WorldWideScience

Sample records for high dose radionuclide

  1. Assessments for high dose radionuclide therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell specific targeting of cancer and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabelled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimised radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be the lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential timepoints using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organ tissues of concern, for the whole body and sometimes for selected tumours. Patient specific factors often require that dose estimates be customised for each patient. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires 'reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs' using the methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high dose studies shows that some are conducted with minimal dosimetry, that the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties. Despite the general availability of software, internal dosimetry methods often seem to be inconsistent from one clinical centre to another. (author)

  2. Method of preparing radionuclide doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of preparing aliquot dosea of a tracer material useful in diagnostic nuclear medicine comprising: storing discrete quantities of a lyophilized radionuclide carrier in separate tubular containers from which air and moisture is excluded, selecting from the tubular containers a container in which is stored a carrier appropriate for a nuclear diagnostic test to be performed, interposing the selected container between the needle and the barrel of a hypodermic syringe, and drawing a predetermined amount of a liquid containing a radionuclide tracer in known concentration into the hypodermic syringe barrel through the hypodermic needle and through the selected container to dissolve the discrete quantity of lyophilized carrier therein to combine the carrier with the radionuclide tracer to form an aliquot dose of nuclear diagnostic tracer material, as needed

  3. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  4. Human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.

    2009-01-01

    Forest soil, understorey vegetation and trees are all sources of radionuclides and human radiation doses after contaminating atmospheric deposition. People are exposed to radiation externally from sources outside the body and internally via ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides. Understorey vegetation contributes to ingestion doses through berries, herbs, wild honey, mushrooms and game meat; also trees provide feed to terrestrial birds and big game. During stay in forests people are subject to external radiation from forest floor and overstorey, and they may inhale airborne radioactive aerosol or gaseous radionuclides in ground level air. In the early phase of contamination also resuspended radionuclides may add to the internal dose of people via inhalation. People in Nordic countries are most exposed to radiation via ingestion of radionuclides in wild foods. The distribution of radionuclides in forests is changed by environmental processes, and thereby also the significance of various dose pathways to humans will change with time. External exposure is received in living environment from contaminated stemwood used as building timber and for manufacturing of furniture and other wood products. The aim of this paper is to outline the significance of various human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests considering the public and workers in forestry and production of bioenergy. Examples on effective doses are given based on two historical events, atmospheric nuclear weapon tests (mostly in 1950's and in 1960's) and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. (au)

  5. Dose rates as a function of time due to postulated radionuclide releases from the U.S. Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Dade W.; Sun, Lin-Shen C.; Cherry, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain repository, which is located in a remote area in the State of Nevada, is being constructed for the long-term care and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified high-level radioactive waste. In accordance with U.S. law, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) promulgated Standards that limit the dose rates to members of the public due to the consumption of ground water, alone, and the consumption of ground water plus agricultural products irrigated with the contaminated ground water, and other exposures, such as those from external sources and the inhalation of airborne radioactive materials. As part of this exercise, the USEPA identified eight specific radionuclides to which their Standards are to apply. These are: 14 C, 99 Tc, 129 I, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. For purposes of the associated dose rate estimates, a range of conservative assumptions have been applied, all of which are designed to assure that the estimated dose rates are well above what might be expected under 'real-world' conditions. As a first step, it was assumed that: (1) at 10 4 year after repository closure, a fractional release of 10 -5 of the entire repository radionuclide inventory occurred; (2) the only prior reduction in the inventory was that due to radioactive decay; and (3) the sole path of exposure to neighboring population groups was through the consumption of 2 L d -1 of contaminated ground water. The accompanying analyses revealed that, of the eight radionuclides, only 226 Ra, 237 Np, and 239 Pu, will represent a significant source of dose at that time. To provide perspective and insights, the next step was to estimate the committed effective dose rates for all eight radionuclides based on an assumed fractional release each year of 10 -5 of the inventory from the time of repository closure up through the 10 6 year. For purposes of providing perspective, it was assumed that each dose rate estimate was independent, that is, no releases

  6. Building shielding effects on radiation doses from routine radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    In calculating population doses from the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere, it is usually assumed that man spends all of his time outdoors standing on a smooth infinite plane. Realistically, however, man spends most of the time indoors, so that substantial reductions in radiation doses may result compared with the usual estimates. Calculational models were developed to study the effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Both internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides are considered. The effect of building structures is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. The internal dose from inhaled radionuclides is proportional to the radionuclide concentration in the air. Assuming that the outdoor airborne concentration is constant with time, the time-dependence of the indoor airborne concentration in terms of the structure air ventilation rate, the deposition velocities for radionuclides on the inside floor, walls, and ceiling, and the radioactive decay constant, were calculated

  7. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Guzzi, G.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M.C.; Ripamonti, D.

    2006-01-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to 4 K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials

  8. Acceptable-doses exceeding in radionuclides transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delabarre, P.

    2006-01-01

    Without any foregoing signal, the 12-gliding month dose in an employee of a radionuclides transporting firm raised to 44,30 mSv (over the double of the ICRP recommended yearly maximum of 20 mSv). Apart from immediate prohibition of any further professional exposure to ionising radiation for the employee concerned, and an inquiry for possible explanations concerning as well the employer as the employee, an in-depth investigation of the employees previous records took place. Except from the sudden rise, the investigation showed that the personal dosimeter was mostly presented for analysis weeks, even months, too late, what made any immediate action from occupational health and radioprotection side difficult and anyhow far too late. Investigation of the records of the other 30 employees showed that 1) mostly the dosimeters were not presented on the assumed date for analysis, but months to (sometimes) nearly one year late behind schedule 2) for the same job in the same period, registered doses varied from naught to over 8,00 mSv, depending on the employee 3) several employees had a 12-gliding months dose of over 10,00 mSv, even over 15,00 mSv During discussion with employee, employer, occupational physician and an agent of the qualified organisation for dosimeter analysis, the employer was anything but cooperative; the employee also was rather reluctant to answer questions, and given possible causes could not be corroborated. In an attempt to clarify the multiple problems, the Governmental Agency for Nuclear Control was involved, which imposed in a first time a( not very stringent, rather indulgent) action plan. Meanwhile, a written comment on the monthly dosimeter analyses was sent from as well the occupational physician as the analytical firm to the employer and to the concerned employees if a 12-gliding months dose exceeding 10 mSv was determined, without any reaction neither from the employer nor the employees. At the moment of the abstract submission (sept 05

  9. Human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests; Forests ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantavaara, A. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Research and Environmental Surveillance, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-06-15

    Forest soil, understorey vegetation and trees are all sources of radionuclides and human radiation doses after contaminating atmospheric deposition. People are exposed to radiation externally from sources outside the body and internally via ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides. Understorey vegetation contributes to ingestion doses through berries, herbs, wild honey, mushrooms and game meat; also trees provide feed to terrestrial birds and big game. During stay in forests people are subject to external radiation from forest floor and overstorey, and they may inhale airborne radioactive aerosol or gaseous radionuclides in ground level air. In the early phase of contamination also resuspended radionuclides may add to the internal dose of people via inhalation. People in Nordic countries are most exposed to radiation via ingestion of radionuclides in wild foods. The distribution of radionuclides in forests is changed by environmental processes, and thereby also the significance of various dose pathways to humans will change with time. External exposure is received in living environment from contaminated stemwood used as building timber and for manufacturing of furniture and other wood products. The aim of this paper is to outline the significance of various human dose pathways of radionuclides in forests considering the public and workers in forestry and production of bioenergy. Examples on effective doses are given based on two historical events, atmospheric nuclear weapon tests (mostly in 1950's and in 1960's) and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. (au)

  10. Individual radiation doses from unit releases of long lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.

    1990-04-01

    The turn-over in a standard biosphere of radionuclides, disposed in a repository for high level waste was studied from a dose point of view. A multi-compartment model with unit releases to the biosphere was designed and solved by the BIOPATH-code. The uncertainty in the results due to the uncertainty in input parameter values were examined for all nuclides with the PRISM-system. Adults and five year old children were exposed from 10 different exposure pathways originating from activity in well and lake water. The results given as total doses per year and Bq release (conversion factors) can be used in combination with leakage rates from the geosphere for safety analysis of a repository. The conversion factors obtained (arithmetic mean values), are given. (65 refs.) (authors)

  11. Infant doses from the transfer of radionuclides in mothers' milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.D.; Smith, T.J.; Phipps, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Assessments of potential internal exposures of the child following radionuclide intakes by the mother require consideration of transfers during lactation as well as during pregnancy. Current ICRP work on internal dosimetry includes the estimation of radiation doses to newborn infants from radionuclides ingested in mothers' milk. Infant doses will be calculated for maternal intakes by ingestion or inhalation of the radionuclides, radioisotopes of 31 elements, for which fetal dose coefficients have been published. In this paper, modelling approaches are examined, concentrating on models developed for iodine, caesium, polonium, alkaline earth elements and the actinides. Comparisons of model predictions show maximum overall transfer to milk following maternal ingestion during lactation of about 30% of ingested activity for 131 I, 20% for 45 Ca and 137 Cs, 10% for 90 Sr, 1% for 210 Po and low values of less than 0.01% for 239 Pu and 241 Am. The corresponding infant doses from milk consumption are estimated in preliminary calculations to be about two to three times the adult dose for 45 Ca and 131 I, 70-80% of the adult dose for 90 Sr, about 40% for 137 Cs, 20% for 210 Po, and 239 Pu and 241 Am. Infant doses from radionuclides in breast milk are compared with doses to the offspring resulting from in utero exposures during pregnancy. (author)

  12. Radiation dose to the patient in radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    In medical radionuclide studies, the radiation risk has to be considered in addition to the general risk of administering a pharmaceutical. As radiation exposure is an essential factor in radiation risk estimation, some aspects of internal dose calculation, including radiation risk assessments, are treated. The formalism of current internal dose calculation is presented. The input data, especially the residence time and the absorbed dose per transformation, their origin and accuracy are discussed. Results of internal dose calculations for the ten most frequently used radionuclide studies are presented as somatically effective dose equivalents. The accuracy of internal dose calculation is treated in detail by considering the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical, the phantoms used for dose calculations, the absorbed dose per transformation, the administered activity, and the transfer of the dose, calculated for a phantom, to the patient. The internal dose calculated for a reference phantom may be assumed to be in accordance with the actual patient dose within a range described by a factor of about two to three. Finally, risk estimates for nuclear medicine procedures are quantified, being generally of sixth order. The radiation risk from the radioiodine test is comparably higher, but probably lower than calculated according to the UNSCEAR risk coefficients. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results and to improve the quantification of the radiation risk from the medical use of radionuclides. (author)

  13. Doses from intakes of radionuclides by adults and young people

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhalgh, J R; Fell, T P

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a methodology for calculating doses from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides by adults, children (aged 10) and infants (aged 1). The calculation scheme follows the procedures and uses the models described in ICRP Publication 30, except in a few instances which are discussed in detail. The methods described in this report have been used to calculate organ doses and effective doses per unit intake for a wide variety of nuclides and compounds. A selection of these doses is given in this report. It is intended that the full dose data base should be made generally available in due course.

  14. Dose assessment on natural radiation, natural radionuclide, and artificial radionuclide released by Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Furukawa, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    Various radionuclides are distributed in environmental materials such as soil, rock, and water. People are exposed every day to natural radiation. According to the UNSCEAR 2008 report, Sources of Ionizing Radiation, natural radiation sources are categorized as terrestrial gamma-rays, radon, cosmic rays and food. The effective dose from radon, thoron and its decay products is about 50% of all natural radiation exposure. Consciousness of the Japanese public toward radiation exposure has significantly increased since the start of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident. In this paper, the nationwide survey and dose estimation for terrestrial gamma-rays and radon are summarized. External dose from artificial radionuclides released by the Fukushima accident are also reported. (author)

  15. Testing waste forms containing high radionuclide loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is obtaining information on radioactive waste during NRC-prescribed tests and in a disposal environment. This paper describes the resin solidification task of that program, including the present status and results to date. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade, ion exchange resins that have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. The objective of the resin solidification task is to determine the adequacy of test procedures specified by NRC for ion exchange resins having high radionuclide loadings

  16. Radiation doses to aquatic organisms from natural radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J E; Jones, S R; Saxen, R; Thoerring, H; Batlle, J Vives i

    2004-01-01

    A framework for protection of the environment is likely to require a methodology for assessing dose rates arising from naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper addresses this issue for European aquatic environments through a process of (a) data collation, mainly with respect to levels of radioactivity in water sediments and aquatic flora and fauna, (b) the use of suitable distribution coefficients, concentration factors and global data where data gaps are present and (c) the utilisation of a reference organism approach whereby a finite number of suitable geometries are selected to allow dose per unit concentration factors to be derived and subsequent absorbed dose calculations (weighted or unweighted) to be made. The majority of the calculated absorbed dose, for both marine and freshwater organisms, arises from internally incorporated alpha emitters, with 210 Po and 226 Ra being the major contributors. Calculated doses are somewhat higher for freshwater compared to marine organisms, and the range of doses is also much greater. This reflects both the much greater variability of radionuclide concentrations in freshwater as compared to seawater, and also variability or uncertainty in concentration factor values. This work has revealed a number of substantial gaps in published empirical data especially for European aquatic environments

  17. Natural radionuclides in food in an area with high concentrations of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Moraes, S.R.; Cavalcante, J.J.V.; Kelecom, A.; Silva, A.X. da; Lopez, J.M.; Filgueiras, R.; Carmo, A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Areas of high natural radiation expose the local population to doses greater than the world average. One of the routes of exposure is food intake. The activity concentration (AC) of 5 natural radionuclides in 7 types of foods was analyzed. The highest CA measured was 2.40 Bq.kg -1 for the U nat in the potato. The multivariate statistic identified two groups: (U nat e 232 Th) and [( 210 Pb and 228 Ra) and 226 Ra

  18. Organ dose from inhaled radionuclides taking lull period into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides is generally carried out in accordance with the lung model recommended by the ICRP Task Group on Lung Dynamics. The relevant expressions are integrated over a given period, assuming continuous inhalation in an atmosphere of constant aerosol concentration. Though for the same amount of intake the dose commitment is found to be independent of variations in the rate of intake, the dose determined over specific intervals of time, is influenced by it or by lull intervals therein. Formulae are developed to arrive at doses to different organs when the subject's intake is constant and continuous for 8 hours, followed by a lull period of 16 hours each day. Results are given for a number of radionuclides and are compared with values characteristic of continuous inhalation. It is observed that when exposure is assumed to be continuous the dose for the same intake of activity is underestimated as compared to the dose when lull period is taken into account. For working periods of 6 days and 30 days the underestimate ranges from 5%-20% and 0.6% to 4.5% respectively. (author)

  19. Gamma radiation dose from radionuclides in Kong Kong soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations have been made of the γ dose rate at one metre above ground from the results of measurements of radionuclide concentrations in soil at various locations in Hong Kong and prior to the Chernobyl accident. The average dose rate is found to be 0.076 μGy h -1 , or 0.67 mGy year -1 . The contribution from fallout nuclides to the annual dose is shown to be small, at about 0.4% of the total. The calculated dose rate in this work is about 80% higher than the world average given by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, in Ionizing Radiation: Sources and Biological Effects, Annex B (Exposure to natural radiation sources). A United Nations Publication, 1982. (author)

  20. Review of radionuclides released from the nuclear fuel cycle and methods of assessing dose to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    There are two broad subject areas associated with releases of radionuclides from nuclear fuel cycle installations to the environment in which there are biological implications. One concerns interpretation of doses to man in terms of their radiological significance; the other concerns estimation of environmental transfer of radionuclides and of associated radiation doses to man. The radiation protection philosophy on which past practice regarding effluent releases of radionuclides to the environment was based is illustrated by drawing upon estimates of the associated radiation doses to man given in the 1977 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The present emphasis in radiation protection philosophy is illustrated by summarizing a review of environmental models relevant to estimation of radiation doses to population groups with reference to effluent releases of 3 H, 14 C, 85 Kr and 129 I; the author carried out the review as a contribution to a current study by an expert group set up by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD. Radionuclides of significance in the future may differ from those currently released to the environment because of possible developments in nuclear fuel cycles and options which may be exercised for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, already in storage or postulated to be produced in the future. (author)

  1. Dependence on age at intake of committed dose equivalents from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.

    1981-01-01

    The dependence of committed dose equivalents on age at intake is needed to assess the significance of exposures of young persons among the general public resulting from inhaled or ingested radionuclides. The committed dose equivalents, evaluated using ICRP principles, depend on the body dimensions of the young person at the time of intake of a radionuclide and on subsequent body growth. Representation of growth by a series of exponential segments facilitates the derivation of general expressions for the age dependence of committed dose equivalents if metabolic models do not change with age. The additional assumption that intakes of radionuclides in air or food are proportional to a person's energy expenditure (implying age-independent dietary composition) enables the demonstration that the age of the most highly exposed 'critical groups' of the general public from these radionuclides is either about 1 year or 17 years. With the above assumptions the exposure of the critical group is less than three times the exposure of adult members of the general public. Approximate values of committed dose equivalents which avoid both underestimation and excessive overestimation are shown to be obtainable by simplified procedures. Modified procedures are suggested for use if metabolic models change with age. (author)

  2. Daily radionuclide ingestion and internal radiation doses in Aomori prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Akata, Naofumi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2013-10-01

    To assess internal annual dose in the general public in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, 80 duplicate cooked diet samples, equivalent to the food consumed over a 400-d period by one person, were collected from 100 volunteers in Aomori City and the village of Rokkasho during 2006–2010 and were analyzed for 11 radionuclides. To obtain average rates of ingestion of radionuclides, the volunteers were selected from among office, fisheries, agricultural, and livestock farm workers. Committed effective doses from ingestion of the diet over a 1-y period were calculated from the analytical results and from International Commission on Radiological Protection dose coefficients; for 40K, an internal effective dose rate from the literature was used. Fisheries workers had significantly higher combined internal annual dose than the other workers, possibly because of high rates of ingestion of marine products known to have high 210Po concentrations. The average internal dose rate, weighted by the numbers of households in each worker group in Aomori Prefecture, was estimated at 0.47 mSv y-1. Polonium-210 contributed 49% of this value. The sum of committed effective dose rates for 210Po, 210Pb, 228Ra, and 14C and the effective dose rate of 40K accounted for approximately 99% of the average internal dose rate.

  3. Estimation of effective dose from radionuclides contained in misch metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Etsuko; Aburai, Tamaru; Nisizawa, Kunihide

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclides contained in three kinds of misch metal products and two kinds of ingots were analyzed using a Ge (Li) semiconductor detector. Lanthanum-138 ( 138 La) and several daughter nuclides derived from thorium and uranium series were detected in all samples. All misch metal products and ingots were determined to be radioactive consumer products (RCP), although they have not been regarded as RCP in Japan. 138 La showed the highest nuclide content rate of all the radionuclides, and the lanthanum metal ingots displayed the highest specific activity at 720 mBq·g -1 . The maximum external effective dose was estimated to be at 3.7 mSv when a metal match was carried for 8,760 hours at 1 mm from the skin. The calculated effective dose under some conditions exceeded 10 μSv per year. This value corresponded to the exemption standard proposed by the UK's National Radiological Protection Board. Individuals working with large amounts of RCP should be appropriately protected. (author)

  4. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.; Meznarich, H.K.; Thrall, K.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radionuclides in chemical forms that provided a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were estimated for these materials, and were combined with data from biokinetic transfer models to predict radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodologies were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed for representative situations; introduction of 1 μCi into a woman's blood at successive months of pregnancy was assumed to accommodate the stage dependence of geometric relationships and biological behaviors. Summary tables of results, correlations, and dosimetric relations, and of tentative generalized categorizations, are provided in the report

  5. Natural radionuclides in the South Indian foods and their annual dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanthi, G., E-mail: shanthidickson@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Women' s Christian College, Nagercoil 629001, Tamil Nadu (India); Thampi Thanka Kumaran, J. [Department of Physics, NM Christian College, Marthandam 629165, Tamil Nadu (India); Gnana Raj, G. Allan [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil 629003, Tamil Nadu (India); Maniyan, C.G [Health Physics Unit, Indian Rare Earths, Manavalakurichi 629252, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-07-21

    The study was carried out to evaluate the radioactivity concentration in the food crops grown in high-level natural radioactive area (HLNRA) in south west India. Food samples collected were analysed by means of a gamma spectroscopy and estimated annual dietary intakes of the radioisotopes {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th and {sup 40}K. The annual intake of the food stuffs was estimated on the basis of their average annual consumption. Calculations were also made to determine the effective dose to an individual consuming such diets. The intakes of these radionuclides were calculated using the concentrations in south Indian foods and daily consumption rates of these foods. Daily intakes of these radionuclides were as follows: {sup 226}Ra, 0.001-1.87; {sup 228}Ra, 0.0023-1.26, {sup 228}Th, 0.01-14.09 {sup 40}K, 0.46-49.39 Bq/day. The daily internal dose resulting from ingestion of radionuclides in food was 4.92 {mu}Sv/day and the annual dose was 1.79 mSv/yr. The radionuclides with highest consumption is {sup 40}K.

  6. Natural radionuclides in the South Indian foods and their annual dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, G.; Thampi Thanka Kumaran, J.; Gnana Raj, G. Allan; Maniyan, C.G

    2010-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the radioactivity concentration in the food crops grown in high-level natural radioactive area (HLNRA) in south west India. Food samples collected were analysed by means of a gamma spectroscopy and estimated annual dietary intakes of the radioisotopes 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K. The annual intake of the food stuffs was estimated on the basis of their average annual consumption. Calculations were also made to determine the effective dose to an individual consuming such diets. The intakes of these radionuclides were calculated using the concentrations in south Indian foods and daily consumption rates of these foods. Daily intakes of these radionuclides were as follows: 226 Ra, 0.001-1.87; 228 Ra, 0.0023-1.26, 228 Th, 0.01-14.09 40 K, 0.46-49.39 Bq/day. The daily internal dose resulting from ingestion of radionuclides in food was 4.92 μSv/day and the annual dose was 1.79 mSv/yr. The radionuclides with highest consumption is 40 K.

  7. Radionuclide releases to the atmosphere from Hanford Operations, 1944--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. The first step in determining dose is to estimate the amount and timing of radionuclide releases to air and water. This report provides the air release information.

  8. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238 U ( 226 Ra), 232 Th ( 228 Ra) and 40 K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg −1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg −1 . The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg −1 for 238 U ( 226 Ra), 0.16 Bq kg −1 for 232 Th ( 228 Ra) and 18 Bq kg −1 for 40 K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg −1 , 0.16 Bq kg −1 and 23 Bq kg −1 . Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 μSv for 226 Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 μSv for 228 Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 μSv for 40 K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 μSv, 22.0 to 38.4 μSv and 31.1 to 45.5 μSv, being some several times world average values. - Highlights: ► Activity concentrations of naturally occuring radionuclides were assessed for shellfish. ► 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K intake via shellfish showed several times higher than world averages. ► Committed effective doses due to the ingestions of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K are the first report in Malaysia. ► Estimated committed effective dose also showed higher values than the world average

  9. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 μCi into a woman's blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors

  10. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

  11. Population dose commitment associated with various radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Robert E.; Baratta, Edmond J.; Tanner, James T.

    1978-01-01

    The radionuclides in foods monitoring program initiated by the Food and Drug Administration in 1973 was expanded in 1975 to include the analysis for hydrogen-3 in selected foods originating from the vicinity of nuclear power stations. Also, in 1975 the analysis for radium-226 was initiated in food samples from areas adjacent to the phosphate mines in Florida. In October 1976 a special survey of milk was performed to determine the levels of fission product contamination from the fallout produced by the detonation of a nuclear device by the People's Republic of China. Results from the analysis of strontium-90 and cesium-137 in the general foods survey for the years 1973 through 1977 indicated intake levels well within range I of the Radiation Protection Guides (RPG) [FRC 1: Range I at 0.1xRPG dose, periodic surveillance; Range II at the RPG dose, quantitative surveillance and routine control; Range III 10xRPG dose, evaluation and additional controls]. The levels of hydrogen-3 in foods from nuclear power station areas were slightly above the tritium background. The radium-226 levels in foods from Florida phosphate mining areas were about double that of the controls. In both cases, however, the radium-226 intake from the total diet was in range II of the RPGs. The iodine-131 levels in the special milk survey in HEW regions I and III were in range III of the RPGs. The levels of barium-lanthanum-140, cesium-137 and strontium-89-90 were all within range I. The clearance half-time from milk for these radionuclides was about 5, 7 and 9 days respectively. (author)

  12. Effects of building structures on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Realistic assessments of radiation doses to the population from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere require consideration of man's largely indoor environment. The effect of a building structure on radiation doses is described quantitatively by a dose reduction factor, which is the ratio of the dose to a reference individual inside a structure to the corresponding dose with no structure present. We have implemented models to estimate dose reduction factors for internal dose from inhaled radionuclides and for external photon dose from airborne and surface-deposited radionuclides. The models are particularly useful in radiological assessment applications, since dose reduction factors may readily be estimated for arbitrary mixtures and concentrations of radionuclides in the atmosphere and on the ground. The model for inhalation dose reduction factors accounts for radioactive decay, air ventilation into and out of the structure, and deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of the structure. External dose reduction factors are estimated using the point-kernel integration method including consideration of buildup in air and the walls of the building. The potential importance of deposition of radionuclides on inside surfaces of a structure on both inhalation and external dose reduction factors has been demonstrated. Model formulation and the assumptions used in the calculations are discussed. Results of model-parameter sensitivity studies and estimates of dose reduction factors for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from an LWR fuel reprocessing plant are presented. (author)

  13. Doses in various parts of the biosphere due to long-lived radionuclides originating from deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Karlsson, Sara; Nordlinder, S.

    1999-01-01

    Turnover of radionuclides and resulting doses to man were modelled for various parts of the biosphere. This was made for different scenarios of leakage of radionuclides from a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and other waste. In previous studies, the emphasis was on doses from contaminated ground water represented by a well or various surface waters. This was because radionuclides were assumed to be released directly to surface water, the use of which subsequently formed the major pathway for radionuclides to agricultural areas. In the present study, radionuclides were considered to reach lakes, running waters, coastal areas, agricultural areas and peat areas. The inflow of radionuclides to agricultural areas was supposed to be from below. Doses due to direct use of contaminated ground water from a well were also considered. Altogether 44 radionuclides contained in the waste were assumed to be released during 10,000 years, with a rate of 1 Bq/year of each radionuclide, to each of the above mentioned biospheric parts. During that time, the biospheric conditions were assumed to be the same as they are today. Doses to the critical group were calculated by exposure pathways specific for each entry-point All calculations were performed with estimation of confidence due to time-dependent parameter variation and uncertainty in input values. The results indicate that drinking water from wells is not a critical exposure pathway for all studied radionuclides. Instead, inflow of contaminated water to soil and peat bogs may be crucial for illustration of doses for geological high-level waste disposal. Improved knowledge of processes at the geosphere-biosphere interface is therefore important

  14. The RADionuclide Transport, Removal, and Dose (RADTRAD) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.A.; Chanin, D.I.; Lee, J.

    1993-01-01

    The RADionuclide Transport, Removal, And Dose (RADTRAD) code is designed for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) use to calculate the radiological consequences to the offsite population and to control room operators following a design-basis accident at Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This code utilizes updated reactor accident source terms published in draft NUREG-1465, ''Accident Source Terms for Light-Water Nuclear Power Plants.'' The code will track the transport of radionuclides as they are released from the reactor pressure vessel, travel through the primary containment and other buildings, and are released to the environment. As the radioactive material is transported through the primary containment and other buildings, credit for several removal mechanisms may be taken including sprays, suppression pools, overlying pools, filters, and natural deposition. Simple models are available for these different removal mechanisms that use, as input, information about the conditions in the plant and predict either a removal coefficient (λ) or decontamination factor. The user may elect to use these models or input a single value for a removal coefficient or decontamination factor

  15. Individual and collective dose rates from naturally-occurring radionuclides in seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Camplin, W.C.; Allington, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Although seafoods are not a large item in the UK diet, they are of interest because of the above-average quantities of naturally-occurring radionuclides which they contain -particularly shellfish. The single most important contributor is 210 Po; studies have therefore been made to examine the contribution which this nuclide makes to the dose received, both collectively and to individual high-rate consumers of shellfish. (author)

  16. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Baumgartner, A.; Rechberger, F.; Seidel, C.; Stietka, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. - Highlights: • Dose models for indoor radiation exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials. • Strategies and methods in radionuclide metrology, activity measurement and dose modelling. • Selection of appropriate parameters in radiation protection standards for building materials. • Scientific-based limitations of indoor exposure due to natural radionuclides in building materials

  17. The principal radionuclides in high level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanto

    1998-01-01

    The principal radionuclides in high level radioactive waste management. The selection of the principal radionuclides in the high level waste (HLW) management was developed in order to improve the disposal scenario of HLW. In this study the unified criteria for selection of the principal radionuclides were proposed as; (1) the value of hazard index estimated by annual limit of intake (ALI) for long-term tendency,(2) the relative dose factor related to adsorbed migration rate transferred by ground water, and (3) heat generation in the repository. From this study it can be concluded that the principal radionuclides in the HLW management were minor actinide (MA=Np, Am, Cm, etc), Tc, I, Cs and Sr, based on the unified basic criteria introduced in this study. The remaining short-lived fission product (SLFPs), after the selected nuclides are removed, should be immobilized and solidified in a glass matrix. Potential risk due to the remaining SLFPs can be lower than that of uranium ore after about 300 year. (author)

  18. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested

  19. The remobilisation of radionuclides from marine sediments: implications for collective dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, S.; MacKenzie, J.

    1988-09-01

    A model of the transfer (in either direction) of radioactivity between seawater and the seabed is described. It was developed, in the first instance, for inclusion in marine collective dose assessment codes. A review of radionuclide-sediment interactions with particular emphasis on the remobilisation process is followed by a description of the seabed model, an investigation of the effect of the model on estimates of collective dose, and a discussion of sedimentation in the Irish Sea in the context of radioactive discharges. The inclusion of the seabed model may lead to marked decreases in the collective dose at short integration times for nuclides with a high affinity for sediments. For discharges of such radionuclides into the Irish Sea, remobilisation may lead to a significant increase in collective dose compared with estimates obtained ignoring this phenomenon; and thirdly, remobilisation appears to have little effect on collective doses integrated to infinite time for discharges from three other locations in the UK. It is also shown that inclusion of the seabed model leads to predictions of a high uptake of plutonium by the seabed for Irish Sea discharges without the need for anomalously high sedimentation rates. (author)

  20. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  1. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  2. Radionuclide content in some building materials and gamma dose rate in dwellings in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigido, Oslvaldo; Montalvan, Adelmo; Rosa, Ramon; Hernandez, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation exposure of the population. This study was undertaken with the purpose of determining radioactivity in some Cuban building materials and for assessing the annual effective dose to Cuban population due external gamma exposure in dwellings for typical Cuban room model. Forty four samples of raw materials and building products were collected in some Cuban provinces. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were determined by gamma ray spectrometry using a p-type coaxial high purity germanium detector and their mean values are in the ranges: 9 to 857 Bq.kg -1 for 40 K; 6 to 57 Bq.kg -1 for 226 Ra; and 1.2 to 22 Bq.kg -1 for 232 Th. The radium equivalent activity in the 44 samples varied from 4 Bq.kg -1 (wood) to 272 Bq.kg -1 (brick). A high pressure ionisation chamber was used for measuring of the indoor absorbed dose rate in 543 dwellings and workplaces in five Cuban provinces. The average absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 43 n Gy.h -1 (Holguin) to 73 n Gy.h -1 (Camaguey) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 145 ± 40 μSv. This dose value is 16% higher than the calculated value for typical room geometry of Cuban house. (author)

  3. Age-dependent effective doses for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effective doses for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air are reported. The calculations were performed for 160 radionuclides, which are important for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. The energies and intensities of photons emitted from radionuclides were taken from the decay data DECDC used for dose calculations. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ) for 6 age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years-old and adult. The effective doses for the adult are also compared to values given in the literature.

