN). The main objective of this work is to propose a methodology for mapping of the flux and estimate of the radiation source term of neutron fields generated by the GE PETtrace-8 cyclotron. The method of neutron activation analysis with gold, indium and nickel activation foils was used to measure the activities induced at specific points in the cyclotron bunker. The irradiations of the activation foils were performed using the intermittent irradiation method to optimize the radiation field during 18 F production. The study of the neutron spectrum was performed using three radiation source terms. The first source term was constructed based on data provided by the cyclotron manufacturer using the neutron cross sections of the ENDF/B-VII library. The other two were proposed considering the irradiation process used in the routine of 18 F production. Both radiation source terms used the LA150H proton cross sections and for the 18 O, the cross sections of the physical model CEM03 (Cascade-exciton model) and TENDL (TALYS-based Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) were used. The results of the source terms in relation to the experimental results, in terms of neutron fluence rates, reaction rates and dose equivalent rates, showed that are in the same order of magnitude as those obtained by Ogata et al, Fujibuchi et al, and Gallerani et al., for the same cyclotron; and by Mendez et al. for a different manufacturing cyclotron. The models of the proposed radiation source terms were validated to obtain the spectra generated during the 18 F production when water enriched at 18 O is bombarded with a proton beam of 16.5 MeV. Finally, the model of the LA150H - TENDL - 2015 radiation source term is

  15. Spallation source neutron target systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.; Brown, R.; Collier, M.; Donahue, J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report for a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to design a next-generation spallation source neutron target system for the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos. It has been recognized for some time that new advanced neutron sources are needed in the US if the country is to maintain a competitive position in several important scientific and technological areas. A recent DOE panel concluded that the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (a nuclear reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and a high-power pulsed spallation source are both needed in the near future. One of the most technically challenging designs for a spallation source is the target station itself and, more specifically, the target-moderator-reflector arrangement. Los Alamos has demonstrated capabilities in designing, building, and operating high-power spallation-neutron-source target stations. Most of the new design ideas proposed worldwide for target system design for the next generation pulsed spallation source have either been conceived and implemented at LANSCE or proposed by LANSCE target system designers. These concepts include split targets, flux-trap moderators, back scattering and composite moderators, and composite reflectors

  16. Safety techniques in the change of nuclear systems. Radiation protection at spallation neutron sources and transmutation facilities; Sicherheitstechnik im Wandel Nuklearer Systeme. Strahlenschutz bei Spallationsneutronenquellen und Transmutationsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuenighoff, Kay

    2009-07-01

    To push the boundary towards higher neutron fluxes concepts based on spallation reactions have been discussed. Here neutrons are produced by bombarding a heavy metal target (e.g. mercury, tungsten, or tantalum) with high energetic protons. Up to now such facilities could not be realised because of the high power particle accelerators needed. Recent developments of the accelerator technology open the possibility of construction and operating proton accelerators in the MW region. This is demonstrated by construction and commissioning of two MW spallation neutron sources, namely SNS (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) with a power of 1.4 MW and J-PARC (Japan) with 1 MW. The realisation of proton accelerators at this power level will open the way towards energy amplifiers, as proposed e.g. by Carlo Rubbia. Such a facility will not only produce electric power. Furthermore longliving radionuclides can be transmutated into shortlived or even stable nuclides by neutron induced nuclear reactions. A mitigation of the problem of nuclear waste disposal. The above discussed developments prove that accelerators are not only constructed for research, moreover application of these technology became state of the art. With the emergence of particle accelerators in the MW region, radiation protection is confronted with new kind of problems to be solved. Especially the higher kinetic energies of the primary beam particles requires modification and expansion of computer programs well known in nuclear engineering. In contrast to nuclear reactors with kinetic energies up to 2-3 MeV, in spallation reaction secondary particles up to the incident energy in the GeV region will be produced. Problems related to radiation protection have to be considered in an energy range three orders of magnitude higher than known from nuclear reactors. In this thesis existing computer codes are compared and validated with data from selected experiments. Questions concerning radiation protection covers a broad range

  17. Secondary gamma-ray skyshine from 14 MeV Neutron Source Facility (OKTAVIAN). Comparison of measurement with its simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morotomi, Ryutaro; Kondo, Tetsuo; Murata, Isao; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radio Isotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Measurement of secondary gamma-ray skyshine was performed at the Intense 14 MeV Neutron Source Facility (OKTAVIAN) of Osaka University with NaI and Hp-Ge detectors. From the result of measurements, some mechanism of secondary gamma-ray skyshine from 14 MeV neutron source facility was found out. The analysis of the measured result were carried out with MCNP-4B for four nuclear data files of JENDL-3.2, JENDL-F.F., FENDL-2, and ENDF/B-VI. It was confirmed that all the nuclear data are fairly reliable for calculations of secondary gamma-ray skyshine. (author)

  18. A Large Neutrino Detector Facility at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, Y.V.

    1999-01-01

    The ORLaND (Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector) collaboration proposes to construct a large neutrino detector in an underground experimental hall adjacent to the first target station of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The main mission of a large (2000 ton) Scintillation-Cherenkov detector is to measure bar ν μ -> bar ν e neutrino oscillation parameters more accurately than they can be determined in other experiments, or significantly extending the covered parameter space below (sin'20 le 10 -4 ). In addition to the neutrino oscillation measurements, ORLaND would be capable of making precise measurements of sin 2 θ W , search for the magnetic moment of the muon neutrino, and investigate the anomaly in the KARMEN time spectrum, which has been attributed to a new neutral particle. With the same facility an extensive program of measurements of neutrino nucleus cross sections is also planned to support nuclear astrophysics

  19. The spallation neutron source SINQ. A new large facility for research at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.; Crawford, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document is intended to familiarize the non-specialist with the principles of neutron scattering and some of its applications. It presents an overview of the foundations of neutron scattering, the basic types of instruments used, and their principles of operation. The design concept and some technical details of the spallation neutron source are described for the benefit of the scientifically or technically interested reader. In future this source will form the heart of the instruments available to PSI's wide community of neutron scattering researchers. (author) 32 figs., 1 tab

  20. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) exposed to high fluxes of gamma radiation, thermal neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Martini, M.; Meinardi, F.; Raffaglio, C.; Salvadori, P.; Scacco, A.; Sichirollo, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD), widely experimented and utilized in personal dosimetry, have some advantageous characteristics which induce one to employ them also in radiotherapy. The new radiotherapy techniques are aimed at selectively depositing a high dose in cancerous tissues. This goal is reached by utilising both conventional and other more recently proposed radiation, such as thermal neutrons and heavy charged particles. In these inhomogeneous radiation fields a reliable mapping of the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is desirable, and the utilized dosemeters have to give such a possibility without notably perturbing the radiation field with the materials of the dosemeters themselves. TLDs, for their small dimension and their tissue equivalence for most radiation, give good support in the mapping of radiation fields. After exposure to the high fluxes of therapeutic beams, some commercial TL dosemeters have shown a loss of reliability. An investigation has therefore be performed, both on commercial and on laboratory made phosphors, in order to investigate their behaviour in such radiation fields. In particular the thermal neutron and gamma ray mixed field of the thermal column of a nuclear reactor, of interest for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (B.N.C.T.) and a proton beam, of interest for proton therapy, were considered. Here some results obtained with new TL phosphors exposed in such radiation fields are presented, after a short description of some radiation damage effect on commercial LiF TLDs exposed in the (n th ,γ) field of the thermal column of a reactor. (author)

  1. Use of higher order signal moments and high speed digital sampling technique for neutron flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baers, L. B.; Gutierrez, T. Rivero; Mendoza, R. A. Carrillo; Santana, G. Jimenez

    1993-08-01

    The second (conventional variance or Campbell signal), the third, and the modified fourth order central signal moments associated with the amplified and filtered currents from two electrodes of an ex-core neutron sensitive fission detector were measured versus the reactor power of the 1-MW TRIGA reactor in Mexico City. Two channels of a high-speed (400-MHz) multiplexing data sampler and an analog-to-digital converter with 12-b resolution and 1-Mword buffer memory were used. The data were further retrieved into a PC, and estimates for autocorrelation and cross-correlation moments up to the fifth order, coherence, skewness, excess, etc., quantities were calculated offline. Five-mode operation of the detector was achieved, including conventional counting rates and currents in agreement with theory and the authors' previous results with analog techniques. The signals are proportional to the neutron flux and reactor power in some flux ranges. The suppression of background noise is improved and the lower limit of the measurement range is extended as the order of moment is increased, in agreement with theory.

  2. Condensed matter and materials research using neutron diffraction and spectroscopy: reactor and pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisanti, Paola; Lovesey, S.W.

    1987-05-01

    The paper provides a short, and partial view of the neutron scattering technique applied to condensed matter and materials research. Reactor and accelerator-based neutron spectrometers are discussed, together with examples of research projects that illustrate the puissance and modern applications of neutron scattering. Some examples are chosen to show the range of facilities available at the medium flux reactor operated by Casaccia ENEA, Roma and the advanced, pulsed spallation neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire. (author)

  3. Conceptual design of facilities and systems for cold neutron source in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Jung, H. S.; Wu, S. I.; Ahn, S. H.; Park, Y. C.; Cho, Y. G.; Ryu, J. S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2004-05-01

    The systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source consist of hydrogen handling system, vacuum system, gas blanket system, helium refrigeration system and electrical and instrumentation and control system. The overriding safety goal in the system design is to prevent the escape of hydrogen from the system boundary or the ingress of air into the hydrogen boundary. Of primary concern is the release of hydrogen (or intrusion of oxygen) into an area where any subsequent reaction could possibly result in damage to the reactor building or safety systems or components, as well as jeopardize personnel safety. It has been an general rule that all aspects of the system design were based on the demonstrated technology of long standing world-wide. In some cases, other options are also suggested for the flexibility of independent review process. This report hopefully serves as basis for the coming detail design and engineering. This report is mainly concentrated on the conceptual system design performed during the first project year. It includes the key safety design requirements in the beginning, followed by the description of the preliminary system design. At the rear part, building layout and equipment arrangement are briefly introduced for easy understanding of the whole pictures. The design status for the In-Pool Assembly including safety analysis and neutron guide and instruments will be discussed in another report

  4. Qualification test for ITER HCCR-TBS mockups with high heat flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon, E-mail: skkim93@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated. • A thermo-hydraulic analysis was performed using a high heat flux test facility by using electron beam. • The plan for qualification tests was developed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization. - Abstract: The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated, and an integrity and thermo-hydraulic performance test should be completed under the same or similar operation conditions of ITER. The test plan for a thermo-hydraulic analysis was developed by using a high heat flux test facility, called the Korean heat load test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB). This facility is utilized for a qualification test of the plasma facing component (PFC) for the ITER first wall and DEMO divertor, and for the thermo-hydraulic experiments. In this work, KoHLT-EB will be used for the plan of the performance qualification test of the ITER HCCR-TBS mockups. This qualification tests should be performed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization (IO), which describe the specifications and qualifications of the heat flux test facility and test procedure for ITER PFC.

  5. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  6. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution; EL-2: Repartition du flux de neutrons thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, A; Genthon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  7. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  8. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  9. Measurement of secondary gamma-ray skyshine and groundshine from intense 14 MeV neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeo; Morotomi, Ryutaro; Kondo, Tetsuo; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-03-01

    Secondary gamma-ray skyshine and groundshine, including the direct contribution from the facility building, have been measured with an Hp-Ge detector and an NaI(Tl) detector at the Intense 14 MeV Neutron Source Facility OKTAVIAN of Osaka University, Japan. The mechanism of secondary gamma-rays propagation were analyzed with the measured spectrum with the Hp-Ge detector. The contribution of the skyshine was shown to be a continuum spectrum that was composed of mainly Compton scattered high energy secondary gamma-rays generated in the facility building created by (n, {gamma}) reaction. The contribution of the groundshine considerably contained secondary gamma-rays generated by {sup nat}Si (n, {gamma}) reaction in soil, including the albedo contribution from the ground. And the total contribution contained capture gamma-rays from iron (Fe) and other nuclides. The measurements with the NaI(Tl) detector as well as the Hp-Ge detector were carried out to investigate the dependence of gamma-ray dose as a function of distance from the neutron source up to hundreds meters. Consequently, it was found that the dependence could be fitted with the function of const.{center_dot}exp(-r/{lambda})/r{sup n}, where n values were around 2 except for the skyshine (n {approx} 1). It was thus indicated that the contribution of the skyshine could be propagated farther downfield than the direct contribution from the facility. The measured ratios of the three contributions (skyshine, groundshine, and direct contributions) and the distance dependence in each path were shown to be in good agreement with calculated results by the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4A. And the total contributions for the two detectors of NaI(Tl) and Hp-Ge agree excellently with each other. (author)

  10. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  11. Neutronics of the IFMIF neutron source: development and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.P.H.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate analysis of this system required the development of a code system and methodology capable of modelling the various physical processes. A generic code system for the neutronics analysis of neutron sources has been created by loosely integrating existing components with new developments: the data processing code NJOY, the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP, and the activation code ALARA were supplemented by a damage data processing program, damChar, and integrated with a number of flexible and extensible modules for the Perl scripting language. Specific advances were required to apply this code system to IFMIF. Based on the ENDF-6 data format requirements of this system, new data evaluations have been implemented for neutron transport and activation. Extensive analysis of the Li(d, xn) reaction has led to a new MCNP source function module, M c DeLi, based on physical reaction models and capable of accurate and flexible modelling of the IFMIF neutron source term. In depth analyses of the neutron flux spectra and spatial distribution throughout the high flux test region permitted a basic validation of the tools and data. The understanding of the features of the neutron flux provided a foundation for the analyses of the other neutron responses. (orig./DGE) [de

  12. Detailed studies of Minor Actinide transmutation-incineration in high-intensity neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringer, O. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Al Mahamid, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, E.H. and S. Div., CA (United States); Blandin, C. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DER/SPEX, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France); Chabod, S. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, F. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DPC/SECR, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dupont, E.; Fioni, G. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Isnard, H. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DPC/SECR, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Letourneau, A.; Marie, F. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Oriol, L. [CEA/Cadarache/DEN/DER/SPEX, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France); Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, C. [CEA/Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The Mini-INCA project is dedicated to the measurement of incineration-transmutation chains and potentials of minor actinides in high-intensity thermal neutron fluxes. In this context, new types of detectors and methods of analysis have been developed. The {sup 241}Am and {sup 232}Th transmutation-incineration chains have been studied and several capture and fission cross sections measured very precisely, showing some discrepancies with existing data or evaluated data. An impact study was made on different based-like GEN-IV reactors. It underlines the necessity to proceed to precise measurements for a large number of minor-actinides that contribute to these future incineration scenarios. (authors)

  13. HELCZA-High heat flux test facility for testing ITER EU first wall components.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokůpek, J.; Samec, K.; Jílek, R.; Gavila, P.; Neufuss, S.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 187-190 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : HELCZA * High heat flux * Electron beam testing * Test facility * Plasma facing components * First wall * Divertora Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617302818

  14. Generating energy dependent neutron flux maps for effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For activation analysis and irradiation scheme of miniature neutron source reactor, designers or engineers usually require information on thermal neutron flux levels and other energy group flux levels (such as fast, resonance and epithermal). A methodology for readily generating such flux maps and flux profiles for any ...

  15. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.

    1998-08-01

    Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Up to a few GeV of energy, the neutron production is roughly proportional to the beam power. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, a number of other issues are discussed. (author)

  16. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10 15 n cm -2 s -1 steady state source or a 10 17 n cm -2 s -1 peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee

  17. Irradiation effects in fused quartz 'Suprasil' as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, O.M.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study about the registration characteristics of synthetic fused quartz 'Suprasil I' use as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons and the effects of irradiation on it was performed. Fission fragments of 252 Cf, gamma radiation doses of of 60 Co up to 150 MGy, and integrated neutrons fluxes up to 10 20 n/cm 2 were used. A model to explain the effects on track registration and development characteristics of 'Suprasil I' irradiated on reactors were proposed, based on the obtained results for efficiency an for annealing. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Seasonal and Lunar Month Periods Observed in Natural Neutron Flux at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkin, Yuri; Alekseenko, Victor; Cai, Zeyu; Cao, Zhen; Cattaneo, Claudio; Cui, Shuwang; Giroletti, Elio; Gromushkin, Dmitry; Guo, Cong; Guo, Xuewen; He, Huihai; Liu, Ye; Ma, Xinhua; Shchegolev, Oleg; Vallania, Piero; Vigorito, Carlo; Zhao, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Air radon concentration measurement is useful for research on geophysical effects, but it is strongly sensitive to site geology and many geophysical and microclimatic processes such as wind, ventilation, air humidity and so on inducing very big fluctuations on the concentration of radon in air. On the contrary, monitoring the radon concentration in soil by measuring the thermal neutron flux reduces environmental effects. In this paper, we report some experimental results on the natural thermal neutron flux as well as on the concentration of air radon and its variations at 4300 m asl. These results were obtained with unshielded thermal neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) and radon monitors located inside the ARGO-YBJ experimental hall. The correlation of these variations with the lunar month and 1-year period is undoubtedly confirmed. A method for earthquake prediction provided by a global net of en-detectors is currently under study.

