WorldWideScience

Sample records for high energy radiations

  1. Dosimetry of high energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sahare, P D

    2018-01-01

    High energy radiation is hazardous to living beings and a threat to mankind. The correct estimation of the high energy radiation is a must and a single technique may not be very successful. The process of estimating the dose (the absorbed energy that could cause damages) is called dosimetry. This book covers the basic technical knowledge in the field of radiation dosimetry. It also makes readers aware of the dangers and hazards of high energy radiation.

  2. Response of monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Haridas, G; Pradhan, S D; Nayak, A R; Bhagwat, A M

    2000-01-01

    Response of commercially available monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation was studied under the stored beam condition of a few milliamperes in the storage ring of the Synchrotron Radiation Source, INDUS-I, at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The storage ring has a circumference of 18.96 m, where electrons at 450 MeV are stored for a few hours, during which the emitted synchrotron radiation is exploited for scientific research and other applications. Radiation environment near storage ring has bremsstrahlung photons of various energies (maximum 450 MeV). A study has indicated underestimation of dose by conventional radiation monitoring instruments by a factor of 2-4. Response after transmission of photons through massive shield was also studied, which indicated spectral degradation and good response by the survey meters.

  3. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE...MM-YYYY)   14-03-2017 2. REPORT TYPE  Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  01 May 2013 to 31 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High energy ion acceleration...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 1FORM SF 298 3/15/2017https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll 1 HIGH ENERGY ION ACCELERATION BY

  4. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ULTRASHORT HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION AND MATTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A J

    2004-01-15

    The workshop is intended as a forum to discuss the latest experimental, theoretical and computational results related to the interaction of high energy radiation with matter. High energy is intended to mean soft x-ray and beyond, but important new results from visible systems will be incorporated. The workshop will be interdisciplinary amongst scientists from many fields, including: plasma physics; x-ray physics and optics; solid state physics and material science; biology ; quantum optics. Topics will include, among other subjects: understanding damage thresholds for x-ray interactions with matter developing {approx} 5 keV x-ray sources to investigate damage; developing {approx} 100 keV Thomsom sources for material studies; developing short pulse (100 fs and less) x-ray diagnostics; developing novel X-ray optics; and developing models for the response of biological samples to ultra intense, sub ps x-rays high-energy radiation.

  5. Portable radiation detection system for pulsed high energy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y. [Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Portable, battery-operated, radiation detection systems for measuring the intensity and energy characteristics of intense, pulsed photon sources (either high energy X-ray or gamma) have been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These field-deployable, suitcase-sized detection units are designed to measure and record the characteristics of a single radiation burst or multiple bursts from a pulsed ionizing radiation source. The recorded information can then be analyzed on a simple laptop computer at a location remote from the detection system and completely independent of the ongoing data acquisition process. Two detection unit designs are described. The first, called the MARK-1, has eight bismuth germanate (BGO) radiation detectors. Four of which are unshielded and have different thicknesses (diameters). The remaining four are the same size as the largest unshielded detector but have different thicknesses of lead shielding surrounding each detector. The second unit design, called the MARK-1 A, utilizes the same detection methodology as the MARK-1 but has ten BGO detectors instead of eight and utilizes a different method of amplifying detector signals enabling reduced overall size and weight of the detection unit. Both the detection system designs have sensitivity ranges from 3 x 10{sup {minus}9} cGy to 9 x 10{sup {minus}5} cGy per radiation burst. Experimental detection results will be presented and discussed along the systems` potential for commercial applications.

  6. A Comparison between High-Energy Radiation Background Models and SPENVIS Trapped-Particle Radiation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2013-01-01

    We have been assessing the effects of background radiation in low-Earth orbit for the next generation of X-ray and Cosmic-ray experiments, in particular for International Space Station orbit. Outside the areas of high fluxes of trapped radiation, we have been using parameterizations developed by the Fermi team to quantify the high-energy induced background. For the low-energy background, we have been using the AE8 and AP8 SPENVIS models to determine the orbit fractions where the fluxes of trapped particles are too high to allow for useful operation of the experiment. One area we are investigating is how the fluxes of SPENVIS predictions at higher energies match the fluxes at the low-energy end of our parameterizations. I will summarize our methodology for background determination from the various sources of cosmogenic and terrestrial radiation and how these compare to SPENVIS predictions in overlapping energy ranges.

  7. Effect of high linear energy transfer radiation on biological membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, D.; Srivastava, M.; Kale, R.K. [Radiation Biology Lab., Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India); Sarma, A. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1998-10-01

    Cellular membranes are vital elements, and their integrity is extremely essential for the viability of the cells. We studied the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the membranes. Rabbit erythrocytes (1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml) and microsomes (0.6 mg protein/ml) prepared from liver of rats were irradiated with {sup 7}Li ions of energy 6.42 MeV/u and {sup 16}O ions of energy 4.25 MeV/u having maximum LET values of 354 keV/{mu}m and 1130 keV/{mu}m, respectively. {sup 7}Li- and {sup 16}O-induced microsomal lipid peroxidation was found to increase with fluence. The {sup 16}O ions were more effective than {sup 7}Li ions, which could be due to the denser energy distribution in the track and the yield of free radicals. These findings suggested that the biological membranes could be peroxidized on exposure to high-LET radiation. Inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was observed in the presence of a membrane-active drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ), which could be due to scavenging of free radicals (mainly HO. and ROO.), electron donation, and hydrogen transfer reactions. The {sup 7}Li and {sup 16}O ions also induced hemolysis in erythrocytes. The extent of hemolysis was found to be a function of time and fluence, and showed a characteristic sigmoidal pattern. The {sup 16}O ions were more effective in the lower fluence range than {sup 7}Li ions. These results were compared with lipid peroxidation and hemolysis induced by gamma-radiation. (orig.) With 7 figs., 3 tabs., 30 refs.

  8. Dosimetry in radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Silari, M; Theis, C

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry at high-energy proton accelerators is a difficult task because of the complexity of the stray radiation field. A good knowledge of this mixed radiation field is very important to be able to select the type of detectors (active and/or passive) to be employed for routine area monitoring and to choose the personal dosimeter legally required for estimating the effective dose received by individuals. At the same time, the response function of the detectors to the mixed field must be thoroughly understood. A proper calibration of a device, which may involve a complex series of measurements in various reference fields, is needed. Monte Carlo simulations provide a complementary – and sometimes the principal – mean of determining the response function. The ambient dose equivalent rates during operation range from a few hundreds of μSv per year to a few mSv per year. To measure such rates one needs detectors of high sensitivity and/or capable of integrating over long periods. The main challenge...

  9. Transition radiation detectors for energy measurements at high Lorentz factors

    CERN Document Server

    Wakely, S P; Müller, D; Hörandel, J R; Gahbauer, F

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic dependence of the intensity of transition radiation (TR) on the Lorentz factor gamma = E/mc**2 of a primary particle is key to a number of practical applications. In particular, one may use TR detectors for energy measurements of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei in a region where alternate techniques are difficult to apply. However, a serious constraint can be the saturation of the TR yield at high gamma-values. We investigate how the onset of saturation can be pushed to as high a Lorentz factor as possible. We then describe the results of test measurements at CERN, which demonstrate the possibility of practical configurations for measurements over the Lorentz factor range of a few hundred to about 10**5.

  10. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  11. Radiation hardness of semiconductor detectors for high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khludkov, S.S.; Stepanov, V.E.; Tolbanov, O.P. [Tomskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Sibirskij Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.

    1996-06-14

    The concept of radiation hardness of semiconductor materials in terms of local charge neutrality is proposed. Deep centres are invoked to play the basic role in the attainment of radiation hardness by high-resistivity semiconductor charged particle detectors exposed to neutron irradiation. (author).

  12. TEA HF laser with a high specific radiation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchikin, A. V.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the chemical HF laser with a non-chain reaction are presented. The possibility of the total laser efficiency of 5 % is shown when a traditional C-to-C pumping circuit with the charging voltage of 20-24 kV is used. It is experimentally shown that the specific radiation output energy of 21 J/l is reached at the specific pump energy of 350 J/l in SF6/H2 = 14/1 mixture at the total pressure of 0.27 bar.

  13. Radiation shielding of high-energy neutrons in SAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltborg, P. [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Albanova University Centre, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: per@neutron.kth.se; Polanski, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141 980, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna (Russian Federation); Petrochenkov, S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141 980, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna (Russian Federation); Lopatkin, A. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, 101 000, PB78, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gudowski, W. [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Albanova University Centre, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Shvetsov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141 980, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-11

    The radiation fields and the effective dose at the Sub-critical Assembly in Dubna (SAD) have been studied with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The effective dose above the shielding, i.e. in the direction of the incident proton beam of 3.0 {mu}A, was found to be about 190 {mu}Sv h{sup -1}. This value meets the dose limits according to Russian radiation protection regulations, provided that access to the rooms in this area is not allowed for working personnel during operation. By separating the radiation fields into a spallation- and a fission-induced part, it was shown that the neutrons with energy higher than 10 MeV, originating exclusively from the proton-induced spallation reactions in the target, contribute for the entire part of the radiation fields and the effective dose at the top of the shielding. Consequently, the effective dose above the SAD reactor system is merely dependent on the proton beam properties and not on the reactivity of the core.

  14. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  15. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, Gregory A.; Vazquez, Marcelo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Slater, James M.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. METHODS: Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. ROTAROD TEST: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. OPEN FIELD TEST: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. MORRIS WATER MAZE: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the CNS. ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process.

  16. Dose equivalent measurements in a strongly pulsed high-energy radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S; Kyllonen, J E; Menzel, Hans Gregor; Otto, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The stray radiation field outside the shielding of high-energy accelerators comprises neutrons, photons and charged particles with a wide range of energies. Often, accelerators operate by accelerating and ejecting short pulses of particles, creating an analogue, pulsed radiation field. The pulses can be as short as 10 mu s with high instantaneous fluence rates and dose rates. Measurements of average dose equivalent (rate) for radiation protection purposes in these fields present a challenge for instrumentation. The performance of three instruments (i.e. a recombination chamber, the Sievert Instrument and a HANDITEPC) measuring total dose equivalent is compared in a high-energy reference radiation field (CERF) and a strongly pulsed, high-energy radiation field at the CERN proton synchrotron (PS).

  17. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  18. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  19. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  20. High Energy/LET Radiation EEE Parts Certification Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Certifying electronic components is a very involved process. It includes pre-coordination with the radiation test facility for time, schedule and cost, as well as intimate work with designers to develop test procedures and hardware. It also involves work with radiation engineers to understand the effects of the radiation field on the test article/setup as well as the analysis and production of a test report. The technical content of traditional ionizing radiation testing protocol is in wide use and generally follows established standards (ref. Appendix C). This document is not intended to cover all these areas but to cover the methodology of using Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) to accomplish the goal of characterizing an electronic component. The Variable Depth Bragg Peak (VDBP) test method is primarily used for deep space applications of electronics. However, it can be used on any part for any radiation environment, especially those parts where the sensitive volume cannot be reached by the radiation beam. An example of this problem would be issues that arise in de-lidding of parts or in parts with flip-chip designs, etc. The VDBP method is ideally suited to test modern avionics designs which increasingly incorporate commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and units. Johnson Space Center (JSC) developed software provides assistance to users in developing the radiation characterization data from the raw test data.

  1. Local enhancement of radiation dose by using high atomic number materials with high energy photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Ahmad Khaled

    The goal of treatment planning in radiation therapy is to maximize the absorbed dose in abnormal cells and minimize the dose in normal cells. It is long established that the probability of pair production interactions (converting photon to electron and positron see chapter II) increases with the increase of the photon energy above a 1.02 MV threshold and with the square of the atomic number of the medium. In this work I tried to locally enhance the absorbed dose by using both a high energy photon beam and high Z material (Gold foils), to observe the effect of the secondary electrons that are produced in the high z material (gold) with high energy photons (end point energy 25MV). To observe the range of these secondary electrons, I changed the gap between two gold foils. I studied also the effect of varying the thickness of both gold foils. To verify the dependence of the atomic number (Z) I repeated the measurements with two Aluminum foils, and to observe the effect of The Higher photon energy I used a range of photon beams with end point energies 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV. I used Monte Carlo code to confirm the result. The calculated dose enhancements from the simulation were in general 5% higher the measured values.

  2. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  3. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  4. Realistic Approach for Beam Dynamics Simulation with Synchrotron Radiation in High Energy Circular Lepton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Glukhov, S A

    2017-01-01

    In extremely high energy circular lepton colliders, correct consideration of synchrotron radiation is important for beam dynamics simulation. We developed a fast precise effective method to track particles in a realistic lattice when the radiation effects are distributed along the orbit. In the present paper we study an effect of decreasing dynamic aperture due to radiation from quadrupole lenses in the FCC-ee lepton collider.

  5. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  6. Models for High-Energy Radiation from Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss on the modelling of blazar jets as emitters of multiwavelength radiation with the implementation of a lepto-hadronic treatment. Assuming that injection of non-thermal electrons and protons can take place at the base of the jet, the stationary particle distributions can be found using an inhomogeneous ...

  7. Structural Analysis of Semiconducting Polymers Exposed to High Energy Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Vaselabadi, Saeed; Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Shakarisaz, David; Strzalka, Joseph; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila

    2015-03-01

    Semicrystalline polymers are used in low-cost electronics such as solar cells, thin film transistors, and light-emitting diodes. Their optoelectronic performance in these devices is partly dictated by molecular ordering and nanoscale structure, where the latter is particularly difficult to control. We used atom-beam radiation to crosslink the polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) into nanoscale and microscale patterns. Ionizing radiation sources generate intermolecular cross-links that render the polymer insoluble in organic solvents. Grazing-incidence Wide-angle X-ray Scattering (GIWAXS) was used to investigate the effects of irradiation on molecular ordering of poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that crosslinking will disrupt intermolecular ordering (reduce crystallinity and crystalline grain sizes). We also found that X-ray exposure during the WAXS measurements can induce the crosslinking through a similar mechanism, and we propose a simple method to test for the damage caused by these measurements. As an example, we find that poly (3-hexylthiophene) has measurable cross-links after 20 sec exposure to 7.35 keV radiation with flux of 1 *1011 photons/sec at an incident angle of 0.5° .

  8. On the use of a recombination chamber for radiation measurements in CERN-EU high energy reference radiation fields

    CERN Document Server

    Golnik, N; Otto, T

    1999-01-01

    Ambient dose equivalent was determined in high energy reference radiation fields at CERN (CERF facility) using a recombination chamber and recombination methods developed in IAE. The chamber was also used for measuring the low LET background radiation which locally accompanies the fields at CERF. The measurements included determination of the absorbed dose and recombination index of radiation quality at different beam intensities. It was shown that the background might considerably influence the measurements of the absorbed dose, however, its influence on the ambient dose equivalent remains important only at low beam intensities. (16 refs).

  9. Radiation issues in the new generation of high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F

    2004-01-01

    With the construction of the Large Hadron Collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), the radiation levels at large High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are significantly increased with respect to past experience. The approach the HEP community is using to ensure radiation tolerance of the electronics installed in these new generation experiments is described. Particular attention is devoted to developments that led to original work: the estimate of the SEU rate in the complex LHC radiation environment and the use of hardness by design techniques to achieve radiation hardness of ASICs in a commercial CMOS technology.

  10. Technology for radiation efficiency measurement of high-power halogen tungsten lamp used in calibration of high-energy laser energy meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Hu, Xiao Yang; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Chang, Yan

    2015-03-20

    The calibration method using a high-power halogen tungsten lamp as a calibration source has many advantages such as strong equivalence and high power, so it is very fit for the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. However, high-power halogen tungsten lamps after power-off still reserve much residual energy and continually radiate energy, which is difficult to be measured. Two measuring systems were found to solve the problems. One system is composed of an integrating sphere and two optical spectrometers, which can accurately characterize the radiative spectra and power-time variation of the halogen tungsten lamp. This measuring system was then calibrated using a normal halogen tungsten lamp made of the same material as the high-power halogen tungsten lamp. In this way, the radiation efficiency of the halogen tungsten lamp after power-off can be quantitatively measured. In the other measuring system, a wide-spectrum power meter was installed far away from the halogen tungsten lamp; thus, the lamp can be regarded as a point light source. The radiation efficiency of residual energy from the halogen tungsten lamp was computed on the basis of geometrical relations. The results show that the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency was improved with power-on time but did not change under constant power-on time/energy. All the tested halogen tungsten lamps reached 89.3% of radiation efficiency at 50 s after power-on. After power-off, the residual energy in the halogen tungsten lamp gradually dropped to less than 10% of the initial radiation power, and the radiation efficiency changed with time. The final total radiation energy was decided by the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency, the radiation efficiency of residual energy, and the total power consumption. The measuring uncertainty of total radiation energy was 2.4% (here, the confidence factor is two).

  11. Development of nuclear energy and radiation textbooks for high school students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Koo; Park, Pil Han; Choi, Yoon Seok; Kim, Wook; Jeong, Im Soon; Han, Eun Ok [Dept. of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    This study aimed to develop textbooks about nuclear energy and radiation targeting high school students-the leaders of the next generation. Students learn about nuclear power generation and radiation through minimal information in science textbooks; most students acquire concepts through teaching-learning activities between teachers and students. Therefore, if a science teacher has an inaccurate perception about nuclear energy and radiation, this may have an improper influence on students. Before the failure of securing social acceptance due to ignorance about nuclear energy and radiation leads to biased political effects, the correct information should be provided in schools to allow future generations to develop educated value judgments. The present textbooks were developed as a part of such effort.

  12. A low power high speed radiation hard serializer for High Energy Physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080243; Marchioro, Alessandro; Ottavi, Marco

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on the development and the characterization of novel solutions for electronic systems for high-speed data transmission in extremely high radio-active environment (e.g. high energy physics application). The text proposes two alternative full-custom solutions for a fundamental enabling block for a lowpower serial data transmission system, the serializer. This block will find place in a future transceiver conceived for the future upgraded phase of the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, at CERN. The first solution proposed, called “triple module redundancy”, is based on hardware redundancy, a well-known solution, to obtain protection against the temporary malfunctioning induced by radiation. In the second case a new architecture, called “code protected”, is proposed. This architecture takes advantage of the error correction code present in the data word to obtain radiation robustness on data and some parts of the control logic and to further reduce the power consumption. A test chip ...

  13. New apparatus with high radiation energy between 320 to 460 nm: physical description and dermatological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutzhas, M.F.; Holzle, E.; Hofmann, C.; Plewig, G.

    1981-01-01

    A new apparatus (UVASUN 5000) is presented with high radiation energy between 320 to 460 nm. The radiator is a specially developed source for high uv-A intensity, housing a quartz bulb with a mixture of argon, mercury and metal-halides. The uv-A energy in the range of 320 to 400 nm is about 84% of the total radiation energy. Effects of very high doses of uv-A on human skin were studied. Following single uv-A applications the minimal tanning dose uv-A (MTD) and the immediate pigment darkening (IPD) dose of uv-A were established. Repeated exposure to this uv-A delivering system yields long lasting dark brown skin pigmentation without any clinical or histological signs of sunburn (uv-B) damage, epidermal hyperplasia or thickening of the stratum corneum. Minimal therapeutic results were seen in the phototherapy of vitiligo and inflammatory acne.

  14. Direct observation of elementary radical events: low- and high-energy radiation femtochemistry in solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata [Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz, 15 Wroblewskiego Street, 93-590 Lodz (Poland); Gliger, David; Hallou, Abdeslem [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique-ENS Techniques Avancees, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Malka, Victor; Gauduel, Yann A. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique-ENS Techniques Avancees, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)]. E-mail: yann.gauduel@ensta.fr

    2005-02-01

    The fundamental importance of understanding the primary effects of ionizing radiations in liquid phase and solutions is emphasized in fields such as electron transfer reactions, radical chemistry and radiobiology. With the advent of ultrashort optical pulses and powerful laser systems (TW lasers), ultrafast spectroscopic investigations might conjecture the direct observation of primary events induced by low-energy (photons) and high-energy (relativistic electrons) radiations. The different points discussed in this paper concern the investigation of short-time solvent caging effects on elementary radical reactions in homogeneous liquid phase and nascent spurs.

  15. Study on radiation damage to high energy accelerator components by irradiation in a nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Casta, J; Van de Voorde, M H

    1975-01-01

    The structural and other components used in high energy accelerators are continuously exposed to a wide spectrum of high energy particles and electromagnetic radiation. The resulting radiation damage may severely influence the functional capability of accelerator facilities. In order to arrive at an estimate of the service life of various materials in the radiation field, simulating experiments have to be carried out in a nuclear reactor. A large number of organic and inorganic materials, electronic components, metals, etc., intended specifically for use in 400 GeV proton synchrotron of CERN near Geneva, were irradiated in the ASTRA reactor in Seibersdorf near Vienna. The paper reports on the irradiation facilities available in this reactor for this purpose, on the dosimetry methods used, on the most important materials irradiated and on the results obtained in these experiments. (14 refs).

  16. Universality, maximum radiation, and absorption in high-energy collisions of black holes with spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-07-26

    We explore the impact of black hole spins on the dynamics of high-energy black hole collisions. We report results from numerical simulations with γ factors up to 2.49 and dimensionless spin parameter χ=+0.85, +0.6, 0, -0.6, -0.85. We find that the scattering threshold becomes independent of spin at large center-of-mass energies, confirming previous conjectures that structure does not matter in ultrarelativistic collisions. It has further been argued that in this limit all of the kinetic energy of the system may be radiated by fine tuning the impact parameter to threshold. On the contrary, we find that only about 60% of the kinetic energy is radiated for γ=2.49. By monitoring apparent horizons before and after scattering events we show that the "missing energy" is absorbed by the individual black holes in the encounter, and moreover the individual black-hole spins change significantly. We support this conclusion with perturbative calculations. An extrapolation of our results to the limit γ→∞ suggests that about half of the center-of-mass energy of the system can be emitted in gravitational radiation, while the rest must be converted into rest-mass and spin energy.

  17. Radiation tolerant fiber optic humidity sensors for High Energy Physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berruti, Gaia Maria; Cusano, Andrea

    This work is devoted to the development of fiber optic humidity sensors to be applied in high-energy physics applications and in particular in experiments currently running at CERN. The high radiation level resulting from the operation of the accelerator at full luminosity can cause serious performance deterioration of the silicon sensors which are responsible for the particle tracking. To increase their lifetime, the sensors must be kept cold at temperatures below 0 C. At such low temperatures, any condensation risk has to be prevented and a precise thermal and hygrometric control of the air filling and surrounding the tracker detector cold volumes is mandatory. The technologies proposed at CERN for relative humidity monitoring are mainly based on capacitive sensing elements which are not designed with radiation resistance characteristic. In this scenario, fiber optic sensors seem to be perfectly suitable. Indeed, the fiber itself, if properly selected, can tolerate a very high level of radiation, optical fi...

  18. A radiation belt monitor for the High Energy Transient Experiment Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, D. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prigozhin, G. Y.; Doty, J.; Ricker, G.

    1993-01-01

    A Radiation Belt Monitor (RBM) sensitive to protons and electrons with energy approximately greater than 0.5 MeV has been designed for the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE) satellite in order to: first, control the on-off configuration of the experiments (i.e. those susceptible to proton damage); and second, to indicate the presence of proton and/or electron events that could masquerade as legitimate high energy photon events. One of the two RBM channels has an enhanced sensitivity to electrons. Each channel of the RBM, based on a PIN silicon diode, requires a typical power of 6 milliwatts. Tests have been performed with protons with energies from approximately 0.1 to 2.5 MeV (generated by a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator via the d(d,p)t reaction), and with electrons with energies up to 1 MeV (from a 1.0 microcurie Bi-207 source).

  19. New apparatus with high radiation energy between 320-460 nm: physical description and dermatological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutzhas, M.F.; Holzle, E.; Hofmann, C.; Plewig, G.

    1981-01-01

    A new apparatus (UVASUN 5000) is presented with high-radiation energy between 320 to 460 nm. The measureable energy below 320 nm was shown to be many orders of magnitude too low to produce erythema. The radiator is a specially developed source for high uv-A intensity, housing a quartz bulb with a mixture of argon, mercury and metal-halides. At a skin-target distance of 0.2 m the size of the irradiated area is 0.35 x 0.35 m, and the measured mean uv-A intensity is about 1400 W. m-2 (140 mW . cm-2). The uv-A energy in the range of 320 to 400 nm is about 84% of the total radiation energy. Effects of very high doses of uv-A on human skin were studied. Following single uv-a applications the minimal tanning dose uv-A (MTD) and the immediate pigment darkening (IPD) dose of uv-A were established. The calculated IPD threshold time was 1.8 min at 0.2 m. Repeated exposure to this uv-A delivering system yields long lasting dark brown skin pigmentation without any clinical or histological signs of sunburn (uv-B) damage, epidermal hyperplasia or thickening of the stratum corneum. The instrument was also successfully used for photo-patch testing and reproduction of skin lesions of polymorphous light eruption. Minimal therapeutic results were seen in the phototherapy of vitiligo and inflammatory acne.

  20. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Ammigan, Kavin; Amroussia, Aida; Avilov, Mikhail; Boehlert, Carl; Calviani, Marco; Casella, Andrew; Densham, Chris; Fornasiere, Elvis; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; KUKSENKO Viacheslav; Lee, Yongjoong; Makimura, Shunsuke; Mausner, Leonard; Medvedev, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collabor...

  1. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  2. Study of Radiation Damage in Lead Tungstate Crystals Using Intense High Energy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Batarin, V; Butler, J; Cheung, H; Datsko, V S; Davidenko, A; Derevshchikov, A A; Dzhelyadin, R I; Fomin, Y; Frolov, V; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Khroustalev, K; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konstantinov, A S; Kravtsov, V; Kubota, Y; Leontiev, V M; Lukanin, V S; Maisheev, V; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Mikhalin, N; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V; Morozov, D A; Mountain, R; Nogach, L V; Pikalov, V A; Ryazantsev, A; Semenov, P A; Shestermanov, K E; Soloviev, L; Solovyanov, V L; Stone, S; Ukhanov, M N; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A; Yakutin, A; Yarba, J V

    2003-01-01

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  3. Optical Absorption in Commercial Single Mode Optical Fibers in a High Energy Physics Radiation Field

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, T; Kuhnhenn, J; Hoeffgen, S K; Weinand, U

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the radiation induced attenuation of light at 1310 nm and 1550 nm in 12 commercially available single mode (SM) optical fibers. The fiber samples are exposed to gamma rays from a 60Co source and to a high energy physics radiation field. The attenuation is studied as a function of total dose, dose rate, light power and temperature. Radiation hard fibers from one manufacturer show an extraordinary low attenuation for light at 1310 nm that does not exceed 5 dB/km even after a total dose of 1 MGy. 2500 km of this type of fiber have been produced by the manufacturer and quality assurance measurements of the production batches are presently ongoing.

  4. A self-powered thin-film radiation detector using intrinsic high-energy current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygmanski, Piotr, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sajo, Erno, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU, E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The authors introduce a radiation detection method that relies on high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary charged particles in the detector material, which induces conduction current in an external readout circuit. Direct energy conversion of the incident radiation powers the signal formation without the need for external bias voltage or amplification. The detector the authors consider is a thin-film multilayer device, composed of alternating disparate electrically conductive and insulating layers. The optimal design of HEC detectors consists of microscopic or nanoscopic structures. Methods: Theoretical and computational developments are presented to illustrate the salient properties of the HEC detector and to demonstrate its feasibility. In this work, the authors examine single-sandwiched and periodic layers of Cu and Al, and Au and Al, ranging in thickness from 100 nm to 300 μm and separated by similarly sized dielectric gaps, exposed to 120 kVp x-ray beam (half-value thickness of 4.1 mm of Al). The energy deposition characteristics and the high-energy current were determined using radiation transport computations. Results: The authors found that in a dual-layer configuration, the signal is in the measurable range. For a defined total detector thickness in a multilayer structure, the signal sharply increases with decreasing thickness of the high-Z conductive layers. This paper focuses on the computational results while a companion paper reports the experimental findings. Conclusions: Significant advantages of the device are that it does not require external power supply and amplification to create a measurable signal; it can be made in any size and geometry, including very thin (sub-millimeter to submicron) flexible curvilinear forms, and it is inexpensive. Potential applications include medical dosimetry (both in vivo and external), radiation protection, and other settings where one or more of the above qualities are desired.

  5. Design of two digital radiation tolerant integrated circuits for high energy physics experiments data readout

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacini, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    High Energy Physics research (HEP) involves the design of readout electron- ics for its experiments, which generate a high radiation ¯eld in the detectors. The several integrated circuits placed in the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments' environment have to resist the radiation and carry out their normal operation. In this thesis I will describe in detail what, during my 10-months partic- ipation in the digital section of the Microelectronics group at CERN, I had the possibility to work on: - The design of a radiation-tolerant data readout digital integrated cir- cuit in a 0.25 ¹m CMOS technology, called \\the Kchip", for the CMS preshower front-end system. This will be described in Chapter 3. - The design of a radiation-tolerant SRAM integrated circuit in a 0.13 ¹m CMOS technology, for technology radiation testing purposes and fu- ture applications in the HEP ¯eld. The SRAM will be described in Chapter 4. All the work has carried out under the supervision and with the help of Dr. Kostas Klouki...

  6. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  7. [Neutron Dosimetry System Using CR-39 for High-energy X-ray Radiation Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuta, Kazutoshi; Monzen, Hajime; Tamura, Masaya; Tsuruta, Takao; Itou, Tetsuo; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    Neutrons are produced during radiation treatment by megavolt X-ray energies. However, it is difficult to measure neutron dose especially just during the irradiation. Therefore, we have developed a system for measuring neutrons with the solid state track detector CR-39, which is free from the influence of the X-ray beams. The energy spectrum of the neutrons was estimated by a Monte Carlo simulation method, and the estimated neutron dose was corrected by the contribution ratio of each energy. Pit formation rates of CR-39 ranged from 2.3 x 10(-3) to 8.2 x 10(-3) for each detector studied. According to the estimated neutron energy spectrum, the energy values for calibration were 144 keV and 515keV, and the contribution ratios were approximately 40:60 for 10 MV photons and 20:70 for photons over 15 MV. Neutron doses measured in the center of a high-energy X-ray field were 0.045 mSv/Gy for a 10 MV linear accelerator and 0.85 mSv/Gy for a 20 MV linear accelerator. We successfully developed the new neutron dose measurement system using the solid track detector, CR-39. This on-time neutron measurement system allows users to measure neutron doses produced in the radiation treatment room more easily.

  8. Genomic stability in response to high versus low linear energy transfer radiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eHuefner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Low linear energy transfer (LET gamma rays and high LET HZE (high atomic weight, high energy particles act as powerful mutagens in both plants and animals. DNA damage generated by HZE particles is more densely clustered than that generated by gamma rays. To understand the genetic requirements for resistance to high vs. low LET radiation, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were exposed to either 1GeV Fe nuclei or gamma radiation. A comparison of effects on the germination and subsequent growth of seedlings led us to conclude that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE of the two types of radiation (HZE vs. gamma are roughly 3:1. Similarly, in wild-type lines, loss of somatic heterozygosity was induced at an RBE of about a 2:1 (HZE vs. gamma. Checkpoint and repair defects, as expected, enhanced sensitivity to both agents. The replication fork checkpoint, governed by ATR, played a slightly more important role in resistance to HZE-induced mutagenesis than in resistance to gamma induced mutagenesis.

  9. Distributed Optical Fiber Radiation and Temperature Sensing at High Energy Accelerators and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090137; Brugger, Markus

    The aim of this Thesis is to investigate the feasibility of a distributed optical fiber radiation sensing system to be used at high energy physics accelerators and experiments where complex mixed-field environments are present. In particular, after having characterized the response of a selection of radiation sensitive optical fibers to ionizing radiation coming from a 60Co source, the results of distributed optical fiber radiation measurements in a mixed-field environment are presented along with the method to actually estimate the dose variation. This study demonstrates that distributed optical fiber dosimetry in the above mentioned mixed-field radiation environment is feasible, allowing to detect dose variations of about 10-15 Gy with a 1 m spatial resolution. The proof of principle has fully succeeded and we can now tackle the challenge of an industrial installation taking into account that some optimizations need to be done both on the control unit of the system as well as on the choice of the sensing f...

  10. Radiation Dose Assessments of Solar Particle Events with Spectral Representation at High Energies for the Improvement of Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    For radiation dose assessments of major solar particle events (SPEs), spectral functional forms of SPEs have been made by fitting available satellite measurements up to approx.100 MeV. However, very high-energy protons (above 500 MeV) have been observed with neutron monitors (NMs) in ground level enhancements (GLEs), which generally present the most severe radiation hazards to astronauts. Due to technical difficulties in converting NM data into absolutely normalized fluence measurements, those functional forms were made with little or no use of NM data. A new analysis of NM data has found that a double power law in rigidity (the so-called Band function) generally provides a satisfactory representation of the combined satellite and NM data from approx.10 MeV to approx.10 GeV in major SPEs (Tylka & Dietrich 2009). We use the Band function fits to re-assess human exposures from large SPEs. Using different spectral representations of large SPEs, variations of exposure levels were compared. The results can be applied to the development of approaches of improved radiation protection for astronauts, as well as the optimization of mission planning and shielding for future space missions.