  4. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg-1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg-1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg-1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16 Bq kg-1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18 Bq kg-1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg-1, 0.16 Bq kg-1 and 23 Bq kg-1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 μSv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 μSv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 μSv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 μSv, 22.0 to 38.4 μSv and 31.1 to 45.5 μSv, being some several times world average values.

  5. Radionuclides and radiation doses in heavy mineral sands and other mining operations in Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F. P.; Matine, O. F.; Taimo, S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Silva, L.; Malta, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sites at the littoral of Mozambique with heavy mineral sands exploited for ilmenite, rutile and zircon and inland mineral deposits exploited for tantalite, uranium and bauxite were surveyed for ambient radiation doses, and samples were collected for the determination of radionuclide concentrations. In heavy mineral sands, 238 U and 232 Th concentrations were 70±2 and 308±9 Bq kg -1 dry weight (dw), respectively, whereas after separation of minerals, the concentrations in the ilmenite fraction were 2240±64 and 6125±485 Bq kg -1 (dw), respectively. Tantalite displayed the highest concentrations with 44 738±2474 Bq kg -1 of 238 U. Radiation exposure of workers in mining facilities is likely to occur at levels above the dose limit for members of the public (1 mSv y -1 ) and therefore radiation doses should be assessed as occupational exposures. Local populations living in these regions in general are not exposed to segregated minerals with high radionuclide concentrations. However, there is intensive traditional mining and a large number of artisan miners and their families may be exposed to radiation doses exceeding the dose limit. A radiation protection programme is therefore needed to ensure radiation protection of the public and workers of developing mining projects. (authors)

  6. Radionuclides and radiation doses in heavy mineral sands and other mining operations in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Matine, Obete F; Taímo, Suzete; Oliveira, João M; Silva, Lídia; Malta, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Sites at the littoral of Mozambique with heavy mineral sands exploited for ilmenite, rutile and zircon and inland mineral deposits exploited for tantalite, uranium and bauxite were surveyed for ambient radiation doses, and samples were collected for the determination of radionuclide concentrations. In heavy mineral sands, (238)U and (232)Th concentrations were 70±2 and 308±9 Bq kg(-1) dry weight (dw), respectively, whereas after separation of minerals, the concentrations in the ilmenite fraction were 2240±64 and 6125±485 Bq kg(-1) (dw), respectively. Tantalite displayed the highest concentrations with 44 738±2474 Bq kg(-1) of (238)U. Radiation exposure of workers in mining facilities is likely to occur at levels above the dose limit for members of the public (1 mSv y(-1)) and therefore radiation doses should be assessed as occupational exposures. Local populations living in these regions in general are not exposed to segregated minerals with high radionuclide concentrations. However, there is intensive artisanal mining and a large number of artisanal miners and their families may be exposed to radiation doses exceeding the dose limit. A radiation protection programme is therefore needed to ensure radiation protection of the public and workers of developing mining projects.

  7. Uncertainties in geologic disposal of high-level wastes - groundwater transport of radionuclides and radiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Bard, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis for radionuclide transport in groundwater considers models and methods for characterizing (1) the present geologic environment and its future evolution due to natural geologic processes and to repository development and waste emplacement, (2) groundwater hydrology, (3) radionuclide geochemistry, and (4) the interactions among these phenomena. The discussion of groundwater transport focuses on the nature of the sources of uncertainty rather than on quantitative estimates of their magnitude, because of the lack of evidence that current models can provide realistic quantitative predictions of radionuclide transport in groundwater for expected repository environments. The analysis for the long-term health risk to man following releases of long-lived radionuclides to the biosphere is more quantitative and involves estimates of uncertainties in (1) radionuclide concentrations in man's exposure environment, (2) radionuclide intake by exposed individuals per unit concentration in the environment, (3) the dose per unit intake, (4) the number of exposed individuals, and (5) the health risk per unit dose. For the important long-lived radionuclides in high-level waste, uncertainties in most of the different components of a calculation of individual and collective dose per unit release appear to be no more than two or three orders of magnitude; these uncertainties are certainly much less than uncertainties in predicting groundwater transport of radionuclides between a repository and the biosphere. Several limitations in current models for predicting the health risk to man per unit release to the biosphere are discussed

  8. Human radiation dose resulting from forests contaminated by radionuclides: generic model and applications to the Chernobyl ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkov, I.; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA; Schell, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    Forest ecosystems have been found to contribute significantly to the human radiation dose in the intermediate and long teens following radionuclide releases. Evaluation of the internal and external radiation dose for these critical population groups requires knowledge of radionuclide transport processes in forest ecosystems, as well as the extent of forest utilization by these populations. The high complexity of the problem requires the use of models to define and analyze the properties of the forest as well as to evaluate the ecosystem response to possible human intervention. A generic FORESTPATH model is used to calculate the internal and external radiation doses for different critical groups of consumers at different times following radionuclide release. The model is tested using the information available for contaminated forests in Belarus. Uncertainty of the model predictions are estimated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. (author)

  9. Soil-plant-relationships and ecological forecast of human internal doses from long-lived radionuclides. Dose 'cost' of the transformation of radionuclides bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, A.P.; Grodzinsky, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Soil pathway of radionuclides pollution of agricultural production becomes the main one at the recovery stage of postaccidental period. For this stage dynamics of the human foodstuffs cleaning and rate of internal dose due to consumption are results , of the interaction of three main factors, namely, the rate of the decrease of soil contamination, structure of soil use and transformations of bioavailability of radionuclides. Representation of these ideas in quantitative form, documentation and analysis of the main ecological causes that determine the intensity of the radionuclides mobility in the biological cycle is essential increase the accuracy of the long-term forecast of human dose formation and promote the development of adequate strategies for countermeasures. General formal model and practical method of the ecological forecast of human internal doses has been proposed and used for estimation. Refs. 5 (author)

  10. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Tien Thinh; Nguyen Hao Quang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  11. Exposure-dose research for radionuclides in natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNelis, D.N.; Patzer, R.G.

    1969-01-01

    The fate determination of specific radionuclides in natural gas stimulated by underground engineering applications is being examined. An experimental program, now in its initial stages, is using gas artificially labeled with krypton-85 and tritium under simulated domestic situations. The following topics are being investigated in this study: 1. The concentration of the radionuclides in a gas-heated home. 2. The build-up of contamination on appliances in the kitchen environment. 3. The concentration in foods as a function of radionuclide, food type and preparation. 4. The maximum exposure plausible under specified conditions. (author)

  12. Exposure-dose research for radionuclides in natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNelis, D N; Patzer, R G [Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, U.S. Public Health Service, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The fate determination of specific radionuclides in natural gas stimulated by underground engineering applications is being examined. An experimental program, now in its initial stages, is using gas artificially labeled with krypton-85 and tritium under simulated domestic situations. The following topics are being investigated in this study: 1. The concentration of the radionuclides in a gas-heated home. 2. The build-up of contamination on appliances in the kitchen environment. 3. The concentration in foods as a function of radionuclide, food type and preparation. 4. The maximum exposure plausible under specified conditions. (author)

  13. Clinical application of iodine 123 with special consideration of radionuclide purity, measuring accuracy and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, H.J.; Ammon, J.; Winkel, K. zum; Haubold, U.

    1975-01-01

    Iodine 123 is a nearly 'ideal' radionuclide for thyroid imaging. The production of Iodine 123 requires cyclotrons or accelerators. The production of multicurie amounts of Iodine 123 has been suggested through the use of high-energy accelerators (> 60 MeV). Most of the methods for the production of Iodine 123 using a compact cyclotron result in contamination with f.e. Iodine 124 which reduces the spatial resolution of imaging procedures and increases the radiation dose to the patient. The radiation dose has been calculated for three methods of production. The various contamination with Iodine 124, Iodine 125 and Iodine 126 result in comparable radiation dose of Iodine 131, provided that the time between production and application is more than four half-live-times of Iodine 123. (orig.) [de

  14. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the US as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 million t (million t TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for tens of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently approximately 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is

  15. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V. E.; Robison, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the United States as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 Mt (Mt TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for 10's of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently about 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is dominated by

  16. High resolution simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Komura, K.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution (2-3 hrs) simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides, 212 Pb, 210 Pb and 7 Be, have been performed by using extremely low background Ge detectors at Ogoya Underground Laboratory. We have measured above radionuclides at three monitoring points viz, 1) Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory (LLRL) Kanazawa University, 2) Shishiku Plateau (640 m MSL) located about 8 km from LLRL to investigate vertical difference of activity levels, and 3) Hegura Island (10 m MSL) located about 50 km from Noto Peninsula in the Sea of Japan to evaluate the influences of Asian continent or mainland of Japan on the variation to the activity levels. Variations of short-lived 212 Pb concentration showed noticeable time lags between at LLRL and at Shishiku Plateau. These time lags might be caused by change of height of a planetary boundary layer. On the contrary, variations of long-lived 210 Pb and 7 Be showed simultaneity at three locations because of homogeneity of these concentrations all over the area. (author)

  17. Activity measurement and effective dose modelling of natural radionuclides in building material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringer, F J; Baumgartner, A; Rechberger, F; Seidel, C; Stietka, M

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the assessment of natural radionuclides' activity concentration in building materials, calibration requirements and related indoor exposure dose models is presented. Particular attention is turned to specific improvements in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the activity concentration of necessary natural radionuclides in building materials with adequate measurement uncertainties. Different approaches for the modelling of the effective dose indoor due to external radiation resulted from natural radionuclides in building material and results of actual building material assessments are shown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Possibility of some radionuclides production using high energy electron Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzhinnyam, N.; Belov, A.G.; Gehrbish, Sh; Maslov, O.D.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Ganbold, G.

    2008-01-01

    The method of some radionuclides production using high energy Bremsstrahlung of electron accelerators and determination of photonuclear reaction yield and specific activities for some radionuclides is described. Photonuclear reaction yield and specific activities for some radionuclides are determined for 117m Sn, 111 In and 195m Pt. Based on the experimental data obtained at low energy (E e- e- = 75 MeV) of the IREN facility (FLNR, JINR) at irradiation of high purity platinum and tin metals

  19. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  20. 238U-series radionuclides in Finnish groundwater-based drinking water and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterbacka, P.

    2005-09-01

    The thesis deals with the occurrence of 238 U-series radionuclides and particle-bound 210 Pb and 210 Po in Finnish groundwater-based drinking water, methods used for removing 234 U, 238 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po, and the annual effective doses caused by 238 U-series radionuclides in drinking water. In order to reduce radiation exposure and avoid high doses, it is important to examine the activity levels of natural radionuclides in groundwater. In this work, the activity concentrations of radon ( 222 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), uranium ( 238 U and 234 U), lead ( 210 Pb) and polonium ( 210 Po) were determined from 472 private wells, which were selected randomly from across Finland. On the basis of the results, the activity concentrations in groundwater and the radiation exposure from drinking water of people living outside the public water supply in Finland was specified. The efficiency of 238 U, 234 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po removal from drinking water was examined at ten private homes. In order to obtain accurate results and correct estimates of effective doses, attention was paid to the sampling of 222 Rn and 210 Pb, and the determination of 210 Pb. The results revealed that the median activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were as much as ten times higher in drilled wells than in wells dug in soil. The average activity concentration of 222 Rn in drilled wells was 460 Bq/l and in dug wells 50 Bq/l. The highest activity concentrations were found in Southern Finland. In addition, occasional high activity concentrations were found all over Finland. The average activity concentrations of 234 U and 238 U in drilled wells were 0.35 and 0.26 Bq/l and in dug wells 0.020 and 0.015 Bq/l, respectively. The spatial distribution of 234 U, 238 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po was essentially similar to that of 222 Rn. In contrast to other natural radionuclides, the highest 226 Ra activity concentrations were found in coastal areas, since drilled well water near the sea has a higher salinity

  1. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Raghunath, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., 238 U series, 232 Th series and 40 K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed

  2. Primordial Radionuclides Distribution and dose Evaluation in Udagamandalam Region of Nilgiris in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, N. Muguntha; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India); Raghunath, V. M. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2001-09-15

    The activity concentration of primordial radionuclides i.e., {sup 238}U series, {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from Udagamandalam environment, have been measured by employing NaI (TI) Gamma ray Spectrometer. The absorbed gamma dose rate has also been simultaneously measured by using both environmental radiation dosimeter at each soil sampling location (ambient gamma dose) as well as from the gamma dose derived from the activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides. The results of activity concentration of each radionuclides in soil, absorbed dose rate in air due to soil activity and possible cosmic radiation at each location along with human effective dose equivalent for Udagamandalam environment are presented and discussed.

  3. Determination of key radionuclides and parameters related to dose from the Columbia River pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These scoping calculations may include some radionuclides and pathways that were included in the Phase 1 Columbia River pathway dose evaluations, as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in future Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) modeling efforts. This scoping calculation (Calculation 009) examines the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in water, fish, and other aquatic biota. Addressed in these calculations are the contributions to effective dose from (1) external exposure to contaminated river water, ( 2) ingestion of contaminated drinking water, and (3) ingestion of contaminated resident Columbia River fish. Additional information on contamination of anadromous fish and waterfowl is provided

  4. Fukushima radionuclides in the NW Pacific, and assessment of doses for Japanese and world population from ingestion of seafood

    OpenAIRE

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Hirose, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Variations of Fukushima-derived radionuclides (90Sr, 134Cs and 137Cs) in seawater and biota offshore Fukushima and in the NW Pacific Ocean were investigated and radiation doses to the Japanese and world population from ingestion of seafood contaminated by Fukushima radionuclides were estimated and compared with those from other sources of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides. The total effective dose commitment from ingestion of radionuclides in fish, shellfish and seaweed caught in coasta...

  5. Individual doses from radionuclides released to the Baltic coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    Individual doses to critical groups from a continuous unit release of nuclides from high-level waste to a coast area were calculated. The selection of nuclides for this study was based on experience of their importance from a radiological point of view. The coastal area should be representative for average conditions along the Swedish Baltic coast. The costal area was simulated in the model by compartments for water and sediment, respectively. Six exposure pathways for activity from the water and sediment reservoirs were considered. The ecosystem was assumed to be similar to present conditions in Sweden. This was also the case concerning diet and living habits. In addition, the doses from naturally occurring nuclides in the uranium decay chains were calculated, based on natural levels. The calculations were carried out with the BIOPATH and PRISM codes. The latter code was used to obtain the uncertainty in the results due to the uncertainty in the input parameter values. (au) (34 refs., 15 tbls.)

  6. Neptun: an interactive code for calculating doses to man due to radionuclides in acquatic food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, Reto.

    1980-07-01

    A flexible and interactive code, NEPTUN, has been written in FORTRAN IV for the PDP-10 computer to assess the impact on man of radionuclides in aquatic food chains. NEPTUN is based on an equilibrium model of the linear-chain type, and calculates aquatic food concentrations and doses to man. A decay term is included for the holdup time of the various food types. A total of seven food types can be selected, which include drinking water, freshwater and salt-water plants, inverebrates and fish. Thirty different diets can be implemented and five different dose factor files can be chosen. These include dose conversion factors for infants and adults based on ICRP 2 and ICRP 26 methodologies. All dose factors involve a dose commitment of 50 years, or equivalently, 50 years of chronic exposure. To date, only stochastic ICRP 26 dose caluclations have been implemented. The basic concentration factor file contains data for 211 different radionuclides; the dose factor files are less comprehensive. However, all files can be readily expanded. The output includes tables of concentrations and doses for individual radionuclides, as well as summaries for groups of radionuclides. Existing aquatic food chain models and the sources of currently-used generic concentration factors are briefly reviewed, and dose factors based on ICRP 2 and ICRP 26 methodologies are contrasted. (auth)

  7. Bioavailability of radionuclides and dose rate in aquatic ecosystems within the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, Dmitri; Nazarov, Alexandr

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Our studies were carried out during 1997-2007 within Krasnensky flood-lands on the left bank of the Pripyat River, which is the most contaminated region of the Ukrainian part of the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone. During 1991-1993 the complex of hydraulic engineering structures as flood protection dams was constructed within the Krasnensky flood-lands, which preventing washing away of radioactive substances from soils and changing a hydrological mode of flood plain flows during a high water. In its turn it was by the reason of strengthening of over-moistening and swamping processes within embankment territories. As a result - on a background of the common tendencies of increase of the mobile forms of 90 Sr in soils of catchment territories and bottom sediments of the exclusion zone, there is an increase of humic acids concentrations in waterlogged soils of Krasnensky flood-lands. It is also raises the content of the water-soluble forms of 90 Sr forming with acids the soluble complexes. Thus the increase of concentrations of the mobile radionuclide forms and their inclusion into biotic circulation of aquatic ecosystems is observed. It confirms also an increase of 90 Sr specific activity in water of lakes within Krasnensky flood-lands, against a background of stabilisation of this parameter for 137 Cs last years. Such dynamics of 90 Sr and 137 Cs contents is significantly reflected on dose rate for hydrobionts due to incorporated radionuclides. However if in running water bodies the decrease of radionuclide contents defines, accordingly, and the decrease of dose rates, in lakes of the left-bank flood-lands of the Pripyat River the situation has an absolutely other character. At rather stable internal absorbed dose rate, caused by 137 Cs during 1993-2007, the dose, caused by the 90 Sr content, has grown more than in 20 times for some species of higher aquatic plants and fish in comparison with the beginning of 1990-s. As a result the total internal dose

  8. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups

  9. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1992-01-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system use relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the code Electron Gamma Shower (EGS4). Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessel sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was or cross fire between blood vessels was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the doses to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures

  10. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses: Relationships between annual limits on intake and prenatal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    This addendum describes approaches for calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from maternal intakes of radionuclides at levels corresponding to fractions or multiples of the Annual Limits on Intake (ALI). Information, concerning metabolic or dosimetric characteristics and the placental transfer of selected, occupationally significant radionuclides was presented in NUREG/CR-5631, Revision 1. That information was used to estimate levels of radioactivity in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry. Extension of MIRD methodology to accommodate gestational-stage-dependent characteristics allowed dose calculations for the simplified situation based on introduction of 1 μCi into the woman's transfer compartment (blood). The expanded scenarios in this addendum include repeated or chronic ingestion or inhalation intakes by a woman during pregnancy and body burdens at the beginning of pregnancy. Tables present dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus relative to intakes of these radionuclides in various chemical or physical forms and from preexisting maternal burdens corresponding to ALI; complementary intake values (fraction of an ALI and μCi) that yield a dose equivalent of 0.05 rem are included. Similar tables give these measures of dose equivalency to the uterus from intakes of radionuclides for use as surrogates for embryo/fetus dose when biokinetic information is not available

  12. Background and anthropogenic radionuclide derived dose rates to freshwater ecosystem - Nuclear power plant cooling pond - Reference organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedveckaite, T.; Filistovic, V.; Marciulioniene, D.; Prokoptchuk, N.; Plukiene, R.; Gudelis, A.; Remeikis, V.; Yankovich, T.; Beresford, N.-A.

    2011-01-01

    The radiological assessment of non-human biota to demonstrate protection is now accepted by a number of international and national bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific basis to assess and evaluate exposure of biota to ionizing radiation. Radionuclides from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Lithuania) were discharged into Lake Druksiai cooling pond. Additional radionuclide migration and recharge to this lake from a hypothetical near-surface, low-level radioactive waste disposal, to be situated 1.5 km from the lake, had been simulated using RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This paper uses ERICA Integrated Approach with associated tools and databases to compare the radiological dose to freshwater reference organisms. Based on these data, it can be concluded that background dose rates to non-human biota in Lake Druksiai far exceed those attributable to anthropogenic radionuclides. With respect the fishery and corresponding annual committed effective human dose as a result of this fish consumption Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body with intensive angling and possible commercial fishing. - Highlights: → Dose rates to the reference organisms are lower than expected from the background radioactivity. → Pelagic fish part of adult human annual committed effective dose would be as small as a few μSv y -1 . → With respect the fishery Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body.

  13. Estimation of doses to individuals from radionuclides disposed of in Solid Waste Storage Area 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Huff, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    A simple methodology has been applied to estimate maximum possible doses to individuals from exposure to radionuclides released from Solid Waste Storage Area No. 6. This is the only operating shallow-land disposal site for radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology is based upon simple, conservative assumptions. A data base of radionuclides disposed of in trenches and auger holes was prepared, and several radionuclide transport and ingestion scenarios were considered. The results of these simulations demonstrate the potential for adverse health effects associated with this waste disposal area, and support the need for further calculations using more complete and realistic assumptions

  14. Extension of the biological effective dose to the MIRD schema and possible implications in radionuclide therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Prideaux, Andrew R.; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George

    2008-01-01

    In dosimetry-based treatment planning protocols, patients with rapid clearance of the radiopharmaceutical require a larger amount of initial activity than those with slow clearance to match the absorbed dose to the critical organ. As a result, the dose-rate to the critical organ is higher in patients with rapid clearance and may cause unexpected toxicity compared to patients with slow clearance. In order to account for the biological impact of different dose-rates, radiobiological modeling is beginning to be applied to the analysis of radionuclide therapy patient data. To date, the formalism used for these analyses is based on kinetics derived from activity in a single organ, the target. This does not include the influence of other source organs to the dose and dose-rate to the target organ. As a result, only self-dose irradiation in the target organ contributes to the dose-rate. In this work, the biological effective dose (BED) formalism has been extended to include the effect of multiple source organ contributions to the net dose-rate in a target organ. The generalized BED derivation has been based on the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee (MIRD) schema assuming multiple source organs following exponential effective clearance of the radionuclide. A BED-based approach to determine the largest safe dose to critical organs has also been developed. The extended BED formalism is applied to red marrow dosimetry, as well as kidney dosimetry considering the cortex and the medulla separately, since both those organs are commonly dose limiting in radionuclide therapy. The analysis shows that because the red marrow is an early responding tissue (high α/β), it is less susceptible to unexpected toxicity arising from rapid clearance of high levels of administered activity in the marrow or in the remainder of the body. In kidney dosimetry, the study demonstrates a complex interplay between clearance of activity in the cortex and the medulla, as well as the initial

  15. Evaluation of radionuclide levels and radiological dose in three populations of marine mammals in the eastern Canadian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, C.R.; Ewing, L.L.; Wiewel, A.M.; Harris, D.A.; Stewart, R.E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Radionuclide levels were measured in beluga, walrus and ringed seal populations collected in 1992 to assess radiation dose and changes in dose with age and sex. The authors hypothesized that Arctic marine food chains accumulate high levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides such as polonium-210 and that radiation may pose a stress to animals which also accumulate metals such as cadmium. Liver, kidney, muscle and jawbone were analyzed by gamma spectrometry for cesium-137, cesium-134, lead-210, potassium-40 and radium-226 and fission-derived nuclides. Polonium-210 was analyzed by alpha spec after autodeposition onto a silver disk. Cesium-137 concentrations in muscle in all three populations were low, and ranged from below detection limits to 10 Bq/kg ww. There was no evidence of fission-derived radionuclides such as zinc-65 or cobalt-60. Lead-210 levels ranged from below detection limits in muscle of ringed seal and walrus to a mean of 82.3 Bq/kg ww in walrus bone. Polonium-210 in the three population ranged from 10 to 30 Bq/kg ww in bone and kidney. The major contributor to dose in the animals was polonium-210 because it is an alpha emitter and accumulates to moderate levels in liver and kidney. Radiological dose is approximately 20--30 times higher than background in humans, and is considerably lower than the dose observed in terrestrial food chains in the Arctic

  16. Effects of indoor residence on radiation doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Dose reduction factors from indoor residence during routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere were studied using models that are suitable for application to arbitrary source terms. Dose reduction factors for internal exposure to inhaled radionuclides account for air ventilation and deposition on inside building surfaces. Estimated internal dose reduction factors are approx. 0.2 to 0.8 for particulates and 0.07 to 0.4 for radioiodine. Dose reduction factors for external photon exposure from airborne and surface-deposited sources are based on the point-kernel integration method. Values for source terms from a fuel reprocessing plant and a hypothetical reactor accident are within a factor of 2 of the value 0.5 adopted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for population dose assessments. For the release at Three Mile Island nuclear station, however, the external dose reduction factor may be an order of magnitude less than the value adopted by the NRC

  17. Committed effective doses at various times after intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed effective doses at nine times after intake from intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu 1 AMAD particles by adults. Data are given for various chemical forms of 359 nuclides. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on committed equivalent doses to organs is given in NRPB-M288. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  18. Evaluation of the absorbed doses in conditions of external and internal contamination with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevic, K.; Stojanovic, D.; Markovic, P.

    1981-01-01

    In experimental conditions of contamination with radionuclides of the skin and skin injuries, an evaluation of the degree of local irradiation in decontamined region and doses absorbed in organs of selective accumulating was carried out by use of mathematical models and tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosemeters. The evaluation of the absorbed doses based on conception, that in adequate analyses of decontamination effect, as a most efficient medico-prophilactic measure from local and total irradiation, should be taken into account the total body burden of the penetrated radionuclide, selective accumulating in critical organs or tissues, as well as the residual radioactivity in decontaminated region. (author)

  19. Transfer factors for assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Colsher, C.S.; Thompson, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    Transfer factors to predict the environmental transport of radionuclides through terrestrial foodchains to man were derived from the literature for radionuclides associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. We present updated transfer coefficients to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in cow's milk and other animal products and concentration factors (CF) to predict the concentration in a food or feed crop from that in soil. Where possible we note the variation of the transfer factor with physical and chemical form of the radionuclide and environmental factors, and characterize the distribution and uncertainty in the estimate. The updated transfer factors are compared with those listed in regulatory guides. The new estimates lead to recommended changes (both increases and decreases) in the listed transfer coefficients for milk and meat and to the suggested practice of adopting multiple soil-to-plant CF's that vary with the type of crop and soil in the place of a single generic CF to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in a crop from that in soil. The updated transfer factors will be useful to assess the dose from radionuclides released from nuclear facilities and evaluating compliance with regulations governing the release of radionuclides

  20. Evaluation of radionuclide concentrations in high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, D.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes a possible approach for development of a numerical definition of the term ''high-level radioactive waste.'' Five wastes are identified which are recognized as being high-level wastes under current, non-numerical definitions. The constituents of these wastes are examined and the most hazardous component radionuclides are identified. This report suggests that other wastes with similar concentrations of these radionuclides could also be defined as high-level wastes. 15 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Calculation of dose point kernels for five radionuclides used in radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okigaki, S.; Ito, A.; Uchida, I.; Tomaru, T.

    1994-01-01

    With the recent interest in radioimmunotherapy, attention has been given to calculation of dose distribution from beta rays and monoenergetic electrons in tissue. Dose distribution around a point source of a beta ray emitting radioisotope is referred to as a beta dose point kernel. Beta dose point kernels for five radionuclides such as 131 I, 186 Re, 32 P, 188 Re, and 90 Y appropriate for radioimmunotherapy are calculated by Monte Carlo method using the EGS4 code system. Present results were compared with the published data of experiments and other calculations. Accuracy and precisions of beta dose point kernels are discussed. (author)

  2. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  3. Selection of dominant radionuclides for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. A vital step in the estimation of radiation doses is the determination of the source term,'' that is, the quantities of radionuclides that were released to the environment from the various Hanford operations. Hanford operations have at various times involved hundreds of different radionuclides, some in relatively large quantities. Those radionuclides present in the largest quantities, although significant from an operational handling point of view, may not necessarily have been those of greatest concern for offsite radiation dose. This report documents the selection of the dominant radionuclides (those that may have resulted in the largest portion of the received doses) in the source term for Phase 1 of the HEDR Project, that is, for atmospheric releases from 1944 through 1947 and for surface water releases from 1964 through 1966. 15 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Activity concentrations and mean annual effective dose from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Lebanese diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreddine, L.; Hwalla, N.; El Samad, O.; Baydoun, R.; Hamze, M.; Parent-Massin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Since the primary factor contributing to the internal effective dose in the human organism is contaminated food, the control of radionuclides in food represents the most important means of protection. This study was conducted to determine the levels of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to gamma-emitting radioisotopes. The activity concentrations of gamma-emitting radioisotopes have been measured in food samples that represent the market basket of an adult urban population in Lebanon. The artificial radionuclide 137 Cs was measured above detection limits in only fish, meat and milk-based deserts. The most abundant natural radionuclide was 40 K (31-121 Bq kg -1 ), with the highest content in fish and meat samples. The annual mean effective dose contributed by 40 K in the reference typical diet was estimated equal to 186 μSv y -1 , a value reasonably consistent with findings reported by several other countries. (authors)

  5. Lifestyle and age as determinates of intake and dose from inhaled radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The whole-body dose from inhaled radionuclides is a complex function of factors describing exposure and physiology. Exposure-related factors may be estimated by considering likely emission rates combined with measured time-varying meteorological (transport) parameters and estimated exercise patterns. Physiological factors, strongly influencing radionuclide intake and consequent radiation dose, have been catalogued as functions of age and activity level. Both exercise patterns and physiological factors are related to age of the exposed individual. Combining these factors permits estimates to be made of the span of exposures that may be expected in a typical population. The ratio of highest to lowest radionuclide intake is predicted to be of the order of 40, suggesting that specification of an 'average' value may be misleading if this value approaches regulatory limits. Individuals exposed to maximal risk may be identified, and are likely to be active children. Activity pattern (lifestyle) is a primary determinant of risk. (author)

  6. Radiation doses to the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.; Phipps, A.; Khursheed, A.

    1996-01-01

    In 1987 the International Commission on Radiological Protection set up a Task Group of Committee 2 charged with the responsibility for calculating radiation doses from incorporated radionuclides for all age groups in the population. This includes the development of models for calculating doses to the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother. The development of models for calculating doses to the embryo and fetus is complex. Particular problems that have had to be addressed are the limited amount of human data available and the consequent need to use both the results of animal studies and chemical analogies; the varying rate of tissue and organ development in different species; the lack of detailed information on the distribution and retention of radionuclides in tissues of the embryo and fetus following intakes by the mother, either before or during gestation, and the radiation sensitivity of tissues of the embryo and fetus. In the development of dosimetric models for specific elements, human data have been used as far as is possible. Where this has not been available a generic modelling approach has been adopted. The models are being used to calculate doses to both mother and offspring for acute and chronic intakes, both before conception and at various times during gestation. Committed doses are being calculated as well as doses to birth. The results of preliminary dose calculations are considered. (author)

  7. Derivation of residual radionuclide inventory guidelines for implace closure of high-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, L.; Yuan, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Residual radionuclide inventory guidelines were derived for the high-level waste tanks at a vitrification facility. The decommissioning scenario assumed for this derivation was that the tanks were to be stabilized at the present locations and the site is released for unrestricted use following a 100-year institutional control period. It was assumed that loss of institutional control would occur at 100-years following tank closure. The derivation of the residual radionuclide inventory guidelines was based on the requirement that the effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a hypothetical individual who lives in the vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose of 0.15 mSv/yr off-site and 5 mSv/yr on-site following closure of the tanks. The RESRAD computer code, modified for exposure scenarios specific for the site, was used for this evaluation. The results of the derivation indicate that the allowable off-site dose limit will not be exceeded. The estimated potential doses to individuals using water offsite from a creek are negligibly small fractions of the 0.15 mSv/yr allowable dose limit. With an assumed 3% heel remaining in the tanks, the estimated peak dose rate for the future offsite water user is about 0.00025 mSv/yr. The residual radionuclide inventory guidelines derived based on potential doses to the on-site resident farmer indicate that, with the exception of Tc-99 and C-14, a 3% heel remaining in the tanks would not result in doses exceeding the 5 mSv/yr allowable dose limit. For this on-site exposure scenario, the peak dose rates occur at about 2000 years after tank closure. The peak dose rate is calculated to be 25 mSv/yr, with greater than 99% produced by four radionuclides: C-14, Tc-99, Np-237, and Am-241. Ingestion of contaminated vegetation contributes most (90%) of the peak dose. Since the inventories used for the derivation are mostly estimated from fuel depletion calculations. There is a need to determine further the actual inventories of these