  19. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  1. Neutron PSDs for the next generation of spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Eijk, C W

    2002-01-01

    A review of R and D for neutron PSDs to be used at anticipated new spallation neutron sources: the Time-of-Flight system facility, European Spallation Source, Spallation Neutron Source and Neutron Arena, is presented. The gas-filled detectors, scintillation detectors and hybrid systems are emphasized.

  2. Future prospects of imaging at spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of state-of-the-art spallation neutron sources is a major step forward in efficient neutron production for most neutron scattering techniques. Although they provide lower time-averaged neutron flux than high flux reactor sources, advantage for different instrumental techniques can be derived from the pulsed time structure of the available flux, which can be translated into energy, respectively, wavelength resolution. Conventional neutron imaging on the other hand relies on an intense continuous beam flux and hence falls short in profiting from the new development. Nevertheless, some recently developed novel imaging techniques require and some can benefit from energy resolution. The impact of the emerging spallation sources on different imaging techniques has been investigated, ways to benefit will be identified (where possible) and prospects of future imaging instruments and possible options and layouts at a spallation neutron source will be discussed and outlined.

  3. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  4. Beam plasma 14 MeV neutron source for fusion materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravenscroft, D.; Bulmer, D.; Coensgen, F.; Doggett, J.; Molvik, A.; Souza, P.; Summers, L.; Williamson, V.

    1991-09-01

    The conceptual engineering design and expected performance for a 14 MeV DT neutron source is detailed. The source would provide an intense neutron flux for accelerated testing of fusion reactor materials. The 150-keV neutral beams inject energetic deuterium atoms, that ionize, are trapped, then react with a warm (200 eV), dense tritium target plasma. This produces a neutron source strength of 3.6 x 10 17 n/sec for a neutron power density at the plasma edge of 5--10 MW/m 2 . This is several times the ∼2 MW/m 2 anticipated at the first wall of fusion reactors. This high flux provides accelerated end-of-life tests of 1- to 2-year duration, thus making materials development possible. The modular design of the source and the facilities are described

  5. CARNAC, Neutron Flux and Neutron Spectra in Criticality Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessis, J.

    1976-01-01

    Nature of physical problem solved: Calculation of flux and neutron spectra in the case of a criticality accident. The method is unsophisticated but fast. The program is divided into two parts: (1) The code CRITIC is based on the Fermi age equation and evaluates the neutron number per fission emitted from a moderate critical system and its energy spectrum. (2) The code NARCISSE uses concrete current albedo, evaluates the product of neutron reflection on walls of the source containment and calculates the resulting flux at any point, and its energy distribution into 21 groups. The results obtained seem satisfactory, if compared with a Monte Carlo program

  6. Analytical evaluation of neutron diffusion equation for the geometry of very intense continuous high flux pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    Using the concept of Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor to obtain a rotating high flux pulse in an annular core an analytical treatment for the quasi-static solution with a moving reflector is presented. Under quasi-static situation, time averaged values for important parameters like multiplication factor, flux, leakage do not change with time. As a result the instantaneous solution can be considered to be separable in time and space after correcting for the coordinates for the motion of the pulser. The space behaviour of the pulser is considered as exp(-αx 2 ). Movement of delayed neutron precursors is also taken into account. (author). 4 refs

  7. Neutron irradiation facility and its characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    A neutron irradiation facility utilizing spallation reactions with high energy protons is conceived as one of the facilities in 'Proton Engineering center (PEC)' proposed at JAERI. Characteristics of neutron irradiation field of the facility for material irradiation studies are described in terms of material damage parameters, influence of the pulse irradiation, irradiation environments other than neutronics features, etc., comparing with the other sorts of neutron irradiation facilities. Some perspectives for materials irradiation studies using PEC are presented. (author)

  8. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, A.; Pedersen, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and 3 He proportional counter measurements. (authors)

  9. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  10. THERMAL NEUTRON FLUX MAPPING ON A TARGET CAPSULE AT RABBIT FACILITY OF RSG-GAS REACTOR FOR USE IN k0-INAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutisna Sutisna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental neutron activation analysis based on the k0 method (k0-INAA requires the availability of the accurate reactor parameter data, in particular a thermal neutron flux that interact with a targets inside the target capsule. This research aims to determine and map the thermal neutron flux inside the capsule and irradiation channels used for the elemental quantification using the k0-AANI. Mapping of the thermal neutron flux (фth on two type of irradiation capsule have been done for RS01 and RS02 facilities of RSG-GAS reactor. Thermal neutron flux determined using Al-0,1%Au alloy through 197Au(n,g 198Au nuclear reaction, while the flux mapping done using statistics R. Thermal neutron flux are calculated using k0-IAEA software provided by IAEA. The results showed the average thermal neutron flux is (5.6±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.6±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (5.2±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 and (5.3±0.4×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for Polyethylene capsule of 1st , 2nd, 3rd and 4th layer respectively. In the case of Aluminum capsule, the thermal neutron flux was lower compared to that on Polyethylene capsule. There were (3.0±0.2×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (2.8±0.1×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1; (3.2±0.3×10+13 n.cm-2.s-1 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd layers respectively. For each layer in the capsule, the thermal neutron flux is not uniform and it was no degradation flux in the axial direction, both for polyethylene and aluminum capsules. Contour map of eight layer on polyethylene capsule and six layers on aluminum capsule for RS01 and RS02 irradiation channels had a similar pattern with a small diversity for all type of the irradiation capsule. Keywords: thermal neutron, flux, capsule, NAA   Analisis aktivasi neutron instrumental berbasis metode k0 (k0-AANI memerlukan ketersediaan data parameter reaktor yang akurat, khususnya data fluks neutron termal yang berinteraksi dengan inti sasaran di dalam kapsul target. Penelitian ini bertujuan menentukan dan memetakan fluks neutron termal

  11. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Research applications of the Livermore RTNS-II neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has completed construction of the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II (RTNS-II) Facility. These sources, built and operated for the Office of Fusion Energy of the Department of Energy, will be operated by LLL as a national facility for the study of materials damage processes induced by 14-MeV neutrons. Design strength of the sources is 4 x 10 13 n/s with a maximum flux of 1 X 10 13 n/cm 2 s. The 400 keV, 150 mA D + accelerators and 5000 rpm titanium--tritide target assemblies were built using experience gained with LLL's RTNS-I neutron source. The RTNS-I source, producing 6 x 10 12 n/s, is currently the most intense 14-MeV source available. RTNS-I has been used for fusion reactor materials studies for the past six years. The experimental program for the new sources will be oriented toward fundamental measurements of high energy neutron-induced effects. The data produced will be used to develop models of damage processes to help guide materials selection for future fusion reactors

  13. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Masashi, E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Calderoni, P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, K. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kolasinski, R. [Hydrogen and Metallurgical Science Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Sharpe, J.P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, ion fluence: 4 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  14. High flux transmutation of fission products and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, A.; Kiselev, G.; Myrtsymova, L.

    2001-01-01

    Long-lived fission products and minor actinides accumulated in spent nuclear fuel of power reactors comprise the major part of high level radwaste. Their incineration is important from the point of view of radwaste management. Transmutation of these nuclides by means of neutron irradiation can be performed either in conventional nuclear reactors, or in specialized transmutation reactors, or in ADS facilities with subcritical reactor and neutron source with application of proton accelerator. Different types of transmutation nuclear facilities can be used in order to insure optimal incineration conditions for radwaste. The choice of facility type for optimal transmutation should be based on the fundamental data in the physics of nuclide transformations. Transmutation of minor actinides leads to the increase of radiotoxicity during irradiation. It takes significant time compared to the lifetime of reactor facility to achieve equilibrium without effective transmutation. High flux nuclear facilities allow to minimize these draw-backs of conventional facilities with both thermal and fast neutron spectrum. They provide fast approach to equilibrium and low level of equilibrium mass and radiotoxicity of transmuted actinides. High flux facilities are advantageous also for transmutation of long-lived fission products as they provide short incineration time

  15. Wide range neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yorimasa; Fukushima, Toshiki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a wide range neutron-flux monitor adapted such that the flux monitoring function and alarming function can automatically by shifted from pulse counting system to cambel method system. Constitution: A wide range neutron-flux monitor comprises (la) pulse counting system and (lb) cambel-method system for inputting detection signals from neutron detectors and separating them into signals for the pulse measuring system and the cambel measuring system, (2) overlap detection and calculation circuit for detecting the existence of the overlap of two output signals from the (la) and (lb) systems, and (3) trip circuit for judging the abnormal state of neutron detectors upon input of the detection signals. (Seki, T.)

  16. Ceramics research in a high-energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on the irradiation effect to ceramics have added much to the basic understanding of their behavior, for example, the amorphous state of ceramics related to radiation-induced metamictization, the radiation-induced strengthening and toughening due to ultrafine defect aggregates, the in situ degradation of electrical resistivity, the role of radiation-induced defects on thermal conductivity and so on. Most of the irradiation testing on ceramics in the fields of structural and thermal properties have been carried out by using fast fission neutrons of about 1 MeV, but if this energy could be significantly changed, the size and nature of damage cascade and the quantity of transmutation gases produced would change. The significance of neutron source parameters, the special test requirement for ceramics such as the use of miniature specimens, the control of test environment, the transient reduction of electrical resistivity and so on are discussed. A special case of ceramic studies is that on new oxide superconductors. These materials can be made into amorphous state at about 1 dpa using 1 MeV electrons, and are considered to be fairly damage-sensitive. (K.I.)

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site a few miles north of Richland, Washington, is a major link in the chain of development required to sustain and advance Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) technology in the United States. This 400 MWt sodium cooled reactor is a three loop design, is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy, and is the largest research reactor of its kind in the world. The purpose of the facility is three-fold: (1) to provide a test bed for components, materials, and breeder reactor fuels which can significantly extend resource reserves; (2) to produce a complete body of base data for the use of liquid sodium in heat transfer systens; and (3) to demonstrate inherent safety characteristics of LMFBR designs

  18. Procedures for multielement analysis using high-flux fast-neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Hopke, P.K.; Meyer, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Improvements have been made in the rabbit system used for multi-element fast-neutron activation analysis at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Rotating Target Neutron Source, RTNS-I. Procedures have been developed for the analysis of 20 to 25 elements in samples with an inorganic matrix and 10 to 15 elements in biological samples, without the need for prohibitively expensive, long irradiations. Results are presented for the analysis of fly ash, orchard leaves, and bovine liver

  19. Lithium Blanket Module dosimetry measurements at the LOTUS 14-MeV neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, F.Y.; Leo, W.R.; Sahraoui, C.; Wuthrich, S.; Harker, Y.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the measurements and results of the dosimeter material reaction rates inside the Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) after irradiation by the LOTUS 14-MeV neutron source at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne. The measurement program has been designed to utilize sets of passive dosimeter materials in the form of foils and wires. The dosimetry materials reaction thresholds and interaction response ranges chosen for this series of measurements encompass the entire neutron spectra along the full length of the LBM fuel rods

  20. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, poisoning, etc are discussed, aiming at a high performance pulsed spallation source

  2. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs

    CERN Document Server

    Pomp, S; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Rottger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-01-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  3. EXILL—a high-efficiency, high-resolution setup for γ-spectroscopy at an intense cold neutron beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschel, M.; Blanc, A.; de France, G.; Köster, U.; Leoni, S.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.; Ahmed, S.; Astier, A.; Augey, L.; Back, T.; Baczyk, P.; Bajoga, A.; Balabanski, D.; Belgya, T.; Benzoni, G.; Bernards, C.; Biswas, D. C.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; Britton, R.; Bruyneel, B.; Burnett, J.; Cakirli, R. B.; Carroll, R.; Catford, W.; Cederwall, B.; Celikovic, I.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Clement, E.; Cooper, N.; Crespi, F.; Csatlos, M.; Curien, D.; Czerwiński, M.; Danu, L. S.; Davies, A.; Didierjean, F.; Drouet, F.; Duchêne, G.; Ducoin, C.; Eberhardt, K.; Erturk, S.; Fraile, L. M.; Gottardo, A.; Grente, L.; Grocutt, L.; Guerrero, C.; Guinet, D.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Ilieva, S.; Ivanova, D.; John, B. V.; John, R.; Jolie, J.; Kisyov, S.; Krticka, M.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Korgul, A.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, T.; Kurpeta, J.; Kuti, I.; Lalkovski, S.; Larijani, C.; Leguillon, R.; Lica, R.; Litaize, O.; Lozeva, R.; Magron, C.; Mancuso, C.; Ruiz Martinez, E.; Massarczyk, R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Million, B.; Mokry, C.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Mulholland, K.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D. R.; Olaizola, B.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Paziy, V.; Petrache, C.; Pfeiffer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Podolyak, Z.; Ramdhane, M.; Redon, N.; Regan, P.; Regis, J. M.; Regnier, D.; Oliver, R. J.; Rudigier, M.; Runke, J.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Saed-Samii, N.; Salsac, M. D.; Scheck, M.; Schwengner, R.; Sengele, L.; Singh, P.; Smith, J.; Stezowski, O.; Szpak, B.; Thomas, T.; Thürauf, M.; Timar, J.; Tom, A.; Tomandl, I.; Tornyi, T.; Townsley, C.; Tuerler, A.; Valenta, S.; Vancraeyenest, A.; Vandone, V.; Vanhoy, J.; Vedia, V.; Warr, N.; Werner, V.; Wilmsen, D.; Wilson, E.; Zerrouki, T.; Zielinska, M.

    2017-11-01

    In the EXILL campaign a highly efficient array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was operated at the cold neutron beam facility PF1B of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) to carry out nuclear structure studies, via measurements of γ-rays following neutron-induced capture and fission reactions. The setup consisted of a collimation system producing a pencil beam with a thermal capture equivalent flux of about 108 n s-1cm-2 at the target position and negligible neutron halo. The target was surrounded by an array of eight to ten anti-Compton shielded EXOGAM Clover detectors, four to six anti-Compton shielded large coaxial GASP detectors and two standard Clover detectors. For a part of the campaign the array was combined with 16 LaBr3:(Ce) detectors from the FATIMA collaboration. The detectors were arranged in an array of rhombicuboctahedron geometry, providing the possibility to carry out very precise angular correlation and directional-polarization correlation measurements. The triggerless acquisition system allowed a signal collection rate of up to 6 × 105 Hz. The data allowed to set multi-fold coincidences to obtain decay schemes and in combination with the FATIMA array of LaBr3:(Ce) detectors to analyze half-lives of excited levels in the pico- to microsecond range. Precise energy and efficiency calibrations of EXILL were performed using standard calibration sources of 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu as well as data from the reactions 27Al(n,γ)28Al and 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl in the energy range from 30 keV up to 10 MeV.

  4. Spallation neutron source target station issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N.; Charlton, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    In many areas of physics, materials and nuclear engineering, it is extremely valuable to have a very intense source of neutrons so that the structure and function of materials can be studied. One facility proposed for this purpose is the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS). This facility will consist of two parts: (1) a high-energy (∼1 GeV) and high powered (∼ 1 MW) proton accelerator, and (2) a target station which converts the protons to low-energy (≤ 2 eV) neutrons and delivers them to the neutron scattering instruments. This paper deals with the second part, i.e., the design and development of the NSNS target station and the scientifically challenging issues. Many scientific and technical disciplines are required to produce a successful target station. These include engineering, remote handling, neutronics, materials, thermal hydraulics, and instrumentation. Some of these areas will be discussed

  5. Design of a target and moderator at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) as a neutron source for fusion reactor materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    The LASREF facility is located in the beam stop area at LAMPF. The neutron spectrum is fission-like with the addition of a 3% to 5% component with E > 20 MeV. The present study evaluates the limits on geometry and material selection that will maximize the neutron flux. MCNP and LAHET were used to predict the neutron flux and energy spectrum for a variety of geometries. The problem considers 760 MeV protons incident on tungsten. The resulting neutrons are multiplied in uranium through (n,xn) reactions. Calculations show that a neutron flux greater than 10 19 n/m 2 /s is achievable. The helium to dpa ratio and the transmutation product generation are calculated. These results are compared to expectations for the proposed DEMO fusion reactor and to FFTF

  6. Sources of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.

    1983-01-01

    Various sources of polarized neutrons are reviewed. Monoenergetic source produced with unpolarized or polarized beams, white sources of polarized neutrons, production by transmissions through polarized hydrogen targets and polarized thermal neutronsare discussed, with appropriate applications included. (U.K.)

