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Sample records for high explosive decomposition

  1. Thermal decomposition and kinetics of 2,4-dinitroimidazole: An insensitive high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anniyappan, M., E-mail: anniorganic@rediffmail.com; Sonawane, S.H.; Pawar, S.J.; Sikder, A.K.

    2015-08-20

    Highlights: • Pure 2,4-dinitroimidazole was prepared by re-crystallization from hot methanol. • A detailed thermal analysis of 2,4-DNI by DSC, TGA, GC–MS and ignition temperature. • Activation energy was calculated for thermal decomposition of 2,4-DNI • Effect of polymeric binder on thermal decomposition of 2,4-DNI were also studied. • Decomposition mechanisms of 2,4-DNI based on EI mass spectra were also described. - Abstract: 2,4-Dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI) is a novel energetic material with much less sensitive and potential for use as a propellant/insensitive munition (IM) formulations. 2,4-DNI possess high thermal stability and less sensitivity as compared to RDX and HMX which are high explosives extensively used at present. This paper reports a detailed thermal study of 2,4-DNI using various instrumental techniques. The activation energy (E = 205 ± 15 kJ/mol) was calculated from thermal decomposition of 2,4-DNI using DSC at different heating rate. The ignition temperature of pure 2,4-DNI was measured and showed at 285 °C. The TGA experiments demonstrate that 2,4-DNI decomposes in three steps with 92% total weight lose. Moreover, the effect of thermal energy on decomposition of 2,4-DNI in presence of polymeric binders like GAP and HTPB were investigated. Further, decomposition mechanisms of 2,4-DNI based on Electron Impact mass spectra analysis were also reported along with its explosive properties.

  2. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  3. Specific features of explosive decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate exposed to an electron beam with an explosive emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduev, B. P.; Belokurov, G. M.; Krechetov, A. G.; Liskov, I. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    A comparative examination of the critical energy density of explosive decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate exposed either to an electron beam of a GIN-600 accelerator (240 keV, 20 ns) with an explosive emission cathode or to this beam combined with metal low-temperature diode plasma has been performed. It has been demonstrated that the contribution of plasma to the development of explosive decomposition is appreciable at explosion probabilities P ≤ 0.2. At higher energy densities and explosion probabilities P ≥ 0.5, the contribution of plasma to the overall beam energy density did not exceed 10%.

  4. Introduction to High Explosives Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, Cary Bradford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-17

    These are a set of slides for educational outreach to children on high explosives science. It gives an introduction to the elements involved in this science: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Combined, these form the molecule HMX. Many pictures are also included to illustrate explosions.

  5. Thin-film methods for examining the decomposition chemistry of explosives

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    Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Experimental techniques using thin-film samples and infrared spectroscopy have been developed to examine thermally-induced condensed-phase decomposition chemistry of explosives. Experiments with nitrocellulose (NC) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) were done to examine the effects of confining the decomposition proucts so that intimate contact was maintained with the remaining explosive during isothermal decomposition at temperatures below those of the respective DTA exotherms. The NC experiments showed that substantial NC decomposition occurred at 150C and confinement of the decomposition products influenced the decomposition reactions. Some of the mechanisms and reaction rates with confined samples compared favorably with published mechanisms and rates from unconfined samples, while other mechanisms and reaction rates differed. The TATB experiments showed that significant TATB degradation occurred at temperatures as low as 210C, and substantial degradation occurred within 24 hours at 250C which is about 80C below the temperature of the DTA exotherm for TATB.

  6. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  7. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  8. High temperature two component explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  9. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Fu, Xiao-Qi, E-mail: xzx19820708@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS{sub 2}(s) + 91NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO{sub 2}(g) + 6Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) + 78NH{sub 3}(g) + 26N{sub 2}O(g) + 2FeSO{sub 4}(s) + 65H{sub 2}O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  10. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-12-30

    The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG-DSC-MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10K/min from room temperature to 350°C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200°C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO2, NH3, SO2 and N2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. High Explosives Research and Development (HERD) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to provide high explosive formulation, chemical analysis, safety and performance testing, processing, X-ray, quality control and loading support for...

  12. Characterization of mock high-explosive powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, C.R.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1979-03-01

    Analytical characterization and explosibility tests were made on a simulative high-explosive powder consisting of cyanuric acid, melamine, nitrocellulose, and tris-(..beta..-chloroethyl)-phosphate. Tests indicated that the powder presents no unusual safety or health hazards in isostatic-pressing and dry-machining operations.

  13. On the Violence of High Explosive Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarver, C M; Chidester, S K

    2004-02-09

    High explosive reactions can be caused by three general energy deposition processes: impact ignition by frictional and/or shear heating; bulk thermal heating; and shock compression. The violence of the subsequent reaction varies from benign slow combustion to catastrophic detonation of the entire charge. The degree of violence depends on many variables, including the rate of energy delivery, the physical and chemical properties of the explosive, and the strength of the confinement surrounding the explosive charge. The current state of experimental and computer modeling research on the violence of impact, thermal, and shock-induced reactions is reviewed.

  14. Highly explosive nanosilicon-based composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, D.; Diener, J.; Gross, E.; Kuenzner, N.; Kovalev, D. [Technical University of Munich, Physics Department, James-Franck-Str., 85747 Garching (Germany); Timoshenko, V.Yu. [Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, Physics Department, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    We present a highly explosive binary system based on porous silicon layers with their pores filled with solid oxidizers. The porous layers are produced by a standard electrochemical etching process and exhibit properties that are different from other energetic materials. Its production is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology and full bulk silicon wafers can be processed and therefore a large number of explosive elements can be produced simultaneously. The application-relevant parameters: the efficiency and the long-term stability of various porous silicon/oxidizer systems have been studied in details. Structural properties of porous silicon, its surface termination, the atomic ratio of silicon to oxygen and the chosen oxidizers were optimized to achieve the highest efficiency of the explosive reaction. This explosive system reveals various possible applications in different industrial fields, e.g. as a novel, very fast airbag igniter. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Criticality safety in high explosives dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, S.D.

    1997-06-01

    In 1992, an incident occurred at the Pantex Plant in which the cladding around a fissile material component (pit) cracked during dismantlement of the high explosives portion of a nuclear weapon. Although the event did not result in any significant contamination or personnel exposures, concerns about the incident led to the conclusion that the current dismantlement process was unacceptable. Options considered for redesign, dissolution tooling design considerations, dissolution tooling design features, and the analysis of the new dissolution tooling are summarized. The final tooling design developed incorporated a number of safety features and provides a simple, self-contained, low-maintenance method of high explosives removal for nuclear explosive dismantlement. Analyses demonstrate that the tooling design will remain subcritical under normal, abnormal, and credible accident scenarios. 1 fig.

  16. Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

    2009-03-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

  17. High Voltage Application of Explosively Formed Fuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, D.G.; Goforth, J.H.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.M.; Oona, H.; Marsh, S.P.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Sena, F.C.; Martinez, E.C.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Kiuttu, G.; Degnan, J.

    1998-10-18

    At Los Alamos, the authors have primarily applied Explosively Formed Fuse (EFF) techniques to high current systems. In these systems, the EFF has interrupted currents from 19 to 25 MA, thus diverting the current to low inductance loads. The magnitude of transferred current is determined by the ratio of storage inductance to load inductance, and with dynamic loads, the current has ranged from 12 to 20 MA. In a system with 18 MJ stored energy, the switch operates at a power up to 6 TW. The authors are now investigating the use of the EFF technique to apply high voltages to high impedance loads in systems that are more compact. In these systems, they are exploring circuits with EFF lengths from 43 to 100 cm, which have storage inductances large enough to apply 300 to 500 kV across high impedance loads. Experimental results and design considerations are presented. Using cylindrical EFF switches of 10 cm diameter and 43 cm length, currents of approximately 3 MA were interrupted producing {approximately}200 kV. This indicate s the switch had an effective resistance of {approximately}100 m{Omega} where 150--200 m{Omega} was expected. To understand the lower performance, several parameters were studied, including: electrical conduction through the explosive products; current density; explosive initiation; insulator type; conductor thickness; and so on. The results show a number of interesting features, most notably that the primary mechanism of switch operation is mechanical and not electrical fusing of the conductor. Switches opening on a 10 to 10 {micro}s time scale with resistances starting at 50 {micro}{Omega} and increasing to perhaps 1 {Omega} now seem possible to construct, using explosive charges as small as a few pounds.

  18. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.A.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this work was to provide data and methodology assisting the transfer and acceptance of composting technology for the remediation of explosives-contaminated soils and sediments. Issues and activities addressed included: (a) chemical and toxicological characterization of compost samples from new field composting experiments, and the environmental availability of composting efficiency by isolation of bacterial consortia and natural surfactants from highly efficient composts, and (c) improved assessment of compost product suitability for land application.

  19. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of High Explosive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse J. Sabatini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the recent advances in the syntheses of high explosive energetic materials. Syntheses of some relevant modern primary explosives and secondary high explosives, and the sensitivities and properties of these molecules are provided. In addition to the synthesis of such materials, processing improvement and formulating aspects using these ingredients, where applicable, are discussed in detail.

  20. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  1. Analysis of xRAGE and flag high explosive burn models with PBX 9404 cylinder tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersen, Kyle Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-05

    High explosives are energetic materials that release their chemical energy in a short interval of time. They are able to generate extreme heat and pressure by a shock driven chemical decomposition reaction, which makes them valuable tools that must be understood. This study investigated the accuracy and performance of two Los Alamos National Laboratory hydrodynamic codes, which are used to determine the behavior of explosives within a variety of systems: xRAGE which utilizes an Eulerian mesh, and FLAG with utilizes a Lagrangian mesh. Various programmed and reactive burn models within both codes were tested using a copper cylinder expansion test. The test was based on a recent experimental setup which contained the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9404. Detonation velocity versus time curves for this explosive were obtained using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The modeled results from each of the burn models tested were then compared to one another and to the experimental results. This study validate

  2. Thermal decomposition and kinetics of plastic bonded explosives based on mixture of HMX and TATB with polymer matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work describes thermal decomposition behaviour of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on mixture of l,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and 2,4,6- triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TATB with Viton A as polymer binder. Thermal decomposition of PBXs was undertaken by applying simultaneous thermal analysis (STA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to investigate influence of the HMX amount on thermal behavior and its kinetics. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA indicated that the thermal decomposition of PBXs based on mixture of HMX and TATB was occurred in a three-steps. The first step was mainly due to decomposition of HMX. The second step was ascribed due to decomposition of TATB, while the third step was occurred due to decomposition of the polymer matrices. The thermal decomposition % was increased with increasing HMX amount. The kinetics related to thermal decomposition were investigated under non-isothermal for a single heating rate measurement. The variation in the activation energy of PBXs based on mixture of HMX and TATB was observed with varying the HMX amount. The kinetics from the results of TGA data at various heating rates under non-isothermal conditions were also calculated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods. The activation energies calculated by employing FWO method were very close to those obtained by KAS method. The mean activation energy calculated by FWO and KAS methods was also a good agreement with the activation energy obtained from single heating rate measurement in the first step decomposition.

  3. Coupled phase transformation, chemical decomposition, and deformation in plastic-bonded explosive: Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Henson, Bryan F.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Zerkle, David K.; Asay, Blaine W.

    2007-12-01

    A continuum thermomechanochemical model of the behavior of a plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) 9501 formulation consisting of the energetic crystal octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) embedded in a polymeric binder is developed. Our main focus is on the study of the β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) in crystalline HMX under a complex pressure-temperature path. To reproduce the pressure-temperature path, in particular during heating of PBX inside of a rigid cylinder, the β ↔δ PTs in HMX are coupled to chemical decomposition of the HMX and binder leading to gas formation, gas leaking from the cylinder, elastic, thermal, and transformational straining as well as straining due to mass loss. A fully physically based thermodynamic and kinetic model of the β ↔δ PT in HMX crystal is developed. It is based on a suggested nucleation mechanism via melt mediated nanocluster transformation and the recently revealed growth mechanism via internal stress-induced virtual melting. During the nucleation, nanosize clusters of the β phase dissolve in a molten binder and transform diffusionally into δ phase clusters. During the interface propagation, internal stresses induced by transformation strain cause the melting of the stressed δ phase much below (120 K) the melting temperature and its immediate resolidification into the unstressed δ phase. These mechanisms explain numerous puzzles of HMX polymorphism and result in overall transformation kinetics that is in good agreement with experiments. Simple phenomenological equations for kinetics of chemical decomposition of the HMX and the binder are in good correspondence with experiments as well. A continuum deformation model is developed in two steps. The geometrically linear (small strain) theory is used to prove that the internal stresses and macroscopic shear stresses are negligible. Then a large strain theory is developed under hydrostatic loading. The developed continuum thermomechanochemical model is

  4. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    1~7JJ!i 5a. DATE: 6a. DATE: 7a. DATE: 8. TITLE: Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 9. CONTRACT NUMBER: 10...00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...600 Raleigh, NC 27605 Contract Number: HDTRA2-11-D-0001 Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 4

  5. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study on Formation of High Concentration of H2 Generated by Gas Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Baiwei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In coal mine fire rescues, if the abnormal increase of gas concentration occurs, it is the primary thing to analyze the reasons and identify sources of the abnormal forming, which is also the basis of judge the combustion state of fire area and formulate proper fire reliefs. Nowadays, related researches have recognized the methane explosion as the source of high concentration of H2 formation, but there are few studies about the conditions and reaction mechanism of gas explosion generating high concentration of H2.Therefore, this paper uses the chemical kinetic calculation software, ChemKin, and the 20L spherical explosion experimental device to simulate the generating process and formation conditions of H2 in gas explosion. The experimental results show that: the decomposition of water vapor is the main base element reaction (R84 which leads to the generation of H2.The free radical H is the key factor to influence the formation of H2 generated from gas explosion. With the gradual increase of gas explosion concentration, the explosive reaction becomes more incomplete, and then the generating quantity of H2 increases gradually. Experimental results of 20L spherical explosion are consistent with the change trend about simulation results, which verifies the accuracy of simulation analysis. The results of explosion experiments show that when gas concentration is higher than 9%, the incomplete reaction of methane explosion increases which leads to the gradual increase of H2 formation.

  6. Highly Scalable Matching Pursuit Signal Decomposition Algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this research, we propose a variant of the classical Matching Pursuit Decomposition (MPD) algorithm with significantly improved scalability and computational...

  7. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  8. Simulating the Thermal Response of High Explosives on Time Scales of Days to Microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A

    2003-07-16

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics.

  9. Mesoscale modeling of metal-loaded high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bdzil, John Bohdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lieberthal, Brandon [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Srewart, Donald S [UNIV OF ILLINOIS

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 3D approach to modeling multi-phase blast explosive, which is primarily condensed explosive by volume with inert embedded particles. These embedded particles are uniform in size and placed on the array of a regular lattice. The asymptotic theory of detonation shock dynamics governs the detonation shock propagation in the explosive. Mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations are used to show how the particles are compressed, deformed, and accelerated by the high-speed detonation products flow.

  10. Color camera pyrometry for high explosive detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, John; Biss, Matthew; Homan, Barrie; McNesby, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Temperature measurements of high-explosive and combustion processes are difficult because of the speed and environment of the events. We have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be used as an optical pyrometer to overcome these challenges. The camera provides both high temporal and spatial resolution. The color filter array of the sensor uses three color filters to measure the spectral distribution of the imaged light. A two-color ratio method is used to calculate a temperature using the color filter array raw image data and a gray-body assumption. If the raw image data is not available, temperatures may be calculated from processed images or movies depending on proper analysis of the digital color imaging pipeline. We analyze three transformations within the pipeline (demosaicing, white balance, and gamma-correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Vision Research Phantom color camera, we have measured the temperature of exploded C-4 charges. The surface temperature of the resulting fireball rapidly increases after detonation and then decayed to a constant value of approximately 1980 K. Processed images indicates that the temperature remains constant until the light intensity decreased below the background value.

  11. Controlled Detonation Dynamics in Additively Manufactured High Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzer, Andrew; Tappan, Bryce; Bowden, Patrick; Manner, Virginia; Clements, Brad; Menikoff, Ralph; Ionita, Axinte; Branch, Brittany; Dattelbaum, Dana; Espy, Michelle; Patterson, Brian; Wu, Ruilian; Mueller, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    The effect of structure in explosives has long been a subject of interest to explosives engineers and scientists. Through structure, detonation dynamics in explosives can be manipulated, introducing a new level of safety and directed performance into these previously difficult to control materials. New advances in additive manufacturing (AM) allow the deliberate introduction of exact internal structures at dimensions approaching the mesoscale of these energetic materials. We show through simulation and experiment that this structure can be used to control detonation behavior by manipulating complex shockwave interactions. We use high-speed video and shorting mag-wires to determine the detonation velocity in AM generated explosive structures, demonstrating, for the first time, a method of controlling the directional propagation of reactive flow through the controlled introduction of structure within a high explosive. With ongoing improvement in the AM methods available coupled with guidance through modeling and simulations, more complex interactions are being explored. LANL LDRD Office.

  12. Decomposition of silicon carbide at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviau, Kierstin; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2017-11-01

    We measure the onset of decomposition of silicon carbide, SiC, to silicon and carbon (e.g., diamond) at high pressures and high temperatures in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We identify decomposition through x-ray diffraction and multiwavelength imaging radiometry coupled with electron microscopy analyses on quenched samples. We find that B3 SiC (also known as 3C or zinc blende SiC) decomposes at high pressures and high temperatures, following a phase boundary with a negative slope. The high-pressure decomposition temperatures measured are considerably lower than those at ambient, with our measurements indicating that SiC begins to decompose at ~ 2000 K at 60 GPa as compared to ~ 2800 K at ambient pressure. Once B3 SiC transitions to the high-pressure B1 (rocksalt) structure, we no longer observe decomposition, despite heating to temperatures in excess of ~ 3200 K. The temperature of decomposition and the nature of the decomposition phase boundary appear to be strongly influenced by the pressure-induced phase transitions to higher-density structures in SiC, silicon, and carbon. The decomposition of SiC at high pressure and temperature has implications for the stability of naturally forming moissanite on Earth and in carbon-rich exoplanets.

  13. Electric conductivity of high explosives with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, I. A.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Kashkarov, A. O.; Kremenko, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a technique for introducing carbon nanotubes into high explosives (HEs). For a number of explosives (trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, benzotrifuroxan), it was possible to achieve the appearance of conductivity by adding a small amount (up to 1% by mass) of single-walled carbon nanotubes TUBALL COATE H2O (CNTs) produced by OCSiAl. Thus it is possible to reduce the sensitivity of explosives to static electricity by adding an insignificant part of conductive nanotubes. This will increase safety of HEs during production and application and will reduce the number of accidents.

  14. Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) Test Technique and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) test facility has been re-established and chartered to impart impulsive loads to a variety of targets. This loading is achieved through the detonation of a primary explosive applied directly to the target surface using a robotic spraying system. Using light as the initiating mechanism ensures virtually simultaneous loading. Uniform, discontinuous, or graded explosive loading conditions are achievable over complex shapes with the LIHE process. This direct detonation technique is a demonstrated capability at the LIHE facility. Test results will be presented. In addition to the direct detonation technique, the LIHE facility is developing the capability to explosively accelerate a thin flyer plate to impact various test targets. This explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer) will enable pressure control during impulsive loading. By controlling flyer density (material), thickness, velocity, and acceleration gap, the impact pressure amplitude and pulse duration can be controlled. Similar to the direct detonation technique, a primary explosive is robotically sprayed onto the flyer plate and subsequently detonated using an intense flash of light. Through the control of the explosive deposition and flyer gap, virtually simultaneous impact is achievable for either uniform or graded loading conditions. X-Flyer test results will be presented.

  15. Characterization of Explosives Processing Waste Decomposition Due to Composting. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    low recovery. The sensitivity for HMX is the lowest of the set. The radiotracer appears to model the recovery of the explosives, but the range of...Heckelman, Eds. 1989. The Merck Index. Merck and Company, Inc., Rahway, NJ. & Kaplan, D. L, and A. M. Kaplan, 1982. Composting Industrial Wastes...Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, OIL 69 13. Norberg-King, T. J., E. J. Durhan, G. T. Ankley and E. Robert. 1991. Application of toxicity

  16. High-explosive-driven delay line pulse generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1982-11-15

    The inclusion of a delay line circuit into the design of a high-explosive-driven generator shortens the time constant of the output pulse. After a brief review of generator concepts and previously described pulse-shortening methods, a geometry is presented which incorporates delay line circuit techcniques into a coil generator. The circuit constants are adjusted to match the velocity of the generated electromagnetic wave to the detonation velocity of the high explosive. The proposed generator can be modeled by adding a variable inductance term to the telegrapher's equation. A particular solution of this equation is useful for exploring the operational parameters of the generator. The duration of the electromagnetic pulse equals the radial expansion time of the high-explosive-driven armature until it strikes the coil. Because the impedance of the generator is a constant, the current multiplication factor is limited only by nonlinear effects such as voltage breakdown, diffusion, and compression at high energies.

  17. High-temperature catalyst for catalytic combustion and decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Jensen, Jeff J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst for propellant composition, including high concentration hydrogen peroxide, and catalytic combustion, including methane air mixtures. The uses include target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The catalyst system requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. Start-up transients of less than 1 second have been demonstrated with catalyst bed and propellant temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The catalyst system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition effeciency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test particles.

  18. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  19. Decomposition of water into highly combustible hydroxyl gas used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method proposed involves the decomposition of water into highly combustible hydroxyl gas via electrolysis, which is used in internal combustion engines of electrical generators for electricity generation. The by-product obtained from combustion of this gas is water vapour and oxygen to replenish the atmosphere.

  20. Carbon cluster formation during thermal decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene high explosives from ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luzheng; Zybin, Sergey V; van Duin, Adri C T; Dasgupta, Siddharth; Goddard, William A; Kober, Edward M

    2009-10-08

    We report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the first-principles-based ReaxFF reactive force field to study the thermal decomposition of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) at various densities and temperatures. TATB is known to produce a large amount (15-30%) of high-molecular-weight carbon clusters, whereas detonation of nitramines such as HMX and RDX (1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) generate predominantly low-molecular-weight products. In agreement with experimental observation, these simulations predict that TATB decomposition quickly (by 30 ps) initiates the formation of large carbonaceous clusters (more than 4000 amu, or approximately 15-30% of the total system mass), and HMX decomposition leads almost exclusively to small-molecule products. We find that HMX decomposes readily on this time scale at lower temperatures, for which the decomposition rate of TATB is about an order of magnitude slower. Analyzing the ReaxFF MD results leads to the detailed atomistic structure of this carbon-rich phase of TATB and allows characterization of the kinetics and chemistry related to this phase and their dependence on system density and temperature. The carbon-rich phase formed from TATB contains mainly polyaromatic rings with large oxygen content, leading to graphitic regions. We use these results to describe the initial reaction steps of thermal decomposition of HMX and TATB in terms of the rates for forming primary and secondary products, allowing comparison to experimentally derived models. These studies show that MD using the ReaxFF reactive force field provides detailed atomistic information that explains such macroscopic observations as the dramatic difference in carbon cluster formation between TATB and HMX. This shows that ReaxFF MD captures the fundamental differences in the mechanisms of such systems and illustrates how the ReaxFF may be applied to model complex chemical phenomena

  1. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  2. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of High Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    toxic mercury fulminate (1), adopted for use in some of the first percussion primer formulations in the early 1800s [6] and later by Alfred Nobel for...high sensitivity of mercury fulminate , and its ability to lose performance under high loading pressures paved the way for lead azide (2) to replace the... mercury fulminate (1), lead azide (2) and normal lead styphnate (3) and basic lead styphnate (4). 2.2. Why “Green” Primary Explosives? Over the past two

  3. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Aleman, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  4. Initiation of Insensitive High Explosives Using Multiple Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Elizabeth; Burritt, Rosmary; Biss, Matt; Bowden, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Insensitive High Explosives (IHEs) increase safety in many types of weapons. However, the safety comes at the cost of performance. Initiation of IHE requires large boosters and powerful detonators as well. Multipoint initiation is being utilized to exploit explosive wave interactions to create overdriven states, greatly facilitating the initiation of IHEs. This presentation will build from recent explosive experiments where the minimum spot size for single-point initiation in PBX 9502 was determined. Below this threshold, PBX 9502 could not be initiated. This was then expanded to three initiation points, which were smaller this threshold. Measurements of the velocity and pressure of the wave interactions were measured using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Initiation was observed, and the resulting pressures at the double and triple points were found to be above the CJ state for PBX 9502. Based on these results, further tests were conducted to isolate and measure the longevity and pressure of this phenomenon using cut-back tests. All results will be presented and discussed.

  5. Spinodal decomposition of tungsten-containing phases in functional coatings obtained via high-energy implantation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, S. V.; Petrov, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    We have studied structural and phase transformations in tungsten-containing functional coatings of carbon steels obtained during the high-energy processes of implanting tungsten carbide micropowders by the method of complex pulse electromechanical processing and micropowders of tungsten by technology of directed energy of explosion based on the effect of superdeep penetration of solid particles (Usherenko effect). It has been shown that, during thermomechanical action, intensive steel austenization occurs in the deformation zone with the dissolution of tungsten carbide powder, the carbidization of tungsten powder, and the subsequent formation of composite gradient structures as a result of the decay of supercooled austenite supersaturated by tungsten according to the diffusion mechanism and the mechanism of spinodal decomposition. Separate zones of tungsten-containing phases of the alloy are in the liquid-phase state, as well as undergo spinodal decomposition with the formation of highly disperse carbide phases of globular morphology.

  6. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  7. High explosive characterization for the dice throw event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, F.; Finger, M.; Hayes, B.; Lee, E.; Cheung, H.; Walton, J.

    1976-06-16

    An equation of state for detonation products was developed to describe the detonation of large charges of ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). The equation of state will be used to predict air-blast and ground-motion effects in the Dice Throw Event. The explosive performance of ANFO is highly dependent on charge size. The equation developed from this work is applicable to heavily confined detonations 101.6 mm in diameter or larger. The equation of state is based on results from experiments in cylinders and hemispheres, and a large field test. The report contains a detailed discussion of the diagnostic and initiation techniques used in these experiments.

  8. Thermolysis, nonisothermal decomposition kinetics, specific heat capacity and adiabatic time-to-explosion of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 (DNANT= dinitroacetonitrile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, Hao; Xu, Kangzhen; Zhang, Wantao; Ren, Zhaoyu; Song, Jirong; Zhao, Fengqi

    2014-02-20

    A new energetic copper complex of dinitroacetonitrile (DNANT), [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2, was first synthesized through an unexpected reaction. The thermal decomposition of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 was studied with DSC and TG/DTG methods. The gas products were analyzed through a TG-FTIR-MS method. The nonisothermal kinetic equation of the exothermic process is dα/dT = 10(10.92)/β4(1 - α)[-ln(1 - α)](3/4) exp(-1.298 × 10(5)/RT). The self-accelerating decomposition temperature and critical temperature of thermal explosion are 217.9 and 221.0 °C. The specific heat capacity of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 was determined with a micro-DSC method, and the molar heat capacity is 512.6 J mol(-1) K(-1) at 25 °C. Adiabatic time-to-explosion of Cu(NH3)4(DNANT)2 was also calculated to be about 137 s.

  9. How and When Metals React in High Performance Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul

    2017-06-01

    The reaction kinetics of aluminum and other metals in detonations has long been studied with the goal to obtain the full enthalpy energy of aluminum oxidation at early timeframes. This requires the oxidation reaction to occur at the same rate as explosive CHNO compounds. While the literature claims some success with model formulations, few fielded formulations obtain such performance due to competing carbon oxidation of the inert formulation binder ingredients. Moreover, from gas analysis data in detonation calorimetry, it is hypothesized that high pressure/high temperature gas equilibrium concentrations are one of some factors that play a role in obtaining early reactivity of metals in the detonation. The mechanism of these reactions and the effect on detonation responses such as detonation pressure and velocity will be discussed Membership pending.

  10. High-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2016-10-09

    This work reports rate coefficients of the thermal unimolecular decomposition reaction of ethyl propionate (EP) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 976–1300 K and pressures of 825–1875 Torr. The reaction progress was monitored by detecting CH near 10.532 μm using CO gas laser absorption. In addition, G3//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and master equation calculations were performed to assess the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the reaction. Our calculations revealed that CH elimination occurs via a six-centered retro-ene transition state. Our measured rate data are close to the high-pressure limit and showed no discernable temperature fall off.

  11. Computer simulation of metal wire explosion under high rate heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Korchuganov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Synchronous electric explosion of metal wires and synthesis of bicomponent nanoparticles were investigated on the base of molecular dynamics method. Copper and nickel nanosized crystallites of cylindrical shape were chosen as conductors for explosion. The embedded atom approximation was used for calculation of the interatomic interactions. The agglomeration process after explosion metal wires was the main mechanism for particle synthesis. The distribution of chemical elements was non-uniform over the cross section of the bicomponent particles. The copper concentration in the surface region was higher than in the bulk of the synthesized particle. By varying the loading parameters (heating temperature, the distance between the wires) one can control the size and internal structure of the synthesized bicomponent nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that the method of molecular dynamics can be effectively used to determine the optimal technological mode of nanoparticle synthesis on the base of electric explosion of metal wires.

  12. Systematic approach to verification and validation: High explosive burn models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, Christina A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-16

    Most material models used in numerical simulations are based on heuristics and empirically calibrated to experimental data. For a specific model, key questions are determining its domain of applicability and assessing its relative merits compared to other models. Answering these questions should be a part of model verification and validation (V and V). Here, we focus on V and V of high explosive models. Typically, model developers implemented their model in their own hydro code and use different sets of experiments to calibrate model parameters. Rarely can one find in the literature simulation results for different models of the same experiment. Consequently, it is difficult to assess objectively the relative merits of different models. This situation results in part from the fact that experimental data is scattered through the literature (articles in journals and conference proceedings) and that the printed literature does not allow the reader to obtain data from a figure in electronic form needed to make detailed comparisons among experiments and simulations. In addition, it is very time consuming to set up and run simulations to compare different models over sufficiently many experiments to cover the range of phenomena of interest. The first difficulty could be overcome if the research community were to support an online web based database. The second difficulty can be greatly reduced by automating procedures to set up and run simulations of similar types of experiments. Moreover, automated testing would be greatly facilitated if the data files obtained from a database were in a standard format that contained key experimental parameters as meta-data in a header to the data file. To illustrate our approach to V and V, we have developed a high explosive database (HED) at LANL. It now contains a large number of shock initiation experiments. Utilizing the header information in a data file from HED, we have written scripts to generate an input file for a hydro code

  13. Numerical analysis of thermal decomposition for RDX, TNT, and Composition B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Hyuk; Nyande, Baggie W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanbat National University, 125 Dongseo-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Soo; Park, Jung Su [Agency for Defence Development, 462 Jochiwon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-150 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Jin [Hanwha corporation, 117 Yeosusandan 3-ro, Yeosu-si, Jeollanam-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Min, E-mail: minoh@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanbat National University, 125 Dongseo-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Reaction mechanism of thermal decomposition of military explosives is investigated. • Mathematical modeling of thermal decomposition are executed. • Commercial scale reactor is employed for demilitarization of waste explosives. • Dynamic response of thermal decomposition is examined in a reactor. - Abstract: Demilitarization of waste explosives on a commercial scale has become an important issue in many countries, and this has created a need for research in this area. TNT, RDX and Composition B have been used as military explosives, and they are very sensitive to thermal shock. For the safe waste treatment of these high-energy and highly sensitive explosives, the most plausible candidate suggested has been thermal decomposition in a rotary kiln. This research examines the safe treatment of waste TNT, RDX and Composition B in a rotary kiln type incinerator with regard to suitable operating conditions. Thermal decomposition in this study includes melting, 3 condensed phase reactions in the liquid phase and 263 gas phase reactions. Rigorous mathematical modeling and dynamic simulation for thermal decomposition were carried out for analysis of dynamic behavior in the reactor. The results showed time transient changes of the temperature, components and mass of the explosives and comparisons were made for the 3 explosives. It was concluded that waste explosives subject to heat supplied by hot air at 523.15 K were incinerated safely without any thermal detonation.

  14. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  15. High Performance Polar Decomposition on Distributed Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal E.

    2016-08-08

    The polar decomposition of a dense matrix is an important operation in linear algebra. It can be directly calculated through the singular value decomposition (SVD) or iteratively using the QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH). The former is difficult to parallelize due to the preponderant number of memory-bound operations during the bidiagonal reduction. We investigate the latter scenario, which performs more floating-point operations but exposes at the same time more parallelism, and therefore, runs closer to the theoretical peak performance of the system, thanks to more compute-bound matrix operations. Profiling results show the performance scalability of QDWH for calculating the polar decomposition using around 9200 MPI processes on well and ill-conditioned matrices of 100K×100K problem size. We study then the performance impact of the QDWH-based polar decomposition as a pre-processing step toward calculating the SVD itself. The new distributed-memory implementation of the QDWH-SVD solver achieves up to five-fold speedup against current state-of-the-art vendor SVD implementations. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.

  16. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    but rely on the concentration of hydrogen. The model ... first-order rate law. Lehmhus and Rausch (2004) have annealed TiH2 pow- der in air and argon. In argon, the powder does not develop a surface layer and as a result, a small amount of hydro- gen is lost ... rate effect on the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiH2.

  17. Highly efficient and stable catalyst for peroxynitrite decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurii V. Geletii; Alan J. Bailey; Jennifer J. Cowan; Ira A. Weinstock; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    The new cobalt substituted-polyoxometalate K7[CoAlW11O39]•15H2O and the simple CoCl2•6H2O salt are efficient catalysts for peroxynitrite decomposition. These compounds also catalyze the oxidation of ascorbic acid and the nitration of phenol by peroxynitrite.

  18. iVCJ: A tool for Interactive Visualization of high explosives CJ states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von Howard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-12

    A graphical user interface (GUI) tool has been developed that facilitates the visualization and analysis of the Chapman-Jouguet state for high explosives gaseous products using the Jones- Wilkins-Lee equation of state.

  19. Formic Acid Investigation for the Prediction of High Explosive Detonation Properties and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, January 1993. 4. Cowperthwaite, M. and Zwisler, W. H., "The JCZ Equations of State for Detonation Products and Their...AD AD-E403 298 Technical Report ARMET-TR-10006 FORMIC ACID INVESTIGATION FOR THE PREDICTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION PROPERTIES AND...DATES COVERED {From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FORMIC ACID INVESTIGATION FOR THE PREDICTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE

  20. Development of new model for high explosives detonation parameters calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremić Radun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The simple semi-empirical model for calculation of detonation pressure and velocity for CHNO explosives has been developed, which is based on experimental values of detonation parameters. Model uses Avakyan’s method for determination of detonation products' chemical composition, and is applicable in wide range of densities. Compared with the well-known Kamlet's method and numerical model of detonation based on BKW EOS, the calculated values from proposed model have significantly better accuracy.

  1. Los Alamos experimental capabilities: Ancho Canyon high explosives and pulse power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    This document outlines the Ancho Canyon testing facility comprehensive material characterization capabilities. These include the high explosive (HE) firing sites, a full complement of gun facilities, and variety of pulse power capacitor bank systems of various energies. The explosive fabrication capability at Los Alamos allows the design and testing of unique HE experimental assemblies. Depending on the hydrodynamic requirements, these explosive systems can vary widely in cost. Years of experience have enabled the development of a comprehensive set of diagnostics to monitor these experiments.

  2. Los Alamos experimental capabilities: Ancho Canyon high explosives and pulse power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E.

    1993-02-01

    This document outlines the Ancho Canyon testing facility comprehensive material characterization capabilities. These include the high explosive (HE) firing sites, a full complement of gun facilities, and variety of pulse power capacitor bank systems of various energies. The explosive fabrication capability at Los Alamos allows the design and testing of unique HE experimental assemblies. Depending on the hydrodynamic requirements, these explosive systems can vary widely in cost. Years of experience have enabled the development of a comprehensive set of diagnostics to monitor these experiments.

  3. 7-Amino-4,6-Dinitrobenzofuroxan, An Insensitive High Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    phosphine to give 7-amino-4,6-dinitrobenzofurazan, a known compound. A by-product isolated from the L~duction reaction is 2-(triphenylphosphinimido)-4,6...decomposition exceeds endo- thermic rearrangement contribution causing the line to rise until at 271"C the endothermic process again prevails and the...4,6- dinitrobenzofuroxan. There is another reduction product isolated . To this compound the structure, 2-(triphenylphosphinimido)-4,6-dinitroaniline

  4. Role of explosive instabilities in high-$\\beta$ disruptions in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Aydemir, A Y; Lee, S G; Seol, J; Park, B H; In, Y K

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically explosive growth of a ballooning finger is demonstrated in nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic calculations of high-$\\beta$ disruptions in tokamaks. The explosive finger is formed by an ideally unstable n=1 mode, dominated by an m/n=2/1 component. The quadrupole geometry of the 2/1 perturbed pressure field provides a generic mechanism for the formation of the initial ballooning finger and its subsequent transition from exponential to explosive growth, without relying on secondary processes. The explosive ejection of the hot plasma from the core and stochastization of the magnetic field occur in Alfv\\'enic time scales, accounting for the extremely fast growth of the precursor oscillations and the rapidity of the thermal quench in some high-$\\beta$ disruptions.

  5. Radiolysis of lignin: Prospective mechanism of high-temperature decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The range of the radiation-thermal processes resulting in conversion of lignin into monomeric phenols is considered. Statistically the most probable places of macromolecule ionization are aromatic units. Release of phenolic products from a lignin macromolecule is the multistage process beginning via fragmentation of primary cation-radicals. Reactions of electrons and small radicals with macromolecules, also as degradation of cation-radicals, result in formation of phenoxyl radicals. Macroradicals possess lower heat stability in comparison with macromolecules. Thermal decomposition of macroradicals leads to release of monohydric and dihydric phenols. The probability of benzenediols formation increases in the presence of alkanes. As noted, partial transformation of lignin into charcoal is inevitable.

  6. Research of explosives in an environment of high pressure and temperature using a new test stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Drzewiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the test stand for determining the blast abilities of explosives in high pressure and temperature conditions as well as the initial results of the research are presented. Explosives are used in rock burst and methane prevention to destroy precisely defined fragments of the rock mass where energy and methane are accumulated. Using this preventive method for fracturing the structure of the rocks which accumulate the energy or coal of the methane seam very often does not bring the anticipated results. It is because of the short range of destructive action of the post-blast gases around the blast hole. Evaluation of the blast dynamics of explosives in a test chamber, i.e. in the pressure and temperature conditions comparable to those found “in situ”, will enable evaluation of their real usefulness in commonly used mining hazard preventive methods. At the same time, it will enable the development of new designs of the explosive charges used for precisely determined mining hazards. In order to test the explosives for their use in difficult environmental conditions and to determine the characteristics of their explosion, a test chamber has been built. It is equipped with a system of sensors and a high-frequency recording system of pressure and temperature during a controlled explosion of an explosive charge. The results of the research will enable the development of new technologies for rock burst and methane prevention which will significantly increase workplace health and safety level. This paper presented results constitute the initial phase of research started in the middle of 2014.

  7. Decomposition and mineralization of amoxicillin by high ionizing energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Kyu; Yu, Seung Ho; Lee, Myun Joo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung Woo [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    The presence of antibiotics in aquatic environment has been concerning as a new environment pollutant problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degradation of antibiotics by gamma irradiation. Amoxicillin as one of β-lactam antibiotics is widely used for both human and animals. To compare the removal efficiencies of amoxicillin, amoxicillin solutions were saturated or purged with three difference gases; N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} separately. The amoxicillin solutions were irradiated at up to 100 kGy. Amoxicillin was completely degraded between 20 and 40 kGy. Especially, amoxicillin saturated with N2O showed the highest degradation rate, and 90% TOC removal efficiency. The enhanced radiolytic decomposition of amoxicillin can be explained by the reactions with oxidizing radicals such as ∙OH and O{sub 2}∙{sup -}/HO{sub 2}∙ radicals.

  8. High methane natural gas/air explosion characteristics in confined vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuang; Si, Zhanbo; Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Kongming; Jin, Zebing

    2014-08-15

    The explosion characteristics of high methane fraction natural gas were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel at different initial conditions. Results show that with the increase of initial pressure, the peak explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise increase due to a higher amount (mass) of flammable mixture, which delivers an increased amount of heat. The increased total flame duration and flame development time result as a consequence of the higher amount of flammable mixture. With the increase of the initial temperature, the peak explosion pressures decrease, but the pressure increase during combustion is accelerated, which indicates a faster flame speed and heat release rate. The maximum value of the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the minimum total combustion duration and the minimum flame development time is observed when the equivalence ratio of the mixture is 1.1. Additionally, for higher methane fraction natural gas, the explosion pressure and the maximum rate of pressure rise are slightly decreased, while the combustion duration is postponed. The combustion phasing is empirically correlated with the experimental parameters with good fitting performance. Furthermore, the addition of dilute gas significantly reduces the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise and postpones the flame development and this flame retarding effect of carbon dioxide is stronger than that of nitrogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. GAP pre-polymer, as an energetic binder and high performance additive for propellants and explosives: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet S. Eroglu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In preparation of energetic composite formulations, functionally terminated pre-polymers have been used as binder. After physically mixing the pre-polymers with oxidizing components, metallic fuel, burning rate modifier and other minor ingredients, they are cured with a suitable curing agent to provide physical and chemical stability. These pre-polymers could be functionalized with carboxyl, epoxide or hydroxyl groups at varying average chain functionalities. For carboxyl-terminated pre-polymers, an epoxy functional curing agents could be used. If the pre-polymer possesses hydroxyl groups, isocyanate functional curing agents are the most suitable curing agents in terms of easy and efficient processing. Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP is one of the well-known low-molecular weight energetic liquid pre-polymer, which was developed to use as energetic binder, high performance additive and gas generator for high performance smokeless composite propellant and explosive formulations. Linear or branched GAP can be synthesized by nucleophilic substitution reaction of corresponding poly(epichlorohydrin (PECH with sodium azide through replacement of chloromethyl groups of PECH with pendant energetic azido-methyl groups on the polyether main chain. Positive heat of formation (+957 kJ/kg enables exothermic and rapid decomposition of GAP producing fuel rich gases. Its polyether main chain provides GAP with relatively low glass transition temperature (Tg= - 48 oC and presence of hydroxyl functional groups allows it to have easy processing in curing with isocyanate curing agents to form covalently crosslinked polyurethane structure. These outstanding properties of GAP enable it to be used as energetic polymeric binder and high performance additive in preparation of energetic materials and low vulnerable explosives.

  10. Simulation of high-speed interaction between impactor and layered-spaced design involving explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr; Afanas'eva, Svetlana; Belov, Nikolai; Burkin, Viktor; Zykova, Angelica; Rogaev, Konstantin; Yugov, Nikolai

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we present calculating and experimental study of high-speed interaction between explosive content, protected by layered-spaced design, and the cermet impactor in wide speed range. An experimental technique and mathematical model of during the behavior of explosives, protected by layer-spaced design, by with high-speed impact. The process of the interaction between the cermet impactor and element of the protective design is customized and depends on the materials of the interacting bodies, the speed and angle of impact.

  11. Comparison Between Surf and Multi-Shock Forest Fire High Explosive Burn Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Nicholas Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-18

    PAGOSA1 has several different burn models used to model high explosive detonation. Two of these, Multi-Shock Forest Fire and Surf, are capable of modeling shock initiation. Accurately calculating shock initiation of a high explosive is important because it is a mechanism for detonation in many accident scenarios (i.e. fragment impact). Comparing the models to pop-plot data give confidence that the models are accurately calculating detonation or lack thereof. To compare the performance of these models, pop-plots2 were created from simulations where one two cm block of PBX 9502 collides with another block of PBX 9502.

  12. A verification and validation effort for high explosives at Los Alamos National Lab (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scovel, Christina A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have started a project to verify and validate ASC codes used to simulate detonation waves in high explosives. Since there are no non-trivial analytic solutions, we are going to compare simulated results with experimental data that cover a wide range of explosive phenomena. The intent is to compare both different codes and different high explosives (HE) models. The first step is to test the products equation of state used for the HE models, For this purpose, the cylinder test, flyer plate and plate-push experiments are being used. These experiments sample different regimes in thermodynamic phase space: the CJ isentrope for the cylinder tests, the isentrope behind an overdriven detonation wave for the flyer plate experiment, and expansion following a reflected CJ detonation for the plate-push experiment, which is sensitive to the Gruneisen coefficient. The results of our findings for PBX 9501 are presented here.

  13. a Verification and Validation Effort for High Explosives at LOS Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovel, C. A.; Menikoff, R.