  8. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, D.; Telenta, B.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  9. Calculated dose factors for the radiosensitive tissues in bone irradiated by surface-deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiers, F.W.; Whitwell, J.R.; Beddoe, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The method of calculating dose factors for the haemopoietic marrow and endosteal tissues in human trabecular bone, used by Whitwell and Spiers for volume-seeking radionuclides, has been developed for the case of radionuclides which are deposited as very thin layers on bone surfaces. The Monte Carlo method is again used, but modifications to the computer program are made to allow for a surface rather than a volume source of particle emission. The principal change is the introduction of a surface-orientation factor which is shown to have a value of approximately 2, varying slightly with bone structure. Results are given for β-emitting radionuclides ranging from 171 Tm(anti Esub(β) = 0.025 MeV) to 90 Y(anti Esub(β) = 0.93 MeV), and also for the α-emitter 239 Pu. It is shown that where the particle ranges are short compared with the dimensions of the bone structures the dose factors for the surface seekers are much greater than those for the volume seekers. For long range particles the dose factors for surface- and volume-seeking radionuclides converge. Comparisons are given relating the dose factors calculated in this paper on the basis of measured bone structures to those of other workers based on single plane geometry. (author)

  10. Estimates of external dose-rate conversion factors and internal dose conversion factors for selected radionuclides released from fusion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Togawa, Orihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    This report provides a tabulation of both external dose-rate conversion factors and internal dose conversion factors using radioactive decay data in the updated Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) for selected 26 radionuclides and all their daughter radionuclides of potential importance in safety assessments of fusion facilities. The external dose-rate conversion factors for 21 target organs are tabulated for three exposure modes that are immersion in contaminated air, irradiation at a height of 1 m above a contaminated ground surface and immersion contaminated water. For internal exposure, committed dose equivalents, based on the methodology of ICRP Publication 30, in the same target organs per intake of unit activity are given for the inhalation and ingestion exposure pathways. The data presented here is intended to be generally used for safety assessments of fusion reactors. Comparisons of external effective dose-rate conversion factors and committed effective dose equivalents are made with the previous data from the independent data bases to provide quality assurance on our calculated results. There is generally good agreement among data from the independent data bases. The differences in the values of both effective dose-rate and dose conversion factors appeared are primarily due to differences in calculational methodology, the use of different radioactive decay data, and compilation errors. (author)

  11. Uptake of radionuclides by vegetation at a High Arctic location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdall, M.; Gwynn, J.P.; Moran, C.; O'Dea, J.; Davids, C.; Lind, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radionuclide levels in vegetation from a High Arctic location were studied and compared to in situ soil concentrations. Levels of the anthropogenic radionuclide 137 Cs and the natural radionuclides 40 K, 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th are discussed and transfer factor (TF) values and aggregated transfer (Tag) values are calculated for vascular plants. Levels of 137 Cs in vegetation generally followed the order mosses > lichen > vascular plants. The uptake of 137 Cs in vascular plants showed an inverse relationship with the uptake of 40 K, with 137 Cs TF and Tag values generally higher than 40 K TF and Tag values. 40 K activity concentrations in all vegetation showed little correlation to associated soil concentrations, while the uptake of 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th by vascular and non-vascular plants was generally low. - Uptake of the anthropogenic radionuclide 137 Cs is highest for moss species

  12. Estimation of radionuclide ingestion: Lessons from dose reconstruction for fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1994-01-01

    The United States conducted atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1963. In 1979 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project to compile a data base related to health effects from nuclear testing and to reconstruct doses to public residing off of the Nevada Test Site. This project is the most comprehensive dose reconstruction project to date, and, since similar assessments are currently underway at several other locations within and outside the U.S., lessons from ORERP can be valuable. A major component of dose reconstruction is estimation of dose from radionuclide ingestion. The PATHWAY food-chain model was developed to estimate the amount of radionuclides ingested. For agricultural components of the human diet, PATHWAY predicts radionuclide concentrations and quantities ingested. To improve accuracy and model credibility, four components of model analysis were conducted: estimation of uncertainty in model predictions, estimation of sensitivity of model predictions to input parameters, and testing of model predictions against independent data (validation), and comparing predictions from PATHWAY with those from other models. These results identified strengths and weaknesses in the model and aided in establishing the confidence associated with model prediction, which is a critical component risk assessment and dose reconstruction. For fallout from the Nevada Test Site, by far, the largest internal doses were received by the thyroid. However, the predicted number of fatal cancers from ingestion dose was generally much smaller than the number predicted from external dose. The number of fatal cancers predicted from ingestion dose was also orders of magnitude below the normal projected cancer rate. Several lessons were learned during the study that are relevant to other dose reconstruction efforts

  13. Assessment of Dose to the Nursing Infant from Radionuclides in Breast Milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    A computer software package was developed to predict tissue doses to an infant due to intake of radionuclides in breast milk based on bioassay measurements and exposure data for the mother. The package is intended mainly to aid in decisions regarding the safety of breast feeding by a mother who has been acutely exposed to a radionuclide during lactation or pregnancy, but it may be applied to previous intakes during the mother s adult life. The package includes biokinetic and dosimetric information needed to address intake of Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ir-192, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, or Cf-252 by the mother. It has been designed so that the library of biokinetic and dosimetric files can be expanded to address a more comprehensive set of radionuclides without modifying the basic computational module. The methods and models build on the approach used in Publication 95 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 2004), Doses to Infants from Ingestion of Radionuclides in Mothers Milk . The software package allows input of case-specific information or judgments such as chemical form or particle size of an inhaled aerosol. The package is expected to be more suitable than ICRP Publication 95 for dose assessment for real events or realistic planning scenarios in which measurements of the mother s excretion or body burden are available.

  14. Age-specific inhalation radiation dose commitment factors for selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    Inhalation dose commitment factors are presented for selected radionuclides for exposure of individuals in four age groups: infant, child, teen and adult. Radionuclides considered are 35 S, 36 Cl, 45 Ca, 67 Ga, 75 Se, 85 Sr, 109 Cd, 113 Sn, 125 I, 133 Ba, 170 Tm, 169 Yb, 182 Ta, 192 Ir, 198 Au, 201 Tl, 204 Tl, and 236 Pu. The calculational method is based on the human metabolic model of ICRP as defined in Publication 2 (ICRP 1959) and as used in previous age-specific dose factor calculations by Hoenes and Soldat (1977). Dose commitment factors are presented for the following organs of reference: total body, bone, liver, kidney, thyroid, lung and lower large intestine

  15. Measurement of beta emitting radionuclides in dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastan, S.; Soylu, A.; Kucuk, O.; Ibis, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Radionuclides for diagnostics purposes like Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67 and In-111 are measured by using ionization type of dose calibrators. Therapeutic radionuclides, which emit both beta and gamma rays are detected by the same type of dose calibrators. Other therapeutic products like Y-90, P-32 and Sr-89 are pure beta emitters and they are gaining wider utility because various new therapy radiopharmaceuticals are being developed. The type of container material, like glass or plastic, may seriously affect radioactivity measurement due to attenuation, Since it is crucial to give the exact amount of radioactivity to the patient for therapy purposes, dedicated dose calibrators are specially manufactured for the measurement of these radionuclides. But these measuring systems are not widely available in nuclear medicine centers where therapy is applied to the patient. It is a known fact that dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments can be calibrated for vials and syringes using standard sources of the same radioisotope. The method of calibration of Y-90 measurement for two ionization chamber dose calibrators available in the institute will be summarized in this presentation

  16. Measurement of beta emitting radionuclides in dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tastan, S.; Soylu, A.; Kucuk, O.; Ibis, E.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides for diagnostics purposes like Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67 and In-111 are measured by using ionization type of dose calibrators. Therapeutic radionuclides, which emit both beta and gamma rays are detected by the same type of dose calibrators. Other therapeutic products like Y-90, P-32 and Sr-89 are pure beta emitters and they are gaining wider utility because various new therapy radiopharmaceuticals are being developed. The type of container material, like glass or plastic, may seriously affect radioactivity measurement due to attenuation, Since it is crucial to give the exact amount of radioactivity to the patient for therapy purposes, dedicated dose calibrators are specially manufactured for the measurement of these radionuclides. But these measuring systems are not widely available in nuclear medicine centers where therapy is applied to the patient. It is a known fact that dose calibrators routinely used in nuclear medicine departments can be calibrated for vials and syringes using standard sources of the same radioisotope. The method of calibration of Y-90 measurement for two ionization chamber dose calibrators available in the institute will be summarized in this presentation. (author)

  17. REIDAC. A software package for retrospective dose assessment in internal contamination with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Takada, Chie; Takasaki, Koji; Ito, Kimio; Momose, Takumaro; Hato, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Oeda, Mikihiro; Kurosawa, Naohiro; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Yamada, Yuji; Akashi, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    For cases of internal contamination with radionuclides, it is necessary to perform an internal dose assessment to facilitate radiation protection. For this purpose, the ICRP has supplied the dose coefficients and the retention and excretion rates for various radionuclides. However, these dosimetric quantities are calculated under typical conditions and are not necessarily detailed enough for dose assessment situations in which specific information on the incident or/and individual biokinetic characteristics could or should be taken into account retrospectively. This paper describes a newly developed PC-based software package called Retrospective Internal Dose Assessment Code (REIDAC) that meets the needs of retrospective dose assessment. REIDAC is made up of a series of calculation programs and a package of software. The former calculates the dosimetric quantities for any radionuclide being assessed and the latter provides a user with the graphical user interface (GUI) for executing the programs, editing parameter values and displaying results. The accuracy of REIDAC was verified by comparisons with dosimetric quantities given in the ICRP publications. This paper presents the basic structure of REIDAC and its calculation methods. Sensitivity analysis of the aerosol size for 239 Pu compounds and provisional calculations for wound contamination with 241 Am were performed as examples of the practical application of REIDAC. (author)

  18. External exposure doses due to gamma emitting natural radionuclides in some Egyptian building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharram, B M; Suliman, M N; Zahran, N F; Shennawy, S E; El Sayed, A R

    2012-01-01

    Using of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K and their progeny results in an external exposures of the housing of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for typical Egyptian rooms are calculated using the analytical method and activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in some building materials. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling assumed. Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K content in eight samples representative Clay soil and different building materials used in most recent Egyptian building were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The specific activity for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, from the selected samples, were in the range 14.15-60.64, 2.75-84.66 and 7.35-554.4Bqkg(-1), respectively. The average indoor absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 0.005μGyh(-1) to 0.071μGyh(-1) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation varies from 0.025 to 0.345mSv. An outdoor dose rate for typical building samples in addition to some radiological hazards has been introduced for comparison. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of doses due to radionuclides in sewage sludge for different scenario of its use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydagiene, R.; Morkunas, G.; Pilkyte, L.

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of doses due to radionuclides in sewage sludge for different scenarios of its use was made for sewage plant storage in Visaginas, Rimses district, Karlu village. Calculations of individual and collective doses were made on the basis of results of measurements. Two potential exposure pathways from radionuclides in sewage sludge were considered and two scenarios descriptions were made. The first scenario is when the sludge is using for fertilization, and the second one - the sludge is covered with soil. Using program Environ-Calc made by American Chemical Society the number of samples needed to be sampled was optimized. 38 sewage samples were collected for gamma spectrometrical measurements and 10 samples - for measurements of tritium activity. Results of measurements pointed out that the sludge has no higher activity of tritium that background ones. The only two man made radionuclides 60 Co and 137 Cs were found by gamma spectrometry in the sludge. Average activity for the fresh weight in the samples of 60 Co was 42 Bq/kg, 137 Cs - 10 Bq/kg. Concentration of natural radionuclides was in the same range as in any soil samples from Lithuania. The dose for the first scenario for 1 years child will be 12 μSv, for adult - 9,4 μSv. In another scenario doses for the workers in sewage plant were estimated as 0,76 mSv. Collective dose in case of use of sewage sludge for fertilizers will be 4,4*10 -3 man Sv. The lowest doses will be when the sewage storage is covered using soil. (author)

  20. Uptake, depuration, and radiation dose estimation in zebrafish exposed to radionuclides via aqueous or dietary routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinardy, Helena C., E-mail: helena.reinardy@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Teyssie, Jean-Louis, E-mail: J.Teyssie@iaea.org [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco); Jeffree, Ross A., E-mail: R.Jeffree@iaea.org [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco); Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Copplestone, David, E-mail: David.copplestone@stir.ac.uk [School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling (United Kingdom); Henry, Theodore B., E-mail: ted.henry@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: A.Jha@plymouth.ac.uk [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    Understanding uptake and depuration of radionuclides in organisms is necessary to relate exposure to radiation dose and ultimately to biological effects. We investigated uptake and depuration of a mixture of radionuclides to link bioaccumulation with radiation dose in zebrafish, Danio rerio. Adult zebrafish were exposed to radionuclides ({sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 75}Se, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 241}Am) at tracer levels (< 200 Bq g{sup -1}) for 14 d, either via water or diet. Radioactivity concentrations were measured in whole body and excised gonads of exposed fish during uptake (14 d) and depuration phases (47 d and 42 d for aqueous and dietary exposures respectively), and dose rates were modelled from activity concentrations in whole body and exposure medium (water or diet). After 14-day aqueous exposure, radionuclides were detected in decreasing activity concentrations: {sup 75}Se > {sup 65}Zn > {sup 109}Cd > {sup 110m}Ag > {sup 54}Mn > {sup 60}Co > {sup 241}Am > {sup 134}Cs (range: 175-8 Bq g{sup 1}). After dietary exposure the order of radionuclide activity concentration in tissues (Bq g{sup -1}) was: {sup 65}Zn > {sup 60}Co > {sup 75}Se > {sup 109}Cd > {sup 110m}Ag > {sup 241}Am > {sup 54}Mn > {sup 134}Cs (range: 91-1 Bq g{sup -1}). Aqueous exposure resulted in higher whole body activity concentrations for all radionuclides except {sup 60}Co. Route of exposure did not appear to influence activity concentrations in gonads, except for {sup 54}Mn, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 75}Se, which had higher activity concentrations in gonads following aqueous exposure. Highest gonad activity concentrations (Bq g{sup -1}) were for {sup 75}Se (211), {sup 109}Cd (142), and {sup 65}Zn (117), and highest dose rates ({mu}Gy h{sup -1}) were from {sup 241}Am (aqueous, 1050; diet 242). This study links radionuclide bioaccumulation data obtained in laboratory experiments with radiation dose determined by application of a dosimetry modelling tool, an

  1. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  2. Link 'soil-plant' as critical in formation committed doses from uptake of long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravetz, A. P.; Pavlenko, Y. A.; Grodzinsky, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    General algorithm of calculation dose from intake 137 Cs and 90 Sr depending upon level of pollution and agrochemical type of soil where trophycal chains to begin with, have been proposed. This methods consider link 'soil → plant' as critical in formation of doses from the intake long-lived radionuclides. Calculation of committed dose as function of type of soil and level of radionuclide pollution have been realized for seven main soil types of the White Russian and Ukrainian Wooded district. (author)

  3. Extrapolation of experimental data on late effects of low-dose radionuclides in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalistratova, V.S.; Nisimov, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    The situation of living of population on radionuclide contamination areas was simulated in the experimental study using white strainless rats of different ages. The significance of age for late stochastic effects of internal radionuclide contamination with low doses of 131 I, 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 106 Ru was studied. Some common regularities and differences in late effects formation depending on age were found. Results of the study showed that the number of tumors developed increased in groups of animals exposed at the youngest age. The younger animal at the moment of internal radionuclide contamination, the higher percentage of malignant tumors appeared. It was especially so for tumors of endocrine glands (pituitary, suprarenal,- and thyroid). Differences in late effects formation related to different type of radionuclide distribution within the body were estimated. On the base of extrapolation the conclusion was made that human organism being exposed at early postnatal or pubertal period could be the most radiosensitive (1.5-2.0 or sometimes even 3-5 times higher than adults). Data confirmed the opinion that children are the most critical part of population even in case of low dose radiation exposure. (author)

  4. Parameters on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants for Korean food chain dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, K. M.; Cho, Y. H.

    2001-12-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. In this report, results of last about 15 years' studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, were summarized and put together. Soil-to-plant transfer factors, parameters quantifying the root uptake of radionuclides, were measured through greenhouse experiments and field studies. In addition to traditional transfer factors, which are based on the activity in unit weight of soil, those based on the activity applied to unit area of soil surface were also investigated. Interception factors, translocation factors and weathering half lives, parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, were investigated through greenhouse experiments. The levels of initial plant contamination with HTO and I2 vapor were described with absorption factors. Especially for HTO vapor, 3H levels in crop plants at harvest were expressed with TFWT (tissue free water tritium) reduction factors and OBT (organically bound tritium) production factors. The above-mentioned parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops and radionuclide species and application times. On the basis of summarized results, the points to be amended or improved in food chain dose assessment models were discussed both for normal operation and for accidental release

  5. Radioimmunotherapy. Dose calculation and radionuclides used in treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, S.

    1995-10-01

    In radioimmunotherapy (RIT) monoclonal antibodies to cancer-associated antigens can be utilized for the transport of therapeutic radioisotopes to cancer cells. Intravenous administration of radiolabelled antibody is a potentially curative form of therapy in hematological amignancies as circulating antibodies have easy access to tumour sites. Intravenous RIT is less effective in the treatment of solid tumours because of the low fractional uptake of the injected dose, particularly in the central parts of tumours. In solid tumours more promising results have been achieved by local RIT applications. The choice of radiation - α, β or γ - will depend of the characteristics of the tumour. The importance of radiation delivered by Auger electrons has been largely underestimated in the past, but recent research has resulted in a remarkable reassessment of this issue significantly influencing the selection of radioisotopes for RIT. Research is now being focused on the therapeutic aspects of different isotopes and microdosimetric problems. There are now good prospects of RIT becoming an important form of cancer treatment before year 2000. (orig.) (78 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.)

  6. Skin dose estimation due to a contamination by a radionuclide β emitter: are doses equivalent good estimator of protection quantities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.

    2011-01-01

    When handling radioactive β emitters, measurements in terms of personal dose equivalents H p (0.07) are used to estimate the equivalent dose limit to skin or extremities given by regulations. First of all, analytical expressions for individual dose equivalents H p (0.07) and equivalent doses to the extremities H skin are given for a point source and for contamination with a radionuclide β emitter. Second of all, operational quantities and protection quantities are compared. It is shown that in this case the operational quantities significantly overstate the protection quantities. For a skin contamination the ratio between operational quantities and protection quantities is 2 for a maximum β energy of 3 MeV and 90 for a maximum β energy of 150 keV. (author)

  7. The BIDAS: bioassay data analysis software for evaluating radionuclide intake and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Young; Lee, Jong Il; Chang, Si Young

    2003-01-01

    The BIDAS (BIoassay Data Analysis Software) computer code was developed for the interpretation of bioassay measurements in terms of the intake and dose using the International Commission on Radiological Protection's(ICRP's) currently recommended respiratory tract, GI-tract and biokinetic models to describe the behavior of the radioactive materials within the body. The code consists of a data base module to the manage bioassay data, a data base module containing the predicted bioassay quantities of each radionuclide, and a computational module to the estimate radionuclide intake and dose from either an acute or a chronic exposure based on the measured bioassay quantities. This paper describes the features of the code as well as the results of the BIDAS validation

  8. SUBDOSA: a computer program for calculating external doses from accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Houston, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    A computer program, SUBDOSA, was developed for calculating external γ and β doses to individuals from the accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Characteristics of SUBDOSA are: doses from both γ and β radiation are calculated as a function of depth in tissue, summed and reported as skin, eye, gonadal, and total body dose; doses are calculated for releases within each of several release time intervals and nuclide inventories and atmospheric dispersion conditions are considered for each time interval; radioactive decay is considered during the release and/or transit using a chain decay scheme with branching to account for transitions to and from isomeric states; the dose from gamma radiation is calculated using a numerical integration technique to account for the finite size of the plume; and the program computes and lists the normalized air concentrations at ground level as a function of distance from the point of release. (auth)

  9. Estimation of the committed radiation dose resulting from gamma radionuclides ingested with food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotr Godyn; Agnieszka Dolhanczuk-Srodka; Zbigniew Ziembik; Ewa Moliszewska

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the value of the radiation dose absorbed in consequence of consumption of popular food products for individual age groups. Potatoes, corn and sugar beet were selected for the study. Edible parts of these plants were collected in experimental fields of the KWS Lochow Polska Sp. z o.o. seeding company in Kondratowice (Poland). On the basis of the obtained study results, it can be stated that in consequence of consumption of the selected food products, people may receive increased doses from both natural and artificial radioactive isotopes. The doses calculated for several age groups do not show any health hazards in consequence of consumption of the tested food. One of the determined radionuclides was 137 Cs; however, its presence in the absorbed dose is lower than the doses from natural radioactive isotopes, in particular 40 K. (author)

  10. Global collective dose commitments from release of long-lived radionuclides. Differential cost-benefit considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoerup, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14 C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle. Comparisons are made with similar estimates of global collective dose commitments resulting from the use of fossil fuels and certain fertilizers due to their content of uranium and its daughter products. In the case of long-lived radionuclides that remain in circulation in the biosphere, it is shown that the use of global collective dose commitments in differential cost-benefit analysis can lead to questionable results. In differential cost-benefit analysis it is suggested that population exposures should not simply be integrated irrespective of their time of occurrence, but that a certain discount rate should be applied for future doses. This suggestion is examined. (author)

  11. Dose evaluation model for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Iyogi, Takashi; Inaba, Jiro; Chiang, Jing-Hsien; Suwa, Hiroji; Koide, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    A dose evaluation model was developed for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which is located in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, and now undergoing test operation. The dose evaluation model suitable for medium- and long-term dose assessments for both prolonged and short-term releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere was developed on the PC. The ARAC-2, a particle tracing type dispersion model coupled with 3-D wind field calculation by a mass conservative model, was adopted as the atmospheric dispersion model. The terrestrial transfer model included movement in soil and groundwater as well as an agricultural and livestock farming system. The available site-specific social and environmental characteristics were incorporated in the model. Growing of the crops was also introduced and radionuclides absorbed were calculated from weight increase from the start of deposition to harvest, and transfer factors. Most of the computer code system of the models was completed by 2005, and this paper reports the results of the development. (author)

  12. The computation of ICRP dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides with PLEIADES: biokinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, T P

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients conveniently divides into two distinct parts--the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper gives a brief summary of the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES.

  13. The computation of ICRP dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides with PLEIADES: biokinetic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP has published dose coefficients for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides in a series of reports covering intakes by workers and members of the public including children and pregnant or lactating women. The calculation of these coefficients conveniently divides into two distinct parts - the biokinetic and dosimetric. This paper gives a brief summary of the methods used to solve the biokinetic problem in the generation of dose coefficients on behalf of the ICRP, as implemented in the Health Protection Agency's internal dosimetry code PLEIADES. (author)

  14. Influence of radiation-dose pattern from inhaled beta--gamma-emitting radionuclides on canine peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.K.; Boecker, B.B.; Pickrell, J.A.; Hobbs, C.H.; McClellan, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    As part of studies assess the biological hazards associated with inhaled radionuclides, periodic hematologic evaluations were performed on beagle dogs given a single nose-only exposure to aerosols of beta--gamma-emitting isotopes. The physical form and specific radionuclides selected produced radiation-dose patterns representative of those which might be encountered in the event of human accidental exposures. Dogs received graded lung burdens of either 90 Y, 91 Y, 144 Ce, or 90 Sr, each in fused clay. Differences in the effective half-lives of these radionuclides resulted in a spectrum of cumulative radiation doses to lung delivered at a variety of dose rates. Since the form in which the radionuclides were inhaled was relatively insoluble, the lung and intrathoracic tissues represented the primary recipient of the dose. Regardless of the effective half-life of radionuclide retention, a dose-related depression of peripheral lymphocytes was observed at various times after inhalation exposure. The time at which maximum depression and subsequent recovery occurred, however, was most directly related to the effective half-life of the radionuclide. Of special interest was the persistence of lymphopenia through 2 1 / 2 years after exposure to 144 Ce and 90 Sr in fused clay where, other than tracheobronchial lymph nodes, the lymphoid tissue received very little radiation dose. The possible mechanisms responsible for lymphocyte depression from these various radiation-dose patterns are discussed

  15. Internal dosimetry contamination: update of revision of the dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Parada, I.; Rojo, A.M.; Sanguineti, R.

    1995-01-01

    ICRP publication 60 introduces new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has also issued, in publications 57, 67 y 69, new biokinetic models for selected radionuclides since the issue of publication 30. In publication 66 the new human respiratory tract model for radiological protection is described. The aim of the present paper is to compare values of dose coefficients for workers calculated using the new tissue weighting factors, biokinetic models and lung model with those given in publication 30.The software package LUPED 1.1 was used to calculate dose coefficients for inhalation and ingestion. When possible, some changes in the biokinetic models were made trying to incorporate new parameters. The following radionuclides were analysed: 60 Co, 90 Sr, 99m Tc, 131 I, 137 Cs, 239 Pu y 241 Am. Most of the inhalation dose coefficients calculated with the new assumptions are within a factor of three of those calculated using the ICRP 30 lung and biokinetic models. Generally, the inhalation dose coefficients calculated with the new respiratory tract model and assuming a 5μm AMAD are lower than those calculated using the ICRP 30 model and parameters. The inhalation dose coefficients are generally within 10-90 % of the corresponding Publication 61 values, the difference tending to increase for relative insoluble compounds. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Primordial radionuclides in soil and their contributions to absorbed dose rate in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriones, C.R.; Duran, E.B.; Cruz, F.M. de la

    1989-01-01

    The predominant primordial radionuclides in soil which give rise to terrestrial radiation (external irradiation) were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. 40 K has the highest average activity mass concentration, i.e. 212 Bq kg -1 . 238 U and 232 Th concentrations are much lower and are only 14 and 16 Bq kg -1 respectively. Based on conversion factors given in the UNSCEAR Report (1988), the absorbed dose rates in air at one meter above the ground surface per unit activity mass concentration of primordial radionuclides were calculated. The average per caput absorbed dose rate in air received by Filipinos due to terrestrial radiation is 23 nGy h -1 . The relative contribution of 232 Th series to the total absorbed dose rate is highest, followed closely by 40 K. The contribution of 238 U series is only about one-half that of the 232 Th series. Based on the results obtained, the terrestrial component of the average per caput exposure dose rate due to natural radiation sources is 2.64 μR h -1 or roughly 3 μR h -1 . This leads to an annual average effective dose equivalent to 202 μSv. (Author). 5 annexes; 4 figs.; 3 tabs.; 6 refs

  17. Theoretical estimation of absorbed dose to organs in radioimmunotherapy using radionuclides with multiple unstable daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamacher, K.A.; Sgouros, G.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity and clinical utility of long-lived alpha emitters such as Ac-225 and Ra-223 will depend upon the fate of alpha-particle emitting unstable intermediates generated after decay of the conjugated parent. For example, decay of Ac-225 to a stable element yields four alpha particles and seven radionuclides. Each of these progeny has its own free-state biodistribution and characteristic half-life. Therefore, their inclusion for a more accurate prediction of absorbed dose and potential toxicity requires a formalism that takes these factors into consideration as well. To facilitate the incorporation of such intermediates into the dose calculation, a previously developed methodology (model 1) has been extended. Two new models (models 2 and 3) for allocation of daughter products are introduced and are compared with the previously developed model. Model 1 restricts the transport to a function that yields either the place of origin or the place(s) of biodistribution depending on the half-life of the parent radionuclide. Model 2 includes the transient time within the bloodstream and model 3 incorporates additional binding at or within the tumor. This means that model 2 also allows for radionuclide decay and further daughter production while moving from one location to the next and that model 3 relaxes the constraint that the residence time within the tumor is solely based on the half-life of the parent. The models are used to estimate normal organ absorbed doses for the following parent radionuclides: Ac-225, Pb-212, At-211, Ra-223, and Bi-213. Model simulations are for a 0.1 g rapidly accessible tumor and a 10 g solid tumor. Additionally, the effects of varying radiolabled carrier molecule purity and amount of carrier molecules, as well as tumor cell antigen saturation are examined. The results indicate that there is a distinct advantage in using parent radionuclides such as Ac-225 or Ra-223, each having a half-life of more than 10 days and yielding four alpha

  18. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, T.; Galvan G, A.; Canizal, G.

    1991-01-01

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  19. Radionuclides in Animal Feed (Poultry) 'Assessment of Radiation Dose'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algadi, S.; Salih, I. [Radiation Safety Institute (Sudan)

    2014-07-01

    In this work a comprehensive study has been carried out for the determination of presents evaluation of effective dose due to consumption of chicken fed by fodders collected from four major Sudanese companies (Hader, Koudjs, Wifi and Preconex SPN.V). The concentrations of radionuclides in the thirty two (32) feed samples have been determined by gamma spectrometry using NaI(Tl) detector. Radionuclides observed were: Pb-212 (daughter of Th-238), Pb-214, Bi-214 (daughters of U-238), Cs-137 and K-40 concentration. In additives the activity concentration of these radionuclides has found in the following ranges: 0.81 - 22.06 Bq/kg, 0.59 - 32.07 Bq/kg, 0.64 - 15.77 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 2.02 Bq/kg and 33.58 - 204.61 Bq/kg respectively. In feed concentrates activity concentration ranges has: 0.73 - 13.79 Bq/kg, 0.33 - 20.04 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 1.67 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.28 Bq/kg, 26.86 - 99.21 Bq/kg respectively. In fodders the activity concentration ranges has: 1.25 - 1.52 Bq/kg, 0.12 - 1.24 Bq/kg, 0.51 - 1.25 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.61 Bq/kg, 11.94 - 127.88 Bq/kg respectively. The 'animal product' activity concentration ranges has: 0.31 - 1.65 Bq/kg, 0.22 - 1.11 Bq/kg, 0.26 - 1.07 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 0.51 Bq/kg, 14.07 - 79.93 Bq/kg respectively. High concentrations (233.3 Bq/Kg) has typically found in toxo(additive); the lowest concentration (27.9 Bq/Kg ) has found in concentrate for layers and animal product. The total average effective dose due to the different feed-stuff has estimated and found to be 5.89x10{sup -6}±3.11x10{sup -6}mSv/y and 13.9 x 10{sup -7} ± 7.24 x 10{sup -7}mSv/y for age categories 7-12 y and >17 y respectively. If compared with the limits - Radioactivity Levels Permitted in foodstuffs Part 1 the Saudi Standards, Metrology and quality (300 Bq/Kg) and ICRP,FAO organization (5 mSv/y) - these values are very low. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  20. Revised age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides using the new tissue weighting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, S.C.; Gupta, M.M.; Nagaratnam, A.; Reddy, A.R.; Mehta, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    ICRP 56 gave age-dependent dose coefficients to members of the public from intake of most radiologically significant radionuclides that might be released to the environment due to various human activities. It has computed effective dose equivalent (now called effective dose) from these dose coefficients utilising the tissue weighting factors as given by ICRP 26. The recent ICRP 1990 recommendations have revised the tissue weighting factors based on new information on risk estimates of fatal cancer and hereditary disorders. This change in the tissue weighting factors will subsequently affect the computation of effective dose due to intake of various radio-nuclides considered by ICRP 56. The revised effective doses for ingested as well as inhaled radionuclides have been worked out and compared from corresponding earlier values. No change was found in the case of tritiated water, organically bound tritium and 14 C. For the majority of the radionuclides, the revised effective dose was within ± 20% of the earlier values. Larger variations in effective dose were noted for radionuclides which deposit preferentially in one or two organs. (author)

  1. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, O. A.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and estimation of individual intakes of radionuclides can be complex. Doses of intakes cannot be measured directly, however must be assessed from the monitoring data of the individual. The individual monitoring data includes whole body counting, excretion analysis (urine or faecal). In the estimation of these data requires that the assessor makes assumptions about the exposure scenario, including the pattern and mode of radionuclide intake. Also physicochemical characteristics of the material involved and the period of time between exposure and measurement. This project report seeks to provide some underlying guidance on monitoring programmes and data interpretation using case study. In this present study the committed effective dose (CED) 1.20mSv exceeded the recording level (i.e. 1mSv) however it was below the investigation level (i.e. 2mSv). The present study recommends that as an essential part in internal dosimetry, specialists be capable of recognizing conditions warranting follow-up bioassay and dose evaluation. Personnel should be familiar with the relevant internal dosimetry literature and the recommendations of national and international scientific organizations with regard to internal dose. (au)

  2. [The main radionuclides and dose formation in fish of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, D I; Kaglian, A E; Kireev, S I; Nazarov, A B; Klenus, V G

    2008-01-01

    The results of the researches of spices-specificity, accumulation dynamics and distribution of 90Sr, of 137Cs and of transuranic elements in fish of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone are analysed. The data of estimations of absorbed doze rate from incorporated radionuclides for pray fish and predatory species are given. For the fish from the lake of the left-bank floodplain of the Pripyat River the increase of 90Sr specific activity is registered which is presumably connected with the dynamics of the physical-chemical forms of the radionuclide in soils and their wash out in water bodies from the catchment basin. Now about 90% of internal dose rate of fish from closed aquatic ecosystems within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone is caused by 90Sr incorporation.