  7. The Clatterbridge high-energy neutron therapy facility: specification and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Blake, S.W.; Shaw, J.E.; Bewley, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A high energy neutron therapy facility has been installed at the Douglas Cyclotron Centre, Clatterbridge Hospital Merseyside, to extend M.R.C. clinical trials of fast neutrons. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 62 MeV protons. The target is isocentrically mounted with potential for 360 0 rotation, with a fully variable collimator, giving a range of rectilinear field sizes from 5 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. Basic neutron beam data including output, field flatness, penumbra and depth-dose data have been measured. For a 10 cm x 10 cm field, 50% depth dose occurs at 16.2 cm in water and output is 1.63 cGy μ A -1 min -1 at maximum dose depth. Effectiveness of the target shielding and neutron-induced radioactivity in the treatment head were also measured. It is concluded that the equipment meets design specifications and fully satisfies criticisms of earlier neutron therapy equipment. A full radiation survey showed that radiation levels present no significant staff hazard. (UK)

  8. Large area solid target neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.C.; Bauer, W.

    1974-01-01

    A potentially useful neutron source may result from the combination of a solid deuterium-tritium loaded target with the large area, high energy ion beams from ion sources being developed for neutral beam injection. The resulting neutron source would have a large radiating area and thus produce the sizable experimental volume necessary for future studies of bulk and synergistic surface radiation effects as well as experiments on engineering samples and small components. With a 200 keV D + T + beam and 40 kW/cm 2 power dissipation on a 200 cm 2 target spot, a total neutron yield of about 4 x 10 15 n/sec may be achieved. Although the useable neutron flux from this source is limited to 1 to 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /sec, this flux can be produced 3 cm in front of the target and over about 300 cm 3 of experimental volume. Problems of total power dissipation, sputtering, isotopic flushing and thermal dissociation are reviewed. Neutron flux profiles and potential experimental configurations are presented and compared to other neutron source concepts. (U.S.)

  9. SEARCH FOR SOURCES OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS WITH FOUR YEARS OF DATA FROM THE ICETOP DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005 (Australia); Abraham, K. [Physik-department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A.; Ansseau, I. [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ahrens, M. [Oskar Klein Centre and Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G. [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Department of Physics, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Anderson, T. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Argüelles, C.; Axani, S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Auffenberg, J. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2016-10-20

    IceTop is an air-shower array located on the Antarctic ice sheet at the geographic South Pole. IceTop can detect an astrophysical flux of neutrons from Galactic sources as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the source direction. Neutrons are undeflected by the Galactic magnetic field and can typically travel 10 ( E /PeV) pc before decay. Two searches are performed using 4 yr of the IceTop data set to look for a statistically significant excess of events with energies above 10 PeV (10{sup 16} eV) arriving within a small solid angle. The all-sky search method covers from −90° to approximately −50° in declination. No significant excess is found. A targeted search is also performed, looking for significant correlation with candidate sources in different target sets. This search uses a higher-energy cut (100 PeV) since most target objects lie beyond 1 kpc. The target sets include pulsars with confirmed TeV energy photon fluxes and high-mass X-ray binaries. No significant correlation is found for any target set. Flux upper limits are determined for both searches, which can constrain Galactic neutron sources and production scenarios.

  10. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amar, E-mail: image@barc.gov.in; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P.S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: •Experimental subcritical facility BRAHMMA coupled to D-D/D-T neutron generator. •Preliminary results of PNS experiments reported. •Feynman-alpha noise measurements explored with continuous source. -- Abstract: The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated k{sub eff} of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor k{sub s} and external neutron source efficiency φ{sup ∗} in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  11. Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Optimizing a three-element core design for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    Source of neutrons in the proposed Advanced Neutron Source facility is a multipurpose research reactor providing 5-10 times the flux, for neutron beams, of the best existing facilities. Baseline design for the reactor core, based on the ''no new inventions'' rule, was an assembly of two annular fuel elements similar to those used in the Oak Ridge and Grenoble high flux reactors, containing highly enriched U silicide particles. DOE commissioned a study of the use of medium- or low-enriched U; a three-element core design was studied as a means to provide extra volume to accommodate the additional U compound required when the fissionable 235 U has to be diluted with 238 U to reduce the enrichment. This paper describes the design and optimization of that three-element core

  13. Reasons why Plutonium 242 is the best fission chamber deposit to monitor the fast component of a high neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, P.; Oriol, L.; Jammes, C.; Vermeeren, L.

    2008-01-01

    The FNDS project aims at developing fission chambers to measure on-line the fast component of a high neutron flux (∼10 14 ncm -2 s -1 or more) with a significant thermal component. We identify with simulations the deposits of fission chambers that are best suited to this goal. We address the question of the evolution of the deposit by radiative capture and decay. A deposit of 242 Pu appears as the best choice, with a high initial sensitivity to fast neutrons only slowly degrading under irradiation. The effect of unavoidable impurities was assessed: small concentrations of 241 Pu and 239 Pu can be tolerated

  14. JRR-3 cold neutron source facility H2-O2 explosion safety proof testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibi, T.; Fuse, H.; Takahashi, H.; Akutsu, C.; Kumai, T.; Kawabata, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cold Neutron Source (CNS) will be installed in Japan Research Reactor-3 (JRR-3) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) during its remodeling project. This CNS holds liquid hydrogen at a temperature of about 20 K as a cold neutron source moderator in the heavy water area of the reactor to moderate thermal neutrons from the reactor to cold neutrons of about 5 meV energy. In the hydrogen circuit of the CNS safety measures are taken to prevent oxygen/hydrogen reaction (H 2 -O 2 explosion). It is also designed in such manner that, should an H 2 -O 2 explosion take place, the soundness of all the components can be maintained so as not to harm the reactor safety. A test hydrogen circuit identical to that of the CNS (real components designed by TECHNICATOME of France) was manufactured to conduct the H 2 -O 2 explosion test. In this test, the detonation that is the severest phenomenon of the oxygen/hydrogen reaction took place in the test hydrogen circuit to measure the exerted pressure on the components and their strain, deformation, leakage, cracking, etc. Based on the results of this measurement, the structural strength of the test hydrogen circuit was analyzed. The results of this test show that the hydrogen circuit components have sufficient structural strength to withstand an oxygen/hydrogen reaction

  15. Radiation protection metrology at a high-energy neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Sherwin, A.G.; More, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A radiation protection survey has been carried out at a high-energy neutron therapy facility using a combination of different detectors and counters. Included in the survey were measurements with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a rem meter, a large volume ionisation chamber (LVI) and a Geiger counter. Dose equivalent rates, normalised to a proton beam current of 25 μA, of between 1 μSv.h -1 and 0.7 Sv.h -1 were recorded depending on the location. In general the results confirm the tendency of the rem meter to over-read in fields consisting mainly of low energy neutrons and illustrate the advantages of the diagnostic and gamma discriminating properties of the TEPC. The LVI-Geiger system was found to be the least favourable combination of dosemeters, substantially under-reading and being unable to estimate the neutron dose rate at levels below about 32 μGy.h -1 . (author)

  16. Development of a high efficient conventional type cold neutron source using a non-explosive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Y.; Satoh, S.

    1999-01-01

    An efficient cold moderator that can be used easily at a small neutron source would be useful for neutron radiography, prompt gamma ray analysis and so on. Non-explosive materials are chosen for a cold moderator since explosive materials such as hydrogen and methane require a safety system. Neutronic performances of coupled moderators of various non-explosive materials are studied so as to develop such a cold moderator since the coupled moderator system is the best to obtain high intensity of cold neutrons. Effect of premoderator is studied and neutron spectra from methanol, ethanol, benzene, mesitylene and benzene methanol are measured around 20 K. The premoderator increased the cold neutron intensity by about 50∼70%. Methanol and mesitylene gave the highest cold neutron intensity. Effect of Be filter-reflector is also studied and a intensity gain of about 20% was obtained below about 5 MeV. (author)

  17. Commissioning of the Opal reactor cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiering, R.; Lu, W.; Ullah, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At OPAL, Australia's first cold neutron facility will form an essential part of the reactor's research programs. Fast neutrons, born in the core of a reactor, interact with a cryogenic material, in this case liquid deuterium, to give them very low energies ( 1 0 m eV). A cold neutron flux of 1.4 1 0 E 1 4 n /cm 2/ s is expected, with a peak in the energy spectrum at 4.2m eV. The cold neutron source reached cryogenic conditions for the first time in late 2005. The cold neutron source operates with a sub-cooled liquid Deuterium moderator at 24 K. The moderator chamber, which contains the deuterium, has been constructed from AlMg 5. The thermosiphon and moderator chamber are cooled by helium gas, in a natural convection thermosiphon loop. The helium refrigeration system utilises the Brayton cycle, and is fully insulated within a high vacuum environment. Despite the proximity of the cold neutron source to the reactor core, it has been considered as effectively separate to the reactor system, due to the design of its special vacuum containment vessel. As OPAL is a multipurpose research reactor, used for beam research as well as radiopharmaceutical production and industrial irradiations, the cold neutron source has been designed with a stand-by mode, to maximise production. The stand-by mode is a warm operating mode using only gaseous deuterium at ambient temperatures (∼ 3 00 K ), allowing for continued reactor operations whilst parts of the cold source are unavailable or in maintenance. This is the first time such a stand-by feature has been incorporated into a cold source facility

  18. Materials irradiation subpanel report to BESAC neutron sources and research panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Goland, A.N.; Lott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The future success of the nuclear power option in the US (fission and fusion) depends critically on the continued existence of a healthy national materials-irradiation program. Consideration of the requirements for acceptable materials-irradiation systems in a new neutron source has led the subcommittee to identify an advanced steady-state reactor (ANS) as a better choice than a spallation neutron source. However, the subcommittee also hastens to point out that the ANS cannot stand alone as the nation's sole high-flux mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation source in the next century. It must be incorporated in a broader program that includes other currently existing neutron irradiation facilities. Upgrading and continuing support for these facilities must be planned. In particular, serious consideration should be given to converting the HFIR into a dedicated materials test reactor, and long-term support for several university reactors should be established

  19. First flux measurement in a SINQ supermirror neutron guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Schlumpf, N.; Bauer, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    On Dec. 3, 1996, the Swiss spallation neutron source SINQ was taken into operation and produced its first neutrons successfully. The neutron spectrum within one of the supermirror guides was estimated by a chopper Time-of-Flight method. The result shows a 30% higher neutron intensity at the flux maximum than expected from previous Monte-Carlo simulations. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  20. A new high resolution neutron powder diffractometer at the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passell, L.; Bar-Ziv, S.; Gardner, D.W.; Cox, D.E.; Axe, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution neutron powder diffractometer under construction at the Brookhaven HFBR is expected to be completed by mid-1991. The new machine will have a Ge (511) monochromator with a take-off angle of 120 o (λ=1.89A) and 64 3 He counters in the detector bank. There will be interchangeable collimators before the monochromator allowing a choice of 5 or 11' horizontal divergence, and 10 cm-high, 5' collimators in front of the detectors. In the higher resolution mode, Δd/d is expected to be about 6x10 -4 at the resolution minimum. The diffractometer is generally similar to D2B at the Institut Laue-Langevin except for the monochromator. This will consist of a vertically focussing array of segments 3x1.27 cm in dimensions cut from stacks of 20 0.43 mm wafers that have been pressed and brazed together. Preliminary measurements indicate that a mosaic width of 0.1-0.15 o and a peak reflectivity of 25% can be achieved in this way. (author) 2 figs., 22 refs

  1. Neutrons Flux Distributions of the Pu-Be Source and its Simulation by the MCNP-4B Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Hadad, K.

    Neutron Fluence rate of a low intense Pu-Be source is measured by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of 197Au foils. Also, the neutron fluence rate distribution versus energy is calculated using the MCNP-4B code based on ENDF/B-V library. Theoretical simulation as well as our experimental performance are a new experience for Iranians to make reliability with the code for further researches. In our theoretical investigation, an isotropic Pu-Be source with cylindrical volume distribution is simulated and relative neutron fluence rate versus energy is calculated using MCNP-4B code. Variation of the fast and also thermal neutrons fluence rate, which are measured by NAA method and MCNP code, are compared.

  2. Experimental assessment of incineration rates of actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deruelle, O.

    2001-01-01

    The Mini-inca project develops new experimental facilities and computational methods to carry out integral measurements of actinide transmutation in given irradiation conditions. 2 types of irradiations are foreseen: -) short irradiations to have a precise determination of unknown nuclear parameters such as capture and fission cross sections including branching ratios; -) long irradiations of mono-isotopic sample or known mixtures of isotopes to determine transmutation rates in given high intensity neutron spectra. Irradiations will be carried out in the ILL reactor in Grenoble. A new detection system named Mini-inca chamber has been developed and installed at the ILL reactor, it allows accurate alpha-gamma spectroscopy just after irradiation and even between successive irradiations of the same sample. The advantages of alpha-gamma spectroscopy to determine the composition of the sample are that it is fast, it needs no chemistry and it is non-destructive. The first validation experiments have been performed and their results concerning the irradiation of a Pu-242 target are presented. (A.C.)

  3. Some general reflections on open-quotes long pulseclose quotes neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    A long pulse spallation neutron source (LPSS) having about 20 times more time average thermal flux than its short pulse counterpart (SPSS) at the same proton beam power and featuring a pronounced time structure not available on CW sources (CWNS) of equal time average flux can in principle host instruments typical for both classes of facilities. While the need for additional choppers introduces some restrictions on inverted time of flight techniques typical for SPSS and high incident neutron energies are not easier to use on LPSS than on CWNS, taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the neutron flux can enhance significantly the performance of direct time of flight instruments and of crystal spectrometers or diffractometers. In the paper some of the options are reviewed in a general manner and criteria are discussed which can be used to optimize the performance enhancement

  4. Primary study for boron neutron capture therapy uses the RSG-GAS beam tube facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suroso

    2000-01-01

    The minimum epithermal neutron flux as one of the prerequisite of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is 1.0 x 10 9 n/(cm 2 s) RSG-GAS have 6 beam tube facilities for neutron source, which is one of the beam tube S-2 has a possibility to utilization for BNCT facility. The totally flux neutron measurement in the front of S-2 beam tube is 1.8 x 10 7 n/(cm 2 s). The neutron flux measurement was less than for BNCT minimum prerequisite. Concerning to the flux neutron production in the reactor, which is reach to 2.5 x 10 14 n/(cm 2 s), there for the S-2 beam tube could be used beside collimator modification

  5. Large sample NAA of a pottery replica utilizing thermal neutron flux at AHWR critical facility and X-Z rotary scanning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Dasari, K.B.; Pujari, P.K.; Swain, K.K.; Shinde, A.D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) of a clay pottery replica from Peru was carried out using low neutron flux graphite reflector position of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) critical facility. This work was taken up as a part of inter-comparison exercise under IAEA CRP on LSNAA of archaeological objects. Irradiated large size sample, placed on an X-Z rotary scanning unit, was assayed using a 40% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) in conjunction with insitu relative detection efficiency was used to calculate concentration ratios of 12 elements with respect to Na. Analyses of both small and large size samples were carried out to check homogeneity and to arrive at absolute concentrations. (author)

  6. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  8. Spatial distribution of neutron flux for the A-711 neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essiet, A. E.; Owolabi, S. A.; Adesanmi, C. A.; Balogun, F. A.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neutron flux for the Kaman sciences A-711 neutron generator recently installed at the Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Ile-Ife Nigeria has been determined. At an operational tube current of 2.0 mA and high voltage power supply (HVPS) of 158 kV, the neutron flux increases from 1.608 ± 0.021*10 8 n/cm 2 s at the top of the irradiated plastic vial to 2.640 ± 0.022*10 8 n/cm 2 s at the centre, and then decreases to 1.943 ± 0.02* 8 n/cm 2 s at the bottom. The flux density is strongly dependent on the diameter of deuteron at the tritium target, and within this range a source strength of 10 8 n/s has been measured for the A-711 neutron generator

  9. Fabrication of 50-mg 252Cf neutron sources for the FDA [Food and Drug Administration] activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, J.E.; Cagle, E.B.; Knauer, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Transuranium Processing Plant (TPP) at ORNL has been requested by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to furnish 200 mg of 252 Cf for use in their new activation analysis facility. This paper discusses the procedure to be employed in fabricating the californium into four neutron sources, each containing a nominal 50-mg of 252 Cf. The ORNL Model LSD (Large, Stainless steel, Doubly encapsulated) neutron source consists of a 6.33-mm-diam aluminum pellet doubly encapsulated in Type 304L stainless steel. The pellet is comprised of an aluminum tube holding Cf 2 O 2 SO 4 microspheres confined by pressed aluminum powder. The microspheres are prepared in a separate vessel and then transferred into the specially designed aluminum tube prior to pressing

  10. Construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source: Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    DOE proposes to construct and operate a state-of-the-art, short-pulsed spallation neutron source comprised of an ion source, a linear accelerator, a proton accumulator ring, and an experiment building containing a liquid mercury target and a suite of neutron scattering instrumentation. The proposed Spallation Neutron Source would be designed to operate at a proton beam power of 1 megawatt. The design would accommodate future upgrades to a peak operating power of 4 megawatts. These upgrades may include construction of a second proton accumulation ring and a second target. The US needs a high-flux, short-pulsed neutron source to provide the scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron scattering research than is currently available, and to assure the availability of a state-of-the-art facility in the decades ahead. This next-generation neutron source would create new scientific and engineering opportunities. In addition, it would help replace the neutron science capacity that will be lost by the eventual shutdown of existing sources as they reach the end of their useful operating lives in the first half of the next century. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts from the proposed action and the alternatives. The analysis assumes a facility operating at a power of 1 MW and 4 MW over the life of the facility. The two primary alternatives analyzed in this EIS are: the proposed action (to proceed with building the Spallation Neutron Source) and the No-Action Alternative. The No-Action Alternative describes the expected condition of the environment if no action were taken. Four siting alternatives for the Spallation Neutron Source are evaluated: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, (preferred alternative); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  11. Spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.; Bartholomew, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The principles and theory of spallation neutron sources are outlined and a comparison is given with other types of neutron source. A summary of the available accelerator types for spallation neutron sources and their advantages and disadvantages is presented. Suitable target materials are discussed for specific applications, and typical target assemblies shown. (U.K.)