  11. Development of High Energy Particle Detector for the Study of Space Radiation Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong-Bok Jo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Small Satellite-1 (NEXTSat-1 is scheduled to launch in 2017 and Instruments for the Study of Space Storm (ISSS is planned to be onboard the NEXTSat-1. High Energy Particle Detector (HEPD is one of the equipment comprising ISSS and the main objective of HEPD is to measure the high energy particles streaming into the Earth radiation belt during the event of a space storm, especially, electrons and protons, to obtain the flux information of those particles. For the design of HEPD, the Geometrical Factor was calculated to be 0.05 to be consistent with the targets of measurement and the structure of telescope with field of view of 33.4° was designed using this factor. In order to decide the thickness of the detector sensor and the classification of the detection channels, a simulation was performed using GEANT4. Based on the simulation results, two silicon detectors with 1 mm thickness were selected and the aluminum foil of 0.05 mm is placed right in front of the silicon detectors to shield low energy particles. The detection channels are divided into an electron channel and two proton channels based on the measured LET of the particle. If the measured LET is less than 0.8 MeV, the particle belongs to the electron channel, otherwise it belongs to proton channels. HEPD is installed in the direction of 0°,45°,90° against the along-track of a satellite to enable the efficient measurement of high energy particles. HEPD detects electrons with the energy of 0.1 MeV to several MeV and protons with the energy of more than a few MeV. Thus, the study on the dynamic mechanism of these particles in the Earth radiation belt will be performed.

  12. Development of High Energy Particle Detector for the Study of Space Radiation Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Gyeong-Bok; Sohn, Jongdae; Choi, Cheong Rim; Yi, Yu; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Kang, Suk-Bin; Na, Go Woon; Shin, Goo-Hwan

    2014-09-01

    Next Generation Small Satellite-1 (NEXTSat-1) is scheduled to launch in 2017 and Instruments for the Study of Space Storm (ISSS) is planned to be onboard the NEXTSat-1. High Energy Particle Detector (HEPD) is one of the equipment comprising ISSS and the main objective of HEPD is to measure the high energy particles streaming into the Earth radiation belt during the event of a space storm, especially, electrons and protons, to obtain the flux information of those particles. For the design of HEPD, the Geometrical Factor was calculated to be 0.05 to be consistent with the targets of measurement and the structure of telescope with field of view of 33.4°Δ was designed using this factor. In order to decide the thickness of the detector sensor and the classification of the detection channels, a simulation was performed using GEANT4. Based on the simulation results, two silicon detectors with 1 mm thickness were selected and the aluminum foil of 0.05 mm is placed right in front of the silicon detectors to shield low energy particles. The detection channels are divided into an electron channel and two proton channels based on the measured LET of the particle. If the measured LET is less than 0.8 MeV, the particle belongs to the electron channel, otherwise it belongs to proton channels. HEPD is installed in the direction of 0°Δ,45°Δ,90°Δ against the along-track of a satellite to enable the efficient measurement of high energy particles. HEPD detects electrons with the energy of 0.1 MeV to several MeV and protons with the energy of more than a few MeV. Thus, the study on the dynamic mechanism of these particles in the Earth radiation belt will be performed.

  13. Radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry with high energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Zimek, Zbigniew; Kałuska, Iwona; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2013-06-01

    The research was carried out to assess the efficiency of radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry of different density using the high energy electron beam based on the inactivation rate of Salmonella ssp, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Ascaris suum eggs. The experiment was conducted with use of the linear electron accelerator Elektronika 10/10 in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The inoculated slurry samples underwent hygienization with high energy electron beam of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. Numbers of reisolated bacteria were determined according to the MPN method, using typical microbiological media. Theoretical lethal doses, D90 doses and hygienization efficiency of high energy electron beam were determined. The theoretical lethal doses for all tested bacteria ranged from 3.63 to 8.84 kGy and for A. suum eggs from 4.07 to 5.83 kGy. Salmonella rods turned out to be the most sensitive and Enterococcus spp were the most resistant to electron beam hygienization. The effectiveness or radiation hygienization was lower in cattle than in swine slurry and in thick than in thin one. Also the species or even the serotype of bacteria determined the dose needed to inactivation of microorganisms.

  14. A radiation transfer model for the Milky Way: I. Radiation fields and application to high-energy astrophysics★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C. C.; Yang, R.; Tuffs, R. J.; Natale, G.; Rushton, M.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-09-01

    We present a solution for the ultraviolet - submillimetre (submm) interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) of the Milky Way (MW), derived from modelling COBE, IRAS and Planck maps of the all-sky emission in the near-, mid-, far-infrared and submm. The analysis uses the axisymmetric radiative transfer model that we have previously implemented to model the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe, but with a new methodology allowing for optimization of the radial and vertical geometry of stellar emissivity and dust opacity, as deduced from the highly resolved emission seen from the vantage point of the Sun. As such, this is the first self-consistent model of the broad-band continuum emission from the MW. In this paper, we present model predictions for the spatially integrated SED of the MW as seen from the Sun, showing good agreement with the data, and give a detailed description of the solutions for the distribution of ISRFs, as well as their physical origin, throughout the volume of the galaxy. We explore how the spatial and spectral distributions of our new predictions for the ISRF in the MW affects the amplitude and spectral distributions of the gamma rays produced via inverse Compton scattering for cosmic ray (CR) electrons situated at different positions in the galaxy, as well as the attenuation of the gamma rays due to interactions of the gamma-ray photons with photons of the ISRF. We also compare and contrast our solutions for the ISRF with those incorporated in the galprop package used for modelling the high-energy emission from CR in the MW.

  15. Using a smart phone application to measure high-energy radiation from thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, G. S.; Smith, D. M.; Rexroad, W. Z.; Kelley, N. A.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Rubenstein, E. P.; Drukier, G.; Benes, G. N.

    2013-12-01

    Commercial airline flights and developing cell phone technologies present a burgeoning opportunity for the public to help investigate radiation from thunderstorms, including terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), longer-lived gamma-ray glows, x-rays from lightning stepped leaders, and possible high-energy radiation, never yet observed, from blue jets, gigantic jets, and blue starters. GammaPix is a smartphone application from Image Insight, Inc. that uses the camera's CCD or CMOS sensor to identify and qualitatively assess threats related to gamma radioactivity, e.g., those caused by accidental exposure to radioactive material, high-altitude air travel, or acts of terrorism. A science-oriented version of the app is under development that will be publicized for use aboard commercial airline flights and on the ground in regions (like Japan in the wintertime) where thunderstorm charge centers come close to the ground. The primary goal of the project is to learn whether TGFs close to passenger aircraft and population centers on the ground occur often enough to create concern about radiation risk.

  16. A comparison of the microbicidal effectiveness of gamma rays and high and low energy electron radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallentire, A.; Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The radiation response of spores of Bacillus pumilus were examined for irradiation with cobalt 60 photons, 10 MeV electrons and low energy electrons at 100 and 80 keV. The responses were found to be the same for all types of radiation within the measurement uncertainties and were also in agreemen...

  17. Prototypes of self-powered radiation detectors employing intrinsic high-energy current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygmanski, Piotr, E-mail: pzygmanski@LROC.HARVARD.EDU; Briovio, Davide [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Sajo, Erno [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The authors experimentally investigate the effect of direct energy conversion of x-rays via selfpowered Auger- and photocurrent, potentially suitable to practical radiation detection and dosimetry in medical applications. Experimental results are compared to computational predictions. The detector the authors consider is a thin-film multilayer device, composed of alternating disparate electrically conductive and insulating layers. This paper focuses on the experiments while a companion paper introduces the fundamental concepts of high-energy current (HEC) detectors. Methods: The energy of ionizing radiation is directly converted to detector signal via electric current induced by high-energy secondary electrons generated in the detector material by the incident primary radiation. The HEC electrons also ionize the dielectric and the resultant charge carriers are selfcollected due to the contact potential of the disparate electrodes. Thus, an electric current is induced in the conductors in two different ways without the need for externally applied bias voltage or amplification. Thus, generated signal in turn is digitized by a data acquisition system. To determine the fundamental properties of the HEC detector and to demonstrate its feasibility for medical applications, the authors used a planar geometry composed of multilayer microstructures. Various detectors with up to seven conducting layers with different combinations of materials (250 μm Al, 35 μm Cu, 100 μm Pb) and air gaps (100 μm) were exposed to nearly plane-parallel 60–120 kVp x-ray beams. For the experimental design and verification, the authors performed coupled electron–photon radiation transport computations. The detector signal was measured using a commercial data acquisition system with 24 bits dynamic range, 0.4 fC sensitivity, and 0.9 ms sampling time. Results: Measured signals for the prototype detector varied depending on the number of layers, material type, and incident photon

  18. Proton-induced displacement damage in GaAs and radiation-hardness of semiconductor detectors for high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khludkov, S.S. [Tomskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Sibirskij Fiziko-Technicheskij Inst.; Stepanov, V.E. [Tomskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Sibirskij Fiziko-Technicheskij Inst.; Tolbanov, O.P. [Tomskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Sibirskij Fiziko-Technicheskij Inst.

    1997-08-01

    A model of the radiation hardness of semiconductor detector materials is developed in terms of local charge neutrality (LCN). The non-ionizing energy deposition in GaAs has been calculated for protons with energies ranging from 1 to 25 GeV. Deep centres are shown to play a basic role in determining the radiation hardness of charged particle detectors fabricated from high-resistivity semiconductor material. (orig.).

  19. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    High energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators produce large scattered radiation by various components of the treatment head, collimator and walls or objects in the treatment room including the patient. These scattered radiation do not provide therapeutic dose and are considered a hazard from the radiation safety perspective. Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams are contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. ICRP take the position that a dose of 500mGy may cause abortion at any stage of pregnancy and that radiation detriment to the fetus includes risk of mental retardation with a possible threshold in the dose response relationship around 100 mGy for the gestational period. The ICRP principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) was recommended for protection of occupation upon the linear no-threshold dose response hypothesis for cancer induction. We suggest this ALARA principle be applied to the fetus and testicle in therapeutic treatment. Radiation dose outside a photon treatment filed is mostly due to scattered photons . This scattered dose is a function of the distance from the beam edge, treatment geometry, primary photon energy, and depth in the patient. The need for effective shielding of the fetus and testicle is reinforced when young patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy and then shielding designed to reduce the scattered photon dose to normal organs have to considered. Irradiation was performed in phantom using high energy photon beams produced by a Varian 2100C/D medical linear accelerator (Varian Oncology Systems, Polo Alto, CA) located at the Yonsei Cancer Center. The composite phantom used was comprised of a commercially available anthropomorphic Rando phantom (Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, YN) and a rectangular solid polystyrene phantom of dimensions 30cm x 30cm x 20cm. The anthropomorphic Rando phantom represents an average man made from tissue equivalent materials that is

  20. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  1. Influence of semiclassical plasma on the energy levels and radiative transitions in highly charged ions★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Zhan-Bin; Chen, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Fu, Nian; Wang, Kai

    2017-11-01

    Considering the quantum effects of diffraction and the collective screening effects, the potential of test charge in semiclassical plasmas is derived. It is generalized exponential screened Coulomb potential. Using the Ritz variational method incorporating this potential, the effects of semiclassical plasma on the energy levels and radiative transitions are investigated systematically, taking highly charged H-like ion as an example. The Debye plasma model is also employed for comparison purposes. Comparisons and analysis are made between these two sets of results and the differences are discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  2. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrici, Luisa; Algoet, Yvon; Bruno, Luca; Magistris, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. In-situ spectroscopy of radiation damage of PTFE irradiated with high-energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A.O.; Rizzutto, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Severin, D.; Seidl, T.; Neumann, R.; Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) shows an outstanding combination of chemical and physical properties such as excellent resistance to chemical reagents, thermal stability in a wide temperature range, high electric resistance, and low friction coefficient. However, PTFE is known to be extremely sensitive to high energy radiation undergoing scission of the main chain. Depending on the irradiation parameters, temperature, and atmosphere, cross-linking mechanisms can be also observed. Sometimes these mechanisms have a very short lifetime, therefore it is necessary to measure the radiation damages during the irradiation process. PTFE films (50 {mu}m thick, Enflo Canada Ltd.) were irradiated with U and Au ions up to energies of 1.3 GeV and fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} at the accelerator UNILAC at the GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. The irradiations were performed at cryo (T 23K) and room temperature in the new setup at the M3-beam line of the materials research M-Branch. This setup allows in-situ investigations of ion irradiation induced material changes with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Mass spectra recorded during room temperature ion irradiation show outgassing of several fragments, with CF and CF{sub 3} being the most dominant species. Almost no fragments are observed during the cryo-irradiation. However, subsequent sample heating to room temperature leads to outgassing of the fragments starting above 150 K. This result indicates that at low irradiation temperatures small fragments are frozen in and accumulated in the sample. The online FTIR analysis of the irradiated samples shows a decrease in the absorption intensity of the bands assigned to the CF{sub 2} bonds, evidencing scission of the main polymer chain. The CF{sub 2} degradation is accompanied by the formation of the CF{sub 3} group indicated by two new bands, one at 738 cm{sup -1} (terminal - CF{sub 3} group) and another at 985 cm{sup -1} (-CF{sub 3} side

  4. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  5. Role of autophagy in high linear energy transfer radiation-induced cytotoxicity to tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Yan; Ye, Fei; Liu, Xiongxiong; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Feifei; Zheng, Xiaogang; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy has a potential advantage over conventional radiotherapy due to improved dose distribution and a higher biological effectiveness in cancer therapy. However, there is a little information currently available on the cellular and molecular basis for heavy-ion irradiation-induced cell death. Autophagy, as a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy, has recently attracted considerable attention. In this study, the effect of autophagy induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ions was examined in various tumor cell lines. To our knowledge, our study is the first to reveal that high-LET carbon ions could induce autophagy in various tumor cells effectively, and the autophagic level in the irradiated cells increased in a dose- and LET-dependent manner. The ability of carbon ions to inhibit the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway rose with increasing their LET. Moreover, modulation of autophagy in tumor cells could modify their sensitivity to high-LET radiation, and inhibiting autophagy accelerated apoptotic cell death, resulting in an increase in radiosensitivity. Our data imply that targeting autophagy might enhance the effectiveness of heavy-ion radiotherapy. PMID:24731006

  6. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  7. Investigation of High-Energy Ion-Irradiated MA957 Using Synchrotron Radiation under In-Situ Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an MA957 oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS alloy was irradiated with high-energy ions in the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System. Fe ions at an energy of 84 MeV bombarded MA957 tensile specimens, creating a damage region ~7.5 μm in depth; the peak damage (~40 dpa was estimated to be at ~7 μm from the surface. Following the irradiation, in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at the Advanced Photon Source in order to study the dynamic deformation behavior of the specimens after ion irradiation damage. In-situ X-ray measurements taken during tensile testing of the ion-irradiated MA957 revealed a difference in loading behavior between the irradiated and un-irradiated regions of the specimen. At equivalent applied stresses, lower lattice strains were found in the radiation-damaged region than those in the un-irradiated region. This might be associated with a higher level of Type II stresses as a result of radiation hardening. The study has demonstrated the feasibility of combining high-energy ion radiation and high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study materials’ radiation damage in a dynamic manner.

  8. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology—Exploitation of the “H2O2 Effect” for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, which is the critical target, as described in “Radiobiology for the Radiologist”, by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the “hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 effect”, which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H2O2 effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H2O2 effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H2O2, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H2O2 effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  9. High-energy radiation and polymers: A review of commercial processes and emerging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has been found to be widely applicable in modifying the structure and properties of polymers, and can be used to tailor the performance of either bulk materials or surfaces. Fifty years of research in polymer radiation chemistry has led to numerous applications of commercial and economic importance, and work remains active in the application of radiation to practical uses involving polymeric materials. This paper provides a survey of radiation-processing methods of industrial interest, ranging from technologies already commercially well established, through innovations in the active R&D stage which show exceptional promise for future commercial use. Radiation-processing technologies are discussed under the following categories: cross-linking of plastics and rubbers, curing of coatings and inks, heat-shrink products, fiber-matrix composites, chain-scission for processing control, surface modification, grafting, hydrogels, sterilization, natural product enhancement, plastics recycling, ceramic precursors, electronic property materials, ion-track membranes and lithography for microdevice production. In addition to new technological innovations utilizing conventional gamma and e-beam sources, a number of promising new applications make use of novel radiation types which include ion beams (heavy ions, light ions, highly focused microscopic beams and high-intensity pulses), soft X-rays which are focused, coherent X-rays (from a synchrotron) and e-beams which undergo scattering to generate patterns.

  10. Metformin radiosensitization effect of low and high linear energy transfer radiation in HCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Jeong, Youn Kyoung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Metformin (1,1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used treatment for type 2 diabetes, provides a good tolerability profile and low cost and has recently sparked keen interest as a potential anticancer agent. Recent evidence has suggested Metformin provides a synergistic benefit with chemotherapy or radiotherapy against certain cancers in several clinical cohort studies.Treatment response rates are higher in patients treated with metformin in cohort studies of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer treated with radiation and in esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. As the sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC has been characterized in vitro and in vivo, we investigated the radio-sensitizing effect of Metformin in HCC cells in combination with γ-ray (low LET) and neutron (high LET) radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of Metformin was much higher in neutron-irradiated than in γ -irradiated cell lines. Fortunately, Metformin had little effect on normal tissues. Our studies revealed no interaction between Metformin and radiation in normal hepatocytes. High LET radiation,including neutron and carbon ion, would produce more complicated and different cellular effects; indeed, the molecular biological mechanism of high LET radiation remains a topic of investigation.

  11. High-energy Emission from Nonrelativistic Radiative Shocks: Application to Gamma-Ray Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-01-01

    The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the nonrelativistic radiative shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least ∼10 GeV. The low-energy extension of the same nonthermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission in the hard X-ray band. Above ≳ 10 {keV}, this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. We find that due to strong Coulomb losses, only a fraction of {10}-4{--}{10}-3 of the gamma-ray luminosity is radiated in the NuSTAR band; nevertheless, this emission could be detectable simultaneously with the LAT emission in bright gamma-ray novae with a ∼50 ks exposure. The spectral slope in hard X-rays is α ≈ 0 for typical nova parameters, thus serving as a testable prediction of the model. Our work demonstrates how combined hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations can be used to constrain properties of the nova outflow (velocity, density, and mass outflow rate) and particle acceleration at the shock. A very low X-ray to gamma-ray luminosity ratio ({L}{{X}}/{L}γ ≲ 5× {10}-4) would disfavor leptonic models for the gamma-ray emission. Our model can also be applied to other astrophysical environments with radiative shocks, including SNe IIn and colliding winds in massive star binaries.

  12. Synchrotron Radiation from Ultra-High Energy Protons and the Fermi Observations of GRB 080916C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    B cr = m e 2 c 3 / eh = 4.4 !10 13 G is the critical magnetic field, and the mean magnetic field of the radiating region is B ’ = 10 5 B 5 ’ G...2! , 3! ) levels, respectively. If Type Ib,c supernovae are the progenitors of long GRBs like GRB 080916C, then ! j " 0.8 o [14]. Taking...rotational energy available in a core collapse supernova could be as large as ! 5 ൒ 54 erg for a 10 M sol core [15]. Although it appears to be a

  13. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-10-26

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  15. Origin of life: hypothesized roles of high-energy electrical discharges, infrared radiation, thermosynthesis and pre-photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J T

    2012-12-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that during the organization of pre-biotic bacterial cell(s), high-energy electrical discharges, infrared radiation (IR), thermosynthesis and possibly pre-photosynthesis were central to the origin of life. High-energy electrical discharges generated some simple organic molecules available for the origin of life. Infrared radiation, both incoming to the Earth and generated on the cooling Earth with day/night and warming/cooling cycles, was a component of heat engine thermosynthesis before enzymes and the genetic code were present. Eventually, a primitive forerunner of photosynthesis and the capability to capture visible light emerged. In addition, the dual particle-wave nature of light is discussed from the perspective that life requires light acting both as a wave and particle.

  16. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silari, M., E-mail: marco.silari@cern.c [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Agosteo, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Beck, P. [ARC, Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Bedogni, R. [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cale, E. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Caresana, M. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Domingo, C. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Donadille, L.; Dubourg, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Esposito, A. [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Fehrenbacher, G. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fernandez, F. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ferrarini, M. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Fiechtner, A.; Fuchs, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Garcia, M.J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Golnik, N. [Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Gutermuth, F. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Khurana, S.; Klages, Th. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. The paper describes in detail the detectors employed in the experiment, followed by a discussion of the results. A comparison is also made with the H*(10) values predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations and those measured by the BSS systems.

  17. Design, development, and calibration of a high energy proton telescope for space radiation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Redus, R H; Oberhardt, M R; McGarity, J O; Dalcolmo, J; Woolf, S; Huber, A C; Pantazis, J A

    2002-01-01

    A compact particle telescope has been developed to measure highly penetrating protons in space, measuring the differential energy spectrum of protons between 25 and 440 MeV and the integral flux above 440 MeV. This instrument combines new detector materials, an innovative sensor geometry, and a combination of active and passive shielding to obtain accurate measurements of highly penetrating protons in an instrument compact and light weight enough for space flight.

  18. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  19. Effects of melanin on high- and low- linear energy transfer (LET) radiation response of human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossi, G.F.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Pugliese, M. [Servizio di Radioprotezione, Univ. di Napoli (Italy); Mosse, I. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    1998-04-01

    The search for effective radioprotectors is of major concern in the medical, military, environmental, and space sciences. Conventional radioprotectors are generally effective only during a single irradiation and display their radioprotective properties only at high, toxic concentrations. In addition, they reduce somatic radiation effects but are poorly efficient in protecting from hereditary stochastic radiation effects. In this respect, the pigment melanin merits attention. Experiments referring to potential melanin effects on the ionising radiation response have been carried out with different biological systems, both in vivo and in vitro. In this paper, we present results on the response to high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10, supplemented by melanin. The incorporation of auto-oxidative (l-dopa) melanin was linear for concentrations from 3 to 10 {mu}g/ml in the growth medium. Concentrations of up to 250 {mu}g/ml did not significantly impair the cells proliferative ability. No significant protective effect of melanin on the survival of cultured cells after exposure to alpha-particles (130 keV/{mu}m) or x-rays was observed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 35 refs.

  20. Prototypes of Self-Powered Radiation Detectors Employing Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    application of similar high-energy electron currents has been confined to in-core neutron flux detectors in nuclear reactors4,5 and Compton detectors...macroscopic geom- etries in defense and space applications.9 Although it has been considered in relation to Compton or in-core neutron detectors, its...optimize it for specific purposes. In principle, it can be made flexible and cut to any size and shape. In a single sandwiched configuration , it is

  1. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  2. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes

    OpenAIRE

    I. P. Pakhotin; A. Y. Drozdov; Yuri Shprits; R. J. Boynton; D. A. Subbotin; M. A. Balikhin

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system ...

  3. A study on radiation safety measures for the use of high-energy beta-ray sources in medical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Jo [Cheju National Univ., Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The scope of this study consists of : an investigation of the current application status of medical radioisotopes, Sr-90, Ho-166, Re-188, which emit beta-rays of energy greater than 1.5 Mev, analyses of the environments under which the above isotopes are used, estimation of personal radiation doses by using the MCNP-4C computer code for the situations in which high radiation doses might be probable, review of the USA's regulations related to safe use of the radioisotopes, investigation of past over-expose cases reported in the internet, analysis of the current domestic regulations, suggestion of safety measures necessary for the use of the radioisotopes.

  4. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  5. Diffracted transition radiation of an ultra-high-energy relativistic electron beam in a thin single-crystal wafer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V., E-mail: noskovbupk@mail.ru [Belgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    We consider diffracted transition radiation (DTR) emitted by high-energy relativistic electrons crossing a thin single-crystal wafer in the Laue geometry. The expression describing the DTR angular density is derived for the case where the electron path length in the target is much smaller than the X-ray wave extinction length in the crystal and the kinematic nature of this expression is demonstrated. It is shown that the DTR angular density in a thin target is proportional to the target thickness.

  6. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  7. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  8. Experimental Research of High-Energy Capabilities of Material Recognition by Dual-Energy Method for the Low- Dose Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abashkin, A.; Osipov, S.; Chakhlov, S.; Shteyn, A.

    2016-06-01

    The algorithm to produce primary radiographs, its transformation by dual energy method and recognition of the object materials were enhanced based on the analysis of experimental results. The experiments were carried out at the inspection complex with high X- ray source - betatron MIB 4/9 in Tomsk Polytechnic University. For the reduced X -ray dose rate, the possibility of recognition of the object materials with thickness from 20 to 120 g/cm2 was proved under the condition that as the dose rate is reduced by the defined number of times, the segment of the image fragment with the reliably identified material will increase by the same number of times.

  9. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field, Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, B., E-mail: burkhard.wiegel@ptb.d [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Agosteo, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Esposito, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Fehrenbacher, G. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ferrarini, M. [Politecnico of Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Hohmann, E. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Hranitzky, C. [Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Kasper, A.; Khurana, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Mares, V. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Reginatto, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Rollet, S. [Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Ruehm, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schardt, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Silari, M. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Simmer, G.; Weitzenegger, E. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an internal quality assurance. The comparison of the neutron spectra measured by the different groups shows very good agreement. A detailed analysis presents some differences between the shapes of the spectra and possible sources of these differences are discussed. However, the ability of Bonner sphere spectrometers to provide reliable integral quantities like fluence and ambient dose equivalent is well demonstrated in this exercise. The fluence and dose results derived by the three groups agree very well within the given uncertainties, not only with respect to the total energy region present in this environment but also for selected energy regions which contribute in certain strength to the total values. In addition to the positions outside Cave A one spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectrum at one position in the entry maze of Cave A. In this case a comparison was possible to earlier measurements.

  10. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  11. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, B; Bedogni, R; Caresana, M; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Ferrarini, M; Hohmann, E; Hranitzky, C; Kasper, A; Khurana, S; Mares, V; Reginatto, M; Rollet, S; Rühm, W; Schardt, D; Silari, M; Simmer, G; Weitzenegger, E

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an int...

  12. High-order discontinuous Galerkin nonlocal transport and energy equations scheme for radiation hydrodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, M.; Limpouch, J.; Liska, R.; Weber, Stefan A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 10 (2017), s. 779-797 ISSN 0271-2091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : radiation hydrodynamics * nonlocal transport * Knudsen number * multigroup diffusion * radiation coupling Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.652, year: 2016

  13. Models for High-Energy Radiation from Blazars G. E. Romero1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We discuss on the modelling of blazar jets as emitters of multiwavelength radiation with the implementation of a lepto-hadronic treatment. Assuming that injection of non-thermal electrons and protons can take place at the base of the jet, the stationary particle distributions can be found using an inhomogeneous ...

  14. The speed law for highly radiative flames in a gaseous mixture with large activation energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G.J.B.; Brauner, C.-M.; Hulshof, J.; Lunardi, A.

    2005-01-01

    We study a thermodiffusive combustion model for premixed flames propagating in reactive gaseous mixtures which contain inert dust. As observed by Joulin, radiative transfer of heat may significantly enhance the flame temperature and its propagation speed. The Joulin effect is at its most pronounced

  15. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  16. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICARUS Collaboration; Antonello, M.; Aprili, P.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D. B.; Cocco, A. G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P. R.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Cohen, A.

    2012-05-01

    The OPERA Collaboration (2011) [1] has reported evidence of superluminal νμ propagation between CERN and the LNGS. Cohen and Glashow (2011) [2] argued that such neutrinos should lose energy by producing photons and e+e- pairs, through Z0 mediated processes analogous to Cherenkov radiation. In terms of the parameter δ≡(vν2-vc2)/vc2, the OPERA result corresponds to δ≈5ṡ10-5. For this value (note that (vν-vc)/vc≈δ2≈2.5ṡ10-5) of δ, a very significant deformation of the neutrino energy spectrum and an abundant production of photons and e+e- pairs should be observed at LNGS. We present an analysis based on the 2010 and part of the 2011 data sets from the ICARUS experiment, located at Gran Sasso National Laboratory and using the same neutrino beam from CERN. We find that the rates and deposited energy distributions of neutrino events in ICARUS agree with the expectations for an unperturbed spectrum of the CERN neutrino beam, as also reported by OPERA. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow (2011) prediction [2] for a weak current analog to Cherenkov radiation. In a dedicated search, no superluminal Cherenkov-like e+e- pair or γ emission event has been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the "bubble chamber-like" ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting the much stricter limit of δ<2.5ṡ10-8 at the 90% confidence level, comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987a (M.J. Longo, 1987 [4]). The observations of high energy neutrino events by Super-Kamiokande and IceCube are also pointing to a much stricter limit on δ.

  17. Soft errors in 10-nm-scale magnetic tunnel junctions exposed to high-energy heavy-ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Makino, Takahiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shoji; Sato, Hideo; Inocencio Enobio, Eli Christopher; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ohno, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    The influences of various types of high-energy heavy-ion radiation on 10-nm-scale CoFeB-MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicular easy axis have been investigated. In addition to possible latent damage, which has already been pointed out in previous studies, high-energy heavy-ion bombardments demonstrated that the magnetic tunnel junctions may exhibit clear flips between their high- and low-resistance states designed for a digital bit 1 or 0. It was also demonstrated that flipped magnetic tunnel junctions still may provide proper memory functions such as read, write, and hold capabilities. These two findings proved that high-energy heavy ions can produce recoverable bit flips in magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e., soft errors. Data analyses suggested that the resistance flips stem from magnetization reversals of the ferromagnetic layers and that each of them is caused by a single strike of heavy ions. It was concurrently found that an ion strike does not always result in a flip, suggesting a stochastic process behind the flip. Experimental data also showed that the flip phenomenon is dependent on the device and heavy-ion characteristics. Among them, the diameter of the device and the linear energy transfer of the heavy ions were revealed as the key parameters. From their dependences, the physical mechanism behind the flip was discussed. It is likely that a 10-nm-scale ferromagnetic disk loses its magnetization due to a local temperature increase induced by a single strike of heavy ions; this demagnetization is followed by a cooling period associated with a possible stochastic recovery process. On the basis of this hypothesis, a simple analytical model was developed, and it was found that the model accounts for the results reasonably well. This model also predicted that magnetic tunnel junctions provide sufficiently high soft-error reliability for use in space, highlighting their advantage over their counterpart conventional semiconductor memories.

  18. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, M. Santana; Blaha, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Li, Z.; Liu, J. C.; Mao, S. X.; Nicolas, L.; Rokni, S. H.; Xiao, S.; Ge, L.

    2017-09-01

    LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  19. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner M. Santana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  20. Problem of work on a high energy synchrotron submitted to large radiation dose

    CERN Document Server

    Gouiran, R

    1975-01-01

    Firstly, organic components have to be surveyed and eventually exchanged; secondly, work done by the staff in radioactive areas should be strictly controlled and minimized. To reach these goals radiation and radioactivity should not only be measured but also predicted years in advance. Radiation doses are computed, measured and predicted according to the proton loss pattern around the accelerator. A correlation scheme of doses versus accelerator operation is then deduced to predict the dose on any sensitive part of the accelerator. In the same way a radioactive pattern is computed, measured and accurately predicted in terms of dose rate. Work on the accelerator is studied in detail in order to forecast its duration and the corresponding dose absorbed by the staff. With these methods, it is easy now not only to predict the fate of the equipment and the doses to be received by the staff, but also to organize the work accordingly and possibly to program the accelerator operation (proton intensity and proton uses...

  1. X-ray optics developments at the APS for the third generation of high-energy synchrotron radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, D M

    1997-05-01

    Third-generation hard-X-ray synchrotron radiation sources simultaneously provide both a need and an opportunity for the development of new short-wavelength optical components. The high power and power densities of the insertion-device-produced X-ray beams have forced researchers to consider what may seem like exotic approaches, such as cryogenically cooled silicon and highly perfect diamond crystals, to mitigate thermal distortions in the first optical components. Once the power has been successfully filtered while maintaining the high beam brilliance, additional specialized optical components can be inserted into the monochromatic beam that take advantage of that brilliance. This paper reviews the performance of such optical components that have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Advanced Photon Source, starting with high-heat-load components and followed by examples of several specialized devices, such as an meV resolution (in-line) monochromator, a high-energy X-ray phase retarder and a phase-zone plate with submicrometer focusing capability.

  2. High-energy radiation monitoring based on radio-fluorogenic co-polymerization. I : Small volume in situ probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warman, J.M.; De Haas, M.P.; Luthjens, L.

    2009-01-01

    A method of radiation dosimetry is described which is based on the radiation-induced initiation of polymerization of a bulk monomer (e.g. methyl methacrylate) containing a small concentration (about 100 ppm) of a compound which is non-fluorescent but which becomes highly fluorescent when it is

  3. Radiation damage in He implanted silicon at high temperature using multi-energies

    CERN Document Server

    David, M L; Oliviero, E; Denanot, M F; Beaufort, M F; Declemy, A; Blanchard, C; Gerasimenko, N N; Barbot, J F

    2002-01-01

    He sup + ions were implanted at 800 deg. C into (1 0 0) silicon with multiple energies and selected fluences to get a number of displacement per atom constant in a large plateau. The ion-related defects have been mainly studied by transmission electron microscopy. Both the amount and the microstructure of defects have been found to be strongly dependent on the order of implants. Faceted cavities are only observed where damage overlapping occurs. The first implant provides thus nucleation sites for cavities. The generation of these sites is less efficient when using increasing energies because of damage recovery; fewer cavities are observed. Concurrently interstitial-type defects, left brace 1 1 3 right brace agglomerates, are formed. The observed state of growth of these left brace 1 1 3 right brace defects (rod-like and ribbon-like defects) is dependent on the implantation energy order but in any cases, no dislocation loops are observed even in the deepest damage region.