  3. radioactivity analysis in food-stuffs and evaluation of annual effective doses from intakes of radionuclides through daily diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.N.; Chowdhury, M. I.; Kamal, M.; Ghose, S.; Islam, M. N.; Mustafa, M. N.; Islam, Al Amin S.

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of natural and anthropogenic gamma emitting radionuclides in different vegetables, grains,fishes, sugar and common salt samples were measured by using high purity germanium ( HPGe ) detector coupled with Personal Computer Analyzer ( PCA ) and thereby the effective doses from the consumption of these diet were evaluated. The activities of 232 Th in vegetable, grains, salt, sugar and fish samples ranged from 0.13±0.02 to 1.49±0.32 Bq. kg -1 . The concentration of 238 U in these food-stuffs ranged from 0.07±0.01 to 0.95±0.26 Bq Kg -1 . The observed activity of 40 K ranged between 5.04±1.05 and 196.60±41.0 Bq Kg -1 . Caesium was not detected in any of the samples, Assessment of annual intake of these radionuclides has been made on the basis of the average annual intake of these food-stuffs by the population of Bangladesh.The annual effective dose equivalent due to ingestion of different naturally occurring radionuclides ( 232 Th, 238 U, and 40 K) by intake food-stuffs ranged from 0.2 to 113.62 μ Sv. y'-1. The annual effective doses observed in the present study for various types of food-stuffs were less than the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendation, which is 1 m Sv. y -1 for the members of the public. The result and knowledge of this study, would be helpful in making a yardstick comparing with which an appropriate radiation control limit may be imposed on food materials for public consumption in Bangladesh. 1 fig., 2 tables, 13 refs. (Author)

  4. Biologically effective dose (BED) for interstitial seed implants containing a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tool for evaluating interstitial seed implants that contain a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives and to demonstrate its utility by examining the clinical implications of prescribing to an isodose surface for such an implant. Methods and Materials: A linear-quadratic model for continuous low dose rate irradiation was developed for permanent implants containing a mixture of radionuclides. Using a generalized equation for the biologically effective dose (BED), the effects of cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair were examined systematically for implants containing a mixture of radionuclides. A head-and-neck permanent seed implant that contained a mixture of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds was used to demonstrate the utility of the generalized BED. Results: An equation of BED for implants containing a mixture of radionuclides with different half-lives was obtained. In such an implant, the effective cell kill was shown to depend strongly on the relative dose contributions from each radionuclide type; dose delivered by radionuclides with shorter half-life always resulted in more cell kill for any given sublethal damage repair and cell proliferation rates. Application of the BED formula to an implant containing a mixture of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds demonstrates that the conventional dose prescription to an isodose surface is not unique for such an implant. When the prescription dose was based on existing clinical experience of using 125 I seeds alone, mixing 103 Pd seeds with 125 I seeds would increase the cell kill. On the other hand, if the prescription dose were based on existing clinical experience of using 103 Pd seeds alone, mixing 125 I seeds with 103 Pd seeds in the same implant would create radiobiologically 'cold' spots (i.e., an increase in cell survival) at locations where a major portion of the prescription dose is contributed by the 125 I seeds. For fast-growing tumors, these 'cold' spots can become significant

  5. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 1: Dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    On February 3, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission monitoring requirements in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and to continuously monitor radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent to a maximum exposed individual greater than 0.1 mrem/y must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method, which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described. Assessments using a HEPA Filtration Factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions that would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. The number was reduced to 15 stacks when the other methods were applied. The paper discusses reasons for the overestimates.

  6. Model to estimate the local radiation doses to man from the atmospheric release of radionuclides (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, J.L.; Beal, S.K.

    1977-04-01

    A model was developed to estimate the radiation dose commitments received by people in the vicinity of a facility that releases radionuclides into the atmosphere. This model considers dose commitments resulting from immersion in the plume, ingestion of contaminated food, inhalation of gaseous and suspended radioactivity, and exposure to ground deposits. The dose commitments from each of these pathways is explicitly considered for each radionuclide released into the atmosphere and for each daughter of each released nuclide. Using the release rate of only the parent radionuclide, the air and ground concentrations of each daughter are calculated for each position of interest. This is considered to be a significant improvement over other models in which the concentrations of daughter radionuclides must be approximated by separate releases

  7. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  8. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. Observations and dispersion modelling of the released radionuclides help to assess the regional impact of such nuclear accidents. Modelling the increase of regional radionuclide activity concentrations, which results from nuclear accidents, underlies a multiplicity of uncertainties. One of the most significant uncertainties is the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source term may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on estimates given by the operators of the nuclear power plant. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site can be estimated using inverse modelling (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). The accuracy of the method depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the used observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a relatively sparse grid and the temporal resolution of available data may be low within the order of hours or a day. Gamma dose rates, on the other hand, are observed routinely on a much denser grid and higher temporal resolution and provide therefore a wider basis for inverse modelling (Saunier et al., 2013). We present a new inversion approach, which combines an atmospheric dispersion model and observations of radionuclide activity concentrations and gamma dose rates to obtain the source term of radionuclides. We use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; Stohl et al., 2005) to model the atmospheric transport of the released radionuclides. The

  9. Gamma ray doses proceeding from natural occurring radionuclides in closed environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Vitor Angelo P. de; Medina, Nilberto H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli da; Moreira, Ramon H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the application of gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from terrestrial natural elements present in building materials such as sand, cement, lime (CaO) and milled granitic stones. The major contribution to annual gamma-ray radiation effective dose is due to the natural occurring radionuclides 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U. Two spectrometry systems were employed to measure the gamma radiation: one with a 60% efficient GeHP detector and the second one with a 2''x2'' NaI(Tl) scintillator. The estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms assumed is 0.63 mSv/yr, proceeding from terrestrial natural elements. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks. (author)

  10. Influence of variations in dose and dose rates on biological effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClellan, R.O.; Benjamin, S.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Hobbs, C.H.; Jones, R.K.; Lundgren, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The biological effects of inhaled β-emitting radionuclides, 90 Y, 91 Y, 144 Ce and 90 Sr, are being investigated in beagle dogs that received single acute exposures at 12 to 14 months of age. The aerosols studied have included 91 YC1 3 , 144 CeC1 3 , 90 SrC1 2 , and 90 Y, 91 Y, 144 Ce or 90 Sr in aluminosilicate particles. Thus, 91 YCl 3 , 144 CeCl 3 and the aluminosilicate containing radionuclide particles all resulted in significant exposures to lung; 91 YC1 3 , 144 CeC1 3 an 90 SrC1 2 resulted in significant exposures to bone; 91 YC1 3 and 144 CeC1 3 resulted in significant exposures to liver. The higher initial doserate exposures have been more effective than low dose-rate exposures on a per-rad basis in producing early effects. To date ( 144 CeO 2 , it was observed that, on a μCi initial lung burden per kilogram body weight basis, mice did not develop pulmonary tumours whereas beagle dogs did. To fid out the reason for this observation mice have been repeatedly exposed by inhalation to 144 CeO 2 to maintain lung burdens of 144 Ce that resulted in radiation dose rates similar to that observed in beagle dogs. Several of the repeatedly exposed mice developed malignant pulmonary tumours. Thus, with similar dose rates and cumulative doses to the lung, mice and dogs responded in a similar manner to chronic β radiation

  11. Dose point kernel simulation for monoenergetic electrons and radionuclides using Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Liu, Y L; Chang, S J; Chao, M M; Tsai, S Y; Huang, D E

    2012-11-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been commonly used in the dose evaluation of radiation accidents and for medical purposes. The accuracy of simulated results is affected by the particle-tracking algorithm, cross-sectional database, random number generator and statistical error. The differences among MC simulation software packages must be validated. This study simulated the dose point kernel (DPK) and the cellular S-values of monoenergetic electrons ranging from 0.01 to 2 MeV and the radionuclides of (90)Y, (177)Lu and (103 m)Rh, using Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) and MC N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP5). A 6-μm-radius cell model consisting of the cell surface, cytoplasm and cell nucleus was constructed for cellular S-value calculation. The mean absolute percentage errors (MAPEs) of the scaled DPKs, simulated using FLUKA and MCNP5, were 7.92, 9.64, 4.62, 3.71 and 3.84 % for 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 MeV, respectively. For the three radionuclides, the MAPEs of the scaled DPKs were within 5 %. The maximum deviations of S(N←N), S(N←Cy) and S(N←CS) for the electron energy larger than 10 keV were 6.63, 6.77 and 5.24 %, respectively. The deviations for the self-absorbed S-values and cross-dose S-values of the three radionuclides were within 4 %. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the simulation results are consistent between FLUKA and MCNP5. However, there is a minor inconsistency for low energy range. The DPK and the cellular S-value should be used as the quality assurance tools before the MC simulation results are adopted as the gold standard.

  12. The calculation of external gamma-ray doses from airborne and deposited radionuclides in the environmental code NECTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    A computer program has been developed for the rapid evaluation of external gamma-ray doses from airborne and deposited radionuclide mixtures. Based on a gaussian dispersion model, the program calculates the dose at any position, including points high above ground level or upwind of the source. Meteorological frequency data for wind speed, direction, atmospheric stability and rainfall are fully taken into account. The calculational model assumes that the ground surface is perfectly flat and that gamma-ray paths are entirely in air; the possible errors caused by these and other assumptions are discussed, with suggested correction factors. The program applies various criteria to determine the best approximation or numerical integration method for each target point; execution times (on an IBM 370 machine) thus vary from less than 0.01s to about 0.3s per target point for a single weather category. The program has been incorporated in the environmental release program NECTAR. (author)

  13. Losses of radionuclides related to high temperature ashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    When measuring radionuclides in samples from the environment of nuclear power plants, a sample preparation step, such as high temperature ashing is often necessary. Althoug much used, this method is subject to controversy because of the risk of losses of several elements. A study, including the ashing of synthetically prepared samples has been undertaken. Controlled and moderate temperature rise rate and a final temperature not exceeding 550 deg. C has been shown vital for recovery

  14. Doses of external exposure in Jordan house due to gamma-emitting natural radionuclides in building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, J; Ulanovsky, A; Pröhl, G

    2009-10-01

    The use of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as (40)K, (232)Th, and (238)U and their progeny results in external exposures of the residents of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for a typical Jordan concrete room are calculated using Monte Carlo method. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling are assumed. Using activity concentrations of natural radionuclides typical for the Jordan houses and assuming them to be in secular equilibrium with their progeny, the maximum annual effective doses are estimated to be 0.16, 0.12 and 0.22 mSv a(-1) for (40)K, (232)Th- and (238)U-series, respectively. In a total, the maximum annual effective indoor dose due to external gamma-radiation is 0.50 mSv a(-1). Additionally, organ dose coefficients are calculated for all organs considered in ICRP Publication 74. Breast, skin and eye lenses have the maximum equivalent dose rate values due to indoor exposures caused by the natural radionuclides, while equivalent dose rates for uterus, colon (LLI) and small intestine are found to be the smallest. More specifically, organ dose rates (nSv a(-1)per Bq kg(-1)) vary from 0.044 to 0.060 for (40)K, from 0.44 to 0.60 for radionuclides from (238)U-series and from 0.60 to 0.81 for radionuclides from (232)Th-series. The obtained organ and effective dose conversion coefficients can be conveniently used in practical dose assessment tasks for the rooms of similar geometry and varying activity concentrations and local-specific occupancy factors.

  15. Concentration activities of natural radionuclides in three fish species in Brazilian coast and their contributions to the absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2009-01-01

    Activity concentrations of U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 e Ra-228 were analysed in three fish species at the Brasilian Coast. The fish 'Cubera snapper' (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828), in the region of Ceara and 'Whitemouth croaker' (Micropogonias furnieri, Desmarest, 1823) and 'Lebranche mullet' (Mugil liza, Valenciennes, 1836) in the region of Rio de Janeiro. These concentrations were transformed in absorbed dose rate using a dose conversion factor in unit of gray per year (μGy y -1 ), per becquerel per kilogram (Bq kg -1 ). Only the absorbed dose due to intake of radionuclides was examined, and the contributions due to radionuclides present in water and sediment were disregarded. The radionuclides were considered to be uniformly distributed in the fish body. The limit of the dose rate used, proposed by the Department of Energy of the USA, is equal to 3.65 10 03 mGy y -1 . The average dose rate due to the studied radionuclides is equal to 6.09 10 00 μGy y -1 , a value minor than 0.1% than the limits indicated by DOE, and quite similar to that found in the literature for 'benthic' fish. The most important radionuclides were the alpha emitters Ra-226 having 61 % of absorbed dose rate. U-238 and Th-232, each contributes with approximately 20 % of the absorbed dose rate. These three radionuclides are responsible for almost 100% of the dose rate received by the studied organisms. The beta emitters Ra-228 and Pb-210 account for approximately 1 % of the absorbed dose rate. (author)

  16. RADTRAD: A simplified model for RADionuclide Transport and Removal And Dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, S.L.; Miller, L.A.; Monroe, D.K.; Heames, T.J.

    1998-04-01

    This report documents the RADTRAD computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to estimate transport and removal of radionuclides and dose at selected receptors. The document includes a users' guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, the quality assurance and code acceptance testing documentation, and a programmers' guide. The RADTRAD code can be used to estimate the containment release using either the NRC TID-14844 or NUREG-1465 source terms and assumptions, or a user-specified table. In addition, the code can account for a reduction in the quantity of radioactive material due to containment sprays, natural deposition, filters, and other natural and engineered safety features. The RADTRAD code uses a combination of tables and/or numerical models of source term reduction phenomena to determine the time-dependent dose at user-specified locations for a given accident scenario. The code system also provides the inventory, decay chain, and dose conversion factor tables needed for the dose calculation. The RADTRAD code can be used to assess occupational radiation exposures, typically in the control room; to estimate site boundary doses; and to estimate dose attenuation due to modification of a facility or accident sequence

  17. Ocular organ dose assessment of nuclear medicine workers handling diagnostic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The dose distribution in the ocular organs of nuclear medicine workers during the handling of diagnostic radionuclides was assessed via simulation in virtual space. The cornea and lenses received the highest dose, and the dose distribution tended to be proportional to the gamma-ray energy emitted from the radiation source being handled. Moreover, calculations on the dose-reduction effects of eye-wear protectors for the eyes of the workers showed that the effects were inversely proportional to the emitted gamma-ray energy, with the dose-reduction effect decreasing in the order of "2"0"1Tl, "1"2"3I, "9"9mTc, "6"7Ga, "1"1"1In and "1"8F. Among the considered sources, the dose-reduction effect was significant for sources that emit relatively less energy, namely "1"2"3I, "2"0"1Tl and "9"9mTc, while it was lower for the remaining sources, namely "1"8F, "1"1"1In and "6"7Ga. (authors)

  18. Radiation dose from natural and manmade radionuclides in the soil of NIAB, Faisalabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, N.; Choudhry, M.A.; Orfi, S.D.; Waqas, M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural Radioactivity originates from extraterrestrial sources as well as from radioactive elements in the earth's crust. The amount of radioactivity in soil varies widely and is a source of continuous exposure to human beings. Amount of radioactivity in soil depends upon the type of soil and its uses. For the investigation of amount of radioactivity in the fertile soil, an area of about 100 hectares of land was selected in NIAB (Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology) at Faisalabad, Pakistan. Soil samples were collected from the cultivated and fertilized land. Activity concentration was measured using a HPGe (high purity germanium) ray detector and a PC based MCA. Specific activity levels due to /sup 40/K, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 232/Th were determined in 125 fertilized soil samples collected at a spacing of about 4 hectares at the depth level of 0-25 cm with a step of 5 cm depth. Activity concentration of the concerned radionuclides for the NIAB soil is: /sup 40/K, 614.4 670.7 Bqkg/sup -1/; /sup 137/Cs, 2.1 3.1 Bqkg/sup -1/; /sup 226/Ra, 28.6 32.6 Bqkg/sup -1/; and /sup 232/Th, 51.6 60.3 Bqkg/sup -1/. Chemical analysis for concentration of Na, Ca and Mg was also carried out along with the measurement of electrical conductivity and pH of the soil samples. The absorbed dose in air at NIAB Farm is 75 nGyh/sup -1/ which is higher than the world average of 57 nGyh/sup -1/ but lies within the range (18-93) nGyh/sup -1/. (author)

  19. Link 'soil-plant' as critical in formation committed doses from uptake of long-lived radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravetz, A P; Pavlenko, Y A; Grodzinsky, D M [Institute of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering AS Vasilcovsky st 31/17, Kiev 252022 (Ukraine)

    1994-11-01

    General algorithm of calculation dose from intake {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr depending upon level of pollution and agrochemical type of soil where trophycal chains to begin with, have been proposed. This methods consider link 'soil {yields} plant' as critical in formation of doses from the intake long-lived radionuclides. Calculation of committed dose as function of type of soil and level of radionuclide pollution have been realized for seven main soil types of the White Russian and Ukrainian Wooded district. (author)

  20. Fetal organ dosimetry for the Techa River and Ozyorsk Offspring Cohorts. Pt. 2. Radionuclide S values for fetal self-dose and maternal cross-dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Matthew R.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Shagina, Natalia B.; Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Degteva, Marina O.; Fell, Tim P.

    2015-01-01

    One of the many objectives of the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) project is to quantify the radiation dose-response following chronic in utero exposures to ionizing radiation. The project is presently conducting a pooled analysis of two cohorts of individuals born to exposed mothers - the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC) and the Ozyorsk Offspring Cohort (OOC). The TROC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures to contaminated riverbanks and internal ingestions of 89 Sr, 90 Sr/ 90 Y, and 137 Cs/ 137m Ba, while the OOC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures seen within the Mayak plutonium production facilities and internal inhalation of 239 Pu and possibly 131 I. In the present study, a newly created Urals-based series of fetal and maternal models is employed to assess S values for all seven radionuclides. Among all fetal ages, S values ranged in magnitude from 10 -14 to 10 -10 Gy per Bq-s for fetal source organs and from 10 -18 to 10 -14 Gy per Bq-s from maternal source organs, depending upon particle type, particle energy, and fetal age. For a given radionuclide and fetal age, S values for fetal source organs were approximately two orders of magnitude higher than for maternal source organs. Little variation in S values was observed among fetal source organs, while variations of over 100 % with respect to the mean were observed for maternal source organs near the fetus. S value variations from maternal cross-fire were highly dependent on fetal position and separation distance from the maternal source organ. These radionuclide S values have been coupled with biokinetic models for use in cohort dose assessment within the SOLO project. (orig.)

  1. Model for prognostication of population irradiation dose at the soil way of long-living radionuclides including in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prister, B.S.; Vinogradskaya, V.D.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of modern pictures of cesium and strontium ion absorption mechanisms a soil taking complex was build the kinetic model of radionuclide migration from soil to plants. Model parameter association with the agricultural chemistry properties of soil, represented by complex estimation of soil properties S e f. The example of model application for prognostication of population internal irradiation dose due to consumption of milk at the soil way of long-living radionuclides including in food chains

  2. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site. Part 1: Dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health (WAC 246-247) on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described

  3. Long-term dose-response studies of inhaled or injected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Miller, S.C.; Bradley, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the scientific progress in, and current status of, life-span studies of the long-term health risks in Beagle dogs of chronic irradiation from internally deposited radionuclides or from an external source. The reporting period for this document is the 2-year period from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1993. Studies that were initiated at three different laboratories (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, ITRI, University of Utah, and Argonne National Laboratory, ANL) are presented here because they are being completed at ITRI. All living dogs in the Utah-initiated studies were transferred to the ITRI facility for the remainder of their life-span observations and measurements in September 1987. This report is the fourth in a series of reports dealing with the current status and progress of both the Utah and ITRI studies. Other life-span studies involving dogs exposed to gamma radiation from an external source were initiated and conducted for many years at ANL. In 1991, the decision was made to discontinue the chronic irradiation of the remaining living dogs and to transfer all remaining dogs to ITRI for care, clinical observations, and pathological observations at death or euthanasia. This report provides the current status of these dogs. Status reports on the Utah and ITRI studies comprise most of this report. The ITRI-related section presents brief statements of project objectives, the general procedures used in these studies, and some study-specific features for each of the 19 studies being conducted with either beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides. Dose- and effect-modifying factors being addressed in these studies include total dose, dose rate, LET, solubility, nonuniformity of dose, species, age, sex, health status, and mode of exposure. Recent additions to experimental protocols for studies in which dogs are still alive involve the collection and analysis of tumor tissues using currently available molecular biology techniques

  4. Dose-response study of the hematological toxicity induced by vectorized radionuclides in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau-Poivet, J.; Sas, N.; Nguyen, F.; Abadie, J.; Chouin, N.; Barbet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: in internal radiotherapy, the dose-limiting factor is often the bone marrow (BM) toxicity. In patients, its relationship with the BM absorbed dose seems to be elusive. Most probable reasons are the BM depletion following previous treatments associated to dose assessment complexity. To avoid this and better understand myelotoxicity mechanisms, we investigated hematopoiesis from BM to blood after radionuclide injections in healthy mice associated to individual BM dosimetry. Based on these data, a compartmental model was developed to predict the depletion of each mouse hematopoietic cell in a dose-dependent manner. Materials and methods: C57/Bl6 mice were injected with increasing activities of 18 FNa, an osteo-tropic agent. Mean absorbed doses to the BM were calculated using the MIRD formalism with the mineralized bone considered as the principal source of 18 FNa. Time-integrated activities within the skeleton were derived from dynamic micro PET-CT images. Hematological toxicity was monitored via blood cell counts and myeloid progenitor colony assays over time after injection. The myelotoxicity model consists in compartments for each hematopoietic cell. Its parameters were adjusted to reproduce experimental toxicities. Results: for an absorbed dose to the BM of 0.8 ± 0.1 Gy, myeloid progenitors showed a 84% depletion 84% at day 7 post-injection (D7) and a recovery at D14 for all precursors and D21 for the less differentiated progenitor. In blood, neutrocytopenia was observed at D3 (80% decrease) and recovered at D7. Thrombocytopenia was also noticed between D7 and D17 with a nadir at D7 (26% of depletion). The compartmental model predicted platelets kinetics in a satisfying manner. The nadir value, time to nadir and time to recovery were estimated with errors of 4.9%, 10.2% and 10% respectively. Whereas higher absorbed doses only increased platelets depletion (62% associated to 1.4 Gy), they extended the recovery time for all

  5. Fukushima radionuclides in the NW Pacific, and assessment of doses for Japanese and world population from ingestion of seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P; Hirose, Katsumi

    2015-03-12

    Variations of Fukushima-derived radionuclides ((90)Sr, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in seawater and biota offshore Fukushima and in the NW Pacific Ocean were investigated and radiation doses to the Japanese and world population from ingestion of seafood contaminated by Fukushima radionuclides were estimated and compared with those from other sources of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides. The total effective dose commitment from ingestion of radionuclides in fish, shellfish and seaweed caught in coastal waters off Fukushima was estimated to be 0.6 ± 0.4 mSv/y. The individual effective dose commitment from consumption of radioactive-contaminated fish caught in the open Pacific Ocean was estimated to be 0.07 ± 0.05 mSv/y. These doses are comparable or much lower than doses delivered from the consumption of natural (210)Po in fish and in shellfish (0.7 mSv/y). The estimated individual doses have been below the levels when any health damage of the Japanese and world population could be expected.

  6. A model for the calculation of the radiation dose from natural radionuclides in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackers, J.G.

    1986-02-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the radiation dose incurred from natural radioactivity indoors and outdoors, expressed in effective dose equivalence/year. The model is applied on a three rooms dwelling characterized by interconnecting air flows and on a dwelling with crawlspace. In this model the distinct parameters are variable in order to allow the investigation of the relative influence. The calculated effective dose equivalent for an adult in the dwelling was calculated to be about 1.7 mSv/year, composed of 15% from cosmic radiation, 35% from terrestrial radioactivity, 20% from radioactivity in the body and 30% from natural radionuclides in building materials. The calculations show an enhancement of about a factor of two in radon concentration in air in a room which is ventilated by air from an adjacent room. It is also shown that the attachment rate of radon products to aerosols and the plate-out effect are relatively important parameters influencing the magnitude of the dose rate. (Auth.)

  7. Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 2, Methods and Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part two of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222Rn, 220Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Assumptions about equilibrium with long-lived parents are made for the 28 other radionuclides in these series lacking data. This paper describes the methods developed to group the collected data into source regions described in the Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) dosimetric methodology. Methods for converting the various units of data published over 50 years into a standard form are developed and described. Often, meaningful values of uncertainty of measurements were not published so that variability in data sets is confounded with measurement uncertainty. A description of the methods developed to estimate variability is included in this paper. The data described in part one are grouped by gender and age to match the RADAR dosimetric phantoms. Within these phantoms, concentration values are grouped into source tissue regions by radionuclide, and they are imputed for source regions lacking tissue data. Radionuclide concentrations are then imputed for other phantoms source regions with missing concentration values, and the uncertainties of the imputed values are increased. The content concentrations of hollow organs are calculated, and activities are apportioned to the bone source regions using assumptions about each radionuclide's bone-seeking behavior. The data sets are then ready to be

  8. Estimate of the annual effective dose for natural radionuclides of anthropogenic origin in the Bay of Cadiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, J. F.; Martinez-Ramos, C.; Barbero, L.; Casas-Ruiz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of radioactivity levels in soils has a double interest: on the one hand, allows you to set the reference values ??(base Linne) from a region or geographic area, and secondly, to evaluate the external radiation dose received by the population and biota, through appropriate dosimetric model. The natural radioactivity, especially the radionuclides in the natural series. The aim of this study is to determine the levels of gamma emitting radionuclides in marine sediments of the Bay of Cadiz, and dose rates from external radiation received in the areas studied. (Author)

  9. Model to estimate radiation dose commitments to the world population from the atmospheric release of radionuclides (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, J.L.; Beal, S.K.

    1978-02-01

    The equations developed for use in the LWBR environmental statement to estimate the dose commitment over a given time interval to a given organ of the population in the entire region affected by the atmospheric releases of a radionuclide are presented and may be used for any assessment of dose commitments in these regions. These equations define the dose commitments to the world resulting from a released radionuclide and each of its daughters and the sum of these dose commitments provides the total dose commitment accrued from the release of a given radionuclide. If more than one radionuclide is released from a facility, then the sum of the dose commitments from each released nuclide and from each daughter of each released nuclide is the total dose commitment to the world from that facility. Furthermore, if more than one facility is considered as part of an industry, then the sum of the dose commitments from the individual facilities represents the total world dose commitment associated with that industry. The actual solutions to these equations are carried out by the AIRWAY computer program. The writing of this computer program entailed defining in detail the specific representations of the various parameters such as scavenging coefficients, resuspension factors, deposition velocities, dose commitment conversion factors, and food uptake factors, in addition to providing specific numerical values for these types of parameters. The program permits the examination of more than one released nuclide at a time and performs the necessary summing to obtain the total dose commitment to the world accrued from the specified releases

  10. Doses to the embryo/fetus and neonate from intakes of radionuclides by the mother. Part 1: Doses received in utero and from activity present at birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Smith, T.J.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    This report considers the consequences of occupational exposures leading to intakes of radionuclides by women who are, or may become, pregnant. Estimates are given of potential doses to offspring following intakes of a selected range of naturally occurring and artificial radionuclides that might arise for different contamination scenarios in the workplace. The radionuclides covered are of interest from both routine operations and accidental releases. Doses can arise both from the transfer of radionuclides to the embryo and fetus, and from activity in the mother's tissues. The relative contributions of these two sources vary widely depending on the emissions of each radionuclide. Doses are also calculated for the lifetime of the newborn child from activity present at birth. The total dose coefficient for the offspring (the sum of the in utero and postnatal doses) calculated in this report is compared to the dose coefficients recommended by ICRP for workers. Of particular interest are cases where the offspring dose is greater than the worker dose since these are the cases where the normal standards for protection of workers may not afford sufficient protection to the offspring, isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, phosphorus, sulphur, iodine and the alkaline earth elements fall into this category. Isotopes of calcium and phosphorus, show the greatest differences between offspring and worker doses with the ratio of the two being over 15 for ingestion of calcium-45 or phosphorus-32. In utero doses for the actinides such as plutonium-239 are at most only a few per cent of the corresponding worker dose In some cases intakes by the mother that occurred well before pregnancy can lead to significant doses to the fetus; this is of particular relevance to the advance planning of protection for female workers. A general implication of this report is that intakes of some radionuclides may need to be restricted to lower levels than those that would lead to a dose to the worker of 1 m

  11. Doses to the embryo/fetus and neonate from intakes of radionuclides by the mother. Part 1: Doses received in utero and from activity present at birth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, A.W.; Smith, T.J.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D

    2001-12-01

    This report considers the consequences of occupational exposures leading to intakes of radionuclides by women who are, or may become, pregnant. Estimates are given of potential doses to offspring following intakes of a selected range of naturally occurring and artificial radionuclides that might arise for different contamination scenarios in the workplace. The radionuclides covered are of interest from both routine operations and accidental releases. Doses can arise both from the transfer of radionuclides to the embryo and fetus, and from activity in the mother's tissues. The relative contributions of these two sources vary widely depending on the emissions of each radionuclide. Doses are also calculated for the lifetime of the newborn child from activity present at birth. The total dose coefficient for the offspring (the sum of the in utero and postnatal doses) calculated in this report is compared to the dose coefficients recommended by ICRP for workers. Of particular interest are cases where the offspring dose is greater than the worker dose since these are the cases where the normal standards for protection of workers may not afford sufficient protection to the offspring, isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, phosphorus, sulphur, iodine and the alkaline earth elements fall into this category. Isotopes of calcium and phosphorus, show the greatest differences between offspring and worker doses with the ratio of the two being over 15 for ingestion of calcium-45 or phosphorus-32. In utero doses for the actinides such as plutonium-239 are at most only a few per cent of the corresponding worker dose In some cases intakes by the mother that occurred well before pregnancy can lead to significant doses to the fetus; this is of particular relevance to the advance planning of protection for female workers. A general implication of this report is that intakes of some radionuclides may need to be restricted to lower levels than those that would lead to a dose to the worker of

  12. Gamma Radiation Dose from Radionuclides in Soil Samples of Udagamandalam (Ooty) in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Muguntha Manikandan, N.; Sivakumar, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Meenakshisundram, V.; Ragunath, V.M.; Gajendran, V.