  12. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  13. Setup for polarized neutron imaging using in situ 3He cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, I; Ziesche, Ralf; Wang, Tianhao; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Lou; Tong, X; Jiang, C Y; Manke, Ingo; Treimer, Wolfgang; Chatterji, Tapan; Kardjilov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we report a new setup for polarized neutron imaging at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline using an in situ 3 He polarizer and analyzer. This development is very important for extending the capabilities of the imaging instrument at ORNL providing a polarized beam with a large field-of-view, which can be further used in combination with optical devices like Wolter optics, focusing guides, or other lenses for the development of microscope arrangement. Such a setup can be of advantage for the existing and future imaging beamlines at the pulsed neutron sources. The first proof-of-concept experiment is performed to study the ferromagnetic phase transition in the Fe 3 Pt sample. We also demonstrate that the polychromatic neutron beam in combination with in situ 3 He cells can be used as the initial step for the rapid measurement and qualitative analysis of radiographs.

  14. Neutron Flux and Activation Calculations for a High Current Deuteron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Coniglio, Angela; Sandri, Sandro

    2005-01-01

    Neutron analysis of the first Neutral Beam (NB) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) was performed to provide the basis for the study of the following main aspects: personnel safety during normal operation and maintenance, radiation shielding design, transportability of the NB components in the European countries. The first ITER NB is a medium energy light particle accelerator. In the scenario considered for the calculation the accelerated particles are negative deuterium ions with maximum energy of 1 MeV. The average beam current is 13.3 A. To assess neutron transport in the ITER NB structure a mathematical model of the components geometry was implemented into MCNP computer code (MCNP version 4c2. "Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System." RSICC Computer Code Collection. June 2001). The neutron source definition was outlined considering both D-D and D-T neutron production. FISPACT code (R.A. Forrest, FISPACT-2003. EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion, December 2002) was used to assess neutron...

  15. Status of the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Research reactors in the United States are becoming more and more outdated, at a time when neutron scattering is being recognized as an increasingly important technique in areas vital to the U.S. scientific and technological future. The last U.S. research reactor was constructed over 25 years ago, whereas new facilities have been built or are under construction in Japan, Russia and, especially, Western Europe, which now has a commanding lead in this important field. Concern over this situation in the early 1980's by a number of organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, led to a recommendation that design work start urgently on an advanced U.S. neutron research facility. This recommendation is realized in the Advanced Neutron Source Project. The centerpiece of the Advanced Neutron Source will be a new research reactor of unprecedented flux (> 7.5x10 19 m -2 ·s -1 ), equipped with a wide variety of state-of-the-art spectrometers and diffractometers on hot, thermal, and cold neutron beams. Very cold and ultracold neutron beams will also be provided for specialized experiments. This paper will discuss the current status of the design and the plans for scattering instrumentation. (author)

  16. maximum neutron flux at thermal nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugar, P.

    1968-10-01

    Since actual research reactors are technically complicated and expensive facilities it is important to achieve savings by appropriate reactor lattice configurations. There is a number of papers, and practical examples of reactors with central reflector, dealing with spatial distribution of fuel elements which would result in higher neutron flux. Common disadvantage of all the solutions is that the choice of best solution is done starting from the anticipated spatial distributions of fuel elements. The weakness of these approaches is lack of defined optimization criteria. Direct approach is defined as follows: determine the spatial distribution of fuel concentration starting from the condition of maximum neutron flux by fulfilling the thermal constraints. Thus the problem of determining the maximum neutron flux is solving a variational problem which is beyond the possibilities of classical variational calculation. This variational problem has been successfully solved by applying the maximum principle of Pontrjagin. Optimum distribution of fuel concentration was obtained in explicit analytical form. Thus, spatial distribution of the neutron flux and critical dimensions of quite complex reactor system are calculated in a relatively simple way. In addition to the fact that the results are innovative this approach is interesting because of the optimization procedure itself [sr

  17. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  18. Study on high speed lithium jet for neutron source of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mak, Michael; Stefanica, Jiri; Dostal, Vaclav; Zhao Wei

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively. (author)

  19. A method for neutron dosimetry in ultrahigh flux environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ougouag, A.M.; Wemple, C.A.; Rogers, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    A method for neutron dosimetry in ultrahigh flux environments is developed, and devices embodying it are proposed and simulated using a Monte Carlo code. The new approach no longer assumes a linear relationship between the fluence and the activity of the nuclides formed by irradiation. It accounts for depletion of the original ''foil'' material and for decay and depletion of the formed nuclides. In facilities where very high fluences are possible, the fluences inferred by activity measurements may be ambiguous. A method for resolving these ambiguities is also proposed and simulated. The new method and proposed devices should make possible the use of materials not traditionally considered desirable for neutron activation dosimetry

  20. Cold source vessel development for the advanced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), will be a user-oriented neutron research facility that will produce the most intense flux of neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the productions of cold neutrons is a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410 mm diameter sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design are being performed with multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This paper presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that will be used to verify the final design.

  1. Properties of neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: white neutron sources, primarily pulsed (6 papers); fast neutron fields (5 papers); Californium-252 prompt fission neutron spectra (14 papers); monoenergetic sources and filtered beams (11 papers); 14 MeV neutron sources (10 papers); selected special application (one paper); and a general interest session (4 papers). Individual abstracts were prepared separately for the papers

  2. A high-flux low-energy hydrogen ion beam using an end-Hall ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhoven, J. van; Sligte, E. te; Janssen, J.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Most ion sources that produce high-flux hydrogen ion beams perform best in the high energy range (keV). Alternatively, some plasma sources produce very-lowenergy ions (<< 10 eV). However, in an intermediate energy range of 10-200 eV, no hydrogen ion sources were found that produce high-flux beams.

  3. Radiological protection considerations during the treatment of glioblastoma patients by boron neutron capture therapy at the high flux reactor in Petten, The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.; Rassow, J.; Finke, E.; Sauerwein, W.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    2001-01-01

    A clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten since October 1997. The JRC (as licence holder of the HFR) must ensure that radiological protection measures are provided. The BNCT trial is a truly European trial, whereby the treatment takes place at a facility in the Netherlands under the responsibility of clinicians from Germany and patients are treated from several European countries. Consequently, radiological protection measures satisfy both German and Dutch laws. To respect both laws, a BNCT radioprotection committee was formed under the chairmanship of an independent radioprotection expert, with members representing all disciplines in the trial. A special nuance of BNCT is that the radiation is provided by a mixed neutron/gamma beam. The radiation dose to the patient is thus a complex mix due to neutrons, gammas and neutron capture in boron, nitrogen and hydrogen, which, amongst others, need to be correctly calculated in non-commercial and validated treatment planning codes. Furthermore, due to neutron activation, measurements on the patient are taken regularly after treatment. Further investigations along these lines include dose determination using TLDs and boron distribution measurements using on-line gamma ray spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. The experiments have contributed to the design of a flux trap in which a thermal flux of nearly 10 9 was obtained, with an enhancement of 6.61

  5. New spallation neutron sources, their performance and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources now operating in the world are at the KEK Laboratory in Japan (the KENS source), at Los Alamos National Laboratory (WNR) and at Argonne National Laboratory (IPNS), both the latter being in the US. The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) is currently the world's most intense source with a peak neutron flux of 4 x 10 14 n cm -2 s -1 at a repetition rate of 30 Hz, and globally producing approx. 1.5 x 10 15 n/sec. Present pulsed sources are still relatively weak compared to their potential. In 1985 the Rutherford Spallation Neutron Source will come on line, and eventually be approx. 30 more intense than the present IPNS. Later, in 1986 the WNR/PSR option at Los Alamos will make that facility of comparable intensity, while a subcritical fission booster at IPNS will keep IPNS competitive. These new sources will expand the applications of pulsed neutrons but are still based on accelerators built for other scientific purposes, usually nuclear or high-energy physics. Accelerator physicists are now designing machines expressly for spallation neutron research, and the proton currents attainable appear in the milliamps. (IPNS now runs at 0.5 GeV and 14 μA). Such design teams are at the KFA Laboratory Julich, Argonne National Laboratory and KEK. Characteristics, particularly the different time structure of the pulses, of these new sources will be discussed. Such machines will be expensive and require national, if not international, collaboration across a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. The new opportunities for neutron research will, of course, be dramatic with these new sources

  6. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. It should be noted that merely placing a slab of polypropylene in the beam will not yield significant multiplication as neutrons are primarily scattered away

  7. A technique for determining fast and thermal neutron flux densities in intense high-energy (8-30 MeV) photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.W.; Holeman, G.R.; Nath, R.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for measuring fast and thermal neutron fluxes in intense high-energy photon fields has been developed. Samples of phorphorous pentoxide are exposed to a mixed photon-neutron field. The irradiated samples are then dissolved in distilled water and their activation products are counted in a liquid scintillation spectrometer at 95-97% efficiency. The radioactive decay characteristics of the samples are then analyzed to determine fast and thermal neutron fluxes. Sensitivity of this neutron detector to high energy photons has been measured and found to be small. (author)

  8. High brilliant thermal and cold moderator for the HBS neutron source project Jülich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronert, T; Zakalek, P; Rücker, U; Brückel, T; Dabruck, J P; Doege, P E; Nabbi, R; Bessler, Y; Hofmann, M; Butzek, M; Klaus, M; Lange, C; Hansen, W

    2016-01-01

    The proposed High Brilliance Neutron Source (HBS), recognized within the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, will optimize the entire chain from particle source through particle accelerator, target, moderator, reflector, shielding, beam extraction, beam transport all the way to the detector, utilizing the nuclear Be(p,n) or Be(d,n) reaction in the lower MeV energy range. A D 2 O moderating reflector prototype (MRP) and a cold source were constructed and build according to MCNP parameter studies. The MRP was tested in a feasibility study at the TREFF instrument at MLZ (Garching). Cold beam extraction from the flux maximum within the moderator based on liquid para H 2 and other cold moderators will be tested by energy spectroscopy via TOF-method. Different ratios of liquid ortho/para H 2 will be fed to the cold moderator. The ratio will be controlled by feeding from reservoires of natural liquid H 2 and a storage loop with an ortho/para converter and determined via online heat capacity measurement. (paper)

  9. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4 He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. (paper)

  10. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  11. The advanced neutron source--designing to meet the needs of the user community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multi-purpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotopes production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The Advanced Neutron Source will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high intensity research reactor. But that reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users coming from all parts of the nation, and the world, placed in a simulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted, and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use. 5 refs., 4 figs

  12. The cold neutron facility of the JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumai, T.; Suzuki, M.; Kakefuda, K.

    1992-01-01

    A description is given of a cold neutron source and neutron guide tubes of the JRR-3M. The installation of the cold neutron source (CNS) together with the neutron guide system is one of the principal objectives of the remodeling project of the JRR-3 and this CNS is the first one that was installed in the high neutron flux reactors of 14 orders of magnitude in Japan. The CNS is a liquid hydrogen moderator and vertical thermosyphon type. It mainly consists of a hydrogen plant for liquid hydrogen and helium refrigerator plant for cold helium gas. Five neutron guide tubes are installed to get thermal and cold neutron beams in the beam hall. The CNS and the guide tubes have been operated very well since August 1990. (author)

  13. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide 252 Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world's largest inventory of compact 252 Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of ≤ 10 11 neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10 8 cm -2 s -1 at the sample. Total flux of ≥10 9 cm -2 s -1 is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the 252 Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis

  14. Flux Gain for Next-Generation Neutron-Scattering Instruments Resulting From Improved Supermirror Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, C.

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation spallation neutron source facilities will offer instruments with unprecedented capabilities through simultaneous enhancement of source power and usage of advanced optical components. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and scheduled to be completed by 2006, will provide greater than an order of magnitude more effective source flux than current state-of-the-art facilities, including the most advanced research reactors. An additional order of magnitude gain is expected through the use of new optical devices and instrumentation concepts. Many instrument designs require supermirror (SM) neutron guides with very high critical angles for total reflection. In this contribution, they discuss how the performance of modern neutron scattering instruments depends on the efficiency of these supermirrors. They outline ideas for enhancing the performance of the SM coatings, particularly for improving the reflectivity at the position of the critical wave vector transfer. A simulation program has been developed which allows different approaches for SM designs to be studied. Possible instrument performance gains are calculated for the example of the SNS reflectometer

  15. Preliminary Assessment of the Nuclide Migration from the Activation Zone Around the Proposed Spallation Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR. Of the 12, only 3 isotopes showed any potential to exceed the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 20 Drinking Water Limits (DWLs). These isotopes were 14C, 22Na, and 54Mn. The latter two activation products have very short half-lives of 2.6 years and 0.854 year, respectively. Therefore, these will decay before reaching an off-site receptor, and they cannot pose off-site hazards. However, for this extremely conservative model, which overestimates the mobility of the contaminant, 14C, which has a 5,730-year half-life, was shown to represent a potential concern in the context of this study's conservative assumptions. This study examines alternative modifications to the SNS shield berm and makes recommendations.

  16. Reactor Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    The present status and the prospects for development of reactor neutron sources for neutron scattering research in the world are considered. The fields of application of neutron scattering relative to synchrotron radiation, the creation stages of reactors (steady state and pulsed) and their position in comparison with spallation neutron sources at present and in the foreseen future are discussed. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. A Project for High Fluence 14 MeV Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pillon, Mario; Pizzuto, Aldo; Pietropaolo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The international community agrees on the importance to build a large facility devoted to test and validate materials to be used in harsh neutron environments. Such a facility, proposed by ENEA , reconsiders a previous study known as “Sorgentina” but takes into account new technological development so far attained. The “New Sorgentina” Fusion Source (NSFS) project is based upon an intense D - T 14 MeV neutron source achievable with T and D ion beams impinging on 2 m radius rotating target s . NSFS produces about 1 x10 13 n cm - 2 s - 1 over about 50 cm 3 . The NSFS facility will use the ion source and accelerating system technology developed for the Positive Ion Injectors (PII) used to heat the plasma in the fusion experiments,. NSFS, to be intended as an European facility, may be realized in a few years, once provided a preliminary technological program devote to study the operation of the ion source in continuous mode, target h eat loading/ removal, target and tritium handling, inventory as well as ...