    2009-12-01

    We have started a project to verify and validate ASC codes used to simulate detonation waves in high explosives. Since there are no non-trivial analytic solutions, we are going to compare simulated results with experimental data that cover a wide range of explosive phenomena. The intent is to compare both different codes and different high explosives (HE) models. The first step is to test the products equation of state used for the HE models. For this purpose, the cylinder test, flyer plate and plate-push experiments are being used. These experiments sample different regimes in thermodynamic phase space: the CJ isentrope for the cylinder tests, the isentrope behind an overdriven detonation wave for the flyer plate experiment, and expansion following a reflected CJ detonation for the pate-push experiment, which is sensitive to the Gruneisen coefficient.

  14. Reliable discrimination of high explosive and chemical/biological artillery using acoustic UGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2005-10-01

    discrimination between conventional and simulated chemical/biological artillery rounds using acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because high explosive warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over large areas, therefore employing a slower burning, less intense explosive to mix and spread their contents. The ensuing blast waves are readily characterized by variations in the corresponding peak pressure and rise time of the blast, differences in the ratio of positive pressure amplitude to the negative amplitude, and variations in the overall duration of the resulting waveform. We show that, highly reliable discrimination (> 98%) between conventional and potentially chemical/biological artillery is achieved at ranges exceeding 3km. A feedforward neural network classifier, trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of wavelet coefficients found within different levels of the multiresolution decomposition yields.

  15. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  16. Full-scale high-speed schlieren imaging of explosions and gunshots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary S.; Grumstrup, Torben P.; Dodson, Lori J.; Miller, J. D.; Gatto, Joseph A.

    2005-03-01

    High-speed imaging and cinematography are important in research on explosions, firearms, and homeland security. Much can be learned from imaging the motion of shock waves generated by such explosive events. However, the required optical equipment is generally not available for such research due to the small aperture and delicacy of the optics and the expense and expertise required to implement high-speed optical methods. For example, previous aircraft hardening experiments involving explosions aboard full-scale aircraft lacked optical shock imaging, even though such imaging is the principal tool of explosion and shock wave research. Here, experiments are reported using the Penn State Full-Scale Schlieren System, a lens-and-grid-type optical system with a very large field-of-view. High-speed images are captured by photography using an electronic flash and by a new high-speed digital video camera. These experiments cover a field-of-view of 2x3 m at frame rates up to 30 kHz. Our previous high-speed schlieren cinematography experiments on aircraft hardening used a traditional drum camera and photographic film. A stark contrast in utility is found between that technology and the all-digital high-speed videography featured in this paper.

  17. A Two-Stage Decomposition of High School Timetabling applied to cases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias; Dahms, Florian H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Integer Programming (IP) has been used to model educational timetabling problems since the very early days of Operations Research. It is well recognized that these IP models in general are hard to solve, and this area of research is dominated by heuristic solution approaches. In this paper a Two-...... the database of the high school ERP system Lectio are used. Computational results show that the decomposition performs significantly better than solving the original IP, in terms of both found solutions and bounds.......-Stage Decomposition of an IP model for a practical case of high school timetabling is shown. This particular timetabling problem consists of assigning lectures to both a timeslot and a classroom, which is modeled using a very large amount of binary variables. The decomposition splits this model into two separate...

  18. HALFTON: A high-explosive containment experiment in partially saturated tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.W.

    1996-03-01

    The HALFTON experiment explored the phenomena of high explosive detonations in 90% water-saturated tuff rock. The explosive source was a 453 kg TNT sphere which was grouted in a drift in G Tunnel, Nevada Test Site. Active gages measured stresses and motions in the range of 1.3 to 5.3 cavity radii and showed a peak stress decay as range raised to the {minus}2.77 power. Additional stress gages were fielded to investigate the gage inclusion problem.

  19. Application of neutron generators for high explosives, toxic agents and fissile material detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, V D; Bogolubov, E P; Bochkarev, O V; Korytko, L A; Nazarov, V I; Polkanov, Yu G; Ryzhkov, V I; Khasaev, T O

    2005-01-01

    The portable pulsed neutron generators developed and designed by VNIIA are presented. The neutron methods are good tools for non-destructive assay of dangerous materials. The samples of various systems for the detection of high explosives in luggage, identification of toxic agents in chemical munitions, and also for the prevention of illicit trafficking of fissile elements in passengers' luggage are discussed.

  20. High-Energy-Absorbing Enclosure for Internal Explosion Containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-15

    reinforced high strain-to-failure viscoelastic matrix material. The core includes foam material which, for many is embodiments, selectively varies...developed is fiber-reinforced polyurethane . Polyurethane is a highly viscoelastic matrix material, having strain-to-failure of 400-500%, compared to... polyurethane in combination with urea as a highly viscoelastic matrix material having properties similar to polyurethane alone. For convenience the terms

  1. Ion Mobility Spectrometry - High Resolution LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Homemade Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Nathan; Goldberg, Ilana; Graichen, Adam; St. Jean, Amanda; Wu, Ching; Lawrence, David; Demirev, Plamen

    2017-08-01

    The detailed chemical characterization of homemade explosives (HMEs) and other chemicals that can mimic or mask the presence of explosives is important for understanding and improving the performance of commercial instrumentation used for explosive detection. To that end, an atmospheric-pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) instrument has been successfully coupled to a commercial tandem mass spectrometry (MS) system. The tandem MS system is comprised of a linear ion trap and a high resolution Orbitrap analyzer. This IMS-MS combination allows extensive characterization of threat chemical compounds, including HMEs, and complex real-world background chemicals that can interfere with detection. Here, the composition of ion species originating from a specific HME, erythritol tetranitrate, has been elucidated using accurate mass measurements, isotopic ratios, and tandem MS. Gated IMS-MS and high-resolution MS have been used to identify minor impurities that can be indicative of the HME source and/or synthesis route. Comparison between data obtained on the IMS/MS system and on commercial stand-alone IMS instruments used as explosive trace detectors (ETDs) has also been performed. Such analysis allows better signature assignments of threat compounds, modified detection algorithms, and improved overall ETD performance.

  2. Active and total microbial communities in forest soil are largely different and highly stratified during decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrian, Petr; Kolařík, Miroslav; Stursová, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Valášková, Vendula; Větrovský, Tomáš; Zifčáková, Lucia; Snajdr, Jaroslav; Rídl, Jakub; Vlček, Cestmír; Voříšková, Jana

    2012-02-01

    Soils of coniferous forest ecosystems are important for the global carbon cycle, and the identification of active microbial decomposers is essential for understanding organic matter transformation in these ecosystems. By the independent analysis of DNA and RNA, whole communities of bacteria and fungi and its active members were compared in topsoil of a Picea abies forest during a period of organic matter decomposition. Fungi quantitatively dominate the microbial community in the litter horizon, while the organic horizon shows comparable amount of fungal and bacterial biomasses. Active microbial populations obtained by RNA analysis exhibit similar diversity as DNA-derived populations, but significantly differ in the composition of microbial taxa. Several highly active taxa, especially fungal ones, show low abundance or even absence in the DNA pool. Bacteria and especially fungi are often distinctly associated with a particular soil horizon. Fungal communities are less even than bacterial ones and show higher relative abundances of dominant species. While dominant bacterial species are distributed across the studied ecosystem, distribution of dominant fungi is often spatially restricted as they are only recovered at some locations. The sequences of cbhI gene encoding for cellobiohydrolase (exocellulase), an essential enzyme for cellulose decomposition, were compared in soil metagenome and metatranscriptome and assigned to their producers. Litter horizon exhibits higher diversity and higher proportion of expressed sequences than organic horizon. Cellulose decomposition is mediated by highly diverse fungal populations largely distinct between soil horizons. The results indicate that low-abundance species make an important contribution to decomposition processes in soils.

  3. Litterfall and litter decomposition in chestnut high forest stands in northern Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricio, M. S.; Nunes, L. F.; Pereira, E. L.

    2012-11-01

    This research aimed to: estimate the inputs of litterfall; model the decomposition process and assess the rates of litter decay and turnover; study the litter decomposition process and dynamics of nutrients in old chestnut high forests. This study aimed to fill a gap in the knowledge of chestnut decomposition process as this type of ecosystems have never been modeled and studied from this point of view in Portugal. The study sites are located in the mountains of Marao, Padrela and Bornes in a west-to-east transect, across northern Portugal, from a more-Atlantic-to-lessmaritime influence. This research was developed on old chestnut high forests for quality timber production submitted to a silviculture management close-to-nature. We collected litterfall using littertraps and studied decomposition of leaf and bur litter by the nylon net bag technique. Simple and double exponential models were used to describe the decomposition of chestnut litterfall incubated in situ during 559 days. The results of the decomposition are discussed in relation to the initial litter quality (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg) and the decomposition rates. Annually, the mature chestnut high-forest stands (density 360-1,260 tree ha1, age 55-73 years old) restore 4.9 Mg DM ha–1 of litter and 2.6 Mg ha{sup -}1 yr{sup -}1 of carbon to the soil. The two-component litter decay model proved to be more biologically realistic, providing a decay rate for the fast initial stage (46-58 yr{sup -}1for the leaves and 38-42 yr{sup -}1for the burs) and a decay rate related to the recalcitrant pool (0.45-0.60 yr{sup -}1for the leaves and 0.22-0.36 yr{sup -}1for the burs). This study pointed to some decay patterns and release of bioelements by the litterfall which can be useful for calibrating existing models and indicators of sustainability to improve both silvicultural and environmental approaches for the management of chestnut forests. (Author) 45 refs.

  4. On the high-temperature unimolecular decomposition of ethyl levulinate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2016-09-20

    The pyrolysis of ethyl levulinate (EL) was studied behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1015-1325K and pressures of 750-1650Torr. The reaction progress was followed by measuring ethylene mole fraction using CO2 gas laser absorption near 10.532 μm. The rate coefficients for the unimolecular dissociation of EL were extracted from the initial slope method and further ascertained by using a complete kinetic model. Our data exhibited no discernible pressure dependence under the current experimental conditions. To rationalize our results further, high-level quantum chemical and master equation calculations were employed to calculate the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the reaction. Our calculations revealed that unimolecular dissociation of EL involves simultaneous 1,5-hydrogen shift of the β-hydrogen to the carbonyl group, rupture of the O-C ester bond and formation of the π-bond (C α -C β ). Our results present evidences that the C2H4 elimination from EL occurs in a concerted manner. To our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental and theoretical study of the thermal unimolecular dissociation of ethyl levulinate. © 2016 The Combustion Institute.

  5. Managing the explosion of high resolution topography in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Phan, Minh; Gross, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Centimeter to decimeter-scale 2.5 to 3D sampling of the Earth surface topography coupled with the potential for photorealistic coloring of point clouds and texture mapping of meshes enables a wide range of science applications. Not only is the configuration and state of the surface as imaged valuable, but repeat surveys enable quantification of topographic change (erosion, deposition, and displacement) caused by various geologic processes. We are in an era of ubiquitous point clouds that come from both active sources such as laser scanners and radar as well as passive scene reconstruction via structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry. With the decreasing costs of high-resolution topography (HRT) data collection, via methods such as SfM and UAS-based laser scanning, the number of researchers collecting these data is increasing. These "long-tail" topographic data are of modest size but great value, and challenges exist to making them widely discoverable, shared, annotated, cited, managed and archived. Presently, there are no central repositories or services to support storage and curation of these datasets. The U.S. National Science Foundation funded OpenTopography (OT) Facility employs cyberinfrastructure including large-scale data management, high-performance computing, and service-oriented architectures, to provide efficient online access to large HRT (mostly lidar) datasets, metadata, and processing tools. With over 225 datasets and 15,000 registered users, OT is well positioned to provide curation for community collected high-resolution topographic data. OT has developed a "Community DataSpace", a service built on a low cost storage cloud (e.g. AWS S3) to make it easy for researchers to upload, curate, annotate and distribute their datasets. The system's ingestion workflow will extract metadata from data uploaded; validate it; assign a digital object identifier (DOI); and create a searchable catalog entry, before publishing via the OT portal. The OT Community

  6. Highly Sensitive Filter Paper Substrate for SERS Trace Explosives Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Fierro-Mercado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel and extremely low-cost surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS substrate fabricated depositing gold nanoparticles on common lab filter paper using thermal inkjet technology. The paper-based substrate combines all advantages of other plasmonic structures fabricated by more elaborate techniques with the dynamic flexibility given by the inherent nature of the paper for an efficient sample collection, robustness, and stability. We describe the fabrication, characterization, and SERS activity of our substrate using 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene as analytes. The paper-based SERS substrates presented a high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility for analytes employed, demonstrating a direct application in forensic science and homeland security.

  7. Mode decomposition methods for flows in high-contrast porous media. A global approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    We apply dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) methods to flows in highly-heterogeneous porous media to extract the dominant coherent structures and derive reduced-order models via Galerkin projection. Permeability fields with high contrast are considered to investigate the capability of these techniques to capture the main flow features and forecast the flow evolution within a certain accuracy. A DMD-based approach shows a better predictive capability due to its ability to accurately extract the information relevant to long-time dynamics, in particular, the slowly-decaying eigenmodes corresponding to largest eigenvalues. Our study enables a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the applicability of these techniques for flows in high-contrast porous media. Furthermore, we discuss the robustness of DMD- and POD-based reduced-order models with respect to variations in initial conditions, permeability fields, and forcing terms. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the

  9. Compact submicrosecond, high current generator for wire explosion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranchuk, L. E.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Larour, J.

    2004-01-01

    The PIAF generator was designed for low total energy and high energy density experiments with liners, X-pinch or fiber Z-pinch loads. These studies are of interest for such applications as surface and material science, microscopy of biological specimens, lithography of x-ray sensitive resists, and x-ray backlighting of pulsed-power plasmas. The generator is based on an RLC circuit that includes six NWL 180 nF-50 kV capacitors that store up to 1.3 kJ. The capacitors are connected in parallel to a single multispark switch designed to operate at atmospheric pressure. The switch allows reaching a time delay between the trigger pulse and the current pulse of less than 80 ns and has jitter of 6 ns. The total inductance without a load compartment was optimized to be as low as 16 nH, which leads to extremely low impedance of ˜0.12 Ω. A 40 kV initial voltage provides 250 kA maximum current in a 6 nH inductive load with a 180 ns current rise time. PIAF has dimensions of 660×660×490 mm and weight of less than 100 kg, thus manifesting itself as robust, simple to operate, and cost effective. A description of the PIAF generator and the initial experimental results on PIAF with an X-pinch type load are reported. The generator was demonstrated to operate successfully with an X-pinch type load. The experiments first started with investigation of the previously unexplored X-pinch conduction time range, 100 ns-1 μs. A single short radiation pulse was obtained that came from a small, point-like plasma. The following x-ray source characteristics were achieved: typical hot spot size of 50-100 μm, radiation pulse duration of 1.5-2 ns, and radiation yield of about 250-500 mJ in the softer spectral range (hν⩾700 eV) and 50-100 mJ in the harder one (hν⩾1 keV). These results provide the potential for further application of this source, such as use as a backlight diagnostic tool.

  10. Analysis of concentration patterns in volcanic rocks: Insights into dynamics of highly explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, D.; Petrelli, M.; Poli, G.

    2006-10-01

    In this contribution we present new data resulting from the analysis of concentration patterns of mixed juvenile fragments ejected by a highly explosive volcanic eruption that occurred on Salina Island (Aeolian Islands, Italy) and our aim is to identify the fluid-dynamic regime characterizing the magma mixing process. Concentration patterns are studied by calculating the power spectrum of concentration variability along transects crossing the magma mixing structures. Results indicate that the slope of power spectrum has an average value of about -5/3, according to Kolmogorov law of turbulence, and suggest that the magma mixing process, in the studied conditions, can be approximated by considering the passive scalar mixing hypothesis in homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow. These results represent a first step towards a better understanding of magma mixing processes associated to highly explosive volcanic eruptions and this first step is taken by studying concentration patterns in volcanic rocks by coupling petrological and non-linear dynamics methods.

  11. Two-Level Domain Decomposition Methods for Highly Heterogeneous Darcy Equations. Connections with Multiscale Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolean Victorita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase, compositional porous media flow models lead to the solution of highly heterogeneous systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDE. We focus on overlapping Schwarz type methods on parallel computers and on multiscale methods. We present a coarse space [Nataf F., Xiang H., Dolean V., Spillane N. (2011 SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 33, 4, 1623-1642] that is robust even when there are such heterogeneities. The two-level domain decomposition approach is compared to multiscale methods.

  12. High temperature performance and stability of Fe-FER catalyst for N2O decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sádovská, Galina; Tabor, Edyta; Sazama, Petr; Lhotka, M.; Bernauer, M.; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, JAN 2017 (2017), s. 133-137 ISSN 1566-7367 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10251S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : High temperature N2O decomposition * FER * Iron Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.330, year: 2016

  13. A Novel Framework Based on FastICA for High Density Surface EMG Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maoqi; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a progressive FastICA peel-off (PFP) framework for high density surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition. The novel framework is based on a shift-invariant model for describing surface EMG. The decomposition process can be viewed as progressively expanding the set of motor unit spike trains, which is primarily based on FastICA. To overcome the local convergence of FastICA, a “peel off” strategy (i.e. removal of the estimated motor unit action potential (MUAP) trains from the previous step) is used to mitigate the effects of the already identified motor units, so more motor units can be extracted. Moreover, a constrained FastICA is applied to assess the extracted spike trains and correct possible erroneous or missed spikes. These procedures work together to improve the decomposition performance. The proposed framework was validated using simulated surface EMG signals with different motor unit numbers (30, 70, 91) and signal to noise ratios (SNRs) (20, 10, 0 dB). The results demonstrated relatively large numbers of extracted motor units and high accuracies (high F1-scores). The framework was also tested with 111 trials of 64-channel electrode array experimental surface EMG signals during the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle contraction at different intensities. On average 14.1 ± 5.0 motor units were identified from each trial of experimental surface EMG signals. PMID:25775496

  14. Mode decomposition methods for flows in high-contrast porous media. Global-local approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we combine concepts of the generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) and mode decomposition methods to construct a robust global-local approach for model reduction of flows in high-contrast porous media. This is achieved by implementing Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) techniques on a coarse grid computed using GMsFEM. The resulting reduced-order approach enables a significant reduction in the flow problem size while accurately capturing the behavior of fully-resolved solutions. We consider a variety of high-contrast coefficients and present the corresponding numerical results to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique. This paper is a continuation of our work presented in Ghommem et al. (2013) [1] where we examine the applicability of POD and DMD to derive simplified and reliable representations of flows in high-contrast porous media on fully resolved models. In the current paper, we discuss how these global model reduction approaches can be combined with local techniques to speed-up the simulations. The speed-up is due to inexpensive, while sufficiently accurate, computations of global snapshots. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Fiber Bragg sensing of high explosive detonation experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Jackson, S. I.; Vincent, S. W.; Gilbertson, S. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is demonstrated. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two examples of detonation front measurements: PETN detasheet test and detonation along a multi-HE cylindrical rate stick containing sections of PBX 9501, Comp B, TNT, PBX 9407, PBX 9520, and inert PMMA. In the PETN detasheet measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins) is achieved, with accuracy in the detonation front velocity at the 0.13% level when compared to the results from the pin data.

  16. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J; Houghton, Bruce F.; Orr, Tim R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  17. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipman, V D

    2011-09-20

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

  18. Determining the Coalescence of Hotspots into Uniform Detonation Fronts in High Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Mays, R. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Converse, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baluyot, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tringe, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-14

    Microwave Interferometry (MI) offers the advantage of a continuous time measurement of detonation front velocity from detonation initiation to disassembly, which is an important step to assure the quality of stockpile high explosives. However, the method is currently characterized by areas of poor signal strength, which lead to low confidence measurements. Experiments in inert materials were conducted to determine if reflective hot spots, pockets of plasma that form during detonation, are responsible due to varying hot spot concentrations. Instead, it was found that the copper tube used in a range of standard HE test configurations is the cause of the poor signal reception. Hot spots were represented by microwave reflective aluminum particles. The aluminum was mixed with Titanium Dioxide, a material electrically similar to the insensitive high explosive, triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), in volume percent fractions (VPFs) between 0 and 100% aluminum, in increments of 10%. Reflectivity was measured based on input and reflection received from a test apparatus with a layer representing undetonated explosive and another representing an approaching shockwave. The results showed no correlation between VPF and measured reflectivity test cases while enclosed in the standard copper tube. Upon further testing, each sample’s measured reflectivity independent of the copper enclosure did correlate with VPF. This revealed that the test enclosure currently used for MI measurements is causing poor MI signal reception, and new methods must be developed to account for this aberration in MI measurements.

  19. High-current electron gun with a planar magnetron integrated with an explosive-emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziridi, P. P.; Ozur, G. E.

    2017-05-01

    A new high-current electron gun with plasma anode and explosive-emission cathode integrated with planar pulsed powered magnetron is described. Five hundred twelve copper wires 1 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height serve as emitters. These emitters are installed on stainless steel disc (substrate) with 3-mm distance between them. Magnetron discharge plasma provides increased ion density on the periphery of plasma anode formed by high-current Penning discharge ignited within several milliseconds after starting of the magnetron discharge. The increased on the periphery ion density improves the uniformity of high-current electron beam produced in such an electron gun.

  20. VISAR Validation Test Series at the Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2007-02-01

    A velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was recently deployed at the light initiated high explosive facility (LIHE) to measure the velocity of an explosively accelerated flyer plate. The velocity data from the flyer plate experiments, using the vendor's fringe constant of 100m/s/fringe, were consistently lower than model predictions. The goal of the VISAR validation test series was to confirm the VISAR system fringe constant. A low velocity gas gun was utilized to impact and accelerate a target at the LIHE facility. VISAR velocity data from the accelerated target was compared against an independent velocity measurement. The data from this test series did in fact reveal the fringe constant was significantly higher than the vendor's specification. The correct fringe constant for the LIHE VISAR system has been determined to be 123 m/s/fringe. The Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility recently completed a Phase I test series to develop an explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer). The X-Flyer impulse technique consists of first spraying a thin layer of silver acetylide silver nitrate explosive onto a thin flyer plate. The explosive is then initiated using an intense flash of light. The explosive detonation accelerates the flyer across a small air gap towards the test item. The impact of the flyer with the test item creates a shock pulse and an impulsive load in the test unit. The goal of Phase I of the X-Flyer development series was to validate the technique theory and design process. One of the key parameters that control the shock pulse and impulsive load is the velocity of the flyer at impact. To measure this key parameter, a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was deployed at the LIHE facility. The VISAR system was assembled by Sandia personnel from the Explosive Projects and Diagnostics department. The VISAR was a three leg, push-pull system using a fixed delay cavity. The primary optical components

  1. Photographic study of channel effect in emulsion explosives using a high-speed framing camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Fumihiko; Hirosaki, Yoshikazu; Kato, Yukio; Ogata, Yuji; Wada, Yuji; Katsuyama, Kunihisa

    1997-12-01

    The precursor air shock wave (PAS), which is propagating ahead of the detonation front in air channel, precompresses and desensitizes the unreacted explosive charges. In some conditions, the PAS causes detonation failure. This phenomenon is known as the channel effect. To investigate the mechanism of the channel effect in emulsion explosives, some experimental works have been carried out using high-speed framing camera. The results of photographic observation at the first experiments demonstrated that the difference between PAS velocity and detonation velocity was the primary factor for the channel effect. It is assumed that the decrease of the PAS velocity can prevent the channel effect. The increase of surface roughness of inner wall was adopted to decrease the PAS velocity. Some experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of surface roughness on the PAS velocity and the detonation propagation. Photographic observations were performed using rectangular tubes with sandpaper on inner ceiling wall to simulate surface roughness under various conditions. The experimental results indicate that the increase of surface roughness reduces the PAS velocity and prevents detonation failure. It is concluded that the surface roughness of wall has a great influence on detonation propagation in emulsion explosive.

  2. Improved accuracy and precision in δ15 NAIR measurements of explosives, urea, and inorganic nitrates by elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry using thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Michael J; Howa, John D; Chesson, Lesley A; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-08-15

    Elemental analyzer systems generate N(2) and CO(2) for elemental composition and isotope ratio measurements. As quantitative conversion of nitrogen in some materials (i.e., nitrate salts and nitro-organic compounds) is difficult, this study tests a recently published method - thermal decomposition without the addition of O(2) - for the analysis of these materials. Elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) was used to compare the traditional combustion method (CM) and the thermal decomposition method (TDM), where additional O(2) is eliminated from the reaction. The comparisons used organic and inorganic materials with oxidized and/or reduced nitrogen and included ureas, nitrate salts, ammonium sulfate, nitro esters, and nitramines. Previous TDM applications were limited to nitrate salts and ammonium sulfate. The measurement precision and accuracy were compared to determine the effectiveness of converting materials containing different fractions of oxidized nitrogen into N(2). The δ(13) C(VPDB) values were not meaningfully different when measured via CM or TDM, allowing for the analysis of multiple elements in one sample. For materials containing oxidized nitrogen, (15) N measurements made using thermal decomposition were more precise than those made using combustion. The precision was similar between the methods for materials containing reduced nitrogen. The %N values were closer to theoretical when measured by TDM than by CM. The δ(15) N(AIR) values of purchased nitrate salts and ureas were nearer to the known values when analyzed using thermal decomposition than using combustion. The thermal decomposition method addresses insufficient recovery of nitrogen during elemental analysis in a variety of organic and inorganic materials. Its implementation requires relatively few changes to the elemental analyzer. Using TDM, it is possible to directly calibrate certain organic materials to international nitrate isotope reference materials without off

  3. Detection of Crossing White Matter Fibers with High-Order Tensors and Rank-k Decompositions

    KAUST Repository

    Jiao, Fangxiang

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental to high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), is the estimation of a positive-semidefinite orientation distribution function (ODF) and extracting the diffusion properties (e.g., fiber directions). In this work we show that these two goals can be achieved efficiently by using homogeneous polynomials to represent the ODF in the spherical deconvolution approach, as was proposed in the Cartesian Tensor-ODF (CT-ODF) formulation. Based on this formulation we first suggest an estimation method for positive-semidefinite ODF by solving a linear programming problem that does not require special parameterization of the ODF. We also propose a rank-k tensor decomposition, known as CP decomposition, to extract the fibers information from the estimated ODF. We show that this decomposition is superior to the fiber direction estimation via ODF maxima detection as it enables one to reach the full fiber separation resolution of the estimation technique. We assess the accuracy of this new framework by applying it to synthetic and experimentally obtained HARDI data. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

  5. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for

  6. Measurement of the Energy and High-Pressure Dependence of X-ray-Induced Decomposition of Crystalline Strontium Oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberger, David [High-Pressure; Evlyukhin, Egor [High-Pressure; Cifligu, Petrika [High-Pressure; Wang, Yonggang [HPCAT,; Pravica, Michael [High-Pressure

    2017-09-18

    We report measurements of the X-ray-induced decomposition of crystalline strontium oxalate (SrC2O4) as a function of energy and high pressure in two separate experiments. SrC2O4 at ambient conditions was irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 28 keV. A broad resonance of the decomposition yield was observed with a clear maximum when irradiating with ~20 keV X-rays and ambient pressure. Little or no decomposition was observed at 15 keV, which is below the Sr K-shell energy of 16.12 keV, suggesting that excitation of core electrons may play an important role in the destabilization of the C2O42– anion. A second experiment was performed to investigate the high-pressure dependence of the X-ray-induced decomposition of strontium oxalate at fixed energy. SrC2O4 was compressed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) in the pressure range from 0 to 7.6 GPa with 1 GPa increments and irradiated in situ with 20 keV X-rays. A marked pressure dependence of the decomposition yield of SrC2O4 was observed with a decomposition yield maximum at around 1 GPa, suggesting that different crystal structures of the material play an important role in the decomposition process. This may be due in part to a phase transition observed near this pressure.

  7. Initial characterization of a highly contaminated high explosives outfall in preparation for in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty A. Strietelmeier; Patrick J. Coyne; Patricia A. Leonard; W. Lamar Miller; Jerry R. Brian

    1999-12-01

    In situ bioremediation is a viable, cost-effective treatment for environmental contamination of many kinds. The feasibility of using biological techniques to remediate soils contaminated with high explosives (HE) requires laboratory evaluation before proceeding to a larger scale field operation. Laboratory investigations have been conducted at pilot scale which indicate that an anaerobic process could be successful at reducing levels of HE, primarily HMX, RDX and TNT, in contaminated soils. A field demonstration project has been designed to create an anaerobic environment for the degradation of HE materials. The first step in this project, initial characterization of the test area, was conducted and is the subject of this report. The levels of HE compounds found in the samples from the test area were higher than the EPA Method 8330 was able to extract without subsequent re-precipitation; therefore, a new method was developed using a superior extractant system. The test area sampling design was relatively simple as one might expect in an initial characterization. A total of 60 samples were each removed to a depth of 4 inches using a 1 inch diameter corer. The samples were spaced at relatively even intervals across a 20 foot cross-section through the middle of four 7-foot-long adjacent plots which are designed to be a part of an in situ bioremediation experiment. Duplicate cores were taken from each location for HE extraction and analysis in order to demonstrate and measure the heterogeneity of the contamination. Each soil sample was air dried and ball-milled to provide a homogeneous solid for extraction and analysis. Several samples had large consolidated pieces of what appeared to be solid HE. These were not ball-milled due to safety concerns, but were dissolved and the solutions were analyzed. The new extraction method was superior in that results obtained for several of the contaminants were up to 20 times those obtained with the EPA extraction method. The

  8. Simulation of changes in temperature and pressure fields during high speed projectiles forming by explosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marković Miloš D; Milinović Momčilo P; Jeremić Olivera M; Jaramaz Slobodan S

    2016-01-01

    The Research in this paper considered the temperatures fields as the consequently influenced effects appeared by plastic deformation, in the explosively forming process aimed to design Explosively Formed Projectiles (henceforth EFP...

  9. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study on Formation of High Concentration of H2 Generated by Gas Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Baiwei; Wu Bing; Zhao Yatong; Ashraf Muhammad Aqeel

    2016-01-01

    In coal mine fire rescues, if the abnormal increase of gas concentration occurs, it is the primary thing to analyze the reasons and identify sources of the abnormal forming, which is also the basis of judge the combustion state of fire area and formulate proper fire reliefs. Nowadays, related researches have recognized the methane explosion as the source of high concentration of H2 formation, but there are few studies about the conditions and reaction mechanism of gas explosion generating hig...

  10. Domain Decomposition Preconditioners for Multiscale Flows in High-Contrast Media

    KAUST Repository

    Galvis, Juan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study domain decomposition preconditioners for multiscale flows in high-contrast media. We consider flow equations governed by elliptic equations in heterogeneous media with a large contrast in the coefficients. Our main goal is to develop domain decomposition preconditioners with the condition number that is independent of the contrast when there are variations within coarse regions. This is accomplished by designing coarse-scale spaces and interpolators that represent important features of the solution within each coarse region. The important features are characterized by the connectivities of high-conductivity regions. To detect these connectivities, we introduce an eigenvalue problem that automatically detects high-conductivity regions via a large gap in the spectrum. A main observation is that this eigenvalue problem has a few small, asymptotically vanishing eigenvalues. The number of these small eigenvalues is the same as the number of connected high-conductivity regions. The coarse spaces are constructed such that they span eigenfunctions corresponding to these small eigenvalues. These spaces are used within two-level additive Schwarz preconditioners as well as overlapping methods for the Schur complement to design preconditioners. We show that the condition number of the preconditioned systems is independent of the contrast. More detailed studies are performed for the case when the high-conductivity region is connected within coarse block neighborhoods. Our numerical experiments confirm the theoretical results presented in this paper. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  11. Material Response Models and Ground Motion Calculations for High Explosive Tests in G-Tunnel Tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-25

    through the use of a viscoelastic model in the form of a standard linear solid. 2.2 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES Physical properties from five G- Tunnel , U12G -OT...34Determination of In Situ Stress in U12g Tunnel , Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,’ U.S. Geological Survey, USGS-474-219, January 1976. 7. Patch, D. F...A -’"’- "’ " [ N • HilM61 AD-A151 737 DNA-TR-84-124 MATERIAL RESPONSE MODELS AND GROUND MOTION CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH EXPLOSIVE TESTS IN G- TUNNEL TUFF

  12. Highly sensitive detection of explosive triacetone triperoxide by an In2O3 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Wei-De; Chen, Lu-Ya

    2010-08-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is one of the most sensitive known explosives and can be easily synthesized using the commonly available chemicals acetone and hydrogen peroxide, but is difficult to be detected. In this study, In2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by a glucose-assisted solvothermal method at 120 °C for 18 h. The gas sensor based on In2O3 nanoparticles exhibits a high response, fast response and recovery, a wide detecting range of 0.50-500 mg, good stability and excellent stability to TATP.

  13. Effects of High Intensity Interval Training on Increasing Explosive Power, Speed, and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajrin, F.; Kusnanik, N. W.; Wijono

    2018-01-01

    High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a type of exercise that combines high-intensity exercise and low intensity exercise in a certain time interval. This type of training is very effective and efficient to improve the physical components. The process of improving athletes achievement related to how the process of improving the physical components, so the selection of a good practice method will be very helpful. This study aims to analyze how is the effects of HIIT on increasing explosive power, speed, and agility. This type of research is quantitative with quasi-experimental methods. The design of this study used the Matching-Only Design, with data analysis using the t-test (paired sample t-test). After being given the treatment for six weeks, the results showed there are significant increasing in explosive power, speed, and agility. HIIT in this study used a form of exercise plyometric as high-intensity exercise and jogging as mild or moderate intensity exercise. Increase was due to the improvement of neuromuscular characteristics that affect the increase in muscle strength and performance. From the data analysis, researchers concluded that, Exercises of High Intensity Interval Training significantly effect on the increase in Power Limbs, speed, and agility.

  14. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  15. Photographic measurement of the detonation velocity of explosives by high-speed camera and its comparison with other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuji; Wada, Yuji; Katsuyama, Kunihisa; Ma, Gui-Chen

    1995-05-01

    It is important to measure the detonation velocity of the explosives for considering the detonation performance of explosives. In this paper the Dautriche test method and the resistance wire method were carried out to measure the detonation velocity of explosives and observed these measuring method by high-speed camera at the same time. The results by two measuring methods were compared with each other. In the Dautriche test method the propagation and the collision of detonation of detonating fuse on the lead plate can be observed with high-speed camera. In the resistance wire method the detonation velocity of explosives was measured continuously. But there was delay time caused by the short circuit between the resistance wire and the stainless tube. The delay time was compared with the observation results of high-speed camera. It took a few microsecond(s) to generate the short circuit between the stainless tube and the resistance wire. The sample explosives which were measures with three kinds of methods was same kind of emulsion slurry explosives. The detonation velocity indicated same value on all kinds of methods.

  16. High voltage pulses for high impedance loads using explosive formed fuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, J.H.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Turchi, P.J. [Air Force Research Labs., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States). Phillips Research Site; Goforth, J.H.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Tasker, D.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Graham, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    Explosive formed fuses (EFF`s) use conducting elements that are deformed by explosive pressure (typically, against dielectric dies). This causes the fuse geometry to change, so that the conducting element cross section decreases. This enables a higher ratio of current conduction to current interrupt time than for normal fuses, and it enables more control of when current interruption occurs. In combination with a suitable output closing switch, EFF`s can be used to obtain several hundred kilovolt voltage pulses from inductive stores to drive several ohm loads. With proper choices of inductive store, EFF geometry and material, and output closing switch features, such a voltage pulse can be approximately flat topped for microsecond duration and have a small fraction of microsecond risetime. The authors present theoretical analysis and circuit simulations which illustrate this, using scaled empirical EFF parameters for inductive stores in the 1 weber flux, several hundred nanohenry range. The circuit simulations were done using MicroCap-IV, with user defined elements. These simulations were done with static inductive stores and with explosive magnetic flux compression generators driving inductive stores.

  17. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  18. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  19. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.; de Resseguier, T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  20. Multi-scale modeling of phase explosion in high fluence nanosecond laser ablation and clarification of ablation depth prediction criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yunfeng; Shin, Yung C., E-mail: shin@purdue.edu

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ns laser ablation of aluminum and copper with phase explosion is investigated. • Melt ejection behavior is successfully predicted through a HD/MD/SPH model. • 0.9T{sub c} does not always work for all materials for ablation depth prediction. • 0.75–0.8T{sub c} works better for copper in predicting ablation depth. - Abstract: When phase explosion occurs, accurate prediction of the ablation behavior in the high energy nanosecond laser ablation process still remains a difficult challenge. In this paper, nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum and copper with phase explosion is investigated through a multi-scale model and experimental verification. The melt ejection behavior during phase explosion is successfully predicted by combined molecular dynamics (MD) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and validated against the experiments. The commonly adopted 0.9T{sub c} (critical temperature) criterion for phase explosion boundary is also assessed with the prediction of the ablation depth for both aluminum and copper, and it is found that the 0.9T{sub c} criterion does not always work. The multi-scale model developed in this work is shown to have better capability in predicting the ablation behavior when phase explosion is involved.

  1. High-strain rate Brazilian testing of an explosive simulant using speckle metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, S. G.; Siviour, C. R.; Proud, W. G.; Field, J. E.

    2004-09-01

    The application of high-speed photography and image correlation has allowed dynamic Brazilian tests to be carried out using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) on PBS9501, an explosive simulant. The essential features of low-rate Brazilian tests are found to occur in the high-rate experiments, with the samples reaching equilibrium quickly and remaining in equilibrium throughout the experiment. The advantage of the approach described here is the ability to make tensile stress/strain measurements in the high-strain rate regime using a compression Hopkinson bar. This allows smaller sample sizes, making testing of expensive or dangerous materials easier, while expanding the capabilities of the compression bar.

  2. Decomposition of conditional probability for high-order symbolic Markov chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, S. S.; Usatenko, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    The main goal of this paper is to develop an estimate for the conditional probability function of random stationary ergodic symbolic sequences with elements belonging to a finite alphabet. We elaborate on a decomposition procedure for the conditional probability function of sequences considered to be high-order Markov chains. We represent the conditional probability function as the sum of multilinear memory function monomials of different orders (from zero up to the chain order). This allows us to introduce a family of Markov chain models and to construct artificial sequences via a method of successive iterations, taking into account at each step increasingly high correlations among random elements. At weak correlations, the memory functions are uniquely expressed in terms of the high-order symbolic correlation functions. The proposed method fills the gap between two approaches, namely the likelihood estimation and the additive Markov chains. The obtained results may have applications for sequential approximation of artificial neural network training.

  3. Inactivation of food microorganisms by high-pressure carbon dioxide treatment with or without explosive decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, A; Nakamura, K; Nagai, K; Hashimoto, T; Hakoda, M

    1997-07-01

    In order to elucidate the sterilization mechanism underlying the explosive decompression system, baker's yeast was pressurized with CO2, N2O, N2, or Ar gas at 40 atm and 40 degrees C for 4h, and then explosively discharged. The survival ratio was markedly decreased only by the treatments with CO2 and N2O, which are relatively soluble gases in water, suggesting that the microorganisms' death may be highly correlated with gas absorption by the cells. Lower decompression rates to atmospheric pressure, however, led to neither any lower reduction of remaining cells nor any smaller release of total cellular proteins. Furthermore, operating with a longer treatment time and smaller number of repetitions was usually more lethal than with a shorter time and more frequent repetition. From these results, most of the yeast cells appear to have been sterilized during the pressurization process. The spore cells of B. megaterium are considered to have been killed in a somewhat different manner, because of their distinct sensitivity to the applied gases.

  4. Amorphization-decomposition behavior of HfW2O8 at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuntala, T.; Rao, Rekha; Garg, Alka B.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2008-09-01

    Structural stability of HfW2O8 is investigated at high pressure using Raman spectroscopy. Irreversible amorphization is found to occur when pressurized to above 3 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The Raman spectrum of the pressure-amorphized sample closely resembles that of amorphous WO3. On the other hand, spectrum of the recovered sample subjected to uniaxial compression of about 5 GPa showed bands characteristic of crystalline HfO2 besides the parent cubic phase and amorphous phase. Ex situ x-ray diffraction measurements on the pressure-cycled samples also indicated the presence of monoclinic HfO2. These results suggest that the observed pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) under hydrostatic compression is indeed due to hindered decomposition, which is facilitated under uniaxial compression. Thus, the behavior of HfW2O8 appears to be different from that of ZrW2O8, which exhibited only PIA and not pressure-induced decomposition at ambient temperature.

  5. Isentropic compression of metals, at multi-megabar pressures, using high explosive pulsed power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, D. G. (Douglas G.); Goforth, J. H. (James H.); King, J. C. (James Carrel); Martinez, E. C. (Ernesto C.); Oona, H. (Hain); Sena, F. C. (Francis C.); Reisman, D. B. (David B.); Cauble, R. C. (Robert C.)

    2001-01-01

    Accurate, ultra-high pressure isentropic equation of state (EOS) data, are required for a variety of applications and materials. Asay reported a new method to obtain these data using pulsed magnetic loading on the Sandia Z-machine. Fast rising current pulses (risetimes from 100 to 30011s) at current densities exceeding many MNcm, create continuous magnetic loading up to a few Mbar. As part of a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories we are adapting our high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain isentropic EOS data with the Asay technique. This year we plan to obtain isentropic EOS data for copper and tantalum at pressures up to -2 Mbar; eventually we hope to reach several tens of Mbar. We will describe the design of the HEPP systems and show out attempts to obtain EOS data to date.

  6. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jong Hyun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 ~ 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal

  7. A High Temperature Kinetic Study for the Thermal Unimolecular Decomposition of Diethyl Carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-07-08

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900 - 1200 K and 1.2 – 2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl-hydrogen-carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature- dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  8. Intensive evaporation and boiling of a heterogeneous liquid droplet with an explosive disintegration in high-temperature gas area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The using of the high-speed (not less than 105 frames per second video recording tools (“Phantom” and the software package ("TEMA Automotive" allowed carrying out an experimental research of laws of intensive vaporization with an explosive disintegration of heterogeneous (with a single solid nontransparent inclusion liquid droplet (by the example of water in high-temperature (500-800 K gases (combustion products. Times of the processes under consideration and stages (liquid heat-up, evaporation from an external surface, bubble boiling at internal interfaces, growth of bubble sizes, explosive droplet breakup were established. Necessary conditions of an explosive vaporization of a heterogeneous droplet were found out. Mechanisms of this process and an influence of properties of liquid and inclusion material on them were determined.

  9. Deflagration Rate Measurements of Three Insensitive High Explosives: LLM-105, TATB, and DAAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Maienschein, J L; Lorenz, K T; Tan, N; Koerner, J G

    2010-03-08

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105, DAAF and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. One DAAF formulation, two different formulations of LLM-105, and four formulations of TATB were studied; results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating DAAF and TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  10. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Fine Tuning the CJ Detonation Speed of a High Explosive products Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-12

    For high explosive (HE) simulations, inaccuracies of a per cent or two in the detonation wave speed can result from not suficiently resolving the reaction zone width or from small inaccuracies in calibrating the products equation of state (EOS) or from variation of HE lots. More accurate detonation speeds can be obtained by ne tuning the equation of state to compensate. Here we show that two simple EOS transformations can be used to adjust the CJ detonation speed by a couple of per cent with minimal effect on the CJ release isentrope. The two transformations are (1) a shift in the energy origin and (2) a linear scaling of the speci c volume. The effectiveness of the transformations is demonstrated with simulations of the cylinder test for PBX 9502 starting with a products EOS for which the CJ detonation speed is 1 per cent too low.

  12. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  13. On beyond the standard model for high explosives: challenges & obstacles to surmount

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph Ds [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) are heterogeneous materials. Nevertheless, current explosive models treat them as homogeneous materials. To compensate, an empirically determined effective burn rate is used in place of a chemical reaction rate. A significant limitation of these models is that different burn parameters are needed for applications in different regimes; for example, shock initiation of a PBX at different initial temperatures or different initial densities. This is due to temperature fluctuations generated when a heterogeneous material is shock compressed. Localized regions of high temperatures are called hot spots. They dominate the reaction for shock initiation. The understanding of hot spot generation and their subsequent evolution has been limited by the inability to measure transients on small spatial ({approx} 1 {micro}m) and small temporal ({approx} 1 ns) scales in the harsh environment of a detonation. With the advances in computing power, it is natural to try and gain an understanding of hot-spot initiation with numerical experiments based on meso-scale simulations that resolve material heterogeneities and utilize realistic chemical reaction rates. However, to capture the underlying physics correctly, such high resolution simulations will require more than fast computers with a large amount of memory. Here we discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed. These include dissipative mechanisms that generate hot spots, accurate thermal propceties for the equations of state of the reactants and products, and controlling numerical entropy error from shock impedance mismatches at material interfaces. The later can generate artificial hot spots and lead to premature reaction. Eliminating numerical hot spots is critical for shock initiation simulations due to the positive feedback between the energy release from reaction and the hydrodynamic flow.