  4. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genotoxic effects of high-energy iron particles in human lymphoblasts differing in radiation sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Evans, T. E.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of (56)Fe particles and (137)Cs gamma radiation were compared in TK6 and WTK1 human lymphoblasts, two related cell lines which differ in TP53 status and in the ability to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks. Both cell lines were more sensitive to the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of (56)Fe particles than to those of gamma rays. However, the mutagenicity of (56)Fe particles and gamma rays at the TK locus was the same per unit dose and was higher for gamma rays than for (56)Fe particles at isotoxic doses. The respective RBEs for TK6 and WTK1 cells were 1.5 and 1.9 for cytotoxicity and 2.5 and 1.9 for clastogenicity, but only 1 for mutagenicity. The results indicate that complex lesions induced by (56)Fe particles are repaired less efficiently than gamma-ray-induced lesions, leading to fewer colony-forming cells, a slightly higher proportion of aberrant cells at the first division, and a lower frequency of viable mutants at isotoxic doses. WTK1 cells (mutant TP53) were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of both gamma rays and (56)Fe particles, but showed greater cytogenetic and mutagenic damage than TK6 cells (TP53(+)). A deficiency in the number of damaged TK6 cells (a) reaching the first mitosis after exposure and (b) forming viable mutants can explain these results.

  6. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonello, M.; Aprili, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Canci, N. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Carbonara, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, INFN e Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Centro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Cesana, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano e Politecnico, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cieslik, K. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland); Cline, D.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cocco, A.G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, INFN e Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Dabrowska, A. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Krakow (Poland); Dequal, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Dermenev, A. [INR RAS, prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Dolfini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN, Universita di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Farnese, C.; Fava, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Ferrari, A., E-mail: alfredo.ferrari@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2012-05-15

    The OPERA Collaboration (2011) has reported evidence of superluminal {nu}{sub {mu}} propagation between CERN and the LNGS. Cohen and Glashow (2011) argued that such neutrinos should lose energy by producing photons and e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs, through Z{sup 0} mediated processes analogous to Cherenkov radiation. In terms of the parameter {delta}{identical_to}(v{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-v{sub c}{sup 2})/v{sub c}{sup 2}, the OPERA result corresponds to {delta}=5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5}. For this value (note that (v{sub {nu}}-v{sub c})/v{sub c}={delta})/2 =2.5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -5}) of {delta}, a very significant deformation of the neutrino energy spectrum and an abundant production of photons and e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs should be observed at LNGS. We present an analysis based on the 2010 and part of the 2011 data sets from the ICARUS experiment, located at Gran Sasso National Laboratory and using the same neutrino beam from CERN. We find that the rates and deposited energy distributions of neutrino events in ICARUS agree with the expectations for an unperturbed spectrum of the CERN neutrino beam, as also reported by OPERA. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow (2011) prediction for a weak current analog to Cherenkov radiation. In a dedicated search, no superluminal Cherenkov-like e{sup +}e{sup -} pair or {gamma} emission event has been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the 'bubble chamber-like' ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting the much stricter limit of {delta}<2.5 Dot-Operator 10{sup -8} at the 90% confidence level, comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987a (M.J. Longo, 1987 ). The observations of high energy neutrino events by Super-Kamiokande and IceCube are also pointing to a much stricter limit on {delta}.

  7. Research study on high energy radiation effect and environment solar cell degradation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, W. E.; Wilkinson, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The most detailed and comprehensively verified analytical model was used to evaluate the effects of simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of predictions made by the external damage coefficient method. It was found that the most serious discrepancies were present in heavily damaged cells, particularly proton damaged cells, in which a gradient in damage across the cell existed. In general, it was found that the current damage coefficient method tends to underestimate damage at high fluences. An exception to this rule was thick cover-slipped cells experiencing heavy degradation due to omnidirectional electrons. In such cases, the damage coefficient method overestimates the damage. Comparisons of degradation predictions made by the two methods and measured flight data confirmed the above findings.

  8. UH-FLUX: Compact, Energy Efficient Superconducting Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC for Ultra-high Fluxes of X-ray and THz Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplev, Ivan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics; Ainsworth, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burt, Graeme [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Cockcroft Inst.; Seryi, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). JAI, Dept. of Physics

    2016-06-01

    The conventional ERLs have limited peak beam current because increasing the beam charge and repetition rate leads to appearance of the beam break-up instabilities. At this stage the highest current, from the SRF ERL, is around 300 mA. A single-turn (the beam will be transported through the accelerating section, interaction point and deceleration section of the AERL only once) Asymmetric Energy Recovery LINAC (AERL) is proposed. The RF cells in different sections of the cavity are tuned in such a way that only operating mode is uniform inside all of the cells. The AERL will drive the electron beams with typical energies of 10 - 30 MeV and peak currents above 1 A, enabling the generation of high flux UV/X-rays and high power coherent THz radiation. We aim to build a copper prototype of the RF cavity for a compact AERL to study its EM properties. The final goal is to build AERL based on the superconducting RF cavity. Preliminary design for AERL's cavity has been developed and will be presented. The results of numerical and analytical models and the next steps toward the AERL operation will also be discussed.

  9. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  10. Generation of intense X-radiation and high-energy-density matter by laser-accelerated electrons; Erzeugung von intensiver Roentgenstrahlung und Materie hoher Energiedichte durch Laserbeschleunigte Elektronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Aim of this thesis was to study the processes of the interaction between highly intense short-pulse laser and matter. The focus lied thereby on the generation of intense X-radiation and warm dense matter. The studies performed for this thesis comprehend thereby the influence of laser parameters like energy, pulse length, focus size, and intensity as well as the influence of the target geometry on the interaction and generation of high-energy-density matter. In this thesis for this two selected experiments are presented. First a silver foil was used as target, in order to study the generation of radiation at 21 keV. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-radiation were used in order to characterize the interaction. For the second experiment freely standing titanium wires were used as target. Hereby the focus lied on the characterization of the heated matter.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy of cancer with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation delivered by radionuclides emitting α-particles or Auger electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghevlian, Sadaf; Boyle, Amanda J; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-01-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) aims to selectively deliver radionuclides emitting α-particles, β-particles or Auger electrons to tumors by conjugation to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize tumor-associated antigens/receptors. The approach has been most successful for treatment of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma but challenges have been encountered in extending these promising results to the treatment of solid malignancies. These challenges include the low potency of β-particle emitters such as 131I, 177Lu or 90Y which have been commonly conjugated to the mAbs, due to their low linear energy transfer (LET=0.1-1.0keV/μm). Furthermore, since the β-particles have a 2-10mm range, there has been dose-limiting non-specific toxicity to hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow (BM) due to the cross-fire effect. Conjugation of mAbs to α-particle-emitters (e.g. 225Ac, 213Bi, 212Pb or 211At) or Auger electron-emitters (e.g. 111In, 67Ga, 123I or 125I) would increase the potency of RIT due to their high LET (50-230keV/μm and 4 to 26keV/μm, respectively). In addition, α-particles have a range in tissues of 28-100μm and Auger electrons are nanometer in range which greatly reduces or eliminates the cross-fire effect compared to β-particles, potentially reducing their non-specific toxicity to the BM. In this review, we describe the results of preclinical and clinical studies of RIT of cancer using radioimmunoconjugates emitting α-particles or Auger electrons, and discuss the potential of these high LET forms of radiation to improve the outcome of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nontargeted stressful effects in normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to low fluences of high charge, high energy (HZE) particles: kinetics of biologic responses and significance of secondary radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-04-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ∼151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ∼50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1-3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21(Waf1) (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ∼109 keV/μm) that targets ∼1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ∼13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ∼13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise particles.

  13. The energy influence on the radiation dose of the staff

    OpenAIRE

    CORTEZ JOSE ITALO; Morokina, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    The text of this paper is concerned to the problem of dose control used the sources of gamma and X-ray radiation in the mining industry and others organization of the nondestructive testing. Distinctive features of the resources are the high energy and intensity radiation is the short time delivering testing. The research is devoted to problems of the high energies and high ionization. The influence of radiation used in the industrial purposes, in particular, in nondestructive testing was stu...

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Comic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Degenhardt, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The custom-made radiation-hard front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The TRT was successfully commissioned with data collected from several million cosmic ray muons. A specia...

  15. Melanin, Radiation, and Energy Transduction in Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Cordero, Radames J B; Bryan, Ruth; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-03-01

    Melanin pigments are found in many diverse fungal species, where they serve a variety of functions that promote fitness and cell survival. Melanotic fungi inhabit some of the most extreme habitats on earth such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl and the highlands of Antarctica, both of which are high-radiation environments. Melanotic fungi migrate toward radioactive sources, which appear to enhance their growth. This phenomenon, combined with the known capacities of melanin to absorb a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and transduce this radiation into other forms of energy, raises the possibility that melanin also functions in harvesting such energy for biological usage. The ability of melanotic fungi to harness electromagnetic radiation for physiological processes has enormous implications for biological energy flows in the biosphere and for exobiology, since it provides new mechanisms for survival in extraterrestrial conditions. Whereas some features of the way melanin-related energy transduction works can be discerned by linking various observations and circumstantial data, the mechanistic details remain to be discovered.

  16. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Cohen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA collaboration [1] has claimed evidence of superluminal propagation between CERN and the LNGS with . We find that the neutrino energy distribution of the ICARUS events in LAr agrees with the expectations from the Monte Carlo predictions from an unaffected energy distribution of beam from CERN. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow prediction [2] for a weak currents analog to Cherenkov radiation. In particular no events with a superluminal Cherenkov like e+e- pair or gamma emission have been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the "bubble chamber like" ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting much stricter limits to the value of delta comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987A.

  17. High Energy $\

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a high statistics exposure of BEBC filled with hydrogen to both @n and &bar.@n beams. The principal physics aims are : \\item a) The study of the production of charmed mesons and baryons using fully constrained events. \\end{enumerate} b) The study of neutral current interactions on the free proton. \\item c) Measurement of the cross-sections for production of exclusive final state N* and @D resonances. \\item d) Studies of hadronic final states in charged and neutral current reactions. \\item e) Measurement of inclusive charged current cross-sections and structure functions. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ The neutrino flux is determined by monitoring the flux of muons in the neutrino shield. The Internal Picket Fence and External Muon Identifier of BEBC are essential parts of the experiment. High resolution cameras are used to search for visible decays of short-lived particles.

  18. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  19. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core “DSB” response specific to clastogenic treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A.; Culligan, Kevin M.; Huefner, Neil D.; Britt, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as “collateral” damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe26+ high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5–24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the “DSB response” were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing “extended night.” This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants. PMID:25136344

  20. Seismology: energy radiation from the Sumatra earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Sidao; Kanamori, Hiroo; Helmberger, Don

    2005-03-31

    We determined the duration of high-frequency energy radiation from Indonesia's great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (26 December 2004) to be about 500 seconds. This duration can be translated into a rupture length of about 1,200 km, which is more than twice as long as that inferred from body-wave analyses performed soon after the event. Our analysis was able rapidly to define the extent of rupture, thereby aiding the assessment of seismic hazard in the immediate future.

  1. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE): Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. [Chicago U., KICP; Bohacova, M. [Prague, Inst. Phys.; Bonifazi, C. [Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Cataldi, G. [INFN, Lecce; Chemerisov, S. [Argonne (main); De Mello Neto, J. R.T. [INFN, Lecce; Facal San Luis, P. [Chicago U., KICP; Fox, B. [Hawaii U.; Gorham, P. W. [Hawaii U.; Hojvat, C. [Fermilab; Hollon, N. [Chicago U., KICP; Meyhandan, R. [Hawaii U.; Monasor, M. [Chicago U., KICP; D' Orfeuil, B. Rouille [Chicago U., KICP; Santos, E. M. [Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Pochez, J. [Chicago U., KICP; Privitera, P. [Chicago U., KICP; Spinka, H. [Argonne (main); Verzi, V. [Rome U., Tor Vergata; Zhou, J. [Chicago U., KICP

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  2. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  3. In situ photoemission spectroscopy for chemical reaction dynamics study of Si (001) oxidation by using high-energy-resolution synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoka, Y

    2002-01-01

    The translation kinetic energy of incident molecules is an important parameter for the study of surface chemical reaction mechanisms. New adsorption reactions, which have been induced by the O sub 2 translational kinetic energy up to 3 eV, have been found in the O sub 2 Si(001) system by applying surface-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy with supersonic molecular beam techniques and high-energy-resolution synchrotron radiation. The termination of dangling bonds of the topmost Si-dimers strongly affected the oxidation of their backbonds. By controlling the translational kinetic energy of incident O sub 2 molecules, the formation of oxide layers at a sub-nanometer scale is possible at room temperature. (author)

  4. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, T. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Jóhannesson, G., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ -rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ -ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  5. Non-reference condition correction factor kNR of typical radiation detectors applied for the dosimetry of high-energy photon fields in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2012-09-01

    According to accepted dosimetry protocols, the "radiation quality correction factor"k(Q) accounts for the energy-dependent changes of detector responses under the conditions of clinical dosimetry for high-energy photon radiations. More precisely, a factor k(QR) is valid under reference conditions, i.e. at a point on the beam axis at depth 10 cm in a large water phantom, for 10×10 cm(2) field size, SSD 100 cm and the given radiation quality with quality index Q. Therefore, a further correction factor k(NR) has been introduced to correct for the influences of spectral quality changes when detectors are used under non-reference conditions such as other depths, field sizes and off-axis distances, while under reference conditions k(NR) is normalized to unity. In this paper, values of k(NR) are calculated for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, using published data of the energy-dependent responses of various radiation detectors to monoenergetic photon radiations, and weighting these responses with validated photon spectra of clinical high-energy photon beams from own Monte-Carlo-calculations for a wide variation of the non-reference conditions within a large water phantom. Our results confirm the observation by Scarboro et al. [26] that k(NR) can be represented by a unique function of the mean energy Em, weighted by the spectral photon fluence. Accordingly, the numerical variations of Em with depth, field size and off-axis distance have been provided. Throughout all considered conditions, the deviations of the k(NR) values from unity are at most 2% for a Farmer type ion chamber, and they remain below 15% for the thermoluminescent detectors LiF:Mg,Ti and LiF:Mg,Cu,P. For the shielded diode EDP-10, k(NR) varies from unity up to 20%, while the unshielded diode EDD-5 shows deviations up to 60% in the peripheral region. Thereby, the restricted application field of unshielded diodes has been clarified. For small field dosimetry purposes k(NR) can be converted into k(NCSF), the non

  6. Non-reference condition correction factor k{sub NR} of typical radiation detectors applied for the dosimetry of high-energy photon fields in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Poppe, Bjoern [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Working Group Medical Radiation Physics; Pius Hospital, Oldenburg (Germany). Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology; Harder, Dietrich

    2012-11-01

    According to accepted dosimetry protocols, the 'radiation quality correction factor' k{sub Q} accounts for the energy-dependent changes of detector responses under the conditions of clinical dosimetry for high-energy photon radiations. More precisely, a factor k{sub QR} is valid under reference conditions, i.e. at a point on the beam axis at depth 10 cm in a large water phantom, for 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field size, SSD 100 cm and the given radiation quality with quality index Q. Therefore, a further correction factor k{sub NR} has been introduced to correct for the influences of spectral quality changes when detectors are used under non-reference conditions such as other depths, field sizes and off-axis distances, while under reference conditions k{sub NR} is normalized to unity. In this paper, values of k{sub NR} are calculated for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, using published data of the energy-dependent responses of various radiation detectors to monoenergetic photon radiations, and weighting these responses with validated photon spectra of clinical high-energy photon beams from own Monte-Carlo-calculations for a wide variation of the non-reference conditions within a large water phantom. Our results confirm the observation by Scarboro et al. [26] that k{sub NR} can be represented by a unique function of the mean energy Em, weighted by the spectral photon fluence. Accordingly, the numerical variations of Em with depth, field size and off-axis distance have been provided. Throughout all considered conditions, the deviations of the k{sub NR} values from unity are at most 2% for a Farmer type ion chamber, and they remain below 15% for the thermoluminescent detectors LiF:Mg,Ti and LiF:Mg,Cu,P. For the shielded diode EDP-10, k{sub NR} varies from unity up to 20%, while the unshielded diode EDD-5 shows deviations up to 60% in the peripheral region. Thereby, the restricted application field of unshielded diodes has been clarified. For small field dosimetry purposes

  7. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. I. Energy accumulation in direct-flow waveguide compressors

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    Proper design of efficient requires precise understanding of the physics pertinent to energy accumulation and exhaust processes in resonant waveguide cavities. In this paper, practically for the first time these highly non-monotonic transient processes are studied in detail using a rigorous time-domain approach. Additionally, influence of the geometrical design and excitation parameters on the compressor\\'s performance is quantified in detail.

  8. Characterization and performance optimization of radiation monitoring sensors for high energy physics experiments at the CERN LHC and Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, Julien

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the matter originating from the universe, a new particle accelerator named the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been built at CERN. The radiation environment generated by the hadrons collisions in the high energy physics experiments of the LHC will be complex and locally very intense. For monitoring this complex radiation field, dosimeters have been installed in the LHC experiments. In previous study, RadFET dosimeters and PIN diodes have been characterized for their use in the particle accelerator. However, even if the RadFETs sensors have been already extensively characterized, their radiation response can be affected by their package. Depending on the material and the geometry, the package can induce errors in the dose measurement. In this thesis, a complete study has been carried out in order to evaluate its influence. Concerning the PIN diodes, the readout protocol used for the LHC is no longer valuable for the Super-LHC. Therefore, a complete study on their radiation response has been p...

  9. High Efficency Lightweight Radiators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — XC Associates proposes to build on prior work to develop and characterize a very high efficiency, lightweight radiator constructed from high thermal conductivity...

  10. Performance of peanut mutants and their offspring generated from mixed high-energy particle field radiation and tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J S; Qiao, L X; Zhao, L S; Wang, P; Guo, B T; Liu, L X; Sui, J M

    2015-09-09

    To develop new ways to breed peanut, we irradiated seeds of the Luhua 11 cultivar with a mixed high-energy particle field at different doses. The embryonic leaflets were extracted as explants and incubated on somatic embryo induction medium and then on somatic embryo germination and regeneration medium. After being grafted, the M1-generation plants were transplanted, and seeds from each M1-generation plant were harvested. In the following year, the M2-generation seeds were planted separately. Some M2-generation plants showed distinct character segregation relative to the mutagenic parent in terms of vigor, fertility, plant height, branch number, and pod size and shape. M2-generation plants that had a high pod weight per plant tended to produce M3-generation offspring that also had a high pod weight per plant, much higher than that of the mutagenic parent, Luhua 11. M4-generation seeds varied greatly in quality, and 35 individuals with an increased fat content (>55%) were obtained. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of mutagenesis via mixed high-energy particle field exposure and tissue culture is promising for peanut breeding.

  11. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  12. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE: Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzi V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  13. The Influence of Radiation Damage on the Deflection of High-Energy Beams in Bent Silicon Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Biino, C; Doble, Niels T; Elsener, K; Gatignon, L; Grafström, P; Mikkelsen, U; Kirsebom, K; Møller, S P; Uggerhøj, Erik; Worm, T

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results obtained for deflection of 450 GeV/c protons channeling along the {111} planes in a bent, strongly irradiated silicon crystal are presented. A comparison between the deflection efficiencies in irradiated areas and non-irradiated areas in the crystal shows that irradiation by 2.4 · 1020 protons/cm2 leads to a reduction of around 30 % in deflection efficiency. As a consequence, beam-splitting and extraction from an accelerator by means of a bent crystal are feasible solutions at high energies even for intense beams and during long periods.

  14. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084568; Baglin, Vincent; Schaefers, Franz

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic...

  15. Machine and radiation protection challenges of high energy/intensity accelerators: the role of Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, F.

    2017-09-01

    The role of Monte Carlo calculations in addressing machine protection and radiation protection challenges regarding accelerator design and operation is discussed, through an overview of different applications and validation examples especially referring to recent LHC measurements.

  16. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  17. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, T. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ-rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ-ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  18. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by {gamma}-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with {gamma}-ray should be carried out. (author)

  19. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yixuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a. In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics.

  20. The influence of reference radiation photon energy on high-LET RBE: comparison of human peripheral lymphocytes and human-hamster hybrid AL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T E; Greubel, C; Dollinger, G; Schmid, E

    2017-03-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) based on the induction of dicentrics in any cell type is principally an important information for the increasing application of high-LET radiation in cancer therapy. Since the standard system of human lymphocytes for measuring dicentrics are not compatible with our microbeam irradiation setup where attaching cells are essential, we used human-hamster hybrid AL cells which do attach on foils and fulfil the special experimental requirement for microbeam irradiations. In this work, the dose-response of AL cells to photons of different energy, 70 and 200 kV X-rays and 60Co γ-rays, is characterized and compared to human lymphocytes. The total number of induced dicentrics in AL cells is approximately one order of magnitude smaller. Despite the smaller α and β parameters of the measured linear-quadratic dose-response relationship, the α/β-ratio versus photon energy dependence is identical within the accuracy of measurement for AL cells and human lymphocytes. Thus, the influence of the reference radiation used for RBE determination is the same. For therapy relevant doses of 2 Gy (60Co equivalent), the difference in RBE is around 20% only. These findings indicate that the biological effectiveness in AL cells can give important information for human cells, especially for studies where attaching cells are essential.

  1. Natural radiation contribution to renewable energy searching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Flores, M.; Huerta, M., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    High anomalies of naturally occurring radon in geothermal fields are becoming an additional geophysics tool for determining the areas of geothermal activity underground. Under close collaboration with the Federal Electricity Board in Mexico (CFE), we have study four geothermal fields (Los Azufres, Tres Virgenes, Humeros and Acoculco) for extending the energy potentially. The heat source in hydrothermal systems produces geothermal gasses, which transport radon to the surface faster than the common diffusion process in absence of a geothermal activity. This paper presents: mechanism of radon production, main physical and chemical features that make it an excellent indicator for locating heat sources of geothermal reservoirs, the detection basis of in situ radon concentration using a high sensitive radiation chamber and the planning experimental strategy for successful use of this technique. (author)

  2. Stability toward High Energy Radiation of Non-Proteinogenic Amino Acids: Implications for the Origins of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Hafez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of non-proteinogenic amino acids, most of them found quite commonly in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites, were subjected to solid state radiolysis in vacuum to a total radiation dose of 3.2 MGy corresponding to 23% of the total dose expected to be taken by organic molecules buried in asteroids and meteorites since the beginning of the solar system 4.6 × 109 years ago. The radiolyzed amino acids were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and by polarimety and Optical Rotatory Dispersion (ORD. It is shown that an important fraction of each amino acid is able to “survive” the massive dose of radiation, while the enantiomeric excess is partially preserved. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that it is unsurprising to find amino acids even in enantiomeric excess in carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Experimental simulation of radiation damage of polymers in space applications by cosmic-ray-type high energy heavy ions and the resulting changes in optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, U.H.; Ensinger, W., E-mail: ensinger@ca.tu-darmstadt.de

    2015-12-15

    Devices operating in space, e.g. in satellites, are being hit by cosmic rays. These include so-called HZE-ions, with High mass (Z) and energy (E). These highly energetic heavy ions penetrate deeply into the materials and deposit a large amount of energy, typically several keV per nm range. Serious damage is created. In space vehicles, polymers are used which are degraded under ion bombardment. HZE ion irradiation can experimentally be simulated in large scale accelerators. In the present study, the radiation damage of aliphatic vinyl- and fluoro-polymers by heavy ions with energies in the GeV range is described. The ions cause bond scission and create volatile small molecular species, leading to considerable mass loss of the polymers. Since hydrogen, oxygen and fluorine-containing molecules are created and these elements are depleted, the remaining material is carbon-richer than the original polymers and contains conjugated CC double bonds. This process is investigated by measuring the optical band gap with UV–Vis absorption spectrometry as a function of ion fluence. The results show how the optical band gaps shift from the UV into the Vis region upon ion irradiation for the different polymers.

  4. Colour dosemeters for high level radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönbacher, H.; Coninckx, F.; Miller, A.

    1990-01-01

    Development work was undertaken in order to produce a visual dosemeter system for measurement of radiation levels around the present and future high energy particle accelerators. This dosemeter should exhibit radiation induced colours in the visible part of the spectrum leading to a visual dose...... radiation; and (2) a paint containing a base substance with a pigment. The paint dosemeter remained unaffected by irradiation up to 3 x 10(4) Gy while the film dosemeter showed a measurable colour change from 10(4) Gy to 5 x 10(5) Gy. Above 10(6) Gy the film dosemeter is destroyed by radiation. Samples...... of paint and film dosemeters were installed in the 450 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN and irradiated during operation for more than two years. Within the useful range of the dosemeters, dose comparisons with other dosemeter types gave satisfactory results. Application in other fields...

  5. Implicit filtered P{sub N} for high-energy density thermal radiation transport using discontinuous Galerkin finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laboure, Vincent M., E-mail: vincent.laboure@tamu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Department, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rgm@tamu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Department, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Hauck, Cory D., E-mail: hauckc@ornl.gov [Computational and Applied Mathematics Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996-1320 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FP{sub N}) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  6. Trace elemental analysis of titanium dioxide pigments and automotive white paint fragments for forensic examination using high-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Shimoda, Osamu; Saito, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Toshio; Terada, Yasuko; Ninomiya, Toshio; Nakai, Izumi

    2009-05-01

    High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) utilizing 116 keV x-rays was used to characterize titanium dioxide pigments (rutile) and automotive white paint fragments for forensic examination. The technique allowed analysis of K lines of 9 trace elements in 18 titanium dioxide pigments (rutile), and 10 trace elements in finish coat layers of seven automotive white paint fragments. High-field strength elements (HFSE) were found to strongly reflect the origin of the titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) pigments, and could be used as effective parameters for discrimination and classification of the pigments and paint fragments. A pairwise comparison of the finish coat layers of seven automotive white paint fragments was performed. The trace elements in the finish coat layers detected by the high-energy SR-XRF were especially effective for identification. By introducing the trace element information of primer and electrocoat layers, all the automotive white paint fragments could be discriminated by this technique.

  7. The effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (Ar-40) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Benton, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a 'string test'. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  8. Measurement of linear energy transfer distribution at CERN-EU high- energy reference field facility with real-time radiation monitoring device III and its comparison with dosimetric telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Doke, T; Hara, K; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Suzuki, S; Terasawa, K

    2004-01-01

    The distributions of linear energy transfer for LET (LET/sub water/) in front of the 80-cm-thick concrete side shield at the CERN-EU high- energy reference field (CERF) facility were measured with a Si detector telescope named real-time radiation monitoring device-III (RRMD-III) covered with and without a 1 cm-thick acrylic plate. In these measurements, a difference of about 20% in the absorbed dose between the two LET/sub water/ distributions was observed as a result of protons, deuterons and tritons recoiled by neutrons. The LET/sub water/ distribution obtained using RRMD-III without the 1-cm-thick acrylic plate is compared with lineal energy distributions obtained using the dosimetric telescope (DOSTEL) detector under the same conditions. These dose equivalents are also compared with that obtained using HANDI TEPC which is used as the standard at the CERF facility. (26 refs).

  9. Midinfrared radiation energy harvesting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Ren; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2017-07-01

    The International Energy Agency reports a 17.6% annual growth rate in sustainable energy production. However, sustainable power generation based on environmental conditions (wind and solar) requires an infrastructure that can handle intermittent power generation. An electromagnetic thermoelectric (EMTE) device to overcome the intermittency problems of current sustainable energy technologies, providing the continuous supply unachievable by photovoltaic cells with portability impossible for traditional thermoelectric (TE) generators, is proposed. The EMTE converts environmental electromagnetic waves to a voltage output without requiring additional input. A single cell of this TE-inspired broadband EMTE can generate a 19.50 nV output within a 7.2-μm2 area, with a verified linear scalability of the output voltage through cell addition. This idea leads to a challenge: the electrical polarity of each row of cells is the same but may require additional routing to combine output from each row. An innovative layout is proposed to overcome this issue through switching the electrical polarity every other row. In this scheme, the EM wave absorption spectrum is not altered, and a simple series connection can be implemented to boost the total voltage output by 1 order within a limited area.

  10. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  11. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 18: Cherenkov Emission By High-Energy Radiation Therapy Beams: A Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlateva, Y.; El Naqa, I. [Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Quitoriano, N. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    We investigate Cherenkov emission (CE) by radiotherapy beams via radiation dose-versus-CE correlation analyses, CE detection optimization by means of a spectral shift towards the near-infrared (NIR) window of biological tissue, and comparison of CE to on-board MV imaging. Dose-CE correlation was investigated via simulation and experiment. A Monte Carlo (MC) CE simulator was designed using Geant4. Experimental phantoms include: water; tissue-simulating phantom composed of water, Intralipid®, and beef blood; plastic phantom with solid water insert. The detector system comprises an optical fiber and diffraction-grating spectrometer incorporating a front/back-illuminated CCD. The NIR shift was carried out with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), emitting at (650±10) nm. CE and MV images were acquired with a CMOS camera and electronic portal imaging device. MC and experimental studies indicate a strong linear dose-CE correlation (Pearson coefficient > 0.99). CE by an 18-MeV beam was effectively NIR-shifted in water and a tissue-simulating phantom, exhibiting a significant increase at 650 nm for QD depths up to 10 mm. CE images exhibited relative contrast superior to MV images by a factor of 30. Our work supports the potential for application of CE in radiotherapy online imaging for patient setup and treatment verification, since CE is intrinsic to the beam and non-ionizing and QDs can be used to improve CE detectability, potentially yielding image quality superior to MV imaging for the case of low-density-variability, low-optical-attenuation materials (ex: breast/oropharynx). Ongoing work involves microenvironment functionalization of QDs and application of multi-channel spectrometry for simultaneous acquisition of dosimetric and tumor oxygenation signals.

  13. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy {beta} radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were {beta} spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy {beta} radiation field a moderated spectrum from a {sup 14}C source (E{sub {beta}},{sub max} =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 {mu}m in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for {sup 147}Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for {beta} radiation from {sup 14}C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to {beta} radiation for radiation fields with maximum {beta} energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum {beta} energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a {beta} dose higher than about 10 {mu}Gy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the {beta}energy for E{sub {beta}},{sub max} values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs.

  14. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    OpenAIRE

    Simos, N; Z. Zhong; Ghose, S.; H. G. Kirk; L-P Trung; K. T. McDonald; Z. Kotsina; Nocera, P.; Assmann, R; Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Quaranta, E.; Rossi, A.; Zwaska, R.; Ammigan, K.

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace ...

  15. Measurements of Relative Depth Doses in Induced by High-Energy Proton Beam Using Multi-Dimensional Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Seo, J. K.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, B. [Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D.; Park, S. Y. [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Proton therapy makes it possible to remove a tumor effectively relative to conventional photon or electron therapy. The distal fall-off in depth dose distribution of the proton beam assures little irradiation damage on normal tissues except for the tumor. In addition, the high energy deposition in the Bragg-peak area is possible to concentrate more doses on a tumor. However, the misposition of the Bragg-peak could cause critical damage to normal tissues and give rise to serious problem to cancer patients. Therefore, the quality assurance (QA) to get the position accuracy of the proton beam using a dosimeter is very important process in proton therapy. Especially, in ocular proton beam therapy, comparably low energies and relatively short ranges (1 {approx} 4 cm) of the proton beams are required, and the depth dose distributions of proton beams have to be measured with a high resolution dosimeter in a real-time. In proton therapy, it is not easy to measure the depth dose distribution using a conventional ionization chamber in a real-time with a high spatial resolution because it has a relatively large volume and consists of non-water equivalent material. On the other hand, a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) uses an organic scintillator as a sensing material, the diameter of which is usually less than 1.0 mm. Organic scintillators are water equivalent and can be used for an exact dose measurement without complicated calibration processes due to temperature and pressure variations. In this study, we fabricated a multi-dimensional FORS which consists of organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers (POFs) and a water phantom with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) for the ocular proton therapy dosimetry. In addition, the relative depth dose of 109 MeV proton beam was measured by using of a multi-dimensional FORS which has 10 x 3 sensor array with a 0.5 mm interval

  16. Multi-energy optimized processing: The use of high intensity ultrasonic and electromagnetic radiation for biofuel production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Matthew Mason

    This work aimed to improve the understanding of the use of microwaves and ultrasound for chemical processes. Using biodiesel production as the case for study, the non-linear effects of high intensity ultrasonics, electromagnetic loss, and microwave heating were explored. Cavitation and atomization phenomena were used to describe the process of ultrasonic emulsification. The dielectric loss mechanisms pertinent to the biodiesel production materials were described as the connection to between the effects of ultrasonic emulsification and microwave heating. Superheating and anisothermal heating phenomena were identified as the specific advantages afforded by microwave heating. High intensity ultrasonics was found to be capable of creating emulsions of biodiesel reactants with uniform dispersed phase droplets. Through optical microscopy, the ability to control the dispersed phase droplet size by altering the frequency and intensity of ultrasound was confirmed. This ultrasonic technique was investigated by measuring complex permittivity of the emulsions from 500 MHz and 5 GHz. The dielectric loss of emulsions consisting of methanol and soybean oil indicated that ultrasonic treatments could be used to alter the microwave absorption. Microwave heating tests of ultrasonically formed emulsions confirmed the permittivity results practically. The superheated boiling point of methanol and heating rate of methanol was extended to higher temperatures and rates in ultrasonically formed emulsions. Microwave heating of ultrasonically mixed emulsions was shown to result in faster transesterification relations than microwave heating of conventionally mixed emulsions. Finally, utilizing ultrasonics to optimize microwave absorption was shown capable of transesterification without catalyst.

  17. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10^{20}  p/cm^{2}. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (∼5×10^{18}

  18. Experimental comparison of laser energy losses in high-quality laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using radiation from fibre and CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyshev, A. A.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Shulyat'ev, V. B.