  18. Neutron spectra characteristics for the intense neutron source, INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battat, M.; Dierckx, R.; Emigh, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Intense Neutron Source, INS, facility is presently under construction at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Its purpose is to provide a broad base for research work related to the radiation effects produced by 14-MeV neutrons from a D-T burn of a fusion reactor. The INS facility produces a D-T burn-like reaction from the collision of an intense tritium-ion beam with a supersonic jet target of deuterium gas. The reaction produces a typical D-T 14-MeV neutron spectrum. By adding a fission blanket surrounding the D-T ''burn,'' the neutron spectral shape may be tailored to match almost perfectly the anticipated first-wall spectra from presently proposed fusion reactors. With a blanket in place, the total production of neutrons can be as large as 3 x 10 16 n/s and experimental volumes of the order of 1000 cm 3 can be available at flux levels greater than 0.6 x 10 14 n/cm 2 s

  19. A coupled diffusion-transport computational method and its application for the determination of space dependent angular flux distributions at a cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    A fast calculation program ''BRIDGE'' was developed for the calculation of a Cold Neutron Source (CNS) at a radial beam tube of the FRG-I reactor, which couples a total assembly diffusion calculation to a transport calculation for a certain subregion. For the coupling flux and current boundary values at the common surfaces are taken from the diffusion calculation and are used as driving conditions in the transport calculation. 'Equivalence Theorie' is used for the transport feedback effect on the diffusion calculation to improve the consistency of the boundary values. The optimization of a CNS for maximizing the subthermal flux in the wavelength range 4 - 6 A is discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 μamp proton beam is 4.0 x 10 11 n/cm 2 -s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error

  1. HFIR cold neutron source moderator vessel design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    A cold neutron source capsule made of aluminum alloy is to be installed and located at the tip of one of the neutron beam tubes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Cold hydrogen liquid of temperature approximately 20 degree Kelvin and 15 bars pressure is designed to flow through the aluminum capsule that serves to chill and to moderate the incoming neutrons produced from the reactor core. The cold and low energy neutrons thus produced will be used as cold neutron sources for the diffraction experiments. The structural design calculation for the aluminum capsule is reported in this paper

  2. Mini-D{sub 2} a source for ultracold neutrons at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altarev, I.; Hartmann, F.J.; Paul, S.; Schott, W.; Trinks, U.; Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Scheuer, A. [TUEV Rheinland, Koeln (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The new Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II offers the possibility to install a unique source for ultracold neutrons (UCN), the Mini-D{sub 2} UCN source, with a small volume of solid deuterium at a temperature of 5 K as converter, exposed to the cold neutron flux. This new source, being dedicated for storage experiments, is designed to be much superior to any existing UCN facility. In the pulsed operation mode the Mini-D{sub 2} source is expected to provide UCN densities up to 10{sup 4} n/cm{sup 3}. This density is orders of magnitude larger than that from the best existing source at Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble ({approx}50 n/cm{sup 3} at the exit of the neutron turbine). The large gain factor will enable new precision measurements of elementary properties of the free neutron, especially the electric dipole moment, the lifetime, and the angular correlation coefficients of the decay. These quantities are of fundamental interest in particle physics. Operated in the continuous mode, the UCN source will provide an UCN flux density of up to 5{center_dot}10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s at the exit, to be compared with {approx}3{center_dot}10{sup 4} n/cm{sup 2}s at ILL. This improved UCN-flux offers new possibilities for traditional studies with UCN. (author)

  3. Obtaining of total and thermal neutron flux in the carousel facility of the TRIGA MARK IPR-R1 reactor using the Monte Carlo transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Bruno Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    The IPR-R1 is a reactor type TRIGA, Mark-I model, manufactured by the General Atomic Company and installed at Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is a light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open-pool type research reactor. IPR-R1 works at 100 kW but it will be briefly licensed to operate at 250 kW. It presents low power, low pressure, for application in research, training and radioisotopes production. The fuel is an alloy of zirconium hydride and uranium enriched at 20% in 235 U. The goal this work is modelling of the IPR-R1 Research Reactor TRIGA using the codes MCNPX2.6.0 (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport extend) and MCNP5 to the calculating the neutron flux in the carousel facility. In each simulation the sample was placed in a different position, totaling forty positions around of the reactor core. The comparison between the results obtained with experimental values from other work showing a relatively good agreement. Moreover, this methodology is a theoretical tool in validating of the experimental values and necessary for determining neutron flux which can not be accessible experimentally. (author)

  4. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  5. An experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermendzhiev, E.; Nazarov, V.M.; Pavlov, S.S.; Ruskov, Iv.; Zamyatin, Yu.S.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission has been designed and tested. A method based on utilization of the Dubna IBR-2 pulsed reactor, has been proposed and realized for periodical irradiation of targets composed of fissionable isotopes. Such a powerful pulsed neutron source in combination with a slow neutron chopper synchronized with the reactor bursts makes possible variation of the exposure duration and effective suppression of the fast neutron background due to delay neutrons emitted from the reactor core. Detection of delayed neutrons from the target is carried out by a high-efficiency multicounter neutron detector with a near-4π geometry. Some test measurements and results are briefly described. Possible use of the facility for other tasks is also discussed. 14 refs.; 14 figs

  6. Spallation target-moderator-reflector studies at the Weapons Neutron Research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Prael, S.D.; Robinson, H.; Howe, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Basic neutronics data, initiated by 800-MeV proton spallation reactions, are important to spallation neutron source development and electronuclear fuel production. Angle-dependent and energy-dependent neutron production cross sections, energy-dependent and total neutron yields, thermal and epithermal neutron surface and beam fluxes, and fertile-to-fissile conversion ratios are being measured. The measurements are being done at the Weapons Neutron Research facility on a variety of targets and target-moderator-reflector configurations. The experiments are relevant to the above applications, and provide data to validate computer codes. Preliminary results are presented and compared to calculated predictions. 13 figures

  7. Spallation neutrons pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the range of scientific applications which can use these pulsed neutrons sources: Studies on super fluids, measures to verify the crawling model for the polymers diffusion; these sources are also useful to study the neutron disintegration, the ultra cold neutrons. In certain applications which were not accessible by neutrons diffusion, for example, radiations damages, radionuclides production and activation analysis, the spallation sources find their use and their improvement will bring new possibilities. Among others contributions, one must notice the place at disposal of pulsed muons sources and neutrinos sources. (N.C.). 3 figs

  8. Neutron flux control systems validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hascik, R.

    2003-01-01

    In nuclear installations main requirement is to obtain corresponding nuclear safety in all operation conditions. From the nuclear safety point of view is commissioning and start-up after reactor refuelling appropriate period for safety systems verification. In this paper, methodology, performance and results of neutron flux measurements systems validation is presented. Standard neutron flux measuring chains incorporated into the reactor protection and control system are used. Standard neutron flux measuring chain contains detector, preamplifier, wiring to data acquisition unit, data acquisition unit, wiring to display at control room and display at control room. During reactor outage only data acquisition unit and wiring and displaying at reactor control room is verified. It is impossible to verify detector, preamplifier and wiring to data acquisition recording unit during reactor refuelling according to low power. Adjustment and accurate functionality of these chains is confirmed by start-up rate (SUR) measurement during start-up tests after refuelling of the reactors. This measurement has direct impact to nuclear safety and increase operational nuclear safety level. Briefly description of each measuring system is given. Results are illustrated on measurements performed at Bohunice NPP during reactor start-up tests. Main failures and their elimination are described (Authors)

  9. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  10. Oscillation effects on high-energy neutrino fluxes from astrophysical hidden sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Razzaque, Soebur

    2007-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos are expected to be produced in a variety of astrophysical sources as well as in optically thick hidden sources. We explore the matter-induced oscillation effects on emitted neutrino fluxes of three different flavors from the latter class. We use the ratio of electron and tau induced showers to muon tracks, in upcoming neutrino telescopes, as the principal observable in our analysis. This ratio depends on the neutrino energy, density profile of the sources, and on the oscillation parameters. The largely unknown flux normalization drops out of our calculation and only affects the statistics. For the current knowledge of the oscillation parameters we find that the matter-induced effects are non-negligible and the enhancement of the ratio from its vacuum value takes place in an energy range where the neutrino telescopes are the most sensitive. Quantifying the effect would be useful to learn about the astrophysics of the sources as well as the oscillation parameters. If the neutrino telescopes mostly detect diffuse neutrinos without identifying their sources, then any deviation of the measured flux ratios from the vacuum expectation values would be most naturally explained by a large population of hidden sources for which matter-induced neutrino oscillation effects are important

  11. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy. (author)

  12. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy

  13. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  14. Reasons why Plutonium 242 is the best fission chamber deposit to monitor the fast component of a high neutron flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filliatre, P. [CEA, DEN, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France)], E-mail: philippe.filliatre@cea.fr; Oriol, L.; Jammes, C. [CEA, DEN, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France)

    2008-08-11

    The FNDS project aims at developing fission chambers to measure on-line the fast component of a high neutron flux ({approx}10{sup 14}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1} or more) with a significant thermal component. We identify with simulations the deposits of fission chambers that are best suited to this goal. We address the question of the evolution of the deposit by radiative capture and decay. A deposit of {sup 242}Pu appears as the best choice, with a high initial sensitivity to fast neutrons only slowly degrading under irradiation. The effect of unavoidable impurities was assessed: small concentrations of {sup 241}Pu and {sup 239}Pu can be tolerated.

  15. Developing plan and pre-conceptual design of target system for JAERI`s high intensity neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Kaminaga, Masanori; Haga, Katsuhiro; Ishikura, Syuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakamura, Fumito; Uchida, Shoji

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an outline of developing plan of a target system and topics obtained by a pre-conceptual design, which aims to establish a technology base of the target system and to make clear a system concept. In the plan, two types of target - solid and mercury targets - are to be developed for a neutron scattering facility. Information obtained through the development shall be applied to designs of an irradiation and a transmutation facilities. Through the pre-conceptual design, system arrangement, scale etc. were made clear: total weight will be 12000 ton, and 26 beam lines with beam shutters will be equipped for 4 moderators. Engineering problems were also made clear through the design; high flux heat removal, dynamic stress caused by thermal shock and pressure wave, loop technology for the mercury target and a slurry moderator consisting of methane pellets and liquefied hydrogen. We are now constructing new test apparatuses and arranging computer codes for solving these problems. (author)

  16. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L., E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: narain@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairbezerra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  17. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L.

    2017-01-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  18. [Project for] a high-flux extracted neutron beam reactor [for physicists]; Un [projet de] reacteur a haut flux et faisceaux sortis [pour physiciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageron, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    French requirements in neutron beams of different energies extracted from a reactor are briefly described. The well-known importance of cold neutrons (above 4 Angstrom) is emphasized. The main characteristics of a reactor suitable for physicists are outlined: They are: 1 - A flux of about 7. 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons in the heavy water of the reflector, 2 - Maximum flexibility obtained by: - physical separation of the core and the reflector, - independence of the different experiments, - possibility of modifying physical experiments up to - and including - the nature of the used reflector, without any appreciable interruption in the operation of the reactor, - reduction of fixed shields to a minimum; ample use of liquid shields (water) and fluid shields (sands). 3 - Technological continuity as far as possible with French research reactors (Siloe, Pegase, Osiris) already existing or under construction. 4 - Safety of operation arising from simplicity of conception. 5 - Minimised construction costs. Lowering of the operating costs is looked for indirectly in the simplification of the solutions and the reduction of operating staff, rather than directly by reducing the consumption of fuel elements and energy. The recommended solution can be described as a closed-core non-pressurized swimming-pool reactor, highly under-moderated by the cooling light water. Surrounding the reactor are a number of 'beam tubes-loops' each consisting of: - a part of the reflector (heavy water in the example described), - a part of neutron extraction beam tube, - the circuits required for their cooling, - the inlet systems of suitable fluids to the beam tube nose (liquid hydrogen in the example described), - the necessary outlets for measurement and control system. The whole 'beam tubes loops' is immersed in the water of the metallic self-supporting swimming-pool. The shielding outside the swimming-pool is composed for the most part by heavy sand in which is the rest of the beam extraction

  19. Conceptual design for an accelerator system for a very high-intensity pulsed neutron source using a linear-induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foss, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Several accelerator-based intense neutron sources have been constructed or designed by various laboratories around the world. All of these facilities have a common scheme of a linac and synchrotron or accumulator ring, and the system produces the proton energy of 500 to 1000 MeV. The average beam currents range from a few mA to a few hundred mA. The protons are then used to generate high-flux neutrons by spallation out of heavy-metal targets. In a synchrotron system, the protons are already bunched, and thus the pulse rate of the neutron beam is that of the repetition rate of the synchrotron. For an accumulator system, the pulse rate is determined by the extraction repetition rate of the accumulator. We have conceptually designed a new system that uses a linear-induction accelerator which can be operated for an average beam current up to a few mA with a repetition rate up to 100 Hz. The details of the design will be given

  20. Neutron sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  1. Neutron sources and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications

  2. Fluxes at experiment facilities in HEU and LEU designs for the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    An Alternative LEU Design for the FRM-II proposed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a compact core consisting of a single fuel element that uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm 3 and has a power level of 32 MW. Both the HEU design by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the alternative LEU design by ANL have the same fuel lifetime(50 days) and the same neutron flux performance (8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the reflector). LEU silicide fuel with 4.5 g/cm 3 has been thoroughly tested and is fully-qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II. Several issues that were raised by TUM have been addressed in Refs. 1-3. The conclusions of these analyses are summarized below. This paper addresses four additional issues that have been raised in several forums, including Ref 4: heat generation in the cold neutron source (CNS), the gamma and fast neutron fluxes which are components of the reactor noise in neutron scattering experiments in the experiment hall of the reactor, a fuel cycle length difference, and the reactivity worth of the beam tubes and other experiment facilities. The results show that: (a) for the same thermal neutron flux, the neutron and gamma heating in the CNS is smaller in the LEU design than in the HEU design, and cold neutron fluxes as good or better than those of the HEU design can be obtained with the LEU design; (b) the gamma and fast neutron components of the reactor noise in the experiment hall are about the same in both designs; (c) the fuel cycle length is 50 days for both designs; and (d) the absolute value of the reactivity worth of the beam tubes and other experiment facilities is smaller in the LEU design, allowing its fuel cycle length to be increased to 53 or 54 days. Based on the excellent results for the Alternative LEU Design that were obtained in all analyses, the RERTR Program reiterates its conclusion that there are no major technical

  3. Accelerator based continuous neutron source.

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, S M; Ruggiero, A G

    2003-01-01

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate pr...

  4. Development of a High Fluence Neutron Source for Nondestructive Characterization of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, Mark M.

    1999-01-01

    We are addressing the need to measure nuclear wastes, residues, and spent fuel in order to process these for final disposition. For example, TRU wastes destined for the WIPP must satisfy extensive characterization criteria outlined in the Waste Acceptance Criteria, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, and the Performance Demonstration Plan. Similar requirements exist for spent fuel and residues. At present, no nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation is capable of satisfying all of the PDP test cycles (particularly for Remote-Handled TRU waste). One of the primary methods for waste assay is by active neutron interrogation. The objective of this project is to improve the capability of all active neutron systems by providing a higher intensity neutron source (by about a factor of 1,000) for essentially the same cost, power, and space requirements as existing systems. This high intensity neutron source is an electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma device. The IEC is a symmetric sphere that was originally developed in the 1960s as a possible fusion reactor. It operates as DT neutron generator. Although it is not likely that this device will scale to fusion reactor levels, previous experiments1 have demonstrated a neutron yield of 2 x 1010 neutrons/second on a table-top device that can be powered from ordinary laboratory circuits (9 kilowatts). Subsequently, the IEC physics has been extensively studied at the University of Illinois and other locations. We have established theoretically the basis for scaling the output up to 1 x 1011 neutrons/second. In addition, IEC devices have run for cumulative times approaching 10,000 hours, which is essential for practical application to NDA. They have been operated in pulsed and continuous mode. The essential features of the IEC plasma neutron source, compared to existing sources of the same cost, size and power consumption, are: Table 1: Present and Target Operating Parameters for Small Neutron Generators Parameter Present IEC

  5. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  6. Moderator materials for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron source providing intense neutron fluxes that will be used for performing a large variety of neutron scattering experiments. SNS is to be completed and start operation in 2005. Protons will be accelerated to 1 GeV, stored in an accumulator ring, and then injected into a neutron-producing target. After leaving the target (Hg in the ca/se of SNS), the neutrons are prepared for experiments by first using a moderator to impose energy and width requirements on the neutron pulse. One of the most important ingredients is the moderator material. Four materials that are commonly used and that were considered for use in SNS are liquid hydrogen (L-H 2 ), liquid water (L-H 2 O), liquid methane (L-CH 4 ), and solid methane (S-CH 4 ). The spectra (neutron current versus neutron energy) for these four materials are shown. As may be seen, at low neutron energies ( 4 , which produces up to four times as many neutrons in this energy range as L-H 2 . The problem with the material is the internal storage of energy that can be spontaneously and explosively released. At energies of just above 10 MeV, the most effective moderator material is L-CH 4 . Polymerization problems, however, preclude its use at high powers (again such as in SNS), where the buildup of undesirable materials becomes prohibitive. This is, however, an important energy range for neutron experiments. Preliminary consideration is being given to a composite moderator that contains two adjacent sections, one of L-H 2 and one of L-H 2 O, which produces a spectrum that is very similar to L-CH 4

  7. The GKSS cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, W.; Wedderien, T.; Krull, W.

    1995-01-01

    The FRG-1 research reactor, in operation since 1958 at 5 MW power, is upgraded and refurbished many times to follow the changing demands on safe operation and the today needs for scientific research. This requires during the lifetime of the reactor many measures to follow these demands. Within the last years many additional activities have been made to overcome the ageing of the experiments, to change the experimental facilities and to increase the neutron flux and adapt the neutron spectrum to ensure good scientific utilization of the research reactor for the next 15 to 20 years. (orig./HP)

  8. Target development for the SINQ high-power neutron spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Werner

    2002-01-01

    SINQ is a 1 MW class research spallation neutron source, driven by the PSI proton accelerator system. In terms of beam power, it is, by a large margin, the most powerful spallation neutron source currently in operation worldwide. As a consequence, target load levels prevail in SINQ which are beyond the realm of existing experience. Therefore, an extensive materials irradiation program (STIP) is currently underway which will help to select the proper structural material and make dependable life time estimates accounting for the real operating conditions that prevail in the facility. In parallel, both theoretical and experimental work is going on within the MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt Pilot Experiment) project, to develop a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target for a beam power level of 1MW

  9. Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide: Charge-carrier properties and the impacts of high flux thermal neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Daniel S.; Rust, Mikah; Herrera, Elan H.; Matei, Liviu; Buliga, Vladimir; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold; Stowe, Ashley; Preston, Jeff; Lukosi, Eric D.