  14. Abiotic transformation of high explosives by freshly precipitated iron minerals in aqueous FeII solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Comfort, Steve D; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Szecsody, Jim E; Grossl, Paul R; Shea, Patrick J

    2010-05-01

    Zerovalent iron barriers have become a viable treatment for field-scale cleanup of various ground water contaminants. While contact with the iron surface is important for contaminant destruction, the interstitial pore water within and near the iron barrier will be laden with aqueous, adsorbed and precipitated Fe(II) phases. These freshly precipitated iron minerals could play an important role in transforming high explosives (HE). Our objective was to determine the transformation of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) by freshly precipitated iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) minerals. This was accomplished by quantifying the effects of initial Fe(II) concentration, pH, and the presence of aquifer solids (Fe(III) phases) on HE transformation rates. Results showed that at pH 8.2, freshly precipitated iron minerals transformed RDX, HMX, and TNT with reaction rates increasing with increasing Fe(II) concentrations. RDX and HMX transformations in these solutions also increased with increasing pH (5.8-8.55). By contrast, TNT transformation was not influenced by pH (6.85-8.55) except at pH values Geochemical modeling also predicted Fe(II) activity would likely be controlled by green rust and magnetite. These results illustrate the important role freshly precipitated Fe(II)/Fe(III) minerals in aqueous Fe(II) solutions play in the transformation of high explosives.

  15. Explosives tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jeffrey S [San Ramon, CA; Howard, Douglas E [Livermore, CA; Eckels, Joel D [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA

    2011-01-11

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  16. Development of a High-Temperature Two-Component Explosive for Geothermal Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    Describes the status of a process that manufactures explosives downhole for injecting into formations. Shows results for oil and gas tests, where flow improvements ranged from 160% to 1300%. At this stage, the project consisted of laboratory tests of a number of explosives for possible use in geothermal dry steam or liquid dominated wells. Report has many pictures and tables. (DJE 2005)

  17. Highly Efficient and Scalable Compound Decomposition of Two-Electron Integral Tensor and Its Application in Coupled Cluster Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo [William R. Wiley Environmental; Kowalski, Karol [William R. Wiley Environmental

    2017-08-11

    The representation and storage of two-electron integral tensors are vital in large- scale applications of accurate electronic structure methods. Low-rank representation and efficient storage strategy of integral tensors can significantly reduce the numerical overhead and consequently time-to-solution of these methods. In this paper, by combining pivoted incomplete Cholesky decomposition (CD) with a follow-up truncated singular vector decomposition (SVD), we develop a decomposition strategy to approximately represent the two-electron integral tensor in terms of low-rank vectors. A systematic benchmark test on a series of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D carbon-hydrogen systems demonstrates high efficiency and scalability of the compound two-step decomposition of the two-electron integral tensor in our implementation. For the size of atomic basis set N_b ranging from ~ 100 up to ~ 2, 000, the observed numerical scaling of our implementation shows O(N_b^{2.5~3}) versus O(N_b^{3~4}) of single CD in most of other implementations. More importantly, this decomposition strategy can significantly reduce the storage requirement of the atomic-orbital (AO) two-electron integral tensor from O(N_b^4) to O(N_b^2 log_{10}(N_b)) with moderate decomposition thresholds. The accuracy tests have been performed using ground- and excited-state formulations of coupled- cluster formalism employing single and double excitations (CCSD) on several bench- mark systems including the C_{60} molecule described by nearly 1,400 basis functions. The results show that the decomposition thresholds can be generally set to 10^{-4} to 10^{-3} to give acceptable compromise between efficiency and accuracy.

  18. Highly Efficient and Scalable Compound Decomposition of Two-Electron Integral Tensor and Its Application in Coupled Cluster Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-09-12

    The representation and storage of two-electron integral tensors are vital in large-scale applications of accurate electronic structure methods. Low-rank representation and efficient storage strategy of integral tensors can significantly reduce the numerical overhead and consequently time-to-solution of these methods. In this work, by combining pivoted incomplete Cholesky decomposition (CD) with a follow-up truncated singular vector decomposition (SVD), we develop a decomposition strategy to approximately represent the two-electron integral tensor in terms of low-rank vectors. A systematic benchmark test on a series of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D carbon-hydrogen systems demonstrates high efficiency and scalability of the compound two-step decomposition of the two-electron integral tensor in our implementation. For the size of the atomic basis set, Nb, ranging from ∼100 up to ∼2,000, the observed numerical scaling of our implementation shows [Formula: see text] versus [Formula: see text] cost of performing single CD on the two-electron integral tensor in most of the other implementations. More importantly, this decomposition strategy can significantly reduce the storage requirement of the atomic orbital (AO) two-electron integral tensor from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] with moderate decomposition thresholds. The accuracy tests have been performed using ground- and excited-state formulations of coupled cluster formalism employing single and double excitations (CCSD) on several benchmark systems including the C60 molecule described by nearly 1,400 basis functions. The results show that the decomposition thresholds can be generally set to 10-4 to 10-3 to give acceptable compromise between efficiency and accuracy.

  19. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  20. Laboratory Column Evaluation of High Explosives Attenuation in Grenade Range Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jongho; Borden, Robert C

    2017-09-01

    High explosives (HEs) deposited on military ranges can leach through the soil and contaminate groundwater. We examined the transport and fate of HEs in laboratory columns containing soils from two hand grenade bays (Bays C and T) and the impact of organic amendments on biodegradation. Soil characteristics were similar; however, Bay C had somewhat higher clay and organic C. Experimental treatments included addition of crude glycerin and lignosulfonate, and parallel control columns. Experimental results showed extensive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) degradation with minimal leaching, consistent with prior batch microcosm results. Amendment addition enhanced TNT degradation in both Bays C and T compared with controls. Although hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (Royal Demolition Explosive, or RDX) did not biodegrade in prior aerobic batch microcosms, 64 to 77% of RDX biodegraded in untreated soil columns with O present in the mobile soil gas. The RDX biodegradation was likely associated with short-term anoxic conditions or anoxic micro-niches. In nearly saturated Bay C columns, RDX removal increased to >92%. Amendment addition to unsaturated Bay T columns increased RDX removal to >86%. In one column, the soil remained anoxic (O < 5% by volume) for about a year after amendment addition, significantly reducing RDX leaching. Nitroso degradation products were produced equivalent to 9 to 39% of the RDX degraded, with most retained in the soil (9-37%) and 0 to 3% in the effluent. These results demonstrate that RDX biodegradation can occur in soils with measurable O, and that amendment addition can reduce RDX leaching by stimulating anaerobic biodegradation. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Parameters affecting the thermal behaviour of emulsion explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.E.G.; Feng, H.; Mintz, K.J.; Augsten, R.A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory

    1999-07-01

    Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) and heat flux calorimetry (HFC) were used to study the sensitivity of ammonium nitrate (AN) and emulsion explosives to pressure and various other parameters. The explosives were evaluated in a series of experiments that examined the influence of pressure in both Argon and air environments at 5.4 MPa. Results of the study demonstrated that significantly lower onset temperatures were observed when the ammonium nitrate (AN) explosive was used in air. Results of the ARC study suggested that lower initial temperatures resulted in an elevated onset temperature. Lower onset temperatures observed in the study were attributed to oxidation of the oil phase in the emulsion. Onset temperatures for the AN explosive were lower than rates observed for the emulsion explosives. The size of the samples also influenced onset temperatures in both the ARC and HFC analyses. At heating rates of 0.1 degrees C per minute, the results of heat flux calorimetry revealed a complex exotherm pattern for the emulsion explosive in both Argon and in air. The high pressure of inert gas inhibited and delayed the exothermic reactions for the emulsion explosives. It was concluded that air-oxidative decomposition results in lower onset temperatures that are influenced by higher pressure rates. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  2. Comparison of sugar molecule decomposition through glucose and fructose: a high-level quantum chemical study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2012-02-01

    Efficient chemical conversion of biomass is essential to produce sustainable energy and industrial chemicals. Industrial level conversion of glucose to useful chemicals, such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, and levulinic acid, is a major step in the biomass conversion but is difficult because of the formation of undesired products and side reactions. To understand the molecular level reaction mechanisms involved in the decomposition of glucose and fructose, we have carried out high-level quantum chemical calculations [Gaussian-4 (G4) theory]. Selective 1,2-dehydration, keto-enol tautomerization, isomerization, retro-aldol condensation, and hydride shifts of glucose and fructose molecules were investigated. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses indicate that, for acyclic glucose and fructose molecules, the dehydration and isomerization require larger activation barriers compared to the retro-aldol reaction at 298 K in neutral medium. The retro-aldol reaction results in the formation of C2 and C4 species from glucose and C3 species from fructose. The formation of the most stable C3 species, dihydroxyacetone from fructose, is thermodynamically downhill. The 1,3-hydride shift leads to the cleavage of the C-C bond in the acyclic species; however, the enthalpy of activation is significantly higher (50-55 kcal/mol) than that of the retro-aldol reaction (38 kcal/mol) mainly because of the sterically hindered distorted four-membered transition state compared to the hexa-membered transition state in the retro-aldol reaction. Both tautomerization and dehydration are catalyzed by a water molecule in aqueous medium; however, water has little effect on the retro-aldol reaction. Isomerization of glucose to fructose and glyceraldehyde to dihydroxyacetone proceeds through hydride shifts that require an activation enthalpy of about 40 kcal/mol at 298 K in water medium. This investigation maps out accurate energetics of the decomposition of glucose and fructose molecules

  3. Highly efficient SERS substrate for direct detection of explosive TNT using popcorn-shaped gold nanoparticle-functionalized SWCNT hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeritte, Teresa; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Fan, Zhen; Singh, Anant Kumar; Senapati, Dulal; Dubey, Madan; Zakar, Eugene; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2012-11-07

    This paper reports for the first time the development of a large-scale SERS substrate from a popcorn-shaped gold nanoparticle-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin film for the selective and highly sensitive detection of explosive TNT material at a 100 femtomolar (fM) level.

  4. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  5. Simulation of changes in temperature and pressure fields during high speed projectiles forming by explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Miloš D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Research in this paper considered the temperatures fields as the consequently influenced effects appeared by plastic deformation, in the explosively forming process aimed to design Explosively Formed Projectiles (henceforth EFP. As the special payloads of the missiles, used projectiles are packaged as the metal liners, joined with explosive charges, to design explosive propulsion effect. Their final form and velocity during shaping depend on distributed temperatures in explosively driven plastic deformation process. Developed simulation model consider forming process without metal cover of explosive charge, in aim to discover liner’s dynamical correlations of effective plastic strains and temperatures in the unconstrained detonation environment made by payload construction. The temperature fields of the liner’s copper material are considered in time, as the consequence of strain/stress displacements driven by explosion environmental thermodynamically fields of pressures and temperatures. Achieved final velocities and mass loses as the expected EFP performances are estimated regarding their dynamical shaping and thermal gradients behavior vs. effective plastic strains. Performances and parameters are presented vs. process time, numerically simulated by the Autodyne software package. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-47029

  6. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaignac, A.L.O. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Lima, R.J.C., E-mail: ricardo.lima.ufma@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Façanha Filho, P.F. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Moreno, A.J.D. [Coordenação de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Bacabal, MA 65700-000 (Brazil); Freire, P.T.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60455-760 (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  7. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  8. Equations of state for detonation products of high energy PBX explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. L.; Helm, F. H.; Finger, M.; Walton, J. R.

    1977-08-01

    It has become apparent that the accumulated changes in the analysis of cylinder test data, in the material specifications, and in the hydrodynamic code simulation of the cylinder test necessitated an update of the detonation product EOS description for explosives in common use at LLL. The explosives reviewed are PBX-9404-3, LX-04-1, LX-10-1, LX-14-0 and LX-09-1. In order to maintain the proper relation of predicted performance of these standard explosives, they have been revised as a single set.

  9. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimblin, Clare; Trainham, Rusty; Capelle, Gene A.; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO) with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ˜10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (˜10-3 s) observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser's focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.

  10. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Kimblin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ∼10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (∼10-3 s observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser’s focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.

  11. Motor unit number estimation based on high-density surface electromyography decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Yao, Bo; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    To advance the motor unit number estimation (MUNE) technique using high density surface electromyography (EMG) decomposition. The K-means clustering convolution kernel compensation algorithm was employed to detect the single motor unit potentials (SMUPs) from high-density surface EMG recordings of the biceps brachii muscles in eight healthy subjects. Contraction forces were controlled at 10%, 20% and 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Achieved MUNE results and the representativeness of the SMUP pools were evaluated using a high-density weighted-average method. Mean numbers of motor units were estimated as 288±132, 155±87, 107±99 and 132±61 by using the developed new MUNE at 10%, 20%, 30% and 10-30% MVCs, respectively. Over 20 SMUPs were obtained at each contraction level, and the mean residual variances were lower than 10%. The new MUNE method allows a convenient and non-invasive collection of a large size of SMUP pool with great representativeness. It provides a useful tool for estimating the motor unit number of proximal muscles. The present new MUNE method successfully avoids the use of intramuscular electrodes or multiple electrical stimuli which is required in currently available MUNE techniques; as such the new MUNE method can minimize patient discomfort for MUNE tests. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sequential high gravity ethanol fermentation and anaerobic digestion of steam explosion and organosolv pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimpouras, Constantinos; Zacharopoulou, Maria; Matsakas, Leonidas; Rova, Ulrika; Christakopoulos, Paul; Topakas, Evangelos

    2017-11-01

    The present work investigates the suitability of pretreated corn stover (CS) to serve as feedstock for high gravity (HG) ethanol production at solids-content of 24wt%. Steam explosion, with and without the addition of H 2 SO 4 , and organosolv pretreated CS samples underwent a liquefaction/saccharification step followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Maximum ethanol concentration of ca. 76g/L (78.3% ethanol yield) was obtained from steam exploded CS (SECS) with 0.2% H 2 SO 4 . Organosolv pretreated CS (OCS) also resulted in high ethanol concentration of ca. 65g/L (62.3% ethanol yield). Moreover, methane production through anaerobic digestion (AD) was conducted from fermentation residues and resulted in maximum methane yields of ca. 120 and 69mL/g volatile solids (VS) for SECS and OCS samples, respectively. The results indicated that the implementation of a liquefaction/saccharification step before SSF employing a liquefaction reactor seemed to handle HG conditions adequately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Active and total microbial communities in forest soil are largely different and highly stratified during decomposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldrian, Petr; Kolařík, Miroslav; Stursová, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Valášková, Vendula; Větrovský, Tomáš; Zifčáková, Lucia; Snajdr, Jaroslav; Rídl, Jakub; Vlček, Cestmír; Voříšková, Jana

    ...s. By the independent analysis of DNA and RNA, whole communities of bacteria and fungi and its active members were compared in topsoil of a Picea abies forest during a period of organic matter decomposition...

  14. Neutralization of improvised explosive devices by high-power lasers: research results from the FP7 project ENCOUNTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterholz, J.; Lueck, M.; Lexow, B.; Wickert, M.

    2016-10-01

    The development of reliable techniques for the safe neutralization of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is an active field of research. Recently, innovative approaches for the neutralization of IEDs were developed and tested within the FP7 project ENCOUNTER ("Explosive Neutralisation and Mitigation Countermeasures for IEDs in Urban/Civil Environment") and were compared to existing, established technologies. Here, the ENCOUNTER project is presented with a special focus on the neutralization of IEDs by high-power lasers. The working principle of the application of high-power lasers for the neutralization of explosive devices is based on thermal effects. Heating of the IEDs main charge may occur either by direct irradiation of the explosive material or by heat transfer through the main charge's confinement. The aim of the application of the laser is to achieve a low order burning reaction of the explosive charge and thus a controlled neutralization of the IED. Since laser beams allow for the directed transport of energy, this technique can be applied over long stand-off distances and has thus potential for an increase of the safety of clearing forces and population in the case of terroristic attacks in a civilian environment. Within the ENCOUNTER project, a laboratory environment has been set up which allows for the irradiation of IEDs with a laser power of up to 10 kW. Experiments have been carried out on a broad spectrum of different types of IEDs. The processes during neutralization were studied in detail with high-speed diagnostics. On the basis of these experimental data, the safety and the reliability of the application of the laser was analyzed, and recommendations to end users were given. In addition to the results of the ENCOUNTER project, approaches for the numerical simulation of the neutralization of IEDs are discussed.

  15. Damage & fracture of high-explosive mock subject to cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lovato, Manuel L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-11

    We use four-point bend specimen with a single shallow edge notch to study the fracture process in Mock 900-21, a PBX 9501 high explosive simulant mock. Subject to monotonic loading we determine quantitatively the threshold load for macroscopic crack initiation from the notch tip. The four-point bend specimen is then subject to cyclic loading in such a way that during the first cycle, the applied force approaches but does not exceed the threshold load determined from the monotonic loading test and in the subsequent cycles, the overall maximum deformation is maintained to be equal to that of the first cycle. It is expected and is also confirmed that no macroscopic damage and cracking occur during the first cycle. However, we observe that sizable macroscopic crack is generated and enlarged during the subsequent cycles, even though the applied force never exceeds the threshold load. Details of the process of damage fonnation, accumulation, and crack extension are presented and the mechanical mechanism responsible for such failure process is postulated and discussed.

  16. Sensitivity effects of void density and arrangements in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gronbech - Jensen, Niels [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-28

    The shock response of two-dimensional model, high explosive crystals with various arrangements of circular voids is explored. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. In square lattices of voids all of one size, reducing that size or increasing the porosity while holding the other parameter fixed causes the hotspots to consume the material more quickly and detonation to occur sooner and at lower piston velocities. The early time behavior is seen to follow a very simple ignition and growth model. The hotspots are seen to collectively develop a broad pressure wave (a sonic, diffuse deflagration front) that, upon merging with the lead shock, transforms it into a detonation. The reaction yields produced by triangular lattices are not significantly different. With random void arrangements, the mean time to detonation is 15.5% larger than with the square lattice; the standard deviation of detonation delays is just 5.1%.

  17. Highly sensitive gas-phase explosive detection by luminescent microporous polymer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räupke, André; Palma-Cando, Alex; Shkura, Eugen; Teckhausen, Peter; Polywka, Andreas; Görrn, Patrick; Scherf, Ullrich; Riedl, Thomas

    2016-07-04

    We propose microporous networks (MPNs) of a light emitting spiro-carbazole based polymer (PSpCz) as luminescent sensor for nitro-aromatic compounds. The MPNs used in this study can be easily synthesized on arbitrarily sized/shaped substrates by simple and low-cost electrochemical deposition. The resulting MPN afford an extremely high specific surface area of 1300 m(2)/g, more than three orders of magnitude higher than that of the thin films of the respective monomer. We demonstrate, that the luminescence of PSpCz is selectively quenched by nitro-aromatic analytes, e.g. nitrobenzene, 2,4-DNT and TNT. In striking contrast to a control sample based on non-porous spiro-carbazole, which does not show any luminescence quenching upon exposure to TNT at levels of 3 ppm and below, the microporous PSpCz shows a clearly detectable response even at TNT concentrations as low as 5 ppb, clearly demonstrating the advantage of microporous films as luminescent sensors for traces of explosive analytes. This level states the vapor pressure of TNT at room temperature.

  18. Ecological surveys of the proposed high explosives wastewater treatment facility region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmann, T.

    1995-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposes to improve its treatment of wastewater from high explosives (HE) research and development activities. The proposed project would focus on a concerted waste minimization effort to greatly reduce the amount of wastewater needing treatment. The result would be a 99% decrease in the HE wastewater volume, from the current level of 6,760,000 L/mo (1,786,000 gal./mo) to 41,200 L/mo (11,000 gal./mo). This reduction would entail closure of HE wastewater outfalls, affecting some wetland areas that depend on HE wastewater effluents. The outfalls also provide drinking water for many wildlife species. Terminating the flow of effluents at outfalls would represent an improvement in water quality in the LANL region but locally could have a negative effect on some wetlands and wildlife species. None of the affected species are protected by any state or federal endangered species laws. The purpose of this report is to briefly discuss the different biological studies that have been done in the region of the project area. This report is written to give biological information and baseline data and the biota of the project area.

  19. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  20. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harry, Herbert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-09

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  1. Measuring myofiber orientations from high-frequency ultrasound images using multiscale decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xulei; Fei, Baowei

    2014-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) has the ability to image both skeletal and cardiac muscles. The quantitative assessment of these myofiber orientations has a number of applications in both research and clinical examinations; however, difficulties arise due to the severe speckle noise contained in the HFU images. Thus, for the purpose of automatically measuring myofiber orientations from two-dimensional HFU images, we propose a two-step multiscale image decomposition method. It combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter and a coherence enhancing diffusion filter to extract myofibers. This method has been verified by ultrasound data from simulated phantoms, excised fiber phantoms, specimens of porcine hearts, and human skeletal muscles in vivo. The quantitative evaluations of both phantoms indicated that the myofiber measurements of our proposed method were more accurate than other methods. The myofiber orientations extracted from different layers of the porcine hearts matched the prediction of an established cardiac mode and demonstrated the feasibility of extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from HFU images ex vivo. Moreover, HFU also demonstrated the ability to measure myofiber orientations in vivo.

  2. High-temperature explosive development for geothermal well stimulation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E.W.; Mars, J.E.; Wang, C.

    1978-03-31

    A two-component, temperature-resistant liquid explosive called HITEX has been developed which is capable of withstanding 561/sup 0/K (550/sup 0/F) for 24 hours in a geothermal environment. The explosive is intended for the stimulation of nonproducing or marginally producing geothermal (hot dry rock, vapor-dominated or hydrothermal) reservoirs by fracturing the strata in the vicinity of a borehole. The explosive is inherently safe because it is mixed below ground downhole from two nondetonable liquid components. Development and safety tests included differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability, minerals compatibility, drop-weight sensitivity, adiabatic compression, electrostatic discharge sensitivity, friction sensitivity, detonation arrest capability, cook-off tests, detonability at ambient and elevated pressure, detonation velocity and thin film propagation in a wedge.

  3. Development of an air cleaning system for dissolving high explosives from nuclear warheads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Staggs, K.; Wapman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a major effort underway in dismantling nuclear weapons. In support of this effort we have been developing a workstation for removing the high explosive (HE) from nuclear warheads using hot sprays of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to dissolve the HE. An important component of the workstation is the air cleaning system that is used to contain DMSO aerosols and vapor and radioactive aerosols. The air cleaning system consists of a condenser to liquefy the hot DMSO vapor, a demister pad to remove most of the DMSO aerosols, a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to remove the remaining aerosols, an activated carbon filter to remove the DMSO vapor, and a final HEPA filter to meet the redundancy requirement for HEPA filters in radioactive applications. The demister pad is a 4{double_prime} thick mat of glass and steel fibers and was selected after conducting screening tests on promising candidates. We also conducted screening tests on various activated carbons and found that all had a similar performance. The carbon breakthrough curves were fitted to a modified Wheeler`s equation and gave excellent predictions for the effect of different flow rates. After all of the components were assembled, we ran a series of performance tests on the components and system to determine the particle capture efficiency as a function of size for dioctyl sebacate (DOS) and DMSO aerosols using laser particle counters and filter samples. The pad had an efficiency greater than 990% for 0.1 {mu}m DMSO particles. Test results on the prototype carbon filter showed only 70% efficiency, instead of the 99.9% in small scale laboratory tests. Thus further work will be required to develop the prototype carbon filter. 7 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Surface-Accelerated Decomposition of δ-HMX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharia, Onise; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija M

    2013-03-07

    Despite extensive efforts to study the explosive decomposition of HMX, a cyclic nitramine widely used as a solid fuel, explosive, and propellant, an understanding of the physicochemical processes, governing the sensitivity of condensed HMX to detonation initiation is not yet achieved. Experimental and theoretical explorations of the initiation of chemistry are equally challenging because of many complex parallel processes, including the β-δ phase transition and the decomposition from both phases. Among four known polymorphs, HMX is produced in the most stable β-phase, which transforms into the most reactive δ-phase under heat or pressure. In this study, the homolytic NO2 loss and HONO elimination precursor reactions of the gas-phase, ideal crystal, and the (100) surface of δ-HMX are explored by first principles modeling. Our calculations revealed that the high sensitivity of δ-HMX is attributed to interactions of surfaces and molecular dipole moments. While both decomposition reactions coexist, the exothermic HONO-isomer formation catalyzes the N-NO2 homolysis, leading to fast violent explosions.

  5. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  6. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  7. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  8. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Gerard; Roudot, Marie; Genetier, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Composite HMX and NTO based high explosives (HE) are widely used in ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside HE. Comparing to a pressed HE, a composite HE is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain - binder interface leading to a different behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. An investigation of how shock-to-detonation transition occurs inside composite HE containing RDX and NTO is proposed in this lecture. Two composite HE have been studied. The first one is HMX - HTPB 82:18. The second one is HMX - NTO - HTPB 12:72:16. These HE have been submitted to plane sustained shock waves at different pressure levels using a laboratory powder gun. Pressure signals are measured using manganin gauges inserted at several distances inside HE. The corresponding run-distances to detonation are determined using wedge test experiments where the plate impact is performed using a powder gun. Both HE exhibit a single detonation buildup curve in the distance - time diagram of shock-to-detonation transition. This feature seems a common shock-to-detonation behavior for composite HE without porosity. This behavior is also confirmed for a RDX - HTPB 85:15 based composite HE. Such a behavior is exploited to determine the heterogeneous reaction rate versus the shock pressure using a method based on the Cauchy-Riemann problem inversion. The reaction rate laws obtained allow to compute both run-distance to detonation and pressure signals.

  9. PBX 9501 high explosive violent response/low amplitude insult project: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idar, D.J.; Lucht, R.A.; Scammon, R.; Straight, J.; Skidmore, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary modeling and experimental analyses of the violent reaction threshold of semi-heavily confined PBX 9501 to low velocity impact have been completed. Experimental threshold measurements were obtained with ten tests using a spigot gun design to launch a hemispherical projectile at the high explosive contained in stainless steel. Powder curves were determined for several gun barrel designs, powders, and projectile materials and have proven to be very reproducible over the range of 75 to 325 ft/s. A threshold velocity of approximately 246 ft/s for violent reaction of the PBX 9501 was determined with experimental gauge and switch measurements and the remaining physical test evidence. Preliminary analyses of the PBX 9501 samples retrieved from both unreacted and partially reacted targets have been completed. Core samples were obtained from the unreacted targets and submitted for density determinations. The subsequent analysis supports the concept that the PBX 9501 yields and fractures under the low velocity compression event to expand and fill the annular gap in the target design. Samples of PBX 9501 from the partially reacted targets were examined with scanning electron microscope and light microscope techniques. Increased evidence of mechanical twinning effects are noted in the HMX crystals from the partially reacted targets. Finite element calculations using DYNA213, with a modified ORION post processor, without reaction or chemistry models, were used to support the design of targets, to compare predictive analyses with experimental measurements, and to evaluate a proposed ignition criterion in a power law form for threshold to reaction with dependence on pressure, maximum shear strain rate, and time variables. The calculations show good agreement with the physical dent and deformation data from the remaining target evidence; however, they do not match the experimental pressure gauge measurements well.

  10. Xsense: using nanotechnology to combine detection methods for high sensitivity handheld explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Kostesha, Natalie; Bosco, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to produce a handheld explosives sensor the Xsense project has been initiated at the Technical University of Denmark in collaboration with a number of partners. Using micro- and nano technological approaches it will be attempted to integrate four detection principles into a single de...

  11. Highly consistent effects of plant litter identity and functional traits on decomposition across a latitudinal gradient.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.A.; Berg, M.P.; Handa, T.; Hattenschwiler, S.; van Ruijven, J.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Aerts, R.

    2012-01-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a key process in terrestrial carbon cycling, yet the relative importance of various control factors remains ambiguous at a global scale. A full reciprocal litter transplant study with 16 litter species that varied widely in traits and originated from four forest sites

  12. Highly consistent effects of plant litter identity and functional traits on decomposition across a latitudinal gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkonen, M.; Berg, M.P.; Handa, I.T.; Hättenschwiler, S.; Ruijven, van J.; Bodegom, van P.M.; Aerts, M.A.P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a key process in terrestrial carbon cycling, yet the relative importance of various control factors remains ambiguous at a global scale. A full reciprocal litter transplant study with 16 litter species that varied widely in traits and originated from four forest sites

  13. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition over High-Performance Ru/Graphene Nanocomposites for Efficient COx-Free Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly-dispersed Ru nanoparticles were grown on graphene nanosheets by simultaneously reducing graphene oxide and Ru ions using ethylene glycol (EG, and the resultant Ru/graphene nanocomposites were applied as a catalyst to ammonia decomposition for COx-free hydrogen production. Tuning the microstructures of Ru/graphene nanocomposites was easily accomplished in terms of Ru particle size, morphology, and loading by adjusting the preparation conditions. This was the key to excellent catalytic activity, because ammonia decomposition over Ru catalysts is structure-sensitive. Our results demonstrated that Ru/graphene prepared using water as a co-solvent greatly enhanced the catalytic performance for ammonia decomposition, due to the significantly improved nano architectures of the composites. The long-term stability of Ru/graphene catalysts was evaluated for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia at high temperatures, and the structural evolution of the catalysts was investigated during the catalytic reactions. Although there were no obvious changes in the catalytic activities at 450 °C over a duration of 80 h, an aggregation of the Ru nanoparticles was still observed in the nanocomposites, which was ascribed mainly to a sintering effect. However, the performance of the Ru/graphene catalyst was decreased gradually at 500 °C within 20 h, which was ascribed mainly to both the effect of the methanation of the graphene nanosheet under a H2 atmosphere and to enhanced sintering under high temperatures.

  14. High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) exhibiting good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Han, Jing; Zhang, Sheng; Zhai, Lianjie; Wang, Bozhou; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping; Gao, Shengli

    2017-09-01

    High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) not only exhibit good energetic performances but also have a good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of energetic materials. In this contribution, two high-energy CPs Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3·3H2O (1) and [Cu3(DDT)2(H2O)2]n (2) (H2DNBT = 3,3‧-dinitro-5,5‧-bis(1H-1,2,4-triazole and H3DDT = 4,5-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-1,2,3-triazole) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Furthermore, 1 was thermos-dehydrated to produce Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3 (1a). The thermal decomposition kinetics of 1, 1a and 2 were studied by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Thermal analyses and sensitivity tests show that all compounds exhibit high thermal stability and low sensitivity for external stimuli. Meanwhile, all compounds have large positive enthalpy of formation, which are calculated as being (1067.67 ± 2.62) kJ mol-1 (1), (1464.12 ± 3.12) kJ mol-1 (1a) and (3877.82 ± 2.75) kJ mol-1 (2), respectively. The catalytic effects of 1a and 2 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) were also investigated.

  15. Microbial decomposition is highly sensitive to leaf litter emersion in a permanent temperate stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Gómez, Juanita; Duarte, Sofia; Cássio, Fernanda; Pascoal, Cláudia; Romaní, Anna M

    2018-04-15

    Drought frequency and intensity in some temperate regions are forecasted to increase under the ongoing global change, which might expose permanent streams to intermittence and have severe repercussions on stream communities and ecosystem processes. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought duration on microbial decomposition of Populus nigra leaf litter in a temperate permanent stream (Oliveira, NW Portugal). Specifically, we measured the response of the structural (assemblage composition, bacterial and fungal biomass) and functional (leaf litter decomposition, extracellular enzyme activities (EEA), and fungal sporulation) parameters of fungal and bacterial communities on leaf litter exposed to emersion during different time periods (7, 14 and 21d). Emersion time affected microbial assemblages and litter decomposition, but the response differed among variables. Leaf decomposition rates and the activity of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase and phosphatase were gradually reduced with increasing emersion time, while β-xylosidase reduction was similar when emersion last for 7 or more days, and the phenol oxidase reduction was similar at 14 and 21days of leaf emersion. Microbial biomass and fungal sporulation were reduced after 21days of emersion. The structure of microbial assemblages was affected by the duration of the emersion period. The shifts in fungal assemblages were correlated with a decreased microbial capacity to degrade lignin and hemicellulose in leaf litter exposed to emersion. Additionally, some resilience was observed in leaf litter mass loss, bacterial biomass, some enzyme activities and structure of fungal assemblages. Our study shows that drought can strongly alter structural and functional aspects of microbial decomposers. Therefore, the exposure of leaf litter to increasing emersion periods in temperate streams is expected to affect decomposer communities and overall decomposition of plant material by decelerating carbon cycling in

  16. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  17. Steam explosion studies review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-03-01

    When a cold liquid is brought into contact with a molten material with a temperature significantly higher than the liquid boiling point, an explosive interaction due to sudden fragmentation of the melt and rapid evaporation of the liquid may take place. This phenomenon is referred to as a steam explosion or vapor explosion. Depending upon the amount of the melt and the liquid involved, the mechanical energy released during a vapor explosion can be large enough to cause serious destruction. In hypothetical severe accidents which involve fuel melt down, subsequent interactions between the molten fuel and coolant may cause steam explosion. This process has been studied by many investigators in an effort to assess the likelihood of containment failure which leads to large scale release of radioactive materials to the environment. In an effort to understand the phenomenology of steam explosion, extensive studies has been performed so far. The report presents both experimental and analytical studies on steam explosion. As for the experimental studies, both small scale tests which involve usually less than 20 g of high temperature melt and medium/large scale tests which more than 1 kg of melt is used are reviewed. For the modelling part of steam explosions, mechanistic modelling as well as thermodynamic modelling is reviewed. (author)

  18. Power Device Thermal Fault Tolerant Control of High-Power Three-Level Explosion-Proof Inverter Based on Holographic Equivalent Dual-Mode Modulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi-Zhou Xu; Chun-jie Wang; Yu-feng Peng

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary for three-level explosion-proof inverters to have high thermal stability and good output characteristics avoiding problems caused by power devices, such as IGBT, so it becomes a hot...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY OF EXPLOSIVES

    OpenAIRE

    KOYUNCU, Hülya

    2017-01-01

    Explosives are used on a large scale byboth the military and by various civilian industries (e.g. mining, high-energymetalwork, and civil engineering). Explosives utilization contributes to the high environmentalcontamination. TNT(2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) are found mainly in soils and surface waters; there havealso been cases of groundwater contamination. Most explosives are stable du...

  20. Modeling yields insight into thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, J.L.; Carr, R.V.; Simpson, M.S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of the thermal decomposition of nitrotoluenes is critical in evaluating the hazards associated with transporting and storing commercial volumes of these chemicals. Detailed modeling of an adiabatic, low PHI and semi-open (vented to a larger pressure vessel) calorimeter provides insight into a multiple reaction mechanism. The reaction rates developed, along with the significant effect of reactant or intermediates vaporization were confirmed with additional experimental results. Such an interpretation of nitrotoluene decomposition is consistent with recent isothermal experiments as well as with the body of data reported in the open literature. The low temperature or induction reactions are accurately represented with a first order Arrhenius model having typical values for kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. These reactions generate minimal amounts of non condensable gas. If the material is maintained at an elevated temperature, but prevented from self-heating (by external cooling), the intermediate products form thermally unstable and nonvolatile oligomers. At higher temperatures the remaining materials undergo explosive reactions characterized by high heats of reaction, large activation energies and massive releases of non condensable gas. Quantifying the rates of nitrotoluene and/or intermediate vaporization versus oligomerization is essential in evaluating the hazard of a thermal explosion involving a commercial quantity of nitrotoluene.

  1. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  2. Hierarchical Decompositions for the Computation of High-Dimensional Multivariate Normal Probabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2017-09-07

    We present a hierarchical decomposition scheme for computing the n-dimensional integral of multivariate normal probabilities that appear frequently in statistics. The scheme exploits the fact that the formally dense covariance matrix can be approximated by a matrix with a hierarchical low rank structure. It allows the reduction of the computational complexity per Monte Carlo sample from O(n2) to O(mn+knlog(n/m)), where k is the numerical rank of off-diagonal matrix blocks and m is the size of small diagonal blocks in the matrix that are not well-approximated by low rank factorizations and treated as dense submatrices. This hierarchical decomposition leads to substantial efficiencies in multivariate normal probability computations and allows integrations in thousands of dimensions to be practical on modern workstations.

  3. Solid state gas sensors for detection of explosives and explosive precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yun

    The increased number of terrorist attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) over the past few years has made the trace detection of explosives a priority for the Department of Homeland Security. Considerable advances in early detection of trace explosives employing spectroscopic detection systems and other sensing devices have been made and have demonstrated outstanding performance. However, modern IEDs are not easily detectable by conventional methods and terrorists have adapted to avoid using metallic or nitro groups in the manufacturing of IEDs. Instead, more powerful but smaller compounds, such as TATP are being more frequently used. In addition, conventional detection techniques usually require large capital investment, labor costs and energy input and are incapable of real-time identification, limiting their application. Thus, a low cost detection system which is capable of continuous online monitoring in a passive mode is needed for explosive detection. In this dissertation, a thermodynamic based thin film gas sensor which can reliably detect various explosive compounds was developed and demonstrated. The principle of the sensors is based on measuring the heat effect associated with the catalytic decomposition of explosive compounds present in the vapor phase. The decomposition mechanism is complicated and not well known, but it can be affected by many parameters including catalyst, reaction temperature and humidity. Explosives that have relatively high vapor pressure and readily sublime at room temperature, like TATP and 2, 6-DNT, are ideal candidate for vapor phase detection using the thermodynamic gas sensor. ZnO, W2O 3, V2O5 and SnO2 were employed as catalysts. This sensor exhibited promising sensitivity results for TATP, but poor selectivity among peroxide based compounds. In order to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermodynamic sensor, a Pd:SnO2 nanocomposite was fabricated and tested as part of this dissertation. A

  4. A Multipathway Model for High Explosives and Barium Transport Using GoldSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, B. D.; Hickmott, D. D.; Keating, E. H.; Robinson, B. A.; Gard, M. O.

    2002-05-01

    Outfalls from High Explosives (HE) production sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) discharged RDX, TNT, HMX, and barium contaminated waters onto a mesa /canyon system on the western edge of the Pajarito Plateau from 1944 to 1996. HE concentrations in surface soils ranged to over 20 wt.%, and HE in waters range to over 800 ug/L. HE in water is present in springs, surface waters, alluvial waters and deep perched (> 700 ft. depth) and possibly regional (> 1200 ft depth) groundwaters. Barium concentrations range to over 4 wt.% in sediments, and to over 5000 ug/L in spring and alluvial waters. Because of the size of contaminant inventories and observations of HE in the perched zone and possibly deeper, there has been concern that there may be a long-term risk at a downgradient drinking water supply well. To address this concern, a GoldSim multipathway model was developed to simulate transport of HE and barium from source areas to the supply well. The objectives of the modeling effort were to generate a preliminary assessment of potential concentrations at the supply well and to identify any model components/parameters that require additional characterization based on model sensitivity and uncertainty. The model evaluates two main source areas, one is controlled by flow through the mesa vadose zone, and the other by flow through the canyon vadose zone. The two vadose zone modules feed into a saturated zone module that terminates at a pumping well (drinking water) module. The hydrogeology of the site is extremely complex and includes a heterogeneous, unfractured/fractured tuff vadose zone geology, ponds, springs, alluvial aquifers, a perennial stream reach, and two deep aquifers. Because of this complexity, and limited characterization and contaminant inventory information, we used a stochastic approach to quantitatively represent model/parameter uncertainties. Model parameters were developed using a variety of information including flow and transport modeling

  5. How nitric oxide affects the decomposition of supported nickel nitrate to arrive at highly dispersed catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sietsma, J.R.A.; Friedrich, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837350; Broersma, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311437532; Versluijs-Helder, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311472699; van Dillen, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111157625; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2008-01-01

    An explanation is put forward for the beneficial effect of thermal decomposition of supported Ni3(NO3)2(OH)4 in NO/He flow (0.1–1 vol%) that enables preparation of well-dispersed (3–5 nm particles) 24 wt% Ni-catalysts via impregnation and drying using aqueous [Ni(OH2)6](NO3)2 precursor solution.

  6. Active and total microbial communities in forest soil are largely different and highly stratified during decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Baldrian, Petr; Kolařík, Miroslav; Štursová, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Valášková, Vendula; Větrovský, Tomáš; Žifčáková, Lucia; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Rídl, Jakub; Vlček, Čestmír; Voříšková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Soils of coniferous forest ecosystems are important for the global carbon cycle, and the identification of active microbial decomposers is essential for understanding organic matter transformation in these ecosystems. By the independent analysis of DNA and RNA, whole communities of bacteria and fungi and its active members were compared in topsoil of a Picea abies forest during a period of organic matter decomposition. Fungi quantitatively dominate the microbial community in the litter horizo...

  7. Graph Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merker, Martin

    The topic of this PhD thesis is graph decompositions. While there exist various kinds of decompositions, this thesis focuses on three problems concerning edgedecompositions. Given a family of graphs H we ask the following question: When can the edge-set of a graph be partitioned so that each part...... induces a subgraph isomorphic to a member of H? Such a decomposition is called an H-decomposition. Apart from the existence of an H-decomposition, we are also interested in the number of parts needed in an H-decomposition. Firstly, we show that for every tree T there exists a constant k(T) such that every...... k(T)-edge-connected graph whose size is divisible by the size of T admits a T-decomposition. This proves a conjecture by Barát and Thomassen from 2006. Moreover, we introduce a new arboricity notion where we restrict the diameter of the trees in a decomposition into forests. We conjecture...

  8. Explosively Generated Plasmas: Measurement and Models of Shock Generation and Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Samuel; Elert, Mark; Giannuzzi, Paul; Le, Ryan; McCarthy, Daniel; Schweigert, Igor

    2017-06-01

    Explosively generated plasmas (EGPs) are created by the focusing of a shock produced from an explosive driver via a conical waveguide. In the waveguide, the gases from the explosive along with the trapped air are accelerated and compressed (via Mach stemming) to such extent that plasma is produced. These EGPs have been measured in controlled experiments to achieve temperatures on the order of 1 eV and velocities as high as 25 km/s. We have conducted a combined modeling and measurement effort to increase the understanding for design purposes of the shock generation of EGPs and the interaction of EGP with explosive materials. Such efforts have led to improved measures of pressure and temperature, spatial structure of the plasma, and the decomposition/deflagration behavior of RDX upon exposure to an EGP. Funding provided by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) Munitions Response program area.

  9. Chemical explosive stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRocca, S.J.; McLamore, R.T.; Spencer, A.M. Jr.

    1974-02-01

    A safe, reliable chemical explosive fracturing process has been demonstrated and prototype equipment for its use has been successfully field tested.Called the Astro-Flow II process, it utilizes a highly energetic, hydrazine-based family of liquid explosives known as Astrolite. A unique property of these explosives is that they can be divided into 2 nonexplosive pumpable components that can be handled safely. The 2 components are pumped independently and simultaneously into the well and blended together downhole to form the explosive which is circulated in place or displaced into formation fractures. Explosive hazards to surface equipment and personnel are eliminated. Extensive testing of the physical and chemical stability of the mixed explosive indicates that the material can be reliable and safely used at elevated temperatures, pressures, and in the adverse chemical environment often found in deep oil and gas wells. These tests of prototype equipment proved that the 2 components could be independently pumped with precision and blended together to form the desired explosive formulation. How the process works is described.

  10. Development of ammonium nitrate based explosives to optimize explosive properties and explosive welding parameters used during explosion cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Christoph

    The ability to accurately measure and predict the velocity of explosively driven flyer plates has been a subject of significant work by the explosives community for some time. The majority of this work has focused on the use of high-energy, ideal explosives that are of interest for defense applications. Several attempts have been made to modify the experimental methods developed for these ideal explosives for use in testing low-energy, non-ideal explosive compounds (including industrially useful mixtures of ammonium nitrate, fuels, and additives) with varying degrees of success. The detonation properties of non-ideal explosives are difficult to measure precisely due to the effect of physical, environmental, and geometric factors on the detonation of these materials. The work presented in this document attempts to mitigate the variability inherent in measurements of non-ideal, ammonium nitrate-based explosives by performing testing using charge geometry similar to that used in the industrial process of explosion welding. A method to measure flyer plate velocity with optical high-speed imaging using commercially available equipment is described. Flyer plate velocity data from both experimental measurements and numerical modeling is presented. A new formula for predicting explosive energy based on the detonation velocity of an ammonium nitrate based explosive in a planar geometry is proposed and applied to a theoretical explosive cladding scenario.

  11. The Xsense project: The application of an intelligent sensor array for high sensitivity handheld explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Bosco, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Multiple independent sensors are used in security and military applications in order to increase sensitivity, selectivity and data reliability. The Xsense project has been initiated at the Technical University of Denmark in collaboration with a number of partners in an effort to produce a handheld...... sensor for trace detection of explosives. We are using micro- and nano technological approaches for integrating four sensing principles into a single device. At the end of the project, the consortium aims at having delivered a sensor platform consisting of four independent detector principles capable...