    1999-01-01

    The systematic study of background radiation and the distribution of radionuclides in the environment of Udagamandalam in Nilgiri District of Tamil Nadu has been made. Gamma spectrometric analysis of the soil samples of this area has been carried out. The measured gamma dose in air is in the range 31.6 nGy.h -1 - 221.1 nGy.h -1 with a mean value 121.8 nGy.h -1 . The average activities of the 232 Th series, 238 U series and 40 K in soil samples are 114.6 ± 52.5 Bq.kg -1 , 43.2 ± 23.2 Bq.kg -1 and 274.6 ± 86.7 Bq.kg -1 respectively. (author)

  13. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 . When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates

  14. Radionuclide concentrations and dose assessment of cistern water and groundwater at the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Robison, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A radiological survey was conducted from September through November of 1978 to determine the concentrations of radionuclides in the terrestrial and marine environments of 11 atolls and 2 islands in the Northern Marshall Islands. More than 70 cistern and groundwater samples were collected at the atolls; the volume of each sample was between 55 and 100 l. The concentration of 90 Sr in cistern water at most atolls is that expected from world-wide fallout in wet deposition. Except for Bikini and Rongelap, 137 Cs concentrations in cistern water are in agreement with the average predicted concentrations from wet deposition. The 239+240 Pu concentrations are everywhere less than the predicted fallout concentrations except at Rongelap, Ailinginae, and Bikini where the measured and predicted concentrations are in general agreement. During the period sampled, most groundwater concentrations of 90 Sr and 137 Cs were everywhere higher than the concentrations in cistern water. Concentrations of the transurancies in filtered groundwater solution were everywhere comparable to or less than the concentrations in cistern water. It is concluded that the concentrations of radionuclides detected during any single period may not necessarily reflect the long-term average concentrations or the concentrations that might be observed if a lined well were extended above the surface. In any case, at all atolls the 90 Sr and 137 Cs concentrations in groundwater are below the concentration guidelines for drinking water recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. The maximum annual dose rates and the 30- and 50-y integral doses are calculated for the intake of both cistern water and groundwater for each of the atolls

  15. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant’s milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant’s powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K activities. The obtained mean activity of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg{sup −1}, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy{sup −1} recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  16. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-04-01

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant's milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant's powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activities. The obtained mean activity of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg-1, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy-1 recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  17. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant’s milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant’s powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K activities. The obtained mean activity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg −1 , respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy −1 recommended by ICRP for all ages

  18. Radiation dose estimates and hazard evaluations for inhaled airborne radionuclides: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The project objective was to conduct confirmatory research on physical chemical characteristics of aerosols produced during manufacture of mixed plutonium and uranium oxide nuclear fuel, to determine the radiation dose distribution in tissues of animals after inhalation exposure to representative aerosols of these materials, and to provide estimates of the relationship of radiation dose and biological response in animals after such inhalation exposure. The first chapter summarizes the physical chemical characterization of samples of aerosols collected from gloveboxes at industrial facilities during normal operations. This chapter provides insights into key aerosol characteristics which are of potential importance in determining the biological fate of specific radionuclides contained in the particulates that would be inhaled by humans following accidental release. The second chapter describes the spatial and temporal distribution of radiation dose in tissues of three species of animals exposed to representative aerosols collected from the industrial facilities. These inhalation studies provide a basis for comparison of the influence of physical chemical form of the inhaled particulates and the variability among species of animal in the radiation dose to tissue. The third chapter details to relationship between radiation dose and biological response in rats exposed to two aerosol forms each at three levels of initial pulmonary burden. This study, conducted over the lifespan of the rats and assuming results to be applicable to humans, indicates that the hazard to health due to inhalation of these industrial aerosols is not different than previously determined for laboratory produced aerosol of PuO 2 . Each chapter is processed separately for the data base

  19. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  20. Modelling of Radionuclides Transfer and Ambient Dose Rates in Fukushima Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.A.; Mourlon, C.; Simon-Cornu, M. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, CE Cadarache-Bat 153, BP3 - 13115 St-Paul-lez- Durance cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident led to high atmospheric depositions of volatile fission products such as Caesium, Iodine and Tellurium isotopes, in north-eastern Japan. The radioactive content and ambient radiation level are particularly high in forest ecosystems, partly due to the enhancement of airborne radionuclides capture by forest canopies. The contamination is likely to be dominated in the next decades by Cesium-137, due to its long physical half-life (i.e. 30 years) and its ability to be immobilized and/or recycled within the biotic and abiotic forest components. Thus the long-term management of contaminated forested areas is an environmental, economic and social challenge for Japanese authorities. IRSN developed a forest model ten years ago and implemented it in the ASTRAL software. This model has been tested against measurements in various Fukushima forest stands with varying deposition and meteorological conditions, typical forest ecosystems quite different from those in western Europe, and also with a hilly landscape. This is a great opportunity to test, improve and validate our model. We can take advantage of the expertise gained following the Chernobyl accident fallout, of the data derived from Japanese publications and of the possibility to conduct field measurements. At first, a German scenario in a Norway spruce stand, following the Chernobyl accident has been tested. All deposition and rainfall events were documented. The model could reproduce very closely the dynamics of caesium concentration in soil and input fluxes (e.g. direct vs indirect throughfall, litterfall). For this scenario, deposition occurred mostly with rainfall and 90% of the total deposit was recovered in the soil layer 1 year after the accident. On the opposite, another scenario at Tochigi Prefecture in a Japanese cedar stand, for the Fukushima accident is characterized by 40% of deposition on the soil 1 year after the accident. For this scenario, much uncertainty concerns both

  1. Average dose to an organ per microcurie-day accumulated by a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, W.S.; Ford, M.R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods are discussed that are used in calculations of the average radiation dose to an organ per microcurie/day accumulated by a radionuclide in a source organ. The dosimetric data on photons are obtained by Monte Carlo type computer calculations on a non-homogeneous phantom having the general form of the human body. (U.S.)

  2. ACRO - a computer program for calculating organ doses from acute or chronic inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Akio; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Shinohara, Kunihiko.

    1978-01-01

    The computer program ACRO has been developed to calculate organ doses from acute or chronic inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides. The ICRP Task Group Lung Model (TGLM) was used for inhalation model, and a simple one-compartment model for ingestion. This program is written in FORTRAN IV, and can be executed with storage requirements of about 260 K bytes. (auth.)

  3. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants; Transport radionuklida i doze u okolini nekih termoelektrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Telenta, B [Savezni hidrometeoroloski zavod, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sokcic-Kostic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1994-07-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  4. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Rock: Numerical Assessment for High Level Waste Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Siqueira da Silveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and stable geological formations with low permeability have been considered for high level waste definitive repository. A common problem is the modeling of radionuclide migration in a fractured medium. Initially, we considered a system consisting of a rock matrix with a single planar fracture in water saturated porous rock. Transport in the fracture is assumed to obey an advection-diffusion equation, while molecular diffusion is considered the dominant mechanism of transport in porous matrix. The partial differential equations describing the movement of radionuclides were discretized by finite difference methods, namely, fully explicit, fully implicit, and Crank-Nicolson schemes. The convective term was discretized by the following numerical schemes: backward differences, centered differences, and forward differences. The model was validated using an analytical solution found in the literature. Finally, we carried out a simulation with relevant spent fuel nuclide data with a system consisting of a horizontal fracture and a vertical fracture for assessing the performance of a hypothetical repository inserted into the host rock. We have analysed the bentonite expanded performance at the beginning of fracture, the quantified radionuclide released from a borehole, and an estimated effective dose to an adult, obtained from ingestion of well water during one year.

  5. Imprecision of dose predictions for radionuclides released to the environment: an application of a Monte Carlo simulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, G; Hoffman, F O

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the imprecision in dose predictions for radionuclides has been performed using correct dose assessment models and knowledge of model parameter value uncertainties. The propagation of parameter uncertainties is demonstrated using a Monte Carlo technique for elemental iodine 131 transported via the pasture-cow-milk-child pathway. Results indicated that when site-specific information is unavailable, the imprecision inherent in the predictions for this pathway is potentially large. (3 graphs, 25 references, 5 tables)

  6. Doses for various pathways to man based on unit concentrations of radionuclides pertinent to decontamination and decommissioning of properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, G.S.

    1979-03-01

    This report gives dose tabulations for unit concentrations of radionuclides likely to be encountered in the decommissioning of real estate contaminated with uranium and thorium ores and residues. The reported doses may be ratioed to known air, soil, and water concentrations, exposure times, and intakes to estimate the total radiation dose for individuals exposed to the facilities. These dose estimates may be used in developing criteria to determine appropriate remedial actions for returning the properties to useful purposes and for establishing restrictions for such use

  7. Vertical Distribution and Estimated Doses from Artificial Radionuclides in Soil Samples around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Tsuchiya, Rimi; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides (241Am, 134Cs, 137Cs, and 60Co) were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides (241Am, 57Co, 137Cs, 95Zr, 95Nb, 58Co, and 60Co) were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991). These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public. PMID:23469013

  8. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Taira

    Full Text Available For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS, the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (134Cs, (137Cs, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (57Co, (137Cs, (95Zr, (95Nb, (58Co, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991. These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP, and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  9. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Tsuchiya, Rimi; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (57)Co, (137)Cs, (95)Zr, (95)Nb, (58)Co, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991). These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  10. Age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides: Pt. 5. Compilation of ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The present report is a compilation of age-dependent committed effective dose coefficients for ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides of the 31 elements covered in previous CRP Publications. The biokinetic models for adults given in ICRP Publication 30 are applied to calculate these dose coefficients, except that age-specific excretion rates are used and increased gastrointestinal absorption in infants is assurred. Changes in body mass, and tissue geometry in children are also taken into account. (UK)

  11. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry

  12. Dosimetric Aspects of Personnel Skin Contamination by Radionuclides - Estimate of a Skin Dose, Monitoring and Interpretation of Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husak, V.; Kleinbauer, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: On the basis of a critical comparison of literary data, tables are compiled of beta and gamma dose rate in mSvh -1 (kBqcm -1 ) to the basal layer of the skin at 0.07 mm depth from contamination by 75 radionuclides unsealed sources; radioactive substances are assumed to reside on the skin surface. The residence time needed for the estimate of the skin dose is calculated assuming that a residual activity per unit area of any radionuclide on the skin, which could not be removed by the repeated careful decontamination, is supposed to be eliminated with the biological half-life of 116 h as a consequence of the natural sloughing off of the skin. Radionuclides are divided into five groups according to the dose estimate in mSv (kBqcm -2 ): ≥250 (e.g. 32 P, 89 Sr, 137 Cs/ 137m Ba), 100-250 (e.g. 90 Y, 131 I, 186 Re), 10-100 (e.g. 35 S, 67 Ga, 200 Tl), 1-10 (e.g. 18 F, 51 Cr, 99m Tc), ≤1 (e.g. 63 Ni, 144 Pr, 238 U). If it is possible, doses can be determined more precisely by measuring the effective half-life of the residual activity on the contaminated area. Our dose estimates are approximately valid on the condition that, after decontamination, residual activity of radionuclides persists predominantly in the superficial layers of epidermis. This and further uncertainties connected with the dose assessment are discussed. Our tables can help to determine easily rough values of doses to personnel in contamination incidents and to interpret them in relation to regulatory derived limits. This work was supported by State Office for Nuclear Safety in Prague. (author)

  13. ORION: a computer code for evaluating environmental concentrations and dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, K.; Nomura, T.; Iwai, M.

    1983-05-01

    The computer code ORION has been developed to evaluate the environmental concentrations and the dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from air-borne radionuclides released from multiple nuclear installations. The modified Gaussian plume model is applied to calculate the dispersion of the radionuclide. Gravitational settling, dry deposition, precipitation scavenging and radioactive decay are considered to be the causes of depletion and deposition on the ground or on vegetation. ORION is written in the FORTRAN IV language and can be run on IBM 360, 370, 303X, 43XX and FACOM M-series computers. 8 references, 6 tables

  14. Quantitative analysis on dose to humans as a result of consuming tuna fish contaminated by cesium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khani, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative empirical data is presented on the dose exposure to North Americans consuming tuna fish that have accumulated concentrations of radioactive isotopes. The two particular radioactive isotopes of interest are cesium-137 and cesium-134. Though biological effects of radiation are a widely debatable topic, the consumption of tuna fish does not support significant increased risk of cancer to humans. An important comparison is made between the elevated levels of radioactive cesium concentrations to naturally occurring radionuclides, namely potassium-40 and polonium-210. It is calculated that naturally occurring radioactive isotopes are in the orders of magnitude greater than the cesium radionuclides in tuna fish. (author)

  15. Quantitative analysis on dose to humans as a result of consuming tuna fish contaminated by cesium radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khani, J.; Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jykhani@ucalgary.ca, E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative empirical data is presented on the dose exposure to North Americans consuming tuna fish that have accumulated concentrations of radioactive isotopes. The two particular radioactive isotopes of interest are cesium-137 and cesium-134. Though biological effects of radiation are a widely debatable topic, the consumption of tuna fish does not support significant increased risk of cancer to humans. An important comparison is made between the elevated levels of radioactive cesium concentrations to naturally occurring radionuclides, namely potassium-40 and polonium-210. It is calculated that naturally occurring radioactive isotopes are in the orders of magnitude greater than the cesium radionuclides in tuna fish. (author)

  16. Pharmacological radionuclide ventriculography for detection of myocardial contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction: head-to-head comparison of low dose dobutamine and low dose dypiridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasinovic, Z.; Ostojic, M.; Beleslin, B.; Stojkovic, S.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Stankovic, G.; Dikic, A.; Pavlovic, S.; Sobic, D.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Low dose pharmacological stress echocardiography with either dobutamine or dipyridamole infusion has been proposed for recognition of myocardial viability. However, dependence on adequate acoustic window, observer experience, and the mild degree of wall motion changes make the viability assessment by stress echocardiography especially bothersome. The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of low dose dobutamine and low dose dipyridamole radionuclide ventriculography to detect contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction and functional recovery after coronary angioplasty. Methods. The study group consisted of 20 consecutive patients (52±10 years, 17 male) with previous myocardial infarction and resting regional dyssynergy, in whom diagnostic cardiac catheterization revealed significant one-vessel coronary artery stenosis suitable for angioplasty. Each patient underwent equilibrium 99m-Tc radionuclide ventriculography which was performed at rest and during low dose dipyridamole (0.28 mg/kg over 2 minutes) and low dose dobutamine infusion (up to 10 mcg/kg/min). Left ventricular global and regional ejection fractions were determined. Increase of regional ejection fraction for >5% (inferoapical and posterolateral regions) or >10% (anteroseptal regions) during low dose dobutamine and dipyridamole in infarcted regions, as well as in the follow up period, was considered as index of contractile reserve. After 8 weeks of successful angioplasty, resting radionuclide ventriculography was repeated in all patients in order to identify functional recovery of the infarct zone. Results. Out of the 180 analyzed segments (20x9), 90 regional ejection fractions have shown depressed contractility. The mean of the regional ejection fractions showing depressed contractility increased from the resting value of 34±12% to 42±14% in the follow-up period (p=0.06). Of the 90 with baseline dyssynergy, 46 were responders during low-dose dobutamine (51

  17. [Ranking of radionuclides and pathways according to their contribution to the dose burden to the population resulting from NPP releases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridonov, S I; Karpenko, E I; Sharpan, L A

    2013-01-01

    Approaches are described towards estimating the consequences of radioactive contamination of ecosystems by nuclear fuel cycle enterprises with the rationale for the optimal specification level for nuclear power plants (NPP) operating in the normal mode. Calculations are made based on the initial data of the IAEA project, INPRO ENV, dealing with the ranking of radionuclides escaping to the environment from the operating NPPs. Influence of various factors on rankings of radionuclides and pathways of public exposure is demon- strated. An important factor is the controlled radionuclide composition of atmospheric NPP releases. It has been found that variation in the dose coefficients for some radionuclides leads to significant changes not only in the ranking results but also in the estimates of total dose burdens. Invariability is shown of the estimation concerning the greatest contribution of the peroral route to the population dose of irradiation in the situation considered. A conclusion was drawn on the need of taking into consideration uncertainties of different factors when comparing effects on the environment from enterprises of conventional and innovative nuclear fuel cycles.

  18. Assessment of fetal activity concentration and fetal dose for selected radionuclides based on animal and human data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Biokinetic data of selected radionuclide compounds from investigations in man and animal were taken from literature references with the purpose to provide a basis for a comparative assessment of fetal and adult radiation doses after intake or administration of radionuclides. The following ratios of fetal to adult doses were derived from human data: 0.5 for caesium 137 and total body, 2.3 for iron 59 and liver, 0.06 - 0.3 - 1.1 for iodine 131 and thyroid, and 0.1 - 0.3 for strontium 90 and bone. The ratios of activity concentrations in fetal and adult tissues are of considerable variability - up to three orders of magnitude. Further studies on fetal and adult biokinetics specifically designed for comparative dose assessment are indispensable. 106 refs.; 6 tabs

  19. Production of high-specific activity radionuclides using SM high-flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, Ye.A.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Filimonov, V.T.; Vakhetov, F.Z.; Tarasov, V.A.; Kuznetsov, R.A.; Lebedev, V.M.; Andreev, O.I.; Melnik, M.I.; Gavrilov, V.D.

    1997-01-01

    The development of High Specific Activity (HSA) radionuclides production technologies is one of the directions of RIAR activity, and the high flux research reactor SM, having neutron flux density up to 2.10 15 cm -2 s 1 in a wide range of neutron spectra hardness, plays the principal role in this development. The use of a high-flux reactor for radionuclide production provides the following advantages: production of radionuclides with extremely high specific activity, decreasing of impurities content in irradiated targets (both radioactive and non-radioactive), cost-effective use of expensive isotopically enriched target materials. The production technologies of P-33, Gd-153, W-188, Ni-63, Fe-55,59, Sn-113,117m,119m, Sr- 89, applied in industry, nuclear medicine, research, etc, were developed by RIAR during the last 5-10 years. The research work included the development of calculation procedures for radionuclide reactor accumulation forecast, experimental determination of neutron cross-sections, the development of irradiated materials reprocessing procedures, isolation and purification of radionuclides. The principal results are reviewed in the paper. (authors)

  20. DEPDOSE: An interactive, microcomputer based program to calculate doses from exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beres, D.A.; Hull, A.P.

    1991-12-01

    DEPDOSE is an interactive, menu driven, microcomputer based program designed to rapidly calculate committed dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground. The program is designed to require little or no computer expertise on the part of the user. The program consisting of a dose calculation section and a library maintenance section. These selections are available to the user from the main menu. The dose calculation section provides the user with the ability to calculate committed doses, determine the decay time needed to reach a particular dose, cross compare deposition data from separate locations, and approximate a committed dose based on a measured exposure rate. The library maintenance section allows the user to review and update dose modifier data as well as to build and maintain libraries of radionuclide data, dose conversion factors, and default deposition data. The program is structured to provide the user easy access for reviewing data prior to running the calculation. Deposition data can either be entered by the user or imported from other databases. Results can either be displayed on the screen or sent to the printer

  1. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  2. The work of Committee 2 of ICRP in developing dose coefficients for the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; Phipps, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection has the responsibility for calculating radiation doses from intakes of radionuclides for all age groups in the population. This includes the development of models for calculating doses to the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother. The development of both biokinetic and dosimetric models are reviewed and the results of preliminary dose calculations presented. (orig.) [de

  3. Assessment of the doses due to natural radionuclide in the green leafy vegetables of Domiasiat, Meghalaya India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Chaturvedi, S.S.; Jha, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    A radiation dose assessment exercise was carried out for the Ipomea batata, Allium sativum, Dacaus carota, and Solanum tuberosum due to naturally available radionuclide 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th in the Domiasiat area of Meghalaya. The concentration of radionuclides in biota as well as corresponding soil was measured by precipitation method using NaI detector for continuous 12 months. Transfer factor was calculated and was, for 40 K(3.96E-05, 3.40E-05, 3.40E-05, 2.70E-05), for 232 Th(3.94E-05, 3.20E-05, 3.20E-054.93E-05), for 238 U(3.60E-05, 3.89E-05, 3.85E-054.57E-05), respectively in each biota due to each radionuclide. The point source dose distribution (source ↔ target) hypotheses was applied for the consideration of absorbed fraction. The generated data were modeled using the FASSET method and obtained dose was 8.42E-03, 8.36E-03, 7.78E-03, 7.74E-03 μGy h -1 , respectively and finally compared with the IAEA and UNSCEAR dataset for screening level dose for terrestrial biota. (author)

  4. Identification and analysis of main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose for workers at radiopharmacy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, Matias Puga

    2004-01-01

    The optimization principle in radiation protection means that there is a reasonable balance between resources used to monitor exposures and the benefits due to the monitoring program. Programs for the monitoring of workers handling radioactive materials are influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of internal doses due to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive materials is often based on measurements of the activity in the tissues of the body and in excreta, following a given intake. In order to enable dose estimations using the biokinetic models recommended by the ICRP and laboratory data, it is proposed to carry out comprehensive study to identify the main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose of workers at radiopharmacy facilities. The applied methodology for identification of these radionuclides takes into account criteria set out by the ICRP and IAEA. The practical purpose to set up this study was to establish a consistent approach to ensure that the dose assessments are as simple as possible and guarantee the necessary quality standards. The result of this study has indicated the requirement of routine measurements for seven radionuclides over all range of radioactive material compounds, handled at the radiopharmacy plant of IPEN, avoiding unjustifiable work concerning activity levels that are not relevant for the health of the occupationally exposed persons. The main intake pathways, the appropriate monitoring frequencies and derived reference level have also been identified. (author)

  5. Natural Radionuclides and 137Cs Concentrations in Rice in Jepara Residence and Internal Dose Estimation Intake by the People

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leli-Nirwani; Minarni; Buchari

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs concentration in rice in Jepara residence and internal dose estimation intake by people have been conducted. The aim of the research is to determine internal dose estimation of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs intake by people in Jepara residence. By knowing the natural radionuclides and 137 Cs concentrations in rice at Jepara residence, the dose coefficient for adult from ICRP No.72 and the annual intake consumption take from the Indonesian food balance published by BPS, the internal dose from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs intake from food can be calculate concentration of 228 Th, 226 Ra and 137 Cs were found in Bayuran, with the average value was (2.00±0.21) x 10 -5 Bq/kg, (0.09±0.25) x 10 -5 Bq/kg, (19.00±0.06) x 10 -5 Bq/kg respectively the highest 40 K concentration was found in Pandansili with the average was about (8.40 ± 0.34) x 10 -5 Bq/kg. The estimation of equivalent doses from intake of 228 Th, 226 Ra, 40 K, and 137 Cs in rice were the highest in Bayuran the value the average values, respectively, was 0.0039 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 18.09 X 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 1.63 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 172.38 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr. Result in this measurement lowest comparing by recommendation IAEA in Safety Series No. 115 in 1996. (author)

  6. Internal Dosimetry Monitoring- Detection Limits for a Selected Set of Radionuclides and Their Translation Into Committed Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, A.; Hrnecek, E.; Steger, F.

    2004-01-01

    To harmonize the practice of internal dosimetry monitoring across the country, the Austrian Standards Institute is currently drafting a new set of standards which are concerned with occupational incorporation monitoring of individuals handling non-sealed radioactive material. This set of standards is expected to consist of three parts discussing the general necessity and frequency, the requirements for monitoring institutions, and the determination and rigorous calculation of committed effective dose after incorporation of radioactive material, respectively. Considerations of the requirements for routine monitoring laboratories have led to an evaluation of the detection limits for routine monitoring equipment. For a selected set of radionuclides, these detection limits are investigated in detail. The main emphasis is placed on the decay chains of naturally occurring radionuclides showing some significant potential for being out of equilibrium due to chemical processes in certain mining industries. The radionuclides considered in this paper are 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U, and 238U. Given the routine monitoring intervals of the Austrian Standard, these detection limits are translated into information on committed effective dose. This paper investigates whether routine monitoring equipment is sufficient to ensure compliance with EC directive 96/29/Euratom for this selected set of radionuclides. (Author) 9 refs

  7. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  8. High resolution and simultaneous monitoring of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Muguntha Manikandan, N.; Komura, K.

    2005-01-01

    By using 11 extremely low background Ge detectors at Ogoya Underground Laboratory, it became possible to investigate temporal variations of airborne 212 Pb (T 1/2 =10.6 h) along with 210 Pb and 7 Be with order of magnitude higher time resolution. Then, we have measured airborne nuclides at three monitoring points, (1) roof of our laboratory (LLRL; 40 m ASL), (2) Shinshiku Plateau (640 m ASL) located about 8 km from LLRL as a comparison of vertical distribution, and (3) Hegura Island (10 m ASL) at about 50 km from Wajima located north of Noto Peninsula facing on the Sea of Japan (about 180 km to the north-northeast of LLRL), to investigate influence of Asian continent. Airborne nuclides were collected by high volume air samplers at intervals of a few hours at either two or three points simultaneously. In the same manner, high resolution monitoring was carried out also at the time of passage of typhoon and cold front. In this study, we observed drastic temporal variations of airborne radionuclides and correlations of multiple monitoring points. The results indicate that high resolution and simultaneous monitoring is very useful to understand dynamic state of variations of airborne nuclides due to short and long-term air-mass movement. (author)

  9. Radioactivity measurement of primordial radionuclides in and dose evaluation from marble and glazed tiles used as covering building materials in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turhan, S.; Varinlioglu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the natural radioactivity arising from primordial radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) in marble and glazed tile samples used covering building materials in Turkey were carried out by gamma-ray spectrometer with a high purity germanium detector. The mean activity concentrations of the 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in marble and glazed tile samples were found as 8.2, 5.5 and 58.1 Bq kg -1 and 81.2, 65.4 and 450.1 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The radiation doses received by occupants of buildings in which the sample marble and glazed tiles might be used are estimated using measured activity concentrations of constituent primordial radionuclides and dose conversion factors evaluated by the European Commission from models of tile use. Results obtained are presented for each radionuclide, analysed and compared with relevant national and international legislation, guidance and report, and with the results obtained from other studies. Results show that the use of such decorative building materials in the construction of domestic homes or workplaces in Turkey is unlikely to lead to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants. (authors)

  10. Short description of the BIOS-model, and selection of biosphere parameters to be used in radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, E.J. de; Koester, H.W.; Vries, W.J. de.

    1990-02-01

    In the framework of the PACOMA-project (Performance assessment of confinements for medium and alpha waste), initiated by the European Commission, possible future radiation doses, due to contamination of the biosphere by radionuclides originating from radioactive waste disposed in salt-formations, were calculated. In all cases considered radionuclides coming out of the geosphere enter a river. For the biosphere calculations the BIOS-model, developed by the NRPB in England, is used. A short description of the model, as well as of the adjustments made at the RIVM to calculate the total individual and collective doses and the subdoses of different exposure pathways is given. The values of biosphere parameters selected for the model are presented, together with the literature consulted. (author). 17 refs., 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. AIRDOS-II computer code for estimating radiation dose to man from airborne radionuclides in areas surrouding nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.E.

    1977-04-01

    The AIRDOS-II computer code estimates individual and population doses resulting from the simultaneous atmospheric release of as many as 36 radionuclides from a nuclear facility. This report describes the meteorological and environmental models used is the code, their computer implementation, and the applicability of the code to assessments of radiological impact. Atmospheric dispersion and surface deposition of released radionuclides are estimated as a function of direction and distance from a nuclear power plant or fuel-cycle facility, and doses to man through inhalation, air immersion, exposure to contaminated ground, food ingestion, and water immersion are estimated in the surrounding area. Annual doses are estimated for total body, GI tract, bone, thyroid, lungs, muscle, kidneys, liver, spleen, testes, and ovaries. Either the annual population doses (man-rems/year) or the highest annual individual doses in the assessment area (rems/year), whichever are applicable, are summarized in output tables in several ways--by nuclides, modes of exposure, and organs. The location of the highest individual doses for each reference organ estimated for the area is specified in the output data

  12. Radionuclide compositions of spent fuel and high level waste from commercial nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    This report provides information on radionuclide compositions of spent fuel and high level waste produced during reprocessing. The reactor types considered are Magnox, AGR, PWR and CFR. The activities of the radionuclides are calculated using the FISPIN code. The results are presented in a form suitable for radioactive waste management calculations. (author)

  13. Lifetime radiation risks from low-dose rate radionuclides in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    One of the largest, long-term (25-yr) animal studies on the effects of low-dose internal irradiation is almost completed. Some 335 beagles were given continuous exposure to graded 90 Sr [low linear energy transfer (LET)] in their diets (D-dogs) through adulthood. A second group (R-dogs) was given fractionated doses of 225 Ra (high LET) as young adults. A third group of 44 was given a single injection of 90 Sr as adults (S-dogs) to compare single to continuous dosages. All dogs were followed through their lifetimes. Only one of the 848 dogs is still alive. The animals were whole-body counted over their entire life span and were examined frequently for assessment of medical status. There were no acute radiation lethalities. Analyses of the large data base from these dogs have begun and preliminary indications are that 90 Sr, which was tested over a 1500-fold skeletal dose rate range, does not cause significant life shortening at average accumulation skeletal doses of ∼2500 rads (25 Gy) and that a curvilinear dose response curve for life shortening was seen at higher accumulation doses. The data will be discussed in terms of modern epidemiological concepts and quantifications will be related to certain parameters of human risk from acute or chronic radiation exposures

  14. Factors that elevate the internal radionuclide and chemical retention, dose and health risks to infants and children in a radiological-nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that influence the dose and risk to vulnerable population groups from exposure and internal uptake of chemicals are examined and, in particular, the radionuclides released in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events. The paper seeks to identify the areas that would benefit from further research. The intake and body burdens of carbon and calcium were assessed as surrogates for contaminants that either act like or bind to hydrocarbons (e.g. tritium and 14 C) or bone-seeking radionuclides (e.g. 90 Sr and 239 Pu). The shortest turnover times for such materials in the whole body were evaluated for the newborn: 11 d and 0.5 y for carbon and calcium, respectively. However, their biokinetic behaviour is complicated by a particularly high percentage of the gut-absorbed dietary intake of carbon (∼16%) and calcium (∼100%) that is incorporated into the soft tissue and skeleton of the growing neonate. The International Commission on Radiological Protection dose coefficients (Sv Bq -1 ) were examined for 14 radionuclides, including 9 of concern because of their potential use in radiological dispersal devices. The dose coefficients for a 3-month-old are greater than those for adults (2-56 times more for ingestion and 2-12 times for inhalation). The age-dependent dose and exposure assessment of contaminant intakes would improve by accounting for gender and growth where it is currently neglected. Health risk is evaluated as the product of the exposure and hazard factors, the latter being about 10-fold greater in infants than in adults. The exposure factor is also approximately 10-fold higher for ingestion by infants than by adults, and unity for inhalation varying with the contaminant. Qualitative and quantitative physiological and epidemiological evidence supports infants being more vulnerable to cancer and neurological deficit than older children). (authors)

  15. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Solid phase microextraction sampling of high explosive residues in the presence of radionuclides and radionuclide surrogate metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, M.C.; Crump, S.L.; Ray, R.J.; Beals, D.; Cotham, W.E.; Mount, K.; Koons, R.D.; Leggitt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE residue involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ( 239/240 Pu, 238 U, 237 Np, 85 Sr, 133 Ba, 137 Cs, 60 Co and 226 Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. (author)

  17. Modeling the Long-term Transport and Accumulation of Radionuclides in the Landscape for Derivation of Dose Conversion Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo Moreno; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological impact of potential releases to the biosphere from a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, it is necessary to assess the long-term dynamics of the distribution of radionuclides in the environment. In this paper, we propose an approach for making prognoses of the distribution and fluxes of radionuclides released from the geosphere, in discharges of contaminated groundwater, to an evolving landscape. The biosphere changes during the temperate part (spanning approximately 20,000 years) of an interglacial period are handled by building biosphere models for the projected succession of situations. Radionuclide transport in the landscape is modeled dynamically with a series of interconnected radioecological models of those ecosystem types (sea, lake, running water, mire, agricultural land and forest) that occur at present, and are projected to occur in the future, in a candidate area for a geological repository in Sweden. The transformation between ecosystems is modeled as discrete events occurring every thousand years by substituting one model by another. Examples of predictions of the radionuclide distribution in the landscape are presented for several scenarios with discharge locations varying in time and space. The article also outlines an approach for estimating the exposure of man resulting from all possible reasonable uses of a potentially contaminated landscape, which was used for derivation of Landscape Dose Factors

  18. Measurement of gamma-ray dose rate in soil and transfer of radionuclides from soil to vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.; Akhter, P.; Khan, H.M.; Ismail, M.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of natural radionuclides in soil, vegetation and vegetable samples collected from some Northern areas of Pakistan was carried out by gamma -ray spectrometry (HPGe detector). The activity concentrations in soil ranged from 24.7 to 78.5 Bqkg/sup -1/, 21.7 to 75.3 Bqkg/sup -1/ and 298.5 to 570.8 Bqkg/sup -1/ for /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 40/K with the mean values of 42.1, 43.3 and 418.3 Bqkg/sup -1/, respectively. In the present analysis, /sup 40/K was the major radionuclide present in soil, vegetation, fruit and vegetable samples. The transfer factors of these radionuclides from soil to vegetation, fruit and vegetable were found in the order: /sup 40/K>/sup 232/Th>/sup 226/Ra. The mean value of outdoor and indoor absorbed dose rate (D) in air was 64.61 and 77.54 nGyh/sup -1/. The activity concentrations of radionuclides found in all samples were nominal. Therefore, they are not associated with any potential source of health hazard to the general public. (Orig./A.B.)