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports on the charge carrier properties of several lithium indium diselenide (LISe) semiconductors. It was found that the charge collection efficiency of LISe was improved after high flux thermal neutron irradiation including the presence of a typically unobservable alpha peak from hole-only collection. Charge carrier trap energies of the irradiated sample were measured using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy. Compared to previous studies of this material, no significant differences in trap energies were observed. Through trap-filled limited voltage measurements, neutron irradiation was found to increase the density of trap states within the bulk of the semiconductor, which created a polarization effect under alpha exposure but not neutron exposure. Further, the charge collection efficiency of the irradiated sample was higher (14-15 fC) than that of alpha particles (3-5 fC), indicating that an increase in hole signal contribution resulted from the neutron irradiation. Finally, it was observed that significant charge loss takes place near the point of generation, producing a significant scintillation response and artificially inflating the W-value of all semiconducting LISe crystals.

  10. Design of the 50 kW neutron converter for SPIRAL2 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avilov, M.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Tecchio, L.B., E-mail: tecchio@lnl.infn.i [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Titov, A.T. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Tsybulya, V.S. [Trofimuk Institute of Geology, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Zhmurikov, E.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-21

    SPIRAL2 is a facility for the study of fundamental nuclear physics and multidisciplinary research. SPIRAL2 represents a major advance for research on exotic nuclei. The radioactive ion beam (RIB) production system is comprised of a neutron converter, a target and an ion source. This paper is dedicated to the designing of the 50 kW neutron converter for the SPIRAL2 facility. Among the different variants of the neutron converter, the one based on a rotating solid disk seems quite attractive due to its safety, ease in production and relatively low cost. Dense graphite used as the converter's material allows the production of high-intensity neutron flux and, at the same time, the heat removal from the converter by means of radiation cooling. Thermo-mechanical simulations performed in order to determine the basic geometry and physical characteristics of the neutron production target for SPIRAL2 facility, to define the appropriate beam power distribution, and to predict the target behaviour under the deuteron beam of nominal parameters (40 MeV, 1.2 mA, 50 kW) are presented. To study the main physical and mechanical properties and serviceability under operating conditions, several kinds of graphite have been analyzed and tested. The paper reports the results of such measurements. Radiation damage is the most important issue for the application of graphite as neutron converter. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated graphite is reduced by a factor of 10 from the initial value after irradiation. Difference in volume expansions between the matrix and the fiber results in serious damage of neutron-irradiated C/C composites. Calculations showed that at high temperature the effect of neutron radiation is not so critical and that the change in thermal conductivity does not prevent the use of graphite as neutron converter.

  11. Design of the 50 kW neutron converter for SPIRAL2 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, M.S.; Tecchio, L.B.; Titov, A.T.; Tsybulya, V.S.; Zhmurikov, E.I.

    2010-01-01

    SPIRAL2 is a facility for the study of fundamental nuclear physics and multidisciplinary research. SPIRAL2 represents a major advance for research on exotic nuclei. The radioactive ion beam (RIB) production system is comprised of a neutron converter, a target and an ion source. This paper is dedicated to the designing of the 50 kW neutron converter for the SPIRAL2 facility. Among the different variants of the neutron converter, the one based on a rotating solid disk seems quite attractive due to its safety, ease in production and relatively low cost. Dense graphite used as the converter's material allows the production of high-intensity neutron flux and, at the same time, the heat removal from the converter by means of radiation cooling. Thermo-mechanical simulations performed in order to determine the basic geometry and physical characteristics of the neutron production target for SPIRAL2 facility, to define the appropriate beam power distribution, and to predict the target behaviour under the deuteron beam of nominal parameters (40 MeV, 1.2 mA, 50 kW) are presented. To study the main physical and mechanical properties and serviceability under operating conditions, several kinds of graphite have been analyzed and tested. The paper reports the results of such measurements. Radiation damage is the most important issue for the application of graphite as neutron converter. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated graphite is reduced by a factor of 10 from the initial value after irradiation. Difference in volume expansions between the matrix and the fiber results in serious damage of neutron-irradiated C/C composites. Calculations showed that at high temperature the effect of neutron radiation is not so critical and that the change in thermal conductivity does not prevent the use of graphite as neutron converter.

  12. Neutron total cross section measurements of gold and tantalum at the nELBE photoneutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaske, Roland; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd; Bemmerer, Daniel; Birgersson, Evert; Ferrari, Anna; Grosse, Eckart; Kempe, Mathias; Kögler, Toni; Marta, Michele; Massarczyk, Ralph; Matic, Andrija; Schramm, Georg; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 197 Au and nat Ta have been measured at the nELBE photoneutron source in the energy range from 0.1 - 10 MeV with a statistical uncertainty of up to 2 % and a total systematic uncertainty of 1 %. This facility is optimized for the fast neutron energy range and combines an excellent t ime structure of the neutron pulses (electron bunch width 5 ps) with a short flight path of 7 m. Because of the low instantaneous neutron flux transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections are possible, that exhibit very different beam and back ground conditions than found at other neutron sources.

  13. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Maekawa, Fujio; Takada, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated. (author)

  14. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, K; Takada, H

    2003-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated.

  15. Isotopic composition of uranium in U3O8 by neutron induced reactions utilizing thermal neutrons from critical facility and high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Pujari, P.K.; Goel, Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    Uranium in oxide and metal forms is used as fuel material in nuclear power reactors. For chemical quality control, it is necessary to know the isotopic composition (IC) of uranium i.e., 235 U to 238 U atom ratio as well as 235 U atom % in addition to its total concentration. Uranium samples can be directly assayed by passive gamma ray spectrometry for obtaining IC by utilizing 185 keV (γ-ray abundance 57.2%) of 235 U and 1001 keV (γ-ray abundance 0.837%) of 234m Pa (decay product of 238 U). However, due to low abundance of 1001 keV, often it is not practiced to obtain IC by this method as it gives higher uncertainty even if higher mass of sample and counting time are used. IC of uranium can be determined using activity ratio of neutron induced fission product of 235 U to activation product of 238 U ( 239 Np). In the present work, authors have demonstrated methodologies for determination of IC of U as well as 235 U atom% in natural ( 235 U 0.715%) and low enriched uranium (LEU, 3-20 atom % of 235 U) samples of uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) by utilizing ratio of counts at 185 keV γ-ray or γ-rays of fission products with respect to 277 keV of 239 Np. Natural and enriched samples (about 25 mg) were neutron irradiated for 4 hours in graphite reflector position of AHWR Critical Facility (CF) using highly thermalized (>99.9% thermal component) neutron flux (∼10 7 cm -2 s -1 )

  16. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  17. The high flux reactor Petten, A multi-purpose research and test facility for the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, H.; Duijves, K.; Conrad, R.; Markgraf, J.F.W.; May, R.; Moss, R.L.; Sordon, G.; Tartaglia, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, is owned by the European Commission (EC) and managed by the Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EC. Its operation has been entrusted since 1962 to the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The HFR is one of the most powerful multi-purpose research and test reactors in the world. Together with the ECN hot cells at Petten, it has provided since three decades an integral and full complement of irradiation and examination services as required by current and future research and development for nuclear energy, industry and research organizations. Since 1963, the HFR has recognized record of consistent, reliable and high availability of more than 250 days of operation per year. The HFR has 20 in-core and 12 poolside irradiation positions, plus 12 beam tubes. With a variety of dedicated irradiation devices, and with its long-standing experience in executing small and large irradiation projects, the HFR is particularly suited for fuel, materials and components testing for all reactor lines, including thermonuclear fusion reactors. In addition, processing with neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-based research and inspection services are employed by industry and research, such as activation analysis, boron neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron diffraction. Moreover, in recent years, HFRs' mission has been broadened within the area of radioisotopes production, where, within a few years, the HFR has attained the European leadership in production volume

  18. High heat flux cooling for accelerator targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, I.; Nagler, A.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerator targets, both for radioisotope production and for high neutron flux sources generate very high thermal power in the target material which absorbs the particles beam. Generally, the geometric size of the targets is very small and the power density is high. The design of these targets requires dealing with very high heat fluxes and very efficient heat removal techniques in order to preserve the integrity of the target. Normal heat fluxes from these targets are in the order of 1 kw/cm 2 and may reach levels of an order of magnitude higher

  19. High-sensitive spectrometer of fast neutrons and the results of fast neutron background flux measurements at the gallium-germanium solar neutrino experiment (SAGE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, D.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Matushko, V.L.; Shikhin, A.A.; Yants, V.E.; Zaborskaya, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    The principle of operation, design, registration system and main characteristics of a fast neutron spectrometer are described. The spectrometer is intended for direct measurements of ultra-low fluxes of fast neutrons. It is sensitive to neutron fluxes of 10 -7 cm -2 · s -1 and lower. The detection efficiency of fast neutrons with simultaneous energy measurement was determined from Monte-Carlo simulation to be equal to 0.11 ± 0.01. The background counting rate in the detector corresponds to a neutron flux of (6.5 ± 2.1) · 10 -7 cm -2 · s -1 in the range of 1.0-11.0 MeV. The natural neutron flux from the surrounding mine rock at the depth of 4600 meters of water equivalent was measured to be (7.3 ± 2.4) · 10 -7 cm -2 · s -1 in the interval 1.0 -11.0 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in the SAGE main room was measured to be 2.3 · 10 -7 cm -2 · s -1 in 1.0 - 11.0 MeV energy range

  20. High-sensitive spectrometer of fast neutrons and the results of fast neutron background flux measurements at the Gallium-Germanium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurashitov, J N; Kalikhov, A V; Matushko, V L; Shikhin, A A; Yants, V E; Zaborskaia, O S

    2002-01-01

    The principle of operation, design, registration system and main characteristics of a fast neutron spectrometer are described. The spectrometer is intended for direct measurements of ultra low fluxes of fast neutrons. It is sensitive to neutron fluxes of 10 sup - sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 and lower. The detection efficiency of fast neutrons with simultaneous energy measurement was determined from Monte-Carlo simulation to be equal to 0.11+-0.01. The background counting rate in the detector corresponds to a neutron flux of (6.5+-2.1)x10 sup - sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 in the range 1.0-11.0 MeV. The natural neutron flux from the surrounding mine rock at the depth of 4600 m of water equivalent was measured to be (7.3+-2.4)x10 sup - sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 in the range 1.0-11.0 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in the SAGE main room was measured to be <2.3x10 sup - sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 in 1.0-11.0 MeV energy range.

  1. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of ∼ 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 x 10 19 M -2 · S -1 . Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R ampersand D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R ampersand D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R ampersand D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks

  2. Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ting; Casagrande, Fabio; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

  3. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in electric-arc jet facilities for planetary entry heating simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes are constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies; the temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its rate of change gives the steady-state, absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. It is concluded that the simple construction of these probes allows them to be expendable and heated to destruction to obtain a measurable temperature slope at high heating rates.

  4. Analysis of traces at ORNL's new high-flux neutron activation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, E.; Handley, T.H.; Dyer, F.F.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations are outlined, which are carried out in order to develop (preferably instrumental) methods for multielement analysis of various trace elements. For this reason a new High-Flux NAA Laboratory was constructed at ORNL's. A general review is given on the Laboratory, further some methods and applications are shown. In the field of comparator activation analysis comparative data are given on mercury determinations in various matrices, and on arsenic determination in grasshoppers. This later method was used to trace the transport of arsenic containing pesticides. Some data are given on absolute activation analysis of Na, Ci, Mn, Br, and Au, too. (K.A.)

  5. Neutron skyshine from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsumi.

    1984-01-01

    The advance in neutron skyshine research and the significance are first described. Then, skyshine calculation methods in 1980s particularly and the skyshine experiment in Japan with various nuclear facilities (reactors, D-T neutron sources, accelerators) are reviewed. In comparison with such experiment usable as bench mark, the skyshine calculation methods (Monte Carlo method, transport calculation method) are evaluated for their accuracy and merits and demerits. The values by Monte Carlo calculation were in agreement within about 30 % with the experimental values. Those by DOT 3.5 calculation were twice as large as the experimental values. Those by PALLAS calculation were in good agreement in dose with the experimental values, but the spectra were considerably different. The values by SKYSHINE-2 were in good agreement with the experimental values, but since the ground effect was ignored, the values may deviate from the experimental ones if it is taken into account. (Mori, K.)

  6. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  7. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  8. Monte Carlo modeling of neutron imaging at the SINQ spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebenhaft, J.R.; Lehmann, E.H.; Pitcher, E.J.; McKinney, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) has been used to demonstrate the neutron radiography capability of the newly released MPI-version of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. A detailed MCNPX model was developed of SINQ and its associated neutron transmission radiography (NEUTRA) facility. Preliminary validation of the model was performed by comparing the calculated and measured neutron fluxes in the NEUTRA beam line, and a simulated radiography image was generated for a sample consisting of steel tubes containing different materials. This paper describes the SINQ facility, provides details of the MCNPX model, and presents preliminary results of the neutron imaging. (authors)

  9. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR. In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1 in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2 out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3 beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4 beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5 beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6 sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7 holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4–7

  10. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  11. Experimental evaluation of the neutrons flux of a irradiator with AmBe sources and its possibility of use in materials analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Ruy Barros de

    2003-01-01

    This work had as a target to determine the irradiator thermal and over cadmium (epithermal and fast) neutrons flux , of the Nuclear Experimental Laboratory of the Nuclear Energy Center (CNEN) - IPEN, and the possibility of its use for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) by the absolute method. The neutrons flux quantification was performed indirectly by the gold naked and cadmium-covered foils activation technique. The neutrons flux was determined for two situations: with polyethylene block 5.0 cm thick and without the polyethylene block. The quantification of the elements present in the irradiated samples was obtained after the experimental determination of the incident neutrons flux in the irradiation position of the sample. Flux values along the irradiator axis were determined. Some materials were analyzed, presenting good agreement with reference values. (author)

  12. Detection and elimination of the electromagnetic interferences in the neutron flux measurement circuit, Source Range; Deteccion y eliminacion de interferencias electromagneticas en el circuito de medicion de flujo neutronico, rango de fuente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, J. M.; Esguivillas, L.; Valle, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    This paper compiles an experience in Asco I Nuclear Power Plant about electromagnetic interferences associated to the neutron flux measurement system, Source Range Asco I NPP. The circuit affected is the proportional detector (BF3) located outside the reactor vessel to measure the neutron leakage in shutdown and in start-up.

  13. Mean energy polarized neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.A.; Zaika, N.I.; Kolotyj, V.V.; Prokopenko, V.S.; Semenov, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    Physical bases and realization scheme of a pulsed source of polarized neutrons with the energy of up to 75 MeV are described. The source comprises polarized deuteron source, transport line, low-energy ion and axial injector to the accelerator, U-240 isochronous cyclotron, targets for polarized neutron production, accelerated deuteron transport line and flight bases. The pulsed source of fast neutrons with the energy of up to 75 MeV can provide for highly polarized neutron beams with the intensity by 2-3 orders higher than in the most perfect source of this range which allows one to perform various experiments with high efficiency and energy resolution. 9 refs.; 1 fig

  14. Accounting for the thermal neutron flux depression in voluminous samples for instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overwater, R.M.W.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology Interfaculty Reactor Institute, a facility has been installed to irradiate cylindrical samples with diameters up to 15 cm and weights up to 50 kg for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) purposes. To be able to do quantitative INAA on voluminous samples, it is necessary to correct for gamma-ray absorption, gamma-ray scattering, neutron absorption, and neutron scattering in the sample. The neutron absorption and the neutron scattering are discussed. An analytical solution is obtained for the diffusion equation in the geometry of the irradiation facility. For samples with known composition, the neutron flux--as a function of position in the sample--can be calculated directly. Those of unknown composition require additional flux measurements on which least-squares fitting must be done to obtain both the thermal neutron diffusion coefficient D s and the diffusion length L s of the sample. Experiments are performed to test the theory

  15. Accelerator-driven neutron sources for materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Particle accelerators are important tools for materials research and production. Advances in high-intensity linear accelerator technology make it possible to consider enhanced neutron sources for fusion material studies or as a source of spallation neutrons. Energy variability, uniformity of target dose distribution, target bombardment from multiple directions, time-scheduled dose patterns, and other features can be provided, opening new experimental opportunities. New designs have also been used to ensure hands-on maintenance on the accelerator in these factory-type facilities. Designs suitable for proposals such as the Japanese Energy-Selective Intense Neutron Source, and the international Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are discussed

  16. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutron flux measurements in C-9 capsule pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbos, D.; Roth, C. S.; Gugiu, D.; Preda, M.