  12. Highly sensitive detection of explosive triacetone triperoxide by an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wenhui; Zhang Weide; Chen Luya, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn [Nano Science Research Center, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-08-06

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is one of the most sensitive known explosives and can be easily synthesized using the commonly available chemicals acetone and hydrogen peroxide, but is difficult to be detected. In this study, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a glucose-assisted solvothermal method at 120 deg. C for 18 h. The gas sensor based on In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles exhibits a high response, fast response and recovery, a wide detecting range of 0.50-500 mg, good stability and excellent stability to TATP.

  13. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  14. Numerical model investigation for potential methane explosion and benzene vapor intrusion associated with high-ethanol blend releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Luo, Hong; Devaull, George E; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could pose an explosion risk if methane accumulates in a confined space above the ground where ignitable conditions exist. Ethanol-derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel hydrocarbons by stimulating the depletion of oxygen by methanotrophs, and thus inhibiting aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors. To assess these processes, a three-dimensional numerical vapor intrusion model was used to simulate the degradation, migration, and intrusion pathway of methane and benzene under different site conditions. Simulations show that methane is unlikely to build up to pose an explosion hazard (5% v/v) if diffusion is the only mass transport mechanism through the deeper vadose zone. However, if methanogenic activity near the source zone is sufficiently high to cause advective gas transport, then the methane indoor concentration may exceed the flammable threshold under simulated conditions. During subsurface migration, methane biodegradation could consume soil oxygen that would otherwise be available to support hydrocarbon degradation, and increase the vapor intrusion potential for benzene. Vapor intrusion would also be exacerbated if methanogenic activity results in sufficiently high pressure to cause advective gas transport in the unsaturated zone. Overall, our simulations show that current approaches to manage the vapor intrusion risk for conventional fuel released might need to be modified when dealing with some high ethanol blend fuel (i.e., E20 up to E95) releases.

  15. Decompositions in the production of low density polyethylene: Reasons, consequences and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoiljković Dragoslav M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the production of low density polyethylene by free radical polymerization of ethylene at high pressure, ethylene and polyethylene occasionally decompose to carbon, hydrogen and methane resulting in an enormous increase of pressure and temperature. Huge explosions occur in a polymerization reactor and in other parts of the installation. In addition to the well known reasons of decompositions, in this work it is pointed out that the polymerization under critical entropy conditions is an additional cause of explosions, which has not been recognized and elaborated in scientific literature and industrial practice.

  16. Computational study of decomposition mechanisms and thermodynamic properties of molecular-type cracking patterns for the highly energetic molecule GZT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sou-Ro; Cheng, Ken-Fa; Liu, Min-Hsien; Hong, Yaw-Shun; Chen, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    This study uses the Gaussian 03 program and density functional theory B3LYP with three basis set methods-[B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,p), and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)]-to model the highly energetic ionic compound diguanidinium 5,5'-azotetrazolate (GZT) to research its decomposition mechanisms and thermodynamic properties. Molecular-type cracking patterns are proposed, which were initiated by heterocyclic ring opening, sequential cracking of the two five-membered rings of GZT, and simultaneous release of N2 molecules; whereas proton transfer, bond-breaking, and atomic rearrangements were performed subsequently. Finally, 15 reaction paths and five transition states were obtained. All possible decomposition species and transition states, including intermediates and products, were identified, and their corresponding enthalpy and Gibbs free energy values were obtained. The results revealed that (1) the maximum activation energy required is 187.8 kJ mol(-1), and the enthalpy change (ΔH) and Gibbs free-energy change (ΔG) of the net reaction are -525.1 kJ mol(-1) and -935.6 kJ mol(-1), respectively; (2) GZT can release large amounts of energy, the main contribution being from the disintegration of the 5,5'-azotetrazolate anion (ZT(2-)) skeleton (ΔH = -598.3 kJ mol(-1)); and (3) the final products contained major amounts of N2 gas, but remaining gas molecules such as HCN and NH3 were obtained, which are in agreement with experimental results. The detailed decomposition simulation results demonstrated the feasibility of this method to calculate the energies of the thermodynamic reactions for the highly energetic GZT and predict the most feasible pathways and the final products.

  17. Combination of biochemical and high-throughput-sequencing approaches to study the role of Antinobacteria and fungi in the decomposition of plant biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Větrovský, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dead plant biomass is a key pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Its decomposition in soil environments is thus an essential process of the carbon cycle. Fungi are considered to be the primary decomposers in soil ecosystems because of their physiological adaptations and enzymatic apparatus composed from highly effective oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes. Many recent works show that in addition to fungi, bacteria may also play a significant role in lignocellulose decomposition and among ba...

  18. Biodegradation of nitro-explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Pradnya; Dautpure, Premlata; Sarnaik, Seema

    2003-09-01

    Environmental contamination by nitro compounds is associated principally with the explosives industry. However, global production and use of explosives is unavoidable. The presently widely used nitro-explosives are TNT (Trinitrotoluene), RDX (Royal Demolition Explosive) and HMX (High Melting Explosive). Nevertheless, the problems of these nitro-explosives are almost parallel due to their similarities of production processes, abundance of nitro-explosives and resembling chemical structures. The nitro-explosives per se as well as their environmental transformation products are toxic, showing symptoms as methaemoglobinaemia, kidney trouble, jaundice etc. Hence their removal/degradation from soil/water is essential. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of TNT and RDX have been reported, while for HMX anaerobic or anoxic degradation have been described in many studies. A multisystem involvement using plants in remediation is gaining importance. Thus the information about degradation of nitro-explosives is available in jigsaw pieces which needs to be arranged and lacunae filled to get concrete degradative schemes so that environmental pollution from nitro-explosives can be dealt with more successfully at a macroscale. An overview of the reports on nitro-explosives degradation, future outlook and studies done by us are presented in this review.

  19. Explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, J.F.M.; Falconer, E.L.

    1971-04-13

    A thickening agent for an aqueous slurry explosive composition consists of the combination of a cross-linked galactomannan with psyllium flour in specific proportions. This thickener provides good fluidity and reduced tackiness. (7 claims)

  20. Laser-Induced Explosion of Nitrated Carbon Nanotubes: Nonadiabatic and Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Pal, Sougata; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-12-14

    Laser-initiated decomposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can lead to medical, military, and other applications. In medicine, CNTs give rise to efficient remedies against diseases and malignant cells, since they encapsulate drug molecules, can be delivered inside living organisms, and absorb light that penetrates through biological tissues. As explosives, pyrotechnics, and propellants, CNTs can be activated remotely by a visible or infrared laser, avoiding the need for a detonating cord. The reported non-equilibrium investigation demonstrates the possibility of photoinduced polynitro-CNT explosion and provides a detailed chemical mechanism of the decomposition process, explicitly in the time domain. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics (MD) performed with real-time time-dependent tight-binding density functional theory demonstrates that the photogenerated exciton deposits its energy into a broad range of phonon modes within less than a picosecond, resulting in a rapid polynitro-CNT heating. Following the heating, reactive MD demonstrates an explosion, during which the local temperature of polynitro-CNTs and its fragments rises as high as 4000 K. Photoexcitation of nitro groups by a high-energy laser is not required; the energy can be delivered to polynitro-CNTs using near-infrared light within the biological window. Furthermore, the explosion is possible both with and without an external oxygen source. Anaerobic explosion could be particularly beneficial in confined biological and nanoscale environments. The products of the polynitro-CNT decomposition are nontoxic: carbon dioxide and molecular nitrogen. The in silico demonstration of the laser-induced polynitro-CNT explosion, its chemical mechanism, and the time scales of physical and chemical transformations can be tested experimentally using time-resolved laser techniques.

  1. Methane decomposition over high-loaded Ni-Cu-SiO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiamao; Zhao, Linjie; He, Jianchao; Dong, Liang; Xiong, Liangping; Du, Yang; Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi, E-mail: hywang@caep.cn; Peng, Shuming, E-mail: pengshuming@caep.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Methane decomposition-regeneration with air cycles over 65%Ni-20%Cu-10%SiO{sub 2} catalysts. - Highlights: • Methane decomposition over Ni-Cu-SiO{sub 2} was studied. • The deactivated catalysts were regenerated by air. • Introduction of Cu could enhance the catalytic performance of Ni-SiO{sub 2}. • The increase of the Ni-Cu particle influences the performance of the catalysts. - Abstract: The performance of Ni-SiO{sub 2} and Ni-Cu-SiO{sub 2} during repeated catalytic decomposition of methane (CDM) reactions and subsequent regeneration of the deactivated catalysts with air has been studied. The catalytic activity of the 75%Ni-25%SiO{sub 2} catalyst in the second and third CDM was lower than that during the first, while the lifetime of the catalyst did not change significantly. Both the lifetime and the catalytic activity of 65%Ni-10%Cu-25%SiO{sub 2} in the second and third CDM reactions decreased significantly. 55%Ni-20%Cu-25%SiO{sub 2} showed better performance than the other two catalysts, and its activity and lifetime did not change significantly until the third CDM reaction. The hydrogen yields of 55%Ni-20%Cu-25%SiO{sub 2} were 56.8 gH{sub 2}/gcat., 42.8 gH{sub 2}/gcat., and 2.4 gH{sub 2}/gcat. for the first, second, and third CDM reactions, respectively. Spherical carbon structures were observed on the catalysts following all three CDM reactions over 75%Ni-25%SiO{sub 2}. However, similar carbon structures were only observed following the second and third CDM over 65%Ni-10%Cu-25%SiO{sub 2}, and only following the third cycle with 55%Ni-20%Cu-25%SiO{sub 2}. The formation of spherical carbon during the repeated CDM reactions strongly influenced the performance of the catalysts.

  2. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  3. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  4. Innovative assistant extraction of flavonoids from pine (Larix olgensis Henry) needles by high-density steam flash-explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongdong; Yang, Ruijin; Zhao, Wei; Katiyo, Wendy; Hua, Xiao; Zhang, Wenbin

    2014-04-30

    High-density steam flash-explosion (HDSF) was first employed to extract flavonoids from pine needles. The HDSF treatment was performed at a steam pressure of 0.5-2.0 MPa for 20-120 s. Scanning electron microscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with photodiode-array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) were used to characterize the morphological changes and analyze flavonoids of pine needles before and after HDSF treatment. Our results indicated that, after steam explosion at 1.5 MPa for 60 s, the flavonoids extracted reached 50.8 rutin equivalents mg/g dry weight, which was 2.54-fold as that of the untreated sample. HDSF pretreatment caused the formation of large micropores on the pine needles and production of particles, as well as the removal of wax layers. Compared to microwave-assisted, ultrasound-assisted, and solvent extraction, HDSF pretreatment took only 30 min to reach a maximum yield of 47.0 rutin equivalents mg/g flavonoids extract after pine needles were treated at 1.5 MPa for 80 s. In addition, after HDSF treatment, the aglycones were 3.17 times higher than that of untreated pine needles, while glycosides were lower by 57% (in HPLC-DAD individuals' sum) due to hydrolysis of flavonoids glycosides. It can be concluded that HDSF is a practical pretreatment for extraction of flavonoids and conversion in the healthy food and pharmaceutical industries.

  5. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, G.; Watson, N.K.; Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Doren, B.van; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Alamillo, E.Calvo; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; der Kolk, N.van; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.C.; Cizel, J.B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; de Freitas, P.Mora; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Taille, Ch.de la; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-23

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range from 10 to 80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from Geant4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  6. Tailoring Wet Explosion Process Parameters for the Pretreatment of Cocksfoot Grass for High Sugar Yields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2013-01-01

    glucose release with low formation of by-products. Under these conditions, the cellulose and hemicellulose sugar recovery was 94 % and 70 %, respectively. The efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose under these conditions was 91 %. On the other hand, the release of pentose sugars was higher......The pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is crucial for efficient subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. In this study, wet explosion (WEx) pretreatment was applied to cocksfoot grass and pretreatment conditions were tailored for maximizing the sugar yields using response...... when applying less severe pretreatment conditions C (160 °C, 5 min, 0.2 % dilute sulfuric acid). Therefore, the choice of the most suitable pretreatment conditions is depending on the main target product, i.e., hexose or pentose sugars....

  7. Circuit simulations of the use of explosive formed fuses to obtain high voltage pulses for high impedance loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, J.H.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Turchi, P.J. [Air Force Research Labs., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States). Phillips Research Site; Graham, J.D. [Maxwell Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goforth, J.H.; Oona, H.; Lopez, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Explosive Formed Fuses (EFF`s) use conducting elements that are deformed by explosive pressure (typically, against dielectric dies). This causes the fuse geometry to change, so that the conducting element cross section decreases. This enables a higher ratio of current conduction to current interrupt time than for normal fuses, and it enables more control of when current interruption occurs. In combination with a suitable output closing switch, EFF`s can be used to obtain several hundred kilovolt voltage pulses from inductive stores to drive several ohm loads. With proper choices of inductive store, EFF geometry and material, and output closing switch features, such a voltage pulse can be approximately flat topped for microsecond duration, and have a small fraction of microsecond risetime. The authors present theoretical analysis and circuit simulations which illustrate this, using scaled empirical EFF parameters, for inductive stores in the 1 Weber flux, several hundred nanohenry range. The circuit simulations were done using Microcap-4, with user defined elements. These simulations were done with static inductive stores, and with explosive magnetic flux compression generators driving inductive stores.

  8. Decomposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  9. Development of highly sensitive and selective antibodies for the detection of the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by bioisosteric replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Almut; Biyikal, Mustafa; Rurack, Knut; Weller, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    An improved antibody against the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was developed. The immunogen was designed by the concept of bioisosteric replacement, which led to an excellent polyclonal antibody with extreme selectivity and immunoassays of very good sensitivity. Compounds such as nitroglycerine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, hexogen (RDX), 2,4,6-trinitroaniline, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, octogen (HMX), triacetone triperoxide, ammonium nitrate, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol and nitrobenzene were tested for potential cross-reactivity. The detection limit of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was determined to be around 0.5 µg/l. The dynamic range of the assay was found to be between 1 and 1000 µg/l, covering a concentration range of three decades. This work shows the successful application of the bioisosteric concept in immunochemistry by exchange of a nitroester to a carbonate diester. The antiserum might be used for the development of quick tests, biosensors, microtitration plate immunoassays, microarrays and other analytical methods for the highly sensitive detection of PETN, an explosive frequently used by terrorists, exploiting the extreme difficulty of its detection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Comparative analysis of low- and high-swirl confined flames and jets by proper orthogonal and dynamic mode decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, D. M.; Abdurakipov, S. S.; Chikishev, L. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Hanjalić, K.

    2014-06-01

    Low-order coherent structures of non-reacting and combusting low- and high-swirl (swirl rates S = 0.41 and S = 1.0) jet flows in an open-ended cylindrical model combustor have been studied using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) of high-repetition stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) velocity measurements. Lean methane-air mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.6 was chosen for the reacting case as lean flames are generally less stable and more receptive to active control. The nonreacting and reacting flows at the same swirl rates exhibit qualitatively similar overall features characterized by highly turbulent annular jets enveloping the central retarding zone (for S = 0.41) or a recirculating bubble (for S = 1.0). At low swirl the dominant coherent structures appeared in the form of tilted ring vortices, evolving into helices as the swirl rate increases. The high-swirl flows are characterized by a pair of well-organized counter-rotating co-winding helical vortices originating in the inner and outer jet shear layers. Vortex cores were detected in both cases, but at low swirl it was less energetic and not associated with a distinct precession frequency. The core region of the low-swirl flame shows intermittent mild flow reversal without permanent central recirculation zone. The thermal expansion enhances the spreading of the reacting flow, especially at the high swirl number. Here the helices pitch is smaller and some neighbouring vortices merge into vortical sheets that act as shear shield confining the flame within the inner shear layer. Despite the significant effects of combustion on the time-averaged characteristics for the high-swirl, the dynamics of both flows were dominated by the global inviscid helical instability mode with a DMD detected conspicuous frequencies of 223 Hz for the nonreacting jet and 257 Hz for the flame.

  11. Some properties of explosive mixtures containing peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeman, Svatopluk [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: svatopluk.zeman@upce.cz; Trzcinski, Waldemar A. [Institute of Chemistry, Military University of Technology, PL-00-908 Warsaw 49 (Poland); Matyas, Robert [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2008-06-15

    This study concerns mixtures of triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) and ammonium nitrate (AN) with added water (W), as the case may be, and dry mixtures of TATP with urea nitrate (UN). Relative performances (RP) of the mixtures and their individual components, relative to TNT, were determined by means of ballistic mortar. The detonation energies, E{sub 0}, and detonation velocities, D, were calculated for the mixtures studied by means of the thermodynamic code CHEETAH. Relationships have been found and are discussed between the RP and the E{sub 0} values related to unit volume of gaseous products of detonation of these mixtures. These relationships together with those between RP and oxygen balance values of the mixtures studied indicate different types of participation of AN and UN in the explosive decomposition of the respective mixtures. Dry TATP/UN mixtures exhibit lower RP than analogous mixtures TATP/AN containing up to 25% of water. Depending on the water content, the TATP/AN mixtures possess higher detonability values than the ANFO explosives. A semi-logarithmic relationship between the D values and oxygen coefficients has been derived for all the mixtures studied at the charge density of 1000 kg m{sup -3}. Among the mixtures studied, this relationship distinguishes several samples of the type of 'tertiary explosives' as well as samples that approach 'high explosives' in their performances and detonation velocities.

  12. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  13. Non-cooperative target recognition by means of singular value decomposition applied to radar high resolution range profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio

    2014-12-29

    Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  14. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  15. A Generalized Image Scene Decomposition-Based System for Supervised Classification of Very High Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhiYong Lv

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Very high resolution (VHR remote sensing images are widely used for land cover classification. However, to the best of our knowledge, few approaches have been shown to improve classification accuracies through image scene decomposition. In this paper, a simple yet powerful observational scene scale decomposition (OSSD-based system is proposed for the classification of VHR images. Different from the traditional methods, the OSSD-based system aims to improve the classification performance by decomposing the complexity of an image’s content. First, an image scene is divided into sub-image blocks through segmentation to decompose the image content. Subsequently, each sub-image block is classified respectively, or each block is processed firstly through an image filter or spectral–spatial feature extraction method, and then each processed segment is taken as the feature input of a classifier. Finally, classified sub-maps are fused together for accuracy evaluation. The effectiveness of our proposed approach was investigated through experiments performed on different images with different supervised classifiers, namely, support vector machine, k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes classifier, and maximum likelihood classifier. Compared with the accuracy achieved without OSSD processing, the accuracy of each classifier improved significantly, and our proposed approach shows outstanding performance in terms of classification accuracy.

  16. A Window on Surface Explosions: Tartaric Acid on Cu(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhatre, B S; Pushkarev, V; Holsclaw, B; Lawton, T J; Sykes, E C. H.; Gellman, A J

    2013-04-18

    Autocatalytic reaction mechanisms are observed in a range of important chemical processes including catalysis, radical-mediated explosions, and biosynthesis. Because of their complexity, the microscopic details of autocatalytic reaction mechanisms have been difficult to study on surfaces and heterogeneous catalysts. Autocatalytic decomposition reactions of S,S- and R,R-tartaric acid (TA) adsorbed on Cu(110) offer molecular-level insight into aspects of these processes, which until now, were largely a matter of speculation. The decomposition of TA/Cu(110) is initiated by a slow, irreversible process that forms vacancies in the adsorbed TA layer, followed by a vacancy-mediated, explosive decomposition process that yields CO{sub 2} and small hydrocarbon products. Initiation of the explosive decomposition of TA/Cu(110) has been studied by measurement of the reaction kinetics, time-resolved low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Initiation results in a decrease in the local coverage of TA and a concomitant increase in the areal vacancy concentration. Observations of explosive TA decomposition on the Cu(651)S surface suggest that initiation does not occur at structural defects in the surface, as has been suggested in the past. Once the vacancy concentration reaches a critical value, the explosive, autocatalytic decomposition step dominates the TA decomposition rate. The onset of the explosive decomposition of TA on Cu(110) is accompanied by the extraction of Cu atoms from the surface to form a (±6,7; {-+}2,1) overlayer that is readily observable using LEED and STM. The explosive decomposition step is second-order in vacancy concentration and accelerates with increasing extent of reaction.

  17. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagge-Hansen, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lauderbach, L. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hodgin, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); van Buuren, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benterou, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graber, T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Jensen, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ilavsky, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Willey, T. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  18. Economically attractive route for the preparation of high quality magnetic nanoparticles by the thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Fernando B.; Couto, Ricardo A.; Kiyohara, Pedro K.; Machado, Giovanna; Masunaga, Sueli H.; Jardim, Renato F.; Rossi, Liane M.

    2017-03-01

    The thermal decomposition (TD) methods are among the most successful in obtaining magnetic nanoparticles with a high degree of control of size and narrow particle size distribution. Here we investigated the TD of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine, and a series of alcohols in order to disclose their role and also investigate economically attractive alternatives for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles without compromising their size and shape control. We have found that some affordable and reasonably less priced alcohols, such as 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, may replace the commonly used and expensive 1,2-hexadecanediol, providing an economically attractive route for the synthesis of high quality magnetic nanoparticles. The relative cost for the preparation of Fe3O4 NPs is reduced to only 21% and 9% of the original cost when using 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, respectively.

  19. High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

    2011-12-31

    The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

  20. Explosively developing extratropical cyclone associated with the high wind-waves along the east coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Ki-Young; Choi, Jin-Yong; Park, Kwang-Soon

    2017-04-01

    An extreme extratropical cyclone struck the northern part of Korea on May 3, 2016 causing significant damage to property on the land due to extreme winds and abnormal high waves in coastal area. The meteorological composite fields for the cyclone show a strong surface wind velocity (up to 45 m s-1) during its mature phase. This study investigated the development mechanisms of an explosive cyclone through numerical simulation and sensitivity experiments using the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model. The trigger mechanism for the explosive cyclogenesis is the strong baroclinic instability and temperature advection associated with upper-level cut-off low and the interaction of potential vorticity (PV) anomalies between the lower- and upper-level. The efficient placement of the high- and low-level jets forms a favorable condition for its development and transportation of water vapor and the instability energy into the cyclone. The sea-state wave simulation of large swell waves along the eastern coast of the Korean Peninsula is obtained using the wave model WAVEWATCHIII (WW3) forced by the 10-m above ground level wind field from the WRF-ARW simulations. The simulation results of WW3 for the significant wave height were compared against buoy observation data at 1-h intervals. The simulated significant wave height systematically underestimated by 0.5 m. However, strong wind field generated by the cyclone is clarified as key features determining the characteristics of the high waves in terms of the temporal growth and decay patterns.

  1. Heat pipe cooling system of high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter based on the loss calculation and finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    The special using condition of high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter limits its cooling system within heat pipe and water-cooled cooling systems. How to calculate these two systems quantitatively to provide references for engineering application becomes one of the critical problems. In this paper, the principle of three-level explosion-proof was introduced first, and the power-loss generation theory was described and deduced into equations. Secondly, the heat pipe cooling system theory calculation was conducted based on the power losses of power devices, and the whole cooling system model was built by using finite element analysis. Finally, the temperature rise experiment was carried out on a 1 MW high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter, and the results proved the feasibility of this theory and its accuracy of analysis.

  2. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey

    2008-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a Cf-252 isotopic neutron source, but recently a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Electronic Neutron Generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  4. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    . Not only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...

  5. TOWARD END-TO-END MODELING FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING: SIMULATION OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND EARTHQUAKES USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND ANELASTIC SIMULATIONS, HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL EARTH MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Vorobiev, O; Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2009-07-06

    This paper describes new research being performed to improve understanding of seismic waves generated by underground nuclear explosions (UNE) by using full waveform simulation, high-performance computing and three-dimensional (3D) earth models. The goal of this effort is to develop an end-to-end modeling capability to cover the range of wave propagation required for nuclear explosion monitoring (NEM) from the buried nuclear device to the seismic sensor. The goal of this work is to improve understanding of the physical basis and prediction capabilities of seismic observables for NEM including source and path-propagation effects. We are pursuing research along three main thrusts. Firstly, we are modeling the non-linear hydrodynamic response of geologic materials to underground explosions in order to better understand how source emplacement conditions impact the seismic waves that emerge from the source region and are ultimately observed hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. Empirical evidence shows that the amplitudes and frequency content of seismic waves at all distances are strongly impacted by the physical properties of the source region (e.g. density, strength, porosity). To model the near-source shock-wave motions of an UNE, we use GEODYN, an Eulerian Godunov (finite volume) code incorporating thermodynamically consistent non-linear constitutive relations, including cavity formation, yielding, porous compaction, tensile failure, bulking and damage. In order to propagate motions to seismic distances we are developing a one-way coupling method to pass motions to WPP (a Cartesian anelastic finite difference code). Preliminary investigations of UNE's in canonical materials (granite, tuff and alluvium) confirm that emplacement conditions have a strong effect on seismic amplitudes and the generation of shear waves. Specifically, we find that motions from an explosion in high-strength, low-porosity granite have high compressional wave amplitudes and weak

  6. Singular value decomposition analysis for examining the impact of Siberian High on winter precipitation variability over South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Syed Muhammad Fahad; Iqbal, Muhammad Jawed

    2017-11-01

    The relationship and linkage of Siberian High (SH) with winter climate over central Asia, East Asia, and Eurasia have been focused in the available literature. The effect of Siberian High over the South Asian region has received little attention. Thus, this article examines the possible teleconnection of SH pressure on winter precipitation variability over the region of South Asia. Moreover, the recent research studies focused on large-scale circulation phenomena: El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and regarded them as responsible for variability of winter rainfall. This paper gives the evidence that the winter rainfall variability is strongly influenced by Siberian High pressure. The effect of Siberian High pressure on winter precipitation over the South Asian region (65-76° E, 33-40° N) has been investigated using singular value decomposition analysis (SVDA) that is performed on gridded datasets of NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis and Climate Research Unit (CRU) of University of East Anglia, UK. SVDA isolates the leading pairs of the coupled signals that mainly explain the relationship between the coupled fields. By employing SVDA, it is found that the Siberian High has dominant impact on precipitation variability during winter season over Northern areas of South Asia.

  7. A comparative evaluation of explosion hazards in chemical and mechanical pulp bleaching systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Alan W. Rudie

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years, at least three pulp mills in North America have experienced catastrophic events that resulted in the explosion of pumps, mixers, and tanks. All these mills were using 50% concentration hydrogen peroxide at the site of the explosions. In at least two instances, alkali catalyzed decomposition of peroxide is implicated in the explosion....

  8. Explosion containment device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  9. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  10. A comparative study on two explosive acetone peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorshev, V. Yu.; Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru; Smirnov, S.P.

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • The most accurate heats of DADP and TATP sublimation were evaluated from experimental vapor pressures in a widened temperature range. • DADP is more volatile while more thermally stable peroxide than TATP. • DADP reveals lesser sensitivity to drop-weight impact, flame temperature, burning rate, and initiating efficiency as compared with TATP. - Abstract: Two explosive cyclic acetone peroxides, diacetone diperoxide (DADP) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) have been studied in respect of thermal decomposition, burning behavior, impact sensitivity, and initiating efficiency. Using the glass Bourdon gauge technique, the vapor pressures of TATP and DADP were determined over the temperature range 75–144 °C and 67–120 °C, respectively. The kinetic parameters of decomposition of the peroxides in the gas phase have been obtained in the temperature interval of 140–200 °C. The decomposition of both DADP and TATP followed the first-order reaction to high degrees of decay with close activation energies of 159.2 kJ/mol (38.0 kcal/mol) and 165.8 kJ/mol (39.6 kcal/mol), respectively. The decomposition rate constants of DADP were found to be approximately 2 times less than those of TATP. The linear burning rate of DADP measured in a constant-pressure window bomb appeared to be approximately 5 times less than that of TATP. Temperature profiles in the combustion wave were measured at subatmospheric pressures with the help of thin tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. The leading reaction on combustion of both volatile peroxides was assumed to occur in the gas phase. Kinetic parameters of the leading reaction derived from the combustion data showed a good agreement with kinetic parameters of low-temperature thermal decomposition extrapolated to the high-temperature flame zone. In the drop-weight impact test, DADP appeared to be notably less sensitive peroxide than TATP. No deflagration-to-detonation transition was observed when RDX was attempted to explode by

  11. Luminescent metal-organic framework-functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites and the reversible detection of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Ha; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2013-08-01

    Achieving both high specificity and sensitivity are essential for gas phase chemical detection systems. Recent implementation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have shown great success in separation and storage systems for specific gas molecules. By implementing a MOF structure comprised of Zn2+ coordinated trans-stilbene derivatives, a gas responsive material has been created which exhibits a high photoluminescence quantum yield, offering new opportunities for chemical sensors. Here, we reveal a nanocomposite material, assembled from azobenzene functionalized graphene oxide and stilbene-MOF, that is capable of luminescent quenching by explosive gases. This unique system displays selectivity to dinitrotoluene (71% quenching) over trinitrotoluene (20% quenching) with sub ppm sensitivity and response times of less than a minute. We show that this implementation of a graphene-based MOF composite provides a unique strategy in the development of molecularly well-defined materials having rapid, reversible, and gas selective fluorescent quenching capabilities. This opens the way for new advances in the assembly of low density frameworks using isomerization suppressed materials.Achieving both high specificity and sensitivity are essential for gas phase chemical detection systems. Recent implementation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have shown great success in separation and storage systems for specific gas molecules. By implementing a MOF structure comprised of Zn2+ coordinated trans-stilbene derivatives, a gas responsive material has been created which exhibits a high photoluminescence quantum yield, offering new opportunities for chemical sensors. Here, we reveal a nanocomposite material, assembled from azobenzene functionalized graphene oxide and stilbene-MOF, that is capable of luminescent quenching by explosive gases. This unique system displays selectivity to dinitrotoluene (71% quenching) over trinitrotoluene (20% quenching) with sub ppm sensitivity and

  12. High heating rate decomposition dynamics of copper oxide by nanocalorimetry-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; DeLisio, Jeffery B.; Nguyen, Nam; Zachariah, Michael R.; LaVan, David A.

    2017-12-01

    The thermodynamics and evolved gases were measured during the rapid decomposition of copper oxide (CuO) thin film at rates exceeding 100,000 K/s. CuO decomposes to release oxygen when heated and serves as an oxidizer in reactive composites and chemical looping combustion. Other instruments have shown either one or two decomposition steps during heating. We have confirmed that CuO decomposes by two steps at both slower and higher heating rates. The decomposition path influences the reaction course in reactive Al/CuO/Al composites, and full understanding is important in designing reactive mixtures and other new reactive materials.

  13. CFD SIMULATION FOR DEMILITARIZATION OF RDX IN A ROTARY KILN BY THERMAL DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI H. LEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demilitarization requires the recovery and disposal of obsolete ammunition and explosives. Since open burning/detonation of hazardous waste has caused serious environmental and safety problems, thermal decomposition has emerged as one of the most feasible methods. RDX is widely used as a military explosive due to its high melting temperature and detonation power. In this work, the feasible conditions under which explosives can be safely incinerated have been investigated via a rotary kiln simulation. To solve this problem, phase change along with the reactions of RDX has been incisively analyzed. A global reaction mechanism consisting of condensed phase and gas phase reactions are used in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. User Defined Functions in FLUENT is utilized in this study to inculcate the reactions and phase change into the simulation. The results divulge the effect of temperature and the varying amounts of gas produced in the rotary kiln during the thermal decomposition of RDX. The result leads to the prospect of demilitarizing waste explosives to avoid the possibility of detonation.

  14. Numerical Model for Hydrovolcanic Explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Charles; Gittings, Michael

    2007-03-01

    A hydrovolcanic explosion is generated by the interaction of hot magma with ground water. It is called Surtseyan after the 1963 explosive eruption off Iceland. The water flashes to steam and expands explosively. Liquid water becomes water gas at constant volume and generates pressures of about 3GPa. The Krakatoa hydrovolcanic explosion was modeled using the full Navier-Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE [1] which includes the high pressure physics of explosions. The water in the hydrovolcanic explosion was described as liquid water heated by magma to 1100 K. The high temperature water is treated as an explosive with the hot liquid water going to water gas. The BKW [2] steady state detonation state has a peak pressure of 8.9 GPa, a propagation velocity of 5900 meters/sec and the water is compressed to 1.33 g/cc. [1] Numerical Modeling of Water Waves, Second Edition, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 2004. [2] Numerical Modeling of Explosions and Propellants, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 1998.

  15. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDES AND RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Donna Beals, D

    2007-04-13

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

  16. High-Precision Spectral Decomposition Method Based on VMD/CWT/FWEO for Hydrocarbon Detection in Tight Sandstone Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seismic time-frequency analysis methods can be used for hydrocarbon detection because of the phenomena of energy and abnormal attenuation of frequency when the seismic waves travel across reservoirs. A high-resolution method based on variational mode decomposition (VMD, continuous-wavelet transform (CWT and frequency-weighted energy operator (FWEO is proposed for hydrocarbon detection in tight sandstone gas reservoirs. VMD can decompose seismic signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMF in the frequency domain. In order to avoid meaningful frequency loss, the CWT method is used to obtain the time-frequency spectra of the selected IMFs. The energy separation algorithm based on FWEO can improve the resolution of time-frequency spectra and highlight abnormal energy, which is applied to track the instantaneous energy in the time-frequency spectra. The difference between the high-frequency section and low-frequency section acquired by applying the proposed method is utilized to detect hydrocarbons. Applications using the model and field data further demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively detect hydrocarbons in tight sandstone reservoirs, with good anti-noise performance. The newly-proposed method can be used as an analysis tool to detect hydrocarbons.

  17. Photocatalytic decomposition of benzene by porous nanocrystalline ZnGa2O4 with a high surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinnian; Huang, Jianhui; Ding, Kaining; Hou, Yidong; Wang, Xinchen; Fu, Xianzhi

    2009-08-01

    Porous nanocrystalline ZnGa2O4 catalysts were synthesized by a simple soft-chemical method at low temperature. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, SEM, TEM, UV/ vis, and FT-IR spectroscopy. The activity of the photocatalysts was evaluated by decomposition of benzene and its derivatives in the gas phase. It was found that hydrothermal treatment resulted in the formation of spinel ZnGa2O4 with a large surface area of 43-201 m2 x g(-1) depending on the synthetic temperature. The optimum synthetic temperature was found to be 80 degrees C, at which the sample possessed a surface area of 201 m2 x g(-1) and had the highest photocatalytic activity for degrading benzene. A comparison with TiO2 and Pt/TiO2 showed that the ZnGa2O4 (synthesized at 80 degrees C) had improved photocatalytic activity and durability over the TiO2-based catalysts. No remarkable deactivation of the ZnGa2O4 catalyst was observed in 80 h photoreaction, whereas the TiO2 deactivated remarkably in 24 h reaction. The high photocatalytic performance of porous ZnGa2O4 catalysts can be explained by the large specific surface area, the accessible porous framework, and the high redox power.

  18. Study of the Laser-Induced Decomposition of HNO3/2-NITROPROPANE Mixture at Static High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, V.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to study the laser-induced decomposition of a condensed HNO3/2-nitropropane mixture containing 58% nitric acid. On the macroscopic scale, this energetic material detonates. Under static high pressure, the formation of an H-bonded complex with that particular composition was demonstrated in a previous study. The high pressure behavior of the complex showed the presence of a solid-solid phase transition around 18 GPa. The combustion front propagation velocity was recorded between 6 and 31 GPa. The analysis of the optical properties of the reaction products as well as the recording of their Raman spectra showed two different combustion regimes. Below 18 GPa, total combustion takes place in the sample and a black residue only composed of soot remains in the cell. Above 18 GPa, the combustion leads to a clear residue with little carbon present. However, the Raman spectra of the remaining sample show new features indicating the presence of species which are not yet clearly identified. The pressure limit between these two behaviors corresponds to the phase transition pressure measured for the complex.

  19. Thermal decomposition of polystyrene in the high temperature fabrication technology of hollow microspheres. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorogotovtsev, V.M.; Akunets, A.A.; Merkuliev, Y.A.; Turivnoy, A.P. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Fizicheskij Inst.; Reibold, R.; Fearon, E.; Cook, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-26

    The degree and nature of polymer degradation that occurs in the high temperature microshell formation process developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute has been examined experimentally. We find that significant mass degradation occurs during the final stages of shell formation. This manifests itself both in terms of mass loss and molecular weight degradation as measured by gel permeation chromatography. This decrease in the molecular weight may be in part responsible for the relatively fragile nature of the shells produced by this high temperature process. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The risk of hydrogen explosion in a submarine p. IV The implementation of high risk projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłos Ryszard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This series of articles on high risk projects looks at the example of the modernisation of hydrogen incinerators on a submarine. The article describes problems connected with the management of such a project.

  1. Preparation, Structural Investigation and Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Two High-Nitrogen Energetic Materials: ZTO·2H{sub 2}O and ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Cong; Huang, Jie; Zhong, Yi Tang; Xu, Kang Zhen; Zhang, Zhao [Northwest Univ., Xi' an (China); Song, Ji Rong [The Palace Museum, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-15

    Two new high-nitrogen energetic compounds ZTO·2H{sub 2}O and ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O have been synthesized (where ZTO = 4,4-azo-1,2,4-triazol-5-one and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). The crystal structure, elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy are presented. Compound 1 ZTO·2H{sub 2}O crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnna and compound 2 ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O in the triclinic crystal system with space group P-1. In ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O, there is intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the -NH group of ZTO molecule (as donor) and N atom of phen molecule (as acceptor). Thermal decomposition process is studied by applying the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo thermogravimetric differential analysis (TG-DTG). The DSC curve shows that there is one exothermic peak in ZTO·2H{sub 2}O and ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O, respectively. The critical temperature of thermal explosion (T{sub b}) for ZTO·2H{sub 2}O and ZTO(phen)·H{sub 2}O is 282.21 .deg. C and 195.94 .deg. C, respectively.

  2. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep K Sharma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to describe the clinical and computed tomography features of 'explosive pleuritis', an entity first named by Braman and Donat in 1986, and to propose a case definition. A case report of a previously healthy, 45-year-old man admitted to hospital with acute onset pleuritic chest pain is presented. The patient arrived at the emergency room at 15:00 in mild respiratory distress; the initial chest x-ray revealed a small right lower lobe effusion. The subsequent clinical course in hospital was dramatic. Within 18 h of admission, he developed severe respiratory distress with oxygen desaturation to 83% on room air and dullness of the right lung field. A repeat chest x-ray, taken the morning after admission, revealed complete opacification of the right hemithorax. A computed tomography scan of the thorax demonstrated a massive pleural effusion with compression of pulmonary tissue and mediastinal shift. Pleural fluid biochemical analysis revealed the following concentrations: glucose 3.5 mmol/L, lactate dehydrogenase 1550 U/L, protein 56.98 g/L, amylase 68 U/L and white blood cell count 600 cells/mL. The pleural fluid cultures demonstrated light growth of coagulase-negative staphylococcus and viridans streptococcus, and very light growth of Candida albicans. Cytology was negative for malignant cells. Thoracotomy was performed, which demonstrated a loculated parapneumonic effusion that required decortication. The patient responded favourably to the empirical administration of intravenous levofloxacin and ceftriaxone, and conservative surgical methods in the management of the empyema. This report also discusses the patient's rapidly progressing pleural effusion and offers a potential case definition for explosive pleuritis. Explosive pleuritis is a medical emergency defined by the rapid development of a pleural effusion involving more than 90% of the hemithorax over 24 h, which causes compression of pulmonary tissue and

  3. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  4. High aspect ratio micro-explosions in the bulk of sapphire generated by femtosecond Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, L; Meyer, R; Giust, R; Furfaro, L; Jacquot, M; Lacourt, P A; Dudley, J M; Courvoisier, F

    2016-09-27

    Femtosecond pulses provide an extreme degree of confinement of light matter-interactions in high-bandgap materials because of the nonlinear nature of ionization. It was recognized very early on that a highly focused single pulse of only nanojoule energy could generate spherical voids in fused silica and sapphire crystal as the nanometric scale plasma generated has energy sufficient to compress the material around it and to generate new material phases. But the volumes of the nanometric void and of the compressed material are extremely small. Here we use single femtosecond pulses shaped into high-angle Bessel beams at microjoule energy, allowing for the creation of very high 100:1 aspect ratio voids in sapphire crystal, which is one of the hardest materials, twice as dense as glass. The void volume is 2 orders of magnitude higher than those created with Gaussian beams. Femtosecond and picosecond illumination regimes yield qualitatively different damage morphologies. These results open novel perspectives for laser processing and new materials synthesis by laser-induced compression.

  5. High-precision (p,t) reactions to determine reaction rates of explosive stellar processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matić, Andrija

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my study was to investigate the nuclear structure of 22Mg and 26Si. These two nuclei play a significant role in stellar reaction processes at high temperatures. On base of the obtained nuclear structure we calculated the stellar reaction rates for the following reactions: 18Ne(α,p)21Na,

  6. ACUTE EFFECTS OF PRE-EVENT LOWER LIMB MASSAGE ON EXPLOSIVE AND HIGH SPEED MOTOR CAPACITIES AND FLEXIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiz Arabaci

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of pre- performance lower limb massage after warm-up on explosive and high-speed motor capacities and flexibility. Twenty-four physically active healthy Caucasian male subjects volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects were from a Physical Education and Sport Department in a large university in Turkey. The study had a counterbalanced crossover design. Each of the subjects applied the following intervention protocols in a randomised order; (a massage, (b stretching, and (c rest. Before (pre and after (post each of the interventions, the 10 meter acceleration (AS, flying start 20 meter sprint (FS, 30 meter sprint from standing position (TS, leg reaction time (LR, vertical jump (VJ and sit & reach (SR tests were performed. A Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare before and after test values within the three interventions (massage, stretching and rest. The data showed a significant worsening, after massage and stretching interventions, in the VJ, LR (only in stretching intervention, AS and TS tests (p < 0.05, and significant improvement in the SR test (p < 0.05. In contrast, the rest intervention led only to a significant decrement in TS performance (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that performing 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massage has an adverse effect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time, and a positive effect on sit and reach test results

  7. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  8. Ultra-High-Speed Travelling Wave Protection of Transmission Line Using Polarity Comparison Principle Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional polarity comparison based travelling wave protection, using the initial wave information, is affected by initial fault angle, bus structure, and external fault. And the relationship between the magnitude and polarity of travelling wave is ignored. Because of the protection tripping and malfunction, the further application of this protection principle is affected. Therefore, this paper presents an ultra-high-speed travelling wave protection using integral based polarity comparison principle. After empirical mode decomposition of the original travelling wave, the first-order intrinsic mode function is used as protection object. Based on the relationship between the magnitude and polarity of travelling wave, this paper demonstrates the feasibility of using travelling wave magnitude which contains polar information as direction criterion. And the paper integrates the direction criterion in a period after fault to avoid wave head detection failure. Through PSCAD simulation with the typical 500 kV transmission system, the reliability and sensitivity of travelling wave protection were verified under different factors’ affection.

  9. Chemical decomposition of high-level nuclear waste storage/disposal glasses under irradiation. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griscom, D.L.; Merzbacher, C.I.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of this research is to use the sensitive technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) to look for evidence of radiation-induced chemical decomposition of vitreous forms contemplated for immobilization of plutonium and/or high-level nuclear wastes, to interpret this evidence in terms of existing knowledge of glass structure, and to recommend certain materials for further study by other techniques, particularly electron microscopy and measurements of gas evolution by high-vacuum mass spectroscopy. Previous ESR studies had demonstrated that an effect of y rays on a simple binary potassium silicate glass was to induce superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and ozonide (O{sub 3}{sup -}) as relatively stable product of long-term irradiation Accordingly, some of the first experiments performed as a part of the present effort involved repeating this work. A glass of composition 44 K{sub 2}O: 56 SiO{sub 2} was prepared from reagent grade K{sub 2}CO3 and SiO{sub 2} powders melted in a Pt crucible in air at 1,200 C for 1.5 hr. A sample irradiated to a dose of 1 MGy (1 MGy = 10{sup 8} rad) indeed yielded the same ESR results as before. To test the notion that the complex oxygen ions detected may be harbingers of radiation-induced phase separation or bubble formation, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment was performed. SANS is theoretically capable of detecting voids or bubbles as small as 10 \\305 in diameter. A preliminary experiment was carried out with the collaboration of Dr. John Barker (NIST). The SANS spectra for the irradiated and unirradiated samples were indistiguishable. A relatively high incoherent background (probably due to the presence of protons) may obscure scattering from small gas bubbles and therefore decrease the effective resolution of this technique. No further SANS experiments are planned at this time.'