    2015-09-01

    We report a comparative experimental study of laseroxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using a fibre laser with a wavelength of 1.07 μm and a CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm at the sheet thickness of 3 - 16 mm. For the two lasers we have measured the dependence of the cutting speed on the radiation power and determined the cutting speed at which the surface roughness is minimal. The coefficient of laser radiation absorption in the laser cutting process is measured for these lasers at different values of the cutting speed and radiation power. It is found that the minimal roughness of the cut surface is reached at the absorbed laser energy per unit volume of the removed material, equal to 11 - 13 J mm-3; this value is the same for the two lasers and does not depend on the sheet thickness.

  19. ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

    2011-08-03

    Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be

  20. High energy semiconductor switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, R. L.

    1989-02-01

    The objective was a controller for electric motors. By operating standard Nema B induction motors at variable speed a great deal of energy is saved. This is especially true in pumping and air conditioning applications. To allow wider use of variable speed AC drives, and to provide improved performance, a better semiconductor switch was sought. This was termed the High Energy Semiconductor Switch.

  1. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  2. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Nicholas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  3. Energy balance in coherent electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Coisson, R

    1994-01-01

    Bunched charges, as in the 'free electron laser', radiate more energy than unbunched ones. For a better understanding of how the forces between particles determine the conservation of energy, we take the simple model of two charges within a wavelength of a sinusodoidal wave, and show that the relative phase of the particle's motion with respect to the wave is modified by the force between the two particles, and this explains the extra work done by the wave. The phase shift is proportional to the emitted field and depends on the retardation (particle distance divided by speed of light), and turns out to be independent of distance. (author)

  4. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  5. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  6. Radiation-Tolerant High-Speed Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Radiation -Tolerant High-Speed Camera Esko Mikkola, Andrew Levy, Matt Engelman Alphacore, Inc. Tempe, AZ 85281 Abstract: As part of an... radiation -hardened CMOS image sensor and camera system. Radiation -hardened cameras with frame rates as high as 10 kfps and resolution of 1Mpixel are not...camera solution that is under development with a similar architecture. It also includes a brief description of the radiation -hardened camera that

  7. Skylab experiments. Volume 5: Astronomy and space physics. [Skylab observations of galactic radiation, solar energy, and interplanetary composition for high school level education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The astronomy and space physics investigations conducted in the Skylab program include over 20 experiments in four categories to explore space phenomena that cannot be observed from earth. The categories of space research are as follows: (1) phenomena within the solar system, such as the effect of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere, the composition of interplanetary space, the possibility of an inner planet, and the X-ray radiation from Jupiter, (2) analysis of energetic particles such as cosmic rays and neutrons in the near-earth space, (3) stellar and galactic astronomy, and (4) self-induced environment surrounding the Skylab spacecraft.

  8. Experimental high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Paula, L

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the contributions on experimental high energy physics to the XXIV Brazilian National Meeting on Particle and Fields is presented. There were 5 invited talks and 32 submitted contributions. The active Brazilian groups are involved in several interesting projects but suffer from the lack of funding and interaction with Brazilian theorists.

  9. High Energy Exoplanet Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet transits of exoplanets allow us to probe the atmospheres of these worlds. High energy transits have been shown to be deeper but also more variable than in the optical. By simulating exoplanet transits using high-energy observations of the Sun, we can test the limits of our ability to accurately measure the properties of these planets in the presence of stellar activity. We use both disk-resolved images of the Solar disk spanning soft X-rays, the ultraviolet, and the optical and also disk-integrated Sun-as-a-star observations of the Lyα irradiance to simulate transits over a wide wavelength range. We find that for stars with activity levels similar to the Sun, the planet-to-star radius ratio can be overestimated by up to 50% if the planet occults an active region at high energies. We also compare our simulations to high energy transits of WASP-12b, HD 189733, 55 Cnc b, and GJ 436b.

  10. High energy battery. Hochenergiebatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H.; Beyermann, G.; Bulling, M.

    1992-03-26

    In a high energy battery with a large number of individual cells in a housing with a cooling medium flowing through it, it is proposed that the cooling medium should be guided so that it only affects one or both sides of the cells thermally.

  11. High energy particle astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  12. Designing Radiation Resistance in Materials for Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    Proposed fusion and advanced (Generation IV) fission energy systems require high-performance materials capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 atomic displacements per atom with large amounts of transmutant hydrogen and helium isotopes. After a brief overview of fusion reactor concepts and radiation effects phenomena in structural and functional (nonstructural) materials, three fundamental options for designing radiation resistance are outlined: Utilize matrix phases with inherent radiation tolerance, select materials in which vacancies are immobile at the design operating temperatures, or engineer materials with high sink densities for point defect recombination. Environmental and safety considerations impose several additional restrictions on potential materials systems, but reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (including thermomechanically treated and oxide dispersion-strengthened options) and silicon carbide ceramic composites emerge as robust structural materials options. Materials modeling (including computational thermodynamics) and advanced manufacturing methods are poised to exert a major impact in the next ten years.

  13. Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distributions for Highest Energy Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, G H I; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

  14. Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distribution for Highest Energy Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, GHI; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

  15. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  16. High Energy Particles from the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, R A

    2000-01-01

    The field of high energy particle astronomy is exciting and rapidly developing. In the last few years, we have detected extragalactic sources of intense TeV gamma radiation and individual cosmic ray particles with energies exceeding 25 Joules. Understanding the workings of astrophysics under extreme conditions is the primary goal of this field. Also important is the possibility of using high energy particles from space to probe beyond the standard models of particle physics and cosmology. This paper presents a review of high energy particle astronomy using photons, cosmic rays, and neutrinos.

  17. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  18. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  19. Heavy Quark Production at High Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R D

    2001-01-01

    We report on QCD radiative corrections to heavy quark production valid at high energy. The formulae presented will allow a matched calculation of the total cross section which is correct at $O(\\as^3)$ and includes resummation of all terms of order $\\as^3 [\\as \\ln (s/m^2)]^n$. We also include asymptotic estimates of the effect of the high energy resummation. A complete description of the calculation of the heavy quark impact factor is included in an appendix.

  20. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  1. Radiation production and absorption in human spacecraft shielding systems under high charge and energy Galactic Cosmic Rays: Material medium, shielding depth, and byproduct aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Joseph; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2018-03-01

    Deep space missions such as the planned 2025 mission to asteroids require spacecraft shields to protect electronics and humans from adverse effects caused by the space radiation environment, primarily Galactic Cosmic Rays. This paper first reviews the theory on how these rays of charged particles interact with matter, and then presents a simulation for a 500 day Mars flyby mission using a deterministic based computer code. High density polyethylene and aluminum shielding materials at a solar minimum are considered. Plots of effective dose with varying shield depth, charged particle flux, and dose in silicon and human tissue behind shielding are presented.

  2. New approach of determinations of earthquake moment magnitude using near earthquake source duration and maximum displacement amplitude of high frequency energy radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, H.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Harjadi, P. J. P. [ITB, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Tecnology (Indonesia); BMKG (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20

    The new approach method to determine the magnitude by using amplitude displacement relationship (A), epicenter distance ({Delta}) and duration of high frequency radiation (t) has been investigated for Tasikmalaya earthquake, on September 2, 2009, and their aftershock. Moment magnitude scale commonly used seismic surface waves with the teleseismic range of the period is greater than 200 seconds or a moment magnitude of the P wave using teleseismic seismogram data and the range of 10-60 seconds. In this research techniques have been developed a new approach to determine the displacement amplitude and duration of high frequency radiation using near earthquake. Determination of the duration of high frequency using half of period of P waves on the seismograms displacement. This is due tothe very complex rupture process in the near earthquake. Seismic data of the P wave mixing with other wave (S wave) before the duration runs out, so it is difficult to separate or determined the final of P-wave. Application of the 68 earthquakes recorded by station of CISI, Garut West Java, the following relationship is obtained: Mw = 0.78 log (A) + 0.83 log {Delta}+ 0.69 log (t) + 6.46 with: A (m), d (km) and t (second). Moment magnitude of this new approach is quite reliable, time processing faster so useful for early warning.

  3. SU-E-T-126: Non-Reference Condition Correction Factor KNR of Typical Radiation Detectors for the Dosimetry of High-Energy Photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, N; Poppe, B; Harder, D

    2012-06-01

    To correct for the deviations of the detector response when typical radiation detectors are used under non-reference conditions, factor kNR was calculated from the known energy dependence of the detector response at photon energies from 10 keV upwards and from clinical photon spectra within a large water phantom beneath a Siemens Primus 6/15 MV linac. A Farmer type ion chamber (NE2571), two TLD detector types and two diodes were investigated. Factor kNR was obtained as the ratio of the weighted responses Yt of a given detector t under reference conditions xref (axial distance r = 0 cm, depth d = 10 cm, field size 10 × 10 cm2 and SSD = 100 cm) and that under non-reference conditions × (off-axis points and depths for various field sizes); kNR = Yt(xref)/Yt(x). For small field (SF) dosimetry, we evaluated correction factor kNRSF, which refers to small field reference conditions (4 × 4 cm2 field). For all detectors investigated, the deviations of kNR from unity were highest outside the field, due to prevailing low-energy scatter contributions. For the Farmer chamber and EDP-10 diode, the kNR deviations did not exceed 2%, but were up to 60% for the EDD-5 diode, while kNR values for LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti deviated at most 15% and 5% respectively. kNR values appear as unique functions of the mean photon energy at the point of interest. Air-filled ion chambers show only small kNR variations, while for non-water equivalent detectors, kNR variations depend on the detector response at low photon energy. kNR can be presented as a unique function of the mean photon energy at the point of interest. A 4 × 4 cm2 reference field is recommended for small fields, with correction factor kNRSF varying almost negligibly from kNR except for unshielded Si diodes. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  5. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  6. Lightweight, High-Temperature Radiator Panels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight, high-temperature radiators are needed for future, high-efficiency power conversion systems for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Creare has developed...

  7. Solar radiation practical modeling for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Daryl Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Written by a leading scientist with over 35 years of experience working at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Solar Radiation: Practical Modeling for Renewable Energy Applications brings together the most widely used, easily implemented concepts and models for estimating broadband and spectral solar radiation data. The author addresses various technical and practical questions about the accuracy of solar radiation measurements and modeling. While the focus is on engineering models and results, the book does review the fundamentals of solar radiation modeling and solar radiation m

  8. High energy astrophysical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Poggiani, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents ultraviolet and X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy, and gravitational wave astronomy as distinct research areas, focusing on the astrophysics targets and the requirements with respect to instrumentation and observation methods. The purpose of the book is to bridge the gap between the reference books and the specialized literature. For each type of astronomy, the discussion proceeds from the orders of magnitude for observable quantities. The physical principles of photon and particle detectors are then addressed, and the specific telescopes and combinations of detectors, presented. Finally the instruments and their limits are discussed with a view to assisting readers in the planning and execution of observations. Astronomical observations with high-energy photons and particles represent the newest additions to multimessenger astronomy and this book will be of value to all with an interest in the field.

  9. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  10. Monitoring the High-Energy Radiation Environment of Exoplanets Around Low-mass Stars with SPARCS (Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Ardila, David; Barman, Travis; Beasley, Matthew; Bowman, Judd D.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jacobs, Daniel; Jewell, April; Llama, Joe; Meadows, Victoria; Nikzad, Shouleh; Scowen, Paul; Swain, Mark; Zellem, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Roughly seventy-five billion M dwarfs in our galaxy host at least one small planet in the habitable zone (HZ). The stellar ultraviolet (UV) radiation from M dwarfs is strong and highly variable, and impacts planetary atmospheric loss, composition and habitability. These effects are amplified by the extreme proximity of their HZs (0.1–0.4 AU). Knowing the UV environments of M dwarf planets will be crucial to understanding their atmospheric composition and a key parameter in discriminating between biological and abiotic sources for observed biosignatures. The Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) will be a 6U CubeSat devoted to photometric monitoring of M stars in the far-UV and near-UV, measuring the time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and evolution of M dwarf stellar UV radiation. For each target, SPARCS will observe continuously over at least one complete stellar rotation (5 - 45 days). SPARCS will also advance UV detector technology by flying high quantum efficiency, UV-optimized detectors developed at JPL. These Delta-doped detectors have a long history of deployment demonstrating greater than five times the quantum efficiency of the detectors used by GALEX. SPARCS will pave the way for their application in missions like LUVOIR or HabEx, including interim UV-capable missions. SPARCS will also be capable of ‘target-of-opportunity’ UV observations for the rocky planets in M dwarf HZs soon to be discovered by NASA’s TESS mission, providing the needed UV context for the first habitable planets that JWST will characterize.Acknowledgements: Funding for SPARCS is provided by NASA’s Astrophysics Research and Analysis program, NNH16ZDA001N.

  11. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  12. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  13. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA?s future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art energy storage devices which require high energy density, high reliability, and...

  14. Modeling the radiation ionization energy and energy resolution of trigonal and amorphous selenium from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, A; Devoie, É; Di Matteo, O; Rubel, O

    2012-11-14

    Advances in the development of amorphous selenium-based direct conversion photoconductors for high-energy radiation critically depend on the improvement of its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, which is directly related to the pair production energy. Traditionally, theories for the pair production energy have been based on the parabolic band approximation and do not provide a satisfactory agreement with experimental results for amorphous selenium. Here we present a calculation of the pair creation energy in trigonal and amorphous selenium based on its electronic structure. In indirect semiconductors, such as trigonal selenium, the ionization threshold energy can be as low as the energy gap, resulting in a lower pair creation energy, which is a favorable factor for sensitivity. Also, the statistics of photogenerated charge carriers is studied in order to evaluate the theoretical value of the Fano factor and its dependence on recombination processes. We show that recombination can significantly compromise the detector's energy resolution as a result of an increase in the Fano factor.

  15. Radiation Hard High Performance Optoelectronic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-performance, radiation-hard, widely-tunable integrated laser/modulator chip and large-area avalanche photodetectors (APDs) are key components of optical...

  16. FSU High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Adams, Todd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Askew, Andrew [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Berg, Bernd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  17. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D imag...

  18. Establishment of a mammalian cell line suitable for industrial production of recombinant protein using mutations induced by high-energy beam radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Yasuhito; Takagi, Keiichi; Terada, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian cells are extensively used for production of biopharmaceuticals. Most cells used in industry have infinite proliferative capacity, which provides a high number of cells and corresponding productivity. However, infinite cells will continue to multiply even after cell density reaches sufficient levels. This excess proliferation aggravates the culture environment and induces low productivity. Therefore, after cell density reaches sufficient levels, downregulation of proliferation would prevent such aggravation and extend the culture period and improve productivity. To realize such suitable proliferation, we aimed to establish a novel cell line whose proliferation was spontaneously downregulated after reaching a sufficient population level. Mutagenesis using high-energy beam irradiation was used. CHO-DP12 cells were irradiated with 2.5 Gy X-rays and screened with hydroxyurea and 5-fluorouracil to eliminate any cells multiplying after confluence and to concentrate desired mutants. One clone was established and named CHO-M1. Cell cycle analysis indicated that CHO-M1 cells had a similar cell cycle profile in the exponential growth phase, but cells rapidly accumulated in G1 phase just before confluence and did not progress through the cell cycle. This suggested that until confluence, proliferation of CHO-M1 was similar to parental CHO, but after confluence, it was inhibited and under G1 arrest. The specific antibody production rate of CHO-M1 was kept high, even after confluence, while that of parental CHO was drastically decreased in stationary phase. These results suggest that the desired cell line was successfully established and that high-energy beam irradiation could be an efficient mutagenic technique for breeding industrial cells.

  19. Energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data of W LV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-bin; Sun, Rui; Koike, Fumihiro; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Dong, Chen-zhong

    2018-01-01

    Calculations of energy levels, radiative data and lifetimes are reported for tungsten Ca-like ion (W LV) by using multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method. The GRASP2K package is adopted to carry out a large-scale systematic computation with a restricted active space treatment; the Breit interaction and QED effects are included in subsequent relativistic configuration interaction calculations. The energies and lifetimes of the lowest 119 levels are listed; the main leading configuration of the levels is of the ground state configuration [Ne]3s23p63d2 and the first excited configuration [Ne]3s23p53d3. The wavelengths, radiative rates and oscillator strengths for relatively strong E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions are listed. Comparisons with earlier experimental and theoretical values are made. The average relative deviations of energy levels from the NIST results and E1 transition wavelengths from the EBIT experimental results have turned to be only 0.20% and 0.13%, respectively. The other present results are in reasonable agreement with available data. These agreements confirm the reliability and accuracy of the current results. The present datasets may help us with the investigation of the electron-electron correlation effects in complex multi-electron highly charged heavy ions and of the diagnosis of tungsten impurity plasmas in fusion science.

  20. GEM applications outside high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge

    2013-01-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  1. MEET ISOLDE - High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Meet ISOLDE - High Energy Physics. ISOLDE is always developing, equipment moves on and off the hall floor, new groups start and end experiments regularly, visiting scientists come and go and experiments evolve. So it was a natural step for ISOLDE to expand from its core low energy science into high-energies.

  2. Energy peaks: A high energy physics outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    Energy distributions of decay products carry information on the kinematics of the decay in ways that are at the same time straightforward and quite hidden. I will review these properties and discuss their early historical applications, as well as more recent ones in the context of (i) methods for the measurement of masses of new physics particle with semi-invisible decays, (ii) the characterization of Dark Matter particles produced at colliders, (iii) precision mass measurements of Standard Model particles, in particular of the top quark. Finally, I will give an outlook of further developments and applications of energy peak method for high energy physics at colliders and beyond.

  3. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  4. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  5. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and radiation dosimetery assessment. G M EL-ARAGI∗, M A AYAD, M A EL-KOLALY and .... 4000 system is in coaxial connection with a computer system which has a special software program for resolving TL-data and assorting the resolved data in classified files.

  6. High Energy Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    sition giving out heat, light, sound and large volumes of gases. The amount of energy released varies with the ... Explosives are classified according to applications either for. 2 Pyrotechnics is the art of manu- facturing or .... rockets are based on Newton's Third Law: an action will always have an equal and opposite reaction.

  7. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  8. High energy neutrinos from GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    De Paolis, F; Orlando, D; Perrone, L

    2001-01-01

    It is by now recognized that GRBs can accelerate protons to relativistic energies and that high density media may be present nearby the source. We compute the high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from the decay of pions produced through the interaction of accelerated protons with nucleons in the surrounding medium. Then, we estimate the flux of high-energy muons induced on a detector by upward-going neutrinos interacting through charge current processes with the surrounding matter.

  9. The Energy Under Our Feet: A Study of Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, I.

    2016-12-01

    In this experiment I tested if asphalt pavement can produce enough solar heat to produce energy through a system that uses water, solar energy and heat. A setup that can conserve the water and prevent it from evaporating, as well as measuring the energy production is required to run this experiment. I have done a lot of research on this experiment and found that there are several variables that impact the results of this experiment. 1. The surface temperature compared to the air temperature 2. The Geographical location of the pavement 3. The time of the year 4. Cloud coverage for the day Overall there will be many variables I will have to keep out of the experiment such as temperature ranges, season changes and geographical location. My constant will be my location at 33.7086o North and 117.9564o West. Asphalt pavements do not reflect the sunlight and hence heat up faster than a light surface that would reflect the sunlight. This means the Asphalt absorbs the solar radiation, which increases the temperature of the air around the asphalt contributing to what is known as the urban heat island effect. This heating in turn contributes to the formation of smog and ozone products. With the population still growing this would also mean an increase in this temperature and hence an increase in smog and ozone, creating a significant health concern. Cities need to start looking at ways to cool their pavement and find ways to harvest the energy created by their streets. Installing pipes with water can provide that solution and not only reduce the heat reflected from the pavement but also harvest energy from this setup, and decrease the smog production and maintain a balance in ozone levels. As well as the asphalt needed to run the testing, a Stirling engine is required. A Stirling Engine is a highly efficient engine that can run on a variety of heat sources. Because it is highly compatible with alternative energy and renewable energy sources it could become increasingly

  10. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  11. Controlling Energy Radiations of Electromagnetic Waves via Frequency Coding Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haotian; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dan; Li, Lianlin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures composed of subwavelength unit cells to control electromagnetic (EM) waves. The spatial coding representation of metamaterial has the ability to describe the material in a digital way. The spatial coding metamaterials are typically constructed by unit cells that have similar shapes with fixed functionality. Here, the concept of frequency coding metamaterial is proposed, which achieves different controls of EM energy radiations with a fixed spatial coding pattern when the frequency changes. In this case, not only different phase responses of the unit cells are considered, but also different phase sensitivities are also required. Due to different frequency sensitivities of unit cells, two units with the same phase response at the initial frequency may have different phase responses at higher frequency. To describe the frequency coding property of unit cell, digitalized frequency sensitivity is proposed, in which the units are encoded with digits "0" and "1" to represent the low and high phase sensitivities, respectively. By this merit, two degrees of freedom, spatial coding and frequency coding, are obtained to control the EM energy radiations by a new class of frequency-spatial coding metamaterials. The above concepts and physical phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and experiments.

  12. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ...

  13. Energy transference in human tissue a multilayer model put under electromagnetic radiation of high frequency; Tranferencia energetica en un modelo multicapa de tejido humano sometido a irradiacion electromagnetica de altra frecuencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, A. J. [Universidad Catolica San Antonio, Guadalupe-Murcia (Spain); Molina C, G. J.; Nunez, M. J. [Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)], e-mail: ajgarcia@pdi.ucam.edu

    2009-07-01

    The way the energy is absorbed when skin surface is being exposed to an electromagnetic radiation, and the physical consequences involved, are essentially the purposes of this study. In particular, we are dealing with High Frequency radiation. When it is directed toward the surface of the skin, energy is transmitted to its inner layers causing an increase of the temperature. This process has experimentally been proved to be beneficial in many cases. Yet theoretically there is still a slightly hollow basis about it. This study pretends to deal with that subject from its origin, and allows future study doors to tap in depth this theme. Skin tissue is actually a multilayer tissue with a different tissue in each layer. Each one of them is characterized by some parameters, such as permittivity, conductivity, density and specific heat. Two kinds of skin tissues will be analysed: a fibrous and a fatty one, each of both with a different skin humidity. In this study some parameters such as the non-linear temporal evolution of tissue temperature and the redistribution of heat them will be take into account. (Author)

  14. Compact high-power terahertz radiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Krafft

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new type of THz radiation source, based on recirculating an electron beam through a high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavity, and using this beam to drive a standard electromagnetic undulator on the return leg, is discussed. Because the beam is recirculated and not stored, short bunches may be produced that radiate coherently in the undulator, yielding exceptionally high average THz power for relatively low average beam power. Deceleration from the coherent emission, and the detuning it causes, limits the charge-per-bunch possible in such a device.

  15. A Mixed Analog-Digital Radiation Hard Technology for High Energy Physics Electronics: DMILL~(Durci~Mixte~sur~Isolant~Logico-Lineaire)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lugiez, F; Leray, J; Rouger, M; Fourches, N T; Musseau, O; Potheau, R

    2002-01-01

    %RD29 %title\\\\ \\\\Physics experiments under preparation with the future LHC require a fast, low noise, very rad-hard (>10 Mrad and >10$^{14}$ neutron/cm$^{2}$), mixed analog-digital microelectronics VLSI technology.\\\\ \\\\The DMILL microelectronics technology (RD29) was developed between 1990 and 1995 by a Consortium gathering the CEA and the firm Thomson-TCS, with the collaboration of IN2P3. The goal of the DMILL program, which is now completed, was to provide the High Energy Physics community, space industry, nuclear industry, and other applications, with an industrial very rad-hard mixed analog-digital microelectronics technology.\\\\ \\\\DMILL integrates mixed analog-digital very rad-hard (>10 Mrad and >10$^{14}$ neutron/cm$^{2}$) vertical bipolar, 0.8 $\\mu$m CMOS and 1.2 $\\mu$m PJFET transistors. Its SOI substrate and its dielectric trenches strongly reduce SEU sensitivity and completely eliminate any possibility of latch-up. Its four transistors are optimized to obtain low-noise features. DMILL also integrates...

  16. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  17. Optimization of a neutron dosimeter for the high energy accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolov Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In high energy accelerator facilities the neutron radiation should be continuously measured during operation to control the ambient dose. This requires a reliable neutron dosimeter in a wide energy range. In this work we present an optimization of a compact cylindrical passive neutron dosimeter for the usage in wide energy neutron fields.

  18. Structural analysis with high brilliance synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    The research subjects in diffraction and scattering of materials with high brilliance synchrotron radiation such as SPring-8 (Super Photon ring 8 GeV) are summarized. The SPring-8 project is going well and 10 public beamlines will be opened for all users in October, 1997. Three JAERI beamlines are also under construction for researches of heavy element science, physical and structural properties under extreme conditions such as high temperature and high pressure. (author)

  19. High-Order Thermal Radiative Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Douglas Nelson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cleveland, Mathew Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wollaeger, Ryan Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warsa, James S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this research is to asses the sensitivity of the linearized thermal radiation transport equations to finite element order on unstructured meshes and to investigate the sensitivity of the nonlinear TRT equations due to evaluating the opacities and heat capacity at nodal temperatures in 2-D using high-order finite elements.

  20. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  1. Chorus Wave Energy Budget Analysis in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancarte, J.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus emissions are important electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously scatter and accelerate electrons of the outer radiation belt, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts. Here, we present an analysis of Van Allen Probes electric and magnetic field VLF waveform data, evaluating the wave energy budget, and show that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to very oblique waves. Such waves, with a generally much smaller (up to 10 times) magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have comparable or even larger total energy. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts and also provide nonlinear effects due to wave-particle interaction through the Landau resonance due to the significant electric field component parallel to the background magnetic field.

  2. High-energy communication

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Communication Group

    2015-01-01

    On Wednesday at 10.40 a.m., the LHC operators declared “stable beams” after two years of technical stop and a few months of commissioning. It was an exciting day for all the teams involved, including those who worked on communicating the news to the public and the media on multiple platforms.   CERN’s most successful tweet on 3 June featured collision images from ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb and was shared 800 times by the Twitter audience. Live blogging, social media posts, a live webcast, and a constant outpouring of photos and videos: Wednesday morning was a crazy time for the communication teams from CERN, the experiments and various institutes around the world. Even though the event started very early in the morning (the live CCC blog started at 7 a.m. and the live webcast at 8.20 a.m.), the public and the media tuned in to follow and generously cover the start of the LHC’s physics run at an unprecedented energy of 13 TeV. The statistics showed th...

  3. Radiation Hydrodynamic Parameter Study of Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is performed with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY. Simulation with differing chamber parameters are implemented to study the effect of gas fill, gas mixtures and chamber radii. Xenon and argon gases are of particular interest as shielding for the first wall due to their high opacity values and ready availability. Mixing of the two gases is an attempt to engineer a gas cocktail to provide the maximum amount of shielding with the least amount of cost. A parameter study of different chamber radii shows a consistent relationship with that of first wall temperature (~1/r2) and overpressure (~1/r3). This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  4. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  5. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation-induced cellular energy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joohong; Halliday, Gary M; Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation is carcinogenic by causing mutations in the skin and also by suppressing cutaneous antitumor immunity. We previously found nicotinamide (vitamin B3) to be highly effective at reducing UV-induced immunosuppression in human volunteers, with microarray studies on in vivo irradiated human skin suggesting that nicotinamide normalizes subsets of apoptosis, immune function and energy metabolism-related genes that are downregulated by UV exposure. Using human adult low calcium temperature keratinocytes, we further investigated nicotinamide's effects on cellular energy metabolism. We found that nicotinamide prevented UV-induced cellular ATP loss and protected against UV-induced glycolytic blockade. To determine whether nicotinamide alters the effects of UV-induced oxidative stress posttranslationally, we also measured UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotinamide had no effect on ROS formation, and at the low UV doses used in these studies, equivalent to ambient daily sun exposure, there was no evidence of apoptosis. Hence, nicotinamide appears to exert its UV protective effects on the skin via its role in cellular energy pathways.

  6. A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for high-energy X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation on bending magnet beamline BL04B2 at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Kohara, S; Kashihara, Y; Matsumoto, N; Umesaki, N; Sakai, I

    2001-01-01

    A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for glasses and liquids, installed at SPring-8 bending magnet beamline BL04B2, operated at 8 GeV electron energy, is described. Photon energies of 37.8 and 61.7 keV were obtained using a bent Si (1 1 1) crystal and a bent Si (2 2 0) crystal, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to measure diffraction spectra of vitreous SiO sub 2 in transmission geometry up to scattering vector Q=36 A sup - sup 1 , and measured total structure factor S(Q) was well reproduced by reverse Monte Carlo modelling.

  7. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  8. Quantum Phenomena in High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, Margaret [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Kapteyn, Henry [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The possibility of implementing efficient (phase matched) HHG upconversion of deep- UV lasers in multiply-ionized plasmas, with potentially unprecedented conversion efficiency is a fascinating prospect. HHG results from the extreme nonlinear response of matter to intense laser light:high harmonics are radiated as a result of a quantum coherent electron recollision process that occurs during laser field ionization of an atom. Under current support from this grant in work published in Science in 2015, we discovered a new regime of bright HHG in highly-ionized plasmas driven by intense UV lasers, that generates bright harmonics to photon energies >280eV

  9. Performance of paint coatings in the radiation fields of nuclear reactors and of high energy particle accelerators and after contamination by radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Oesterle, K M; Van de Voorde, M

    1977-01-01

    Several commercially available two/component coating systems based on epoxy and polyurethane resin, as well as lithium silicate/zinc dust paint coatings, have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor up to a dose of 2*10/sup 9/ rad and in a 28 GeV proton accelerator up to a dose of 1*10/sup 9/ rad. Besides assessment by visual inspection, the irradiated specimens have been subjected to the impact hardness test, the infinitesimal hardness behaviour tests, the grid scarification test and to swelling tests in methanol and acetone. The decontaminability of these paint coatings after contamination with solutions containing Ca 45, S 35 and I 131 is also investigated. Very good results in respect of decontaminability and radiation resistance up to 1*10/sup 9/ rad have been obtained with a coating of polyurethane cross-linked with an aliphatic diisocyanate. (9 refs).

  10. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  11. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  12. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  13. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It provides a panoramic view of the main theoretical developments in high energy physics since its inception more than half a century ago, a period in which experiments have spanned an enormous range of energies, theories have been developed leading up to the Standard Model, and proposals – including the radical ...

  14. A hemispherical high-pressure xenon gamma radiation spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kessick, R

    2002-01-01

    A prototype hemispherical high-pressure xenon gamma radiation spectrometer was designed, constructed and tested. The detector consists of a pair of concentric hemispherical electrodes contained inside a thin-walled stainless steel pressure dome. Detector performance parameters such as energy resolution, linearity and vibration sensitivity were determined and compared to previous cylindrical and planar designs. Without a Frisch grid, the hemispherical detector provides a total room temperature energy resolution of 6% at 662 keV and is relatively insensitive to acoustic interference.

  15. High-energy astroparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Semikoz, A

    2010-01-01

    In these three lectures I discuss the present status of high-energy astroparticle physics including Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR), high-energy gamma rays, and neutrinos. The first lecture is devoted to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. After a brief introduction to UHECR I discuss the acceleration of charged particles to highest energies in the astrophysical objects, their propagation in the intergalactic space, recent observational results by the Auger and HiRes experiments, anisotropies of UHECR arrival directions, and secondary gamma rays produced by UHECR. In the second lecture I review recent results on TeV gamma rays. After a short introduction to detection techniques, I discuss recent exciting results of the H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and Milagro experiments on the point-like and diffuse sources of TeV gamma rays. A special section is devoted to the detection of extragalactic magnetic fields with TeV gammaray measurements. Finally, in the third lecture I discuss Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) neutrinos. I review t...

  16. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Darwin: dose monitoring system applicable to various radiations with wide energy ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Satoh, D; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y

    2007-01-01

    A new radiation dose monitor, designated as DARWIN (Dose monitoring system Applicable to various Radiations with Wide energy ranges), has been developed for real-time monitoring of doses in workspaces and surrounding environments of high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN is composed of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, which consists of liquid organic scintillator BC501A coupled with ZnS(Ag) scintillation sheets doped with (6)Li, and a data acquisition system based on a Digital-Storage-Oscilloscope. DARWIN has the following features: (1) capable of monitoring doses from neutrons, photons and muons with energies from thermal energy to 1 GeV, 150 keV to 100 MeV and 1 MeV to 100 GeV, respectively, (2) highly sensitive with precision and (3) easy to operate with a simple graphical user-interface. The performance of DARWIN was examined experimentally in several radiation fields. The results of the experiments indicated the accuracy and wide response range of DARWIN for measuring dose rates from neutrons, photons and muons with wide energies. It was also found from the experiments that DARWIN enables us to monitor small fluctuations of neutron dose rates near the background level because of its high sensitivity. With these properties, DARWIN will be able to play a very important role for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  18. Monte Carlo study of the influence of energy spectra, mesh size, high Z element on dose and PVDR based on 1-D and 3-D heterogeneous mouse head phantom for Microbeam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Liangfeng; Mao, Xiaoli

    2017-09-22

    To evaluate the influence of energy spectra, mesh sizes, high Z element on dose and PVDR in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) based on 1-D analogy-mouse-head-model (1-D MHM) and 3-D voxel-mouse-head-phantom (3-D VMHP) by Monte Carlo simulation. A Microbeam-Array-Source-Model was implemented into EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The microbeam size is assumed to be 25μm, 50μm or 75μm in thickness and fixed 1mm in height with 200μmc-t-c. The influence of the energy spectra of ID17@ESRF and BMIT@CLS were investigated. The mesh size was optimized. PVDR in 1-D MHM and 3-D VMHP was compared with the homogeneous water phantom. The arc influence of 3-D VMHP filled with water (3-D VMHWP) was compared with the rectangle phantom. PVDR of the lower BMIT@CLS spectrum is 2.4times that of ID17@ESRF for lower valley dose. The optimized mesh is 5µm for 25µm, and 10µm for 50µm and 75µm microbeams with 200µmc-t-c. A 500μm skull layer could make PVDR difference up to 62.5% for 1-D MHM. However this influence is limited (influence is limited for the more depth (influence of 3-D heterogeneous media. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing high wind energy penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    In order to convincingly promote installing wind power capacity as a substantial part of the energy supply system, a set of careful analyses must be undertaken. This paper applies a case study concentrated on assessing the cost/benefit of high wind energy penetration. The case study considers...... expanding the grid connected wind power capacity in Praia, the capital of Cape Verde. The currently installed 1 MW of wind power is estimated to supply close to 10% of the electric energy consumption in 1996. Increasing the wind energy penetration to a higher level is considered viable as the project...... with the existing wind power, supply over 30% of the electric consumption in 1996. Applying the recommended practices for estimating the cost of wind energy, the life-cycle cost of this 2.4 MW investment is estimated at a 7% discount rate and a 20 year lifetime to 0.26 DKK/kW h....