    2001-01-01

    C-9 capsule is a fuel testing facility in which the testing consists of a daily cycle ranging between the limits 100% power to 50% power. C-9 in-pile section with sample holder an instrumentation are introduced in G-9 and G-10 experimental channels. The experimental fuel channel has a maximum value when the in-pile section (pressure tube) is in G-9 channel and minimum value in G-10 channel. In this paper the main goals are determination or measurements of: - axial thermal neutron flux distribution in C-9 pressure tube both in G-9 and G-10 channel; - ratio of maximum neutron flux value in G-9 and the same value in G-9 channel and the same value in G-10 channel; - neutron flux-spectrum. On the basis of axial neutron flux distribution measurements, the experimental fuel element in sample holder position in set. Both axial neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons and neutron flux-spectrum were performed using multi- foil activation technique. Activation rates were obtained by absolute measurements of the induced activity using gamma spectroscopy methods. To determine the axial thermal neutron flux distribution in G-9 and G-10, Cu 100% wire was irradiated at the reactor power of 2 MW. Ratio between the two maximum values, in G-9 and G-10 channels, is 2.55. Multi-foil activation method was used for neutron flux spectrum measurements. The neutron spectra and flux were obtained from reaction rate measurements by means of SAND 2 code. To obtain gamma-ray spectra, a HPGe detector connected to a multichannel analyzer was used. The spectrometer is absolute efficiency calibrated. The foils were irradiated at 2 MW reactor power in previously determined maximum flux position resulted from wire measurements. This reaction rates were normalized for 10 MW reactor power. Neutron self shielding corrections for the activation foils were applied. The self-shielding corrections are computed using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The measured integral flux is 1.1·10 14 n/cm 2 s

  18. LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes at 100 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''maximum'' unperturbed, steady state thermal neutron flux for LANSCE is calculated to be 2 /times/ 10 13 n/cm 2 -s for 100 μA of 800-MeV protons. This LANSCE neutron flux is a comparable entity to a steady state reactor thermal neutron flux. LANSCE perturbed steady state thermal neutron fluxes have also been calculated. Because LANSCE is a pulsed neutron source, much higher ''peak'' (in time) neutron fluxes can be generated than at a steady state reactor source. 5 refs., 5 figs

  19. Fast neutron fluxes distribution in Egyptian ilmenite concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, R.M.; Abou El-Nasr, T.Z.; Bashter, I.I.

    1978-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the distribution of fast neutron fluxes in a new type of heavy concrete made from Egyptian ilmenite ores. The neutron source used was a collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Measurements were carried-out using phosphorous activation detectors. Iso-flux curves were represented which give directly the shape and thickness required to attenuate the emitted fast neutron flux to a certain value. The relaxation lengths were also evaluated from the measured data for both disc monodirectional source and infinite plane monodirectional source. The obtained values were compared with that calculated using the derived values of relative number densities and microscopic removal cross-sections of the different constituents. The obtained data show that ilmenite concrete attenuates fast neutron flux more strongly than ordinary concrete. A semiemperical formula was derived to calculate the fast neutron flux at different thicknesses along the beam axis. Another semiemperical formula was also derived to calculate the fast neutron flux in ordinary concrete along the beam axis using the corresponding value in ilmenite concrete

  20. Radiation transport calculations for the ANS [Advanced Neutron Source] beam tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.; Lillie, R.A.; Slater, C.O.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source facility (ANS) will incorporate a large number of both radial and no-line-of-sight (NLS) beam tubes to provide very large thermal neutron fluxes to experimental facilities. The purpose of this work was to obtain comparisons for the ANS single- and split-core designs of the thermal and damage neutron and gamma-ray scalar fluxes in these beams tubes. For experimental locations far from the reactor cores, angular flux data are required; however, for close-in experimental locations, the scalar fluxes within each beam tube provide a credible estimate of the various signal to noise ratios. In this paper, the coupled two- and three-dimensional radiation transport calculations employed to estimate the scalar neutron and gamma-ray fluxes will be described and the results from these calculations will be discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs

  1. A high-sensitivity neutron counter and waste-drum counting with the high-sensitivity neutron instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.E.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1993-04-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a highly sensitive neutron counter was developed that can detect and accurately measure the neutrons from small quantities of plutonium or from other low-level neutron sources. This neutron counter was originally designed to survey waste containers leaving the Plutonium Facility. However, it has proven to be useful in other research applications requiring a high-sensitivity neutron instrument

  2. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 · 10 19 · m -2 · s -1 . Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R ampersand D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R ampersand D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R ampersand D program will focus on the four objectives described

  3. Applicability of the two-angle differential method to response measurement of neutron-sensitive devices at the RCNP high-energy neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Akihiko, E-mail: aki-masuda@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tetsuro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Iwamoto, Yosuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hagiwara, Masayuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yashima, Hiroshi [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nakane, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nishiyama, Jun [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shima, Tatsushi; Tamii, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Harano, Hideki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2017-03-21

    Quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields induced by {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions are used for the response evaluation of neutron-sensitive devices. The quasi-monoenergetic high-energy field consists of high-energy monoenergetic peak neutrons and unwanted continuum neutrons down to the low-energy region. A two-angle differential method has been developed to compensate for the effect of the continuum neutrons in the response measurements. In this study, the two-angle differential method was demonstrated for Bonner sphere detectors, which are typical examples of moderator-based neutron-sensitive detectors, to investigate the method's applicability and its dependence on detector characteristics. Experiments were performed under 96–387 MeV quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The measurement results for large high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sphere detectors agreed well with Monte Carlo calculations, which verified the adequacy of the two-angle differential method. By contrast, discrepancies were observed in the results for small HDPE sphere detectors and metal-induced sphere detectors. The former indicated that detectors that are particularly sensitive to low-energy neutrons may be affected by penetrating neutrons owing to the geometrical features of the RCNP facility. The latter discrepancy could be consistently explained by a problem in the evaluated cross-section data for the metals used in the calculation. Through those discussions, the adequacy of the two-angle differential method was experimentally verified, and practical suggestions were made pertaining to this method.

  4. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  5. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments

  6. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  7. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 x 10 19 m -2 s -1 is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Neutron and gamma-ray sources in LWR high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.

    1977-06-01

    Predictions of the composition of high-level waste from U-fueled LWRs have been used to calculate the neutron and gamma-ray sources in such waste at cooling times of 3 and 10 years. The results are intended for interim application to studies of waste shipping and storage pending the availability of more exact knowledge of fuel recycling and of waste concentration and solidification

  9. Ion source requirements for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high-power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor for a large class of experiments. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 kW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H - source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The 1 to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. A workshop held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H - source technologies, and identified necessary R ampersand D efforts to bridge the gap. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Ion source requirements for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high- power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor for a large class of experiments. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 KW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H - source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The 1 to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. A workshop held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H - source technologies, and identified necessary R ampersand D efforts to bridge the gap

  11. Effect of thermal gab conductance for MoO3 ampoules irradiated in a high neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2010-01-01

    During the irradiation process of MoO 3 powder with in a high neutron flux, energy deposited in the powder must be released to avoid energy accumulation. The temperature increasing in the powder due to energy accumulation may cause powder phase change and under certain conditions the temperature may reach the melting point. An analytical model was developed to study the effect of gap conductance on the temperature distribution in the powder during the irradiation process. The gap conductance model was studied for helium and nitrogen gases at different pressures to obtain the optimum conditions verifying the safety in heat transfer point of view. It was found that the gap conductance is a function of gas pressure. The model provided the optimum conductivity for the gap filled with helium gas at 1 atm pressure. (orig.)

  12. Design and simulation of an optimized e-linac based neutron source for BNCT research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durisi, E.; Alikaniotis, K.; Borla, O.; Bragato, F.; Costa, M.; Giannini, G.; Monti, V.; Visca, L.; Vivaldo, G.; Zanini, A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is focused on the study of a novel photo-neutron source for BNCT preclinical research based on medical electron Linacs. Previous studies by the authors already demonstrated the possibility to obtain a mixed thermal and epithermal neutron flux of the order of 10"7 cm"−"2 s"−"1. This paper investigates possible Linac’s modifications and a new photo-converter design to rise the neutron flux above 5 10"7 cm"−"2 s"−"1, also reducing the gamma contamination. - Highlights: • Proposal of a mixed thermal and epithermal (named hyperthermal) neutron source based on medical high energy electron Linac. • Photo-neutron production via Giant Dipole Resonance on high Z materials. • MCNP4B-GN simulations to design the photo-converter geometry maximizing the hyperthermal neutron flux and minimizing the fast neutron and gamma contaminations. Hyperthermal neutron field suitable for BNCT preclinical research.

  13. The NIST NBSR and Cold Neutron Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, J.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Guthersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The 20 MW Neutron Beam Split-Core Reactor (NBSR) has nine radial thermal beam tubes, and a large, highly accessible (35cm) cold source serving an extensive network of eight guide tubes. In operation or under construction are twenty-five neutron beam instruments (20 for neutron scattering) and about a dozen other facilities for neutron trace analysis, dosimetry and irradiation. The 6 x 15cm cold neutron guides are coated with {sup 58}Ni, and the last three being installed this fall are coated top and bottom with supermirrors for further increases in intensity. The new semi-spherical liquid hydrogen source will be described, along with the eight scattering instruments (reflectometry, SANS and high-resolution spectroscopy) which have, or will have, an extensive use in biological research. These instruments will likely provide the best overall capability in the U.S. for the next decade for a number of applications in biomolecular structure and dynamics.

  14. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5 · 10 11 n/s for D-T and ∼ 1 · 10 10 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60 · 6 mm 2 ) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm 2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

  15. Accelerator-based intense neutron source for materials R ampersand D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerator-based neutron sources for R ampersand D of materials in nuclear energy systems, including fusion reactors, can provide sufficient neutron flux, flux-volume, fluence and other attractive features for many aspects of materials research. The neutron spectrum produced from the D-Li reaction has been judged useful for many basic materials research problems, and to be a satisfactory approximation to that of the fusion process. The technology of high-intensity linear accelerators can readily be applied to provide the deuteron beam for the neutron source. Earlier applications included the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility prototype. The key features of today's advanced accelerator technology are presented to illustrate the present state-of-the-art in terms of improved understanding of basic physical principles and engineering technique, and to show how these advances can be applied to present demands in a timely manner. These features include how to produce an intense beam current with the high quality required to minimize beam losses along the accelerator and transport system that could cause maintenance difficulties, by controlling the beam emittance through proper choice of the operating frequency, balancing of the forces acting on the beam, and realization in practical hardware. A most interesting aspect for materials researchers is the increased flexibility and opportunities for experimental configurations that a modern accelerator-based source could add to the set of available tools. 8 refs., 5 figs

  16. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  17. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Dudey, N.D.

    1976-01-01

    The invention described provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then ''boil off'' or evaporate a neutron

  18. Neutronics Conversion Analyses of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Calzavara, Y. [Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France)

    2014-09-30

    The following report describes the neutronics results obtained with the MCNP model of the RHF U7Mo LEU reference design that has been established in 2010 during the feasibility analysis. This work constitutes a complete and detailed neutronics analysis of that LEU design using models that have been significantly improved since 2010 and the release of the feasibility report. When possible, the credibility of the neutronics model is tested by comparing the HEU model results with experimental data or other codes calculations results. The results obtained with the LEU model are systematically compared to the HEU model. The changes applied to the neutronics model lead to better comparisons with experimental data or improved the calculation efficiency but do not challenge the conclusion of the feasibility analysis. If the U7Mo fuel is commercially available, not cost prohibitive, a back-end solution is established and if it is possible to manufacture the proposed element, neutronics analyses show that the performance of the reactor would not be challenged by the conversion to LEU fuel.

  19. Stability of high-speed lithium sheet jets for the neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masamichi; Takahashi, Minoru; Aritomi, Masanori; Kobayashi, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The stability of high-speed liquid lithium sheet jets was analytically studied for the neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), which makes cancers and tumors curable with cell-level selections and hence high QOL. The object of our research is to realize the thin and high-speed plane sheet jets of liquid lithium in a high-vacuum as an accelerator target. Linear analysis approach is made to the stability on thin plane sheet jets of liquid lithium in a high-vacuum, and then our analytical results were compared with the previous experimental ones. We proved that the waves of surface tension on thin lithium sheet jets in a high-vacuum are of supercritical flows and neutral stable under about 17.4 m/s in flow velocity and that the fast non-dispersive anti-symmetric waves are more significant than the very slow dispersive symmetric waves. We also formulated the equation of shrinking angle in isosceles-triangularly or isosceles-trapezoidal shrinking sheet jets corresponding to the Mach angle of supersonic gas flows. This formula states universally the physical meaning of Weber number of sheet jets on the wave of surface tension in supercritical flows. We obtained satisfactory prospects (making choice of larger flow velocity U and larger thickness of sheet a) to materialize a liquid target of accelerator in BNCT. (author)

  20. SUPER-FMIT, an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Holmes, J.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Mann, F.M.; Miles, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The SUPER-FMIT facility is proposed as an advanced accelerator based neutron source for high flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. There, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1 ampere beam of 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high flux (> 10 14 n/cm 2 -s) testing in SUPER-FMIT would be 14 liters, about a factor of 30 larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35 MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1.0 amperes or more. Such a large increase can be accomplished by acceleration of multiple beams of molecular deuterium ions (D 2 +) to 70 MeV in a common accelerator sructure. The availability of multiple beams and large total current allows great variety in the testing that can be done. For example, fluxes greater than 10 16 n/cm 2 -s, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring of spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved

  1. Scientific opportunities at SARAF with a liquid lithium jet target neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Ido; Arenshtam, Alex; Berkovits, Dan; Eliyahu, Ilan; Gavish, Inbal; Grin, Asher; Halfon, Shlomi; Hass, Michael; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kaizer, Boaz; Kijel, Daniel; Kreisel, Arik; Mardor, Israel; Mishnayot, Yonatan; Palchan, Tala; Perry, Amichay; Paul, Michael; Ron, Guy; Shimel, Guy; Shor, Asher; Tamim, Noam; Tessler, Moshe; Vaintraub, Sergey; Weissman, Leo

    2018-05-01

    SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) is based on a 5 mA, 40 MeV, proton/deuteron accelerator. Phase-I, operational since 2010, provides proton and deuteron beams up to 4 and 5 MeV, respectively, for basic and applied research activities. The high power Liquid-Lithium jet Target (LiLiT), with 1.912 MeV proton beam, provides high flux quasi-Maxwellian neutrons at kT 30 keV (about 2 × 1010 n/s/cm2/mA on the irradiated sample, about 1 cm from the target), enabling studies of s-process reactions relevant to nucleo-synthesis of the heavy elements in giant AGB stars. With higher energy proton beams and with deuterons, LiLiT can provide higher fluxes of high energy neutrons up to 20 MeV. The experimental program with SARAF phase-I will be enhanced shortly with a new target room complex which is under construction. Finally, SARAF phase-II, planned to start operation at 2023, will enable full capabilities with proton/ deuteron beams at 5 mA and 40 MeV. Liquid lithium targets will then be used to produce neutron sources with intensities of 1015 n/s, which after thermalization will provide thermal neutron (25 meV) fluxes of about 1012 n/s/cm2 at the entrance to neutron beam lines to diffraction and radiography stations.

  2. Fast flux test facility noise data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive collection of spectra from an automated data collection system at the Fast Flux Facility has features from neutron data extracted and managed by database software. Inquiry techniques, including screening, applied to database results show the influences of control rods on wideband noise and, more generally, abilities to detect diverse types of off-normal noise. Uncovering a temporary 0.1-Hz resonance shift gave additional diagnostic information on a 13-Hz mechanical motion characterized by the interference of two resonances. The latter phenomenon is discussed generically for possible application to other reactor types. (author)

  3. Measurements of the neutron capture cross sections and incineration potentials of minor-actinides in high thermal neutron fluxes: Impact on the transmutation of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringer, O.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis comes within the framework of minor-actinide nuclear transmutation studies. First of all, we have evaluated the impact of minor actinide nuclear data uncertainties within the cases of 241 Am and 237 Np incineration in three different reactor spectra: EFR (fast), GT-MHR (epithermal) and HI-HWR (thermal). The nuclear parameters which give the highest uncertainties were thus highlighted. As a result of fact, we have tried to reduce data uncertainties, in the thermal energy region, for one part of them through experimental campaigns in the moderated high intensity neutron fluxes of ILL reactor (Grenoble). These measurements were focused onto the incineration and transmutation of the americium-241, the curium-244 and the californium-249 isotopes. Finally, the values of 12 different cross sections and the 241 Am isomeric branching ratio were precisely measured at thermal energy point. (author)

  4. Joint estimation of the fast and thermal components of a high neutron flux with a two on-line detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, P.; Oriol, L.; Jammes, C.; Vermeeren, L.

    2009-01-01

    A fission chamber with a 242 Pu deposit is the best suited detector for on-line measurements of the fast component of a high neutron flux (∼10 14 ncm -2 s -1 or more) with a significant thermal component. To get the fast flux, it is, however, necessary to subtract the contribution of the thermal neutrons, which increases with fluence because of the evolution of the isotopic content of the deposit. This paper presents an algorithm that permits, thanks to measurements provided by a 242 Pu fission chamber and a detector for thermal neutrons, to estimate the thermal and the fast flux at any time. An implementation allows to test it with simulated data.

  5. Joint estimation of the fast and thermal components of a high neutron flux with a two on-line detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filliatre, P. [CEA, DEN, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France)], E-mail: philippe.filliatre@cea.fr; Oriol, L.; Jammes, C. [CEA, DEN, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Laboratoire Commun d' Instrumentation CEA-SCK-CEN (France)

    2009-05-21

    A fission chamber with a {sup 242}Pu deposit is the best suited detector for on-line measurements of the fast component of a high neutron flux ({approx}10{sup 14}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1} or more) with a significant thermal component. To get the fast flux, it is, however, necessary to subtract the contribution of the thermal neutrons, which increases with fluence because of the evolution of the isotopic content of the deposit. This paper presents an algorithm that permits, thanks to measurements provided by a {sup 242}Pu fission chamber and a detector for thermal neutrons, to estimate the thermal and the fast flux at any time. An implementation allows to test it with simulated data.