  19. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations

  20. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations.

  1. Estimation of internal radiation dose to the adult Asian population from the dietary intakes of two long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, G.V.; Kawamura, H.; Dang, H.S.; Parr, R.M.; Wang, J.W.; Akhter, Perveen; Cho, S.Y.; Natera, E.; Miah, F.K.; Nguyen, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Daily dietary intakes of two naturally occurring long-lived radionuclides, 232 Th and 238 U, were estimated for the adult population living in a number of Asian countries, using highly sensitive analytical methods such as instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (INAA and RNAA), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Asian countries that participated in the study were Bangladesh (BGD), China (CPR), India (IND), Japan (JPN), Pakistan (PAK), Philippines (PHI), Republic of Korea (ROK) and Vietnam (VIE). Altogether, these countries represent more than 50% of the world population. The median daily intakes of 232 Th ranged between 0.6 and 14.4 mBq, the lowest being for Philippines and the highest for Bangladesh, and daily intakes of 238 U ranged between 6.7 and 62.5 mBq, lowest and the highest being for India and China, respectively. The Asian median intakes were obtained as 4.2 mBq for 232 Th and 12.7 mBq for 238 U. Although the Asian intakes were lower than intakes of 12.3 mBq (3.0 μg) 232 Th and 23.6 mBq (1.9 μg) 238 U proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the ICRP Reference Man, they were comparable to the global intake values of 4.6 mBq 232 Th and 15.6 mBq 238 U proposed by the United Nation Scientific Commission on Effects of Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual committed effective doses to Asian population from the dietary intake of 232 Th and 238 U were calculated to be 0.34 and 0.20 μSv, respectively, which are three orders of magnitude lower than the global average annual radiation dose of 2400 μSv to man from the natural radiation sources as proposed by UNSCEAR

  2. Determination of dose rate from natural radionuclide in porcelain dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, A.D.; El-Zourgany, A.; Elmashat, Alia; El-Masri, Karima

    2010-01-01

    There are three main aims that make this study particularly important and interesting to radiometric studies. Firstly, it will provides information on the concentration composition of natural and the associated man-made radioactivity of imported dental porcelain materials to be used by most dental laboratories in Great Jamahiriya. Since these materials do not pass radiation inspection tests before their entry or use and there is a large variety of supply source of these dental materials to be used for all dental works on Libyan patients, anomalies can be identified easily. Secondly, the analysis of selective elemental abundance (U, Th, and K ) and dose rate calculations may be used to calculate effective dose rates to dental laboratory technicians and also to the patient who will be using these specific materials. This research project will provide the first results of such measurements and the corresponding average annual effective dose rates equivalent to the patients using these materials and also to the dental technician and doctors work in the various dental laboratories that make use of these materials in their daily work. A total number of 30 dental powder samples were collected from a number of dental laboratories around Tripoli area will be analyzed. In this research project, the results from this preliminary survey regarding Th, U and K elemental concentrations in a wide variety of dental materials by means of high-resolution X-ray spectrometry will be presented. Further results from these investigations concerning activity concentrations and the associated dose rates, effective dose and the committed dose due to the use of these materials are going to be calculated and compared with other published data elsewhere and recommendation of their use will be derived accordingly. (author)

  3. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  4. Development of a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Thiago Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bioanalysis and assessment of the time of incorporation. The biokinetics models are represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN. Consequently serving as a agile and efficient tool for the designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. The architecture of the system was conceived containing two independent software: CBT - responsible for the setup and manipulation of models and SSID - responsible for the mathematical solution of the models. Four different techniques are offered for the resolution of system of equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods, allowing for comparison of precision and performance of both. The software was developed in C≠ programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved via SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system replicated the values published by ICRP. (author)

  5. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: radionuclide concentrations in fish and clams and estimated doses via the marine pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Phillips, W.A.; Eagle, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The survey consisted, in part, of an aerial radiological reconnaissance to map the external gamma-ray exposure rates. As a secondary phase, terrestrial and marine samples were collected to assess the radiological dose from pertinent food chains to atoll inhabitants. The marine sample collection, processing, and dose assessment methodology are presented as well as the concentration data for 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, and any of the other gamma emitters in fish and clam muscle tissue from the different species collected. Doses are calculated from the average radionuclide concentrations in fish and clam muscle tissue assuming an average daily intake of 200 and 10 g, respectivelty. The 90 Sr concentration in muscle tissue is very low and there is little difference in the average concentrations from the different fish from different atolls or islands. The 239+240 Pu concentration in the muscle tissue of all reef species, however, is higher than that in pelagic lagoon fish. In contrast, 137 Cs concentrations are lowest in the muscle tissue of the bottom-feeding reef species and highest in pelagic logoon fish. Recent measurements of radionuclide concentrations in fish muscle tissue and other marine dietary items from international sources show that the average concentrations in species from the Marshall Islands are comparable to those in fish typically consumed as food in the United States and are generally lower than those in most international marine dietary items. The whole-body dose rates based on continuous consumption of 200 g/d of fish range from 0.028 to 0.1 mrem/y; the bone-marrow dose rates range from 0.029 to 0.12 mrem/y. The dose commitment, or 30-y integral doses, range from 0.00063 to 0.0022 rem for the whole body and from 0.00065 to 0.0032 rem for the bone marrow

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Protection Rad Neshaps Radionuclide Inventory Web Database and Rad Neshaps Source and Dose Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Patricia A; Smith, Linda L; Johnson, David N

    2017-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated national emission standards for emissions of radionuclides other than radon from US Department of Energy facilities in Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H. This regulatory standard limits the annual effective dose that any member of the public can receive from Department of Energy facilities to 0.1 mSv. As defined in the preamble of the final rule, all of the facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, i.e., the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, East Tennessee Technology Park, and any other U.S. Department of Energy operations on Oak Ridge Reservation, combined, must meet the annual dose limit of 0.1 mSv. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, there are monitored sources and numerous unmonitored sources. To maintain radiological source and inventory information for these unmonitored sources, e.g., laboratory hoods, equipment exhausts, and room exhausts not currently venting to monitored stacks on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus, the Environmental Protection Rad NESHAPs Inventory Web Database was developed. This database is updated annually and is used to compile emissions data for the annual Radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad NESHAPs) report required by 40 CFR 61.94. It also provides supporting documentation for facility compliance audits. In addition, a Rad NESHAPs source and dose database was developed to import the source and dose summary data from Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 computer model files. This database provides Oak Ridge Reservation and facility-specific source inventory; doses associated with each source and facility; and total doses for the Oak Ridge Reservation dose.

  7. Absorbed dose evaluation of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides: impact of input decay spectra on dose point kernels and S-values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Lee, Boon Q; Fernández-Varea, José M; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Kibédi, Tibor; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of decay data provided by the newly developed stochastic atomic relaxation model BrIccEmis on dose point kernels (DPKs - radial dose distribution around a unit point source) and S-values (absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) of 14 Auger electron (AE) emitting radionuclides, namely 67 Ga, 80m Br, 89 Zr, 90 Nb, 99m Tc, 111 In, 117m Sn, 119 Sb, 123 I, 124 I, 125 I, 135 La, 195m Pt and 201 Tl. Radiation spectra were based on the nuclear decay data from the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) RADTABS program and the BrIccEmis code, assuming both an isolated-atom and condensed-phase approach. DPKs were simulated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) code using event-by-event electron and photon transport. S-values for concentric spherical cells of various sizes were derived from these DPKs using appropriate geometric reduction factors. The number of Auger and Coster-Kronig (CK) electrons and x-ray photons released per nuclear decay (yield) from MIRD-RADTABS were consistently higher than those calculated using BrIccEmis. DPKs for the electron spectra from BrIccEmis were considerably different from MIRD-RADTABS in the first few hundred nanometres from a point source where most of the Auger electrons are stopped. S-values were, however, not significantly impacted as the differences in DPKs in the sub-micrometre dimension were quickly diminished in larger dimensions. Overestimation in the total AE energy output by MIRD-RADTABS leads to higher predicted energy deposition by AE emitting radionuclides, especially in the immediate vicinity of the decaying radionuclides. This should be taken into account when MIRD-RADTABS data are used to simulate biological damage at nanoscale dimensions.

  8. Fiber optics in high dose radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of state-of-the-art optical fiber waveguides in high dose (greater than or equal to 10 5 rad), steady state radiation fields is presented. The influence on radiation-induced transmission loss due to experimental parameters such as dose rate, total dose, irradiation history, temperature, wavelength, and light intensity, for future work in high dose environments are given

  9. BIODOSE: a code for predicting the dose to man from radionuclides released from underground nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, N.A.; Ng, Y.C.

    1980-03-01

    The BIODOSE computer program simulates the environmental transport of radionuclides released to surface water and predicts the resulting dosage to humans. This report describes the program and discusses its use in the evaluation of nuclear waste repositories. The methods used to estimate dose are examined critically, and the most important parameters in each stage of the calculations are identified as an aid in planning for measurements in the field. Dose predictions from releases of nuclear waste to a large northwestern river (the baseline river) are presented to point out the nuclides, compartments and pathways that contribute most to the hazard as a function of waste storage time. Predictions for five other water systems are presented to identify the most important system parameters that determine the concentrations of individual nuclides in compartments and the resultant dose. The uncertainties in the biological parameters for dose prediction are identified, and changes in current values are suggested. Various ways of reporting dose estimates for radiological safety assessments are discussed. Additional work needed to improve the dose predictions from BIODOSE and specific areas and steps to improve our capabilities to assess the environmental transport of nuclides released from nuclear waste repositories and the resultant dose to man are suggested

  10. Use of the GEANT4 Monte Carlo to determine three-dimensional dose factors for radionuclide dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Ernesto, E-mail: eamato@unime.it [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Italiano, Antonio [INFN – Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina (Italy); Minutoli, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences (Italy)

    2013-04-21

    The voxel-level dosimetry is the most simple and common approach to internal dosimetry of nonuniform distributions of activity within the human body. Aim of this work was to obtain the dose “S” factors (mGy/MBqs) at the voxel level for eight beta and beta–gamma emitting radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of a region of soft tissue as defined by the ICRP, divided into 11×11×11 cubic voxels, 3 mm in side. The simulation used the parameterizations of the electromagnetic interaction optimized for low energy (EEDL, EPDL). The decay of each radionuclide ({sup 32}P, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 186}Re, {sup 188}Re) were simulated homogeneously distributed within the central voxel (0,0,0), and the energy deposited in the surrounding voxels was mediated on the 8 octants of the three dimensional space, for reasons of symmetry. The results obtained were compared with those available in the literature. While the iodine deviations remain within 16%, for phosphorus, a pure beta emitter, the agreement is very good for self-dose (0,0,0) and good for the dose to first neighbors, while differences are observed ranging from −60% to +100% for voxels far distant from the source. The existence of significant differences in the percentage calculation of the voxel S factors, especially for pure beta emitters such as {sup 32}P or {sup 90}Y, has already been highlighted by other authors. These data can usefully extend the dosimetric approach based on the voxel to other radionuclides not covered in the available literature.

  11. Use of the GEANT4 Monte Carlo to determine three-dimensional dose factors for radionuclide dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Minutoli, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The voxel-level dosimetry is the most simple and common approach to internal dosimetry of nonuniform distributions of activity within the human body. Aim of this work was to obtain the dose “S” factors (mGy/MBqs) at the voxel level for eight beta and beta–gamma emitting radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of a region of soft tissue as defined by the ICRP, divided into 11×11×11 cubic voxels, 3 mm in side. The simulation used the parameterizations of the electromagnetic interaction optimized for low energy (EEDL, EPDL). The decay of each radionuclide ( 32 P, 90 Y, 99m Tc, 177 Lu, 131 I, 153 Sm, 186 Re, 188 Re) were simulated homogeneously distributed within the central voxel (0,0,0), and the energy deposited in the surrounding voxels was mediated on the 8 octants of the three dimensional space, for reasons of symmetry. The results obtained were compared with those available in the literature. While the iodine deviations remain within 16%, for phosphorus, a pure beta emitter, the agreement is very good for self-dose (0,0,0) and good for the dose to first neighbors, while differences are observed ranging from −60% to +100% for voxels far distant from the source. The existence of significant differences in the percentage calculation of the voxel S factors, especially for pure beta emitters such as 32 P or 90 Y, has already been highlighted by other authors. These data can usefully extend the dosimetric approach based on the voxel to other radionuclides not covered in the available literature

  12. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  13. Biological effects of disintegration of electrocaptured radionuclides: the role of physical characteristics of disintegration and distribution of the absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Problems pertaining to the internal irradiation by radionuclides radiating during the disintegration according to the electron capture scheme a great amount of low-energy monoenergetic electrons (Auger electrons, internal conversion electrons) are considered. Main attention has been paid to the role of low-energy electrons and transmutation effects in the selective injury of intranuclear sensitive locuses as well as to the importance of the character of absorption dose distribution over the tissue microstructures. It is shown that very promising seems to be in principle the possibility of using electronradiating atoms for the radiotherapy purposes

  14. Box modelling approach for evaluation of influence of ice transport of radionuclides for doses to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iospje, M.

    2002-01-01

    Modelling of the ice transport of radionuclides, which is a unique pathway in the Arctic ocean and adjacent sea areas, is limited by necessity to describe complete processes of incorporation of radioactivity into ice and ice sediment. Freezing / melting processes and transport of 'clean' ice can be described with a good accuracy for relatively short time scale on the basis of the present level of modelling, but detailed description of the sediment entrainment into ice based on the Reynolds equations with attention to coagulation processes is limited by low concentration of particles (grease ice cannot be described) and time scale up to 5 . 10 -2 s (1 . 10 -9 y) what is not available for large time scale and ice masses. Adding the radioactivity incorporation into the ice with following description of transport and fate of radionuclides will lead to further increasing of the complexity of the modelling. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an alternative approach for purposes of radiological assessment on the basis of the box modelling to describe the incorporation of radioactivity into ice and ice sediment, transport of radioactivity by ice and incorporation of radioactivity into sea areas through melding processes. It is shown that the ice transport of radionuclides can be a significant factor for some scenarios and radionuclides. The influence of the ice transport increases with increasing K d values for radionuclides. It is necessary to note that the content and structure of the sediment load in ice vary within wide limits, and therefore, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis can improve the possibility to represent model results satisfactorily. (LN)

  15. Investigation of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China and evaluation of internal dose to public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Changshou; Liu Yulan; Xu Ning; Hu Aiying; Kou Tiluo; Shi Zhongxin

    1992-12-01

    In order to obtain background radiation levels of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China, the determination and analysis of water and food samples have been completed by organizations of radiological protection from 28 provinces, autonomous regions and three major cities. Ranges of specific activity of natural radionuclides for U, Th, Ra, K, Pb and Po are (2.2 ∼ 25.5) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (0.5 ∼ 6.9) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (3.4 ∼ 25.5) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (25 ∼ 420) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, (3.9 ∼ 55) x 10 -2 Bq/kg and (2.7 ∼ 58) x 10 -2 Bq/kg, respectively. Samples of drinking water were taken from tap water or well. The average concentrations in tap water and well water are 2.8 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 3.7 x 10 -2 Bq/L for U, 0.8 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 1.3 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Ra, 0.07 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 0.06 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Th, 0. 3 x 10 -2 Bq/L and 1.1 x 10 -2 Bq/L for Pb and 0.3 Bq/L and 0.5 Bq/L for Po respectively. The annual intakes by ingestion have been calculated. The annual intake of male adult from six main natural radionuclides is about 205 Bq. Among them 64% of total intake of U is from drinking water. The contributions from grains to the total intake of Ra, Pb and Po are 55.7%, 59.7% and 70% respectively. The total annual average effective dose equivalent of 6 natural radionuclides for male adult in China is about 310 μSv

  16. Calculated radiation doses from radionuclides brought to the surface if future drilling intercepts the WIPP repository and pressurized brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a scenario in which an exploratory borehole connects an underlying brine reservoir with the repository and results in saturation of the waste storage area. A subsequent borehole brings portions of this radionuclide contaminated brine to the surface. Radiation odses are calculated for time periods of 125, 400, and 1000 years after repository closing for the following: (1) external radiation doses for workers at the borehole location; (2) inhalation doses for workers at the borehole location; (3) external and inhalation doses for a resident located 360 meters downwind; (4) ingestion doses for the downwind resident from locally grown produce, milk, and meat; and (5) population doses from inhalation within a 50-mile radius. The probability of the various calculated doses occurring was estimated. Probability was included in the report because of a belief that probability considerations are useful in evaluating the acceptability of unlikely events and to encourage others to provide a more detailed evaluation using more sophisticated methodology. Since the probabilities presented in this report were calculated using a simple methodology, with some parameter values chosen arbitrarily, they should be considered as approximate examples, not accurate numbers. The reasonableness of the scenario and the significance of the results are also discussed

  17. Comparison of the COMRADEX-IV and AIRDOS-EPA methodologies for estimating the radiation dose to man from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Hoffman, F.O.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents a comparison between two computerized methodologies for estimating the radiation dose to man from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. The COMRADEX-IV code was designed to provide a means of assessing potential radiological consequences from postulated power reactor accidents. The AIRDOS-EPA code was developed primarily to assess routine radionuclide releases from nuclear facilities. Although a number of different calculations are performed by these codes, three calculations are in common - atmospheric dispersion, estimation of internal dose from inhalation, and estimation of external dose from immersion in air containing gamma emitting radionuclides. The models used in these calculations were examined and found, in general, to be the same. Most differences in the doses calculated by the two codes are due to differences in values chosen for input parameters and not due to model differences. A sample problem is presented for illustration

  18. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within Tract A-18-2 for Land Conveyance and Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-26

    In 2017, soil sampling for radiological materials was conducted within Tract A-18-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for land conveyance decisions. Measurements of radionuclides in soil samples were evaluated against a recreational use scenario, and all measurements were below screening action levels for each radionuclide. The total estimated dose was less than 1 mrem/yr (<10 μSv/yr) for a hypothetical recreational user (compared with a dose limit of 25 mrem/yr [250 μSv/yr]). Dose estimates were based on the 95% upper confidence levels for radionuclide concentrations within the Tract. Dose estimates less than 3 mrem/yr are considered to be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), therefore no follow-up analysis was conducted. Release of this property is consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 458.1 (DOE 2013) and Policy 412 (LANL 2014).

  19. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within Tract A-18-2 for Land Conveyance and Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    In 2017, soil sampling for radiological materials was conducted within Tract A-18-2 specifically for land conveyance decisions. Measurements of radionuclides in soil samples were evaluated against a recreational use scenario, and all measurements were below screening action levels for each radionuclide. The total estimated dose was less than 1 mrem/y (< 10 μSv/y) for a hypothetical recreational user (compared to a dose limit of 25 mrem/y (250 μSv/y)). Dose estimates were based on the 95% upper confidence limits for radionuclide concentrations within the Tract. Additionally, dose estimates less than 3 mrem/y are considered to be As Low As Reasonably Achievable, so no follow-up analysis was conducted. Release of this property is consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 458.1 and Policy 412.

  20. Progress in high-dose radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Nam, J.W.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a deluge of new high-dose dosimetry techniques and expanded applications of methods developed earlier. Many of the principal systems are calibrated by means of calorimetry, although production of heat is not always the final radiation effect of interest. Reference systems also include a number of chemical dose meters: ferrous sulphate, ferrous-cupric sulphate, and ceric sulphate acidic aqueous solutions. Requirements for stable and reliable transfer dose meters have led to further developments of several important high-dose systems: amino acids and saccharides analysed by ESR or lyoluminescence, thermoluminescent materials, radiochromic dyes and plastics, ceric-cerous solutions analysed by potentiometry, and ethanol-chlorobenzene solutions analysed by high-frequency oscillometry. A number of other prospective dose meters are also treated in this review. In addition, an IAEA programme of high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing is described. (author)

  1. An experimental study on the toxicity of several radionuclides inhaled at different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.; Nenot, J.C.; Morin, M.; Masse, R.; Metivier, H.; Nolibe, D.; Skupinski, W.

    1975-01-01

    For over 5 years investigations have been carried out on large lots of rats on the toxicological action of several inhaled radionuclides. Various physico chemical forms of α-emitting actinides and β-emitting lanthanides were used, respectively 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, as oxide or nitrate solution at pH1, 244 Cm nitrate, and 144 Ce chloride and 141 Ce chloride and oxide. The activities deposited per gram of lung varied between 10nCi and 10μCi. The first effect observed was life-shortening. A comparison of the survival curves shows a heterogeneity factor whose values for the various radionuclides is given. Lung cancers were also observed. Rarely lung carcinomas were the cause of death, which was unknown and seemed to vary with the different compounds [fr

  2. Assessing radiation doses to the public from radionuclides in timber and wood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident involving the release of radionuclides to the biosphere the radioactive contamination of forests can become a significant potential source of public radiation exposure. Two of these accidents - the Kyshtim accident, Urals, USSR (now Russian Federation) in 1957 and the Chernobyl accident, USSR (now Ukraine), in 1986 - resulted in significant contamination of thousands of square kilometres of forested areas with mixtures of radionuclides including long lived fission products such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr. Measurements and modelling of forest ecosystems after both accidents have shown that, following initial contamination, the activity concentration of long lived radionuclides in wood gradually increases over one to two decades and then slowly decreases in the subsequent period. The longevity of the contamination is due to the slow migration and persistent bioavailability of radionuclides in the forest soil profile, which results in long term transfer into wood through the root system of the trees. Another source of contamination is from global radioactive fallout after nuclear weapons tests, but the level of contamination is much lower than that from, for example, the Chernobyl accident. For instance, the level of 137 Cs in wood in Sweden is about 2-5 Bq kg -1 from global fallout. Global values are very similar to the Swedish levels. In contrast, the level of 137 Cs in Swedish wood due to Chernobyl is around 50 Bq kg -1 . Levels in wood from some contaminated areas located in countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are about one to two orders of magnitude higher than this. The data on 137 Cs soil contamination within European territories, originating mainly from the Chernobyl accident, illustrate the scale of the problem. For comparison, residual 137 Cs soil deposition in Europe from global radioactive fallout was in the range 1-4 kBq m -2 . There is concern in several countries about the potential radiation exposure of people from

  3. Estimation of internal radiation dose to the adult Asian population from the dietary intakes of two long-lived radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyengar, G.V. E-mail: v.iyengar@iaea.org; Kawamura, H.; Dang, H.S.; Parr, R.M.; Wang, J.W.; Akhter, Perveen; Cho, S.Y.; Natera, E.; Miah, F.K.; Nguyen, M.S

    2004-07-01

    Daily dietary intakes of two naturally occurring long-lived radionuclides, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, were estimated for the adult population living in a number of Asian countries, using highly sensitive analytical methods such as instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (INAA and RNAA), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Asian countries that participated in the study were Bangladesh (BGD), China (CPR), India (IND), Japan (JPN), Pakistan (PAK), Philippines (PHI), Republic of Korea (ROK) and Vietnam (VIE). Altogether, these countries represent more than 50% of the world population. The median daily intakes of {sup 232}Th ranged between 0.6 and 14.4 mBq, the lowest being for Philippines and the highest for Bangladesh, and daily intakes of {sup 238}U ranged between 6.7 and 62.5 mBq, lowest and the highest being for India and China, respectively. The Asian median intakes were obtained as 4.2 mBq for {sup 232}Th and 12.7 mBq for {sup 238}U. Although the Asian intakes were lower than intakes of 12.3 mBq (3.0 {mu}g) {sup 232}Th and 23.6 mBq (1.9 {mu}g) {sup 238}U proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the ICRP Reference Man, they were comparable to the global intake values of 4.6 mBq {sup 232}Th and 15.6 mBq {sup 238}U proposed by the United Nation Scientific Commission on Effects of Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual committed effective doses to Asian population from the dietary intake of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U were calculated to be 0.34 and 0.20 {mu}Sv, respectively, which are three orders of magnitude lower than the global average annual radiation dose of 2400 {mu}Sv to man from the natural radiation sources as proposed by UNSCEAR.