  20. Photomask specifications for high energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pindo, M

    2002-01-01

    Planar technologies used for radiation detector fabrication imply an extensive use of photomasks whose characteristics are critical in determining final detector performance. Compatibly with their manufacturing process, photomasks must satisfy the application-specific requirements dictated both by wafer manufacturers and detector final users. The design and realization of microstrip and pixel detectors, widely used in high energy physics experiments, ask for intensive scientific effort, advanced technology and important economical investments. Photomask specification definition is one of the fundamental steps to optimize detector fabrication processes and fulfill experimental requirements at the most appropriate cost.

  1. Laboratory investigation of fire radiative energy and smoke aerosol emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Ichoku; J. Vanderlei Martins; Yoram J. Kaufman; Martin J. Wooster; Patrick H. Freeborn; Wei Min Hao; Stephen Baker; Cecily A. Ryan; Bryce L. Nordgren

    2008-01-01

    Fuel biomass samples from southern Africa and the United States were burned in a laboratory combustion chamber while measuring the biomass consumption rate, the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate (Rfre), and the smoke concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulate matter (PM). The PM mass emission rate (RPM) was quantified from...

  2. Unified limiting form of graviton radiation at extreme energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Coradeschi, Francesco; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    We derive the limiting form of graviton radiation in gravitational scattering at trans-Planckian energies (E ≫MP) and small deflection angles. We show that—owing to the graviton's spin 2—such a limiting form unifies the soft and Regge regimes of emission, by covering a broad angular range, from forward fragmentation to the deeply central region. The single-exchange emission amplitudes have a nice expression in terms of the transformation phases of helicity amplitudes under rotations. As a result, the multiple-exchange emission amplitudes can be resummed via an impact parameter b -space factorization theorem that takes into account all coherence effects. We then see the emergence of an energy spectrum of the emitted radiation which, being tuned on ℏ/R ˜MP2/E ≪MP, is reminiscent of Hawking's radiation. Such a spectrum is much softer than the one naïvely expected for increasing input energies and neatly solves a potential energy crisis. Furthermore, by including rescattering corrections in the (quantum) factorization formula, we are able to recover the classical limit and find the corresponding quantum corrections. Perspectives for the extrapolation of such limiting radiation towards the classical collapse regime (where b is of the order of the gravitational radius R ) are also discussed.

  3. Rectenna that converts infrared radiation to electrical energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W.

    2016-09-06

    Technologies pertaining to converting infrared (IR) radiation to DC energy are described herein. In a general embodiment, a rectenna comprises a conductive layer. A thin insulator layer is formed on the conductive layer, and a nanoantenna is formed on the thin insulator layer. The thin insulator layer acts as a tunnel junction of a tunnel diode.

  4. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  5. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  6. Electromagnetic Energy Radiated from Mobile Phone Alters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients presented with cardiovascular diseases (e.g., high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, valvular heart disease) without evidence of myocardial ischemia (43 males and 67 females). Patients with previous history of ischemic heart disease who attended the consultant clinic in the teaching hospital for follow-up ...

  7. X-Raying the Beating Heart of a Newborn Star: Rotational Modulation of High-Energy Radiation from V1647 Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.; Richmond, Michael; Petre, Robert; Teets, William K.; Principe, David

    2012-01-01

    We report a periodicity of approx.1 day in the highly elevated X-ray emission from the protostar V1647 Ori during its two recent multiple-year outbursts of mass accretion. This periodicity is indicative of protostellar rotation at near-breakup speed. Modeling of the phased X-ray light curve indicates the high-temperature ( 50 MK), X-ray-emitting plasma, which is most likely heated by accretion-induced magnetic reconnection, resides in dense ( 5 1010 cm.3), pancake-shaped magnetic footprints where the accretion stream feeds the newborn star. The sustained X-ray periodicity of V1647 Ori demonstrates that such protostellar magnetospheric accretion configurations can be stable over timescales of years. Subject headings: stars: formation stars: individual (V1647 Ori) stars: pre-main sequence X-rays: stars

  8. Violation of unitarity by Hawking radiation does not violate energy-momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje, E-mail: hnikolic@irb.hr [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Bošković Institute, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-04-01

    An argument by Banks, Susskind and Peskin (BSP), according to which violation of unitarity would violate either locality or energy-momentum conservation, is widely believed to be a strong argument against non-unitarity of Hawking radiation. We find that the whole BSP argument rests on the crucial assumption that the Hamiltonian is not highly degenerate, and point out that this assumption is not satisfied for systems with many degrees of freedom. Using Lindblad equation, we show that high degeneracy of the Hamiltonian allows local non-unitary evolution without violating energy-momentum conservation. Moreover, since energy-momentum is the source of gravity, we argue that energy-momentum is necessarily conserved for a large class of non-unitary systems with gravity. Finally, we explicitly calculate the Lindblad operators for non-unitary Hawking radiation and show that they conserve energy-momentum.

  9. Violation of unitarity by Hawking radiation does not violate energy-momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Bošković Institute, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-04-02

    An argument by Banks, Susskind and Peskin (BSP), according to which violation of unitarity would violate either locality or energy-momentum conservation, is widely believed to be a strong argument against non-unitarity of Hawking radiation. We find that the whole BSP argument rests on the crucial assumption that the Hamiltonian is not highly degenerate, and point out that this assumption is not satisfied for systems with many degrees of freedom. Using Lindblad equation, we show that high degeneracy of the Hamiltonian allows local non-unitary evolution without violating energy-momentum conservation. Moreover, since energy-momentum is the source of gravity, we argue that energy-momentum is necessarily conserved for a large class of non-unitary systems with gravity. Finally, we explicitly calculate the Lindblad operators for non-unitary Hawking radiation and show that they conserve energy-momentum.

  10. High-energy scissors mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojarov, R.; Faessler, A.; Dingfelder, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    1995-05-01

    All the orbital {ital M}1 excitations, at both low and high energies, obtained from a rotationally invariant quasiparticle random-phase approximation, represent the fragmented scissors mode. The high-energy {ital M}1 strength is almost purely orbital and resides in the region of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. In heavy deformed nuclei the high-energy scissors model is strongly fragmented between 17 and 25 MeV (with uncertainties arising from the poor knowledge of the isovector potential). The coherent scissors motion is hindered by the fragmentation and {ital B}({ital M}1){lt}0.25{mu}{sub {ital N}}{sup 2} for single transitions in this region. The ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}) cross sections for excitations above 17 MeV are one order of magnitude larger for {ital E}2 than for {ital M}1 excitations even at backward angles.

  11. A Self-Powered Thin-Film Radiation Detector Using Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (Author’s Final Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    interactions, the underlying operating principle is based on the detection of photocurrent and Compton current7-9 originating in a high-Z electrode ... electrodes are made of thin films, micron- and submicron range, not significantly thicker than the average range of secondary photoelectrons, 95 Auger...Ω=ΩΩ= π π ϕµ 2 0 1 14 ˆ,,ˆˆ,,, ddErJdErJErJ (1) where µ = cos θ( ) . In planar geometry the net current is the difference between the

  12. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D [Idaho Falls, ID; Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Pinhero, Patrick J [Columbia, MO

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  13. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novack, Steven D [Idaho Falls, ID; Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Pinhero, Patrick J [Columbia, MO

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  14. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  15. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

  16. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  17. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  18. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-energy physics; gauge theories; Standard Model; physics beyond the ... elusive goal. The Standard Model describes the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions, but only unifies the first two. Despite its spectacular success in ex ..... Towards the end of the 1960s, a path-breaking new 'deep inelastic' electron scat-.

  19. Radiative energy loss of neighboring subjets arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    We compute the in-medium energy loss probability distribution of two neighboring subjets at leading order, in the large-$N_c$ approximation. Our result exhibits a gradual onset of color decoherence of the system and accounts for two expected limiting cases. When the angular separation is smaller than the characteristic angle for medium-induced radiation, the two-pronged substructure lose energy coherently as a single color charge, namely that of the parent parton. At large angular separation the two subjets lose energy independently. Our result is a first step towards quantifying effects of energy loss as a result of the fluctuation of the multi-parton jet substructure and therefore goes beyond the standard approach to jet quenching based on single parton energy loss. We briefly discuss applications to jet observables in heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Unified limiting form of graviton radiation at extreme energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Coradeschi, Francesco; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    We derive the limiting form of graviton radiation in gravitational scattering at transplanckian energies ($E\\gg M_P$) and small deflection angles. We show that --- owing to the graviton's spin 2 --- such limiting form unifies the soft- and Regge- regimes of emission, by covering a broad angular range, from forward fragmentation to deeply central region. The single-exchange emission amplitudes have a nice expression in terms of the transformation phases of helicity amplitudes under rotations. As a result, the multiple-exchange emission amplitudes can be resummed via an impact parameter $b$-space factorization theorem that takes into account all coherence effects. We then see the emergence of an energy spectrum of the emitted radiation which, being tuned on $\\hbar/R \\sim M_P^2/E \\ll M_P$, is reminiscent of Hawking's radiation. Such a spectrum is much softer than the one na\\"ively expected for increasing input energies and neatly solves a potential energy crisis. Furthermore, by including rescattering correction...

  1. Nuclear energy and health: and the benefits of low-dose radiation hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Pollycove, Myron

    2009-01-01

    Energy needs worldwide are expected to increase for the foreseeable future, but fuel supplies are limited. Nuclear reactors could supply much of the energy demand in a safe, sustainable manner were it not for fear of potential releases of radioactivity. Such releases would likely deliver a low dose or dose rate of radiation, within the range of naturally occurring radiation, to which life is already accustomed. The key areas of concern are discussed. Studies of actual health effects, especially thyroid cancers, following exposures are assessed. Radiation hormesis is explained, pointing out that beneficial effects are expected following a low dose or dose rate because protective responses against stresses are stimulated. The notions that no amount of radiation is small enough to be harmless and that a nuclear accident could kill hundreds of thousands are challenged in light of experience: more than a century with radiation and six decades with reactors. If nuclear energy is to play a significant role in meeting future needs, regulatory authorities must examine the scientific evidence and communicate the real health effects of nuclear radiation. Negative images and implications of health risks derived by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects of high doses must be dispelled.

  2. Highly Catalytic Nanodots with Renal Clearance for Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Junying; Yang, Jiang; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiu; Deng, Jiao; Deng, Dehui; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Changlong; Li, Meixian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (gamma and x-ray) is widely used in industry and medicine, but it can also pose a significant hazardous effect on health and induce cancer, physical deformity and even death, due to DNA damages and invasion of free radicals. There is therefore an urgent unmet demand in designing highly efficient radioprotectants with synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and low toxicity. In this study, we designed ultrasmall (sub-5 nm) highly catalytically active and cysteine-protected MoS2 dots as radioprotectants and investigated their application in protection against ionizing radiation. In vivo preclinical studies showed that the surviving fraction of MoS2-treated mice can appreciably increase to up to 79 % when they were exposed to high-energy ionizing radiation. Furthermore, MoS2 dots can contribute in cleaning up the accumulated free radicals within the body, repairing DNA damages and recovering all vital chemical and biochemical indicators, suggesting their unique role as free radical...

  3. Ultrafast outflows disappear in high radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, C.; Alston, W.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Gallo, L. C.; Buisson, D. J. K.; Walton, D. J.; Kara, E.; Jiang, J.; Lohfink, A.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast outflows (UFOs) are the most extreme winds launched by active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their mildly-relativistic speeds (˜0.1 - 0.3c) and are thought to significantly contribute to galactic evolution via AGN feedback. Their nature and launching mechanism are however not well understood. Recently, we have discovered the presence of a variable UFO in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 IRAS 13224-3809. The UFO varies in response to the brightness of the source. In this work we perform flux-resolved X-ray spectroscopy to study the variability of the UFO and found that the ionisation parameter is correlated with the luminosity. In the brightest states the gas is almost completely ionised by the powerful radiation field and the UFO is hardly detected. This agrees with our recent results obtained with principal component analysis. We might have found the tip of the iceberg: the high ionisation of the outflowing gas may explain why it is commonly difficult to detect UFOs in AGN and possibly suggest that we may underestimate their actual feedback. We have also found a tentative correlation between the outflow velocity and the luminosity, which is expected from theoretical predictions of radiation-pressure driven winds. This trend is rather marginal due to the Fe XXV-XXVI degeneracy. Further work is needed to break such degeneracy through time-resolved spectroscopy.

  4. High Temperature Radiators for Electric Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The VASIMR propulsion system uses a high temperature Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) radiator to reject heat from the helicon section. The current baseline radiator uses...

  5. Ionizing radiation, nuclear energy and radiation protection for school; Radiacao ionizante, energia nuclear e protecao radiologica para a escola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, E.A.; Reis, R.G.; Pinho, A.S.; Alves, A.S.; Rio, M.A.P.; Reis, A.A., E-mail: arlene@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, J.W.S. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Paula, G.A. de; Goncalves Junior, M.A. [Escola Sesc de Ensino Medio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, ionizing radiation has been applied in many sectors of society, such as medicine, industry, safety, construction, engineering and research. However, population is unaware of both the applications of ionizing radiation and their risks and benefits. It can be seen that most people associate the terms 'radiation' and 'nuclear energy' with the atomic bomb or cancer, most likely because of warlike applications and the stealthy way radioactivity had been treated in the past. Thus, it is necessary to clarify the population about the main aspects related to the applications, risks and associated benefits. These knowledge can be disseminated in schools. Brazilian legislation for basic education provides for topics such as nuclear energy and radioactivity to high school students. However, some factors hamper such an educational practice, namely, few hours of class, textbooks do not address the subject, previous concepts obtained in the media, difficulty in dealing with the subject in the classroom, phobia, etc. One solution would be the approximation between schools and institutions that employ technologies involving radioactivity, which would allow students to know the practices, associated radiological protection, as well as the risks and benefits to society. Currently, with the increasing application of ionizing radiation, especially in medicine, it is necessary to demystify the use of radioactivity. (author)

  6. Diamond based detectors for high temperature, high radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, A.; Fern, G. R.; Hobson, P. R.; Smith, D. R.; Lefeuvre, G.; Saenger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties as a radiation detector; exceptional radiation hardness and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry and transmission mode applications), wide bandgap (high temperature operation with low noise and solar blind), an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. This combination of radiation hardness, temperature tolerance and ability to detect mixed radiation types with a single sensor makes diamond particularly attractive as a detector material for harsh environments such as nuclear power station monitoring (fission and fusion) and oil well logging. Effective exploitation of these properties requires the development of a metallisation scheme to give contacts that remain stable over extended periods at elevated temperatures (up to 250°C in this instance). Due to the cost of the primary detector material, computational modelling is essential to best utilise the available processing methods for optimising sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations and to fully interpret experimental data. Monte Carlo simulations of our diamond based sensor have been developed, using MCNP6 and FLUKA2011, assessing the sensor performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of the detector and converter geometry. Sensors with varying metallisation schemes for high temperature operation have been fabricated at Brunel University London and by Micron Semiconductor Limited. These sensors have been tested under a varied set of conditions including irradiation with fast neutrons and alpha particles at high temperatures. The presented study indicates that viable metallisation schemes for high temperature contacts have been successfully developed and the modelling results, supported by preliminary experimental data from partners, indicate that the simulations provide a reasonable representation of

  7. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  8. Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

    1994-12-01

    The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

  9. Supernovae and supernova remnants at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    The physical phenomena that are observable with X- and gamma-ray observations of supernovae are discussed with respect to possible high-energy astrophysics experiments. Prompt photospheric emission and its echo are discussed, supernova radioactivity and neutron star effects are examined, and circumstellar and interstellar interaction are reviewed. The primary uncertainties are found to be the hardening of the spectrum by non-LTE effects and the amount of absorption of the radiation from the initial soft X-ray burst. The radioactivity in supernovae is theorized to lead to gamma-ray lines and continuum emission unless the event is low-mass type II. Gamma-ray observations are proposed to examine the efficiency of particle acceleration, and high-resolution spectroscopy can provide data regarding ionization, temperature, composition, and velocities of the X-ray-emitting gas.

  10. High energy density aluminum battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  11. A high energy physics perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  12. Effect of Varieties and Plant Population Densities on Dry Matter Production, Radiation Interception and Radiation Energy Conversion in Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    agus suprapto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The solar radiation is one of the major criteria to obtaining advantages on peanuts (Arachishypogaea L.. Although various combinations of crops have been reported, but variety association and plant population densities (PPD during the periodically stage of growth on peanuts have yet to be analyzed. Dry matter production (DM, radiation energy interception, and radiation energy conversions were monitored over the growth period of two varieties of peanut. An experiment was conducted in Jambegede Research Farm, Indonesian Legume and Tuber Crops Research Institute, Malang, East Java, Indonesia, from July until October 2011. The experiment was arranged in a Split Plot Design with three replications. Peanut varieties, as the main plot consisted of two treatments: Kelinci andKancil variety. In addition, five PPD variations as sub plot consisted of 8.1, 11.1, 16.0, 25.0 and 44.4 plant m-2 were arranged in a square spacing. The results showed that DM production from high PPD increased gradually to lower PPD in all varieties. Interception efficiency (IE increased in all varieties from early sowing. A plant population density of 25.0 m-2 and 44.4 plants m-2 intercepted more radiation over 11.1 or 16.0 plants m-2. Conversion efficiency of radiation energy (CE to total dry matter production on Kelinci variety (1.52% indicated a slight higher percentage than on Kancil variety (1.41%. Moreover, the CE and IE values indicated a decrease as the PPD increased on maximum DM.

  13. Virtual Corrections to Bremsstrahlung in High-Energy Collider Physics LHC and $e^+ e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Yost, S A; Yost, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe radiative corrections to bremsstrahlung and their application to high energy collider physics, focusing on the applications to luminosity measurement, fermion pair production and radiative return. We review the status of one loop radiative corrections in BHLUMI and the KKMC, including cross checks with newer results developed independently for radiative return. We outline a YFS-exponentiated approach to the Drell-Yan process for LHC physics, including a discussion of the relevant radiative corrections.

  14. Quantum chromodynamics at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kovchegov, Yuri V

    2012-01-01

    Filling a gap in the current literature, this book is the first entirely dedicated to high energy QCD including parton saturation. It presents groundbreaking progress on the subject and describes many of the problems at the forefront of research, bringing postgraduate students, theorists and advanced experimentalists up to date with the current status of the field. A broad range of topics in high energy QCD are covered, most notably on the physics of parton saturation and the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). The material is presented in a pedagogical way, with numerous examples and exercises. Discussion ranges from the quasi-classical McLerran–Venugopalan model to the linear and non-linear BFKL/BK/JIMWLK small-x evolution equations. The authors adopt both a theoretical and experimental outlook and present the physics of strong interactions in a universal way, making it useful to physicists from various sub-communities and applicable to processes studied at high energy accelerators around the world.

  15. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ....... Complementary information is obtained by post mortem electron microscopy on the same sample volume previously investigated by HEDM....

  16. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A V; Agapitov, O V; Mourenas, D; Krasnoselskikh, V V; Mozer, F S

    2015-05-15

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave-particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity.

  17. The radiative potential method for calculations of QED radiative corrections to energy levels and electromagnetic amplitudes in many-electron atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2005-01-01

    We derive an approximate expression for a "radiative potential" which can be used to calculate QED strong Coulomb field radiative corrections to energies and electric dipole (E1) transition amplitudes in many-electron atoms with an accuracy of a few percent. The expectation value of the radiative potential gives radiative corrections to the energies. Radiative corrections to E1 amplitudes can be expressed in terms of the radiative potential and its energy derivative (the low-energy theorem): ...

  18. Energy and carbon balances in cheatgrass, an essay in autecology. [Shortwave radiation, radiowave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment to determine the fates of energy and carbon in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was carried out on steep (40/sup 0/) north- and south-facing slopes on a small earth mound, using many small lysimeters to emulate swards of cheatgrass. Meteorological conditions and energy fluxes that were measured included air and soil temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, net all-wave radiation, heat flux to the soil, and evaporation and transpiration separately. The fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during spring growth was determined by analysis of the plant tissues into mineral nutrients, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) for roots, shoots, and seeds separately. (auth)

  19. Photoproduction at high energy and high intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photon beam used for this programme is tagged and provides a large flux up to very high energies (150-200 GeV). It is also hadron-free, since it is obtained by a two-step conversion method. A spectrometer is designed to exploit this beam and to perform a programme of photoproduction with a high level of sensitivity (5-50 events/picobarn).\\\\ \\\\ Priority will be given to the study of processes exhibiting the point-like behaviour of the photon, especially deep inelastic Compton scattering. The spectrometer has two magnets. Charged tracks are measured by MWPC's located only in field-free regions. Three calorimeters provide a large coverage for identifying and measuring electrons and photons. An iron filter downstream identifies muons. Most of the equipment is existing and recuperated from previous experiments.

  20. High Speed Link Radiated Emission Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, P.; Pelissou, P.; Cissou, R.; Giniaux, M.; Vargas, O.

    2016-05-01

    To control the radiated emission of high-speed link and associated unit, the current approach is to implement overall harness shielding on cables bundles. This method is very efficient in the HF/ VHF (high frequency/ very high frequency) and UHF (ultra-high frequency) ranges when the overall harness shielding is properly bonded on EMC back-shell. Unfortunately, with the increasing frequency, the associated half wavelength matches with the size of Sub-D connector that is the case for the L band. Therefore, the unit connectors become the main source of interference emission. For the L-band and S-band, the current technology of EMC back-shell leaves thin aperture matched with the L band half wavelength and therefore, the shielding effectiveness is drastically reduced. In addition, overall harness shielding means significant increases of the harness mass.Airbus D&S Toulouse and Elancourt investigated a new solution to avoid the need of overall harness shielding. The objective is to procure EM (Electro-Magnetic) clean unit connected to cables bundles free of any overall harness shielding. The proposed solution is to implement EMC common mode filtering on signal interfaces directly on unit PCB as close as possible the unit connector.Airbus D&S Elancourt designed and manufactured eight mock-ups of LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling) interface PCBs' with different solutions of filtering. After verification of the signal integrity, three mock-ups were retained (RC filter and two common mode choke coil) in addition to the reference one (without EMC filter).Airbus D&S Toulouse manufactured associated LVDS cable bundles and integrated the RX (Receiver) and TX (Transmitter) LVDS boards in shielded boxes.Then Airbus D&S performed radiated emission measurement of the LVDS links subassemblies (e.g. RX and TX boxes linked by LVDS cables) according to the standard test method. This paper presents the different tested solutions and main conclusions on the feasibility of such

  1. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  2. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  3. Fricke Xylenol Gel characterization at megavoltage radiation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Lama, Lucas Sacchini, E-mail: lucasdellama@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, DF-FFCLRP/USP, Avenida Bandeirantes, n" o 3900, Monte Alegre, CEP: 14040-901, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Petchevist, Paulo César Dias [Oncoville, Centro de Excelência em Radioterapia em Curitiba, Rodovia BR-277, n" o 1437, Ecoville, CEP: 82305-100, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Almeida, Adelaide de [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, DF-FFCLRP/USP, Avenida Bandeirantes, n" o 3900, Monte Alegre, CEP: 14040-901, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2017-03-01

    Accurate determination of absorbed dose is of great importance in every medical application of ionizing radiation, mainly when involving biological tissues. Among different types of dosimeters, the ferrous sulfate chemical solution, known as Fricke solution, can be detached, due to its accuracy, reproducibility and linearity, been used in radiation dosimetry for over 50 years. Besides these characteristics, the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG), became one of the most known dosimeters for absorbed dose spatial distribution because of its high spatial resolution. In this work, we evaluated the FXG dosimeter taking into account different preparation recipes, in order to characterize its response in terms of absorbed dose range, linearity, sensitivity and fading.

  4. Shining light on radiation detection and energy transfer : Triazole ligands used for detection of radiation and lanthanide binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Some substances, fluorophores, absorb light and then emit that light again as fluorescence. Apart from absorption of light, some of these substances can also emit light after having absorbed energy from radiation. A substance which can absorb radiation and emit the energy as light is called a

  5. Differences in fundamental reaction mechanisms between high and low-LET in recent advancements and applications of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Farahani, Mahnaz; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Gifford, Ian; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Recent applications of high-LET radiation include boron neutron capture therapy. UV treatment of electron-irradiated UHMWPE impedes degradation caused by allyl radicals. Radiation synthesis of PVP nanogels above 55 1C leads to intra-molecular crosslinking. PCBs in contaminated sediments can be dechlorinated by reactions with hydrated electrons. a b s t r a c t Differences among the mechanisms of energy deposition by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, consisti...

  6. Performance of new polymeric materials with high radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T.; O`Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    The resistance to radiation of polymeric materials with high modulus and strength, high service temperatures, high resistance to thermal oxidation, and high chemical resistance is evaluated. Different methods of assessment are considered, which require radiation doses from 0.01 to 10 MGy.

  7. Duke University high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  8. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  9. High-Energy-Density Physics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2017-10-01

    At modern laser facilities, energy densities ranging from 1 Mbar to many hundreds of gigabars can regularly be achieved. These high-energy states of matter last for mere moments, measured in nanoseconds to tens of picoseconds, but during those times numerous high-precision instruments can be employed, revealing remarkable compressed matter physics, radiation-hydrodynamics physics, laser-matter interaction physics, and nuclear physics processes. We review the current progress of high-energy-density physics at the National Ignition Facility and describe the underlying physical principles.

  10. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  11. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  12. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  13. Recycling of laser and plasma radiation energy for enhancement of extreme ultraviolet sources for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Johnson, K.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed comprehensive integrated models for detailed simulation of laser-produced plasma (LPP) and laser/target interaction, with potential recycling of the escaping laser and out-of-band plasma radiation. Recycling, i.e., returning the escaping laser and plasma radiation to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation region using retroreflective mirrors, has the potential of increasing the EUV conversion efficiency (CE) by up to 60% according to our simulations. This would result in significantly reduced power consumption and/or increased EUV output. Based on our recently developed models, our High Energy Interaction with General Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) computer simulation package was upgraded for LPP devices to include various radiation recycling regimes and to estimate the potential CE enhancement. The upgraded HEIGHTS was used to study recycling of both laser and plasma-generated radiation and to predict possible gains in conversion efficiency compared to no-recycling LPP devices when using droplets of tin target. We considered three versions of the LPP system including a single CO2 laser, a single Nd:YAG laser, and a dual-pulse device combining both laser systems. The gains in generating EUV energy were predicted and compared for these systems. Overall, laser and radiation energy recycling showed the potential for significant enhancement in source efficiency of up to 60% for the dual-pulse system. Significantly higher CE gains might be possible with optimization of the pre-pulse and main pulse parameters and source size.

  14. High-Absorptance Radiative Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafferty, T.

    1983-01-01

    Absorptance of black-painted open-cell aluminum honeycomb improved by cutting honeycomb at angle or bias rather than straight across. This ensures honeycomb cavities escapes. At each reflection radiation attenuated by absorption. Applications include space-background simulators, space radiators, solar absorbers, and passive coolers for terrestrial use.

  15. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  16. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p5, 3s3p6, 3s23p43d, 3s3p53d, 3s23p33d2, 3s23p44s, 3s23p44p and 3s23p44d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested.

  17. Predicting Induced Radioactivity at High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, Alberto

    1999-08-27

    Radioactive nuclides are produced at high-energy electron accelerators by different kinds of particle interactions with accelerator components and shielding structures. Radioactivity can also be induced in air, cooling fluids, soil and groundwater. The physical reactions involved include spallations due to the hadronic component of electromagnetic showers, photonuclear reactions by intermediate energy photons and low-energy neutron capture. Although the amount of induced radioactivity is less important than that of proton accelerators by about two orders of magnitude, reliable methods to predict induced radioactivity distributions are essential in order to assess the environmental impact of a facility and to plan its decommissioning. Conventional techniques used so far are reviewed, and a new integrated approach is presented, based on an extension of methods used at proton accelerators and on the unique capability of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to handle the whole joint electromagnetic and hadronic cascade, scoring residual nuclei produced by all relevant particles. The radiation aspects related to the operation of superconducting RF cavities are also addressed.

  18. Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O A

    2007-10-29

    While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

  19. High-throughput identification of ionizing radiation-sensitive plant genes and development of radiation indicator plant and radiation sensing Genechip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Jinbaek; Ha, Bokeun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sunhee

    2013-05-15

    Physiological analysis of monocot model plant (rice) in response to ionizing radiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - Identification of antioxidant characters through cytochemical analysis. - Comparison of antioxidant activities in response to ionizing irradiation. - Evaluation of anthocyanin quantity in response to ionizing irradiation. Ionization energy response gene family analysis via bioinformatic validation. - Expression analysis of monocot and dicot gene families. - In silico and bioinformatic approach to elucidate gene function. Characterization and functional analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing irradiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - High throughput trancriptomic analysis of plants under ionizing radiation using microarray. - Promotor and cis-element analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing radiation. - Validation and function analysis of candidate genes. - Elucidation of plant mechanism of sensing and response to ionization energy. Development of bioindicator plants detecting ionization energy. - Cloning and identification of 'Radio marker genes (RMG)'. - Development of Over-expression (O/E) or Knock-out (K/O) plant using RMG. Development of Genechip as an ionization energy detector. - Expression profiling analysis of genes specifically expression in response to ionization energy. - Prepare high-conserved gene specific oligomer. - Development of ionization energy monitoring Genechip and application.

  20. Energy and charge distribution of energetic helium ions in the outer radiation belt of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The first direct measurement of the charge states of helium at energies greater than 0.5 MeV/nucleon in the outer radiation belt, obtained aboard the ISEE-1 spacecraft in 1977, is reported. High abundances of singly ionized helium, with He(+)/He(2+) = 0.4 + or - 0.1 at L = 3.3 was found during one perigee pass, with a sudden decrease of that ratio by a factor of about 10 between L = 3.3 and 3.7. It is shown that nonstationary and/or nonadiabatic processes may play an important role for the distribution of helium ions in the outer radiation belt.

  1. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Space Sciences

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 Ge

  2. High fidelity, radiation tolerant analog-to-digital converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charles Chang-I (Inventor); Linscott, Ivan Richard (Inventor); Inan, Umran S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using pipeline architecture includes a linearization technique for a spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) over 80 deciBels. In some embodiments, sampling rates exceed a megahertz. According to a second approach, a switched-capacitor circuit is configured for correct operation in a high radiation environment. In one embodiment, the combination yields high fidelity ADC (>88 deciBel SFDR) while sampling at 5 megahertz sampling rates and consuming ADC displays no latchup up to a highest tested linear energy transfer of 63 million electron Volts square centimeters per milligram at elevated temperature (131 degrees C.) and supply (2.7 Volts, versus 2.5 Volts nominal).

  3. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  4. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from nuclear collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Turbide, Simon; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting matter created in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC energies is modeled with relativistic hydrodynamics, and the spectra of real and virtual photons produced at mid-rapidity in these events are calculated. Several different sources are considered, and their relative importance is compared. Specifically, we include jet fragmentation, jet-plasma interactions, the emission of radiation from the thermal medium and from primordial hard collisions. Our calculations consistently take into account jet energy loss, as evaluated in the AMY formalism. We obtain results for the spectra, the nuclear modification factor (R_AA), and the azimuthal anisotropy (v_2) that agree with the photon measurements performed by the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC.

  6. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  7. Radiation Detection and Dual-Energy X-Ray Imaging for Port Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashby, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divin, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-09

    Millions of cargo containers are transported across the United States border annually and are inspected for illicit radioactive material and contraband using a combination of passive radiation portal monitors (RPM) and high energy X-ray non-intrusive inspection (NII) systems. As detection performance is expected to vary with the material composition of cargo, characterizing the types of material present in cargo is important to national security. This work analyzes the passive radiation and dual energy radiography signatures from on RPM and two NII system, respectively. First, the cargos were analyzed to determine their ability to attenuate emissions from an embedded radioactive source. Secondly, dual-energy X-ray discrimination was used to determine the material composition and density of the cargos.

  8. Tactical high-energy laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Josef; Wilson, Gerald T.; Avidor, Joel M.

    2002-06-01

    The Nautilus Project was started in 1995 as a joint US-Israel feasibility study for using laser systems to defend against short-range artillery rockets. It has now matured into a successful laser weapon demonstration program - the Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Program. By now the THEL Demonstrator has engaged and destroyed a large number of artillery rockets in mid-flight in an extended series of demonstration tests at the US Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The THEL ACTD hardware and development process are described in this paper, as well as the major test results. The paper also describes the operational concept for a deployed THEL weapon system and some possible growth paths for the THEL ACTD Program.