  6. Spallation neutron source target station design, development, and commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R., E-mail: hainesjr@ornl.gov; McManamy, T.J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Battle, R.E.; Chipley, K.K.; Crabtree, J.A.; Jacobs, L.L.; Lousteau, D.C.; Rennich, M.J.; Riemer, B.W.

    2014-11-11

    The spallation neutron source target station is designed to safely, reliably, and efficiently convert a 1 GeV beam of protons to a high flux of about 1 meV neutrons that are available at 24 neutron scattering instrument beam lines. Research and development findings, design requirements, design description, initial checkout testing, and results from early operation with beam are discussed for each of the primary target subsystems, including the mercury target, neutron moderators and reflector, surrounding vessels and shielding, utilities, remote handling equipment, and instrumentation and controls. Future plans for the mercury target development program are also briefly discussed.

  7. Assessment of gold flux monitor at irradiation facilities of MINT TRIGA MK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee Boon Siong; Abdul Khalik Wood; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Nazaratul Ashifa Abd Salim

    2005-01-01

    Neutron source of MINTs TRIGA MK II reactor has been used for activation analysis for many years and neutron flux plays important role in activation of samples at various positions. Currently, two irradiation facilities namely the pneumatic transfer system and rotary rack are available to cater for short and long lived irradiation. Neutron flux variation for both irradiation facilities have been determined using gold wire and gold solution as flux monitor. However, the use of gold wire as flux monitor is costlier if compared to gold solution. The results from analysis of certified reference materials showed that gold solution as flux monitors yield satisfactory results and proved to safe cost on the purchasing of gold wire. Further experiment on self-shielding effects of gold solution at various concentrations has been carried out. This study is crucial in providing vital information on the suitable concentration for gold solution as flux monitor. In the near future, gold solution flux monitor will be applied for routine analysis and hence to improve the capability of the laboratory on neutron activation analysis. (Author)

  8. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively. - Highlights: • Two in-core neutron detectors and three BNCT neutron beam monitors were compared. • BNCT neutron beam monitors improve the stability in neutron

  9. A standard fission neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, S.G.; Chakraborty, P.P.; Iyer, M.R.; Kirthi, K.N.; Soman, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fission neutron irradiation facility (FISNIF) has been set up at the thermal column of the CIRUS reactor at BARC. The spectrum and the flux have been measured using threshold detectors. The paper describes the setting up of the facility, measurement and application. A concentric cylinder containing UO 2 powder sealed inside surrounds the irradiation point of a pneumatic sample transfer system located in the thermal column of the reactor. Samples are loaded in a standard aluminium capsule with cadmium lining and transported pneumatically. A sample transfer time of 1 s can be achieved in the facility. Typical applications of the facility for studying activation of iron and sodium in fission neutrons are also discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Plant protection system optimization studies to mitigate consequences of large breaks in the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, M.I.; March-Leuba, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents some of the optimization studies performed to maximize the performance of the engineered safety features and scram systems to mitigate the consequences of large breaks in the primary cooling system of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor. The ANS is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the field of material science and engineering, biology, chemistry, material analysis, and nuclear science. To achieve the high neutron fluxes for these state-of-the-art experiments, the ANS design has a very high power density core (330 MW fission with an active volume of 67.6 ell) surrounded by a large heavy-water reflector, where most neutrons are moderated. This design maximizes the number of neutrons available for experiments but results in a low heat capacity core that creates unique challenges to the design of the plant protection system

  11. Future neutron data activity on the neutron source IREN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeva, N.B.; Koyumdjieva, N.T.; Grigoriev, Y.V.; Gundorin, N.A.; Mareev, Y.D.; Kopatch, Y.N.; Pikelner, L.B.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Sedyshev, P.V.; Zeinalov, S.; Ruskov, I.N.

    2011-01-01

    The global energy demand continues to rise and nuclear power has a potential to be part of the solution of energy problem. Complete and accurate information about the nuclear reactions ensures developing and operating nuclear reactors to reach high efficiencies and adequate safety standards. This demands many nuclear data of improved quality, including covariance nuclear data and correlations. The new neutron source IREN (1 stage) has been put in operation at the end of 2009. The first stage includes the construction of the LUE-200 linear accelerator and non multiplying target. The first measured TOF spectra have been presented recently. The facility is in continuous completion and improvement (according to the full version in the project). The program for neutron data investigation on the IREN neutron source is in preparation. The measuring targets for neutron cross-sections TOF spectra would be selected between isotopes of construction materials, fission products and minor actinides. Now the experimental facilities are in preparation - detectors, innovative electronics equipment and systems for data acquisition and analysis. (authors)

  12. Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimov, R.; Bayanov, B.; Belchenko, Yu.; Belov, V.; Davydenko, V.; Donin, A.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kandaurov, I; Kraynov, G.; Krivenko, A.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Kursanov, N.; Savkin, V.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.; Tiunov, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk) and the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk) have proposed an accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture and fast neutron therapy for hospital. Innovative approach is based upon vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and near threshold 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be neutron generation. Pilot accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. In the present report, the pilot facility design is presented and discussed. Design features of facility components are discussed. Results of experiments and simulations are presented. Complete experimental tests are planned by the end of the year 2005

  13. FRM-II research neutron source commissioned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    On March 2, 2004, the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz research neutron source (FRM-II) generated neutrons for the first time. This marked the most important step on the way to using FRM-II for scientific purposes. On this occasion, this unique research facility in the world was dedicated in a ceremony attended by approximately 1000 representatives of politics, industry, and science. The keynote speaker, Federal Minister of the Interior Otto Schily; Bavarian Minister President Edmund Stoiber; Professor Claus Weyrich (Member of the Executive Board of Siemens AG); Dr. Thomas Goppel (Bavarian State Minister for Science, Research, and Arts); Professor Wolfgang A. Herman (President of the Technical University of Munich); Hannelore Gabor (2nd Mayor of the host municipality of Garching); and Professor Winfried Petry (Scientific Director of FRM-II) underlined the great importance of FRM-II for science, research, medicine, and technology. FRM-II will not only fill the 'neutron gap', but create extremely brilliant working conditions thanks to its considerably higher neutron flux compared to that of its predecessor, the legendary Atomic Egg. After the first conceptual design studies starting in 1980, the ground breaking ceremony in August 1996, and the third partial permit issued at Easter of 2003, a unique tool is now available for modern science and for medical and technical applications. (orig.) [de

  14. The spallation neutron source: New opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) facility became operational in the spring of ... the opportunity to develop science and instrumentation programs which take ... in telecommunications, manufacturing, transportation, information technology, ...

  15. Neutron sources and their characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, R.C.; Swanson, W.P.

    1979-03-01

    The significant sources of photoneutrons within a linear-accelerator treatment head are identified and absolute estimates of neutron production per treatment dose are given for typical components. It is found that the high-Z materials within the treatment head do not significantly alter the neutron fluence but do substantially reduce the average energy of the transmitted spectrum. Reflection of neutrons from the concrete treatment room contribute to the neutron fluence, but not substantially to the patient integral dose, because of a further reduction in average energy. The ratio of maximum fluence to the treatment dose at the same distance is given as a function of electron energy. This ratio rises with energy to an almost constant value of 2.1 x 10 5 neutrons cm -2 rad -1 at electron energies above about 25 MeV. Measured data obtained at a variety of accelerator installations are presented and compared with these calculations. Reasons for apparent deviations are suggested. Absolute depth-dose and depth-dose-equivalent distributions for realistic neutron spectra that occur at therapy installations are calculated, and a rapid falloff with depth is found. The ratio of neutron integral absorbed dose to leakage photon absorbed dose is estimated to be 0.04 and 0.2 for 14 to 25 MeV incident electron energy, respectively. Possible reasons are given for lesser neutron production from betatrons than from linear accelerators. Possible ways in which neutron production can be reduced are discussed

  16. Safety analysis report for the Neutron Multiplier Facility, 329 Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, H.G.

    1978-09-01

    Neutron multiplication is a process wherein the flux of a neutron source such as 252 Cf is enhanced by fission reactions that occur in a subcritical assemblage of fissile material. The multiplication factor of the device depends upon the consequences of neutron reactions with matter and is independent of the initial number of neutrons present. Safe utilization of such a device demands that the fissile material assemblage be maintained in a subcritical state throughout all normal and credibly abnormal conditions. Examples of things that can alter the multiplication factor (and degree of subcriticality) are temperature fluctuations, changes in moderator material such as voiding or composition, addition of fissile materials, and change in assembly configuration. The Neutron Multiplier Facility (NMF) utilizes a multiplier- 252 Cf assembly to produce neutrons for activation analysis of organic and inorganic environmental samples and for on-line mass spectrometry analysis of fission products which diffuse from a stationary fissile target (less than or equal to 4 g fissile material) located in the Neutron Multiplier. The NMF annex to the 329 Building provides close proximity to related counting equipment, and delay between sample irradiation and counting is minimized

  17. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Boeck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10 9 cm -2 s -1 at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. - Highlights: → Neutron activation is an important process for the waste management of nuclear facilities. → Biological shield of the TRIGA reactor Vienna has been topic of investigation. → Flux values allow a categorization of the concrete concerning radiation protection legislation. → Reactor installations are of great importance as neutron sources into the biological shield. → Every installation shows distinguishable flux profiles.

  18. Neutron scattering instruments for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.K.; Fornek, T.; Herwig, K.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a 1 MW pulsed spallation source for neutron scattering planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This facility is being designed as a 5-laboratory collaboration project. This paper addresses the proposed facility layout, the process for selection and construction of neutron scattering instruments at the SNS, the initial planning done on the basis of a reference set of ten instruments, and the plans for research and development (R and D) to support construction of the first ten instruments and to establish the infrastructure to support later development and construction of additional instruments

  19. Fast neutron induced flux pinning in Tl-based high-Tc single crystals and thin films, highly textured tapes and melt-textured bulk 123-superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstaetter, G.; Samadi Hosseinalli, G.; Kern, C.; Sauerzopf, F.M.; Schulz, G.W.; Straif, W.; Yang, X.; Weber, H.W.; Hu, Q.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Various compounds (TI-2223, TI-1223, TI-2212) as well as material forms (single crystals, thin films, ceramics, tapes) of TI-based high temperature superconductors were investigated by magnetic and transport techniques. TI-2223 has a very 'low lying' irreversibility line (H parallel e) and negligible critical current densities J c at 77 K. However, the irreversibility line shifts to higher fields and temperatures and J c is strongly enhanced, even at 77 K, after fast neutron irradiation. In contrast, the related TI-1223 compound has a much steeper irreversibility line (H parallel c) similar to that of Y-123. J c is significant up to 77 K, even in the unirradiated state, and can be largely improved by neutron irradiation. Transport measurements made on TI-1223 tapes still show much lower critical current densities. TI-2212 and Tl-2223 thin films have J c 's at 77 K, which are comparable to those of TI-1223 single crystals. Transport measurements on highly textured Bi-2223 tapes as well as flux profile measurements on Nd-123 bulk superconductors confirm the beneficial effects of neutron induced defects (collision cascades) for flux pinning. (author)

  20. TREAT neutron-radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The TREAT reactor was built as a transient irradiation test reactor. By taking advantage of built-in system features, it was possible to add a neutron-radiography facility. This facility has been used over the years to radiograph a wide variety and large number of preirradiated fuel pins in many different configurations. Eight different specimen handling casks weighing up to 54.4 t (60 T) can be accommodated. Thermal, epithermal, and track-etch radiographs have been taken. Neutron-radiography service can be provided for specimens from other reactor facilities, and the capacity for storing preirradiated specimens also exists

  1. Neutron flux measurements in PUSPATI Triga Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Ah Auu; Mohamad Amin Sharifuldin Salleh; Mohamad Ali Sufi.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron flux measurement in the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (PTR) was initiated after its commissioning on 28 June 1982. Initial measured thermal neutron flux at the bottom of the rotary specimen rack (rotating) and in-core pneumatic terminus were 3.81E+11 n/cm 2 sec and 1.10E+12n/cm 2 sec respectively at 100KW. Work to complete the neutron flux data are still going on. The cadmium ratio, thermal and epithermal neutron flux are measured in the reactor core, rotary specimen rack, in-core pneumatic terminus and thermal column. Bare and Cadmium covered gold foils and wires are used for the above measurement. The activities of the irradiated gold foils and wires are determined using Ge(Li) and hyperpure germinium detectors. (author)

  2. Neutron flux stabilization in the NG-150 neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, L.E.; Makarov, S.A.; Pronman, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Problem of metal tritium target lifetime increase and neutron flux stabilization in the NG-150 neutron generators is studied. Possibility on neutron flux stabilization using the mass analyzer for low-angle (4 deg and 41 deg) mass separation of a beam in thre components, which fall on a target simultaneously, is confirmed experimentally. Basic generator parameters are: accelerating voltage of 150 kV, total beam current on a target of 1.5 mA, beam current density of 0.3-1.6 mA/cm 2 , beam diameter of 8 mm. The initial neutron flux on the targets of 0.73 mg/cm 2 thick constituted 1.1x10 11 ssup(-1). The neutron flux monitoring was accomplished from recoil proton recording by a plastic scintillator. Flux decrease by more than 5% served as a signel for measuring mass analyzer magnetic field providing beam displacement on a target and restoration of the given flux. The NG-150 generator neutron flux stabilization was attained during 2h

  3. The general concept for a spallation neutron source in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between the two German nuclear research centres at Karlsruhe and at Juelich, a reference concept for a spallation neutron source has been studied which would be suitable to satisfy the medium term needs in neutrons for fundamental research and to serve a large number of other scientific disciplines as well. The reference facility, consisting of a high power proton linac for 5 mA time average current of 1.1 GeV protons and a rotating lead target with hybrid H 2 O-D 2 O moderators can deliver a thermal neutron flux equivalent to 7 x 10 14 cm -2 s -1 at the beam tube noses. Pulsed operation of the accelerator results in an intensity modulation of this flux at a repitition rate of 100 Hz with a peak flux of 1.3 x 10 16 cm -2 s -1 and a pulse width of 510 μs. Further possible improvements were considered, consisting in the use of uranium as target material and in the addition of a proton pulse compressor to increase the neutron peak flux especially in the epithermal energy range and to provide a time structure suitable for neutrino and muon research. To realize this concept in a fashion compatible with existing constraints while still serving a maximum number of users at the earliest possible date, a staged concept is being considered by KFA Juelich. (orig.) [de

  4. Structural integrity assessment based on the HFR Petten neutron beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ohms, C; Idsert, P V D

    2002-01-01

    Neutrons are becoming recognized as a valuable tool for structural-integrity assessment of industrial components and advanced materials development. Microstructure, texture and residual stress analyses are commonly performed by neutron diffraction and a joint CEN/ISO Pre-Standard for residual stress analysis is under development. Furthermore neutrons provide for defects analyses, i.e. precipitations, voids, pores and cracks, through small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) or radiography. At the High Flux Reactor, 12 beam tubes have been installed for the extraction of thermal neutrons for such applications. Two of them are equipped with neutron diffractometers for residual stress and structure determination and have been extensively used in the past. Several other facilities are currently being reactivated and upgraded. These include the SANS and radiography facilities as well as a powder diffractometer. This paper summarizes the main characteristics and current status of these facilities as well as recently in...

  5. On scaling and optimization of high-intensity, low-beam-loss RF linacs for neutron source drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    RF linacs providing cw proton beams of 30--250 mA at 800--1600 MeV, and cw deuteron beams of 100--250 mA at 35--40 MeV, are needed as drivers for factory neutron sources applied to radioactive waste transmutation, advanced energy production, materials testing facilities, and spallation neutron sources. The maintenance goals require very low beam loss along the linac. Optimization of such systems is complex; status of beam dynamics aspects presently being investigated is outlined

  6. Self-powered neutron flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.

    1979-01-01

    A self-powered neutron flux detector having an emitter electrode, at least a major portion of which is, 95 Mo encased in a tubular collector electrode and separated therefrom by dielectric material. The 95 Mo emitter electrode has experimentally shown a 98% prompt response, is primarily sensitive to neutron flux, has adequate sensitivity and has low burn up. Preferably the emitter electrode is molybdenum which has been enriched 75% to 99% by weight with 95 Mo

  7. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  8. Neutron flux distribution forecasting device of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    A neutron flux distribution is forecast by using current data obtained from a reactor. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux monitor disposed in various positions in the reactor, (2) a forecasting means for calculating and forecasting a one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to imaginable events by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and physical models, and (3) a display means for displaying the results forecast in the forecasting means to a reactor operation console. Since the forecast values for the one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to the imaginable events are calculated in the device of the present invention by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and the physical models, the data as a base of the calculation are new and the period for calculating the forecast values can be shortened. Accordingly, although there is a worry of providing some errors in the forecast values, they can be utilized sufficiently as reference data. As a result, the reactor can be operated more appropriately. (I.N.)