  4. Baseline assessment of doses and risk due to natural radionuclides in edible biota of Domiasiat, Meghalaya, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Chaturvedi, S.S.; Jha, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose-risk assessment was carried out for cereal species Brassica compestris var. dichotoma, Oryza sativa var. Shalum1, Zea mays, Lactuca indica, Cumunis sativum, and Clocasia esculanta due to naturally available radionuclides 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th in Domiasiat area. The activity in biota and corresponding soil was measured by precipitation method using NaI(TI) detector. Transfer factor (TF) was for Oryza spp. (1.00E-01- 40 K, 8.76E-05- 232 Th, and 9.11E-05- 238 U), for Brassica spp. (5.39E-01- 40 K, 8.17E-04- 232 Th and 2.96E-04- 238 U) and for Zea spp. (3.41E-01- 40 K, 5.84E-05- 232 Th, 8.87E-05- 238 U) etc., respectively. A detailed physio-morphological study of the biota and extensive investigation of ecosystem was carried out for assessment. The data was modeled using FASSET for dose estimation and obtained total dose was 1.58E-04 μGy h -1 in Oryza spp., 2.87E-04 μGy h -1 Brassica spp. and 6.90E-03 μGy h -1 in Zea spp. etc. The dose was compared with the UNSCEAR dataset for screening level dose for biota. Zea spp. was more susceptible for the chronic radiation exposure. (author)

  5. A model for inverse dose-rate effects - low dose-rate hyper-sensibility in response to targeted radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, I.; Mather, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival, developed for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), could be extended to targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) in order to predict dose-response relationships in a cell line exhibiting low dose hypersensitivity (LDH). Methods: aliquots of the PC-3 cancer cell line were treated with either EBRT or an in-vitro model of TRT (Irradiation of cell culture with Y-90 EDTA over 24, 48, 72 or 96 hours). Dosimetry for the TRT was calculated using radiation transport simulations with the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Clonogenic as well as functional biological assays were used to assess cell response. An extension of the LQ model was developed which incorporated a dose-rate threshold for activation of repair mechanisms. Results: accurate dosimetry for in-vitro exposures of cell cultures to radioactivity was established. LQ parameters of cell survival were established for the PC-3 cell line in response to EBRT. The standard LQ model did not predict survival in PC-3 cells exposed to Y 90 irradiation over periods of up to 96 hours. In fact cells were more sensitive to the same dose when irradiation was carried out over 96 hours than 24 hours. I.e. at a lower dose-rate. Deviations from the LQ predictions were most pronounced below a threshold dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/hr. These results led to an extension of the LQ model based upon a dose-rate dependent sigmoid model of single strand DNA repair. This extension to the model resulted in predicted cell survival curves that closely matched the experimental data. Conclusion: the LQ model of cell survival to radiation has been shown to be largely predictive of response to low dose-rate irradiation. However, in cells displaying LDH, further adaptation of the model was required. (authors)

  6. Assessing radiation doses to the public from radionuclides in timber and wood products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-10-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident involving the release of radionuclides to the biosphere the radioactive contamination of forests can become a significant potential source of public radiation exposure. Two of these accidents - the Kyshtim accident, Urals, USSR (now Russian Federation) in 1957 and the Chernobyl accident, USSR (now Ukraine), in 1986 - resulted in significant contamination of thousands of square kilometres of forested areas with mixtures of radionuclides including long lived fission products such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. Measurements and modelling of forest ecosystems after both accidents have shown that, following initial contamination, the activity concentration of long lived radionuclides in wood gradually increases over one to two decades and then slowly decreases in the subsequent period. The longevity of the contamination is due to the slow migration and persistent bioavailability of radionuclides in the forest soil profile, which results in long term transfer into wood through the root system of the trees. Another source of contamination is from global radioactive fallout after nuclear weapons tests, but the level of contamination is much lower than that from, for example, the Chernobyl accident. For instance, the level of {sup 137}Cs in wood in Sweden is about 2-5 Bq kg{sup -1} from global fallout. Global values are very similar to the Swedish levels. In contrast, the level of {sup 137}Cs in Swedish wood due to Chernobyl is around 50 Bq kg{sup -1}. Levels in wood from some contaminated areas located in countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are about one to two orders of magnitude higher than this. The data on {sup 137}Cs soil contamination within European territories, originating mainly from the Chernobyl accident, illustrate the scale of the problem. For comparison, residual {sup 137}Cs soil deposition in Europe from global radioactive fallout was in the range 1-4 kBq m{sup -2}. There is concern in several countries about the

  7. Doses rate in contact with plastic syringes of 1, 2 and 5 mL for different beta and gamma emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Berdeguez, Mirta; Ayra Pardo, Enrique; Falcon, Lazaro

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to calculate the dose rate in contact with plastic syringes of 1, 2 and 5 m L volume, unshielded and the dose rate in the same syringes after a lead or a Lucite shield of various thickness has been installed, depending on the emission of the radionuclide used. The radionuclides involved in the assessment were 32 P, 51 Cr, 90 Y, 99m Tc, 125 I, 131 I, 153 Sm, 186 Re, 188 Re, 169 Er and 177 Lu. The code used was the MCNP4C. The results are intended to be used by a Radiation Protection Officer wherever the radionuclides in question are handled to rapidly assess the dose in hands of the operators. (author)

  8. High resolution analysis of temporal variation of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Manikandan, M.; Murata, Y.; Iida, T.; Moriizumi, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the application of ultra low-background gamma spectrometry, we tried to measure temporal variation of airborne radionuclides at intervals of 1 to few hours in extreme case. Airborne radionuclides were collected on a filter paper made of quartz fiber at the Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory (LLRL), Kanazawa Univ. in Tatsunokuchi (since Nov. 2002), Hegra Island located 50 km from Noto peninsula (since Apr. 2003) to investigate influence of Asian continent and Shishiku plateau at 640 m above sea to know vertical difference (since Sep., 2003). Pb-210, Pb-212 and Be-7 were measured nondestructively by ultra low background Ge detectors in Ogoya Underground Laboratory (270 meter water Concentration of Rn-222 was monitored 1 hour intervals and wind direction and speed were recorded 10 min or 2 min intervals (Hegra Is.) as support data in data analyses. In the regular monitoring, sampling was made at 1-2 day (LLRL and Shishiku) or 1 week intervals (Hegra) to know daily and seasonal variations and similarity or difference between sampling locations. When drastic meteorological change, such as passage of front or typhoon, occurrence of inversion layer and snow fall etc., short sampling at 1-2 hours of intervals was conducted to find the corrlation with meteorological factors at single point or 2 points simultaneously. As a results, it was found that concentrations of Pb-210, Po-210, Pb-212 and Be-7 were found to vary very quickly in a short time (see Figure below) due mainly to horizontal or vertical mixing of air-masses. (authors)

  9. Analysis of the Nevada-Applied-Ecology-Group model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the inhalation pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The inhalation pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of the dose to liver, bone, kidney and total body. The GI tract receives 99% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5% ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph nodes. (author)

  10. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose from 239 Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  11. Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    We analyze the model for estimating the dose FR-om /sup 239/Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose FR-om the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables

  12. Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 3, Results, Variability, and Uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part three of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. The radionuclides of interest are the 238 U series (14 nuclides), the actinium series (headed by 235 U; 11 nuclides), and the 232 Th series (11 nuclides); primordial radionuclides 87 Rb and 40 K; cosmogenic and fallout radionuclides 14 C and 3 H; and purely anthropogenic radionuclides 137 Cs- 137m Ba, 129 I and 90 Sr- 90 Y. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222 Rn, 220 Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Part two described the methods used to organize the data collected in part one and segregate it into the ages and genders defined by the study, imputed missing values from the existing data, apportioned activity in bone, and imputed activity in hollow organ contents and the remainder of the body. This paper estimates equivalent doses to target tissues from source regions and maps target tissues to lists of tissues with International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) tissue-weighting factors or to surrogate tissue regions when there is no direct match. Effective doses, using ICRP tissue-weighting factors recommended in 1977, 1990, and 2007, are then calculated, and an upper bound of variability of the effective dose is estimated by calculating the average coefficients of variation (CV), assuming all variance is due to variability. Most of the data were for adult males, whose average annual effective dose is estimated to be 337 (micro)Sv y -1 (CV = 0.65, geometric mean

  13. A Monte Carlo program converting activity distribution to absorbed dose distributions in a radionuclide treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagesson, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    In systemic radiation therapy, the absorbed dose distribution must be calculated from the individual activity distribution. A computer code has been developed for the conversion of an arbitrary activity distribution to a 3-D absorbed dose distribution. The activity distribution can be described either analytically or as a voxel based distribution, which comes from a SPECT acquisition. Decay points are sampled according to the activity map, and particles (photons and electrons) from the decay are followed through the tissue until they either escape the patient or drop below a cut off energy. To verify the calculated results, the mathematically defined MIRD phantom and unity density spheres have been included in the code. Also other published dosimetry data were used for verification. Absorbed fraction and S-values were calculated. A comparison with simulated data from the code with MIRD data shows good agreement. The S values are within 10-20% of published MIRD S values for most organs. Absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in spheres (masses between 1 g and 200 kg) are within 10-15% of those published. Radial absorbed dose distributions in a necrotic tumor show good agreement with published data. The application of the code in a radionuclide therapy dose planning system, based on quantitative SPECT, is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Rapid analysis of key radionuclides in urine and estimation of internal dose for nuclear accident emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shuquan; Hu Heping; Wu Mingyu; Zhu Guoying; Huang Shibin; Liu Shiming

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the internal doses of a Chinese visiting scholar in the Chernobyl accident. Methods: The contents of 134 Cs and 137 Cs in urine were measured using a Ge(Li) γ-spectrometer. Their internal doses were estimated according to ICRP reports. Dose review of 131I was performed referring to UNSCEAR 2000 report. Results: The effective dose equivalent from 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 131 I were 66 μSv, 88 μSv and 1728 μSv respectively. Their summation was 1.9 mSv. Conclusion: The internal dose from 131 I was 10 times higher than that from 134 Cs and 137 Cs. So, the earlier estimation of internal doses for 131 I is significant in evaluation on radiation injuries of a nuclear reactor accident. (authors)

  15. The Bad Berka dose protocol: comparative results of dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using (177)Lu-DOTATATE, (177)Lu-DOTANOC, and (177)Lu-DOTATOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Prasad, Vikas; Zachert, Carolin; Müller, Dirk; Baum, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the in vivo behavior of the (177)Lu-labeled peptides DOTATATE, DOTANOC, and DOTATOC used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT) of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), by measuring organ and tumor kinetics and by performing dosimetric calculations. Two hundred fifty-three patients (group 1) with metastasized NET who underwent PRRNT were examined. Out of these, 185 patients received (177)Lu-DOTATATE, 9 were treated with (177)Lu-DOTANOC, and 59 with (177)Lu-DOTATOC. Additionally, 25 patients receiving, in consecutive PRRNT cycles, DOTATATE followed by DOTATOC (group 2) and 3 patients receiving DOTATATE and DOTANOC (group 3) were analyzed. Dosimetric calculations (according to MIRD scheme) were performed using OLINDA software. In group 1, DOTATOC exhibited the lowest and DOTANOC the highest uptake and therefore mean absorbed dose in normal organs (whole body, kidney, and spleen). In group 2, there was a significant difference between DOTATATE and DOTATOC concerning kinetics and normal organ doses. (177)Lu-DOTATOC had the lowest uptake/dose delivered to normal organs and highest tumor-to-kidney ratio. There were no significant differences between the three peptides concerning tumor kinetics and mean absorbed tumor dose. The study demonstrates a correlation between high affinity of DOTANOC in vitro and high uptake in normal organs/whole body in vivo, resulting in a higher whole-body dose. DOTATOC exhibited the lowest uptake and dose delivered to normal tissues and the best tumor-to-kidney ratio. Due to large interpatient variability, individual dosimetry should be performed for each therapy cycle.

  16. Dose due to man-made radionuclides in terrestrial wild foods near Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulker, M.J.; Jackson, D.; McKay, K.; John, C.; Leonard, D.R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological dose implications for consumers of wild foods around Sellafield have been assessed. Habits were surveyed from 72 households, mostly within a few kilometres of Sellafield. A few people were included who lived further away but collect wild foods close to Sellafield. Dose estimates were based on measured gamma emitters, as well as 239 Pu, 241 Am, 14 C and 129 I in selected samples. In all cases, doses were dominated by 137 Cs. One infant was identified who consumed wild food, giving an estimated effective dose of 0.3 μSv a -1 . In the age group 2 to 10 years a mean dose of 0.51 μSv a -1 , and a maximum of 2.8 μSv a -1 , were estimated. Intakes by adults were higher and resulted in more radiologically significant doses. The extreme individual received a dose of 32 μSv a -1 largely due to consumption of honey that included contributions from the Chernobyl accident, and hedgerow fruits. This is comparable to doses to the critical group for consumption of conventional agricultural produce close to the Sellafield site. The 97.5th percentile dose, for all age groups of consumers taken together, was 16.6 μSv a -1 , or 6.2 μSv a -1 if the contributions from Chernobyl are excluded. Considering the contributions from different foods to the whole group of 181 wild food consumers, the rank order is honey, blackberries and venison. (author)

  17. External dose-rate conversion factors of radionuclides for air submersion, ground surface contamination and water immersion based on the new ICRP dosimetric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Song Jae; Jang, Han-Ki; Lee, Jai-Ki; Noh, Siwan; Cho, Gyuseong

    2013-01-01

    For the assessment of external doses due to contaminated environment, the dose-rate conversion factors (DCFs) prescribed in Federal Guidance Report 12 (FGR 12) and FGR 13 have been widely used. Recently, there were significant changes in dosimetric models and parameters, which include the use of the Reference Male and Female Phantoms and the revised tissue weighting factors, as well as the updated decay data of radionuclides. In this study, the DCFs for effective and equivalent doses were calculated for three exposure settings: skyshine, groundshine and water immersion. Doses to the Reference Phantoms were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNPX 2.7.0 radiation transport code for 26 mono-energy photons between 0.01 and 10 MeV. The transport calculations were performed for the source volume within the cut-off distances practically contributing to the dose rates, which were determined by a simplified calculation model. For small tissues for which the reduction of variances are difficult, the equivalent dose ratios to a larger tissue (with lower statistical errors) nearby were employed to make the calculation efficient. Empirical response functions relating photon energies, and the organ equivalent doses or the effective doses were then derived by the use of cubic-spline fitting of the resulting doses for 26 energy points. The DCFs for all radionuclides considered important were evaluated by combining the photon emission data of the radionuclide and the empirical response functions. Finally, contributions of accompanied beta particles to the skin equivalent doses and the effective doses were calculated separately and added to the DCFs. For radionuclides considered in this study, the new DCFs for the three exposure settings were within ±10 % when compared with DCFs in FGR 13.

  18. The effect of dose protraction on the incidence of lung carcinomas in beagle dogs with internally deposited β-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, W.C.; Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Snipes, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Studies using Beagle dogs were conducted to understand health effects when lung is the primary organ irradiated after inhaling insoluble radioactive particles containing one of four β-emitting radionuclides, 90 Y, 91 Y, 144 Ce, or 90 Sr. The low-LET β irradiation was delivered over a wide range of total doses and dose rate patterns that protracted the dose to lung from about 1 wk to several years. The tumor incidence rates for lung carcinomas were estimated using a proportional hazard rate model. These studies suggest that dose protraction only affects production of lung carcinomas at doses above 50 Gy

  19. High-dose irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies performed on behalf of the International Project on Food Irradiation in the period from 1971 until 1980 resulted in the concluding statement that ''.the irradiation of any food commodity up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy presents no toxicological hazard; hence, toxicological testing of foods so treated is no longer required.'' Since then, licenses for food irradiation have been restricted to this maximum dose in any country applying this technology. Further testing programmes have been carried out investigating the wholesomeness or hazards of high-dose irradiation, but there has been little demand so far by the food industry for licensing of high-dose irradiation, as there is only a small range of products whose irradiation at higher doses offers advantages for given, intended use. These include eg. spices, dried herbs, meat products in flexible pouch packagings for astronauts, or patients with immune deficiencies. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Radionuclide mobility in the shallow portion of an active high-temperature geothermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the behavior of radionuclides in natural rock-water systems is crucial for the prediction of the consequences of failure of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in progress at Argonne National Laboratory involves the detailed geochemical analysis of rock, mineral, and water samples from shallow drill holes in a thermal area of Yellowstone National Park. This study is designed to provide data that will increase our understanding of the behavior of a group of radionuclides in an environment similar to that of the near field of a high-level nuclear waste repository

  1. Investigation of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China and evaluation of internal dose to public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changshou, Zhu; Yulan, Liu; Ning, Xu; Aiying, Hu; Tiluo, Kou; Zhongxin, Shi [Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene, Ministry of Public Health (China); and others

    1992-12-01

    In order to obtain background radiation levels of natural radionuclides in foods and waters in China, the determination and analysis of water and food samples have been completed by organizations of radiological protection from 28 provinces, autonomous regions and three major cities. Ranges of specific activity of natural radionuclides for U, Th, Ra, K, Pb and Po are (2.2 {approx} 25.5) x 10 {sup -2} Bq/kg, (0.5 {approx} 6.9) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, (3.4 {approx} 25.5) x 10 {sup -2} Bq/kg, (25 {approx} 420) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, (3.9 {approx} 55) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg and (2.7 {approx} 58) x 10{sup -2} Bq/kg, respectively. Samples of drinking water were taken from tap water or well. The average concentrations in tap water and well water are 2.8 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 3.7 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for U, 0.8 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 1.3 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Ra, 0.07 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 0.06 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Th, 0. 3 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L and 1.1 x 10{sup -2} Bq/L for Pb and 0.3 Bq/L and 0.5 Bq/L for Po respectively. The annual intakes by ingestion have been calculated. The annual intake of male adult from six main natural radionuclides is about 205 Bq. Among them 64% of total intake of U is from drinking water. The contributions from grains to the total intake of Ra, Pb and Po are 55.7%, 59.7% and 70% respectively. The total annual average effective dose equivalent of 6 natural radionuclides for male adult in China is about 310 {mu}Sv.

  2. Spatial and seasonal variation of radionuclides in soils and waters near a coal-fired power plant of Northern Greece. Environmental dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noli, F.; Tsamos, P.; Stoulos, S.

    2017-01-01

    The determination of the radionuclides of U- and Th-series as well as of "4"0K and "1"3"7Cs in soils and waters in a lignite mining area was performed. The measurements in the soils were undertaken by γ-ray spectrometry while the concentrations of "2"3"4U and "2"3"8U in waters and the isotopic ratio "2"3"4U/"2"3"8U were determined by α-ray spectrometry. Slight seasonal variation of the radioactivity was observed with high values in summer and low in winter. The estimated annual radiation dose from soil was lower than the worldwide average whereas in the case of water only one location showed increment in the internal radiation about 18 % of the worldwide average. (author)

  3. HUMTRN: documentation and verification for an ICRP-based age- and sex-specific human simulation model for radionuclide dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1984-06-01

    The dynamic human simulation model HUMTRN is designed specifically as a major module of BIOTRAN to integrate climatic, hydrologic, atmospheric, food crop, and herbivore simulation with human dietary and physiological characteristics, and metabolism and radionuclides to predict radiation doses to selected organs of both sexes in different age groups. The model is based on age- and weight-specific equations developed for predicting human radionuclide transport from metabolic and physical characteristics. These characteristics are modeled from studies documented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 23). HUMTRN allows cumulative doses from uranium or plutonium radionuclides to be predicted by modeling age-specific anatomical, physiological, and metabolic properties of individuals between 1 and 70 years of age and can track radiation exposure and radionuclide metabolism for any age group for specified daily or yearly time periods. The simulated daily dose integration of eight or more simultaneous air, water, and food intakes gives a new, comprehensive, dynamic picture of radionuclide intake, uptake, and hazard analysis for complex scenarios. A detailed example using site-specific data based on the Pantex studies is included for verification. 14 references, 24 figures, 10 tables

  4. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  5. Activity concentration and population dose from natural occurring radionuclide (40K) due to consumption of fresh water fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, M.K.; Patra, A.K.; Jaison, T.J.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the concentration of natural occurring radionuclide ( 40 K) in different fresh water fish collected from Moticher lake near Kakrapar, Gujarat. The three types of commonly available fresh water fish in Moticher lake are Notopterus sps, Ophiocephalus sps. and Tor sps. The 40 K activity (Bq/kg flesh wt.) was found to be in the range of 38-100 (Notopterus sps.), 33-123 (Ophiocephalus sps.) and 80-116 (Tor sps.) respectively. The ingestion dose (μSv/y) to the adult population around Kakrapar was estimated due to the consumption of fresh water fish and found to be in the range of 7.7-20.5 (Notopterus sps.), 6.8-25.0 (Ophiocephalus sps.) and 16.0-24.0 (Tor sps.) respectively. (author)

  6. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  7. Global Collective Dose Commitments from Release of Long-Lived Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of global collective dose commitment as a measure of total detriment from the release of radioactivity to the environment is outlined. Estimates are given of global collective dose commitments resulting from the release of 14C and uranium daughter products from the nuclear fuel cycle...... that the use of global collective dose commitments in differential cost-benefit analysis can lead to questionable results. In differential cost-benefit analysis it is suggested that population exposures should not simply be integrated irrespective of their time of occurrence, but that a certain discount rate...

  8. Transport in biosphere of radionuclides released from finally disposed nuclear waste - background information for transport and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulmi, R.; Savolainen, I.

    1981-07-01

    An outline is made about the biosphere transport and dose models employed in the estimation of doses due to releases from finally disposed nuclear waste. The models often divide into two parts; the first one describes the transport of radionuclides in those parts of biosphere where the time scale is large (e.g. soil, sea and sea sediment), the second part of the model describes the transport of nuclides in the systems where the time scale is small (e.g. food chains, plants and animals). The description of biosphere conditions includes remarkable uncertainty due to the complexity of the biosphere and its ecosystems. Therefore studies of scenario type are recommended: some values of parametres describing the conditions are assumed, and the consequences are estimated by using these values. The effect of uncertainty in various factors on the uncertainty of final results should be investigated with the employment of alternative scenarios and parametric sensitivity studies. In addition to the ordinary results, intermediate results should be presented. A proposal for the structure of a transport and dose program based on dynamic linear compartment model is presented and mathematical solution alternatives are studied also

  9. Impact of radiation protection means on the dose to the lens of the eye while handling radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchmann, Iris; Szermerski, Bastian; Geworski, Lilli [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. for Radiation Protection and Medical Physics; Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The human eye lens appears to be more radiosensitive than previously assumed. The reduction of the limit for the dose to the lens of the eye to 20 mSv per year has been passed in the current Euratom Directives (2013). Therefore, in this work the impact of laboratory glasses and X-ray protective goggles was investigated and reciprocal attenuation factors (i.e. transmission factors) for different nuclides (Tc-99m, I-131, Y-90, F-18 and Ga-68) were determined. The radionuclides in typical geometry (syringe, applicator) were positioned at a distance of 50 cm to the eyes of four Alderson-Head-Phantoms. Different dosemeters measuring H{sub p}(3) respective H{sub p}(0.07) were fixed to the eyes of the phantoms, either behind the glasses or without any protection means, respectively. The mean reciprocal attenuation factors were determined to be between unity for F-18 and I-131 using laboratory glasses (no attenuation effect) and < 0.01 for Y-90 using X-ray protective goggles. All other results were between these extremes. It has been shown, that prospective doses to the lens of the eye can be reduced significantly by using appropriate radiation protection means, especially for those dose-relevant beta radiation emitting nuclides such as Y-90.

  10. Standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2000-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department (CRP) is an advanced and modern facility that encompasses two essential components: radioisotope research, and radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing. Radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program is not only quite unique, but also an essential component of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC) in providing quality patient care for the population of the Kingdom. Accurate diagnosis and therapy with medical imaging equipment requires quality radiopharmaceuticals that are available readily and with reliability. The CRP Department provides that quality and reliability. Research activities of the CRP Department are focused on developing new radiotracers with potential usefulness in biomedical research and clinical applications. Research projects consist of: developing cyclotron targetry for radioisotope production; developing synthesis methods for radiolabeling biomolecules; and developing analytical methods for quality control. The CRP Department operates a semi-commercial radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program that supplies the diagnostic radioactive products to several hospitals in the Kingdom and neighboring countries. These products for clinical applications are produced according to the international standards of Good Manufacturing Practices of quality and efficacy. At the heart of the radioisotope program is a medium energy cyclotron capable of accelerating a number of particles for transformation of non-radioactive atoms into radionuclides that are the primary sources for research and development activities, and for preparing radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to having the only cyclotron facility in the region, KFSH and RC also has the only Positron Emission Tomography Center (PET) in this part of the world. This combination of cyclotron and the ultra modern PET facility translates into advanced and specialized care for the patients at KFSH and RC

  11. Variability in dose estimates associated with the food-chain transport and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1982-06-01

    Dose predictions for the ingestion of 90 Sr and 137 Cs, using aquatic and terrestrial food chain transport models similar to those in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.109, are evaluated through estimating the variability of model parameters and determining the effect of this variability on model output. The variability in the predicted dose equivalent is determined using analytical and numerical procedures. In addition, a detailed discussion is included on 90 Sr dosimetry. The overall estimates of uncertainty are most relevant to conditions where site-specific data is unavailable and when model structure and parameter estimates are unbiased. Based on the comparisons performed in this report, it is concluded that the use of the generic default parameters in Regulatory Guide 1.109 will usually produce conservative dose estimates that exceed the 90th percentile of the predicted distribution of dose equivalents. An exception is the meat pathway for 137 Cs, in which use of generic default values results in a dose estimate at the 24th percentile. Among the terrestrial pathways of exposure, the non-leafy vegetable pathway is the most important for 90 Sr. For 90 Sr, the parameters for soil retention, soil-to-plant transfer, and internal dosimetry contribute most significantly to the variability in the predicted dose for the combined exposure to all terrestrial pathways. For 137 Cs, the meat transfer coefficient the mass interception factor for pasture forage, and the ingestion dose factor are the most important parameters. The freshwater finfish bioaccumulation factor is the most important parameter for the dose prediction of 90 Sr and 137 Cs transported over the water-fish-man pathway

  12. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/μCi-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult

  13. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/..mu..Ci-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult.

  14. Radiation dose in the high background radiation area in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, E P; Jojo, P J; Vaidyan, V K; Anilkumar, S; Eappen, K P

    2012-03-01

    A systematic radiological survey has been carried out in the region of high-background radiation area in Kollam district of Kerala to define the natural gamma-radiation levels. One hundred and forty seven soil samples from high-background radiation areas and five samples from normal background region were collected as per standard sampling procedures and were analysed for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K by gamma-ray spectroscopy. External gamma dose rates at all sampling locations were also measured using a survey meter. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K was found to vary from 17 to 3081 Bq kg(-1), 54 to 11976 Bq kg(-1) and BDL (67.4 Bq kg(-1)) to 216 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in the study area. Such heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the region may be attributed to the deposition phenomenon of beach sand soil in the region. Radium equivalent activities were found high in several locations. External gamma dose rates estimated from the levels of radionuclides in soil had a range from 49 to 9244 nGy h(-1). The result of gamma dose rate measured at the sampling sites using survey meter showed an excellent correlation with dose rates computed from the natural radionuclides estimated from the soil samples.

  15. Effective Equivalent Doses of External Irradiation of Population by Man-made Radionuclides from the Soil in the Sarajevo Region Over the Period of 1986-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saracevic, L.; Samek, D.; Hasanbasic, D.; Gradascevic, N.

    1998-01-01

    Assessment of exposition of human body to radioactive materials is seen as radiation-hygienic measure of utmost importance, since the doses absorbed due to radionuclides present in soil, air, food and water are significant integral parts of the total dose that the human being receives in all kinds and conditions of exposition. External irradiation by radionuclides deposed in soil is a major contributor to the whole dose of irradiation of population. Assuming that fission radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 had a specially significant contribution to the total dose of irradiation of the population over the investigation period (1986-1989), we established their levels of activity in the soil in different localities of the Sarajevo region, and then calculated the effective equivalent dose for the population for each year of investigation. The mean values for the yearly effective equivalent doses of external irradiation of the population by fission radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 from the soil in the Sarajevo region were 0.77 mSv/year in 1989. Contribution by Cs-134 to the total effective equivalent dose was 63.64 % in 1986 year, to be reeducated in 1987 to 45.67 %, in 1988 to 35.89 % and in the year 1989 to 33.33 %. The effective equivalent dose was different to a great extent by the investigated localities (town sections) during the started period. It can be inferred from the above that the average population of the Sarajevo region did not receive a larger dose of radiation than the one established by the International Commission for Radiological Protection as the limit for subsequent exposition to radiation. (author)

  16. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60 Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm 3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60 Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma

  17. Stimulatory effect of low dose radionuclide on DNA synthesis and UDS in splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Yang Zhanshan

    1999-12-01

    To study the stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in splenic lymphocytes induced by low dose enriched uranium 235 U. By using 3 H-TdR incorporation assay technique, the DNA replicative synthesis in PHA and LPS stimulated splenic lymphocytes was observed. By using DNA synthesis inhibitor such as hydroxyurea, the UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in splenic lymphocytes occurred. When the injected low dose of enriched uranium 235 u was 0.1 μg/kg body weight, the transformation capacity was elevated for splenic T lymphocytes, simultaneously the stimulative index increased. The UDS of splenic lymphocytes induced by ultra-violate revealed a statistically significant increase by low dose of enriched uranium 235 U at the range of 0.1-20 μg/kg body weight. A stimulatory action of low dose enriched uranium 235 U on DNA replicative synthesis as well as on UV-induced UDS in splenic lymphocytes was detected

  18. The Effective Dose Due to Radionuclides Intake Via Ingestion in Poland in 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, D.; Kurowski, W.; Muszynski, W.; Rubel, B.; Swietochowska, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: One of the pathways of radiation exposure in humans is consumption of contaminated food. The composition of an average diet is diversified for various groups within the population and depends on age, sex, consumption habit and performed work. To asses the dose obtained by people due to ingestion of contaminated food, the activity of main products of Polish diet has been analysed for period 1986 - 1999. The samples of milk, meat, vegetables, fruit and cereals were collected all over the territory of Poland to determine the activity of caesium isotopes. In the first two-year after the Chernobyl accident the differences in contamination were observed in various regions. Later on the differences were less pronounced except in milk and meat. The calculation of an average annual intake of caesium isotopes was based on statistical data consumption and contamination of certain product important in daily diet. Annual intake of caesium was different among regions. Mean annual effective dose related to the ingestion of contaminated food of 137 Cs was assessed on 54μSv in 1986 and 28μSv in 1987 and of 134 Cs on 34μSv and 13μSv respectively. In next years the dose was diminishing and from 1993 the average annual effective dose from 137 Cs has been on level 6-7 μSv. (author)

  19. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  20. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculations. Data for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tamura, Tsutomu

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear decay data used for dose calculations were compiled for 162 nuclides with half-lives greater than or equal to 10 min that are not listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and their 28 daughter nuclides. Additional 14 nuclides that are considered to be important in fusion reactor facilities were also included. The data were compiled using decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Investigations of the data sets were performed to check their consistency by referring to recent literature and NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides, and by using the utility programs of ENSDF. Possible revisions of the data sets were made for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The revised data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to calculate the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays including annihilation photons, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformations of the radionuclides. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were presented in two types of format; Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. This report provides the decay data in the Publ. 38 format along with decay scheme drawings. The data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection. (author)

  1. Evaluation of radionuclides transfer from soil-to-edible flora and estimation of radiological dose to the Malaysian populace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Mohd Nasir, Noor Liyana; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Bradley, D A; Jojo, P J; Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-07-01

    Malaysia, a rapidly growing industrial country, is susceptible to pollution via large-scale industrial engagements and associated human activities. One particular concern is the potential impact upon the quality of locally resourced vegetables, foodstuffs that contain important nutrients necessary for good health, forming an essential part of the Malaysian diet. As a part of this, it is of importance for there to be accurate knowledge of radioactive material uptake in these vegetables, not least in respect of any public health detriment. Herein, using HPGe γ-ray spectrometry, quantification has been performed of naturally occurring radionuclides in common edible vegetables and their associated soils. From samples analyses, the soil activity concentration ranges (in units of Bq/kg) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were respectively 1.33-30.90, 0.48-26.80, 7.99-136.5 while in vegetable samples the ranges were 0.64-3.80, 0.21-6.91, 85.53-463.8. Using the corresponding activities, the transfer factors (TFs) from soil-to-vegetables were estimated, the transfers being greatest for (40)K, an expected outcome given the essentiality of this element in support of vigorous growth. The TFs of (226)Ra and (232)Th were found to be in accord with available literature data, the values indicating the mobility of these radionuclides to be low in the studied soils. Committed effective dose and the associated life-time cancer risk was estimated, being found to be below the permissible limit proposed by UNSCEAR. Results for the studied media show that the prevalent activities and mobilities pose no significant threat to human health, the edible vegetables being safe for consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  3. Natural radionuclides in food in an area with high concentrations of radionuclides; Radionuclídeos naturais em alimentos em uma área com altas concentrações de radionuclídeos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S.; Moraes, S.R.; Cavalcante, J.J.V. [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kelecom, A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X. da; Lopez, J.M.; Filgueiras, R.; Carmo, A.S., E-mail: pereiras@gmail.com, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Areas of high natural radiation expose the local population to doses greater than the world average. One of the routes of exposure is food intake. The activity concentration (AC) of 5 natural radionuclides in 7 types of foods was analyzed. The highest CA measured was 2.40 Bq.kg{sup -1} for the U{sub nat} in the potato. The multivariate statistic identified two groups: (U{sub nat}e {sup 232}Th) and [({sup 210}Pb and {sup 228}Ra) and {sup 226}Ra].

  4. Measurement of highly active samples of ultrashort-lived radionuclides and its problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van der Baan, J.G.; Panek, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of highly active eluates obtained from the generators for ultrashort-lived radionuclides poses several problems which are briefly discussed by using the example of the /sup 195m/Hg→/sup 195m/Au generator. For overcoming some of the problems, the construction of a multiple single-channel analyzer that allows high count rates, is described, as well as the counting technique applicable for highly active eluates

  5. Radiation doses due to long-range transport of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, G.; Valkama, I.; Rossi, J.; Savolainen, I.