  10. Freeze frame analysis on high speed cinematography of Nd/YAG laser explosions in ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, S A; Cheng, H

    1986-01-01

    High speed colour cinematography at 400 frames per second was used to photograph both single and train burst Nd/YAG laser applications in ox eyes at threshold energy levels. Measurements of the extent and speed of particle scatter and tissue distortion from the acoustic transient were made from a sequential freeze frame analysis of the films. Particles were observed to travel over 8 mm from the site of Nd/YAG application 20 milliseconds after a single pulse at initial speeds in excess of 20 km/h. The use of train bursts of pulses was seen to increase the number of particles scattered and project the wavefront of particles further from the point of laser application. Images PMID:3754458

  11. Hydrated lime for metals immobilization and explosives transformation: Treatability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W Andy; Larson, S L; Nestler, C C; Fabian, G; O'Connor, G; Felt, D R

    2012-05-15

    Fragmentation grenades contain Composition B (RDX and TNT) within a steel shell casing. There is the potential for off-site migration of high explosives and metals from hand grenade training ranges by transport in surface water and subsurface transport in leachate. This treatability study used bench-scale columns and mesocosm-scale laboratory lysimeters to investigate the potential of hydrated lime as a soil amendment for in situ remediation of explosives and metals stabilization in hand grenade range soils. Compared to the unamended soil there was a 26-92% reduction of RDX in the leachate and runoff water from the lime treated soils and a 66-83% reduction of zinc in the leachate and runoff water samples; where the hand grenade range metals of concern were zinc, iron, and manganese. The amended soil was maintained at the target pH of greater than 10.5 for optimum explosives decomposition. The treatability study indicated a high potential of success for scale-up to an in situ field study. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The propagation of detonation waves in non-ideal condensed-phase explosives confined by high sound-speed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos; Lee, Bok Jik

    2013-08-01

    Highly non-ideal condensed-phase explosives used by the mining industry have a strong detonation velocity dependence on the charge dimension. Detonation velocities can be as low as one third of the theoretically calculated ideal detonation velocity in charge radii close to the failure radius. Under these detonation conditions the flow in the confiner can become subsonic, a flow condition under which classical shock-polar analysis is not applicable. This restriction prohibits the use of popular engineering models like detonation shock dynamics and Wood-Kirkwood type models under these confinement conditions. In addition, it has been found in the literature that subsonic flow in the confiner will increase the influence of the confining material on the detonation performance. In this work, we use a multi-phase model coupled to an elastic-plastic model (for the representation of a confiner) to explore the interaction of detonations under these confiner conditions. An ammonium nitrate based mining emulsion is investigated in aluminium and steel confinement of finite and infinite thickness representing the confiner as either a fluid or an elastic-plastic material. It is found that the presence of elastic waves is negligible close to ideal detonation conditions, but is important close to the failure radius and in detonation conditions with subsonic flow in the confiner. High sound-speed confiners support the detonation through energy transport ahead of the detonation front if desensitisation effects are negligible. The detonation front profiles are found to remain convex even in the most non-ideal detonation conditions, and the detonation front curvature only becomes concave in a localised region close to the confiner edge.

  13. Plasma-Induced Decomposition of Copper Complex Ink for the Formation of Highly Conductive Copper Tracks on Heat-Sensitive Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farraj, Yousef; Smooha, Ariel; Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2017-03-15

    The use of Cu-formate-2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol ink and low-pressure plasma for the formation of highly conductive patterns on heat sensitive plastic substrates was studied. It was found that plasma results in decomposition of copper complex to form metallic copper without heating at high temperatures. Ink composition and plasma parameters (predrying conditions, plasma treatment duration, gas type, and flow rate) were optimized to obtain uniform conductive metallic films. The morphology and electrical characteristics of these films were evaluated. Exposing the printed copper metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) ink to 160 W plasma for 8 min yielded resistivity as low as 7.3 ± 0.2 μΩ cm, which corresponds to 23% bulk copper conductivity. These results demonstrate the applicability of MOD inks and plasma treatment to obtain highly conductive printed patterns on low-cost plastic substrates and 3D printed polymers.

  14. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  15. Underground Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    is viewed as a result of the propulsion of broken rock mass by explosion gas by-products. The physical model used to recreate the second and the third...period seismographs. Seismologists of the                                                              5  Edinaya  Sistema   Seismicheskih  Nablyudenii...d’explosifs chiniques dans le sable: Programme Dynasol, Centre d’etudes Nucl. De Grenoble Lab. D’applications Speciales de la Physique, Grenoble. 9

  16. Energetic Residues and Crater Geometries from the Firing of 120-mm High-Explosive Mortar Projectiles into Eagle River Flats, June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    method, but with three new randomly chosen starting points. Figure 5. Sampling of 200 m × 200 m cell. Each point was cleared with a metal detector for...propellant burn was visible (despite the blackened surface produced by the June burn (Fig. 3e). Because of the uncertainty of the exact location of the...detect a metallic signal, indicating that the projectile penetrated several meters. Analysis for Comp B Residue No high-explosives residues were

  17. A fluorescent sensor for highly selective detection of nitroaromatic explosives based on a 2D, extremely stable, metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Bao, Shao-Juan; Li, Shun-Li; He, Wen-Wen; Lan, Ya-Qian; Shen, Ping; Su, Zhong-Min

    2014-03-24

    A 2D, extremely stable, metal-organic framework (MOF), NENU-503, was successfully constructed. It displays highly selective and recyclable properties in detection of nitroaromatic explosives as a fluorescent sensor. This is the first MOF that can distinguish between nitroaromatic molecules with different numbers of NO2 groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Acute effects of pre-event lower limb massage on explosive and high speed motor capacities and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabaci, Ramiz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of pre- performance lower limb massage after warm-up on explosive and high-speed motor capacities and flexibility. Twenty-four physically active healthy Caucasian male subjects volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects were from a Physical Education and Sport Department in a large university in Turkey. The study had a counterbalanced crossover design. Each of the subjects applied the following intervention protocols in a randomised order; (a) massage, (b) stretching, and (c) rest. Before (pre) and after (post) each of the interventions, the 10 meter acceleration (AS), flying start 20 meter sprint (FS), 30 meter sprint from standing position (TS), leg reaction time (LR), vertical jump (VJ) and sit & reach (SR) tests were performed. A Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare before and after test values within the three interventions (massage, stretching and rest). The data showed a significant worsening, after massage and stretching interventions, in the VJ, LR (only in stretching intervention), AS and TS tests (p performance (p performing 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massage has an adverse effect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time, and a positive effect on sit and reach test results. Key pointsPerforming 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massages has an adverse affect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time and a positive effect on sit and reach test results.According to the present results, long duration massage should not be recommended for warm-ups.Larger subject pools are needed to verify these events.

  19. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Variational Mode Decomposition and Multi-Layer Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nantian; Chen, Huaijin; Cai, Guowei; Fang, Lihua; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-11-10

    Mechanical fault diagnosis of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs) based on vibration signal analysis is one of the most significant issues in improving the reliability and reducing the outage cost for power systems. The limitation of training samples and types of machine faults in HVCBs causes the existing mechanical fault diagnostic methods to recognize new types of machine faults easily without training samples as either a normal condition or a wrong fault type. A new mechanical fault diagnosis method for HVCBs based on variational mode decomposition (VMD) and multi-layer classifier (MLC) is proposed to improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis. First, HVCB vibration signals during operation are measured using an acceleration sensor. Second, a VMD algorithm is used to decompose the vibration signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The IMF matrix is divided into submatrices to compute the local singular values (LSV). The maximum singular values of each submatrix are selected as the feature vectors for fault diagnosis. Finally, a MLC composed of two one-class support vector machines (OCSVMs) and a support vector machine (SVM) is constructed to identify the fault type. Two layers of independent OCSVM are adopted to distinguish normal or fault conditions with known or unknown fault types, respectively. On this basis, SVM recognizes the specific fault type. Real diagnostic experiments are conducted with a real SF₆ HVCB with normal and fault states. Three different faults (i.e., jam fault of the iron core, looseness of the base screw, and poor lubrication of the connecting lever) are simulated in a field experiment on a real HVCB to test the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the classification accuracy of the new method is superior to other traditional methods.

  20. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Variational Mode Decomposition and Multi-Layer Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical fault diagnosis of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs based on vibration signal analysis is one of the most significant issues in improving the reliability and reducing the outage cost for power systems. The limitation of training samples and types of machine faults in HVCBs causes the existing mechanical fault diagnostic methods to recognize new types of machine faults easily without training samples as either a normal condition or a wrong fault type. A new mechanical fault diagnosis method for HVCBs based on variational mode decomposition (VMD and multi-layer classifier (MLC is proposed to improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis. First, HVCB vibration signals during operation are measured using an acceleration sensor. Second, a VMD algorithm is used to decompose the vibration signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The IMF matrix is divided into submatrices to compute the local singular values (LSV. The maximum singular values of each submatrix are selected as the feature vectors for fault diagnosis. Finally, a MLC composed of two one-class support vector machines (OCSVMs and a support vector machine (SVM is constructed to identify the fault type. Two layers of independent OCSVM are adopted to distinguish normal or fault conditions with known or unknown fault types, respectively. On this basis, SVM recognizes the specific fault type. Real diagnostic experiments are conducted with a real SF6 HVCB with normal and fault states. Three different faults (i.e., jam fault of the iron core, looseness of the base screw, and poor lubrication of the connecting lever are simulated in a field experiment on a real HVCB to test the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the classification accuracy of the new method is superior to other traditional methods.

  1. Full wavefield decomposition of high-frequency secondary microseisms reveals distinct arrival azimuths for Rayleigh and Love waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.

    2017-06-01

    In the secondary microseism band (0.1-1.0 Hz) the theoretical excitation of Rayleigh waves (Rg/LR), through oceanic wave-wave interaction, is well understood. For Love waves (LQ), the excitation mechanism in the secondary microseism band is less clear. We explore high-frequency secondary microseism excitation between 0.35 and 1 Hz by analyzing a full year (2013) of records from a three-component seismic array in Pilbara (PSAR), Australia. Our recently developed three-component waveform decomposition algorithm (CLEAN-3C) fully decomposes the beam power in slowness space into multiple point sources. This method allows for a directionally dependent power estimation for all separable wave phases. In this contribution, we compare quantitatively microseismic energy recorded on vertical and transverse components. We find the mean power representation of Rayleigh and Love waves to have differing azimuthal distributions, which are likely a result of their respective generation mechanisms. Rayleigh waves show correlation with convex coastlines, while Love waves correlate with seafloor sedimentary basins. The observations are compared to the WAVEWATCH III ocean model, implemented at the Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), which describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of microseismic source excitation. We find Love wave energy to originate from raypaths coinciding with seafloor sedimentary basins where strong Rayleigh wave excitation is predicted by the ocean model. The total power of Rg waves is found to dominate at 0.35-0.6 Hz, and the Rayleigh/Love wave power ratio strongly varies with direction and frequency.

  2. Contrasting above- and belowground organic matter decomposition and carbon and nitrogen dynamics in response to warming in High Arctic tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Daan; Faucherre, Samuel; Banyasz, Imre; Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Elberling, Bo

    2017-12-13

    Tundra regions are projected to warm rapidly during the coming decades. The tundra biome holds the largest terrestrial carbon pool, largely contained in frozen permafrost soils. With warming, these permafrost soils may thaw and become available for microbial decomposition, potentially providing a positive feedback to global warming. Warming may directly stimulate microbial metabolism but may also indirectly stimulate organic matter turnover through increased plant productivity by soil priming from root exudates and accelerated litter turnover rates. Here, we assess the impacts of experimental warming on turnover rates of leaf litter, active layer soil and thawed permafrost sediment in two high-arctic tundra heath sites in NE-Greenland, either dominated by evergreen or deciduous shrubs. We incubated shrub leaf litter on the surface of control and warmed plots for 1 and 2 years. Active layer soil was collected from the plots to assess the effects of 8 years of field warming on soil carbon stocks. Finally, we incubated open cores filled with newly thawed permafrost soil for 2 years in the active layer of the same plots. After field incubation, we measured basal respiration rates of recovered thawed permafrost cores in the lab. Warming significantly reduced litter mass loss by 26% after 1 year incubation, but differences in litter mass loss among treatments disappeared after 2 years incubation. Warming also reduced litter nitrogen mineralization and decreased the litter carbon to nitrogen ratio. Active layer soil carbon stocks were reduced 15% by warming, while soil dissolved nitrogen was reduced by half in warmed plots. Warming had a positive legacy effect on carbon turnover rates in thawed permafrost cores, with 10% higher respiration rates measured in cores from warmed plots. These results demonstrate that warming may have contrasting effects on above- and belowground tundra carbon turnover, possibly governed by microbial resource availability. © 2017 John

  3. Analysis of Explosives by GC-UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasko, Jan; Lagesson-Andrasko, Ludmila; Dahlén, Johan; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald

    2017-07-01

    A mixture of explosives was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) linked to ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry that enabled detection in the range of 178-330 nm. The gas-phase UV spectra of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), glycerine trinitrate (NG, nitroglycerine), triacetone triperoxide (TATP), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were successfully recorded. The most interesting aspect of the current application is that it enabled simultaneous detection of both the target analyte and its decomposition products. At suitable elevated temperatures of the transfer line between the GC instrument and the UV detector, a partial decomposition was accomplished. Detection was made in real time and resulted in overlaid spectra of the mother compound and its decomposition product. Hence, the presented approach added another level to the qualitative identification of the explosives in comparison with traditional methods that relies only on the detection of the target analyte. As expected, the decomposition product of EGDN, NG, and PETN was NO, while TATP degraded to acetone. DNT and TNT did not exhibit any decomposition at the temperatures used. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Large scale production of highly-qualified graphene by ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunwei; Tong, Xili; Guo, Xiaoning; Wang, Yingyong; Jin, Guoqiang; Guo, Xiangyun

    2013-11-29

    Highly-qualified graphene was prepared by the ultrasonic exfoliation of commercial expanded graphite (EG) under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition. The yield of graphene from the first exfoliation is 7 wt%, and it can be increased to more than 65 wt% by repeated exfoliations. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analysis show that the as-prepared graphene only has a few defects or oxides, and more than 95% of the graphene flakes have a thickness of ~1 nm. The electrochemical performance of the as-prepared graphene is comparable to reduced graphene oxide in the determination of dopamine (DA) from the mixed solution of ascorbic acid, uric acid and DA. These results show that the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3 molecules in the EG layers under ultrasonication promotes the exfoliation of graphite and provides a low-priced route for large scale production of highly-quality graphene.

  5. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D [Laboratoire ISL/CNRS ' Nanomateriaux pour les Systemes Sous Sollicitations Extremes' (NS3E), FRE 3026, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL), 5 rue du General Cassagnou, 68301 Saint-Louis (France)], E-mail: comet@isl.tm.fr

    2008-07-16

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation.

  6. Facile, mild and fast thermal-decomposition reduction of graphene oxide in air and its application in high-performance lithium batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-li; Xu, Dan; Huang, Yun; Wu, Zhong; Wang, Li-min; Zhang, Xin-bo

    2012-01-25

    We firstly propose a facile, mild and effective thermal-decomposition strategy to prepare high-quality graphene at a low temperature of 300 °C in only 5 min under an ambient atmosphere. Applying the advantage of this strategy that provides an oxidizing atmosphere, pure V(2)O(5)/graphene composite is successfully synthesized and exerts excellent lithium storage properties. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Explosive signatures: Pre & post blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Evan Thomas

    Manuscripts 1 and 2 of this dissertation both involve the pre-blast detection of trace explosive material. The first manuscript explores the analysis of human hair as an indicator of exposure to explosives. Field analysis of hair for trace explosives is quick and non-invasive, and could prove to be a powerful linkage to physical evidence in the form of bulk explosive material. Individuals tested were involved in studies which required handling or close proximity to bulk high explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX. The second manuscript reports the results of research in the design and application of canine training aids for non-traditional, peroxide-based explosives. Organic peroxides such as triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine (HMTD) can be synthesized relatively easily with store-bought ingredients and have become popular improvised explosives with many terrorist groups. Due to the hazards of handling such sensitive compounds, this research established methods for preparing training aids which contained safe quantities of TATP and HMTD for use in imprinting canines with their characteristic odor. Manuscripts 3 and 4 of this dissertation focus on research conducted to characterize pipe bombs during and after an explosion (post-blast). Pipe bombs represent a large percentage of domestic devices encountered by law enforcement. The current project has involved the preparation and controlled explosion of over 90 pipe bombs of different configurations in order to obtain data on fragmentation patterns, fragment velocity, blast overpressure, and fragmentation distance. Physical data recorded from the collected fragments, such as mass, size, and thickness, was correlated with the relative power of the initial device. Manuscript 4 explores the microstructural analysis of select pipe bomb fragments. Shock-loading of the pipe steel led to plastic deformation and work hardening in the steel grain structure as evidenced by optical microscopy and

  8. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    .e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...

  9. Degassing vs. eruptive styles at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): Volatile stocking, gas fluxing, and the shift from low-energy to highly-explosive basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Roberto; Métrich, Nicole; Di Renzo, Valeria; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Allard, Patrick; Arienzo, Ilenia

    2017-04-01

    Basaltic magmas can transport and release large amounts of volatiles into the atmosphere, especially in subduction zones, where slab-derived fluids enrich the mantle wedge. Depending on magma volatile content, basaltic volcanoes thus display a wide spectrum of eruptive styles, from common Strombolian-type activity to Plinian events. Mt. Etna in Sicily, is a typical basaltic volcano where the volatile control on such a variable activity can be investigated. Based on a melt inclusion study in products from Strombolian or lava-fountain activity to Plinian eruptions, here we show that for the same initial volatile content, different eruptive styles reflect variable degassing paths throughout the composite Etnean plumbing system. The combined influence of i) crystallization, ii) deep degassing and iii) CO2 gas fluxing can explain the evolution of H2O, CO2, S and Cl in products from such a spectrum of activity. Deep crystallization produces the CO2-rich gas fluxing the upward magma portions, which will become buoyant and easily mobilized in small gas-rich batches stored within the plumbing system. When reaching gas dominated conditions (i.e., a gas/melt mass ratio of 0.3 and CO2,gas/H2Ogas molar ratio 5 ), these will erupt effusively or mildly explosively, whilst in case of the 122 BC Plinian eruption, open-system degassing conditions took place within the plumbing system, such that continuous CO2-fluxing determined gas accumulation on top of the magmatic system. The emission of such a cap in the early eruptive phase triggered the arrival of deep H2O-rich whose fast decompression and bubble nucleation lead to the highly explosive character, enhanced by abundant microlite crystallization and consequent increase of magma effective viscosity. This could explain why open system basaltic systems like Etna may experience highly explosive or even Plinian episodes during eruptions that start with effusive to mildly explosive phases. The proposed mechanism also determines a

  10. Chemical profiling of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, G.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop analytical methods for the chemical profiling of explosives. Current methodologies for the forensic analysis of explosives focus on identification of the explosive material. However, chemical profiling of explosives becomes increasingly important, as

  11. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  12. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  13. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  14. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of a HMX-based pressed explosive: Effects of combined high pressure and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumel, H.; Lambert, P.; Biessy, M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents a study of the combined effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the behaviour and microstructure evolutions of a HMX-based explosive. Hopkinson bar compression experiments are carried-out on samples confined with a brass sleeve. The latter is instrumented in order to determine the confining pressure on the explosive sample, directly function of the sleeve thickness and yield strength. A sample confined at 75 MPa and deformed at 250s-1 is recovered, cross-sectioned and studied using optical microscopy. Distributed microplasticity and microcracking appear similar to those induced by confined quasi-static experiments, indicating that stress triaxiality is the most important loading parameter. The sample also displays a large shear macrocrack, resulting from the formation of an adiabatic shear band. Shear banding seems to proceed by strong plastic strain gradients, followed by dynamic re-crystallization. Further strong thermal effects are observed, resulting in local reactive melting.

  15. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of a HMX-based pressed explosive: Effects of combined high pressure and strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biessy M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study of the combined effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the behaviour and microstructure evolutions of a HMX-based explosive. Hopkinson bar compression experiments are carried-out on samples confined with a brass sleeve. The latter is instrumented in order to determine the confining pressure on the explosive sample, directly function of the sleeve thickness and yield strength. A sample confined at 75 MPa and deformed at 250s−1 is recovered, cross-sectioned and studied using optical microscopy. Distributed microplasticity and microcracking appear similar to those induced by confined quasi-static experiments, indicating that stress triaxiality is the most important loading parameter. The sample also displays a large shear macrocrack, resulting from the formation of an adiabatic shear band. Shear banding seems to proceed by strong plastic strain gradients, followed by dynamic re-crystallization. Further strong thermal effects are observed, resulting in local reactive melting.

  16. Highly sensitive detection of nitroaromatic explosives using an electrospun nanofibrous sensor based on a novel fluorescent conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haibo; Wang, Huaming; Peng, Zhou; Yang, Yufei; Zhang, Guoqing; Li, Na; Liu, Feng; Pei, Jian

    2012-09-26

    An electrospun nanofibrous explosive sensor was first constructed based on a newly developed fluorescent conjugated polymer P containing heteroatom polycyclic units. Electrospinning by doping polymer P as a fluorescent probe in a polystyrene supporting matrix afforded a fluorescence nanofibrous film with unique porous structures, and effectively avoided the aggregation of polymer P. The novel explosive sensor exhibited stable fluorescence property, satisfactory reversibility with less than 5% loss of signal intensity after four quenching-regeneration cycles, and good reproducibility among three batches with a relative standard deviation of 2.8%. Such fabricated sensor also showed remarkable sensitivity toward a series of trace nitroaromatic explosive vapors, including picric acid (parts-per-trillion level) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene vapor (parts-per-billion level), as well as good selectivity with less than 10% response to typical interferents. Therefore, the present strategy extends the application of different kinds of conjugated polymers for the construction of optical chemosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis of the Thermal Stabilities of Nitroaromatic Compounds Following Different Decomposition Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Huo, Xing; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition behavior of energetic materials is very important for the safety problems concerning their production, transportation, use and storage, because molecular decomposition is intimately connected to their explosive properties. Nitroaromatic compounds, particularly nitrobenzene derivatives, are often considered as prototypical energetic molecules, and some of them are commonly used as high explosives. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) represents a potential tool for predicting the thermal stability properties of energetic materials. But it is reported that constructing general reliable models to predict their stability and their potential explosive properties is a very difficult task. In this work, we make our efforts to investigate the relationship between the molecular structures and corresponding thermal stabilities of 77 nitrobenzene derivatives with various substituent functional groups (in ortho, meta and/or para positions). The proposed best MLR model, developed by the new software QSARINS, based on Genetic Algorithm for variable selection and with various validation tools, is robust, stable and predictive with R(2) of 0.86, QLOO (2) of 0.79 and CCC of 0.90. The results indicated that, though difficult, it is possible to build predictive, externally validated QSAR models to estimate the thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Phase unwrapping with graph cuts optimization and dual decomposition acceleration for 3D high-resolution MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianwu; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Tian; Yu, Zhaofei; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Existence of low SNR regions and rapid-phase variations pose challenges to spatial phase unwrapping algorithms. Global optimization-based phase unwrapping methods are widely used, but are significantly slower than greedy methods. In this paper, dual decomposition acceleration is introduced to speed up a three-dimensional graph cut-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The phase unwrapping problem is formulated as a global discrete energy minimization problem, whereas the technique of dual decomposition is used to increase the computational efficiency by splitting the full problem into overlapping subproblems and enforcing the congruence of overlapping variables. Using three dimensional (3D) multiecho gradient echo images from an agarose phantom and five brain hemorrhage patients, we compared this proposed method with an unaccelerated graph cut-based method. Experimental results show up to 18-fold acceleration in computation time. Dual decomposition significantly improves the computational efficiency of 3D graph cut-based phase unwrapping algorithms. Magn Reson Med 77:1353-1358, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Shock-tube study of the decomposition of tetramethylsilane using gas chromatography and high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, P; Peukert, S; Herzler, J; Fikri, M; Schulz, C

    2018-01-05

    The decomposition of tetramethylsilane was studied in shock-tube experiments in a temperature range of 1270-1580 K and pressures ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 bar behind reflected shock waves combining gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HRR-TOF-MS). The main observed products were methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6), and acetylene (C2H2). In addition, the formation of a solid deposit was observed, which was identified to consist of silicon- and carbon-containing nanoparticles. A kinetics sub-mechanism with 13 silicon species and 20 silicon-containing reactions was developed. It was combined with the USC_MechII mechanism for hydrocarbons, which was able to simulate the experimental observations. The main decomposition channel of TMS is the Si-C bond scission forming methyl (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals (Si(CH3)3). The rate constant for TMS decomposition is represented by the Arrhenius expression ktotal[TMS → products] = 5.9 × 1012 exp(-267 kJ mol-1/RT) s-1.

  20. X-Ray Visualisation Of High Speed Phenomena: Application To The Behavior Of Materials Under High Explosives Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauducoeur, A.; Fischer, D.; Guix, R.

    1983-08-01

    Flash Radiography and Cineradiography allow the visualisation of high speed phenomena and the stop motion effect with recording on film of qualitative and quantitative data on the dynamic state of the matter under very intense shock waves. In this paper, we present a set of experimental devices and results obtained with a large range of flash X-ray generators : - small generators made with Marx discharge circuits coupled to void X-ray tubes, working up to 2.5 MV, - a big flash machine, GREC (presented at this conference (ref.1))used with very absor-bing materials. The presented applications illustrate a large field of experiments in the field of shock waves, interaction of 2 shock or detonation waves, flow visualisation of detonation, Taylor instabilities/metal jetting, spalling in iron...

  1. Explosives signatures and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Augustus Way, III; Oyler, Jonathan M.; Ostazeski, Stanley A.

    2008-04-01

    The challenge of sampling explosive materials for various high threat military and civilian operational scenarios requires the community to identify and exploit other chemical compounds within the mixtures that may be available to support stand-off detection techniques. While limited surface and vapor phase characterization of IEDs exist, they are insufficient to guide the future development and evaluation of field deployable explosives detection (proximity and standoff) capabilities. ECBC has conducted a limited investigation of three artillery ammunition types to determine what chemical vapors, if any, are available for sensing; the relative composition of the vapors which includes the more volatile compounds in munitions, i.e., plastersizers and binders; and the sensitivity needed detect these vapors at stand-off. Also in partnership with MIT-Lincoln Laboratory, we performed a background measurement campaign at the National Training Center to determine the baseline ambient amounts and variability of nitrates and nitro-ester compounds as vapors, particulates, and on surfaces; as well as other chemical compounds related to non-energetic explosive additives. Environmental persistence studies in contexts relevant to counter-IED sensing operations, such as surface residues, are still necessary.

  2. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  3. Oxygen vacancies enabled enhancement of catalytic property of Al reduced anatase TiO{sub 2} in the decomposition of high concentration ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yanhua; Zhang, Xiaolei [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Chen, Li [East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Wang, Xiaorui [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhang, Na, E-mail: nzhang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Liu, Yufeng [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Fang, Yongzheng, E-mail: fyz1003@sina.com [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The catalytic decomposition of gaseous ozone (O{sub 3}) is investigated using anatase TiO{sub 2} (A-TiO{sub 2}) and Aluminum-reduced A-TiO{sub 2} (ARA-TiO{sub 2}) at high concentration and high relative humidity (RH) without light illumination. Compared with the pristine A-TiO{sub 2}, the ARA-TiO{sub 2} sample possesses a unique crystalline core-amorphous shell structure. It is proved to be an excellent solar energy “capture” for solar thermal collectors due to lots of oxygen vacancies. The results indicate that the overall decomposition efficiency of O{sub 3} without any light irradiation has been greatly improved from 4.8% on A-TiO{sub 2} to 100% on ARA-TiO{sub 2} under the RH=100% condition. The ozone conversion over T500/ARA-TiO{sub 2} catalyst is still maintained at 95% after a 72 h test under the reaction condition of 18.5 g/m{sup 3} ozone initial concentration, and RH=90%. The results can be explained that T500/ARA-TiO{sub 2} possesses the largest amorphous contour, the lowest crystallinity, the most surface-active Ti{sup 3+}/T{sup i4+}couples, and the most oxygen vacancies. This result opens a new door to widen the application of TiO{sub 2} in the thermal-catalytic field. - Graphical abstract: The anatase-TiO{sub 2} with various oxidation states and oxygen vacancies have been obtained by aluminum-reduction, and the decomposition efficiency of O{sub 3} has been greatly improved from 4.8% to 100% without irradiation under the RH=100% condition. - Highlights: • The decomposition of gaseous ozone over Al reduced TiO2 (ARA-TiO{sub 2}) is firstly reported. • The decomposition efficiency is up to 100% without any light irradiation on ARA-TiO{sub 2} under RH=100% condition. • The ozone conversion is maintained at 95% after a 72 h test, when C{sub inlet}=18.5 g/m{sup 3} and RH=90%.

  4. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  5. Explosives detection technology for commercial aviation security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafrik, Robert E.

    1994-03-01

    The threat posed to commercial aviation by small, concealed plastic explosives is particularly onerous. Small amounts of these highly energetic explosives are difficult to reliably detect using current technologies. But they can cause significant damage to an aircraft that can result in the destruction of the aircraft, resulting in loss of life. The key issues regarding explosive detection technologies include: What methods can detect plastic explosives? How do these methods perform in practice? How can the different methods be best employed to counter the terrorist threat?

  6. Inspection tester for explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2007-11-13

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  7. Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    weight (6 kg), and its power require- ments (24 W) allow for the high portability of the system. Laser vibrometer measurement, 2 meters from target...2515 P ar tic le v el oc ity (× 1 0 μ m /s ) −1 −2 2 0 1 −1 −2 2 0 1 −1 −2 2 0 1 The laser vibrometer and processing algorithms clearly...technique is depicted for a moving system. Note that the laser vibrometer measures the vibrations caused by the explosive vaporization process. At the same

  8. 75 FR 5545 - Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... for classifying, labeling, and providing safety data sheets for explosives. By withdrawing this.... OSHA-S031-2006-0665 and OSHA-S-031)] RIN 1218-AC09 Explosives AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health... the rulemaking to amend its Explosives and Blasting Agents Standard at 29 CFR 1910.109. OSHA is taking...

  9. The Preparation and Analysis of Soil Compost Material for Inorganic and Explosive Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    in the composting process and their effects on the decomposition of soil explosives. Inorganic Analysis In these studies a sample of uncontaminated... composting to decompose explosives such as TNT, HMX, and RDX in contaminated soils and sediments is an effective remediation procedure. In previous studies... COMPOST MATERIAL FOR INORGANIC AND EXPLOSIVE CONSTITUENTS Prepared For: U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010

  10. Waring decompositions of monomials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buczyńska, Weronika; Buczyński, Jarosław; Teitler, Zach

    2013-01-01

    .... We prove that any Waring decomposition of a monomial is obtained from a complete intersection ideal, determine the dimension of the set of Waring decompositions, and give the conditions under which...

  11. Sunset Crater, AZ: Evolution of a highly explosive basaltic eruption as indicated by granulometry and clast componentry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, C. M.; Clarke, A. B.; Pioli, L.; Alfano, F.

    2011-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic edifice on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability in eruptive style, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes, mostly alkali basalt scoria cones, and five silicic centers [Wood and Kienle (1990), Cambridge University Press]. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of eight tephra-bearing phases and three lava flows [Amos (1986), MS thesis, ASU]. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions have volumes gold glassy and iridescent surfaces. The glassy and iridescent clasts likely represent fresh, juvenile ejecta, which were quenched rapidly, whereas the red and grey rounded clasts may be the result of recycling of the cone or vent-fill material. Alternatively, the differences among the populations may represent lateral variations in conduit flow conditions. In general, phases associated with large volumes and large dispersal areas tend to contain larger proportions of the glassy/iridescent clasts. Phase 1 has a large proportion of glassy clasts. Phase 2 has approximately half red and half grey clasts, as well as a small fraction of glassy material. Phase 3, which is the phase with the largest dispersal area, has a similar proportion of glassy clasts as phase 1. Phase 4, the largest by volume at ~0.11km3 DRE [Amos (1986)], has the highest proportion of glassy clasts. Phase 5 is comparable to phase 4 (similar fractions of each clast type), although the glassy surface changes from gold to black as clast size decreases. Each phase is well- to very well

  12. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

  13. High thermoelectric performance of n-type PbTe1-ySy due to deep lying states induced by indium doping and spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian; Chere, Eyob; Wang, Yumei; Kim, Hee; He, Ran; Cao, Feng; Dahal, Keshab; Broido, David; Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Good thermoelectric materials should have high engineering figure-of-merit (ZT)eng, not peak ZT, to achieve high conversion efficiency. In this work, we achieved a good (ZT)eng by optimizing the carrier concentration to improve the room temperature ZT using deep lying dopant, indium, in PbTe1-ySy. It was found that a room temperature ZT as high as ~0.5 and a peak ZT ~1.1 at about 673 K were obtained in Pb0.98In0.02Te0.8S0.2 due to a lower thermal conductivity by alloy scattering and Spinodal decomposition. The calculated efficiency could be as high as ~12% at cold side 323 K and hot side 773 K. The approach is expected to work in other materials systems too.

  14. Highly efficient decomposition of Remazol Brilliant Blue R using tubular reactor coated with thin layer of PdO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Rahat; Qazi, Umair Yaqub; Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-09-15

    In this work, we propose a novel approach to dye decomposition under subcritical water conditions using a continuous-flow tubular reactor coated with thin layer of PdO as a catalyst. Remazole Brilliant Blue R was used as an example of synthetic dyes. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an environmental-friendly oxidant as it leaves no residues after treatment. The effect of temperature, pressure and dye concentration on total organic carbon (TOC) removal were studied. 99.9% of TOC removal was achieved at 300 °C and 10 MPa pressure within a short residence time of 3.2 s. This method provided an efficient and rapid process that has a potential for treating a wide range of textile wastewaters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing oxidative and dilute acid wet explosion pretreatment of Cocksfoot grass at high dry matter concentration for cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2013-01-01

    was investigated for cellulosic ethanol production. The biomass raw materials were pretreated using wet explosion (WEx) at 25% dry matter concentration with addition of oxygen or dilute sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was significantly improved after pretreatment. The highest conversion......The choice of a suitable pretreatment method and the adjustment of the pretreatment parameters for efficient conversion of biomass are crucial for a successful biorefinery concept. In this study, cocksfoot grass, a suitable lignocellulosic biomass with a potential for large-scale production...... into cellulose monomeric C6 sugars was achieved for WEx condition AC-E (180°C, 15 min, and 0.2% sulfuric acid). For that condition, the highest ethanol yield of 197 g/kg DM (97% of theoretical maximum value) was achieved for SSF process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the highest concentration...

  16. Single-charge craters excavated during subsurface high-explosive experiments at Big Black Test Site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.; Bryan, J.B.

    1978-10-19

    Single-charge and row-charge subsurface cratering experiments were performed to learn how close-spacing enhances single-crater dimensions. Our first experimental phase established cratering curves for 60-lb charges of the chemical explosive. For the second phase, to be described in a subsequent report, the Row-cratering experiments were designed and executed. This data report contains excavated dimensions and auxiliary data for the single-charge cratering experiments. The dimensions for the row-charge experiments will be in the other report. Significant changes in the soil's water content appeared to cause a variability in the excavated dimensions. This variability clouded the interpretation and application of the cratering curves obtained.

  17. Fast, highly selective and sensitive anionic metal-organic framework with nitrogen-rich sites fluorescent chemosensor for nitro explosives detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Lan; Yuan, Da-Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Biao; Cao, Rong

    2018-02-15

    Developing a highly efficient fluorescent sensor for detection of trace amounts of nitro explosives remains a great challenge. Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are one class of promising fluorescent sensors towards small molecules. Herein, we constructed an anionic Zn-based MOF FJI-C8 based on π-conjugated aromatic ligand H6TDPAT (2,4,6-tris(3,5-dicarboxylphenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine) containing nitrogen-rich sites. On account of the high density of uncoordinated N atoms, the high overlap between the emission spectrum of the anionic MOF FJI-C8 and the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the representative nitro explosive 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), and the porosity of the MOF, FJI-C8 is demonstrated to be an excellent chemosensor for 2,4-DNP with fast response time (less than 30s), high selectivity (Ksv=5.11×104M-1 for 2,4-DNP), extra sensitivity (LOD=0.002866mM for 2,4-DNP), low usage amount (0.04mg/mL), good stability and quantitative detection features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example for highly selective detection of 2,4-DNP. More importantly, theoretical calculation and control experiments unveiled that the energy transfer is the main mechanism for highly detection of 2,4-DNP. This work will pave the way for designing highly efficient luminescent chemosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectroscopic measurement of high-frequency electric fields in the interaction of explosive debris plasma with magnetized background plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, A. S., E-mail: AntonBondarenko@ymail.com; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The collision-less transfer of momentum and energy from explosive debris plasma to magnetized background plasma is a salient feature of various astrophysical and space environments. While much theoretical and computational work has investigated collision-less coupling mechanisms and relevant parameters, an experimental validation of the results demands the measurement of the complex, collective electric fields associated with debris-background plasma interaction. Emission spectroscopy offers a non-interfering diagnostic of electric fields via the Stark effect. A unique experiment at the University of California, Los Angeles, that combines the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix laser facility has investigated the marginally super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of a laser-produced carbon (C) debris plasma through a preformed, magnetized helium (He) background plasma via emission spectroscopy. Spectral profiles of the He II 468.6 nm line measured at the maximum extent of the diamagnetic cavity are observed to intensify, broaden, and develop equally spaced modulations in response to the explosive C debris, indicative of an energetic electron population and strong oscillatory electric fields. The profiles are analyzed via time-dependent Stark effect models corresponding to single-mode and multi-mode monochromatic (single frequency) electric fields, yielding temporally resolved magnitudes and frequencies. The proximity of the measured frequencies to the expected electron plasma frequency suggests the development of the electron beam-plasma instability, and a simple saturation model demonstrates that the measured magnitudes are feasible provided that a sufficiently fast electron population is generated during C debris–He background interaction. Potential sources of the fast electrons, which likely correspond to collision-less coupling mechanisms, are briefly considered.

  19. High Aspect Ratio Carbon Nanotube Membranes Decorated with Pt Nanoparticle Urchins for Micro Underwater Vehicle Propulsion via H2O2 Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Kevin M; Chen, Bolin; Mootz, Eric J; Geder, Jason; Pruessner, Marius; Melde, Brian J; Vanfleet, Richard R; Medintz, Igor L; Iverson, Brian D; Claussen, Jonathan C

    2015-08-25

    The utility of unmanned micro underwater vehicles (MUVs) is paramount for exploring confined spaces, but their spatial agility is often impaired when maneuvers require burst-propulsion. Herein we develop high-aspect ratio (150:1), multiwalled carbon nanotube microarray membranes (CNT-MMs) for propulsive, MUV thrust generation by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The CNT-MMs are grown via chemical vapor deposition with diamond shaped pores (nominal diagonal dimensions of 4.5 × 9.0 μm) and subsequently decorated with urchin-like, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles via a facile, electroless, chemical deposition process. The Pt-CNT-MMs display robust, high catalytic ability with an effective activation energy of 26.96 kJ mol(-1) capable of producing a thrust of 0.209 ± 0.049 N from 50% [w/w] H2O2 decomposition within a compact reaction chamber of eight Pt-CNT-MMs in series.

  20. Communication: Two-step explosion processes of highly charged fullerene cations C{sub 60}{sup q+} (q = 20–60)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Kaoru; Nakamura, Takashi; Kanno, Manabu; Kono, Hirohiko, E-mail: hirokiko-kono@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Niitsu, Naoyuki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nanosystem Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Ueda, Kiyoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    To establish the fundamental understanding of the fragmentation dynamics of highly positive charged nano- and bio-materials, we carried out on-the-fly classical trajectory calculations on the fragmentation dynamics of C{sub 60}{sup q+} (q = 20–60). We used the UB3LYP/3-21G level of density functional theory and the self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding theory. For q ≥ 20, we found that a two-step explosion mechanism governs the fragmentation dynamics: C{sub 60}{sup q+} first ejects singly and multiply charged fast atomic cations C{sup z+} (z ≥ 1) via Coulomb explosions on a timescale of 10 fs to stabilize the remaining core cluster. Thermal evaporations of slow atomic and molecular fragments from the core cluster subsequently occur on a timescale of 100 fs to 1 ps. Increasing the charge q makes the fragments smaller. This two-step mechanism governs the fragmentation dynamics in the most likely case that the initial kinetic energy accumulated upon ionization to C{sub 60}{sup q+} by ion impact or X-ray free electron laser is larger than 100 eV.

  1. Explosion interaction with water in a tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homae, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Wakabayashi, K.; Matsumura, T.; Nakayama, Y.

    2017-02-01

    As proposed and legislated in Japan, subsurface magazines have an explosive storage chamber, a horizontal passageway, and a vertical shaft for a vent. The authors found that a small amount of water on the floor of the storage chamber mitigated blast pressure remarkably. The mitigation mechanism has been examined more closely. To examine the effect of water, the present study assesses explosions in a transparent, square cross section, and a straight tube. A high-speed camera used to observe the tube interior. Blast pressure in and around the tube was also measured. Images obtained using the high-speed camera revealed that water inside the tube did not move after the explosion. Differences between cases of tubes without water and with water were unclear. Along with blast pressure measurements, these study results suggest that blast pressure mitigation by water occurs because of interaction between the explosion and the water near the explosion point.

  2. Sliding Window Empirical Mode Decomposition -its performance and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepien Pawel

    2014-12-01

    Proposed algorithm speeds up (about 10 times the computation with acceptable quality of decomposition. Conclusions Sliding Window EMD algorithm is suitable for decomposition of long signals with high sampling frequency.

  3. Relationship between the decomposition process of coarse woody debris and fungal community structure as detected by high-throughput sequencing in a deciduous broad-leaved forest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Masuya, Hayato; Abe, Shin; Masaki, Takashi; Okabe, Kimiko

    2015-01-01

    We examined the relationship between the community structure of wood-decaying fungi, detected by high-throughput sequencing, and the decomposition rate using 13 years of data from a forest dynamics plot. For molecular analysis and wood density measurements, drill dust samples were collected from logs and stumps of Fagus and Quercus in the plot. Regression using a negative exponential model between wood density and time since death revealed that the decomposition rate of Fagus was greater than that of Quercus. The residual between the expected value obtained from the regression curve and the observed wood density was used as a decomposition rate index. Principal component analysis showed that the fungal community compositions of both Fagus and Quercus changed with time since death. Principal component analysis axis scores were used as an index of fungal community composition. A structural equation model for each wood genus was used to assess the effect of fungal community structure traits on the decomposition rate and how the fungal community structure was determined by the traits of coarse woody debris. Results of the structural equation model suggested that the decomposition rate of Fagus was affected by two fungal community composition components: one that was affected by time since death and another that was not affected by the traits of coarse woody debris. In contrast, the decomposition rate of Quercus was not affected by coarse woody debris traits or fungal community structure. These findings suggest that, in the case of Fagus coarse woody debris, the fungal community structure is related to the decomposition process of its host substrate. Because fungal community structure is affected partly by the decay stage and wood density of its substrate, these factors influence each other. Further research on interactive effects is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between fungal community structure and the woody debris decomposition process.

  4. Explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, D.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a very high temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures homogeneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles almost instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse and

  5. Lead-free primary explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  6. Laser machining of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.; Banks, Paul S.; Myers, Booth R.; Sefcik, Joseph A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  7. Research on Initiation Sensitivity of Solid Explosive and Planer Initiation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Matsuo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, recently, there are a lot of techniques being demanded for complex process, various explosive initiation method and highly accurate control of detonation are needed. In this research, the metal foil explosion using high current is focused attention on the method to obtain linear or planate initiation easily, and the main evaluation of metal foil explosion to initiate explosive was conducted. The explosion power was evaluated by observing optically the underwater shock wave generated from the metal foil explosion. Secondly, in high energy explosive processing, there are several applications, such as shock compaction, explosive welding, food processing and explosive forming. In these explosive applications, a high sensitive explosive has been mainly used. The high sensitive explosive is so dangerous, since it can lead to explosion suddenly. So, for developing explosives, the safety is the most important thing as well as low manufacturing cost and explosive characteristics. In this work, we have focused on the initiation sensitivity of a solid explosive and performed numerical analysis of sympathetic detonation. The numerical analysis is calculated by LS-DYNA 3D (commercial code. To understand the initiation reaction of an explosive, Lee-Tarver equation was used and impact detonation process was analyzed by ALE code. Configuration of simulation model is a quarter of circular cylinder. The donor type of explosive (SEP was used as initiation explosive. When the donor explosive is exploded, a shock wave is generated and it propagates into PMMA, air and metallic layers in order. During passing through the layers, the shock wave is attenuated and finally, it has influence on the acceptor explosive, Comp. B. Here, we evaluate the initiation of acceptor explosive and discuss about detonation pressure, reactive rate of acceptor explosive and attenuation of impact pressure.