  9. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  10. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The theory and current status of materials research for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion are reviewed. Semiconductors are shown to be the preferred class of materials for this application. Optimization of the figure of merit of both broadband and narrow-band semiconductors is discussed as a function of temperature. Phonon scattering mechanisms are discussed, and basic material guidelines are given for reduction of thermal conductivity. Two general classes of materials show promise for high temperature figure of merit (Z) values, namely the rare earth chalcogenides and the boron-rich borides. The electronic transport properties of the rare earth chalcogenides are explicable on the basis of degenerate or partially degenerate n-type semiconductors. Boron and boron-rich borides exhibit p-type hopping conductivity, with detailed explanations proposed for the transport differing from compound to compound. Some discussion is presented on the reasons for the low thermal conductivities in these materials. Also, ZTs greater than one appear to have been realized at high temperature in many of these compounds.

  11. High Altitude Radiations Relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagan, P.; Maiden, D. L.; Tai, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Langley Research Center (LaRC) performed atmospheric radiation studies under the SST development program in which important ionizing radiation components were measured and extended by calculations to develop the existing atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) model. In that program the measured neutron spectrum was limited to less than 10 MeV by the available 1960-1970 instrumentation. Extension of the neutron spectrum to high energies was made using the LaRC PROPER-3C monte carlo code. It was found that the atmospheric neutrons contributed about half of the dose equivalent and approximately half of the neutron contribution was from high energy neutrons above 10 MeV. Furthermore, monte carlo calculations of solar particle events showed that potential exposures as large as 10-100 mSv/hr may occur on important high latitude routes but acceptable levels of exposure could be obtained if timely descent to subsonic altitudes could be made. The principal concern was for pregnant occupants onboard the aircraft. As a result of these studies the FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST recommended: 1. Crew members will have to be informed of their exposure levels 2. Maximum exposures on any flight to be limited to 5 mSv 3. Airborne radiation detection devices for total exposure and exposure rates 4. Satellite monitoring system to provide SST aircraft real-time information on atmospheric radiation levels for exposure mitigation 5. A solar forecasting system to warn flight operations of an impending solar event for flight scheduling and alert status. These recommendations are a reasonable starting point to requirements for the HSCT with some modification reflecting new standards of protection as a result of changing risk coefficients.

  12. Dual energy versus single energy MDCT: measurement of radiation dose using adult abdominal imaging protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lisa M; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Nelson, Rendon C; Marin, Daniele; Toncheva, Greta; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the radiation dose of dual-energy and single-energy multidetector computed tomographic (CT) imaging using adult liver, renal, and aortic imaging protocols. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging was performed on a conventional 64-detector CT scanner using a software upgrade (Volume Dual Energy) at tube voltages of 140 and 80 kVp (with tube currents of 385 and 675 mA, respectively), with a 0.8-second gantry revolution time in axial mode. Parameters for single-energy CT (SECT) imaging were a tube voltage of 140 kVp, a tube current of 385 mA, a 0.5-second gantry revolution time, helical mode, and pitch of 1.375:1. The volume CT dose index (CTDI(vol)) value displayed on the console for each scan was recorded. Organ doses were measured using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor technology. Effective dose was calculated as the sum of 20 organ doses multiplied by a weighting factor found in International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Radiation dose saving with virtual noncontrast imaging reconstruction was also determined. The CTDI(vol) values were 49.4 mGy for DECT imaging and 16.2 mGy for SECT imaging. Effective dose ranged from 22.5 to 36.4 mSv for DECT imaging and from 9.4 to 13.8 mSv for SECT imaging. Virtual noncontrast imaging reconstruction reduced the total effective dose of multiphase DECT imaging by 19% to 28%. Using the current Volume Dual Energy software, radiation doses with DECT imaging were higher than those with SECT imaging. Substantial radiation dose savings are possible with DECT imaging if virtual noncontrast imaging reconstruction replaces precontrast imaging.

  13. Optical solar energy adaptations and radiative temperature control of green leaves and tree barks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrion, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut [Department of Si-Photovoltaik and Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Trees have adapted to keep leaves and barks cool in sunshine and can serve as interesting bionic model systems for radiative cooling. Silicon solar cells, on the other hand, loose up to one third of their energy efficiency due to heating in intensive sunshine. It is shown that green leaves minimize absorption of useful radiation and allow efficient infrared thermal emission. Since elevated temperatures are detrimental for tensile water flow in the Xylem tissue below barks, the optical properties of barks should also have evolved so as to avoid excessive heating. This was tested by performing optical studies with tree bark samples from representative trees. It was found that tree barks have optimized their reflection of incoming sunlight between 0.7 and 2 {mu}m. This is approximately the optical window in which solar light is transmitted and reflected by green vegetation. Simultaneously, the tree bark is highly absorbing and thus radiation emitting between 6 and 10 {mu}m. These two properties, mainly provided by tannins, create optimal conditions for radiative temperature control. In addition, tannins seem to have adopted a function as mediators for excitation energy towards photo-antioxidative activity for control of radiation damage. The results obtained are used to discuss challenges for future solar cell optimization. (author)

  14. Radiative transfer and the energy equation in SPH simulations of star formation

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatellos, Dimitrios; Whitworth, Anthony Peter; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Goodwin, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aims.We introduce and test a new and highly efficient method for treating the thermal and radiative effects influencing the energy equation in SPH simulations of star formation.\\ud Methods.The method uses the density, temperature and gravitational potential of each particle to estimate a mean optical depth, which then regulates the particle's heating and cooling. The method captures - at minimal computational cost - the effects of (i) the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of H2; (...

  15. New method for the transformation of solar radiation energy into electric power for energy feeding of the space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludanov, K. I.

    The author proposes a new method for the transformation of solar radiation energy into electric power, which is alternative for photo-transformation. Ukrpatents's positive decisions are obtained for the method and for the installation for its realization. The method includes two phases: concentration of solar radiation by paraboloid mirrors with high potential heat obtaining in the helio receiver and the next heat transformation into electric power in the framework of the thermal cycle "high temperature electrolytic steam decomposition on the components (H2 and O2) + electrochemical generation by the way of the water recombination from H2 and O2 in the low temperature fuel cell". The new method gives the double superiority in comparison with the photo-transformation.

  16. Influence of high energy electrons on ECRH in LHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogasawara S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The central bulk electron temperature of more than 20 keV is achieved in LHD as a result of increasing the injection power and the lowering the electron density near 2 × 1018 m−3. Such collision-less regime is important from the aspect of the neoclassical transport and also the potential structure formation. The presences of appreciable amount of high energy electrons are indicated from hard X-ray PHA, and the discrepancy between the stored energy and kinetic energy estimated from Thomson scattering. ECE spectrum are also sensitive to the presence of high energy electrons and discussed by solving the radiation transfer equation. The ECRH power absorption to the bulk and the high energy electrons are dramatically affected by the acceleration and the confinement of high energy electrons. The heating mechanisms and the acceleration process of high energy electrons are discussed by comparing the experimental results and the ray tracing calculation under assumed various density and mean energy of high energy electrons.

  17. High energy chemical laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  18. Overview. Department of High Energy Physics. Section 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coghen, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The activities of Department of High Energy Physics in 1994 have been presented. They cover a variety of problems of experimental and theoretical high energy elementary particle physics: hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (mainly characteristics of particle production , including heavy quark physics), e{sup +} e{sup -} interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluations of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles.Research on detectors and development of apparatus for high energy physics experiments at future accelerators such as LHC or RHIC were also carried out. The short information about personnel employed in the Department, seminars, publication, conferences and reports is also given.

  19. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment......, remote control of the goniometer, data acquisition, energy-sensitive detectors using small-area and large-area detector crystals, modes of operation, powder and single crystal diffraction. An example is given from a high-pressure study of YbH2 using a diamond anvil cell....

  20. Wave energy budget analysis in the Earth's radiation belts uncovers a missing energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A.V.; Agapitov, O.V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.; Mozer, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whistler-mode emissions are important electromagnetic waves pervasive in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously remove or energize electrons trapped by the geomagnetic field, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts and the upper-atmosphere ionization or chemical composition. Here, we report an analysis of 10-year Cluster data, statistically evaluating the full wave energy budget in the Earth's magnetosphere, revealing that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to hitherto generally neglected very oblique waves. Such waves, with 10 times smaller magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have similar total energy. Moreover, they carry up to 80% of the wave energy involved in wave–particle resonant interactions. It implies that electron heating and precipitation into the atmosphere may have been significantly under/over-valued in past studies considering only conventional quasi-parallel waves. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts, controlled by solar activity. PMID:25975615

  1. Radiation effects in cold moderator materials: Experimental study of accumulation and release of chemical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, E.

    2004-01-01

    Study of radiation resistance of hydrogenous materials at low temperatures is a first priority task in the design of advanced cold neutron moderators. At temperatures 20-100 K the most essential radiation effects in solid hydrogenous substances are: Formation of radiolytic hydrogen. Accumulation of "frozen" radicals, which results in a rise of a self-sustaining reaction of their recombination followed with unexpected fast heating of the moderator. Formation of high-molecular, high-boiling products of radiolysis. Decrease of thermal conductivity. In the paper, the recently obtained results of the study of the accumulation of chemical energy and the conditions of its release performed with the URAM-2 cryogenic irradiation facility at the IBR-2 research reactor, are presented. Spontaneous releases of stored energy were detected in solid methane, water ice, hydrates of methane and tetrahydrofuran [Particles and Nuclei, Lett. 5 (2002) 82; Radiat. Phys. Chem. 67 (2003) 315] and in frozen mixtures of water ice with atomic hydrogen scavengers. A negligible amount of energy is accumulated in aromatic hydrocarbons which demonstrate no spontaneous self-heating under irradiation. All irradiation runs were performed at up to 20 MGy in the temperature range of 15-50 K.

  2. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenau, Melanie; Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus; Sommer, Holger; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a (60)Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks' formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks' formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV(-1) cm(-2). The energy response was quantified relative to the response to (60)Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The observed energy dependence could be well explained with the assumption of ionization quenching as described by Birks' formula. Plastic scintillation detectors should be calibrated at the same radiation

  3. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro, E-mail: t.shimaoka@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shin-ichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Hideyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  4. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  5. Energy deposition study of low-energy cosmic radiation at sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Pushpa

    In this dissertation work, a computer simulation model based on the Geant4 simulation package has been designed and developed to study the energy deposition and track structures of cosmic muons and their secondary electrons in tissue-like materials. The particle interactions in a cubic water volume were first simulated. To analyze the energy deposition and tracks in small structures, with the intention of studying the energy localization in nanometric structures such as DNA, the chamber was sliced in three dimentions. Validation studies have been performed by comparing the results with experimental, theoretical, and other simulation results to test the accuracy of the simulation model. A human body phantom in sea-level muon environment was modeled to measure the yearly dose to a human from cosmic muons. The yearly dose in this phantom is about 22 millirems. This is close to the accepted value for the yearly dose from cosmic radiation at sea level. Shielding cosmic muons with a concrete slab from 0 to 2 meters increased the dose received by the body. This dissertation presents an extensive study on the interactions of secondary electrons created by muons in water. Index words. Radiation Dosimetry Simulation, Track Structures, Sea-Level muon Flux, Energy Deposition

  6. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  7. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  8. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  9. Modular, Reconfigurable, High-Energy Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The Modular, Reconfigurable High-Energy (MRHE) Technology Demonstrator project was to have been a series of ground-based demonstrations to mature critical technologies needed for in-space assembly of a highpower high-voltage modular spacecraft in low Earth orbit, enabling the development of future modular solar-powered exploration cargo-transport vehicles and infrastructure. MRHE was a project in the High Energy Space Systems (HESS) Program, within NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESR&T) Program. NASA participants included Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and Glenn Research Center (GRC). Contractor participants were the Boeing Phantom Works in Huntsville, AL, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA, ENTECH, Inc. in Keller, TX, and the University of AL Huntsville (UAH). MRHE's technical objectives were to mature: (a) lightweight, efficient, high-voltage, radiation-resistant solar power generation (SPG) technologies; (b) innovative, lightweight, efficient thermal management systems; (c) efficient, 100kW-class, high-voltage power delivery systems from an SPG to an electric thruster system; (d) autonomous rendezvous and docking technology for in-space assembly of modular, reconfigurable spacecraft; (e) robotic assembly of modular space systems; and (f) modular, reconfigurable distributed avionics technologies. Maturation of these technologies was to be implemented through a series of increasingly-inclusive laboratory demonstrations that would have integrated and demonstrated two systems-of-systems: (a) the autonomous rendezvous and docking of modular spacecraft with deployable structures, robotic assembly, reconfiguration both during assembly and (b) the development and integration of an advanced thermal heat pipe and a high-voltage power delivery system with a representative lightweight high-voltage SPG array. In addition, an integrated simulation testbed would have been developed

  10. High Energy Density Electrolytic Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A new type of electrolytic capacitor which combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitor cathode was developed. The resulting capacitor has a four time higher energy density than standard electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electric performance. The prototype, a 480 microFarad, 200 V device, has an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now a 680 microFarad 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. The potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V hybrid capacitors and results from ongoing qualification testing of the MIL-style tantalum capacitors.

  11. High Energy Electron Detectors on Sphinx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Porte, A.; Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Auriel, G.; Coleman, P. L.; Bayol, F.; Lalle, B.; Krishnan, M.; Wilson, K.

    2008-11-01

    Z-pinch plasma radiation sources are used to dose test objects with K-shell (˜1-4keV) x-rays. The implosion physics can produce high energy electrons (> 50keV), which could distort interpretation of the soft x-ray effects. We describe the design and implementation of a diagnostic suite to characterize the electron environment of Al wire and Ar gas puff z-pinches on Sphinx. The design used ITS calculations to model detector response to both soft x-rays and electrons and help set upper bounds to the spurious electron flux. Strategies to discriminate between the known soft x-ray emission and the suspected electron flux will be discussed. H.Calamy et al, ``Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion,'' Phys Plasmas 15, 012701 (2008) J.A.Halbleib et al, ``ITS: the integrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes-Version 3.0,'' IEEE Trans on Nuclear Sci, 39, 1025 (1992)

  12. Three Decades of High Energy Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most brilliant explosions in space. The first GRB was discovered on 1967, just over 40 years ago. It took several years and multiple generations of space and ground instruments to unravel some of the mysteries of this phenomenon. However, many questions remain open today. I will discuss the history, evolution and current status of the GRB field and its contributions in our understanding of the transient high energy sky. Finally, I will describe how GRBs can be utilized in future missions as tools, to probe the cosmic chemical evolution of the Universe Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 24) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11, 2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from several magnetar sources. In total, six new sources were discovered between 2008 and 2011, with a synergy between Swift, RXTE, Fermi and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  13. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  14. High Operating Temperature, Radiation-Hard MIM Thermophotovoltaic Converters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spire Corporation proposes to investigate InGaAs thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells optimized for high temperature operation (~150C) and radiation hardness against the...

  15. Radiation Tolerant, High Capacity Non-Volatile Memory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for reliable, high capacity, radiation tolerant nonvolatile memory exists in many Human space flight applications. Most projects rely on COTS hardware for a...

  16. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  17. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    them aimed at a final unification of all fundamental forces including gravity. Attempts have been made to extend the reach of some of these theories, based on an underlying string-theory picture, all the way to the Planck energy scale MPl = (8πGN). −1/2,. GN being Newton's gravitational constant. MPl is. Keywords.

  18. An intercomparison and validation of satellite-based surface radiative energy flux estimates over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, Aku; Key, Jeffrey R.; Meirink, Jan Fokke; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Palo, Timo; Karlsson, Karl-Göran

    2017-05-01

    Accurate determination of radiative energy fluxes over the Arctic is of crucial importance for understanding atmosphere-surface interactions, melt and refreezing cycles of the snow and ice cover, and the role of the Arctic in the global energy budget. Satellite-based estimates can provide comprehensive spatiotemporal coverage, but the accuracy and comparability of the existing data sets must be ascertained to facilitate their use. Here we compare radiative flux estimates from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Synoptic 1-degree (SYN1deg)/Energy Balanced and Filled, Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) surface energy budget, and our own experimental FluxNet / Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring cLoud, Albedo and RAdiation (CLARA) data against in situ observations over Arctic sea ice and the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer of 2007. In general, CERES SYN1deg flux estimates agree best with in situ measurements, although with two particular limitations: (1) over sea ice the upwelling shortwave flux in CERES SYN1deg appears to be underestimated because of an underestimated surface albedo and (2) the CERES SYN1deg upwelling longwave flux over sea ice saturates during midsummer. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer-based GEWEX and FluxNet-CLARA flux estimates generally show a larger range in retrieval errors relative to CERES, with contrasting tendencies relative to each other. The largest source of retrieval error in the FluxNet-CLARA downwelling shortwave flux is shown to be an overestimated cloud optical thickness. The results illustrate that satellite-based flux estimates over the Arctic are not yet homogeneous and that further efforts are necessary to investigate the differences in the surface and cloud properties which lead to disagreements in flux retrievals.

  19. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  20. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was found that radiation levels would be minimum for different gases, when the gas pressure was between 0.5 and 0.8 Torr. Only helium deviated from this phenomenon as it gave maximum radiation level at 0.8 Torr pressure. It was also found that, for all the gases used, the radiation levels were maximum when the ...

  1. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, Hector [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico)

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1) Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  2. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  3. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  5. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  6. Estimating the Reliability of Electronic Parts in High Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everline, Chester; Clark, Karla; Man, Guy; Rasmussen, Robert; Johnston, Allan; Kohlhase, Charles; Paulos, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Radiation effects on materials and electronic parts constrain the lifetime of flight systems visiting Europa. Understanding mission lifetime limits is critical to the design and planning of such a mission. Therefore, the operational aspects of radiation dose are a mission success issue. To predict and manage mission lifetime in a high radiation environment, system engineers need capable tools to trade radiation design choices against system design and reliability, and science achievements. Conventional tools and approaches provided past missions with conservative designs without the ability to predict their lifetime beyond the baseline mission.This paper describes a more systematic approach to understanding spacecraft design margin, allowing better prediction of spacecraft lifetime. This is possible because of newly available electronic parts radiation effects statistics and an enhanced spacecraft system reliability methodology. This new approach can be used in conjunction with traditional approaches for mission design. This paper describes the fundamentals of the new methodology.

  7. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  8. Mobile unit for high active spent radiation sources immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojovan, M.I.; Sobolev, I.A.; Kachalov, M.B.; Arustamov, A.E.; Shiryaev, V.V.; Semenov, K.N.; Timofeev, E.M.; Stephanovsky, S.V. [Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Sergiev Posad (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

    1993-12-31

    A new method of solid high active waste (spent radiation sources) immobilization was developed. It provides the inclusion of the spent radiation sources into the metal matrix directly in the underground repositories. The radiation shielding of the repositories is used for the safety. The method provides the preparation of the metal melt outside of repository. In this way the action of high temperature on the waste is minimal as well as the volatilization of the radio nuclei. A special Mobile Unit for High Active Spent Radiation Sources immobilization was designed. It consists of some modules which are easily assembled on the repositories. The new technology and Mobile Unit are used by Scientific and Industrial Association ``Radon`` beginning 1986 on industrial scale.

  9. The interaction region of high energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial view of the interaction region of colliding high energy protons (in terms of impact parameter) is considered. It is shown that the region of inelastic collisions has a very peculiar shape. It saturates for central collisions at an energy of 7 TeV. We speculate on the further evolution with energy, which is contrasted to the "black disk" picture.

  10. URBox : High tech energy and informal housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Y.J.; Smets, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the URBox concept encompassing the high tech end of solar energy and informal low cost and affordable housing. It aims to contribute to solving the global energy crisis by building solar energy settlements in deserts where land is affordable and sunshine in abundance. First the

  11. Synergy between low and high energy radical femtochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauduel, Y A, E-mail: yann.gauduel@ensta-paristech.fr [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR7639, Ecole Polytechnique ParisTech-ENS Techniques Avancees ParisTech, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France) and Radiation Biology MELUSYN Network, Armir-College de Polytechnique, Paris (France)

    2011-01-01

    The deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on integrated biological targets being dependent on the spatio-temporal distribution of short-lived radical processes, a thorough knowledge of these early events requires a real-time probing in the range 10{sup -15} - 10{sup -10} s. This manuscript review is focused on the synergy that exists between low (1-10 eV) and high (MeV) energy radiation femtochemistry (LERF, HERF respectively). The synergy remains crucial for the investigation of primary radical processes that take place within the prethermal regime of low energy secondary electrons. The quantum character of very-short lived electron in a prehydrated configuration provides a unique sub-nanometric probe to spatially explore some early radiation-induced biomolecular damage. This approach would foreshadow the development of innovative applications for spatio-temporal radiation biology such as, (i) a highly-selective pro-drug activation using well-defined quantum states of short-lived radicals, (ii) the real-time nanodosimetry in biologically relevant environments, and (iii) the ultrashort irradiation of living cells.

  12. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  13. Radiation injury in a patient with unusually high sensitivity to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, S.; Saito, F.; Suda, T.; Fijibayashi, H.; Shibuya, H.; Horiuchi, J.; Suzuki, S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation therapy is usually given with the assumption that interindividual variations in radiosensitivity are small, except for some patients with hereditary diseases associated with increased sensitivity. Recently, we observed radiation induced pericarditis in a breast carcinoma patient, in whom clinical signs, blood counts and chromosome analysis after in vitro irradiation of blood suggested a state of unusually high radiosensitivity. No evidence of constitutional chromosome abnormality was found in karyotypic analysis with the G-banding technique.

  14. Therapy of patients with osteoarthritis with low energy laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Vasiljeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess influence oflow energy laser radiation (LELR on glycosaminoglycan (GAG and vitamin С level in pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. 82 pts with primary OA and 25 healthy volunteers signed informed consent were included in an open randomized prospective 12-month study. Inclusion criteria: unsatisfactory effect of previous drug therapy (DT, stable NSAID dose 3-5 days before and during LELR course, absence of comorbid hepatic and kidney diseases in stage of functional decompensation, malignant diseases, exclusion therapy influencing microcirculation, exercise therapy, physical therapy. Intra-articular injections were not done during 3 months before the study. Pts were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 received complex DT and LELR, group 2 - DT. clinical and laboratory parameters were used as efficacy measures. Statistical analysis was performed on personal computer IBM PC (OS — Windows EP Home Edition with Microsoft office and STATISTICA 6.0 programs. Results. Analysis of the results showed significant improvement of most measures in comparison with traditional DT. LELR administration allowed to decrease chondroprotector and NSAID doses. Vitamin С decrease in serum of OA pts may be a risk factor of development and progression of this disease.

  15. Collisionless dissociation and isotopic enrichment of SF6 using high-powered CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, M. C.; Billman, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation of S-32F6 and the resultant isotopic enrichment of S-34F6 using high-powered CO2 laser radiation has been studied with higher experimental sensitivity than previously reported. Enrichment factors have been measured as a function of laser pulse number, wavelength, energy and time duration. A geometry independent dissociation cross section is introduced and measured values are presented. Threshold energy densities, below which no dissociation was observed, were also determined.

  16. Increased Artemis levels confer radioresistance to both high and low LET radiation exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridharan Deepa M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemis has a defined role in V(DJ recombination and has been implicated in the repair of radiation induced double-strand breaks. However the exact function(s of Artemis in DNA repair and its preferred substrate(s in vivo remain undefined. Our previous work suggests that Artemis is important for the repair of complex DNA damage like that inflicted by high Linear Energy Transfer (LET radiation. To establish the contribution of Artemis in repairing DNA damage caused by various radiation qualities, we evaluated the effect of over-expressing Artemis on cell survival, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest after exposure to high and low LET radiation. Results Our data reveal that Artemis over-expression confers marked radioprotection against both types of radiation, although the radioprotective effect was greater following high LET radiation. Inhibitor studies reveal that the radioprotection imparted by Artemis is primarily dependent on DNA-PK activity, and to a lesser extent on ATM kinase activity. Together, these data suggest a DNA-PK dependent role for Artemis in the repair of complex DNA damage. Conclusions These findings indicate that Artemis levels significantly influence radiation toxicity in human cells and suggest that Artemis inhibition could be a practical target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  17. High-Energy Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies neutrino interactions in iron at the highest available energies using the narrow-band neutrino beam N3 and the wide-band neutrino beam N1. The basis of the detector is a massive target-calorimeter in which the energy deposited by a neutrino (or antineutrino) is measured by electronic techniques and the momentum of outgoing muons is determined by magnetic deflection. The detector is constructed in the form of a 20 m long iron-cored toroidal magnet, composed of modules of length 70~cm and 90~cm, and of 3.75~m diameter. Drift chambers placed in between each module measure the trajectory of muons from the neutrino interactions. The modules are of three types. The first ten modules are constructed of 2.5~cm iron plates with 20~scintillator planes inserted between the plates. The next five modules are constructed of 5~cm plates with 15~planes of scintillator and the last six modules are constructed of 15~cm plates with 5~planes of scintillators. The total mass of the detector is @=~1400 tons...

  18. Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) imaging: a novel method for optical imaging of PET isotopes in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dothager, Robin S; Goiffon, Reece J; Jackson, Erin; Harpstrite, Scott; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2010-10-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows sensitive, non-invasive analysis of the distribution of radiopharmaceutical tracers labeled with positron (β(+))-emitting radionuclides in small animals and humans. Upon β(+) decay, the initial velocity of high-energy β(+) particles can momentarily exceed the speed of light in tissue, producing Cerenkov radiation that is detectable by optical imaging, but is highly absorbed in living organisms. To improve optical imaging of Cerenkov radiation in biological systems, we demonstrate that Cerenkov radiation from decay of the PET isotopes (64)Cu and (18)F can be spectrally coupled by energy transfer to high Stokes-shift quantum nanoparticles (Qtracker705) to produce highly red-shifted photonic emissions. Efficient energy transfer was not detected with (99m)Tc, a predominantly γ-emitting isotope. Similar to bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), herein we define the Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) ratio as the normalized quotient of light detected within a spectral window centered on the fluorophore emission divided by light detected within a spectral window of the Cerenkov radiation emission to quantify imaging signals. Optical images of solutions containing Qtracker705 nanoparticles and [(18)F]FDG showed CRET ratios in vitro as high as 8.8±1.1, while images of mice with subcutaneous pseudotumors impregnated with Qtracker705 following intravenous injection of [(18)F]FDG showed CRET ratios in vivo as high as 3.5±0.3. Quantitative CRET imaging may afford a variety of novel optical imaging applications and activation strategies for PET radiopharmaceuticals and other isotopes in biomaterials, tissues and live animals.

  19. Investigation of the Frohlich hypothesis with high intensity terahertz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This article provides an update to recent reviews of the Frohlich hypothesis that biological organisation is facilitated by the creation of coherent excited states driven by a flow of free energy provided by metabolic processes and mediated by molecular motions in the terahertz range. Sources of intense terahertz radiation have the potential to test this hypothesis since if it is true the growth and development of sensitive systems such as stem cells should be influenced by irradiation with intense terahertz radiation. A brief survey of recent work shows that it is not yet possible to make an assessment of the validity of the Frohlich hypothesis. Under some conditions a variety of cell types respond to irradiation with intense THz radiation in ways that involve changes in the activity of their DNA. In other experiments very intense and prolonged THz radiation has no measureable effect on the behavior of very sensitive systems such as stem cells. The wide variation in experimental conditions makes it impossible to draw any conclusions as to characteristics of THz radiation that will induce a response in living cells. It is possible that in environments suitable for their maintenance and growth cells are capable of compensating for any effects caused by exposure to THz radiation up to some currently unknown level of THz peak power.

  20. Modeling coherent cherenkov radio emissions from high energy electromagnetic showers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoessow, P.

    1998-04-24

    A technique currently under study for the detection of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray neutrinos involves the measurement of radio emissions from the electromagnetic shower generated by the neutrino in a large volume of naturally occurring dielectric such as the Antarctic ice cap or salt domes. The formation of an electron excess in the shower leads to the emission of coherent Cherenkov radiation, an effect similar to the generation of wakefields in dielectric loaded structures. We have used the finite difference time domain (FDTD) wakefield code ARRAKIS to model coherent Cherenkov radiation fields from high energy showers; we present as an example calculations of expected signals in a proof of principle experiment proposed for the Fermilab Main Injector.

  1. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Capacitor size and reliability are often limiting factors in pulse power, high speed switching, and power management and distribution (PMAD) systems. T/J...

  2. Evaluation and prediction of solar radiation for energy management based on neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshina, O. V.; Van Tai, Dinh

    2017-08-01

    Currently, there is a high rate of distribution of renewable energy sources and distributed power generation based on intelligent networks; therefore, meteorological forecasts are particularly useful for planning and managing the energy system in order to increase its overall efficiency and productivity. The application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in the field of photovoltaic energy is presented in this article. Implemented in this study, two periodically repeating dynamic ANS, that are the concentration of the time delay of a neural network (CTDNN) and the non-linear autoregression of a network with exogenous inputs of the NAEI, are used in the development of a model for estimating and daily forecasting of solar radiation. ANN show good productivity, as reliable and accurate models of daily solar radiation are obtained. This allows to successfully predict the photovoltaic output power for this installation. The potential of the proposed method for controlling the energy of the electrical network is shown using the example of the application of the NAEI network for predicting the electric load.

  3. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    establish an the radiation increases in this region. To account for these effects, an empirical non-coronal model was developed which takes the impurity residence time at the pedestal into account. The validity of this assumption was verified by modelling the evolution of the impurities and radiation for ASDEX Upgrade H-modes with nitrogen seeding by coupling the ASTRA transport code with STRAHL. The time-dependent simulations include impurity radiation due to nitrogen and tungsten and the transport effects induced at the edge by the ELMs. The modelling results have been validated against the experimental data. The modelled radiation profiles show a very good agreement with the measured ones over both radius and time. In particular, the strong enhancement of the nitrogen radiation caused by non-coronal effects through the ELM-induced transport is well reproduced. The radiation properties of tungsten are very weakly influenced by non-coronal effects due to the faster equilibration. W radiation, which is highly dependent on the f{sub ELM}, strongly increases when f{sub ELM} is decreased, due to the lack of sufficiently strong flush out of this impurity. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates that maintaining high ELM frequency is essential for the stability and performance of the discharges. Analyses of the high density scenario with pellets indicate that several processes take place when pellets are injected into the plasma. In particular, due to their cooling effect, the temperature drops as soon as pellets are injected. This is compensated by an increase in density. These processes occur mainly at the edge and are propagated to the core via stiffness. This explains why the confinement stays approximately constant during the whole discharge. Both experiments and transport calculations reveal that the energy confinement time is independent of the density indicating that the currently used scaling is not valid in this regime. The results of this

  4. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  5. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  6. Dosimetric effects of energy spectrum uncertainties in radiation therapy with laser-driven particle beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, S; Wilkens, J J

    2012-03-07

    Laser-driven particle acceleration is a potentially cost-efficient and compact new technology that might replace synchrotrons or cyclotrons for future proton or heavy-ion radiation therapy. Since the energy spectrum of laser-accelerated particles is rather wide, compared to the monoenergetic beams of conventional machines, studies have proposed the usage of broader spectra for the treatment of at least certain parts of the target volume to make the process more efficient. The thereby introduced additional uncertainty in the applied energy spectrum is analysed in this note. It is shown that the uncertainty can be categorized into a change of the total number of particles, and a change in the energy distribution of the particles. The former one can be monitored by a simple fluence detector and cancels for a high number of statistically fluctuating shots. The latter one, the redistribution of a fixed number of particles to different energy bins in the window of transmitted energies of the energy selection system, only introduces smaller changes to the resulting depth dose curve. Therefore, it might not be necessary to monitor this uncertainty for all applied shots. These findings might enable an easier uncertainty management for particle therapy with broad energy spectra.

  7. Optical power and energy radiated by natural lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Mason G.; Krider, E. Philip

    2013-02-01

    Calibrated measurements of the visible and near-infrared radiation produced by both negative and positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strokes have been made at distances of 5 to 32 km in southern Arizona (AZ) and the central Great Plains using a photodiode sensor with a flat spectral response between 0.4 and 1.0 µm. Time-correlated video images (60 fps) of the channel development provided information about the types of strokes that were detected and reports from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network indicated their locations, polarities, and estimates of their peak current. In our sample of negative strokes that were suitable for analysis, there were 23 first (or only) strokes (FS), 19 subsequent strokes that created new ground contacts (NGC), and 101 subsequent strokes that re-illuminated a preexisting channel (PEC). We also analyzed 10 positive strokes (in nine flashes), and 73 of the larger impulses that were radiated by intracloud discharges (CPs). Assuming that these events can be approximated as isotropic sources and that the effects of atmospheric extinction are negligible, the peak optical power (Po), total optical energy (Eo), and characteristic widths of the sources (tcw = Eo/Po) have been computed. Median values of Po for negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 1.8 × 1010 W, 1.1 × 1010 W, and 4.4 × 109 W, respectively. Median values of Eo were 3.6 × 106 J, 3.5 × 106 J, and 1.2 × 106 J, respectively. The median characteristic widths of negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 229 µs, 244 µs, and 283 µs, respectively. Positive CG strokes produced a median Po, Eo, and tcw of 1.9 × 1010 W, 9.3 × 106 J, and 497 µs, respectively. Estimates of the space-and-time-average power per unit length (ℓo) in the lower portion of negative FS, NGC, and PEC channels had medians of 2.8 × 106 W/m, 3.2 × 106 W/m, and 1.4 × 106 W/m, respectively, and the median ℓo for four positive strokes was 8.8 × 106 W/m. Median values for the estimated peak

  8. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  9. High energy physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  10. High-energy anomalous scattering: Is it semiclassical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattis, M.P. (Theoretical Division T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); McLerran, L. (Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MI (United States)); Yaffe, L.G. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-06-01

    We discuss the possibility of a semiclassical evaluation of baryon-number-nonconserving scattering amplitudes at nonperturbative'' energies of order {ital M}{sub {ital W}}/{alpha}{sub {ital W}}. Semiclassical expansions around standard instanton configurations are known {ital not} to be valid at these energies: multiloop radiative corrections are not suppressed relative to tree-graph contributions. Despite this pathology, we present a conjecture showing how anomalous scattering at such nonperturbative energies may nevertheless remain semiclassically calculable, and discuss partial results supporting this conjecture. To determine the correct weak-coupling behavior of high-energy anomalous scattering amplitudes, we argue that one must solve a modified set of classical field equations, or equivalently sum suitably modified tree graphs.

  11. Natural radiation - a perspective to radiological risk factors of nuclear energy production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustonen, R.; Christensen, T.; Stranden, E.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation doses from natural radiation and from man-made modifications on natural radiation, and different natural radiological environments in the Nordic countries are summarized and used as a perspective for the radiological consequences of nuclear energy production. The significance of different...... radiation sources can be judged against the total collective effective dose equivalent from natural radiation in the Nordic countries, 92 000 manSv per year. The collective dose from nuclear energy production during normal operation is estimated to 20 manSv per year and from non-nuclear energy production...... to 80 manSv per year. The increase in collective dose due to the conservation of heating energy in Nordic dwellings is estimated to 23 000 manSv per year, from 1973 to 1984. An indirect radiological danger index is defined in order to be able to compare the significance of estimated future releases...

  12. Differences in fundamental reaction mechanisms between high and low-LET in recent advancements and applications of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mahnaz; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Gifford, Ian; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Differences among the mechanisms of energy deposition by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, consisting of neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions on one hand, and low-LET radiation, exemplified by electron beam and gamma radiation on the other, are utilized in the selection of types of radiation used for specific applications. Thus, high-LET radiation is used for modification of carbon nanotubes, ion track grafting, and the synthesis of membranes and nanowires, as well as for characterization of materials by means of neutron scattering. Recent applications of low-LET irradiation include minimization of radiolytic degradation upon sterilization of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), radiolytic synthesis of nanogels for drug delivery systems, grafting of polymers in the synthesis of adsorbents for uranium from seawater, and reductive remediation of PCBs.1

  13. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  14. High energy density lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Aifantis, Katerina E; Kumar, R Vasant

    2010-01-01

    Cell phones, portable computers and other electronic devices crucially depend on reliable, compact yet powerful batteries. Therefore, intensive research is devoted to improving performance and reducing failure rates. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries promise significant advancement and high application potential for hybrid vehicles, biomedical devices, and everyday appliances. This monograph provides special focus on the methods and approaches for enhancing the performance of next-generation batteries through the use of nanotechnology. Deeper understanding of the mechanisms and strategies is

  15. The development of advanced robotics technology in high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jaiwan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Jin Suk; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Moon, Byung Soo

    1997-07-01

    In the tele-operation technology using tele-presence in high radiation environment, stereo vision target tracking by centroid method, vergence control of stereo camera by moving vector method, stereo observing system by correlation method, horizontal moving axis stereo camera, and 3 dimensional information acquisition by stereo image is developed. Also, gesture image acquisition by computer vision and construction of virtual environment for remote work in nuclear power plant. In the development of intelligent control and monitoring technology for tele-robot in hazardous environment, the characteristics and principle of robot operation. And, robot end-effector tracking algorithm by centroid method and neural network method are developed for the observation and survey in hazardous environment. 3-dimensional information acquisition algorithm by structured light is developed. In the development of radiation hardened sensor technology, radiation-hardened camera module is designed and tested. And radiation characteristics of electric components is robot system is evaluated. Also 2-dimensional radiation monitoring system is developed. These advanced critical robot technology and telepresence techniques developed in this project can be applied to nozzle-dam installation /removal robot system, can be used to realize unmanned remotelization of nozzle-dam installation / removal task in steam generator of nuclear power plant, which can be contributed for people involved in extremely hazardous high radioactivity area to eliminate their exposure to radiation, enhance their task safety, and raise their working efficiency. (author). 75 refs., 21 tabs., 15 figs.

  16. Effect Of Feedback On The Escape Of Ionizing Radiation From High-Z Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebitsch, Maxime; Blaizot, Jérémy; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-06-01

    Quantifying how much of the ionizing radiation produced in high-redshift galaxies escapes in the IGM is one of the main challenges in understanding the sources of reionization. We investigate the radiative properties of simulated low mass galaxies (halos of a few 109 Msun at z=6), where radiation is modelled on-the-fly, and different sources of feedback (from stars and AGN) are included. Using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations performed with Ramses-RT we study how the energy and momentum input from supernovae and black hole activity modulates the properties of the interstellar medium and therefore how, and how many, photons can escape from the galaxy. I will present simulations showing (Trebitsch et al. 2017, https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00941) that stellar feedback has a pivotal role in regulating the escape fraction in dwarf galaxies. Supernovae carve holes in the gas distribution, through which ionizing photons can escape.

  17. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose that high-power electron beam from such an industrial linac can first pass through an undulator to generate useful terahertz (THz) radiation, and the spent electron beam coming out of the undulator can still be used for the intended industrial applications. This will enhance the utilization of a high-power industrial ...

  18. Colloquium: Multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ando, S.; Baret, B.; Bartos, I.; Bouhou, B.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Corsi, A.; Di Palma, I.; Dietz, A.; Donzaud, C.; Eichler, D.; Finley, C.; Guetta, D.; Halzen, F.; Jones, G.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kotake, K.; Kouchner, A.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Moscoso, L.; Papa, M.A.; Piran, T.; Pradier, T.; Romero, G.E.; Sutton, P.; Thrane, E.; van Elewyck, V.; Waxman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves and high-energy cosmic radiation, including photons, hadrons, and presumably also neutrinos. Both gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN) are cosmic

  19. PREFACE: International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects (EFRE-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects 2014 (EFRE 2014) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 21-26, 2014. The organizers of the Congress were the Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS and Tomsk Polytechnic University. EFRE 2014 combines three international conferences which are regularly held in Tomsk, Russia: the 18th International Symposium on High-Current Electronics (18th SHCE), the 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows (12th CMM) and the 16th International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter (16th RPC). The International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter is a traditional representative forum devoted to the discussion of the fundamental problems of physical and chemical non-linear processes in condensed matter (mainly inorganic dielectrics) under the action of particle and photon beams of all types including pulsed power laser radiation. The International Symposium on High-Current Electronics is held biannually in Tomsk, Russia. The program of the conferences covers a wide range of scientific and technical areas including pulsed power technology, ion and electron beams, high-power microwaves, plasma and particle beam sources, modification of materials, and pulsed power applications in chemistry, biology and medicine. The 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows is devoted to the discussion of the fundamental and applied issues in the field of modification of materials properties with particle beams and plasma flows. The six-day Congress brought together more than 250 specialists and scientists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussion on the topics of interest. The proceedings were edited by Victor Lisitsyn, Vladimir

  20. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene as a base material for shielding cosmic radiation in aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marlon A., E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Fisica Aplicada; Goncalez, Odair L. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (PG/CTE/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias Espaciais

    2013-07-01

    Materials with high content of hydrogen have good properties of shielding against the effects of cosmic rays (CR) because are less effective than materials with high nuclear masses in the generation of secondary radiation. Beside the Aluminum, Polyethylene has been used as a reference and as a base material for composites applied in structures and in shielding of ionizing radiation for aerospace applications. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), pure and doped 10% by mass with cadmium chloride, had its shielding properties for CR evaluated in this paper. Methodology used was based in conventional radioactive sources employed on simple geometries experiments and then computational simulation for isotropic fluxes of cosmic-ray high energy particles. Transmission experiments were performed with a3.7GBq (100 mCi){sup 241}Am-Be neutron source and a set of conventional calibration gamma radiation sources. Samples were characterized according to their gamma total attenuation coefficients from 59 to 1,408 keV, dose deposition curve for {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, fast neutron transmission coefficient, generation and self-absorption of thermal neutrons as well as their generation of internal cascades of secondary electrons and gamma-rays by nuclear interactions of fast neutrons with shielding material. Main effects of the additive in the polyethylene base were the most effective removal of gamma radiation and of secondary electrons with energies below 200 keV, the reduction of the albedo as well as the thermal neutrons transmission. Dose reduction due to primary CR were not significant, since the largest contribution to the doses due to high energy ionizing particles transmitted and, also, due to secondary radiation with energy above 1 MeV produced in shielding. (author)

  1. New Materials for Vacuum Chambers in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum chambers must fulfil ultra-high vacuum requirements while withstanding thermo-mechanical loads. This is particularly true in high energy particle accelerator where interactions of particles with matter may induce thermal load, material activation, background… The choice of the material of the vacuum chamber is crucial for the final application. Metals such as stainless steel, copper and aluminium are usually used. Even with outstanding mechanical and physical properties, beryllium is used for very specific applications because of its cost and toxicity.Ceramics such as alumina are usually used for fast magnet vacuum chambers. With the next generation of high energy physics accelerator generation such as CLIC and TLEP, the problematic of high cyclic thermal load induced by synchrotron radiation is raised. This paper aims at defining some figures of merit of different materials with respect to several load scenarios and presents briefly their vacuum compatibility.

  2. Single event effects in high-energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alía, Rubén; Brugger, Markus; Danzeca, Salvatore; Cerutti, Francesco; de Carvalho Saraiva, Joao Pedro; Denz, Reiner; Ferrari, Alfredo; Foro, Lionel L.; Peronnard, Paul; Røed, Ketil; Secondo, Raffaello; Steckert, Jens; Thurel, Yves; Toccafondo, Iacocpo; Uznanski, Slawosz

    2017-03-01

    The radiation environment encountered at high-energy hadron accelerators strongly differs from the environment relevant for space applications. The mixed-field expected at modern accelerators is composed of charged and neutral hadrons (protons, pions, kaons and neutrons), photons, electrons, positrons and muons, ranging from very low (thermal) energies up to the TeV range. This complex field, which is extensively simulated by Monte Carlo codes (e.g. FLUKA) is due to beam losses in the experimental areas, distributed along the machine (e.g. collimation points) and deriving from the interaction with the residual gas inside the beam pipe. The resulting intensity, energy distribution and proportion of the different particles largely depends on the distance and angle with respect to the interaction point as well as the amount of installed shielding material. Electronics operating in the vicinity of the accelerator will therefore be subject to both cumulative damage from radiation (total ionizing dose, displacement damage) as well as single event effects which can seriously compromise the operation of the machine. This, combined with the extensive use of commercial-off-the-shelf components due to budget, performance and availability reasons, results in the need to carefully characterize the response of the devices and systems to representative radiation conditions.

  3. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-radiative-efficiency Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yi; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and ...

  4. Study on Solar Radiation Models in South Korea for Improving Office Building Energy Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Han Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hourly global solar radiation in a weather file is one of the significant parameters for improving building energy performance analyses using simulation programs. However, most weather stations worldwide are not equipped with solar radiation sensors because they tend to be difficult to manage. In South Korea, only twenty-two out of ninety-two weather stations are equipped with sensors, and there are large areas not equipped with any sensors. Thus, solar radiation must often be calculated by reliable solar models. Hence, it is important to find a reliable model that can be applied in the wide variety of weather conditions seen in South Korea. In this study, solar radiation in the southeastern part of South Korea was calculated using three solar models: cloud-cover radiation model (CRM, Zhang and Huang model (ZHM, and meteorological radiation model (MRM. These values were then compared to measured solar radiation data. After that, the calculated solar radiation data from the three solar models were used in a building energy simulation for an office building with various window characteristics conditions, in order to identify how solar radiation differences affect building energy performance. It was found that a seasonal solar model for the area should be developed to improve building energy performance analysis.

  5. Biological effects of high-energy neutrons measured in vivo using a vertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Wendy W; Gersey, Brad B; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S

    2009-10-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0-0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0-15 Gy of reference gamma radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference gamma radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6-40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0-66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure.

  6. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Lee [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Greenwood, Zeno [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Wobisch, Marcus [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  7. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  8. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  9. MARIACHI - Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Helio

    2006-04-01

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with energies in excess of 10^20eV (100 EeV) have been detected by several experiments. They present a conundrum whose solution may provide insight into the origins and evolution of the universe. There are no known sources within our galaxy or those close to us that could accelerate particles to these almost macroscopic energies, and yet the turn-on of pion production through the interactions of high energy charged particles with the 2.7K microwave background provides a strong limit for propagation from greater distances. The detection of UHECR to date has been accomplished either by detection of the particles from the extensive air showers by ground arrays or by means of detection of the light produced by the EAS in the atmosphere from Cerenkov radiation. MARIACHI (Mixed Apparatus for Radar Investigation of Cosmic-rays of High Ionization) is an innovative concept that will explore the detection of UHECR by bi-static radar using VHF transmitters. If successful, the MARIACHI technique will allow for detection of UHECR economically over much larger areas than currently possible, and might provide for detection of the associated ultra high energy neutrino flux. MARIACHI is also innovative in that ground array detectors that will initially confirm the radio signals are scintillator arrays to be built and operated by high school students and teachers. We will present the present status of the experiment.

  10. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  11. Capacitance-Voltage Study on the Effects of Low Energy Electron Radiation on Al(0.27)Ga(0.73)N/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jarzen, Thomas D

    2005-01-01

    The effects of radiation on semiconductors are extremely important to the Department of Defense since the majority of the defense informational, navigational and communications systems are now satellite-based...

  12. High-energy particles. [in Jovian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, A. W.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the magnetosphere of Jupiter is in many respects quite different from that of the earth. The energy required to drive the Jovian magnetosphere is apparently extracted from Jupiter's rotational energy rather than from the solar wind. Jupiter is a strong source of energetic charged particles which can be detected as far away as the orbit of Mercury. The structure and dynamics of the energetic particle distribution in the inner magnetosphere is discussed, taking into account observations, transport and losses in the inner magnetosphere, satellite interactions, and electron synchrotron radiation. The subsolar hemisphere is considered, giving attention to particle fluxes in the subsolar magnetosphere, conditions in the middle magnetosphere, and the characteristics of the outer magnetosphere. A description of the predawn magnetosphere is also provided.

  13. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  14. Studies In Theoretical High Energy Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keung, Wai Yee [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This is a final technical report for grant no. DE-SC0007948 describing research activities in theoretical high energy physics at University of Illinois at Chicago for the whole grant period from July 1, 2012 to March 31, 2017.

  15. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  16. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  17. 1570 nm High Energy Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all features of...

  18. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  19. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  20. Diffractometer for high energy X-rays at the APS

    CERN Document Server

    Rütt, U; Strempfer, J; Jennings, G; Kurtz, C; Montano, P A

    2001-01-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) has designed and built a diffractometer specialized for high energy synchrotron radiation (E>60 keV) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The diffractometer, which is installed at the elliptical multipole wiggler, uses linearly polarized light (U. Ruett et al., Proc. SPIE 3348 (1998) 132.). The instrument is a triple-axis diffractometer allowing high resolution measurement in two dimensions of the reciprocal space. As opposed to the other diffractometers for high photon energies at HASYLAB (Germany) and ESRF (France) (R. Bouchard et al., 5 (1998) 90; K.-D. Liss et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 5 (1998) 82), this diffractometer utilizes the vertical scattering plane to take full advantage of the small vertical divergence of the beam and to allow horizontal focusing of the broad beam from the wiggler without disturbing the resolution of the instrument. The instrument is designed to carry heavy sample equipment up to a weight of 200 kg, while maintaining...

  1. European School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The European School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young experimental and phenomenological physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lecture notes on the Standard Model of electroweak interactions, Monte Carlo generators, relativistic heavy-ion physics, the flavour dynamics and CP violation in the Standard Model, cosmology, and high-energy neutrino astronomy with IceCube.

  2. Future of high energy physics some aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Prokofiev, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises 26 carefully edited articles with well-referenced and up-to-date material written by many of the leading experts. These articles originated from presentations and dialogues at the second HKUST Institute for Advanced Study Program on High Energy Physics are organized into three aspects, Theory, Accelerator, and Experiment, focusing on in-depth analyses and technical aspects that are essential for the developments and expectations for the future high energy physics.

  3. New developments in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the important developments in the field of high energy physics are reviewed. Starting from the status of knowledge of the structure of matter the details of experiments leading to the discovery of charmed particles and psi resonances are emphasized. Also some of the areas of activity of the Indiana University High Energy group are reviewed and related to the principal unsolved problems in the field. (JFP)

  4. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  5. Institute for High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Alan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-01-13

    The project objective was for the Institute of High Energy Density Science (IHEDS) at the University of Texas at Austin to help grow the High Energy Density (HED) science community, by connecting academia with the Z Facility (Z) and associated staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). IHEDS was originally motivated by common interests and complementary capabilities at SNL and the University of Texas System (UTX), in 2008.

  6. Beam Energy Considerations for Gold Nano-Particle Enhanced Radiation Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, F Van den; Nuyts, S

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A novel approach using nano technology enhanced radiation modalities is investigated. The proposed methodology uses antibodies labeled with organically inert metals with a high atomic number. Irradiation using photons with energies in the kilo--electron volt (keV) range show an increase in dose due to a combination of an increase in photo-electric interactions and a pronounced generation of Auger and/or Coster-Kronig (A-CK) electrons. Methods: The dependency of the dose deposition on various factors is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation models. The factors investigated include: agent concentration, spectral dependency looking at mono--energetic sources as well as classical bremsstrahlung sources. The optimization of the energy spectrum is performed in terms of physical dose enhancement as well as the dose deposited by Auger and/or Coster-Kronig electrons and their biological effectiveness. Results: A quasi-linear dependency on concentration and an exponential decrease within the target medium ...

  7. Fundamentals of high energy electron beam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turman, B. N.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Neau, E. L.

    High energy electron beam accelerator technology has been developed over the past three decades in response to military and energy-related requirements for weapons simulators, directed-energy weapons, and inertially-confined fusion. These applications required high instantaneous power, large beam energy, high accelerated particle energy, and high current. These accelerators are generally referred to as 'pulsed power' devices, and are typified by accelerating potential of millions of volts (MV), beam current in thousands of amperes (KA), pulse duration of tens to hundreds of nanoseconds, kilojoules of beam energy, and instantaneous power of gigawatts to teffawatts (10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) watts). Much of the early development work was directed toward single pulse machines, but recent work has extended these pulsed power devices to continuously repetitive applications. These relativistic beams penetrate deeply into materials, with stopping range on the order of a centimeter. Such high instantaneous power deposited in depth offers possibilities for new material fabrication and processing capabilities that can only now be explored. Fundamental techniques of pulse compression, high voltage requirements, beam generation and transport under space-charge-dominated conditions will be discussed in this paper.

  8. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Karen Salomé Caballero

    2016-01-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray, gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (up to $10^{20}$ eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  9. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé Caballero Mora, Karen

    2016-10-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray (CR), gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (UHECR ∼ 1020 eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  10. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, M.T.

    2015-05-22

    The origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above E > 10 17 eV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. This is a written version of a series of lectures devoted to UHECR at the 2013 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics. We present anintroduction to acceleration mechanisms of charged particles to the highest energies in astrophysical objects, their propagation from the sources to Earth, and the experimental techniques for their detection. We also discuss some of the relevant observational results from Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators.

  11. Progress toward high energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergei Nagaitsev

    2001-07-20

    All electron cooling systems in operation to date can be classified as low energy systems. The electron beam kinetic energy in such a system is limited to about 0.6-1 MeV by the use of a conventional commercial Cockcroft-Walton high-voltage power supply. This, in turn, bounds the maximum ion kinetic energy, accessible for cooling with today's standard technology, to about 2 GeV/nucleon (about a factor of 2-3 times higher than the electron systems in operation today). Electron cooling systems with kinetic energies above 1 MeV could provide economically justifiable improvements in the performance of many existing and proposed accelerator complexes, such as RHIC, Tevatron and HERA. This paper reviews the status of the development of the technology needed for high energy electron cooling.

  12. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O 2 , temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, E k , i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  13. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  14. High-dose radiation sensor with wireless optical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapkiewicz, Paweł; Augustyniak, Izabela; Sareło, Katarzyna; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We present a miniature silicon-glass MEMS sensor for measurement of high doses of ionizing radiation (above 10 kGy) using a novel wireless optical detection method. The radiation sensor is a miniaturized version of the so-called hydrogen dosimeter. An amount of high-density polyethylene, located inside the MEMS sensor, degrades under ionizing radiation, releasing gaseous hydrogen. The increasing pressure deflects the thin silicon membrane. The sensor’s destructive and proportional modes of work are also proposed. In the destructive mode, sensors provide in situ information on excessive and discrete levels of radiation. The optical detection method is based on an optical head consisting of a moving membrane and a silicon screen with a matrix of micro-holes. Laser light is reflected from the membrane and scattered when the membrane is deflected, in the process illuminating the holes on the silicon screen. The number of illuminated holes is a function of the degree of membrane deflection; the transformation of the holes to the deflection allows for the calculation of pressure and eventually the dose of ionizing radiation.

  15. Radiation from relativistic jets in blazars and the efficient dissipation of their bulk energy via photon breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Boris E.; Poutanen, Juri

    2008-02-01

    High-energy photons propagating in the magnetized medium with large velocity gradients can mediate energy and momentum exchange. Conversion of these photons into electron-positron pairs in the field of soft photons with the consequent isotropization and emission of new high-energy photons by Compton scattering can lead to the runaway cascade of the high-energy photons and electron-positron pairs fed by the bulk energy of the flow. This is the essence of the photon breeding mechanism. We study the problem of high-energy emission of relativistic jets in blazars via photon breeding mechanism using 2D ballistic model for the jet with the detailed treatment of particle propagation and interactions. Our numerical simulations from first principles demonstrate that a jet propagating in the soft radiation field of broad emission-line region can convert a significant fraction (up to 80 per cent) of its total power into radiation. We show that the gamma-ray background of similar energy density as observed at Earth is sufficient to trigger the photon breeding. The considered mechanism produces a population of high-energy leptons and, therefore, alleviates the need for Fermi-type particle acceleration models in relativistic flows. The mechanism reproduces basic spectral features observed in blazars including the blazar sequence (shift of spectral peaks towards lower energies with increasing luminosity). The significant deceleration of the jet at subparsec scales and the transversal gradient of the Lorentz factor (so-called structured jet) predicted by the model reconcile the discrepancy between the high Doppler factors determined by the fits to the spectra of TeV blazars and the low apparent velocities observed at very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scales. The mechanism produces significantly broader angular distribution of radiation than that predicted by a simple model assuming the isotropic emission in the jet frame. This helps to reconcile the observed statistics and

  16. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from MODIS observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J.; van der Werf, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate near real time fire emissions estimates are required for air quality forecasts. To date, most approaches are based on satellite-derived estimates of fire radiative power (FRP), which can be converted to fire radiative energy (FRE) which is directly related to fire emissions. Uncertainties

  17. Cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of zonal available potential energy (APE) by cloud radiative heating is discussed. The APE concept was mathematically formulated by Lorenz (1955) as a measure of the maximum amount of total potential energy that is available for conversion by adiabatic processes to kinetic energy. The rate of change of APE is the rate of the generation of APE minus the rate of conversion between potential and kinetic energy. By radiative transfer calculations, a mean cloud-generated radiative heating for a well defined set of cloud classes is derived as a function of cloud optical thickness. The formulation is suitable for using a general cloud parameter data set and has the advantage of taking into account nonlinearities between the microphysical and macrophysical cloud properties and the related radiation field.

  18. A Unified Model of High-Energy Astrophysical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    I outline a unified model of high-energy astrophysics, in which the gamma background radiation, cluster "cooling flows", gamma-ray bursts, X-ray flashes and cosmic-ray electrons and nuclei of all energies -share a common origin. The mechanism underlying these phenomena is the emission of relativistic "cannonballs" by ordinary supernovae, analogous to the observed ejection of plasmoids by quasars and microquasars. I concentrate on Cosmic Rays: the longest-lasting conundrum in astrophysics. The distribution of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy, their total "luminosity", the broken power-law spectra with their observed slopes, the position of the knee(s) and ankle(s), and the alleged variations of composition with energy are all explained in terms of simple and "standard" physics. The model is only lacking a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the "cannon" that emits the cannonballs in catastrophic episodes of accretion onto a compact object.

  19. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  20. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of (222)Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  1. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case–control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case–control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors. PMID:19454802

  2. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkaline. Stored energy, thermoluminescence and coloration; Aniquilacion termica de dano inducido por irradiacion a altas dosis en haluros alcalinos a 300 k. energia almacenda. Termoluminiscencia y coloracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, L.

    1980-07-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminescence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminescence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KC1 samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose.Capacity of alkali halides to store energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. (Author) 51 refs.

  3. High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mano Misra

    2010-05-07

    Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 ºC. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011Ω-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 μCi), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the

  4. White Beam, X-Ray, Energy-Dispersive Diffractometry using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif; Buras, B.; Olsen, J. Staun

    1978-01-01

    The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY.......The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY....

  5. Implantation of keV-energy argon clusters and radiation damage in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We show that for impacting argon clusters, both mean projected ranges of the constituents and depths of radiation damage in diamond scale linearly with momentum. The same dependence was earlier found for keV-energy cluster implantation in graphite, thus suggesting the universality of this scaling...... law. For diamond, a good agreement for the value of displacement energy for the case of cluster impact is found by comparing the calculated target sputtering and experimentally measured depth of radiation damage....

  6. ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dr. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources, the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE, serving  two free electron lasers, sources for intense coherent THz radiation, mono-energetic positrons, electrons, γ-rays, a neutron time-of-flight system as well as two synchronized ultra-short pulsed Petawatt laser systems are collocated. The characteristics of these beams make the ELBE center a unique research instrument for a variety of external users in fields ranging from material science over nuclear physics to cancer research, as well as scientists of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR.

  7. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  8. 5th International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrala, G.A

    2005-01-01

    During the past several years, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Research is underway in many areas, such as compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiation flow, radiative shocks and jets, complex opacities, equations o fstat, and relativistic plasmas. Beyond this current research and the papers it is producing, plans are being made for the application, to astrophysics-relevant research, of the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the 600 kj Ligne d'Intergration Laser (LIL) and the 2 MJ Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux, France; petawatt-range lasers now under construction around the world; and current and future Z pinches. The goal of this conference and these proceedings is to continue focusing and attention on this emerging research area. The conference brought together different scientists interested in this emerging new fi...

  9. Radiation damage limitations for the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanger, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    One important factor determining the lifetime of particle accelerators using superconducting magnets is the accumulated radiation damage of the magnet components. Using existing damage studies and a measured correlation between the radiation levels with the beam-off and the beam-on, a reasonable assessment of magnet lifetimes can be made. On the basis of this assessment it is expected that damage to the magnet conductor will not limit the magnet performance. The proper choice of polymeric materials used in the magnet is necessary to avoid frequent refurbishing of the magnets.

  10. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex with low energy accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Emdadul; Makuuchi, Keizo; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Mitomo, Hiroshi [Gunma Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL) with the recently installed electron beam (EB) pilot plant at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Takasaki, Japan has been discussed. The accelerating voltage and beam current of the plant are 250 kV and 10 mA respectively. The plant has a reaction vessel with the capacity of 18 liters latex to irradiate at a time. In order to obtain a suitable setting of experimental for RVNRL under EB of the plant the parameters such as irradiation time, defoamer concentration, volume of latex, beam current etc. are being optimized by varying the individual parameter at a constant set of the other variables. (author)

  11. Lightweight Damage Tolerant, High-Temperature Radiators for Nuclear Power and Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Paul D.; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is increasingly emphasizing exploration to bodies beyond near-Earth orbit. New propulsion systems and new spacecraft are being built for these missions. As the target bodies get further out from Earth, high energy density systems, e.g., nuclear fusion, for propulsion and power will be advantageous. The mass and size of these systems, including supporting systems such as the heat exchange system, including thermal radiators, will need to be as small as possible. Conventional heat exchange systems are a significant portion of the total thermal management mass and size. Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is a promising option for high-speed, in-space travel due to the high energy density of nuclear fission power sources and efficient electric thrusters. Heat from the reactor is converted to power for use in propulsion or for system power. The heat not used in the power conversion is then radiated to space as shown in figure 1. Advanced power conversion technologies will require high operating temperatures and would benefit from lightweight radiator materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion systems. Pitch-based carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in operating temperature, thermal conductivity, and mass. These properties combine to allow significant decreases in the total mass of the radiators and significant increases in the operating temperature of the fins. A Center-funded project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has shown that high thermal conductivity, woven carbon fiber fins with no matrix material, can be used to dissipate waste heat from NEP systems and because of high specific power (kW/kg), will require less mass and possibly less total area than standard metal and composite radiator fins for radiating the same amount of heat. This project uses an innovative approach to reduce the mass and size required for the thermal radiators to the point that in-space NEP and power

  12. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Li, Huiyun [Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest–Shamir–Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  13. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang; Li, Huiyun

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  14. [Protection of cadaver tissues exposed to high gamma radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Flores-Fletes, J R; Carrillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is the most widely used tissue for the treatment of various conditions. As a result of this, allografts are used at an increasing frequency and processes for their harvest, preservation and sterilization have improved. The sterilization method that grants the greatest sterilization is high-dose gamma radiation, which destroys prions and any microorganism thus assuring that patients will not experience any infection. But given that radiation use has proven to deteriorate bone and tendon tissue, efforts have been made to protect the latter. One way to do this is a commercially available substance called Clearant. Studies conducted elsewhere have found that it does protect bone and tendon tissue. This study was therefore conducted with allograft samples exposed to high-dose radiation. Its purpose was to assess, with photon microscopy using various dyes and electron microscopy, the presence of color changes as well as the destruction of the anatomical structure. The same tissue was followed-up throughout the process until it was placed in the patient. The review found no structural changes in bone and tendon tissues exposed to high radiation doses (60 kilograys) when the Clearant process was used, and concluded that the former may be used safely in orthopedic or traumatologic diseases.

  15. Radiation and energy balance dynamics over young chir pine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Net short wave and long wave radiative fluxes substantially varied with cloud dynamics, season, rainfall induced surface wetness, and green growth. The study clearly brought out the intimate link of albedo dynamics in chir pine system with dynamics of leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture, and changes in understory ...

  16. Radiation exchange between persons and surfaces for building energy simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorre, Mette Havgaard; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Dreau, Jerome Le

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiation within buildings is a significant component of thermal comfort. Typically the methods applied for calculating view factors between a person and its building surfaces requires great computational time. This research developed a view factor calculation method suitable for building...

  17. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  18. STACKING FAULT ENERGY IN HIGH MANGANESE ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mazancová

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Stacking fault energy of high manganese alloys (marked as TWIP and TRIPLEX is an important parameter determining deformation mechanism type realized in above mentioned alloys. Stacking fault energy level can be asserted with a gliding of partial and/or full dislocations, b gliding mechanism and twinning deformation process in connection with increasing of fracture deformation level (deformation elongation and with increasing of simultaneously realized work hardening proces., c gliding mechanism and deformation induced e-martensite formation. In contribution calculated stacking fault energies are presented for various chemical compositions of high manganese alloys. Stacking fault energy dependences on manganese, carbon, iron and alluminium contents are presented. Results are confronted with some accessible papers.The aim of work is to deepen knowledge of presented data. The TWIP and TRIPLEX alloys can be held for promissing new automotive materials.

  19. Opportunities for high wind energy penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, J.O.; Hansen, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Wind power is today a mature technology, which at windy locations, is economically competitive to conventional power generation technologies. This and growing global environmental concerns have led governments to encourage and plan for wind energy development, a typical aim being 10% of electricity...... consumption. The successful operation of the three major power systems of Cape Verde, with a total wind energy penetration of about 15% since December 1994, demonstrates that power systems can be operated with high penetration of wind energy by adding simple control and monitoring systems only. Thorough...... analyses conclude that expanding to even above 15% wind energy penetration in the Cape Verde power systems is economical. Worldwide, numerous locations with favorable wind conditions and power systems similar to the Capeverdean provide good opportunities for installing wind farms and achieving high wind...

  20. The effectiveness of the microbiological radiation decontamination process of agricultural products with the use of low energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryczka, Urszula; Migdał, Wojciech; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-02-01

    The effectiveness of the radiation decontamination process was tested for electron beam of energy 200 keV and 300 keV. The energy of electrons was controlled by the measurements of its penetration ability in stack of B3 dosimetric film. In the presented work, the reduction of total aerobic bacteria count was observed, depending on time of irradiation for samples of dried black pepper, onion flakes and bay leaves. The results were compared with the effect observed for the process where high energy electron beam was used.