  8. Caribbean AIDS explosion examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-13

    Homophobia, sex tourism, infidelity, and poverty are major factors causing a rapid explosion of AIDS and increasingly infecting women in the Caribbean. The region has the second largest incidence of AIDS in the world after Africa. The number of people with the HIV virus is likely greater than 500,000 and could be as high as 700,000, about twice the previously reported figures. Societal norms encourage homosexuals to have heterosexual relationships, and married men to have extramarital affairs, while poverty forces men and women to prostitution, often with tourists. In addition, a survey of 8100 school children in 4 English-speaking Caribbean islands revealed that 42% of the children had experienced sex before the age of 10 years; 62% had experienced it by age 12. This finding may reflect a high rate of child molestation in the region.

  9. High temperature shock tube studies on the thermal decomposition of O3 and the reaction of dimethyl carbonate with O-atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-09

    The shock tube technique was used to study the thermal decomposition of ozone, O3, with a view to using this as a thermal precursor of O-atoms at high temperatures. The formation of O-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range, 819 K ≤ T ≤ 1166 K, at pressures 0.13 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.6 bar. Unimolecular rate theory provides an excellent representation of the falloff characteristics from the present and literature data on ozone decomposition at high temperatures. The present decomposition study on ozone permits its usage as a thermal source for O-atoms allowing measurements for, O + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → OH + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [A]. Reflected shock tube experiments monitoring the formation and decay of O-atoms were performed on reaction A using mixtures of O3 and CH3OC(O)OCH3, (DMC), in Kr bath gas over the T-range, 862 K ≤ T ≤ 1167 K, and pressure range, 0.15 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.33 bar. A detailed model was used to fit the O-atom temporal profile to obtain experimental rate constants for reaction A. Rate constants from the present experiments for O + DMC can be represented by the Arrhenius expression: kA(T) = 2.70 × 10(-11) exp(-2725 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (862-1167 K). Transition state theory calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for reaction A are in good agreement with the experimental rate constants. The theoretical rate constants can be well represented (to within ±10%) over the 500-2000 K temperature range by: kA(T) = 1.87 × 10(-20)T(2.924) exp(-2338 K/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The present study represents the first experimental measurement and theoretical study on this bimolecular reaction which is of relevance to the high temperature oxidation of DMC.

  10. Highly Stable Zr(IV)-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Detection and Removal of Antibiotics and Organic Explosives in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Lv, Xiu-Liang; Feng, Dawei; Xie, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Jian; Li, Ming; Xie, Yabo; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-05-18

    Antibiotics and organic explosives are among the main organic pollutants in wastewater; their detection and removal are quite important but challenging. As a new class of porous materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered as a promising platform for the sensing and adsorption applications. In this work, guided by a topological design approach, two stable isostructural Zr(IV)-based MOFs, Zr6O4(OH)8(H2O)4(CTTA)8/3 (BUT-12, H3CTTA = 5'-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2',4',6'-trimethyl-[1,1':3',1″-terphenyl]-4,4″-dicarboxylic acid) and Zr6O4(OH)8(H2O)4(TTNA)8/3 (BUT-13, H3TTNA = 6,6',6″-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzene-1,3,5-triyl)tris(2-naphthoic acid)) with the the-a topological structure constructed by D4h 8-connected Zr6 clusters and D3h 3-connected linkers were designed and synthesized. The two MOFs are highly porous with the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 3387 and 3948 m(2) g(-1), respectively. Particularly, BUT-13 features one of the most porous water-stable MOFs reported so far. Interestingly, these MOFs represent excellent fluorescent properties, which can be efficiently quenched by trace amounts of nitrofurazone (NZF) and nitrofurantoin (NFT) antibiotics as well as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) organic explosives in water solution. They are responsive to NZF and TNP at parts per billion (ppb) levels, which are among the best performing luminescent MOF-based sensing materials. Simultaneously, both MOFs also display high adsorption abilities toward these organic molecules. It was demonstrated that the adsorption plays an important role in the preconcentration of analytes, which can further increase the fluorescent quenching efficiency. These results indicate that BUT-12 and -13 are favorable materials for the simultaneous selective detection and removal of specific antibiotics and organic explosives from water, being potentially useful in monitoring water quality and treating wastewater.

  11. Dynamics of explosive paroxysms at open andesitic systems: high-resolution mass distribution analyses of 2006 tephra from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, J.; Eychenne, J.; Ramon, P.; Yepes, H.

    2012-12-01

    Many andesitic volcanoes at subduction plate margins can experience in the course of their evolution periods of sub-continuous eruption during years, decades, or centuries. Such long-lived periods may embrace more or less intense outgassing events, extrusion of viscous lava flows and domes (e.g. Colima in Mexico, Merapi in Indonesia, Arenal in Costa Rica), and explosive activity of uneven intensity (e.g. Semeru in Indonesia, Sakurajima in Japan, Sangay in Ecuador). In addition, strong explosive events of short duration may occur, with potential generation of pyroclastic flows on the flanks and beyond, which can pose significant hazards in populated regions. The origin and dynamics of such violent eruptions remain poorly known and may involve a combination of different factors. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, reawaken in 1999 and is an example of such open-system behaviour that experienced a strong and deadly andesitic pyroclastic flow-forming event in August 2006. Inspection of the deposits suggested that the event could have been triggered by magma mixing (silicic pumices in the tephra), magma-water interaction (presence of xenolithic clasts) or deep andesitic magma reinjection (based on mineral chemistry). Here we investigate these options by performing a high-resolution mass budget analysis of the scoria fall deposit. This is achieved by analysing componentry compositions and their mass distribution pattern in the layer, which allow us to document and integrate exponential and power laws mass decay rates over wide areas. The results yield a total mass for the tephra layer of ~2 x 1010kg. The pumice mass fraction is far too small (paroxysm. Altogether our results support an explosive event fed by a deep gas-rich andesitic reinjection, which would have incorporated a pocket of older differentiated magma and eroded the upper conduit during the sub-plinian event. The high-resolution mass-based approach reveals useful to decipher the origin of the violent 2006 paroxysm

  12. Explosives tester with heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Eckels, Joel [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Whipple, Richard E [Livermore, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  13. Modeling cookoff of HMX based PBX explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2017-03-01

    We have previously developed a PBX 9501 cookoff model for the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501 consisting of 95 wt% octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazoncine (HMX), 2.5 wt% Estane® 5703 (a polyurethane thermoplastic), and 2.5 wt% of a nitroplasticizer (NP): BDNPA/F, a 50/50 wt% eutectic mixture bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)-acetal (BDNPA) and bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)-formal (BDNPF). This fivestep model includes desorption of water, decomposition of the NP to form NO2, reaction of the NO2 with Estane and HMX, and decomposition of HMX [1]. This model has been successfully validated with data from six laboratories with scales ranging from 2 g to more than 2.5 kg of explosive. We have determined, that the PBX 9501 model can be used to predict cookoff of other plastic bonded explosives containing HMX and an inert binder, such as LX-04 consisting of 85 wt% HMX and 15 wt% Viton A (vinylidine fluoride/hexafluoropropylene copolymer), LX-07 (90 wt% HMX and 10 wt% Viton A), LX- 10-0 (95 wt% HMX and 5 wt% Viton A), and LX-14 consisting of 95.5 wt % HMX and 4.5 wt% Estane® 5702-F1 (a polyurethane thermoplastic). Normally our cookoff models are verified using Sandia’s Instrumented Thermal Initiation (SITI) experiment. However, SITI data for LX-04, LX-07, LX-10-0, and LX-14 are not available at pressed density; although, some molding powder SITI data on LX-10-0 and LX-14 exists. Tarver and Tran [2] provide some one-dimensional time-to-explosion (ODTX) data for these explosives. The applicability of the PBX 9501 model to LX-04, LX-07, LX-10-0, AND LX-14 was made using this ODTX data [2]. The PBX 9501 model is applied to these other explosives by accounting for the correct amount of HMX in the explosive and limiting the NP reaction. We have found the PBX 9501 model to be useful for predicting the response of these PBXs to abnormal thermal environments such as fire.

  14. Characterization of Explosives Processing Waste Decomposition Due to Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Germination and Early Growth of Lettuce After 5 D .................. 68 5.5 Germination Rates of Arabidopsis, Cabbage and Clover Seeds in 100% Sand or Compost...assays were conducted according to the Salmonella /mammalian microsome plate incorporation method described by Ames et. al. (16) with strains TA-98 and TA...experiments were 15 performed. The Salmonella also were tested against known mutagens (nitrofluorene, acetylaminofluorene, benzo(a)pyrene, and sodium

  15. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  16. Dynamics of explosive paroxysms at open-vent andesitic systems: High-resolution mass distribution analyses of the 2006 Tungurahua fall deposit (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychenne, Julia; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Ramón, Patricio; Yepes, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Long-lasting andesitic eruptions sometimes include strong short-lived explosive events, which can pose significant hazards in populated regions. The origin and dynamics of such violent eruptions remain poorly known and may involve a combination of different factors. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, reawakens in 1999 and is an example of such an open-vent system that experienced a strong and deadly andesitic pyroclastic flow-forming event in August 2006. Inspection of the deposits suggested that the event could have been triggered by magma mixing (coexistence of both silicic pumices and andesitic scoria in the tephra), magma-water interaction (presence of xenolithic clasts) or deep andesitic magma reinjection (based on mineral chemistry). Here we investigate these options by performing a high-resolution mass budget analysis of the scoria fall deposit. This is achieved by analysing componentry compositions and their mass distribution pattern in the layer, which allow us to document and integrate exponential and power laws mass decay rates over wide areas. The results yield a total mass for the tephra layer of ˜2×1010 kg. The pumice mass fraction is far too small (paroxysm. Altogether our results support an explosive event fed by a deep gas-rich andesitic reinjection, which would have incorporated a pocket of older differentiated magma and eroded the upper conduit during the sub-plinian event. The high-resolution mass-based approach reveals useful to decipher the origin of the violent 2006 paroxysm and has potential to improve magnitude determinations of ancient eruption by considering componentry mass instead of volume. It is also applicable for monitoring purposes in the context of ongoing crises at andesitic volcanoes worldwide

  17. Highly ordered binary assembly of silica mesochannels and surfactant micelles for extraction and electrochemical analysis of trace nitroaromatic explosives and pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; He, Yayun; Ding, Longhua; Su, Bin

    2015-04-21

    The rapid and sensitive detection of nitroaromatic compounds is of great significance for human health, the environment, and public security. The present work reports on the extraction and electrochemical analysis of trace nitroaromatic compounds, such as explosives and organophosphate pesticides (OPs), using the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with a highly ordered and aligned binary assembly of silica mesochannels and micelles (BASMM). With a pore diameter of ca. 2-3 nm, silica mesochannels (SMs) perpendicularly oriented to the ITO electrode surface can provide hard and robust supports to confine the soft cylindrical micelles formed by the aggregation of cationic surfactants, namely, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Due to the organized self-assembly of hydrocarbon tails of CTAB surfactants, each micelle has a hydrophobic core, which acts as an excellent adsorbent for rapid extraction and preconcentration of trace nitroaromatic compounds from aqueous solutions via the hydrophobic effect. Furthermore, the cylindrical micelles are directly in contact with the underlying electrode surface, to which extracted compounds can freely diffuse and then be reduced therein, thus allowing their determination by means of voltammetry. Using the BASMM/ITO sensor, electrochemical analysis of trace nitroaromatic explosives, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 3-nitrophenol, and nitrobenzene, and OPs, such as paraoxon, methyl parathion, and fenitrothion, was achieved with a fast response, wide linear range, high sensitivity, and low detection limit at the ppb level. TNT and paraoxon in real apple, tea, and water samples were also determined. By combining the heterogeneous extraction and determination in one ordered binary nanostructure, the BASMM sensor provides a very simple, rapid, and cost-effective way for analysis of nitroaromatic compounds and can be extended to a wide range of lipophilic yet redox-active analytes.

  18. Why Electricity Demand Is Highly Income-Elastic in Spain: A Cross-Country Comparison Based on an Index-Decomposition Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Pérez-García

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 1990, Spain has had one of the highest elasticities of electricity demand in the European Union. We provide an in-depth analysis into the causes of this high elasticity, and we examine how these same causes influence electricity demand in other European countries. To this end, we present an index-decomposition analysis of growth in electricity demand which allows us to identify three key factors in the relationship between gross domestic product (GDP and electricity demand: (i structural change; (ii GDP growth; and (iii intensity of electricity use. Our findings show that the main differences in electricity demand elasticities across countries and time are accounted for by the fast convergence in residential per capita electricity consumption. This convergence has almost concluded, and we expect the Spanish energy demand elasticity to converge to European standards in the near future.

  19. Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

    1998-09-01

    There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Active explosion barrier performance against methane and coal dust explosions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. J. L. du Plessis

    2015-01-01

    Preventing the propagation of methane or coal dust explosions through the use of active explosion-suppression systems remains one of the most underutilised explosion controls in underground coal mines...

  1. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  2. A Signal Processing Approach with a Smooth Empirical Mode Decomposition to Reveal Hidden Trace of Corrosion in Highly Contaminated Guided Wave Signals for Concrete-Covered Pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Javad; Chen, Jingming; Tse, Peter W

    2017-02-07

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been extensively applied for non-destructive testing of plate-like structures particularly pipes in past two decades. In this regard, if a structure has a simple geometry, obtained guided waves' signals are easy to explain. However, any small degree of complexity in the geometry such as contacting with other materials may cause an extra amount of complication in the interpretation of guided wave signals. The problem deepens if defects have irregular shapes such as natural corrosion. Signal processing techniques that have been proposed for guided wave signals' analysis are generally good for simple signals obtained in a highly controlled experimental environment. In fact, guided wave signals in a real situation such as the existence of natural corrosion in wall-covered pipes are much more complicated. Considering pipes in residential buildings that pass through concrete walls, in this paper we introduced Smooth Empirical Mode Decomposition (SEMD) to efficiently separate overlapped guided waves. As empirical mode decomposition (EMD) which is a good candidate for analyzing non-stationary signals, suffers from some shortcomings, wavelet transform was adopted in the sifting stage of EMD to improve its outcome in SEMD. However, selection of mother wavelet that suits best for our purpose plays an important role. Since in guided wave inspection, the incident waves are well known and are usually tone-burst signals, we tailored a complex tone-burst signal to be used as our mother wavelet. In the sifting stage of EMD, wavelet de-noising was applied to eliminate unwanted frequency components from each IMF. SEMD greatly enhances the performance of EMD in guided wave analysis for highly contaminated signals. In our experiment on concrete covered pipes with natural corrosion, this method not only separates the concrete wall indication clearly in time domain signal, a natural corrosion with complex geometry that was hidden and located inside the

  3. A Signal Processing Approach with a Smooth Empirical Mode Decomposition to Reveal Hidden Trace of Corrosion in Highly Contaminated Guided Wave Signals for Concrete-Covered Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Rostami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic guided waves have been extensively applied for non-destructive testing of plate-like structures particularly pipes in past two decades. In this regard, if a structure has a simple geometry, obtained guided waves’ signals are easy to explain. However, any small degree of complexity in the geometry such as contacting with other materials may cause an extra amount of complication in the interpretation of guided wave signals. The problem deepens if defects have irregular shapes such as natural corrosion. Signal processing techniques that have been proposed for guided wave signals’ analysis are generally good for simple signals obtained in a highly controlled experimental environment. In fact, guided wave signals in a real situation such as the existence of natural corrosion in wall-covered pipes are much more complicated. Considering pipes in residential buildings that pass through concrete walls, in this paper we introduced Smooth Empirical Mode Decomposition (SEMD to efficiently separate overlapped guided waves. As empirical mode decomposition (EMD which is a good candidate for analyzing non-stationary signals, suffers from some shortcomings, wavelet transform was adopted in the sifting stage of EMD to improve its outcome in SEMD. However, selection of mother wavelet that suits best for our purpose plays an important role. Since in guided wave inspection, the incident waves are well known and are usually tone-burst signals, we tailored a complex tone-burst signal to be used as our mother wavelet. In the sifting stage of EMD, wavelet de-noising was applied to eliminate unwanted frequency components from each IMF. SEMD greatly enhances the performance of EMD in guided wave analysis for highly contaminated signals. In our experiment on concrete covered pipes with natural corrosion, this method not only separates the concrete wall indication clearly in time domain signal, a natural corrosion with complex geometry that was hidden and

  4. Observations of Glide and Decomposition of a Dislocations at High Temperatures in Ni-Al Single Crystals Deformed along the Hard Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R.; Daw, M. S.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Ni-44at.% Al and Ni-50at.% single crystals were tested in compression in the hard (001) orientations. The dislocation processes and deformation behavior were studied as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate. A slip transition in NiAl occurs from alpha(111) slip to non-alphaaaaaaaaaaa9111) slip at intermediate temperatures. In Ni-50at.% Al single crystal, only alpha(010) dislocations are observed above the slip transition temperature. In contrast, alpha(101)(101) glide has been observed to control deformation beyond the slip transition temperature in Ni-44at.%Al. alpha(101) dislocations are observed primarily along both (111) directions in the glide plane. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations show that the core of the alpha(101) dislocations along these directions is decomposed into two alpha(010) dislocations, separated by a distance of approximately 2nm. The temperature window of stability for these alpha(101) dislocations depends upon the strain rate. At a strain rate of 1.4 x 10(exp -4)/s, lpha(101) dislocations are observed between 800 and 1000K. Complete decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations into alpha(010) dislocations occurs beyond 1000K, leading to alpha(010) climb as the deformation mode at higher temperature. At lower strain rates, decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations has been observed to occur along the edge orientation at temperatures below 1000K. Embedded-atom method calculations and experimental results indicate that alpha(101) dislocation have a large Peieris stress at low temperature. Based on the present microstructural observations and a survey of the literature with respect to vacancy content and diffusion in NiAl, a model is proposed for alpha(101)(101) glide in Ni-44at.%Al, and for the observed yield strength versus temperature behavior of Ni-Al alloys at intermediate and high temperatures.

  5. First determination of volume changes and enthalpies of the high-pressure decomposition reaction of the structure H methane hydrate to the cubic structure I methane hydrate and fluid methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogienko, Andrey G; Tkacz, Marek; Manakov, Andrey Yu; Lipkowski, Janusz

    2007-11-08

    Pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions of the decomposition reaction of the structure H high-pressure methane hydrate to the cubic structure I methane hydrate and fluid methane were studied with a piston-cylinder apparatus at room temperature. For the first time, volume changes accompanying this reaction were determined. With the use of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation the enthalpies of the decomposition reaction of the structure H high-pressure methane hydrate to the cubic structure I methane hydrate and fluid methane have been calculated.

  6. Effect of Nano-Magnesium Hydride on the Thermal Decomposition Behaviors of RDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the detonation performance of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX explosive, addictives with high heat values were used, and magnesium hydride (MgH2 is one of the candidates. However, it is important to see whether MgH2 is a safe addictive. In this paper, the thermal and kinetic properties of RDX and mixture of RDX/MgH2 were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC, respectively. The apparent activation energy (E and frequency factor (A of thermal explosion were calculated based on the data of DSC experiments using the Kissinger and Ozawa approaches. The results show that the addition of MgH2 decreases both E and A of RDX, which means that the mixture of RDX/MgH2 has a lower thermal stability than RDX, and the calculation results obtained from the ARC experiments data support this too. Besides, the most probable mechanism functions about the decomposition of RDX and RDX/MgH2 were given in this paper which confirmed the change of the decomposition mechanism.

  7. Experimental Investigations of Multiphase Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Joel R.; Lightstone, James M.; McGrath, Thomas P.

    2009-12-01

    The addition of solid fuel particles to explosive formulations generally reduces the detonation velocity, but can enhance the blast performance if prompt combustion of the particles occurs in the detonation products and surrounding air early enough to support the shock. The degree to which fuel particles burn heavily depends on their dispersal throughout the explosion field and access to oxidizers. To distinguish the factors affecting the dispersal of fuel particles from those controlling their combustion, we began by analyzing the dispersal of equivalent mock inert particles. Solid glass spheres embedded in detonating small explosive charges were tracked using high-speed digital shadowgraphy. Two different particle sizes, 3 and 30 μm, and different mass fractions in the explosive compositions were considered. Shadowgraphs and pressure measurements were compared to the predictions of a newly developed multiphase numerical model. Reactive aluminum particles in the range of 1 to 120 μm in diameter were also analyzed. During the first 50 μs of the expansion, the general trend for both reactive and inert particles is for the smaller particles to expand near or beyond the leading shock wave to a greater extent than the larger particles. Expansion beyond the initial shock from the detonation is presumed to occur when particles agglomerate. The results are consistent with the predictions of the numerical models, highlighting the role of simple factors such as particle size and density in the early time expansion and mixing of fuels for enhanced blast applications.

  8. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  9. Cell phone explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Eva; Schraml, Rüdiger; Maisch, Tim; Kobuch, Karin; König, Burkhard; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Hillenkamp, Jost; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Vasold, Rudolf

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green (ICG) and to test the cytotoxicity of light-induced ICG decomposition products. ICG in solution was irradiated with laser light, solar light, or surgical endolight. The light-induced decomposition of ICG was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Porcine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were incubated with the light-induced decomposition products of ICG, and cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion assay. Independent of the light source used, singlet oxygen (photodynamic type 2 reaction) is generated by ICG leading to dioxetanes by [2+2]-cycloaddition of singlet oxygen. These dioxetanes thermally decompose into several carbonyl compounds. The decomposition products were identified by mass spectrometry. The decomposition of ICG was inhibited by adding sodium azide, a quencher of singlet oxygen. Incubation with ICG decomposition products significantly reduced the viability of RPE cells in contrast to control cells. ICG is decomposed by light within a self-sensitized photo oxidation. The decomposition products reduce the viability of RPE cells in vitro. The toxic effects of decomposed ICG should be further investigated under in vivo conditions.

  11. Thermal decomposition of hemicelluloses

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Kajsa; Pommer, Linda; Broström, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition modeling of biomass often uses commercially available xylan as model compound representing hemicelluloses, not taking in account the heterogeneous nature of that group of carbohydrates. In this study, the thermal decomposition behavior of seven different hemicelluloses (beta-glucan, arabinogalactan, arabinoxylan, galactomannan, glucomannan, xyloglucan, and xylan) were investigated in inert atmosphere using (i) thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spec...

  12. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goutsias (John); H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1998-01-01

    textabstract[PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis

  13. Azimuthal decomposition of optical modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This presentation analyses the azimuthal decomposition of optical modes. Decomposition of azimuthal modes need two steps, namely generation and decomposition. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency...

  14. Wave dynamics of electric explosion in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkin, V. V.; Kuznetsova, N. S.; Lopatin, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    A mathematical model of an electric explosion is developed that consistently describes the expansion of the explosion channel with regard to the parameters of the discharge circuit of a high-voltage pulse generator, radiation, and propagation of stress waves in a solid. The dynamics of conversion of the stored energy to a wave and the formation of mechanical stresses due to electric explosion in a solid immersed in a liquid are considered. In the context of electro-discharge destruction of hard materials, the resulting stress field and the relationship between the discharge circuit parameters and characteristics of the wave are analyzed and the most efficient discharge modes are determined.

  15. Research on Initiation Sensitivity of Solid Explosive and Planer Initiation System

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, N; M Otuka; H Hamasima; K Hokamoto; Itoh, S.

    2016-01-01

    Firstly, recently, there are a lot of techniques being demanded for complex process, various explosive initiation method and highly accurate control of detonation are needed. In this research, the metal foil explosion using high current is focused attention on the method to obtain linear or planate initiation easily, and the main evaluation of metal foil explosion to initiate explosive was conducted. The explosion power was evaluated by observing optically the underwater shock wave generated ...

  16. Effect of polar surfaces on decomposition of molecular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklja, Maija M; Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Sharia, Onise

    2014-09-24

    We report polar instability in molecular materials. Polarization-induced explosive decomposition in molecular crystals is explored with an illustrative example of two crystalline polymorphs of HMX, an important energetic material. We establish that the presence of a polar surface in δ-HMX has fundamental implications for material stability and overall chemical behavior. A comparative quantum-chemical analysis of major decomposition mechanisms in polar δ-HMX and nonpolar β-HMX discovered a dramatic difference in dominating dissociation reactions, activation barriers, and reaction rates. The presence of charge on the polar δ-HMX surface alters chemical mechanisms and effectively triggers decomposition simultaneously through several channels with significantly reduced activation barriers. This results in much faster decomposition chemistry and in higher chemical reactivity of δ-HMX phase relatively to β-HMX phase. We predict decomposition mechanisms and their activation barriers in condensed δ-HMX phase, sensitivity of which happens to be comparable to primary explosives. We suggest that the observed trend among polymorphs is a manifestation of polar instability phenomena, and hence similar processes are likely to take place in all polar molecular crystals.

  17. Some properties of explosive mixtures containing peroxides Part I. Relative performance and detonation of mixtures with triacetone triperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Svatopluk; Trzciński, Waldemar A; Matyás, Robert

    2008-06-15

    This study concerns mixtures of triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) and ammonium nitrate (AN) with added water (W), as the case may be, and dry mixtures of TATP with urea nitrate (UN). Relative performances (RP) of the mixtures and their individual components, relative to TNT, were determined by means of ballistic mortar. The detonation energies, E0, and detonation velocities, D, were calculated for the mixtures studied by means of the thermodynamic code CHEETAH. Relationships have been found and are discussed between the RP and the E0 values related to unit volume of gaseous products of detonation of these mixtures. These relationships together with those between RP and oxygen balance values of the mixtures studied indicate different types of participation of AN and UN in the explosive decomposition of the respective mixtures. Dry TATP/UN mixtures exhibit lower RP than analogous mixtures TATP/AN containing up to 25% of water. Depending on the water content, the TATP/AN mixtures possess higher detonability values than the ANFO explosives. A semi-logarithmic relationship between the D values and oxygen coefficients has been derived for all the mixtures studied at the charge density of 1000 kg m(-3). Among the mixtures studied, this relationship distinguishes several samples of the type of "tertiary explosives" as well as samples that approach "high explosives" in their performances and detonation velocities.

  18. High and low frequency unfolded partial least squares regression based on empirical mode decomposition for quantitative analysis of fuel oil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xihui; Li, Shujuan; Lin, Ligang; Tan, Xiaoyao; Fan, Qingjie; Li, Ming

    2016-06-21

    Accurate prediction of the model is fundamental to the successful analysis of complex samples. To utilize abundant information embedded over frequency and time domains, a novel regression model is presented for quantitative analysis of hydrocarbon contents in the fuel oil samples. The proposed method named as high and low frequency unfolded PLSR (HLUPLSR), which integrates empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and unfolded strategy with partial least squares regression (PLSR). In the proposed method, the original signals are firstly decomposed into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residue by EMD. Secondly, the former high frequency IMFs are summed as a high frequency matrix and the latter IMFs and residue are summed as a low frequency matrix. Finally, the two matrices are unfolded to an extended matrix in variable dimension, and then the PLSR model is built between the extended matrix and the target values. Coupled with Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy, HLUPLSR has been applied to determine hydrocarbon contents of light gas oil and diesel fuels samples. Comparing with single PLSR and other signal processing techniques, the proposed method shows superiority in prediction ability and better model interpretation. Therefore, HLUPLSR method provides a promising tool for quantitative analysis of complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High temperature shock tube and theoretical studies on the thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate and its bimolecular reactions with H and D-atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-09

    The shock tube technique was used to study the high temperature thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate, CH3OC(O)OCH3 (DMC). The formation of H-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range of 1053-1157 K at pressures ∼0.5 atm. The H-atom profiles were simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC thermal decomposition. Simulations indicate that the formation of H-atoms is sensitive to the rate constants for the energetically lowest-lying bond fission channel, CH3OC(O)OCH3 → CH3 + CH3OC(O)O [A], where H-atoms form instantaneously at high temperatures from the sequence of radical β-scissions, CH3OC(O)O → CH3O + CO2 → H + CH2O + CO2. A master equation analysis was performed using CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for all thermal decomposition processes in DMC. The theoretical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the present experimentally derived rate constants for the bond fission channel (A). The theoretically derived rate constants for this important bond-fission process in DMC can be represented by a modified Arrhenius expression at 0.5 atm over the T-range 1000-2000 K as, kA(T) = 6.85 × 10(98)T (-24.239) exp(-65250 K/T) s(-1). The H-atom temporal profiles at long times show only minor sensitivity to the abstraction reaction, H + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → H2 + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [B]. However, H + DMC is an important fuel destruction reaction at high temperatures. Consequently, measurements of D-atom profiles using D-ARAS allowed unambiguous rate constant measurements for the deuterated analog of reaction B, D + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → HD + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [C]. Reaction C is a surrogate for H + DMC since the theoretically predicted kinetic isotope effect at high temperatures (1000 - 2000K) is close to unity, kC ≈ 1.2 kB. TST calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties

  20. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiese-Smith, Deneille [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Highley, Aaron M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steill, Jeffrey D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Behrens, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kay, Jeffrey J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  1. Inelastic processes in seismic wave generation by underground explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodean, H.C.

    1980-08-01

    Theories, computer calculations, and measurements of spherical stress waves from explosions are described and compared, with emphasis on the transition from inelastic to almost-elastic relations between stress and strain. Two aspects of nonspherical explosion geometry are considered: tectonic strain release and surface spall. Tectonic strain release affects the generation of surface waves; spall closure may also. The reduced-displacement potential is a common solution (the equivalent elastic source) of the forward and inverse problems, assuming a spherical source. Measured reduced-displacement potentials are compared with potentials calculated as solutions of the direct and inverse problems; there are significant differences between the results of the two types of calculations and between calculations and measurements. The simple spherical model of an explosion is not sufficient to account for observations of explosions over wide ranges of depth and yield. The explosion environment can have a large effect on explosion detection and yield estimation. The best sets of seismic observations for use in developing discrimination techniques are for high-magnitude high-yield explosions; the identification problem is most difficult for low-magnitude low-yield explosions. Most of the presently available explosion data (time, medium, depth, yield, etc.) are for explosions in a few media at the Nevada Test Site; some key questions concerning magnitude vs yield and m/sub b/ vs M/sub s/ relations can be answered only by data for explosions in other media at other locations.

  2. Studying stellar explosions with Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P.; Jonker, P.

    Athena is the second large mission selected in the ESA Cosmic Vision plan. With its large collecting area, high spectral-energy resolution (X-IFU instrument) and impressive grasp (WFI instrument), Athena will truly revolutionise X-ray astronomy. The most prodigious sources of high-energy photons are often transitory in nature. Athena will provide the sensitivity and spectral resolution coupled with rapid response to enable the study of the dynamic sky. Potential sources include: distant Gamma-Ray Bursts to probe the reionisation epoch and find missing baryons in the cosmic web; tidal disruption events to reveal dormant supermassive and intermediate-mass black holes; and supernova explosions to understand progenitors and their environments. We illustrate Athenas capabilities and show how it will be able to constrain the nature of explosive transients including gas metallicity and dynamics.

  3. Ranchero Explosive Pulsed Power Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Deninger, W.J.; Fowler, C.M.; Herrera, D.H.; King, J.C.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Sena, F.C.; Tabaka, L.J.; Tasker, D.G.; Torres, D.T.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Taylor, A.J.; Rodriguez, G.; Oro, D.M.; Garcia, O.F.; parker, J.V.; Broste, W.B.

    1999-06-27

    The authors are developing the Ranchero high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. The near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas Capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of {approximately}50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. They have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long.

  4. RANCHERO explosive pulsed power experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Goforth, J H; Armijo, E V; Atchison, W L; Bartos, Yu; Clark, D A; Day, R D; Deninger, W J; Faehl, R J; Fowler, C M; García, F P; García, O F; Herrera, D H; Herrera, T J; Keinigs, R K; King, J C; Lindemuth, I R; López, E; Martínez, E C; Martínez, D; McGuire, J A; Morgan, D; Oona, H; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Randolph, R B; Reinovsky, R E; Rodríguez, G; Stokes, J L; Sena, F C; Tabaka, L J; Tasker, D G; Taylor, A J; Torres, D T; Anderson, H D; Broste, W B; Johnson, J B; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The authors are developing the RANCHERO high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. Their near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of ~50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. The authors have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper, they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long. (6 refs).

  5. Graph Decompositions and Factorizing Permutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Capelle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A factorizing permutation of a given graph is simply a permutation of the vertices in which all decomposition sets appear to be factors. Such a concept seems to play a central role in recent papers dealing with graph decomposition. It is applied here for modular decomposition and we propose a linear algorithm that computes the whole decomposition tree when a factorizing permutation is provided. This algorithm can be seen as a common generalization of Ma and Hsu for modular decomposition of chordal graphs and Habib, Huchard and Spinrad for inheritance graphs decomposition. It also suggests many new decomposition algorithms for various notions of graph decompositions.

  6. Nuclear explosion locations at the Balapan, Kazakhstan, nuclear test site: the effects of high-precision arrival times and three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Clifford; Trabant, Chad; Haslinger, Florian; Hartog, Renate

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the potential contributions of improved arrival times (using waveform cross-correlation) and the use of three-dimensional (3-D) velocity models for seismic event location capability. Our analyses are applied to a dataset of nuclear explosions at Balapan, Kazakhstan, for which ground-truth locations and some absolute origin times are available. This ground-truth information allows us to determine excellent origin time estimates for the remaining explosions. The combination of excellent ground-truth location information and high-quality origin time estimates permits us to (1) carry out a detailed examination of the quality of ISC picks, (2) identify probable timing errors in the digital data, (3) evaluate relative and absolute location capability using data from a sparse network, (4) assess the influence of event signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on relative location accuracy, (5) utilize the Balapan events as a source array for 3-D tomography beneath the test site, and (6) test the influence of 3-D structure (local and global) on relative location accuracy and precision in a "controlled" situation. Our principal finding is that improved arrival times are the primary contributor to improved locations. Joint and individual relocations of Balapan events using the full digital dataset result in average mislocations of less than 1 km and 95% confidence regions of a compatible size. To mimic a CTBT scenario more realistically, we also carry out relocations using very few stations (4-10 observations). Location accuracy degrades somewhat, but the high-quality picks generally result in mislocations less than 10 km, even for events with very large azimuthal gaps. Uncertainty is generally underestimated in these cases. Tests with artificially degraded SNR show that mislocation increases slowly as SNR decreases. 3-D velocity structure makes a smaller contribution to relative location accuracy than accurate time picks. Travel time variations due to global 3-D

  7. Decompositions of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Daverman, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition theory studies decompositions, or partitions, of manifolds into simple pieces, usually cell-like sets. Since its inception in 1929, the subject has become an important tool in geometric topology. The main goal of the book is to help students interested in geometric topology to bridge the gap between entry-level graduate courses and research at the frontier as well as to demonstrate interrelations of decomposition theory with other parts of geometric topology. With numerous exercises and problems, many of them quite challenging, the book continues to be strongly recommended to eve

  8. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  9. Plant litter decomposition in wetlands receiving acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittle, D.L.; McGraw, J.B.; Garbutt, K. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-03-01

    The impact of acid mine drainage on the decomposition of wetland plant species of northern West Virginia was studied to determine if the potential exists for nutrient cycling to be altered in systems used to treat this drainage. There were two objectives of this study. First, decomposition of aboveground plant material was measured to determine species decomposition patterns as a function of pH. Second, decomposition of litter from various pH environments was compared to assess whether litter origin affects decomposition rates. Species differences were detected throughout the study. Decomposition rates of woolgrass ({ital Scirpus cyperinus} (L.) Kunth) and common rush ({ital Juncus effusus} L.) were significantly lower than the use of calamus ({ital Acorus calamus} L.) and rice cutgrass ({ital Leersia oryzoids} L.). Differences among species explained a large proportion of the variation in percentage of biomass remaining. Thus, differences in litter quality among species was important in determining the rate of decomposition. In general, significantly more decomposition occurred for all species in high pH environments, indicating impeded decomposition at low pH. While decomposition of some species litter differed depending on its origin, other species showed no effect. Cattail ({ital Typha latifolia} L.) in particular, was found to have lower decomposition rates occurring with material grown at low pH. Lower decomposition rates could result in lower nutrient availability leading to further reduction of productivity under low pH conditions. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Generation of High-Frequency P and S Wave Energy by Rock Fracture During a Buried Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-20

    speed digital cameras, and monitored the resultant seismic waves using a laser vibrometer (as an ultra-high-frequency seismometer). We originally... laser vibrometers to record particle velocities in the resultant P and S waves. Since no mechanical data was available for candy- glass, we measured...plates photographing them using high-speed digital cameras, and monitoring the resultant seismic waves using laser vibrometers (as an array of

  11. Aging of civil explosives (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam-La Haye, E.L.M.; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Hoen, C. 't; Krämer, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    For the Dutch MoD and police, TNO composed sets with different kinds of civil explosives to train their detection dogs. The manufacturer of these explosives guarantees several years of stability of these explosives. These sets of explosives are used under different conditions, like temperature and

  12. : Signal Decomposition of High Resolution Time Series River data to Separate Local and Regional Components of Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signal processing techniques were applied to high-resolution time series data obtained from conductivity loggers placed upstream and downstream of a wastewater treatment facility along a river. Data was collected over 14-60 days, and several seasons. The power spectral densit...

  13. Signal Decomposition of High Resolution Time Series River Data to Separate Local and Regional Components of Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signal processing techniques were applied to high-resolution time series data obtained from conductivity loggers placed upstream and downstream of an oil and gas wastewater treatment facility along a river. Data was collected over 14-60 days. The power spectral density was us...

  14. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  15. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Intermittent explosive disorder Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  17. Modeling nuclear explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Jeremy; Panin, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    As a result of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, no nuclear explosion tests have been performed by the US since 1992. This appreciably limits valuable experimental data needed for improvement of existing weapons and development of new ones, as well as for use of nuclear devices in non-military applications (such as making underground oil reservoirs or compressed air energy storages). This in turn increases the value of numerical modeling of nuclear explosions and of their effects on the environment. We develop numerical codes simulating fission chain reactions in a supercritical U and Pu core and the dynamics of the subsequent expansion of generated hot plasma in order to better understand the impact of such explosions on their surroundings. The results of our simulations (of both above ground and underground explosions) of various energy yields are presented.

  18. Explosion suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  19. Polymeric binder for explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical reaction for producing a polymer which can be mixed with explosives to produce a rigid material is discussed. Physical and chemical properties of polymers are described and chemical structure of the polymer is illustrated.

  20. Grain-scale Dynamics in Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2002-09-30

    High explosives can have reactions to external stimuli that range from mild pressure bursts to full detonation. The ability to predict these responses is important for understanding the performance as well as the safety and reliability of these important materials. At present, we have only relatively simple phenomenological computational models for the behavior of high explosives under these conditions. These models are limited by the assumption that the explosive can be treated as homogeneous. In reality the explosive is a highly heterogeneous composite of irregular crystallites and plastic binder. The heterogeneous nature of explosives is responsible for many of their unique mechanical and chemical properties. We use computational models to simulate the response of explosives to external mechanical stimuli at the grain-scale level. The ultimate goal of this work is to understand the detailed processes involved with the material response, so that we can develop realistic material models, which can be used in a hydrodynamics/multi-physics code to model real systems. The new material models will provide a more realistic description of the explosive system during the most critical period of ignition and initiation. The focus of this work is to use the results of grain-scale simulations to develop an advanced macroscopic reactive flow model that is consistent with our understanding of the grain-scale details, and that can incorporate such information quantitatively. The objective is to connect changes to observed properties of the explosive (grain size distribution, binder thickness distribution, void shape, size, and separation distribution, binder mechanical properties, etc.) with predictions of the resulting sensitivity and performance.

  1. Polyethylene hydroperoxide decomposition products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lacoste, J; Carlsson, David James (Dave); Falicki, S; Wiles, D. M

    1991-01-01

    The decomposition products from pre-oxidized, linear low-density polyethylene have been identified and quantified for films exposed in the absence of oxygen to ultra-violet irradiation, heat or γ-irradiation...

  2. Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015....

  3. Cyclic degradation of titanium-tantalum high-temperature shape memory alloys - The role of dislocation activity and chemical decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Niendorf, T.; Krooß, P.; Somsen, C.; Rynko, R.; Paulsen, A.; Batyrshina, E.; Frenzel, J.; G. Eggeler; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Titanium-tantalum shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for actuator applications at elevated temperatures. They may even succeed in substituting ternary nickel-titanium high temperature SMAs, which are either extremely expensive or difficult to form. However, titanium-tantalum alloys show rapid functional and structural degradation under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading. The current work reveals that degradation is not only governed by the evolution of the ω-phase. Dislocation ...

  4. Experimental studies of the effect of rapid afterburn on shock development of near-field explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Tyas, A.; Reay, J.J.; Fay, S.D.; Clarke, S.D.; Rigby, S.E.; Warren, J.A.; Pope, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Many conventional high explosives do not contain sufficient internal oxygen to fully combust the gaseous products\\ud which result from detonation of the explosive material. Because of this, under-oxygenated explosives continue\\ud to burn after detonation. This process, called afterburn, is known to influence the late-time pressure and energy\\ud released by the explosive, which has particular significance for confined explosives. Recent experimental work\\ud at the University of Sheffield, alon...

  5. Ocular injuries in survivors of improvised explosive devices (IED) in commuter trains

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal Vinay; Mehta Salil; Jiandani Prakash

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Ocular injuries are common in survivors of terror incidents that involve the use of explosive materials. These explosives are commonly of a High Explosive type (HE) and may be fashioned into improvised explosive devices (IED) that incorporate additional materials to maximise trauma and injuries. Serial IED explosions have occurred in commuter trains in several cities including London and Madrid but data on ocular injuries is limited. We report the ocular injuries of the su...

  6. Orthogonal tensor decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamara G. Kolda

    2000-03-01

    The authors explore the orthogonal decomposition of tensors (also known as multi-dimensional arrays or n-way arrays) using two different definitions of orthogonality. They present numerous examples to illustrate the difficulties in understanding such decompositions. They conclude with a counterexample to a tensor extension of the Eckart-Young SVD approximation theorem by Leibovici and Sabatier [Linear Algebra Appl. 269(1998):307--329].

  7. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M; Heussler, Sascha P; Breese, Mark B H

    2018-01-05

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M.; Heussler, Sascha P.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2018-01-01

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment.

  9. Current characteristics of quasi-planar vacuum diodes with explosive-emission cathodes made of various materials at a high-voltage pulse duration of a few nanoseconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'ev, K. V.; Vagner, M. I.; Kutenkov, O. P.; Pegel, I. V.; Pribytkov, G. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2012-12-01

    The currents of 5-ns pulsed high-current electron beams produced in a planar vacuum diode with explosive-emission cathodes made of various materials with no external magnetic field at an average electric field strength in the gap of about 300 kV/cm have been measured and time-integrated observation of the optical luminescence of the cathode surface have been performed. Cathodes with a ceramic bushing and spring metal contacts, with ceramic plates set in a magnetic iron matrix, with blades made of stamped exfoliated graphite (Graflex), with blades made of foil fiberglass plastic, and a composite cathode made of crystalline boron and copper powders were tested. The current carried by one emission center has been estimated to range between 5 and 20 A for various cathodes. For the metal-dielectric cathode, the velocity of expansion of the cathode plasma over the ceramic surface has been estimated as 2·107 cm/s. The lifetimes of the cathodes at a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz have been investigated.

  10. Terrorist Event Training in US Medical Schools. A Survey of Chemical, Biologic, Radiologic, Nuclear, and High-Yield Explosives Training in US Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, James M; Ziegler, Kristina; Armstrong, Jessica M; Shapiro, David

    2015-01-01

    September 11, 2001 saw the dawn of the US-led global war on terror, a combined diplomatic, military, social, and cultural war on terrorist activities. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE), as a group of tactics, are often the preferred weapons of terrorists across the globe. We undertook a survey of US medical schools to determine what their self-reported level of training for terrorist events encompasses during the four years of undergraduate medical education. We surveyed 170 medical schools in the US and Puerto Rico using a five-question, internet-based survey, followed by telephone calls to curriculum offices for initial nonresponders. We used simple descriptive statistics to analyze the data. A majority of US medical schools that completed the survey (79 schools or 65.3%) have no required lecture or course on CBRNE or terrorist activities during the first or second year (preclinical years). Ninety-eight out of the 121 respondents (81.0%), however, believed that CBRNE training was either very important or somewhat important, as reflected in survey answers. Most physician educators believe that training in CBRNE is important; however this belief has not resulted in widespread acceptance of a CBRNE curriculum in US medical schools.

  11. Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots—Highly efficient photoluminescence redox catalyst for hydrogenations of olefins and decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2017-03-21

    We present the first bottom-up approach to synthesize Fe(III)-functionalized carbon dots (CDs) from molecular precursors without the need of conventional thermal or microwave treatment and additional reagents. Specifically, sonication of xylene in the presence of anhydrous FeCl3 results in oxidative coupling of the aromatic substrate towards Fe(III)-functionalized CDs. The as-prepared CDs are spherical in shape with a size of 3–8 nm, highly dispersible in organic solvents and display wavelength-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The iron ions attached to the surface endow the CDs with superior catalytic activity for olefin hydrogenation with excellent conversion and selectivity (up to 100%). The Fe(III)-CDs are more effective in the hydrogenation of a series of electron donating or withdrawing olefin substrates compared to conventional homogeneous or heterogeneous Fe(III)-based catalysts. The as-prepared heterogeneous nanocatalyst can be used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. Importantly, the stability of the new catalysts can be easily monitored by PL intensity or quantum yield measurements, which certainly opens the doors for real time monitoring in a range of applications. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, the oxidative property of Fe-CDs was also explored in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in water with the first order rate constant of 0.7 × 10−2 min−1, proving the versatile catalytic properties of such hybrid systems.

  12. High-efficiency and mechano-/photo- bi-catalysis of piezoelectric-ZnO@ photoelectric-TiO2core-shell nanofibers for dye decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Huilin; Wu, Zheng; Jia, Yanmin; Xu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yuntao; Han, Zichen; Wang, Yu

    2017-09-01

    A mechano-/photo- bi-catalyst of piezoelectric-ZnO@photoelectric-TiO 2 core-shell nanofibers was hydrothermally synthesized for Methyl Orange (10 mg L -1 ) decomposition. The mechano-/photo- bi-catalysis in ZnO@TiO 2 is superior to mechano- or photo-catalysis in decomposing Methyl Orange, which is mainly attributed to the synergy effect of the piezoelectric-ZnO core's mechano-catalysis and the thin photoelectric TiO 2 shell's photo-catalysis. The heterostructure of the piezoelectric-ZnO@photoelectric-TiO 2 core-shell interface, being helpful to reduce electron-hole pair recombination and to separate the piezoelectrically-/photoelectric ally- induced electrons and holes, may also make a great contribution to the enhanced catalysis performance. The mechano-/photo-bi-catalysis in ZnO@TiO 2 core-shell nanofibers possesses the advantages of high efficiency, non-toxicity and tractability and is potential in utilizing mechanical/solar energy to deal with dye wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation of a highly active Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst through solid-state ion exchange for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, M.; Kesore, K.; Moennig, R.; Schwieger, W. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Schlossberg 2, D-06108 Halle/S (Germany); Tissler, A. [ALSI-PENTA Zeolithe GmbH, Alustrasse 50-52, D-92421 Schwandorf (Germany); Turek, T. [Institut fuer Chemische Verfahrenstechnik, Universitaet Karlsruhe TH, Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1999-08-16

    This work describes a new and simple preparation method for Fe-ZSM-5 pentasil-zeolites through solid-state ion exchange process. The zeolite catalysts thus prepared exhibit high activity during the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O in the absence of reducing agents. The aimed choice of using FeSO{sub 4}x7H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}-ZSM-5 as starting materials consisted of forming such products (ammonium salts) after the ion exchange process that can be completely removed through thermal treatment. The complete preparation process leading to the formation of catalytically active iron species inside the zeolite takes place in two steps at two distinguished temperatures, respectively. The first step during which the solid-state ion exchange takes place has been carried out through two different routes, in air and in vacuum, in search for an enhanced catalytic activity. The second step has to be necessarily done under anaerobic conditions. XRD measurements have revealed the presence of hematite in samples with a Fe(II)/Al ratio above 0.5. The different numbers of Broensted sites occupied by the iron species in the catalysts with different Fe contents have also been determined

  14. Discovery of microorganisms and enzymes involved in high-solids decomposition of rice straw using metagenomic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitha P Reddy

    Full Text Available High-solids incubations were performed to enrich for microbial communities and enzymes that decompose rice straw under mesophilic (35°C and thermophilic (55°C conditions. Thermophilic enrichments yielded a community that was 7.5 times more metabolically active on rice straw than mesophilic enrichments. Extracted xylanase and endoglucanse activities were also 2.6 and 13.4 times greater, respectively, for thermophilic enrichments. Metagenome sequencing was performed on enriched communities to determine community composition and mine for genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes. Proteobacteria were found to dominate the mesophilic community while Actinobacteria were most abundant in the thermophilic community. Analysis of protein family representation in each metagenome indicated that cellobiohydrolases containing carbohydrate binding module 2 (CBM2 were significantly overrepresented in the thermophilic community. Micromonospora, a member of Actinobacteria, primarily housed these genes in the thermophilic community. In light of these findings, Micromonospora and other closely related Actinobacteria genera appear to be promising sources of thermophilic lignocellulolytic enzymes for rice straw deconstruction under high-solids conditions. Furthermore, these discoveries warrant future research to determine if exoglucanases with CBM2 represent thermostable enzymes tolerant to the process conditions expected to be encountered during industrial biofuel production.

  15. Solid Rocket Launch Vehicle Explosion Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E. H.; Blackwood, J. M.; Hays, M. J.; Skinner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical explosion data from full scale solid rocket launch vehicle accidents and tests were collected from all available literature from the 1950s to the present. In general data included peak blast overpressure, blast impulse, fragment size, fragment speed, and fragment dispersion. Most propellants were 1.1 explosives but a few were 1.3. Oftentimes the data from a single accident was disjointed and/or missing key aspects. Despite this fact, once the data as a whole was digitized, categorized, and plotted clear trends appeared. Particular emphasis was placed on tests or accidents that would be applicable to scenarios from which a crew might need to escape. Therefore, such tests where a large quantity of high explosive was used to initiate the solid rocket explosion were differentiated. Also, high speed ground impacts or tests used to simulate such were also culled. It was found that the explosions from all accidents and applicable tests could be described using only the pressurized gas energy stored in the chamber at the time of failure. Additionally, fragmentation trends were produced. Only one accident mentioned the elusive "small" propellant fragments, but upon further analysis it was found that these were most likely produced as secondary fragments when larger primary fragments impacted the ground. Finally, a brief discussion of how this data is used in a new launch vehicle explosion model for improving crew/payload survival is presented.

  16. Facile and large-scale synthesis of high quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets via methane decomposition over unsupported iron family catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awadallah, Ahmed E., E-mail: ahmedelsayed_epri@yahoo.com [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Aboul-Enein, Ateyya A. [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Kandil, Usama F. [Petroleum Application Department, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Taha, Mahmoud Reda [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    High quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) were successfully prepared via catalytic chemical vapor deposition of methane under ambient pressure using substrate-free unsupported iron, cobalt, and nickel metallic sheets as catalysts. The bulk catalysts were prepared via combustion method using citric acid as a fuel. Various analytical techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the fresh and reduced catalysts and to identify the morphological structure of the as-grown GNPs. TEM images of the reduced metal catalysts showed that polycrystalline metallic sheets were easily produced after complete reduction of unsupported metal oxides. The data demonstrated that the formation of zero-valent metallic sheets could effectively promote the growth of GNPs on their surfaces. The unsupported Ni catalyst exhibits higher catalytic growth activity in terms of GNPs yield (254 wt%) compared with all other catalysts. Raman spectra and TEM results established that a few layers of GNPs with high crystallinity and good graphitization were produced. TGA results further demonstrated that the as-grown GNPs exhibit significantly higher thermal stability in air atmosphere compared with other synthesis methods. - Highlights: • Few-layered graphene nanoplatelets were prepared via methane catalytic decomposition. • Metallic sheets of iron group metals were used as novel catalysts. • The surfaces of metallic sheets were found to be very effective for GNPs growth. • The number of layers is dependent on the morphological structure of the catalysts. • The unsupported metallic Ni catalyst exhibited higher catalytic growth activity.

  17. Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

    2004-10-11

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  18. High spatial resolution infrared micro-spectroscopy reveals the mechanism of leaf lignin decomposition by aquatic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice L Kerr

    Full Text Available Organic carbon is a critical component of aquatic systems, providing energy storage and transfer between organisms. Fungi are a major decomposer group in the aquatic carbon cycle, and are one of few groups thought to be capable of breaking down woody (lignified tissue. In this work we have used high spatial resolution (synchrotron light source infrared micro-spectroscopy to study the interaction between aquatic fungi and lignified leaf vein material (xylem from River Redgum trees (E. camaldulensis endemic to the lowland rivers of South-Eastern Australia. The work provides spatially explicit evidence that fungal colonisation of leaf litter involves the oxidative breakdown of lignin immediately adjacent to the fungal tissue and depletion of the lignin-bound cellulose. Cellulose depletion occurs over relatively short length scales (5-15 µm and highlights the likely importance of mechanical breakdown in accessing the carbohydrate content of this resource. Low bioavailability compounds (oxidized lignin and polyphenols of plant origin remain in colonised leaves, even after fungal activity diminishes, and suggests a possible pathway for the sequestration of carbon in wetlands. The work shows that fungi likely have a critical role in the partitioning of lignified material into a biodegradable fraction that can re-enter the aquatic carbon cycle, and a recalcitrant fraction that enters long-term storage in sediments or contribute to the formation of dissolved organic carbon in the water column.

  19. Escherichia coli O104:H4 Pathogenesis: an Enteroaggregative E. coli/Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Explosive Cocktail of High Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    A major outbreak caused by Escherichia coli of serotype O104:H4 spread throughout Europe in 2011. This large outbreak was caused by an unusual strain that is most similar to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) of serotype O104:H4. A significant difference, however, is the presence of a prophage encoding the Shiga toxin, which is characteristic of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strains. This combination of genomic features, associating characteristics from both EAEC and EHEC, represents a new pathotype. The 2011 E. coli O104:H4 outbreak of hemorrhagic diarrhea in Germany is an example of the explosive cocktail of high virulence and resistance that can emerge in this species. A total of 46 deaths, 782 cases of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and 3,128 cases of acute gastroenteritis were attributed to this new clone of EAEC/EHEC. In addition, recent identification in France of similar O104:H4 clones exhibiting the same virulence factors suggests that the EHEC O104:H4 pathogen has become endemically established in Europe after the end of the outbreak. EAEC strains of serotype O104:H4 contain a large set of virulence-associated genes regulated by the AggR transcription factor. They include, among other factors, the pAA plasmid genes encoding the aggregative adherence fimbriae, which anchor the bacterium to the intestinal mucosa (stacked-brick adherence pattern on epithelial cells). Furthermore, sequencing studies showed that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga toxin-producing EAEC O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak. This article discusses the role these virulence factors could have in EAEC/EHEC O104:H4 pathogenesis.

  20. Regional Seismic Methods of Identifying Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pasyanos, M.; Pyle, M. L.; Hauk, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    A lesson from the 2006, 2009 and 2013 DPRK declared nuclear explosion Ms:mb observations is that our historic collection of data may not be representative of future nuclear test signatures (e.g. Selby et al., 2012). To have confidence in identifying future explosions amongst the background of other seismic signals, we need to put our empirical methods on a firmer physical footing. Here we review the two of the main identification methods: 1) P/S ratios and 2) Moment Tensor techniques, which can be applied at the regional distance (200-1600 km) to very small events, improving nuclear explosion monitoring and confidence in verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Amplitude ratios of seismic P-to-S waves at sufficiently high frequencies (~>2 Hz) can identify explosions among a background of natural earthquakes (e.g. Walter et al., 1995). However the physical basis for the generation of explosion S-waves, and therefore the predictability of this P/S technique as a function of event properties such as size, depth, geology and path, remains incompletely understood. Calculated intermediate period (10-100s) waveforms from regional 1-D models can match data and provide moment tensor results that separate explosions from earthquakes and cavity collapses (e.g. Ford et al. 2009). However it has long been observed that some nuclear tests produce large Love waves and reversed Rayleigh waves that complicate moment tensor modeling. Again the physical basis for the generation of these effects from explosions remains incompletely understood. We are re-examining regional seismic data from a variety of nuclear test sites including the DPRK and the former Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)). Newer relative amplitude techniques can be employed to better quantify differences between explosions and used to understand those differences in term of depth, media and other properties. We are also making use of the Source Physics

  1. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... hydrocarbons. Explosive organic nitrate mixtures. Explosive powders. F Flash powder. ] Fulminate of mercury. Fulminate of silver. Fulminating gold. Fulminating mercury. Fulminating platinum. Fulminating silver. G... fulminate. Mercury oxalate. Mercury tartrate. Metriol trinitrate. Minol-2 . MMAN ; methylamine nitrate...

  2. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, severe psychological distress, explosive anger and grief amongst partners of survivors of high levels of trauma in post-conflict Timor-Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silove, D M; Tay, A K; Steel, Z; Tam, N; Soares, Z; Soares, C; Dos Reis, N; Alves, A; Rees, S

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the mental health of partners of survivors of high levels of trauma in post-conflict countries. We studied 677 spouse dyads (n = 1354) drawn from a community survey (response 82.4%) in post-conflict Timor-Leste. We used culturally adapted measures of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological distress, explosive anger and grief. Latent class analysis identified three classes of couples: class 1, comprising women with higher trauma events (TEs), men with intermediate TEs (19%); class 2, including men with higher TEs, women with lower TEs (23%); and class 3, comprising couples in which men and women had lower TE exposure (58%) (the reference group). Men and women partners of survivors of higher TE exposure (classes 1 and 2) had increased symptoms of explosive anger and grief compared with the reference class (class 3). Women partners of survivors of higher TE exposure (class 2) had a 20-fold increased rate of PTSD symptoms compared with the reference class, a pattern that was not evident for men living with women exposed to higher levels of trauma (class 1). Men and women living with survivors of higher levels of trauma showed an increase in symptoms of grief and explosive anger. The manifold higher rate of PTSD symptoms amongst women living with men exposed to high levels of trauma requires replication. It is important to assess the mental health of partners when treating survivors of high levels of trauma in post-conflict settings.

  3. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, A. [ITEP,25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Institute for Information Transmission Problems,19-1 Bolshoy Karetniy, Moscow, 127051 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI,31 Kashirskoe highway, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Zenkevich, Y. [ITEP,25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI,31 Kashirskoe highway, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences,6a Prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-16

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair “interaction” is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  4. Quick-closing valve is actuated by explosive discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, S. J.

    1966-01-01

    Remotely controlled plug-type valve shuts off a high-pressure, high-temperature gas flow in a few milliseconds. The valve is actuated by a commercially available electrically initiated squib of low explosive power. More rapid closure is attainable with squibs containing heavier explosive changes.

  5. Relating pressure measurements to phenomena observed in high speed video recordings during tests of explosive charges in a semi-confined blast chamber

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mostert, FJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available video recordings were obtained from the open end of the chamber of the fireball and post detonative behaviour of explosive products. The framing rate of the video camera was 10 000 fps and the pressure measurements were obtained for at least 10 ms after...

  6. High speed imaging, lightning mapping arrays and thermal imaging: a synergy for the monitoring of electrical discharges at the onset of volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Cimarelli, Corrado; Behnke, Sonja; Cigala, Valeria; Edens, Harald; McNutt, Stefen; Smith, Cassandra; Thomas, Ronald; Van Eaton, Alexa

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic lightning is being increasingly studied, due to its great potential for the detection and monitoring of ash plumes. Indeed, it is observed in a large number of ash-rich volcanic eruptions and it produces electromagnetic waves that can be detected remotely in all weather conditions. Electrical discharges in volcanic plume can also significantly change the structural, chemical and reactivity properties of the erupted material. Although electrical discharges are detected in various regions of the plume, those happening at the onset of an explosion are of particular relevance for the early warning and the study of volcanic jet dynamics. In order to better constrain the electrical activity of young volcanic plumes, we deployed at Sakurajima (Japan) in 2015 a multiparametric set-up including: i) a lightning mapping array (LMA) of 10 VHF antennas recording the electromagnetic waves produced by lightning at a sample rate of 25 Msps; ii) a visible-light high speed camera (5000 frames per second, 0.5 m pixel size, 300 m field of view) shooting short movies (approx. duration 1 s) at different stages of the plume evolution, showing the location of discharges in relation to the plume; and iii) a thermal camera (25 fps, 1.5 m pixel size, 800 m field of view) continuously recording the plume and allowing the estimation of its main source parameters (volume, rise velocity, mass eruption rate). The complementarity of these three setups is demonstrated by comparing and aggregating the data at various stages of the plume development. In the earliest stages, the high speed camera spots discrete small discharges, that appear on the LMA data as peaks superimposed to the continuous radio frequency (CRF) signal. At later stages, flashes happen less frequently and increase in length. The correspondence between high speed camera and LMA data allows to define a direct correlation between the length of the flash and the intensity of the electromagnetic signal. Such correlation is

  7. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d, as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables....... Exploiting this duality, we propose necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such a decomposition of a given rank, using the properties of Hankel (and quasi-Hankel) matrices, derived from multivariate polynomials and normal form computations. This leads to the resolution of systems...

  8. Coal-preparation baghouse protects against explosion damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Improvements in baghouse containment technology are reducing the risks when air and coal dust mixtures ignite and cause secondary explosions that were formerly vented. The cement industry was quick to adopt the new technology that resembles a circular pressure vessel able to withstand a 50-psi internal pressure and contain secondary explosions. Steps to minimize primary explosions include new standards for baghouse design and construction to eliminate components that cause sparks, electrical grounding, continuous dust removal, high air-to-cloth ratios, and pulse jet cleaning. Other considerations involving baghouse location, maintenance access, fire suppression, and rotary valve sizing can also reduce explosion risks. (DCK)

  9. Nitrogen-rich heterocycles as reactivity retardants in shocked insensitive explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaa, M Riad; Reed, Evan J; Fried, Laurence E; Goldman, Nir

    2009-04-22

    We report the first quantum-based multiscale simulations to study the reactivity of shocked perfect crystals of the insensitive energetic material triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB). Tracking chemical transformations of TATB experiencing overdriven shock speeds of 9 km/s for up to 0.43 ns and 10 km/s for up to 0.2 ns reveal high concentrations of nitrogen-rich heterocyclic clusters. Further reactivity of TATB toward the final decomposition products of fluid N(2) and solid carbon is inhibited due to the formation of these heterocycles. Our results thus suggest a new mechanism for carbon-rich explosive materials that precedes the slow diffusion-limited process of forming the bulk solid from carbon clusters and provide fundamental insight at the atomistic level into the long reaction zone of shocked TATB.

  10. The gas dynamics of explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee,\tJohn H S

    2016-01-01

    Explosions, and the non-steady shock propagation associated with them, continue to interest researchers working in different fields of physics and engineering (such as astrophysics and fusion). Based on the author's course in shock dynamics, this book describes the various analytical methods developed to determine non-steady shock propagation. These methods offer a simple alternative to the direct numerical integration of the Euler equations and offer a better insight into the physics of the problem. Professor Lee presents the subject systematically and in a style that is accessible to graduate students and researchers working in shock dynamics, combustion, high-speed aerodynamics, propulsion and related topics.

  11. Power of TATP based explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyás, Robert; Selesovský, Jakub

    2009-06-15

    The power of various explosive mixtures based on triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP), ammonimum nitrate (AN), urea nitrate (UrN) and water (W), namely TATP/AN, oil/AN, TATP/UrN, TATP/W and TATP/AN/W, was studied using the ballistic mortar test. The ternary mixtures of TATP/AN/W have relatively high power in case of the low water contents. Their power decrease significantly with increasing the water content in the mixture to more than 30%.

  12. XIT Commercial Explosives Identification Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Explosives Identification Tool (XIT) was supported by the Canadian Safety and Security Program ( CSSP ) which is led by Defence Research and Development...Explosives Training Unit, and Toronto Police Service, Explosives Disposal Unit. CSSP is a federally-funded program to strengthen Canada’s ability to

  13. Kosambi and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 6. Kosambi and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition. Roddam Narasimha. General ... Keywords. Proper orthogonal decomposition; Karhunen–Loéve expansion; statistics in function space; characteristic eddies; special calculating machines.

  14. Explosive detection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, Steven; Crownover, Robin

    2017-05-01

    The continuing proliferation of improvised explosive devices is an omnipresent threat to civilians and members of military and law enforcement around the world. The ability to accurately and quickly detect explosive materials from a distance would be an extremely valuable tool for mitigating the risk posed by these devices. A variety of techniques exist that are capable of accurately identifying explosive compounds, but an effective standoff technique is still yet to be realized. Most of the methods being investigated to fill this gap in capabilities are laser based. Raman spectroscopy is one such technique that has been demonstrated to be effective at a distance. Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) is a technique capable of identifying chemical compounds inside of containers, which could be used to detect hidden explosive devices. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) utilized a coherent pair of lasers to excite a sample, greatly increasing the response of sample while decreasing the strength of the lasers being used, which significantly improves the eye safety issue that typically hinders laser-based detection methods. Time-gating techniques are also being developed to improve the data collection from Raman techniques, which are often hindered fluorescence of the test sample in addition to atmospheric, substrate, and contaminant responses. Ultraviolet based techniques have also shown significant promise by greatly improved signal strength from excitation of resonance in many explosive compounds. Raman spectroscopy, which identifies compounds based on their molecular response, can be coupled with Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) capable of characterizing the sample's atomic composition using a single laser.

  15. Azimuthal decomposition with digital holograms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Litvin_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 26000 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Litvin_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Azimuthal decomposition... outside the annular ring and 1 inside the ring was programmed using complex amplitude modulation for amplitude only effects on a phase-only device. The hologram takes the form of a high frequency grating that oscillates between phase values of 0...

  16. The Quiet Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    weak and 'soft' [1], very different from a gamma-ray burst and more in line with what is expected from a normal supernova." So, after the supernova was discovered, the team rapidly observed it from the Asiago Observatory in Northern Italy and established that it was a Type Ic supernova. "These are supernovae produced by stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium-rich outermost layers before exploding, and are the only type of supernovae which are associated with (long) gamma-ray bursts," explains Mazzali. "The object thus became even more interesting!" Earlier this year, an independent team of astronomers reported in the journal Nature that SN 2008D is a rather normal supernova. The fact that X-rays were detected was, they said, because for the first time, astronomers were lucky enough to catch the star in the act of exploding. Mazzali and his team think otherwise. "Our observations and modeling show this to be a rather unusual event, to be better understood in terms of an object lying at the boundary between normal supernovae and gamma-ray bursts." The team set up an observational campaign to monitor the evolution of the supernova using both ESO and national telescopes, collecting a large quantity of data. The early behaviour of the supernova indicated that it was a highly energetic event, although not quite as powerful as a gamma-ray burst. After a few days, however, the spectra of the supernova began to change. In particular Helium lines appeared, showing that the progenitor star was not stripped as deeply as supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts. Over the years, Mazzali and his group have developed theoretical models to analyse the properties of supernovae. When applied to SN2008D, their models indicated that the progenitor star was at birth as massive as 30 times the Sun, but had lost so much mass that at the time of the explosion the star had a mass of only 8-10 solar masses. The likely result of the collapse of such a massive star is a black hole

  17. Resource recycling technique of abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyang; Ding, Yukui

    2017-08-01

    TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive is a kind of high energy mixed explosive. It has the detonation characteristics even when reaching the scrapping standard. Inappropriate disposal often causes serious accident. Employing the resource recycling technique, the abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosive can be recycled. This paper summarized the progress of recycling of abandoned mixed explosive. What's more, three kinds of technological process of resource recycling abandoned TNT-RDX-AL mixed explosives are introduced. The author analysis of the current recovery processes and provided a reference for the recycling of the other same type explosive.

  18. Class and Home Problems. Modeling an Explosion: The Devil Is in the Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter W.; Rudie, Alan W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, three North American pulp mills experienced catastrophic equipment failures while using 50 wt% hydrogen peroxide. In two cases, explosions occurred when normal pulp flow was interrupted due to other process problems. To understand the accidents, a kinetic model of alkali-catalyzed decomposition of peroxide was developed.…

  19. Headspace-GC/MS detection of TATP traces in post-explosion debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambouli, A; El Bouri, A; Bouayoun, T; Bellimam, M A

    2004-12-02

    In this study, we describe a HS-GC/MS method as a new analytical technique for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) traces in samples from post-explosion debris. We evaluate the optimum parameters for the analysis of this product with lowliness thermal decomposition and for the detection of TATP lesser than nanogram (.1 ng) level.

  20. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal structure of explosively compacted high-T(sub c) superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D.; Szalay, A.

    1995-01-01

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) and a composite of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) + Ag, with changing K, Na and F content but a constant silver content (Ag = 10 mass%) was prepared using a single heat treatment. the resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 micron, 0-63 micron and 63-900 micron and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10(exp 4) MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 micron fraction of composition Y(Ba(1.95) K(0.01)Cu3O(x)F(0),(05)/Ag: porosity less than 0.01 cu cm/g and current density 2800 A/sq cm at 77K.

  1. Thermal Environment inside a Tunnel after Thermobaric Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The outstanding thermal damage effect of thermobaric explosive (TBX is enhanced in closed or semiclosed spaces, which may pose a serious threat to the security of people sheltered in tunnels or other protective engineering. In order to investigate the thermal environment inside a tunnel after thermobaric explosion, we developed a damage evaluation method for the thermal radiation of explosion fireballs in tunnels; secondly, the air temperature distribution inside a tunnel shortly after explosion was theoretically analyzed; finally, the dynamic thermal environment after the explosion and the influences of TBXs mass and initial ground temperature on it in cases of open and blocked tunnels were numerically simulated with the FLUENT software. The results show that the fireball thermal radiation damage occurs mainly in the vicinity of the explosion source. The air temperature inside a tunnel shortly after the explosion decreases continuously with increasing distance from the explosion source and finally reaches the initial air temperature. The decay rate of air temperature inside a tunnel is slower in the blocked case, which increases the probability of causing a secondary fire disaster. The increase of explosive mass and the initial ground temperature favor the high-temperature performance of TBX, especially for the blocked tunnel.

  2. High-speed imaging and small-scale explosive characterization techniques to understand effects of primary blast-induced injury on nerve cell structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, T.; Banton, R.; Zander, N.; Duckworth, J.; Benjamin, R.; Sparks, R.

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often associated with blast exposure. Even in the absence of penetrating injury or evidence of tissue injury on imaging, blast TBI may trigger a series of neural/glial cellular and functional changes. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and proper treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) caused by explosive blast is challenging, as it is not easy to clinically distinguish blast from non-blast TBI on the basis of patient symptoms. Damage to brain tissue, cell, and subcellular structures continues to occur slowly and in a manner undetectable by conventional imaging techniques. The threshold shock impulse levels required to induce damage and the cumulative effects upon multiple exposures are not well characterized. Understanding how functional and structural damage from realistic blast impact at cellular and tissue levels at variable timescales after mTBI events may be vital for understanding this injury phenomenon and for linking mechanically induced structural changes with measurable effects on the nervous system. Our working hypothesis is that there is some transient physiological dysfunction occurring at cellular and subcellular levels within the central nervous system due to primary blast exposure. We have developed a novel in vitro indoor experimental system that uses real military explosive charges to more accurately represent military blast exposure and to probe the effects of primary explosive blast on dissociated neurons. We believe this system offers a controlled experimental method to analyze and characterize primary explosive blast-induced cellular injury and to understand threshold injury phenomenon. This paper will also focus on the modeling aspect of our work and how it relates to the experimental work.

  3. Preciscavanje otpadnih voda u postupcima prerade i flegmatizacije eksploziva / Refining of waste waters in processes of manufacturing and coating of high explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Anđelković-Lukić

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available U radu su prikazani tehnološki postupci prerade (flegmatizacije eksploziva pri kojima dolazi do zagađenja okoline otpadnim vodama. Prikazani su neki od načina prerade otpadnih voda pre nego što se ispuste u javne vodotokove. / The paper deals with production processes of manufacturing and coating Ugh explosives which pollute environment with waste waters. Some methods of refining waste waters before letting them into open water current are presented.

  4. ACUTE EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT WARM-UP PROTOCOLS ON FLEXIBILITY AND LOWER LIMB EXPLOSIVE PERFORMANCE IN MALE AND FEMALE HIGH LEVEL ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charilaos Tsolakis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of two different warm-up protocols on lower limb power and flexibility in high level athletes. Twenty international level fencers (10 males and 10 females performed two warm-up protocols that included 5-min light jogging and either short (15s or long (45s static stretching exercises for each of the main leg muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstrings and triceps surae, followed by either 3 sets of 3 (short stretching treatment, or 3 sets of 5 tuck jumps (long stretching treatment, in a randomized crossover design with one week between treatments. Hip joint flexion was measured with a Lafayette goniometer before and after the 5-min warm-up, after stretching and 8 min after the tuck jumps, while counter movement jump (CMJ performance was evaluated by an Ergojump contact platform, before and after the stretching treatment, as well as immediately after and 8 minutes after the tuck jumps. Three way ANOVA (condition, time, gender revealed significant time (p < 0.001 and gender (p < 0.001 main effects for hip joint flexion, with no interaction between factors. Flexibility increased by 6. 8 ± 1.1% (p < 0.01 after warm-up and by another 5.8 ± 1.6% (p < 0.01 after stretching, while it remained increased 8 min after the tuck jumps. Women had greater ROM compared with men at all time points (125 ± 8° vs. 94 ± 4° p<0.01 at baseline, but the pattern of change in hip flexibility was not different between genders. CMJ performance was greater in men compared with women at all time points (38.2 ± 1.9 cm vs. 29.8 ± 1.2 cm p < 0.01 at baseline, but the percentage of change CMJ performance was not different between genders. CMJ performance remained unchanged throughout the short stretching protocol, while it decreased by 5.5 ± 0.9% (p < 0.01 after stretching in the long stretching protocol However, 8 min after the tuck jumps, CMJ performance was not different from the baseline value (p = 0.075. In conclusion, lower limb power may

  5. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained...

  6. Jet noise recorded during discrete explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlato, P.; Sesterhenn, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Most commonly, acoustic studies of explosive volcanic activity focus on the infrasonic range, as related to large volumetric changes mostly associated with the liberation of pressurized gas. However, there are multiple potential sources of sound that accompany explosive activity, expected to cover a broad range of frequencies. Among the audible range are several mechanisms, generating sound in high-velocity jets of gas or gas-particle mixture entering the atmosphere. This types of sound, well-documented and investigated in physics and engineering literature, has been so far mostly neglected in the study of explosive eruptions, due to the high energy content of the jet noise in the infrasonic regime, despite the potential it holds for parameterizing and understanding eruption processes. High-speed imaging of Strombolian and Vulcanian explosive eruptions at several volcanoes allowed the visualization of acoustic waves generated during the emission of the eruptive gas-pyroclast mixture. The waves, visible only when travelling within dilute gas/aerosol plumes, are thought to cause a temporary phase change in the travel medium. Image analysis allows direct measurement of the apparent (projected) trajectory, wavelength and travel velocity of the waves. Synchronized audio recording from the same eruptions include frequency contents in agreement with the observed waves. The general features of the observed waves are compatible with jet noise originated by the gas-pyroclast mixture entering the atmosphere, opening the way for future comparison with the results of numerical simulations of explosive eruptions, and possibly setting the basis for new acoustic monitoring tools for explosive eruptions.

  7. Magnetorotational Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are accompanied by formation of neutron stars. The gravitation energy is transformed into the energy of the explosion, observed as SN II, SN Ib,c type supernovae. We present results of 2-D MHD simulations, where the source of energy is rotation, and magnetic eld serves as a "transition belt" for the transformation of the rotation energy into the energy of the explosion. The toroidal part of the magnetic energy initially grows linearly with time due to dierential rotation. When the twisted toroidal component strongly exceeds the poloidal eld, magneto-rotational instability develops, leading to a drastic acceleration in the growth of magnetic energy. Finally, a fast MHD shock is formed, producing a supernova explosion. Mildly collimated jet is produced for dipole-like type of the initial field. At very high initial magnetic field no MRI development was found.

  8. Magic Coset Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciatori, Sergio L; Marrani, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting a "mixed" non-symmetric Freudenthal-Rozenfeld-Tits magic square, two types of coset decompositions are analyzed for the non-compact special K\\"ahler symmetric rank-3 coset E7(-25)/[(E6(-78) x U(1))/Z_3], occurring in supergravity as the vector multiplets' scalar manifold in N=2, D=4 exceptional Maxwell-Einstein theory. The first decomposition exhibits maximal manifest covariance, whereas the second (triality-symmetric) one is of Iwasawa type, with maximal SO(8) covariance. Generalizations to conformal non-compact, real forms of non-degenerate, simple groups "of type E7" are presented for both classes of coset parametrizations, and relations to rank-3 simple Euclidean Jordan algebras and normed trialities over division algebras are also discussed.

  9. Services Textbook of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-03-01

    and shock effects is obtained by the use of ’primary’ (also known as ’initiatory’) explosives, among the most important of which are mercury fulminate ...Brown had discovered that compressed dry guncotton could be detonated by a mercury fulminate detonator, and a little later they found that compressed wet...of his powder (a mixture of mercury fulminate and potassium chlorate) enclosed in thin copper caps. This idea did not at once meet with the approval

  10. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  11. Effect of Velocity of Detonation of Explosives on Seismic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Leidig, M.; Bonner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We studied seismic body wave generation from four fully contained explosions of approximately the same yields (68 kg of TNT equivalent) conducted in anisotropic granite in Barre, VT. The explosions were detonated using three types of explosives with different velocities of detonation (VOD): Black Powder (BP), Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil/Emulsion (ANFO), and Composition B (COMP B). The main objective of the experiment was to study differences in seismic wave generation among different types of explosives, and to determine the mechanism responsible for these differences. The explosives with slow burn rate (BP) produced lower P-wave amplitude and lower corner frequency, which resulted in lower seismic efficiency (0.35%) in comparison with high burn rate explosives (2.2% for ANFO and 3% for COMP B). The seismic efficiency estimates for ANFO and COMP B agree with previous studies for nuclear explosions in granite. The body wave radiation pattern is consistent with an isotropic explosion with an added azimuthal component caused by vertical tensile fractures oriented along pre-existing micro-fracturing in the granite, although the complexities in the P- and S-wave radiation patterns suggest that more than one fracture orientation could be responsible for their generation. High S/P amplitude ratios and low P-wave amplitudes suggest that a significant fraction of the BP source mechanism can be explained by opening of the tensile fractures as a result of the slow energy release.

  12. Liquid explosives. The threat to civil aviation and the European response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, C.J. de; Lemmens, O.M.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the specific group of homemade liquid high explosives in relation to aviation security. The sudden and irrefutable focus on homemade explosives and liquid explosives in particular after the 2006 defeated attacks in London, made the aviation security community realize that the

  13. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ki-Yeob; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Jae Woong; Ryu, Yong Hee; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs), has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of...

  14. Do not underestimate danger of explosion; Even dust can destroy equipment and kill

    OpenAIRE

    P. Štroch

    2016-01-01

    Explosions never happen at random, they have their exact laws. And sometimes they need very little – high dust concentration, turbulence and ignition source, often spontaneous combustion. If these conditions are met, explosions always follow. It needs to be mentioned that all organic substances are explosive, for example starch, flour, dried milk, sugar, cocoa, pharmaceuticals, textiles, wood and coal dust and others. The highest risk of explosion primarily threatens factories, where they wor...

  15. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2017-05-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster ( F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  16. Photodegradation at day, microbial decomposition at night - decomposition in arid lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliksman, Daniel; Gruenzweig, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Our current knowledge of decomposition in dry seasons and its role in carbon turnover is fragmentary. So far, decomposition during dry seasons was mostly attributed to abiotic mechanisms, mainly photochemical and thermal degradation, while the contribution of microorganisms to the decay process was excluded. We asked whether microbial decomposition occurs during the dry season and explored its interaction with photochemical degradation under Mediterranean climate. We conducted a litter bag experiment with local plant litter and manipulated litter exposure to radiation using radiation filters. We found notable rates of CO2 fluxes from litter which were related to microbial activity mainly during night-time throughout the dry season. This activity was correlated with litter moisture content and high levels of air humidity and dew. Day-time CO2 fluxes were related to solar radiation, and radiation manipulation suggested photodegradation as the underlying mechanism. In addition, a decline in microbial activity was followed by a reduction in photodegradation-related CO2 fluxes. The levels of microbial decomposition and photodegradation in the dry season were likely the factors influencing carbon mineralization during the subsequent wet season. This study showed that microbial decomposition can be a dominant contributor to CO2 emissions and mass loss in the dry season and it suggests a regulating effect of microbial activity on photodegradation. Microbial decomposition is an important contributor to the dry season decomposition and impacts the annual litter turn-over rates in dry regions. Global warming may lead to reduced moisture availability and dew deposition, which may greatly influence not only microbial decomposition of plant litter, but also photodegradation.

  17. Analysis of different materials subjected to open-air explosions in search of explosive traces by Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Félix; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2017-06-01

    Post-explosion scenes offer such chaos and destruction that evidence recovery and detection of post-blast residues from the explosive in the surrounding materials is highly challenging and difficult. The suitability of materials to retain explosives residues and their subsequent analysis has been scarcely investigated. Particularly, the use of explosive mixtures containing inorganic oxidizing salts to make improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is a current security concern due to their wide availability and lax control. In this work, a wide variety of materials such as glass, steel, plywood, plastic bag, brick, cardboard or cotton subjected to open-air explosions were examined using confocal Raman microscopy, aiming to detect the inorganic oxidizing salts contained in explosives as black powder, chloratite, dynamite, ammonium nitrate fuel oil and ammonal. Post-blast residues were detected through microscopic examination of materials surfaces. In general, the more homogeneous and smoother the surface was, the less difficulties and better results in terms of identification were obtained. However, those highly irregular surfaces were the most unsuitable collectors for the posterior identification of explosive traces by Raman microscopy. The findings, difficulties and some recommendations related to the identification of post-blast particles in the different materials studied are thoroughly discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR THE KRAKATOA HYDROVOLCANIC EXPLOSION AND TSUNAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Mader

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Krakatoa exploded August 27, 1883 obliterating 5 square miles of land and leaving a crater 3.5 miles across and 200-300 meters deep. Thirty three feet high tsunami waves hit Anjer and Merak demolishing the towns and killing over 10,000 people. In Merak the wave rose to 135 feet above sea level and moved 100 ton coral blocks up on the shore.Tsunami waves swept over 300 coastal towns and villages killing 40,000 people. The sea withdrew at Bombay, India and killed one person in Sri Lanka.The tsunami was produced by a hydrovolcanic explosion and the associated shock wave and pyroclastic flows.A hydrovolcanic explosion is generated by the interaction of hot magma with ground water. It is called Surtseyan after the 1963 explosive eruption off Iceland. The water flashes to steam and expands explosively. Liquid water becoming water gas at constant volume generates a pressure of 30,000 atmospheres.The Krakatoa hydrovolcanic explosion was modeled using the full Navier-Stokes AMREulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE which includes the high pressure physics of explosions.The water in the hydrovolcanic explosion was described as liquid water heated by the magma to 1100 degree Kelvin or 19 kcal/mole. The high temperature water is an explosive with the hot liquid water going to a water gas. The BKW steady state detonation state has a peak pressure of 89 kilobars, a propagation velocity of 5900 meters/second and the water is compressed to 1.33 grams/cc.The observed Krakatoa tsunami had a period of less than 5 minutes and wavelength of less than 7 kilometers and thus rapidly decayed. The far field tsunami wave was negligible. The air shock generated by the hydrovolcanic explosion propagated around the world and coupled to the ocean resulting in the explosion being recorded on tide gauges around the world.

  19. Thermal decomposition of lead titanyl oxalate tetrahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, G.M.H.; Oranje, P.J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of PbTiO(C2O4)2·4H2O (PTO) has been investigated, employing TG, quantitative DTA, infrared spectroscopy and (high temperature) X-ray powder diffraction. The decomposition involves four main steps. The first is the dehydration of the tetrahydrate (30–180°C), followed by a small

  20. Simultaneous determination of arbutin and its decomposed product hydroquinone in whitening creams using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection: Effect of temperature and pH on decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, J S; Kim, B H; Lee, S H; Kwon, H J; Bae, H J; Kim, S K; Park, J A; Shim, J H; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shin, H C

    2015-12-01

    Arbutin is an effective agent for the treatment of melanin disorders. Arbutin may be converted to hydroquinone under conditions of high temperature, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and dilute acid. The aim of the current study was to develop an analytical method to determine the levels of arbutin and hydroquinone in whitening cosmetic products using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD). In addition, we investigated the effects of high temperature and pH on the decomposition of arbutin. Samples extracted using two-step sonications were separated on a C18 column using a gradient mobile phase consisting of water and methanol. A 60-mm (40 μL) DAD cell was used to enhance the sensitivity of hydroquinone determination. Thermal decomposition of arbutin was evaluated at temperatures ranging from 60 to 120°C for 1-36 h. The method showed good linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9997), precision (relative standard deviation, RSD cream and 0.12 g 100 g(-1) cream of hydroquinone. Arbutin (327.18 ppm) decomposed after 6 h at 120°C and produced 10.73 ppm of hydroquinone. The developed method is simple to detect both arbutin and hydroquinone simultaneously in cosmetic products, at an adequate level of sensitivity. Notably, temperature and pH did not influence the decomposition of arbutin to hydroquinone in a 2% arbutin cream. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  1. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal strucutre of explosively compacted high-Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D. [Univ. of Veszprem (Hungary)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y} and a composite, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y}+Ag, with changing K, Na and F content, but a constant silver content (Ag=10 mass per cent) was prepared using a single heat treatment. The resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 {mu}m, 0-63 {mu}m and 63-900 {mu}m and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10{sup 4} MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 {mu}m fraction of composition Y(Ba{sub 1,95}K{sub 0,01})Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}F{sub 0,05}/Ag: porosity <0.01 cm{sup 3}/g and current density 2800 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K.

  2. Quantification of 1,3-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin and its decomposition products in cosmetics by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Akiko; Doi, Takahiro; Takeda, Akihiro; Kajimura, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method to simultaneously and quantitatively measure four compounds commonly found in commercial cosmetics: 1,3-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMDMH) and its decomposition products 1-hydroxymethyl-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (1-MDMH), 3-hydroxymethyl-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (3-MDMH), and 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH). In addition, we succeeded in synthesizing 3-MDMH selectively from DMDMH. Our new analytical method involves the use of an HPLC system and an octadecylsilanized silica column. HPLC calibration curves for DMDMH, 1-MDMH, 3-MDMH, and DMH were linear over the wide concentration ranges. In cosmetics whose pH is basic, the recovery of 3-MDMH and DMH was substantially higher than 100%, whereas that of DMDMH and 1-MDMH was considerably lower than 100%, however, the average recovery of the four compounds was in the range of 85-105%. It was suggested that the latter tend to decompose to the former. We confirmed that our HPLC separation method is suitable for the analysis of dimethyhydantoins without the progress of decomposition and should be useful for rapid analysis of these compounds in cosmetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal decomposition of illite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo José Humberto de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on illite in air at temperatures ranging from 750 to 1150 °C was studied using the Mössbauer effect in 57Fe. The dependence of the Mössbauer parameters and relative percentage of the radiation absorption area was measured as a function of the firing temperature. The onset of thermal structural decomposition occurred at 800 °C. With rising temperature, the formation of hematite (Fe2O3 increased at the expense of the silicate mineral.

  4. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  5. Fracturing composition using the gas pressure generated by the thermit decomposition reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okitsu, Toshihiro; Moriyama, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryouichi

    1995-12-31

    The fracturing composition using the gas pressure generated by the thermit decomposition reaction gives the following performances: Heat of reaction--280 kcal/kg; Gas volume--330 l/kg; and Reaction rate--190 m/sec. With respect to many valuable data from the various fracturing experiments on sites, the results on breakage by the fracturing composition as compared with commercial explosives can be summarized as follows: (1) The specific charge of the fracturing composition is between two and four times that of a watergel explosive. (2) The ground vibration generated on breaking is between one-third and one-fourth that of the explosive. On the other hand, the sound level is between ten and twenty dB (A fast) lower than that of the explosive. (3) The fracturing composition can be applicable to any free faces breakage for the various brittle materials.

  6. Local Explosion Monitoring using Rg

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, C. T.; Baker, G. E.

    2016-12-01

    Rg is the high-frequency fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave, which is only excited by near-surface events. As such, an Rg detection indicates that a seismic source is shallow, generally less than a few km depending on the velocity structure, and so likely man-made. Conversely, the absence of Rg can indicate that the source is deeper and so likely naturally occurring. We have developed a new automated method of detecting Rg arrivals from various explosion sources at local distances, and a process for estimating the likelihood that a source is not shallow when no Rg is detected. Our Rg detection method scans the spectrogram of a seismic signal for a characteristic frequency peak. We test this on the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment data, which includes earthquakes, active source explosions in boreholes, and mining explosions recorded on a dense network that spans the Bighorn Mountains and Powder River Basin. The Rg passbands used were 0.4-0.8 Hz for mining blasts and 0.8-1.2 Hz for borehole shots. We successfully detect Rg across the full network for most mining blasts. The lower-yield shots are detectable out to 50 km. We achieve methods that use cross-correlation to detect retrograde motion of the surface waves. Our method shows more complete detection across the network, especially in the Powder River Basin where Rg exhibits prograde motion that does not trigger the existing detector. We also estimate the likelihood that Rg would have been detected from a surface source, based on the measured P amplitude. For example, an event with a large P wave and no detectable Rg would have a high probability of being a deeper event, whereas we cannot confidently determine whether an event with a small P wave and no Rg detection is shallow or not. These results allow us to detect Rg arrivals, which indicate a shallow source, and to use the absence of Rg to estimate the likelihood that a source in a calibrated region is not shallow enough to be man-made.