  1. Effects of the Effect of Ultra High Frequency Mobile Phone Radiation on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mosa; Naghdi, Nasrollah; Hemmati, Hamidreza; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Bahmani, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Public and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields due to the growing trend of electronic devices may cause adverse effects on human health. This paper describes the risk of mutation and sexual trauma and infertility in masculine sexual cell by mobile phone radiations. In this study, we measured the emitted dose from a radiofrequency device, such as switching high voltage at different frequencies using a scintillation detector. The switching high voltage power supply (HVPS) was built for the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. For radiation dosimetry, we used an ALNOR scintillator that can measure gamma radiation. The simulation was performed by MATLAB software, and data from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were used to verify the simulation. We investigated the risks that result from the waves, according to a report by International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), to every organ of the body is defined by the beam and electromagnetic radiation from this electronic device on people. The results showed that the maximum personal dose over a 15-min period working at the mentioned HVPS did not exceed 0.31 μSV/h (with an aluminum shield). So, according to other sources of radiation, continuous working time of the system should not be more than 10 hours. Finally, a characteristic curve for secure working with modules at different frequencies was reported. The RF input signal to the body for maximum penetration depth (δ) and electromagnetic energy absorption rate (SAR) of biological tissue were obtained for each tissue. The results of this study and International Commission of Non Ionization Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reports showed the people who spend more than 50 minutes a day using a cell phone could have early dementia or other thermal damage due to the burning of glucose in the brain.

  2. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energ...

  3. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses; Energies, sante, medecine. Les faibles doses de rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  4. Effects of synchrotron radiation spectrum energy on polymethyl methacrylate photosensitivity to deep x-ray lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Mekaru, H; Hattori, T

    2003-01-01

    Since X-ray lithography requires a high photon flux to achieve deep resist exposure, a synchrotron radiation beam, which is not monochromatized, is generally used as a light source. If the synchrotron radiation beam is monochromatized, photon flux will decrease rapidly. Because of this reason, the wavelength dependence of the resist sensitivity has not been investigated for deep X-ray lithography. Measuring the spectrum of a white beam with a Si solid-state detector (SSD) is difficult because a white beam has a high intensity and an SSD has a high sensitivity. We were able to measure the spectrum and the photocurrent of a white beam from a beam line used for deep X-ray lithography by keeping the ring current below 0.05 mA. We evaluated the characteristics of the output beam based on the measured spectrum and photocurrent, and used them to investigate the relationship between the total exposure energy and the dose-processing depth with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). We found that it is possible to guess the p...

  5. Portable meter study of ionizing radiation Teletector in high rates of air kerma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damatto, Willian Behling; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: willbdamatto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established. Applied tests were: energy dependence and primarily overload with the new irradiation system. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs) and new calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. (author)

  6. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  7. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  8. Gravitational energy and radiation of a charged black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Luciano; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the energy configuration of a charged black hole in the teleparallel framework of general relativity. We obtain the energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field in a stationary frame, and we calculate its contribution to the total energy of the system. We study the same gravitational field measured by an accelerated frame and we analyze how the energy-momentum tensor is transformed. We found that in the accelerated frame, a Poynting-like flux appears for the gravitational field but not for the electromagnetic field.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to a mixed beam of low energy neutrons and gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, A; Obe, G; Lisowska, H; Czub, J; Nievaart, V; Moss, R; Huiskamp, R; Sauerwein, W

    2012-09-01

    Cells exposed to thermal neutrons are simultaneously damaged by radiations with high and low linear energy transfer (LET). A question relevant for the assessment of risk of exposure to a mixed beam is whether the biological effect of both radiation types is additive or synergistic. The aim of the present investigation was to calculate whether the high and low LET components of a thermal neutron field interact when damaging cells. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to neutrons from the HB11 beam at the Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten, Netherlands, in a 37 °C water phantom at varying depths, where the mix of high and low LET beam components differs. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values as well as the expected contributions of protons and photons to the aberration yield were calculated based on a dose response of aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation. The RBE for 10 dicentrics per 100 cells was 3 for mixed beam and 7.2 for protons. For 20 dicentrics per 100 cells the respective values were 2.4 and 5.8. Within the limitations of the experimental setup the results indicate that for this endpoint there is no synergism between the high and low LET radiations.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  11. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...... it is important that the corresponding divergences in the parton shower are subtracted, keeping only the collinear parts. We present a novel, shower-independent method for achieving this, enabling us to generate fully exclusive and hadronized events with multiple hard jets, in hadronic collisions. We discuss...

  12. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  13. The development of gamma energy identify algorithm for compact radiation sensors using stepwise refinement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun Jun [Div. of Radiation Regulation, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Hyun Duk; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Dept. of of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    A gamma energy identifying algorithm using spectral decomposition combined with smoothing method was suggested to confirm the existence of the artificial radio isotopes. The algorithm is composed by original pattern recognition method and smoothing method to enhance the performance to identify gamma energy of radiation sensors that have low energy resolution. The gamma energy identifying algorithm for the compact radiation sensor is a three-step of refinement process. Firstly, the magnitude set is calculated by the original spectral decomposition. Secondly, the magnitude of modeling error in the magnitude set is reduced by the smoothing method. Thirdly, the expected gamma energy is finally decided based on the enhanced magnitude set as a result of the spectral decomposition with the smoothing method. The algorithm was optimized for the designed radiation sensor composed of a CsI (Tl) scintillator and a silicon pin diode. The two performance parameters used to estimate the algorithm are the accuracy of expected gamma energy and the number of repeated calculations. The original gamma energy was accurately identified with the single energy of gamma radiation by adapting this modeling error reduction method. Also the average error decreased by half with the multi energies of gamma radiation in comparison to the original spectral decomposition. In addition, the number of repeated calculations also decreased by half even in low fluence conditions under 104 (/0.09 cm{sup 2} of the scintillator surface). Through the development of this algorithm, we have confirmed the possibility of developing a product that can identify artificial radionuclides nearby using inexpensive radiation sensors that are easy to use by the public. Therefore, it can contribute to reduce the anxiety of the public exposure by determining the presence of artificial radionuclides in the vicinity.

  14. Study of energy dependence of portable radiation monitors used for radiodiagnostic; Estudo da dependencia energetica de monitores portateis de radiacao usados em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the energy dependence of survey meters (ionization chambers) used for area monitoring in diagnostic Radiology systems. According to the norm ISO 4037-3 (series N, narrow beam) four radiation qualities were established, from 33 to 83 keV (medium energy) and half-value layers of 0,09 to 1,10 mm Cu. Such monitors are sent yearly to the Calibration Laboratory of Sao Paulo for the calibration. The tests were made initially at the gamma radiation fields of {sup 60} Co and after that at the ISO qualities established and the behavior of these instruments was analyzed. In the studied X radiation range most of the instruments presented around 50% of energy dependence, and in relation to the gamma radiation of {sup 60} co all instruments showed a very high energy dependence. (author) 3 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Near-Field Thermal Radiation for Solar Thermophotovoltaics and High Temperature Thermal Logic and Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzouka, Mahmoud

    This dissertation investigates Near-Field Thermal Radiation (NFTR) applied to MEMS-based concentrated solar thermophotovoltaics (STPV) energy conversion and thermal memory and logics. NFTR is the exchange of thermal radiation energy at nano/microscale; when separation between the hot and cold objects is less than dominant radiation wavelength (˜1 mum). NFTR is particularly of interest to the above applications due to its high rate of energy transfer, exceeding the blackbody limit by orders of magnitude, and its strong dependence on separation gap size, surface nano/microstructure and material properties. Concentrated STPV system converts solar radiation to electricity using heat as an intermediary through a thermally coupled absorber/emitter, which causes STPV to have one of the highest solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency limits (85.4%). Modeling of a near-field concentrated STPV microsystem is carried out to investigate the use of STPV based solid-state energy conversion as high power density MEMS power generator. Numerical results for In 0.18Ga0.82Sb PV cell illuminated with tungsten emitter showed significant enhancement in energy transfer, resulting in output power densities as high as 60 W/cm2; 30 times higher than the equivalent far-field power density. On thermal computing, this dissertation demonstrates near-field heat transfer enabled high temperature NanoThermoMechanical memory and logics. Unlike electronics, NanoThermoMechanical memory and logic devices use heat instead of electricity to record and process data; hence they can operate in harsh environments where electronics typically fail. NanoThermoMechanical devices achieve memory and thermal rectification functions through the coupling of near-field thermal radiation and thermal expansion in microstructures, resulting in nonlinear heat transfer between two temperature terminals. Numerical modeling of a conceptual NanoThermoMechanical is carried out; results include the dynamic response under

  16. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  17. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  18. High-energy Emission Components in the Short GRB 090510

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Alessandra; Guetta, Dafne; Piro, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the prompt and delayed emission observed in the short GRB 090510. We use the broadband data to test whether the most popular theoretical models for gamma-ray burst emission can accommodate the observations for this burst. We first attempt to explain the soft-to-hard spectral evolution associated with the delayed onset of a GeV tail with the hypothesis that the prompt burst and the high-energy tail both originate from a single process, namely, synchrotron emission from internal shocks (IS). Considerations on the compactness of the source imply that the high-energy tail should be produced in a late-emitted shell, characterized by a Lorentz factor greater than the one generating the prompt burst. However, in this hypothesis, the predicted evolution of the synchrotron peak frequency does not agree with the observed soft-to-hard evolution. Given the difficulties of a single-mechanism hypothesis, we test two alternative double-component scenarios. In the first, the prompt burst is explained as synchrotron radiation from IS and the high-energy emission (up to about 1 s following the trigger) as IS synchrotron-self-Compton. In the second scenario, in view of its long duration (~100 s), the high-energy tail is decoupled from the prompt burst and has an external shock origin. In this case, we show that a reasonable choice of parameters does indeed exist to accommodate the optical-to-GeV data, provided the Lorentz factor of the shocked shell is sufficiently high. Finally, we attempt to explain the chromatic break observed around ~103 s with a structured jet model. We find that this might be a viable explanation and that it lowers the high value of the burst energy derived by assuming isotropy, ~1053 erg, below ~1049 erg, which is more compatible with the energetics from a binary merger progenitor.

  19. High-energy, high-rate materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, H. L.; Bourell, D. L.; Eliezer, Z.; Persad, C.; Weldon, W.

    1987-12-01

    The increasingly available range of pulsed-power, high energy kinetic storage devices, such as low-inductance pulse-forming networks, compulsators, and homopolar generators, is presently considered as a basis for industrial high energy/high rate (HEHR) processing to accomplish shock hardening, drilling, rapid surface alloying and melting, welding and cutting, transformation hardening, and cladding and surface melting in metallic materials. Time-temperature-transformation concepts furnish the basis for a fundamental understanding of the potential advantages of this direct pulsed power processing. Attention is given to the HEHR processing of a refractory molybdenum alloy, a nickel-base metallic glass, tungsten, titanium aluminides, and metal-matrix composites.

  20. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, Gordon Andrew; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Dropinski, Steven Clark; Hanson, Donald L.; Johnson, William Arthur; York, Mathew William; Lewis, D.F. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Korde, R. (International Radiation Detectors, Torrance, CA); Haslett, C.L. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wall, D.L. (Resonetics, Nashua, New hampshire); Ruggles, Laurence E.; Ramirez, L.E. (ATK Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; McKenney, John Lee; Bryce, Edwin Anthony; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Torres, Jose A.; Mills, Jerry Alan; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Fehl, David Lee; Spielman, R. B. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Pyle, John H. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Ives, Harry Crockett, III (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM); Seamen, Johann F.; Simpson, Walter W.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total) energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP) diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38 x 38 square array of 10-{micro}m-diameter pinholes in a 50-{micro}m-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of {approx}1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999)RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode's output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation) the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and--on every shot--provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects) of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented.

  1. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Ives

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38×38 square array of 10-μm-diameter pinholes in a 50-μm-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of ∼1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode’s output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and—on every shot—provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented.

  2. A Gas Calorimeter for High-Energy Experiment and Study of High-Energy Cascade Shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Hitoshi [Tsukuba U.

    1984-01-01

    High energy behavior of the electromagnetic cascade shower has been studied. high energy showers were created by electron and hadron beams with energies between 25 GeV and 150 GeV at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The showers were observed by a shower detector consisting of multi-layer of lead plates and proportional chambers. The experimental results were analyzed with special emphasis on the fluctuation problem of the electromagnetic cascade shower....

  3. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  4. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  5. Progress in high-energy cosmic ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E.

    2018-01-01

    We review some of the recent progress in our knowledge about high-energy cosmic rays, with an emphasis on the interpretation of the different observational results. We discuss the effects that are relevant to shape the cosmic ray spectrum and the explanations proposed to account for its features and for the observed changes in composition. The physics of air-showers is summarized and we also present the results obtained on the proton-air cross section and on the muon content of the showers. We discuss the cosmic ray propagation through magnetic fields, the effects of diffusion and of magnetic lensing, the cosmic ray interactions with background radiation fields and the production of secondary neutrinos and photons. We also consider the cosmic ray anisotropies, both at large and small angular scales, presenting the results obtained from the TeV up to the highest energies and discuss the models proposed to explain their origin.

  6. LuAG:Ce fibers for high energy calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dujardin, C; Ledoux, G; Perrodin, D; Ovanesyan, K L; Amans, D; Abler, D; Petrosyan, A; Auffray, E; Mancini, C

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this contribution is to point out the potentialities of cerium doped LuAG single crystal as pixels and fibers. We first show that after optimization of growth conditions using Bridgman technology, this composition exhibits very good performances for scintillating applications (up to 26 000 photons/MeV). When grown with the micropulling down technology, fiber shapes can be obtained while the intrinsic performances are preserved. For the future high energy experiments requiring new detector concepts capable of delivering much richer informations about x- or gamma-ray energy deposition, unusual fiber shaped dense materials need to be developed. We demonstrate in this frame that cerium doped LuAG is a serious candidate for the next generation of ionizing radiation calorimeters. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. {[}doi: 10.1063/1.3452358

  7. A new gridded surface solar radiation dataset over Europe from the Global Energy Balance Archive: update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiacchio, M.; Arabini, E.; Wild, M.; Folini, D.

    2012-04-01

    The need for a gridded downward surface shortwave radiation (DSW) dataset from surface observations is important for the study of long-term changes as well as for the assessment of modeled and satellite-derived data of this radiative parameter. This will be accomplished by applying geostatistical techniques, such as ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting from distributed DSW station data over Europe from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) for the period 1965-2005, onto regular grids of different spatial resolutions. Though the dataset is comprised of stations that cover the globe, they are highly concentrated in Europe with a total of 437. However, only about 170 stations were available for our period of study. Quality control procedures have been applied to this dataset with a measurement random error of about 2% for the monthly mean. Such a low error allows this dataset to be highly useful for climate and validation studies. A number of studies have already been made on this subject in the past but would greatly benefit if a gridded database of DSW would exist, especially for a direct comparison to be made between modeled and satellite-derived data. After applying the ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting methods, an assessment could be made on their performance using cross validation techniques and a direct comparison to DSW station measurements from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Variogram modeling will also be performed including testing different model variograms to improve results. Overall it showed that ordinary kriging is the best method to estimate DSW with good precision and low biases and root mean square errors.

  8. High-Energy Physics: Exit America?

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Budget cuts and cancellations threaten to end U.S. exploration of the particle frontier. Fermilab's Tevatron, due to shut down around 200, could be the last large particle accelerator in the United States; the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva should ensure European dominance of high-energy physics (3 pages)

  9. Hard scattering in high-energy QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2000-01-01

    I review the recent results in the field of QCD at high energy presented to this Conference. In particular, I will concentrate on measurements of $\\as$ from studies of event structures and jet rates, jet production in hadronic collisions, and heavy quark production.

  10. Perspective in high energy physics instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, L. [INFN, Genoa (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    The discovery potential of the next generation of particle accelerators, and in particular of the large hadron collider (LHC), can only be fully exploited by very sophisticated particle detectors. The basics of detectors for momentum and energy measurement is here presented together with a recollection of recent developments which are relevant for use at high luminosity accelerators.

  11. Detecting ultra high energy neutrinos with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mevius, M.; Buitink, S.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J.; James, C. W.; McFadden, R.; Scholten, O.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; ter Veen, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NuMoon project aims to detect signals of Ultra High Energy (UHE) Cosmic Rays with radio telescopes on Earth using the Lunar Cherenkov technique at low frequencies (similar to 150 MHz). The advantage of using low frequencies is the much larger effective detecting volume, with as trade-off the

  12. Maximal Entanglement in High Energy Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervera-Lierta, Alba; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    We analyze how maximal entanglement is generated at the fundamental level in QED by studying correlations between helicity states in tree-level scattering processes at high energy. We demonstrate that two mechanisms for the generation of maximal entanglement are at work: i) $s$-channel processes

  13. High energy bosons do not propagate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkov, M.A., E-mail: Kurkov@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Lizzi, Fedele, E-mail: fedele.lizzi@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Vassilevich, Dmitri, E-mail: dvassil@gmail.com [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, S.P. (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    We discuss the propagation of bosons (scalars, gauge fields and gravitons) at high energy in the context of the spectral action. Using heat kernel techniques, we find that in the high-momentum limit the quadratic part of the action does not contain positive powers of the derivatives. We interpret this as the fact that the two-point Green functions vanish for nearby points, where the proximity scale is given by the inverse of the cutoff.

  14. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  15. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  16. Very high energy emission from passive supermassive black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedaletti, Giovanna

    2009-10-22

    The H.E.S.S. experiment, an array of four Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, widened the horizon of Very High Energy (VHE) astronomy. Its unprecedented sensitivity is well suited for the study of new classes of expected VHE emitters, such as passive galactic nuclei that are the main focus of the work presented in this thesis. Acceleration of particles up to Ultra High Energies is expected in the magnetosphere of supermassive black holes (SMBH). The radiation losses of these accelerated particles are expected to reach the VHE regime in which H.E.S.S. operates. Predicted fluxes exceed the sensitivity of the array. However, strong photon fields in the surrounding of the acceleration region might absorb the produced radiation. Therefore observations focus on those galactic nuclei that are underluminous at lower photon energies. This work presents data collected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes on the test candidate NGC 1399 and their interpretation. While no detection has been achieved, important constraints can be derived from the obtained upper limits on the maximum energy attainable by the accelerated particles and on the magnetic field strength in the acceleration region. A limit on the magnetic field of B < 74 Gauss is given. The limit is model dependent and a scaling of the result with the assumptions is given. This is the tightest empirical constraint to date. Because of the lack of signal from the test candidate, a stacking analysis has been performed on similar sources in three cluster fields. A search for signal from classes of active galactic nuclei has also been made in the same three fields. None of the analyzed samples revealed a significant signal. Also presented are the expectations for the next generation of Cherenkov Telescopes and an outlook on the relativistic effects expected on the VHE emission close to SMBH. (orig.)

  17. A Cosmological Model Based on a Quadratic Equation of State Unifying Vacuum Energy, Radiation, and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a cosmological model based on a quadratic equation of state (where is the Planck density and is the cosmological density “unifying” vacuum energy, radiation, and dark energy. For , it reduces to leading to a phase of early accelerated expansion (early inflation with a constant density equal to the Planck density  g/m3 (vacuum energy. For , we recover the equation of state of radiation . For , we get leading to a phase of late accelerated expansion (late inflation with a constant density equal to the cosmological density  g/m3 (dark energy. The temperature is determined by a generalized Stefan-Boltzmann law. We show a nice “symmetry” between the early universe (vacuum energy + radiation and the late universe (radiation + dark energy. In our model, they are described by two polytropic equations of state with index and respectively. Furthermore, the Planck density in the early universe plays a role similar to that of the cosmological density in the late universe. They represent fundamental upper and lower density bounds differing by 122 orders of magnitude. We add the contribution of baryonic matter and dark matter considered as independent species and obtain a simple cosmological model describing the whole evolution of the universe. We study the evolution of the scale factor, density, and temperature. This model gives the same results as the standard CDM model for , where is the Planck time and completes it by incorporating the phase of early inflation in a natural manner. Furthermore, this model does not present any singularity at and exists eternally in the past (although it may be incorrect to extrapolate the solution to the infinite past. Our study suggests that vacuum energy, radiation, and dark energy may be the manifestation of a unique form of “generalized radiation.” By contrast, the baryonic and dark matter components of the universe are treated as different species. This is at variance with usual models

  18. Subharmonic energy gap structure in the Josephson radiation at 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Levinsen, M. T.; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    1979-01-01

    Nonresonant detection of the Josephson radiation 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge is reported. The high frequency and the accuracy of these measurements lead to a new important observation: subharmonic energy gap structure in the detected integral power. The maximum integral po...... power measured was as large as 8×10−11 W. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  19. Photons as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays ?

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, O E; Semikoz, D V; Tkachev, Igor I

    2001-01-01

    We study spectra of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays assuming primaries are protons and photons, and that their sources are extragalactic. We assume power low for the injection spectra and take into account the influence of cosmic microwave, infrared, optical and radio backgrounds as well as extragalactic magnetic fields on propagation of primaries. Our additional free parameters are the maximum energy of injected particles and the distance to the nearest source. We find a parameter range where the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off is avoided.

  20. High Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    Emission at X-ray and gamma-ray energies has been detected from millisecond pulsars, both isolated and in binary systems. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, so that high-energy emission from these sources is not unexpected. In fact, several nearby energetic millisecond pulsars that have been detected in X-rays could easily have been detected in gamma-rays by EGRET, but they were not. The reason for this may lie in a high-energy spectrum that is very different in these sources from that of normal pulsars. Both polar cap and outer gap models predict a two-component spectrum, one component peaking in hard X-rays and the other peaking above 1 GeV, with a gap at EGRET peak sensitivity. I will discuss the models for high-energy emission from millisecond pulsars, highlighting the differences between polar cap and outer gap models in spectrum and geometry of the emission.

  1. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-03-31

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  2. Positron energy distributions from a hybrid positron source based on channeling radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadegan, B.; Mahdipour, A. [Hakim Sabzevari University, P.O. Box 397, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabagov, S.B. [INFN LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute and NRNU MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wagner, W., E-mail: w.wagner@hzdr.de [HZDR Dresden, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    A hybrid positron source which is based on the generation of channeling radiation by relativistic electrons channeled along different crystallographic planes and axes of a tungsten single crystal and subsequent conversion of radiation into e{sup +}e{sup −}-pairs in an amorphous tungsten target is described. The photon spectra of channeling radiation are calculated using the Doyle–Turner approximation for the continuum potentials and classical equations of motion for channeled particles to obtain their trajectories, velocities and accelerations. The spectral-angular distributions of channeling radiation are found applying classical electrodynamics. Finally, the conversion of radiation into e{sup +}e{sup −}-pairs and the energy distributions of positrons are simulated using the GEANT4 package.

  3. Radiation length imaging with high-resolution telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B.; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C.; Lütticke, F.

    2017-02-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length X/X0 profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the X/X0 imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of X/X0 imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of 100 million tracks at 4 GeV has been collected, which is sufficient to resolve complex material profiles on the 30 μm scale.

  4. High performance DNA separation media using synergistic radiation grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Schulte, Detlef E-mail: detlef.mueller2@post.rwth-aachen.de; Hodenius, Michel

    2002-03-01

    Simultaneous radiation grafting technique was carried out using 2-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate as monomer to introduce positively charged groups into polyethylene and polyamide microcarriers. Special selection of diverse solvents and comonomers like N-vinylpyrrolidone, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate leads to high grafting yields. The functionality of the cationic carriers were examined with regard to their DNA binding properties using a high molecular weight phage {lambda} DNA. Comparative examinations with commercial DNA and cationic separation gels revealed an up to 50% higher DNA binding capacity of the grafted carriers.

  5. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Smajo Sulejmanovic; Suad Kunosic; Ema Hankic

    2014-01-01

    This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to r...

  6. High energy high intensity coherent photon beam for the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    What is proposed for the 20 TeV protons hitting a fixed target is to make a tertiary electron beam similar to that which is the basis of the tagged photon beam at Fermilab. Briefly, a zero degree neutral beam is formed by sweeping out the primary proton beam and any secondary charged particles. Then the photons, from the decay of ..pi../sup 0/ in the neutral beam, are converted to e/sup +/e/sup -/ pairs in a lead converter and a high quality electron beam is formed. This beam is brought to the target area where it is converted to a photon beam by Bremsstrahlung in a radiator.

  7. Development of high effectiveness biomimetic materials by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nho, Youngchang; Lim, Younmook; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Jeong, Sungin; Jo, Seonyoung

    2013-09-15

    The aims of this project is to develop the high-performance biomedical new materials. In the 1{sup st} project, we have developed the polymer matrix for drug delivery systems (DDS) for mucosa membrane. We studied on the drug release behavior such as election of drug loading method for antibiotics, propolis and adrenocortic hormone valuation of drug release behavior. The oral DDS is to cure gingival disease as well as inflammation in mouth. It is expected that a new market will be created in the field of DDS for oral mucosa. The 2{sup nd} project, we have developed the multi-functional artificial skin for substitution of animal test such as toxicity, whitening, wrinkle improvement, skin for substitution and skin sensitivity by radiation. It is expected for the above development of biocompatible artificial skin model with good physical property by using radiation technique to be useful for the future biology, cosmetics and pharmaceutical research.

  8. Ultra High Fluence Radiation Monitoring Technology for the Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gorine, Georgi; Mandic, Igor; Jazbec, Anže; Snoj, Luka; Capeans, Mar; Moll, Michael; Bouvet, Didier; Ravotti, Federico; Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) is foreseen as the next generation ~100 km long synchrotron to be built in the Geneva area starting 2050. This machine is expected to reach an energy level of 100 TeV generating unprecedented radiation levels >100 times higher than in today`s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Current Radiation Monitoring system, like the RADMONs employed in the LHC, will not be capable to function and withstand this harsh environment. The development of a new Ultra High Fluence and Dose Radiation Sensor is a key element to allow irradiation tests of FCC equipment and, at a later stage, to monitor radiation levels in the FCC itself. In this paper, we present an innovative dosimetry solution based on thin layers of metals, which resistivity is shown to increase significantly due to the accumulated displacement damage. After describing the fabrication techniques used to manufacture these Radiation Dependent Resistors (RDR), we show and discuss the results of the irradiation experiments carried out ...

  9. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  10. Progress in high energy physics and nuclear safety : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Safe Nuclear Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Polański, Aleksander; Begun, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The book contains recent results on the progress in high-energy physics, accelerator, detection and nuclear technologies, as well as nuclear safety in high-energy experimentation and in nuclear industry, covered by leading experts in the field. The forthcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and cosmic-ray experiments are highlighted. Most of the current high-energy experiments and their physical motivation are analyzed. Various nuclear energy safety aspects, including progress in the production of new radiation-resistant materials, new and safe nuclear reactor designs, such as the slowly-burning reactor, as well as the use of coal-nuclear symbiotic methods of energy production can be found in the book.

  11. The potential of global solar radiation in the Silesia region as a renewable source of energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waniek Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, Silesia has been at the centre of the Polish coal industry for many years and thus has experienced poorer air quality compared to other voivodeships. However, in recent years strong economic transformation in the area has led to a considerable reduction in coal production. This study aimed to assess the variability of global solar radiation at selected stations within the Silesian voivodeship, in order to re-evaluate the resources of renewable solar energy during the period 1994–2013. The theoretical potential of solar radiation was calculated based on a three-dimensional terrain model. The data on global solar radiation from 13 stations within the Silesia region, covering the period 1994–2013, were obtained from the Regional Inspectorate of Environmental Protection in Katowice. The most favourable conditions for the use of solar energy were found at the cities Sosnowiec and Cieszyn. The largest increase in global radiation over the research period was observed in Zabrze. The average annual global radiation ranged between 600–1300 kWh·m−2. Digital Elevation Models (DEM for selected districts of the Silesia region were used to calculate the theoretical potential of global solar radiation. The highest theoretical potential of global radiation was found in the district of Cieszyn, located at the highest altitude.

  12. Low-energy particle radiation environment at synchronous altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Lens, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The degradation of thermal control coatings of satellites due to the effects of low energy charged particles in the space environment is discussed. Data obtained from ATS-5 satellite measurement of proton and electron fluxes are presented. The variations in electron density, proton density, and magnetic activity are presented to show correlations which exist between these space factors.

  13. Current Perspectives in High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    High energy astrophysics is a space-age discipline that has taken a quantum leap forward in the 1990s. The observables are photons and particles that are unable to penetrate the atmosphere and can only be observed from space or very high altitude balloons. The lectures presented as chapters of this book are based on the results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) missions to which the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center made significant hardware contributions. These missions study emissions from very hot plasmas, nuclear processes, and high energy particle interactions in space. Results to be discussed include gamma-ray beaming from active galactic nuclei (AGN), gamma-ray emission from pulsars, radioactive elements in the interstellar medium, X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, and the progress being made to unravel the gamma-ray burst mystery. The recently launched X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and prospects for upcoming Astro-E and Advanced X-ray Astronomy Satellite (AXAF) missions are also discussed.

  14. The High Energy Telescope for STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Reames, D. V.; Baker, R.; Hawk, J.; Nolan, J. T.; Ryan, L.; Shuman, S.; Wortman, K. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Cook, W. R.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2008-04-01

    The IMPACT investigation for the STEREO Mission includes a complement of Solar Energetic Particle instruments on each of the two STEREO spacecraft. Of these instruments, the High Energy Telescopes (HETs) provide the highest energy measurements. This paper describes the HETs in detail, including the scientific objectives, the sensors, the overall mechanical and electrical design, and the on-board software. The HETs are designed to measure the abundances and energy spectra of electrons, protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe in interplanetary space. For protons and He that stop in the HET, the kinetic energy range corresponds to ˜13 to 40 MeV/n. Protons that do not stop in the telescope (referred to as penetrating protons) are measured up to ˜100 MeV/n, as are penetrating He. For stopping He, the individual isotopes 3He and 4He can be distinguished. Stopping electrons are measured in the energy range ˜0.7 6 MeV.

  15. The CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility: applications and latest developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silari, Marco; Pozzi, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The CERF facility at CERN provides an almost unique high-energy workplace reference radiation field for the calibration and test of radiation protection instrumentation employed at high-energy accelerator facilities and for aircraft and space dosimetry. This paper describes the main features of the facility and supplies a non-exhaustive list of recent (as of 2005) applications for which CERF is used. Upgrade work started in 2015 to provide the scientific and industrial communities with a state-of-the-art reference facility is also discussed.

  16. The CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF facility: applications and latest developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silari Marco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The CERF facility at CERN provides an almost unique high-energy workplace reference radiation field for the calibration and test of radiation protection instrumentation employed at high-energy accelerator facilities and for aircraft and space dosimetry. This paper describes the main features of the facility and supplies a non-exhaustive list of recent (as of 2005 applications for which CERF is used. Upgrade work started in 2015 to provide the scientific and industrial communities with a state-of-the-art reference facility is also discussed.

  17. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  18. Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-07-01

    This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

  19. High LET Radiation Amplifies Centrosome Overduplication Through a Pathway of γ-Tubulin Monoubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Mikio [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hirayama, Ryoichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi, E-mail: komatsu@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation induces centrosome overduplication, leading to mitotic catastrophe and tumorigenesis. Because mitotic catastrophe is one of the major tumor cell killing factors in high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation therapy and long-term survivors from such treatment have a potential risk of secondary tumors, we investigated LET dependence of radiation-induced centrosome overduplication and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Materials: Carbon and iron ion beams (13-200 keV/μm) and γ-rays (0.5 keV/μm) were used as radiation sources. To count centrosomes after IR exposure, human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells were immunostained with antibodies of γ-tubulin and centrin 2. Similarly, Nbs1-, Brca1-, Ku70-, and DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cells and their counterpart wild-type cells were used for measurement of centrosome overduplication. Results: The number of excess centrosome-containing cells at interphase and the resulting multipolar spindle at mitosis were amplified with increased LET, reaching a maximum level of 100 keV/μm, followed by sharp decrease in frequency. Interestingly, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs deficiencies marginally affected the induction of centrosome overduplication, whereas the cell killings were significantly enhanced. This was in contrast to observation that high LET radiation significantly enhanced frequencies of centrosome overduplication in Nbs1- and Brca1-deficient cells. Because NBS1/BRCA1 is implicated in monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin, we subsequently tested whether it is affected by high LET radiation. As a result, monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin was abolished in 48 to 72 hours after exposure to high LET radiation, although γ-ray exposure slightly decreased it 48 hours postirradiation and was restored to a normal level at 72 hours. Conclusions: High LET radiation significantly reduces NBS1/BRCA1-mediated monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin and amplifies centrosome overduplication with a peak at 100 keV/μm. In contrast, Ku70 and DNA

  20. Thermodynamic Temperature of High-Temperature Fixed Points Traceable to Blackbody Radiation and Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wähmer, M.; Anhalt, K.; Hollandt, J.; Klein, R.; Taubert, R. D.; Thornagel, R.; Ulm, G.; Gavrilov, V.; Grigoryeva, I.; Khlevnoy, B.; Sapritsky, V.

    2017-10-01

    Absolute spectral radiometry is currently the only established primary thermometric method for the temperature range above 1300 K. Up to now, the ongoing improvements of high-temperature fixed points and their formal implementation into an improved temperature scale with the mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin, rely solely on single-wavelength absolute radiometry traceable to the cryogenic radiometer. Two alternative primary thermometric methods, yielding comparable or possibly even smaller uncertainties, have been proposed in the literature. They use ratios of irradiances to determine the thermodynamic temperature traceable to blackbody radiation and synchrotron radiation. At PTB, a project has been established in cooperation with VNIIOFI to use, for the first time, all three methods simultaneously for the determination of the phase transition temperatures of high-temperature fixed points. For this, a dedicated four-wavelengths ratio filter radiometer was developed. With all three thermometric methods performed independently and in parallel, we aim to compare the potential and practical limitations of all three methods, disclose possibly undetected systematic effects of each method and thereby confirm or improve the previous measurements traceable to the cryogenic radiometer. This will give further and independent confidence in the thermodynamic temperature determination of the high-temperature fixed point's phase transitions.