  7. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained ge...... capturing pure noise. Therefore it is necessary to use both criteria, high likelihood ratio in favor of a more complex genetic model and proportion of genetic variance explained, to identify biologically important gene groups...

  8. Construction of hydrogenation stalls for explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichle, L.

    1943-05-03

    This report contained explanations for different questions that had been asked by the Association of Chemical Manufacturers. The first item discussed was the pressure occurring in hydrogenation stalls in hydrogen explosions. The pressures actually used were much smaller than the maximum design pressure due to burning gases being allowed to escape from the top and front of the stalls since these areas were open and it could not be assumed that the whole stall space was filled with a 32% hydrogen concentration at the beginning of an explosion. The second item discussed was specifications and rules for the building of hydrogenation stalls. These included the calculations for simple wind pressure according to the Building Code with the usual safety factors and the calculations for an inner pressure of 300 kg/m/sup 2/ with the usual safety factors. An explanation of a stall explosion in Poelitz and reinforced stall construction in Poelitz were two other items that were discussed. Appendix I of the report involved maximum pressures and temperature in hydrogen explosions. Diagram I was involved with this. Appendix II discussed the behavior of a hydrogen flame at high emerging velocities and Appendix III discussed stall construction at Poelitz.

  9. Effects of temperature, humidity, sample geometry, and other variables on Bruceton Type 12 impact initiation of HMX-based high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilucea, Gabriel; Aragon, Daniel; Peterson, Paul

    2009-06-01

    The drop weight impact test, developed at Bruceton Naval Research Laboratory 60 years ago, is still the most commonly used configuration for evaluating sensitivity of explosives to non-shock ignition. The standard drop weight impact test is performed under ambient conditions for temperature and humidity - variations in which are known to significantly affect the probability of reaction. We have performed a series of impact tests in an attempt to characterize the effect of temperature, humidity, sample geometry (height, mass, L/d, and pressed density), sample confinement, and impact surface properties (strength and coefficient of friction) on the probability of reaction in a drop weight impact test. Differences in the probability of reaction have been determined across a range of drop heights for each configuration. The results clearly show significant shifts in the probability of reaction and in the slope of the reaction probability curve for each of the variables.

  10. Effect of high-temperature treatment in air on the surface area and porous texture of zirconium dioxide prepared by thermal decomposition of the nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arean, C.O.; Colinas, J.M.F.; Garcia, M.A.V. (Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry); Arjona, A.M. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

    1982-09-01

    Zirconium dioxide, prepared by thermal decomposition of zirconium nitrate, was heated in air at temperatures ranging from 573 to 1023 K. An analysis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms on the resulting materials allowed determination of the corresponding specific surface area and porous texture. All oxides calcined within the temperature range 573 to 873 K were found to be basically mesoporous; the most frequent pore radius increasing from 3 to 10.5 nm as the temperature was raised. BET surface areas decreased across the same temperature range, from 94 down to 20 m/sup 2/ g/sup -1/. The sample fired at 1023 K showed a BET surface area smaller than 5 m/sup 2/ g/sup -1/.

  11. Explosives detection for aviation security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainberg, A

    1992-03-20

    The threat of terrorism against commercial aviation has received much attention in the past few years. In response, new ways to detect explosives and to combine techniques based on different phenomena into integrated security systems are being developed to improve aviation security. Several leading methods for explosives and weapons detection are presented.

  12. Microbial bioreporters of trace explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, Benjamin; Koshet, Ori; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon

    2017-06-01

    Since its introduction as an explosive in the late 19th century, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), along with other explosive compounds, has left numerous environmental marks. One of these is widespread soil and water pollution by trace explosives in military proving grounds, manufacturing facilities, or actual battlefields. Another dramatic impact is that exerted by the millions of landmines and other explosive devices buried in large parts of the world, causing extensive loss of life, injuries, and economical damage. In this review we highlight recent advances in the design and construction of microbial bioreporters, molecularly engineered to generate a quantifiable dose-dependent signal in the presence of trace amounts of explosives. Such sensor strains may be employed for monitoring environmental pollution as well as for the remote detection of buried landmines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of regional seismic waves from large explosive events including Korean nuclear explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eunyoung; Lee, Ha-sung

    2015-04-01

    Three North Korean underground nuclear explosion (UNE) tests were conducted in 2006, 2009 and 2013. Discrimination of explosions from natural earthquakes is important in monitoring the seismic activity in the Korean Peninsula. The UNEs were well recorded by dense regional seismic networks in South Korea. The UNEs provide unique regional seismic waveforms with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, the continental crust in the Korean Peninsula changes abruptly into a transitional structure between continental and oceanic crusts across the eastern coast. The complex geological and tectonic structures around the Korean Peninsula cause significant variations in regional waveforms. Outstanding question is whether conventional discrimination techniques can be applicable for explosions including the North Korean UNEs. P/S amplitude ratios are widely used for seismic discrimination. To understand the regional shear-energy composition, we analyze the frequency contents of waveforms. The shear-energy contents for the UNEs are compared with those for natural earthquakes with comparable magnitudes. The result shows that the UNEs are successfully discriminated from earthquakes in the Korean Peninsula. We also analyze the explosive events from North Korean not UNEs to test the applicability of the discrimination technique. The result of high frequency Pn/Sn regional discrimination in the explosions show that as magnitude of event is smaller, available distance of discrimination is decreased particularly in high frequency range. The poor signal to noise ratio of Pn phase in the explosions, and inefficient propagation of Sn phase in the Western part of the peninsula frustrate Pn/Sn discriminant, while the UNEs show good performance using both discriminants because of propagation path effects in the eastern part of the peninsula.

  14. Aluminum-Enhanced Underwater Electrical Discharges for Steam Explosion Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOGELAND, STEVE R.; NELSON, LLOYD S.; ROTH, THOMAS CHRISTOPHER

    1999-07-01

    For a number of years, we have been initiating steam explosions of single drops of molten materials with pressure and flow (bubble growth) transients generated by discharging a capacitor bank through gold bridgewires placed underwater. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the field of steam explosions, however, have made it important to substantially increase these relatively mild transients in water without using high explosives, if possible. To do this with the same capacitor bank, we have discharged similar energies through tiny strips of aluminum foil submerged in water. By replacing the gold wires with the aluminum strips, we were able to add the energy of the aluminum-water combustion to that normally deposited electrically by the bridgewire explosion in water. The chemical enhancement of the explosive characteristics of the discharges was substantial: when the same electrical energies were discharged through the aluminum strips, peak pressures increased as much as 12-fold and maximum bubble volumes as much as 5-fold above those generated with the gold wires. For given weights of aluminum, the magnitudes of both parameters appeared to exceed those produced by the underwater explosion of equivalent weights of high explosives.

  15. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  16. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  17. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10/sup 6/ M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints.

  18. Mixing in explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  19. Decomposition methods for unsupervised learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding...... methods and clustering problems is derived both in terms of classical point clustering but also in terms of community detection in complex networks. A guiding principle throughout this thesis is the principle of parsimony. Hence, the goal of Unsupervised Learning is here posed as striving for simplicity...... in the decompositions. Thus, it is demonstrated how a wide range of decomposition methods explicitly or implicitly strive to attain this goal. Applications of the derived decompositions are given ranging from multi-media analysis of image and sound data, analysis of biomedical data such as electroencephalography...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Explosive Forming Using Detonating Fuse

    OpenAIRE

    H Iyama; Higa, Y.; Nishi, M.; Itoh, S.

    2017-01-01

    The explosive forming is a characteristic method. An underwater shock wave is generated by underwater explosion of an explosive. A metal plate is affected high strain rate by the shock loading and is formed along a metal die. Although this method has the advantage of mirroring the shape of the die, a free forming was used in this paper. An expensive metal die is not necessary for this free forming. It is possible that a metal plate is formed with simple supporting parts. However, the forming ...

  1. Discriminating between explosions and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake, explosion, and a nuclear test data are compared with forward modeling and band-pass filtered surface wave amplitude data for exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination. The proposed discrimination method is based on the solutions of a double integral transformation in the wavenumber and frequency domains. Recorded explosion data on June 26, 2001 (39.212°N, 125.383°E) and October 30, 2001 (38.748°N, 125.267°E), a nuclear test on October 9, 2006 (41.275°N, 129.095°E), and two earthquakes on April 14, 2002 (39.207°N, 125.686°E) and June 7, 2002 (38.703°N, 125.638°E), all in North Korea, are used to discriminate between explosions and earthquakes by seismic wave analysis and numerical modeling. The explosion signal is characterized by first P waves with higher energy than that of S waves. Rg waves are clearly dominant at 0.05-0.5 Hz in the explosion data but not in the earthquake data. This feature is attributed to the dominant P waves in the explosion and their coupling with the SH components.

  2. Initiation and Propagation in Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, P. M.; Field, J. E.

    1993-05-01

    The initiation and propagation of deflagration and detonation in mercury fulminate, lead azide, mercuric-5-nitrotetrazole and silver-5-nitrotetrazole have been studied using various techniques. Streak and framing high-speed photography were used to observe these events directly. The main aim has been to investigate the factors which affect deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and the related phenomenon of dead-pressing, which may be regarded as a failure of the DDT process at high pressed densities. These factors include the variable properties of pressed density, void structure, confinement and charge dimension and geometry, and also fixed properties (for a given explosive) such as shock and thermal sensitivities, heat of explosion and the quantity and state of the reaction products. The nature and strength of the initiating stimulus also have a major effect on the subsequent reaction.

  3. Fire and explosion hazards to flora and fauna from explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, R

    2000-06-30

    Deliberate or accidental initiation of explosives can produce a range of potentially damaging fire and explosion effects. Quantification of the consequences of such effects upon the surroundings, particularly on people and structures, has always been of paramount importance. Information on the effects on flora and fauna, however, is limited, with probably the weakest area lying with fragmentation of buildings and their effects on different small mammals. Information has been used here to gain an appreciation of the likely magnitude of the potential fire and explosion effects on flora and fauna. This is based on a number of broad assumptions and a variety of data sources including World War II bomb damage, experiments performed with animals 30-40 years ago, and more recent field trials on building break-up under explosive loading.

  4. Decomposition of dioxin analogues and ablation study for carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-08-01

    Two application studies associated with the free electron laser are presented separately, which are the titles of 'Decomposition of Dioxin Analogues' and 'Ablation Study for Carbon Nanotube'. The decomposition of dioxin analogues by infrared (IR) laser irradiation includes the thermal destruction and multiple-photon dissociation. It is important for us to choose the highly absorbable laser wavelength for the decomposition. The thermal decomposition takes place by the irradiation of the low IR laser power. Considering the model of thermal decomposition, it is proposed that adjacent water molecules assist the decomposition of dioxin analogues in addition to the thermal decomposition by the direct laser absorption. The laser ablation study is performed for the aim of a carbon nanotube synthesis. The vapor by the ablation is weakly ionized in the power of several-hundred megawatts. The plasma internal energy is kept over an 8.5 times longer than the vacuum. The cluster was produced from the weakly ionized gas in the enclosed gas, which is composed of the rough particles in the low power laser more than the high power which is composed of the fine particles. (J.P.N.)

  5. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  6. Pyroshock Prediction of Ridge-Cut Explosive Bolts Using Hydrocodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrotechnic release devices such as explosive bolts are prevalent for many applications due to their merits: high reliability, high power-to-weight ratio, reasonable cost, and more. However, pyroshock generated by an explosive event can cause failures in electric components. Although pyroshock propagations are relatively well understood through many numerical and experimental studies, the prediction of pyroshock generation is still a very difficult problem. This study proposes a numerical method for predicting the pyroshock of a ridge-cut explosive bolt using a commercial hydrocode (ANSYS AUTODYN. A numerical model is established by integrating fluid-structure interaction and complex material models for high explosives and metals, including high explosive detonation, shock wave transmission and propagation, and stress wave propagation. To verify the proposed numerical scheme, pyroshock measurement experiments of the ridge-cut explosive bolts with two types of surrounding structures are performed using laser Doppler vibrometers (LDVs. The numerical analysis results provide accurate prediction in both the time (acceleration and frequency domains (maximax shock response spectra. In maximax shock response spectra, the peaks due to vibration modes of the structures are observed in both the experimental and numerical results. The numerical analysis also helps to identify the pyroshock generation source and the propagation routes.

  7. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Explosive Forming Using Detonating Fuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Iyama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The explosive forming is a characteristic method. An underwater shock wave is generated by underwater explosion of an explosive. A metal plate is affected high strain rate by the shock loading and is formed along a metal die. Although this method has the advantage of mirroring the shape of the die, a free forming was used in this paper. An expensive metal die is not necessary for this free forming. It is possible that a metal plate is formed with simple supporting parts. However, the forming shape is depend on the shock pressure distribution act on the metal plate. This pressure distribution is able to change by the shape of explosive, a mass of explosive and a shape of pressure vessel. On the other hand, we need the pressure vessel for food processing by the underwater shock wave. Therefore, we propose making the pressure vessel by this explosive forming. One design suggestion of pressure vessel made of stainless steel was considered. However, we cannot decide suitable conditions, the mass of the explosive and the distance between the explosive and the metal plate to make the pressure vessel. In order to decide these conditions, we have tried the numerical simulation on this explosive forming. The basic simulation method was ALE (Arbitrary Laglangian Eulerian method including with Mie-Grümeisen EOS (equation of state, JWL EOS, Johnson-Cook constitutive equation for a material model. In this paper, the underwater pressure contours to clear the propagations of the underwater shock wave, forming processes and deformation velocity of the metal plate is shown and it will be discussed about those results.

  9. Photographic Study Of A Dead-Pressed Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallowe, G. M.; Field, J. E.

    1983-03-01

    High speed photography in conjunction with electron microscopy and a pressure measuring technique have been used to investigate the differences between dead-pressed and non-dead-pressed samples of the primary explosive Mercury Fulminate (Hg Ful). Photographs of reaction propagation were taken in transmitted light using a specially adapted drop-weight machine with transparent anvils. The results of these experiments suggested a mechanism for dead-pressing in Hg Ful based on the microscopic internal structure of the compacted explosive.

  10. Testing of Confining Pressure Impacton Explosion Energy of Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Jan; Myszkowski, Jacek; Pytlik, Andrzej; Pytlik, Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the results of testing the explosion effects of two explosive charges placed in an environment with specified values of confining pressure. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of variable environmental conditions on the suitability of particular explosives for their use in the prevention of natural hazards in hard coal mining. The research results will contribute to improving the efficiency of currently adopted technologies of natural hazard prevention and aid in raising the level of occupational safety. To carry out the subject matter measurements, a special test stand was constructed which allows the value of the initial pressure inside the chamber, which constitutes its integral part, to be altered before the detonation of the charge being tested. The obtained characteristics of the pressure changes during the explosion of the analysed charge helped to identify the work (energy) which was produced during the process. The test results are a valuable source of information, opening up new possibilities for the use of explosives, the development of innovative solutions for the construction of explosive charges and their initiation.

  11. Study of the reactivity of an aggregative explosive sensitized by dynamical damage; Etude de la reactivite d`un explosif agregataire sensibilise par endommagement dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertuis, Ch.

    1997-11-13

    The thermal decomposition of a TATB-based explosive that have been exposed to a projectile impact, is studied in order to determine its sensitivity based on the morphological state of the damaged material. Two self-maintained thermal decomposition modes have been identified, one is a slow mode, the other is a rapid mode; four media have been differentiated in the damaged explosive: sound, porous, micro-cracked and fractured media, and thermal decomposition is studied for each media, using two experimental techniques, manometric bomb and a specifically designed strand burner. Laws giving the regression speed of each media has been established considering confinement pressure and initial temperature of the explosive. Analytical calculations yield the regression speed evolution as a function of certain parameters

  12. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  13. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  14. Explosives mimic for testing, training, and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, John G.; Durban, Matthew M.; Gash, Alexander E.; Grapes, Michael D.; Kelley, Ryan S.; Sullivan, Kyle T.

    2018-02-13

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is used to make mimics for explosives. The process uses mixtures of explosives and matrices commonly used in AM. The explosives are formulated into a mixture with the matrix and printed using AM techniques and equipment. The explosive concentrations are kept less than 10% by wt. of the mixture to conform to requirements of shipping and handling.

  15. Microglass spheres in ammonium nitrate explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Kazakov; G. Turesheva; Olga Golovchenko; N. Bergeneva; R. Seisembayev

    2010-01-01

    Developed consisting the explosive ammonium nitrate, paraffin and mikrosteklosfer. Due to the input of the explosive paraffin increased water resistance of explosives to 60 minutes. By entering into the explosive mikrosteklosfers been improved caking indices, since steklomikrosfers and paraffin was formed seal between the granules of ammonium nitrate.

  16. Microglass spheres in ammonium nitrate explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kazakov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed consisting the explosive ammonium nitrate, paraffin and mikrosteklosfer. Due to the input of the explosive paraffin increased water resistance of explosives to 60 minutes. By entering into the explosive mikrosteklosfers been improved caking indices, since steklomikrosfers and paraffin was formed seal between the granules of ammonium nitrate.

  17. Causes of the Cambrian Explosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Paul Smith; David A. T. Harper

    2013-01-01

    .... Recent hypotheses for the Cambrian explosion fall into three main categories: developmental/genetic, ecologic, and abiotic/environmental, with geochemical hypotheses forming an abundant and distinctive subset of the last...

  18. Shock Initiation of Wedge-shaped Explosive Measured with Smear Camera and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is an important insensitive high explosive in conventional weapons due to its safety and high energy. In order to have an insight into the shock initiation performance of a TATB-based insensitive high explosive (IHE), experimental measurements of the particle velocity histories of the TATB-based Explosive using Photon Doppler Velocimetry and shock wave profile of the TATB-based explosive using High Speed Rotating Mirror Smear Camera had been performed. In this paper, we would describe the shock initiation performance of the TATB-based explosive by run-to-detonation distance and the particle velocity history at an initialization shock of about 7.9 GPa. The parameters of hugoniot of unreacted the TATB-based explosive and Pop relationship could be derived with the particle velocity history obtained in this paper.

  19. Furball Explosive Breakout Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Joshua David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-05

    For more than 30 years the Onionskin test has been the primary way to study the surface breakout of a detonation wave. Currently the Onionskin test allows for only a small, one dimensional, slice of the explosive in question to be observed. Asymmetrical features are not observable with the Onionskin test and its one dimensional view. As a result, in 2011, preliminary designs for the Hairball and Furball were developed then tested. The Hairball used shorting pins connected to an oscilloscope to determine the arrival time at 24 discrete points. This limited number of data points, caused by the limited number of oscilloscope channels, ultimately led to the Hairball’s demise. Following this, the Furball was developed to increase the number of data points collected. Instead of shorting pins the Furball uses fiber optics imaged by a streak camera to determine the detonation wave arrival time for each point. The original design was able to capture the detonation wave’s arrival time at 205 discrete points with the ability to increase the number of data points if necessary.

  20. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrovnikov Sergei M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT, hexogen (RDX, trotyl-hexogen (Comp B, octogen (HMX, and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  1. Intraperitoneal explosion following gastric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Scott K; Borrowdale, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    The object of this study is to report a rare case of explosion during laparotomy where diathermy ignited intraperitoneal gas from a spontaneous stomach perforation. Fortunately, the patient survived but the surgeon experienced a finger burn. A literature review demonstrates other examples of intraoperative explosion where gastrointestinal gases were the fuel source. Lessons learned from these cases provide recommendations to prevent this potentially lethal event from occurring. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Intraperitoneal explosion following gastric perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott K. Mansfield

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is to report a rare case of explosion during laparotomy where diathermy ignited intraperitoneal gas from a spontaneous stomach perforation. Fortunately, the patient survived but the surgeon experienced a finger burn. A literature review demonstrates other examples of intraoperative explosion where gastrointestinal gases were the fuel source. Lessons learned from these cases provide recommendations to prevent this potentially lethal event from occurring.

  3. exLOPA for explosion risks assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, Adam S

    2007-04-11

    The European Union regulations require safety and health protection of workers who are potentially at risk from explosive atmosphere areas. According to the requirements, the operators of installations where potentially explosive atmosphere can occur are obliged to produce an explosion protection document. The key objective of this document is the assessment of explosion risks. This paper is concerned with the so-called explosion layer of protection analysis (exLOPA), which allows for semi-quantitative explosion risk assessment for process plants where explosive atmospheres occur. The exLOPA is based on the original work of CCPS for LOPA but takes into account some typical factors appropriate for explosion, like the probability that an explosive atmosphere will occur, probability that sources of ignition will be present and become effective as well as the probability of failure on demand for appropriate explosion prevention and mitigation means.

  4. Seismic explosion sources on an ice cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Controlled source seismic investigation of crustal structure below ice covers is an emerging technique. We have recently conducted an explosive refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic experiment on the ice cap in east-central Greenland. The data-quality is high for all shot points and a full...... crustal model can be modelled. A crucial challenge for applying the technique is to control the sources. Here, we present data that describe the efficiency of explosive sources in the ice cover. Analysis of the data shows, that the ice cap traps a significant amount of energy, which is observed...... as a strong ice wave. The ice cap leads to low transmission of energy into the crust such that charges need be larger than in conventional onshore experiments to obtain reliable seismic signals. The strong reflection coefficient at the base of the ice generates strong multiples which may mask for secondary...

  5. Study on Explosive Forming of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Iyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Now, the aluminum alloy is often used as auto parts, for example, body, engine. For example, there are the body, a cylinder block, a piston, a connecting rod, interior, exterior parts, etc. These are practical used the characteristic of a light and strong aluminum alloy efficiently. However, although an aluminum alloy is lighter than steel, the elongation is smaller than that. Therefore, in press forming, some problems often occur. We have proposed use of explosive forming, in order to solve this problem. In the explosive forming, since a blank is formed at high speed, a strain rate effect becomes large and it can be made the elongation is larger. Then, in order to clarify this feature, we carried out experimental research and numerical analysis. In this paper, these contents will be discussed.

  6. Quantum cascade laser FM spectroscopy of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Zach; Clasp, Trocia; Lue, Chris; Johnson, Tiffani; Ingle, Taylor; Jamison, Janet; Buchanan, Roger; Reeve, Scott

    2013-05-01

    Polyisobutylene is an industrial polymer that is widely used in a number of applications including the manufacture of military grade explosives. We have examined the vapor emanating from a series of different molecular weight samples of polyisobutylene using high resolution Quantum Cascade Laser FM spectroscopy. The vapor phase spectra all exhibit a rovibrational structure similar to that for the gas phase isobutylene molecule. We have assigned the structure in the 890 cm-1 and 1380 cm-1 regions to the isobutylene ν28 and ν7 fundamental bands respectively. These spectroscopic signatures may prove useful for infrared sensing applications. Here we will present the infrared signatures along with recent GCMS data from a sample of C4, utilizing solid-phase microextraction vapor collection fibers, which confirm the presence of isobutylene as one of the volatile bouquet species in RDX-based explosives.

  7. Electronic Nose for Detection of Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Landon; Dobrokhotov, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    The ability to sense the environment is of critical importance for a broad array of applications ranging from ecosystem health, hazardous materials avoidance/chemical warfare to medical applications. In this research project we use the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-functionalized nanoparticle-decorated nanosprings as a novel design for sensing vapors associated with explosives. The common requirements for any sensor application are sensitivity, selectivity, refreshability, repeatability, low cost of manufacture, and ease of use. The project goal is to answer these needs through the use of mats of functionalized metal nanoparticle-coated nanosprings as a novel type of low-cost nanomaterials-based gas sensor. The advantage of this approach is that very dilute quantities of airborne explosive products can be accumulated over a few seconds to a few minutes onto our high surface area nanospring electrodes. This will facilitate electronic detection, which in contrast to optical detection methods reduces false positive signals, reduces detector sizes and complexity.

  8. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  9. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  10. Decomposition of Network Communication Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter; Hendrickx, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    Using network control structures this paper introduces network communication games as a generalization of vertex games and edge games corresponding to communication situations and studies their decomposition into unanimity games. We obtain a relation between the dividends of the network

  11. Bias-corrected estimation in potentially mildly explosive autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haufmann, Hendrik; Kruse, Robinson

    that the indirect inference approach oers a valuable alternative to other existing techniques. Its performance (measured by its bias and root mean squared error) is balanced and highly competitive across many different settings. A clear advantage is its applicability for mildly explosive processes. In an empirical...... application to a long annual US Debt/GDP series we consider rolling window estimation of autoregressive models. We find substantial evidence for time-varying persistence and periods of explosiveness during the Civil War and World War II. During the recent years, the series is nearly explosive again. Further......This paper provides a comprehensive Monte Carlo comparison of different finite-sample bias-correction methods for autoregressive processes. We consider classic situations where the process is either stationary or exhibits a unit root. Importantly, the case of mildly explosive behaviour is studied...

  12. Contributed review: quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Yu, B; Fischer, H; Chen, W; Yalin, A P

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  13. EXPLOSION OF ANNULAR CHARGE ON DUSTY SURFASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Levin Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This problem is related to the safety problem in the area of forest fires. It is well known that is possible to extinguish a fire, for example, by means of a powerful air stream. Such flow arises from the explosive shock wave. To enhance the im- pact of the blast wave can be used an explosive charge of annular shape. The shock wave, produced by the explosion, in- creased during moves to the center and can serve as a means of transportation dust in the seat of the fire. In addition, emerging after the collapse of a converging shock wave strong updraft can raise dust on a greater height and facilitate fire extinguishing, precipitating dust over a large area. This updraft can be dangerous for aircraft that are in the sky above the fire. To determine the width and height of the danger zone performed the numerical simulation of the ring of the explosion and the subsequent movement of dust and gas mixtures. The gas is considered ideal and perfect. The explosion is modeled as an instantaneous increase in the specific internal energy in an annular zone on the value of the specific heat of explosives. The flow is consid- ered as two-dimensional, and axisymmetric. The axis of symmetry perpendicular to the Earth surface. This surface is considered to be absolutely rigid and is considered as the boundary of the computational domain. On this surface is exhibited the condition of no motion. For the numerical method S. K. Godunov is used a movable grid. One system of lines of this grid is moved in accordance with movement of the shock wave. Others lines of this grid are stationary. The calculations were per- formed for different values of the radii of the annular field and for different sizes of rectangular cross-sectional of the annular field. Numerical results show that a very strong flow is occurring near the axis of symmetry and the particles rise high above the surface. These calculations allow us to estimate the sizes of the zone of danger in specific

  14. Decomposition Bounds for Marginal MAP

    OpenAIRE

    PING, WEI; Liu,Qiang; Ihler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Marginal MAP inference involves making MAP predictions in systems defined with latent variables or missing information. It is significantly more difficult than pure marginalization and MAP tasks, for which a large class of efficient and convergent variational algorithms, such as dual decomposition, exist. In this work, we generalize dual decomposition to a generic power sum inference task, which includes marginal MAP, along with pure marginalization and MAP, as special cases. Our method is ba...

  15. Facility Location Using Cross Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Leroy A.

    1995-01-01

    The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. Determining the best base stationing for military units can be modeled as a capacitated facility location problem with sole sourcing and multiple resource categories. Computational experience suggests that cross decomposition, a unification of Benders Decomposition and Lagrangean relaxation, is superior to other contempo...

  16. Hydroelastic behaviour of a structure exposed to an underwater explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchio, G.; Greco, M.; Brocchini, M.; Faltinsen, O. M.

    2015-01-01

    The hydroelastic interaction between an underwater explosion and an elastic plate is investigated num- erically through a domain-decomposition strategy. The three-dimensional features of the problem require a large computational effort, which is reduced through a weak coupling between a one-dimensional radial blast solver, which resolves the blast evolution far from the boundaries, and a three-dimensional compressible flow solver used where the interactions between the compression wave and the boundaries take place and the flow becomes three-dimensional. The three-dimensional flow solver at the boundaries is directly coupled with a modal structural solver that models the response of the solid boundaries like elastic plates. This enables one to simulate the fluid–structure interaction as a strong coupling, in order to capture hydroelastic effects. The method has been applied to the experimental case of Hung et al. (2005 Int. J. Impact Eng. 31, 151–168 (doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2003.10.039)) with explosion and structure sufficiently far from other boundaries and successfully validated in terms of the evolution of the acceleration induced on the plate. It was also used to investigate the interaction of an underwater explosion with the bottom of a close-by ship modelled as an orthotropic plate. In the application, the acoustic phase of the fluid–structure interaction is examined, highlighting the need of the fluid–structure coupling to capture correctly the possible inception of cavitation. PMID:25512585

  17. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Henry W Loescher

    2017-01-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines ...

  18. Decomposition mechanisms and kinetics of novel energetic molecules BNFF-1 and ANFF-1: quantum-chemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Kuklja, Maija M

    2013-07-18

    Decomposition mechanisms, activation barriers, Arrhenius parameters, and reaction kinetics of the novel explosive compounds, 3,4-bis(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole (BNFF-1), and 3-(4-amino-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-4-(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole (ANFF-1) were explored by means of density functional theory with a range of functionals combined with variational transition state theory. BNFF-1 and ANFF-1 were recently suggested to be good candidates for insensitive high energy density materials. Our modeling reveals that the decomposition initiation in both BNFF-1 and ANFF-1 molecules is triggered by ring cleavage reactions while the further process is defined by a competition between two major pathways, the fast C-NO₂ homolysis and slow nitro-nitrite isomerization releasing NO. We discuss insights on design of new energetic materials with targeted properties gained from our modeling.

  19. Decomposition Mechanisms and Kinetics of Novel Energetic Molecules BNFF-1 and ANFF-1: Quantum-Chemical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija M. Kuklja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition mechanisms, activation barriers, Arrhenius parameters, and reaction kinetics of the novel explosive compounds, 3,4-bis(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl-1,2,5-oxadiazole (BNFF-1, and 3-(4-amino-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl-4-(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl-1,2,5-oxadiazole (ANFF-1 were explored by means of density functional theory with a range of functionals combined with variational transition state theory. BNFF-1 and ANFF-1 were recently suggested to be good candidates for insensitive high energy density materials. Our modeling reveals that the decomposition initiation in both BNFF-1 and ANFF-1 molecules is triggered by ring cleavage reactions while the further process is defined by a competition between two major pathways, the fast C-NO2 homolysis and slow nitro-nitrite isomerization releasing NO. We discuss insights on design of new energetic materials with targeted properties gained from our modeling.

  20. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration

  1. Reaction Mechanisms of Energetic Materials in the Condensed Phase: Long-term Aging, Munition Safety and Condensed-Phase Processes in Propellants and Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-31

    HMX crystal polymorphs using a flexible molecule force field, Journal Of Computer Aided Materials Design 8, 2-3 (2002). 67. T. R. Botcher, and C. A...Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS propellants, explosives, reaction mechanisms, kinetics, safety, aging, IM, complex reaction processes, HMX , RDX...summarizes work on the decomposition of BDNPA/F and several HMX -based explosive formulations: PBX9501, LX-04, LX-10, LX-14 and EDC-37. The results on the

  2. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Loinard, Laurent [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Schmid-Burgk, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using {sup 12}CO( J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, but with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.

  3. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Loescher, Henry W.

    2017-02-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines in the heat capacity of extracellular enzymes as predicted by thermodynamic theory, or due to simultaneous declines in soil moisture. It is also uncertain whether oxygen limits decomposition rates at high water contents. Here we present the results of a full factorial experiment using organic soils from a boreal forest incubated at high temperatures (25 and 35 °C), a wide range of water-filled pore space (WFPS; 15, 30, 60, 90 %), and contrasting oxygen concentrations (1 and 20 %). We found support for the hypothesis that decomposition rates are high at high temperatures, provided that enough moisture and oxygen are available for decomposition. Furthermore, we found that decomposition rates are mostly limited by oxygen concentrations at high moisture levels; even at 90 % WFPS, decomposition proceeded at high rates in the presence of oxygen. Our results suggest an important degree of interaction among temperature, moisture, and oxygen in determining decomposition rates at the soil core scale.

  4. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  5. Multispectral Observations of Explosive Gas Emissions from Santiaguito, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, S. A.; Watson, M.; Thomas, H.; Rodriguez, L. A.; Campion, R.; Prata, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, has been persistently active for decades, producing frequent explosions from its actively growing lava dome. Repeated release of volcanic gases contains information about conduit processes during the cyclical explosions at Santiaguito, but the composition of the gas phase and the amount of volatiles released in each explosion remains poorly constrained. In addition to its persistent activity, Santiaguito offers an exceptional opportunity to investigate lava dome degassing processes since the upper surface of the active lava dome can be viewed from the summit of neighboring Santa Maria. In January 2016 we conducted multi-spectral observations of Santiaguito's explosive eruption plumes and passive degassing from multiple perspectives as part of the first NSF-sponsored `Workshop on Volcanoes' instrument deployment. Gas measurements included open-path Fourier-Transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy from the Santa Maria summit, coincident with ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) camera and UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) from the El Mirador site below Santiaguito's active Caliente lava dome. Using the OP-FTIR in passive mode with the Caliente lava dome as the source of IR radiation, we were able to collect IR spectra at high temporal resolution prior to and during two explosions of Santiaguito on 7-8 January, with volcanic SO2 and H2O emissions detected. UV and IR camera data provide constraints on the total SO2 burden in the emissions (and potentially the volcanic ash burden), which coupled with the FTIR gas ratios provides new constraints on the mass and composition of volatiles driving explosions at Santiaguito. All gas measurements indicate significant volatile release during explosions with limited degassing during repose periods. In this presentation we will present ongoing analysis of the unique Santiaguito gas dataset including estimation of the total volatile mass released in explosions and an

  6. Potentials and limits of mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C.; Sharma, A. K.; Willer, U.; Burgmeier, J.; Braunschweig, B.; Schade, W.; Blaser, S.; Hvozdara, L.; Müller, A.; Holl, G.

    2008-09-01

    Optical methods are well-established for trace gas detection in many applications, such as industrial process control or environmental sensing. Consequently, they gain much interest in the discussion of sensing methods for counterterrorism, e.g., the detection of explosives. Explosives as well as their decomposition products possess strong absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region between λ=5 and 11 μm. In this report we present two different laser spectroscopic approaches based on quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operating at wavelengths around λ=5 and 8 μm, respectively. Stand-off configuration for the remote detection of nitro-based explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, TNT) and a fiber coupled sensor device for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are discussed.

  7. Classification of explosives transformation products in plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.L.; Jones, R.P. (Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MI (United States). Waterways Experiment Station); Escalon, L.; Parker, D. (AScI Corp., McLean, VA (United States))

    1999-06-01

    Explosives contamination in surface or groundwater used for the irrigation of food crops and phytoremediation of explosives-contaminated soil or water using plant-assisted biodegradation have brought about concerns as to the fate of explosives in plants. Liquid scintillation counting, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gel permeation chromatography were utilized to characterize explosives (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and trinitrotoluene) and their metabolites in plant tissues obtained from three separate studies. Analyzing tissues of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus), corn (Zea mays), lettuce (Lacuta sativa), tomato (Lyopersicum esculentum), radish (Raphanus sativus), and parrot feather (Myriophyllum aquaticum) from three studies where exposure to explosives at nontoxic levels occurred showed that extensive transformation of the explosive contaminant occurred, variations were noted in uptake and transformation between terrestrial and aquatic plants, the products had significantly higher polarity and water solubility than the parent compounds, and the molecular sizes of the transformation products were significantly greater than those of the parent compounds.

  8. Shock-induced explosive chemistry in a deterministic sample configuration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cesarano, Joseph, III (,; ); Trott, Wayne Merle; Baer, Melvin R.; Tappan, Alexander Smith

    2005-10-01

    Explosive initiation and energy release have been studied in two sample geometries designed to minimize stochastic behavior in shock-loading experiments. These sample concepts include a design with explosive material occupying the hole locations of a close-packed bed of inert spheres and a design that utilizes infiltration of a liquid explosive into a well-defined inert matrix. Wave profiles transmitted by these samples in gas-gun impact experiments have been characterized by both velocity interferometry diagnostics and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Highly organized wave structures associated with the characteristic length scales of the deterministic samples have been observed. Initiation and reaction growth in an inert matrix filled with sensitized nitromethane (a homogeneous explosive material) result in wave profiles similar to those observed with heterogeneous explosives. Comparison of experimental and numerical results indicates that energetic material studies in deterministic sample geometries can provide an important new tool for validation of models of energy release in numerical simulations of explosive initiation and performance.

  9. Spatial, temporal, and hybrid decompositions for large-scale vehicle routing with time windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the use of decomposition techniques to quickly find high-quality solutions to large-scale vehicle routing problems with time windows. It considers an adaptive decomposition scheme which iteratively decouples a routing problem based on the current solution. Earlier work considered vehicle-based decompositions that partitions the vehicles across the subproblems. The subproblems can then be optimized independently and merged easily. This paper argues that vehicle-based decompositions, although very effective on various problem classes also have limitations. In particular, they do not accommodate temporal decompositions and may produce spatial decompositions that are not focused enough. This paper then proposes customer-based decompositions which generalize vehicle-based decouplings and allows for focused spatial and temporal decompositions. Experimental results on class R2 of the extended Solomon benchmarks demonstrates the benefits of the customer-based adaptive decomposition scheme and its spatial, temporal, and hybrid instantiations. In particular, they show that customer-based decompositions bring significant benefits over large neighborhood search in contrast to vehicle-based decompositions.

  10. High thermoelectric performance of n-type PbTe 1-y S y due to deep lying states induced by indium doping and spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian; Chere, Eyob Kebede; Wang, Yumei; Kim, Hee Seok; He, Ran; Cao, Feng; Dahal, Keshab; Broido, David; Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Good thermoelectric materials should have high engineering figure-of-merit (ZT)eng, not peak ZT, to achieve high conversion efficiency. In this work, we achieved a good (ZT)eng by optimizing the carrier concentration to improve the room temperature ZT using deep lying dopant, indium, in PbTe 1-y S y. It was found that a room temperature ZT as high as ~0.5 and a peak ZT ~1.1 at about 673 K were obtained in Pb0.98In0.02Te0.8S0.2 due to a lower thermal conductivity by alloy scattering and Spinodal decomposition. The calculated efficiency could be as high as ~12% at cold side 323 K and hot side 773 K. The approach is expected to work in other materials systems too.

  11. Perspectives on Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) Decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D; Brackett, C; Sparkman, D O

    2002-07-01

    This report evaluates the large body of work involving the decomposition of PETN and identifies the major decomposition routes and byproducts. From these studies it becomes apparent that the PETN decomposition mechanisms and the resulting byproducts are primarily determined by the chemical environment. In the absence of water, PETN can decompose through the scission of the O-NO{sup 2} bond resulting in the formation of an alkoxy radical and NO{sub 2}. Because of the relatively high reactivity of both these initial byproducts, they are believed to drive a number of autocatalytic reactions eventually forming (NO{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CCHO, (NO{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}){sub 2}C=CHONO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}OCH=C=CHONO{sub 2}, (NO{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}C-NO{sub 2}, (NO{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}){sub 2}C(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}, NO{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}, and C(NO{sub 2}){sub 4} as well as polymer-like species such as di-PEHN and tri-PEON. Surprisingly, the products of many of these proposed autocatalytic reactions have never been analytically validated. Conversely, in the presence of water, PETN has been shown to decompose primarily to mono, di, and tri nitrates of pentaerythritol.

  12. An examination of the spatial distribution of the tissue fragments created during a single explosive attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, E; Bowers, K; Rando, C

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the course of a forensic investigation following an explosive attack, the identification and recovery of tissue fragments is of extreme importance. There are few universally accepted methods to achieve this end. This project aims to explore this issue through the examination of the spatial distribution of the tissue fragments resulting from an explosive event. To address this, a two stage pilot study was conducted: first, a series of controlled explosions on porcine carcases was undertaken. Second, the data produced from these explosions were used to chart the spatial distribution of the tissue debris. In the controlled explosions, 3kg military grade explosive was chosen to create the maximum amount of fragmentation; this level of explosive also prevented the complete disappearance of forensic evidence through evaporation. Additionally, the blast created by military grade explosive is highly powerful and would mean that the maximum possible distance was achieved and would therefore allow the recorded distances and pattern spread to be a guideline for forensic recovery of associated with an explosive amount of an unknown size and quality. A total station was employed to record the location of the resulting forensic evidence, with the collected data analysed using R Studio. The observed patterns suggested that the distribution of remains is fairly consistent in trials under similar environmental conditions. This indicates potential for some general guidelines for forensic evidence collection (for example, the distance from the explosion that a search should cover). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Behavioural and Genetic Evidence for C. elegans' Ability to Detect Volatile Chemicals Associated with Explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Chunyan Liao; Andrew Gock; Michelle Michie; Bethany Morton; Alisha Anderson; Stephen Trowell

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Automated standoff detection and classification of explosives based on their characteristic vapours would be highly desirable. Biologically derived odorant receptors have potential as the explosive recognition element in novel biosensors. Caenorhabditis elegans' genome contains over 1,000 uncharacterised candidate chemosensory receptors. It was not known whether any of these respond to volatile chemicals derived from or associated with explosives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: W...

  14. Bladder Explosion during Transurethral Resection of the Prostate with Nitrous Oxide Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Eiko; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Ogura, Shinobu; Kawamata, Miwako

    2015-01-01

    Bladder explosions are a rare complication of transurethral resection of the prostate. We report a patient who suffered a bladder rupture following transurethral resection of the prostate. Although explosive gases accumulate during the procedure, a high concentration of oxygen is needed to support an explosion. This rare phenomenon can be prevented by preventing the flow of room air into the bladder during the procedure to maintain a low concentration of oxygen inside the bladder. PMID:26294981

  15. Explosive strength training improves speed and agility in wheelchair basketball athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Ozmen,Tarik; Yuktasir,Bekir; Yildirim,Necmiye Un; Yalcin,Birol; Willems,Mark ET

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Wheelchair basketball is a paralympic sport characterized by intermittent high-intensity activities that require explosive strength and speed. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of explosive strength training on speed and agility performance in wheelchair basketball players. METHODS: Ten male wheelchair basketball players (Mage=31±4 yrs) were divided into two groups [i.e. explosive strength training (ES); control (CN)] based on International Wheelchair Basketball Fede...

  16. Thickened aqueous slurry explosive composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, J.F.M.; Matts, T.C.; Seto, P.F.L.

    1979-01-04

    A thickened slurry explosive composition consists of water, inorganic oxidizing salt, fuel, and thickener wherein the thickener is a mixture of an unmodified guar gum and a hydroxypropyl-modified guar gum. The thickener mixture improves the stability and rheologic properties of the explosive. The preferred thickener mixture contains from 15 to 85% by weight of unmodified guar to 15 to 85% by weight of hydroxypropyl-modified guar and the composition preferably comprises 0.2% to 2.0% by weight of the thickener mixture. The thickener mixture is especially effective in explosive compositions sensitized with gas bubbles or with water-soluble organic nitrate for example, ethylene glycol mononitrate, propylene glycol mononitrate, ethanolamine nitrate, propanolamine nitrate, methylamine nitrate, ethylamine nitrate, ethylenediamine dinitrate, urea nitrate, or aniline nitrate. 14 claims.

  17. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  18. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and belowground litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a 2-yr decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered by

  19. Experiments in gasdynamics of explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, A. K.; Soloukhin, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Various topics concerning recent accomplishments in experimental studies of gasdynamics of explosions are reviewed. Detonations, shocks, and blast waves form these topics. The most important feature of current studies is the particular attention paid to transient processes and the concomitant progress made in the development of novel experimental means for the study of such processes. The most exciting prospects for the future are associated with possibilities of exploiting knowledge of explosion phenomena for the development of such interesting devices as the gasdynamic laser and the apparatus based on the use of lasers to achieve controlled thermonuclear reaction.

  20. Intravesical explosion during transurethral electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgios, Kallinikas; Evangelos, Boulinakis; Helai, Habib; Ioannis, Gerzelis

    2015-05-01

    Intravesical explosion is a very rare complication of transurethral resection of prostate and transurethral resection of bladder tumour operations. In vitro studies have shown that the gases produced during the procedure could result in a blast once they are mixed with air from the atmosphere. A 79-year-old male experienced an explosion in his bladder while undergoing a transurethral resection of bladder tumour. The case is presented as well as the way that it was treated as an emergency. Precautions of such events are finally suggested. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.