    1985-12-01

    Within the framework of this study a model for estimating the long range transport of radioactive material and for calculating the resultant doses is developed. In the model initially the dispersion paths, i.e. trajectories, of the radioactive matter are calculated from the assumed source areas as well as the dispersion conditions along the trajectories. The trajectories are calculated at three-hour intervals in a two-dimensional grid using numerically analysed winds at a constant pressure level of 850 mb. The dispersion condition parameters applied are: the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer, the so-called mixing height, occurrence of precipitation and the character of the terrain. For each trajectory a type-index value is computed, describing the severity of the possible effects of radioactivity transported by the particular trajectory. The dispersion model uses the information on dispersion conditions provided by the trajectory model to compute the remaining radioactivity in the cloud, the deposition, as well as the doses due to different dose pathways. The pathways used are the external radiation from the cloud and from the activity deposited on the ground, inhalation of radioactive material and ingestion of contaminated food products (milk, meat, green vegetables, grain and roots). In addition to the effects of individual transport incidents, the cumulative probability distributions of the effects of accidental releases of radioactive matter can also be calculated using trajectory statistics and the trajectory type index

  6. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  7. PLGA nanoparticles for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors: a novel approach towards reduction of renal radiation dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Arora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT, employed for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs is based on over-expression of Somatostatin Receptors (SSTRs on NETs. It is, however, limited by high uptake and retention of radiolabeled peptide in kidneys resulting in unnecessary radiation exposure thus causing nephrotoxicity. Employing a nanocarrier to deliver PRRT drugs specifically to the tumor can reduce the associated nephrotoxicity. Based on this, (177Lu-DOTATATE loaded PLGA nanoparticles (NPs were formulated in the present study, as a potential therapeutic model for NETs. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: DOTATATE was labeled with Lutetium-177 ((177Lu (labeling efficiency 98%; R(f∼0.8. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG coated (177Lu-DOTATATE-PLGA NPs (50:50 and 75:25 formulated, were spherical with mean size of 304.5±80.8 and 733.4±101.3 nm (uncoated and 303.8±67.2 and 494.3±71.8 nm (coated for PLGA(50:50 and PLGA(75:25 respectively. Encapsulation efficiency (EE and In-vitro release kinetics for uncoated and coated NPs of PLGA (50:50 & 75:25 were assessed and compared. Mean EE was 77.375±4.98% & 67.885±5.12% (uncoated and 65.385±5.67% & 58.495±5.35% (coated. NPs showed initial burst release between 16.64-21.65% with total 42.83-44.79% over 21 days. The release increased with coating to 20.4-23.95% initially and 60.97-69.12% over 21 days. In-vivo studies were done in rats injected with (177Lu-DOTATATE and (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP (uncoated and PEG-coated by imaging and organ counting after sacrificing rats at different time points over 24 hr post-injection. With (177Lu-DOTATATE, renal uptake of 37.89±10.2%ID/g was observed, which reduced to 4.6±1.97% and 5.27±1.66%ID/g with uncoated and coated (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP. The high liver uptake with uncoated (177Lu-DOTATATE-NP (13.68±3.08% ID/g, reduced to 7.20±2.04%ID/g (p = 0.02 with PEG coating. CONCLUSION: PLGA NPs were easily formulated and modified for desired release properties. PLGA

  8. Risk-informed assessment of radionuclide release from dissolution of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae M., E-mail: tae.ahn@nrc.gov

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Dissolution of HLW waste form was assessed with long-term risk informed approach. • The radionuclide release rate decreases with time from the initial release rate. • Fast release radionuclides can be dispersed with discrete container failure time. • Fast release radionuclides can be restricted by container opening area. • Dissolved radionuclides may be further sequestered by sorption or others means. - Abstract: This paper aims to detail the different parameters to be considered for use in an assessment of radionuclide release. The dissolution of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste glass was considered for risk and performance insights in a generic disposal system for more than 100,000 years. The probabilistic performance assessment includes the waste form, container, geology, and hydrology. Based on the author’s previous extended work and data from the literature, this paper presents more detailed specific cases of (1) the time dependence of radionuclide release, (2) radionuclide release coupled with container failure (rate-limiting process), (3) radionuclide release through the opening area of the container and cladding, and (4) sequestration of radionuclides in the near field after container failure. These cases are better understood for risk and performance insights. The dissolved amount of waste form is not linear with time but is higher at first. The radionuclide release rate from waste form dissolution can be constrained by container failure time. The partial opening area of the container surface may decrease radionuclide release. Radionuclides sequestered by various chemical reactions in the near field of a failed container may become stable with time as the radiation level decreases with time.

  9. Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described

  10. Determination of radionuclide concentrations in ground level air using the ASS-500 high volume sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenzel, E.; Arnold, D.; Wershofen, H.

    1996-01-01

    A method for determination of radionuclide concentrations in air aerosol samples collected by the high volume aerosol sampler ASS-500 was elaborated. The aerosol sampling station ASS-500 is a Stand alone, all-weather proofed instrument. It is designed for representative sampling of airborne radionuclides from ground level air at a height of about 1.5 m above ground level. The ASS-500 station enables continuous air monitoring both normal and emergency Situations. The collection of aerosols on the Petrianov FPP-15-1.5 type filter out of an air volume of about 100,000 m 3 (sampling period 1 wk) or of about 250,000 m 3 (sampling period 3 wk) admits accurate spectrometric low level measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides. The achieved detection limit is 0.5 μBq m -3 and 0.2 μBq m -3 for 137 Cs, respectively. A new developed air flow Meter system allows to enhance the collected air volume to about 150,000 m 3 per week and lowers the detection limit to -3 for 137 Cs for weekly collected aerosol samples. In Poland the CLOR uses 9 Stations ASS-500 at different sites as atmospheric radioactivity control system. On the basis of spectrometric measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides in the collected aerosol samples at the different sites, CLOR establishes a weekly report about the radiological situation at Poland for responsible authorities. The very low achievable detection limit of the Station ASS-500 due 10 the high air flow fate and the long possible sampling period were the key argument for other government radiation protection authorities in Europe to introduce the Station ASS-500 into their low level radionuclide atmospheric monitoring programs (Austria, Belarus, France, Germany, Iceland, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine)

  11. Nonlinear model of high-dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilyuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The models of high-dose implantation, using the distribution functions, are relatively simple. However, they must take into account the variation of the function of distribution of the implanted ions with increasing dose [1-4]. This variation takes place owing to the fact that the increase of the concentration of the implanted ions results in a change of the properties of the target. High-dose implantation is accompanied by sputtering, volume growth, diffusion, generation of defects, formation of new phases, etc. The variation of the distribution function is determined by many factors and is not known in advance. The variation within the framework of these models [1-4] is taken into account in advance by the introduction of intuitive assumptions on the basis of implicit considerations. Therefore, these attempts should be regarded as incorrect. The model prepared here makes it possible to take into account the sputtering of the target, volume growth and additional declaration on the implanted ions. Without any assumptions in relation to the variation of the distribution function with increasing dose. In our model it is assumed that the type of distribution function for small doses in a pure target substance is the same as in substances with implanted ions. A second assumption relates to the type of the distribution function valid for small doses in the given substances. These functions are determined as a result of a large number of theoretical and experimental investigations and are well-known at the present time. They include the symmetric and nonsymmetric Gauss distribution, the Pearson distribution, and others. We examine implantation with small doses of up to 10 14 - 10 15 cm -2 when the accurately known distribution is valid

  12. High dose gamma-ray standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrin, R.; Moraru, R.

    1999-01-01

    The high gamma-ray doses produced in a gamma irradiator are used, mainly, for radiation processing, i.e. sterilization of medical products, processing of food, modifications of polymers, irradiation of electronic devices, a.s.o. The used absorbed doses depend on the application and cover the range 10 Gy to 100 MGy. The regulations in our country require that the response of the dosimetry systems, used for the irradiation of food and medical products, be calibrated and traceable to the national standards. In order to be sure that the products receive the desired absorbed dose, appropriate dosimetric measurements must be performed, including the calibration of the dosemeters and their traceability to the national standards. The high dose gamma-ray measurements are predominantly based on the use of reference radiochemical dosemeters. Among them the ferrous sulfate can be used as reference dosemeter for low doses (up to 400 Gy) but due to its characteristics it deserves to be considered a standard dosemeter and to be used for transferring the conventional absorbed dose to other chemical dosemeters used for absorbed doses up to 100 MGy. The study of the ferrous sulfate dosemeter consisted in preparing many batches of solution by different operators in quality assurance conditions and in determining for all batches the linearity, the relative intrinsic error, the repeatability and the reproducibility. The principal results are the following: the linear regression coefficient: 0.999, the relative intrinsic error: max.6 %, the repeatability (for P* = 95 %): max.3 %, the reproducibility (P* = 95%): max.5 %. (authors)

  13. High levels of natural radionuclides in a deep-sea infaunal xenophyophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinbanks, D D; Shirayama, Y

    1986-03-27

    The paper concerns the high levels of natural radionuclides in a deep-sea infaunal xenophyophore from the Izu-Ogasawara Trench. Measured /sup 210/Po activities and barium contents of various parts of Occultammina profunda and the surrounding sediment are given, together with their estimated /sup 210/Pb and /sup 226/Ra activities. The data suggest that xenophyphores are probably subject to unusually high levels of natural radiation.

  14. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  15. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation are calculated for 240 radionuclides of potential importance in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors for photons and electrons are calculated for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. Dose-rate conversion factors for photons only are calculated for 22 body organs. (author)

  16. Accumulation of main radionuclides that participate in exposure dose formation in liver of wild ungulate animals on the territory of the Palesse state radioecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korol', R.A.; Nikitin, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The dose of internal exposure of liver of wild ungulate animals (deer, elk, boar) mainly determined by Cs 137 at present time. The dose from Cs 137 is decrease in line wild boar - deer - elk and variate from 0.3 to 104.8 mSv/y. Other 'Chernobyl' radionuclides about equally contribute in the dose. The relative role of transuranium elements are increasing and will be equal to Cs 137 after about 250 years. The role of Sr 90 will minor all time. (authors)

  17. Calibration of gamma cameras for the evaluation of accidental intakes of high-energy photon emitting radionuclides by humans based on urine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenhardt, A.L.; Lucena, E.A.; Reis, A.A. dos; Souza, W.O.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Dantas, B.M., E-mail: bmdantas@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Dosimetria

    2017-07-01

    The prompt response to emergency situations involving suspicion of intakes of radionuclides requires the use of simple and rapid methods of internal monitoring of the exposed individuals. The use of gamma cameras to estimate intakes and committed doses was investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) of the USA in 2010.The present study aims to develop a calibration protocol for gamma cameras to be applied on internal monitoring based on urine samples to evaluate the incorporation of high-energy photon emitting radionuclides in emergency situations. A gamma camera available in a public hospital located in the city of Rio de Janeiro was calibrated using a standard liquid source of {sup 152}Eu supplied by the LNMRI of the IRD.'Efficiency vs Energy' curves at 10 and 30 cm were obtained. Calibration factors, Minimum Detectable Activities and Minimum Detectable Effective Doses of the gamma camera were calculated for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The gamma camera evaluated in this work presents enough sensitivity to detect activities of such radionuclides at dose levels suitable to assess suspected accidental intakes. (author)

  18. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  19. NIST high-dose calibration services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for the standardization of high-dose measurements used in the radiation-processing industry in order to provide assured traceability to national standards. NIST provides dosimetry calibration services to this industry. One of these services involves administration of known absorbed doses of gamma rays to customer-supplied dosimeters. The dosimeters are packaged to provide electron equilibrium conditions and are irradiated in a standard 60 Co calibration facility; this provides a calibration of that batch of dosimeters. Another service consists of supplying to a customer calibrated transfer dosimeters for irradiation with the customer's radiation source. The irradiated transfer dosimeters are then returned to NIST for analysis; the results are reported to the customer, providing a calibration of the dose rate of the customer's source. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of radionuclide concentration and absorbed dose from consumption of community water supplies in oil and gas producing areas in delta State Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokossa, P.; Olomo, J.B.; Balogun, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of radioactivity concentration in water supplies used for domestic and industrial purposes in the oil and gas producing communities of Delta State, Nigeria was carried out using a well-calibrated High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector system. The study area was partitioned into ten sections and a total of two samples per partition were collected for analysis. Samples of water from a non-producing area 14 were also collected as control. In all, a total number of forty three samples were collected and analyzed. Each sample was acidified at the rate of 10 ml of 11 M HCI per litre of water to prevent the absorption of radionuclides into the wall of the container and sealed in a properly cleaned container for at least one month so as to attain a state of secular radioactive equilibrium before analysis. The photo peaks observed with reliable regularity belong to the naturally occurring series-decay radionuclide headed by 238U and 232Th, as well as the non-series decay type 40K. The mean specific activity obtained for 40K was 49.15±15.35 BqL-1 with a range of 6.03 and 177.04 Bq L-1 while for 226Ra, the mean specific activity was 3.36±1.28 Bq L-1 with a range of 1.29 and 12.08 BqL-1 and the mean specific activity for 228Ra was 3.21± 2.69 BqL-1 with a range of 1.61 and 9.83 BqL-1 and the total annual effective dose did not show any significant health impact. (author)

  1. Radionuclides in resident and migratory fishes of a wedge bank region: Estimation of dose to human beings, South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroz Khan, M.; Godwin Wesley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► 137 Cs, 210 Po and 210 Pb accumulation in 47 species of marine fishes. ► Baseline data for Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project. ► Assessment of daily intake and committed effective dose. - Abstract: Baseline activity concentration of 137 Cs, 210 Po and 210 Pb was determined for 25 resident and 22 migratory fish species collected in a so-called wedge bank region in the extreme south of India. A nuclear power station is now under construction at Kudankulam near the target region and the data provide background information on the radionuclide activity concentration in the region. Three-way ANOVA revealed no significant variation in the concentrations of 137 Cs, 210 Po and 210 Pb between species based on feeding habit, habitat and migratory pattern except the effect of feeding habit on 210 Po concentration (p 137 Cs was negligibly small while those due to 210 Po and 210 Pb varied from 1.2 to 36.9 and 0.2 to 2.9 μSv yr −1 , respectively.

  2. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetité, Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Py Júnior, Delcy de Azevedo

    2008-08-01

    The uranium mining at Caetité (Uranium Concentrate Unit—URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5×103 μGy y-1 has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51×100 μGy y-1, that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota.

  3. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S; Kelecom, Alphonse; Azevedo Py Junior, Delcy de

    2008-01-01

    The uranium mining at Caetite (Uranium Concentrate Unit--URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5x10 3 μGy y -1 has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51x10 0 μGy y -1 , that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota

  4. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculation. Revised data for radionuclides listed in ICRP Publication 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2001-03-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 817 radionuclides that are listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and for 6 additional isomers. The decay data were prepared using decay data sets from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Basic nuclear properties in the decay data sets that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of emissions were examined and updated by referring to NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. The reviewed and updated data were half-life, decay mode and its branching ratio, spin and parity of the ground and isomeric states, excitation energy of isomers, and Q value. In addition, possible revisions of partial and incomplete decay data sets were done for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. After that, the decay data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to compute the energies and intensities of α particles, β particles, γ rays, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformation. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt γ rays, delayed γ rays, and β particles were also calculated. The compiled data were prepared in two different types of format: Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. Comparison of the compiled decay data with those in Publ. 38 was also presented. The decay data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection and will be beneficial to a future revision of ICRP Publ. 38. (author)

  5. Radon concentration, absorbed dose rate in air and concentration of natural radionuclides in soil in the Osaka district of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megumi, K.; Matsunami, T.; Ishiyama, T.; Abe, M.; Kimura, S.; Yamazaki, K.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radon concentrations in outdoor air at 18 sites in the Osaka district, in the central part of Japan's main island, were measured with electrostatic integrating radon monitors which were developed by Y Ikebe et al of the Osaka survey centre as part of a nationwide survey of radon indoors and outdoors in Japan conducted by the National Institute of Radiological Science. The mean radon concentration in outdoor air during 2-month periods was measured over a period of a year and a half. In addition, the absorbed dose rate in air and the concentration of natural radionuclides in soil were measured at 40 sites in Osaka Prefecture which is located in the central part of the Osaka district using thermoluminescence dosemeters and with gamma ray spectrometry, respectively. Radon concentration in outdoor air showed a seasonal pattern, reaching its maximum during the winter and its minimum during the summer, but this variation was not significant at the coastal sites. It was concluded that this variation is correlated with a seasonal wind which blows from the continental interior to the ocean in winter and in the opposite direction in summer, as well as with geographical factors. Radon concentration in outdoor air in the Osaka district ranged from 0.6 to 17.9 Bq.m -3 and mean annual radon concentration in outdoor air at the 18 sites ranged from 2.7 to 6.9 Bq.m -3 . It was discovered that radon concentration in outdoor air decreased with wind speed in both winter and summer. The absorbed dose rate in air ranged from 66 to 114 nGy.h -1 , and the concentration of 226 Ra in soil ranged from 20 to 60 Bq.kg -1 respectively. (author)

  6. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculation. Revised data for radionuclides listed in ICRP Publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 817 radionuclides that are listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and for 6 additional isomers. The decay data were prepared using decay data sets from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Basic nuclear properties in the decay data sets that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of emissions were examined and updated by referring to NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. The reviewed and updated data were half-life, decay mode and its branching ratio, spin and parity of the ground and isomeric states, excitation energy of isomers, and Q value. In addition, possible revisions of partial and incomplete decay data sets were done for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. After that, the decay data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to compute the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformation. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were prepared in two different types of format: Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. Comparison of the compiled decay data with those in Publ. 38 was also presented. The decay data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection and will be beneficial to a future revision of ICRP Publ. 38. (author)

  7. Radioimmunotherapy. Dose calculation and radionuclides used in treatment; Radioimmunoterapia. Hoidon radionuklidit ja annoslaskenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Kairemo, K [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Chemistry; Liewendahl, K [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Isotopes; Rannikko, S [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    In radioimmunotherapy (RIT) monoclonal antibodies to cancer-associated antigens can be utilized for the transport of therapeutic radioisotopes to cancer cells. Intravenous administration of radiolabelled antibody is a potentially curative form of therapy in hematological amignancies as circulating antibodies have easy access to tumour sites. Intravenous RIT is less effective in the treatment of solid tumours because of the low fractional uptake of the injected dose, particularly in the central parts of tumours. In solid tumours more promising results have been achieved by local RIT applications. The choice of radiation - {alpha}, {beta} or {gamma} - will depend of the characteristics of the tumour. The importance of radiation delivered by Auger electrons has been largely underestimated in the past, but recent research has resulted in a remarkable reassessment of this issue significantly influencing the selection of radioisotopes for RIT. Research is now being focused on the therapeutic aspects of different isotopes and microdosimetric problems. There are now good prospects of RIT becoming an important form of cancer treatment before year 2000. (orig.) (78 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.).

  8. High temperature chlorination of uranium and some radionuclides from rich sulphide ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the application of the high temperature chlorination technique upon a sulphide-rich uranium ore from elliot lake, ontario, canada. The purpose is to find a substitute to conventional sulphuric acid leaching which involves both acid drainage and radionuclide dissolution problems. Test work has therefore been directed towards studying some relevant factors of chlorination beside the effect of a number of additives

  9. Dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3) for frequently used radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szermerski, Bastian; Bruchmann, Iris; Geworski, Lilli [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. for Radiation Protection and Medical Physics; Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    According to recent studies, the human eye lens is more sensitive to ionising radiation than previously assumed. Therefore, the dose limit for personnel occupationally exposed to ionising radiation will be lowered from currently 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Currently, no data base for a reliable estimation of the dose to the lens of the eye is available for nuclear medicine. Furthermore, the dose is usually not monitored. The aim of this work was to determine dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3), which is supposed to estimate the dose to the lens of the eye. For this, H{sub p}(3)-dosemeters were fixed to an Alderson Phantom at different positions. The dosemeters were exposed to radiation from nuclides typically used in nuclear medicine in their geometries analog to their application in nuclear medicine, e.g. syringe or vial. The results show that the handling of high-energy beta (i.e. electron or positron) emitters may lead to a relevant dose to the lens of the eye. For low-energy beta emitters and gamma emitters, an exceeding of the lowered dose limit seems to be unlikely.

  10. Measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides in food samples and water for human consumption in Austria for the calculation of the ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudia Landstetter; Michael Zapletal; Merita Sinojmeri; Christian Katzlberger

    2013-01-01

    A new report on food habits of the Austrian population in the year 2006/2007 was released in 2008. Mixed diets and foodstuffs are measured within a monitoring program according to the Austrian radiation protection law, food law, and the Commission Recommendation 2000/473/Euratom on the application of Article 36 of the Euratom Treaty concerning the monitoring of the levels of radioactivity in the environment for the purpose of assessing the exposure of the population as a whole. In addition, drinking and mineral water samples are measured for natural and artificial radionuclides. The ingestion dose for the Austrian population is recalculated based on the results of these measurements, literature data, and the data of the new report on food habits. In general, the major part of the ingestion dose is caused by natural radionuclides, especially 40 K. (author)

  11. High-dose erythropoietin for tissue protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discovery of potential anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has led to clinical trials investigating the use of high-dose, short-term rHuEPO therapy for tissue protection in conditions such as stroke and myocardial infarction....... Experimental studies have been favourable, but the clinical efficacy has yet to be validated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have reviewed clinical studies regarding the use of high-dose, short-term rHuEPO therapy for tissue protection in humans with the purpose to detail the safety and efficacy of r...... no effect of rHuEPO therapy on measures of tissue protection. Five trials including 1025 patients reported safety concerns in the form of increased mortality or adverse event rates. No studies reported reduced mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is sparse to support a tissue-protective benefit of r...

  12. Natural radionuclides in rocks and soils of the high-mountain regions of the Great Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvarova, T. A.; Abdulaeva, A. S.; Magomedov, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the radioecological survey in the high-mountain regions of the Great Caucasus at the heights from 2200 to 3800 m a.s.l. are considered. This survey encompassed the territories of Dagestan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Chechnya, Northern Ossetia-Alania, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessia, and the Stavropol and Krasnodar regions. The natural γ background radiation in the studied regions is subjected to considerable fluctuations and varies from 6 to 40 μR/h. The major regularities of the migration of natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, and 40K in soils in dependence on the particular environmental conditions (the initial concentration of the radionuclides in the parent material; the intensity of pedogenesis; the intensity of the vertical and horizontal migration; and the geographic, climatic, and landscape-geochemical factors) are discussed.

  13. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations

  14. High-tension electrical injury to the heart as assessed by radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Hatano, Tsuguhisa [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)] [and others

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiac complications associated with electrical injury, 7 patients with high-tension electrical injury (6,600 V alternating current) underwent {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in addition to conventional electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessments. Electrocardiography showed transient atrial fibrillation, second degree atrioventricular block, ST-segment depression, and sinus bradycardia in each patient. Echocardiography showed mild hypokinesis of the anterior wall in only 2 patients, but {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy showed an abnormal scan image in 6/7 and 5/6 patients, respectively. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was seen primarily in areas extending from the anterior wall to the septum. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was smaller in extent and milder in degree in {sup 123}I-MIBG than in {sup 201}Tl imaging. These results suggest that even in patients without definite evidence of severe cardiac complications in conventional examinations, radionuclide imaging detects significant damage due to high-tension electrical injury, in which sympathetic nerve dysfunction might be milder than myocardial cell damage. (author)

  15. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  16. Process and research method of radionuclide migration in high level radioactive waste geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhang Zhanshi

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclides released from waste can migrate from the repository to the rock and soil outside. On the other hand, nuclides also are retarded by the backfill material. Radionuclide migration is the main geochemical process of the waste disposal. This paper introduces various methods for radionuclide migration research, and give a brief analysis of the geochemical process of radionuclide migration. Finally, two of the most important processes of the radionuclide migration have been instanced. (authors)

  17. Absorbed dose rate due to intake of natural radionuclides by Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) estimated near uranium anomaly at Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de; Kelecom, Alphonse; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo

    2007-01-01

    The uranium mining at Santa Quiteria (Santa Quiteria Unit - USQ) is in its environmental licensing phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the USQ, a monitoring program is underway. However, radioprotection of biota is not explicitly mentioned in Brazilian norms. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to behave in a pro-active way as expected by licensing organs, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology, based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected biomarker was the fish tilapia (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). Since there are no exposition limits for biota, in Brazil, the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5 x 10 3 μGy/y has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for tilapia was 2.76 x 10 0 μGy/y, that is less than 0.1 % of the limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was U-238, with 99% of the absorbed dose rate. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that in pre-operational conditions analyzed natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to the biota. (author)

  18. Absorbed dose rate due to intake of natural radionuclides by Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) estimated near uranium anomaly at Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios], E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Caetite, BA (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Unidade de Concentrado de Uranio], E-mail: Delcy@inb.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The uranium mining at Santa Quiteria (Santa Quiteria Unit - USQ) is in its environmental licensing phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the USQ, a monitoring program is underway. However, radioprotection of biota is not explicitly mentioned in Brazilian norms. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to behave in a pro-active way as expected by licensing organs, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology, based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected biomarker was the fish tilapia (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). Since there are no exposition limits for biota, in Brazil, the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5 x 10{sup 3} {mu}Gy/y has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for tilapia was 2.76 x 10{sup 0} {mu}Gy/y, that is less than 0.1 % of the limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was U-238, with 99% of the absorbed dose rate. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that in pre-operational conditions analyzed natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to the biota. (author)

  19. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  20. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  1. Global dose to man from proposed NNTRP high altitude nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.R.

    1975-05-01

    Radionuclide measurements from past high altitude nuclear testing have enabled development of a model to estimate surface deposition and doses from 400 kt of fission products injected in winter within the Pacific Test Area at altitudes in excess of 50 km. The largest 30-year average dose to man is about 10 millirem and occurs at 30 0 to 50 0 N latitude. The principal contributor to this dose is external gamma radiation from gross fission products. Individual doses from 90 Sr via the forage-cow-milk pathway and 137 Cs via the pasture-meat pathway are about 1/5 the gross fission product doses. The global 30-year population dose is 3 x 10 7 person-rem, which compares with a 30-year natural background population dose of 1 X 10 10 person-rem. Due in large part to the global distribution of population, over 98 percent of the global person-rem from the proposed high altitude tests is received in the Northern Hemisphere, while about 75 percent of the total population dose occurs within the 30 0 --50 0 N latitude belt. Detonations in summer would decrease the global dose by about a factor of three. (U.S.)

  2. Update on pediatric resuscitation drugs: high dose, low dose, or no dose at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Annalise

    2005-04-01

    Pediatric resuscitation has been a topic of discussion for years. It is difficult to keep abreast of changing recommendations, especially for busy pediatricians who do not regularly use these skills. This review will focus on the most recent guidelines for resuscitation drugs. Three specific questions will be discussed: standard dose versus high-dose epinephrine, amiodarone use, and the future of vasopressin in pediatric resuscitation. The issue of using high-dose epinephrine for cardiopulmonary resuscitation refractory to standard dose epinephrine has been a topic of debate for many years. Recently, a prospective, double-blinded study was performed to help settle the debate. These results will be reviewed and compared with previous studies. Amiodarone is a medication that was added to the pediatric resuscitation algorithms with the most recent recommendations from the American Heart Association in 2000. Its use and safety will also be discussed. Another topic that is resurfacing in resuscitation is the use of vasopressin. Its mechanism and comparisons to other agents will be highlighted, although its use in the pediatric patient has not been thoroughly studied. Pediatric resuscitation is a constantly evolving subject that is on the mind of anyone taking care of sick children. Clinicians are continually searching for the most effective methods to resuscitate children in terms of short- and long-term outcomes. It is important to be familiar with not only the agents being used but also the optimal way to use them.

  3. Limit of the radionuclides in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaling; Jiang Rangrong

    2003-01-01

    Granite is an important sort of building materials. Their radionuclide contents are limited by the national standard GB6566-2001 just as other building materials. This standard divides them into main materials and decorative materials, and relaxes the limit of the latter obviously. Owing to the consideration of public dose limit and environment protection, this method needs discussion. Otherwise, red granite contains high radionuclide contents relatively, especially the sort of Indian Red, and need be paid more attention

  4. Key radionuclides and parameters that determine performance of geologic repositories for high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joonhong Ahn; Atsuyuki Suzuki

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents results of a mathematical analysis for performance of the engineered barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories. The main body of the mathematical model developed in this study is mass transport of actinides in a bentonite region. In an analysis of actinide transport, radioactive decay chain and effects of low solubilities must be taken into account. In many previous models for mass transport in engineered barriers including radioactive decay chain, however, boundary conditions at the interface between the waste form and the bentonite region cannot be determined flexibly. In some models, solubility-limited boundary condition is assumed for all the members in a chain. In order to investigate what are key radionuclides and parameters that control performance of engineered barriers of a geologic repository, we must evaluate mass transport with the source boundary condition determined by a detailed analysis on mass transfer at the boundary. In this study, we developed a mathematical model, which can determine whether the inner boundary condition is solubility-limited or congruent release, based on a mathematical analysis for mass transfer at the glass dissolution location, and how long the solubility-limited boundary condition applies. Based on the mathematical model, we point out radionuclides and parameters that have primary influences on the performance of a repository, and investigate a reasonable strategy for coupling geologic disposal and partitioning of those key radionuclides from the standpoint of reducing hazard of geologic disposal. (authors). 4 tabs., 2 figs., 8 refs

  5. High resolution simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides in the pan-Japan sea area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Abe, T.; Murata, Y.M.; Manikandan, N.; Tanaka, K.; Komura, K.

    2006-01-01

    By the use of ultra low background Ge detectors at Ogoya Underground Laboratory (OUL), it became possible to detect extremely low levels of environmental radionuclides. In this study, we tried to measure high resolution simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides at three monitoring points, i.e., 1) Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory (LLRL 40m asl) in Nomi City as the regular monitoring point, 2) Hegura Island Located 50 km from Noto Peninsula in the Sea of Japan to investigate the influence of Asian continent or mainland of Japan, and 3) Shishiku Plateau (640m asl) located about 8 km from LLRL to know vertical difference. Pb-210 and Be-7 were measured nondestructively by ultra low background gamma spectrometry at OUL, Po-210 by alpha spectrometry using Si detectors after the chemical treatment. Various interesting results on the concentrations and variation patterns of airborne radionuclides were obtained, particularly, during drastic meteorological changes such as the passage of typhoon, snow fall and so on. We have been analyzing the influence of the arrival of yellow sand occurred in this spring. (author)

  6. Effect of buffer thickness on the retardation of radionuclide release from the high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kang, Chul Hyung; Han, Kyung Won

    2000-12-01

    The radionuclide release from buffer in the high-level waste repository to the surrounding host rock was assessed, and the effect of the radial buffer thickness on the release rate was analyzed. The total release rates decrease sharply with increasing radial buffer thickness up to 0.25 m, and decrease moderately at the buffer thickness between 0.25 m and 0.5 m. But increasing the radial buffer thickness beyond 0.5 m has little effect in reducing radionuclide release. Therefore a radial buffer thickness between 0.25 m and 0.5 m is sufficient based on the viewpoint of radionuclide retention

  7. Absorbed dose profiles for 32P, 90Y, 188Re, 177Lu, 51Cr, 153Sm and 169Er: radionuclides used in radiosynoviortheses treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.; Ayra, E.; Albuerne, O.; Delgado, M.

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable advances in the design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals has created the opportunity of generating new agents for the treatment of radiosynoviortheses (RSV) which exhibit a minimum leakage from the synovial joint reducing, this way, the non desired absorbed doses to non target organs such as liver, spleen, kidney. Nowadays, the variety of beta emitters used in RSV ranges between 0.34 MeV - 0.33 mm penetration in tissue ( 169 Er) and 2.27 MeV - 3.6 mm penetration in tissue ( 90 Y). The half life of these isotopes goes from 2.3 hours ( 165 Dy) to 27.8 days ( 51 Cr). The selection criterion on which radionuclide should be used, in modern clinics, depends on which joints are to be treated. Thus, the smaller the joint, the lowest should be the energy of the beta emitted and the penetration in soft tissue of these particles. This leads to the use of fixed radionuclides and doses for each kind of joint. In the Isotopes Centre, we've been carrying on studies for the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the radiosynoviortheses treatment and focused our attention in the following radionuclides: 32 P, 90 Y, 188 Re, 177 Lu, 51 Cr, 153 Sm and 169 Er. The main objective of this paper was to obtain the absorbed dose profiles for radionuclides of frequent or potential use in radiosynoviortheses. These profiles reveal the absorbed dose imparted per unit activity of injected radionuclide (Gy/h*MBq) in the synovial membrane and the articular cartilage. The researched radionuclides were those previously mentioned. Also were calculated the therapeutic range of each radionuclides in synovial tissue. The therapeutic range is defined as the deepness at which the absorbed dose equals the 10 % of the maximum dose deposited in the synovial surface. This range determines the synovial thickness that can be sufficiently irradiated and thus successfully treated. The synovial membrane model consisted on a cylinder with the source uniformly distributed in its volume. This

  8. Internal doses of French adult population linked to the intake of radionuclides from the decay-chains of uranium and thorium by foodstuffs ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Ph.; Parache, V.; Roussel-Debet, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study provides the first dose assessment to the French adult population due to the intake of radionuclides from the decay chains of uranium and thorium by foodstuff ingestion (water consumption excepted). This dose varies widely with the consumption of seafood, from less than 200 μSv.y -1 for people who do not consume shellfish or crustaceans at all, to more than 2,000 μSv.y -1 for the biggest consumers (about 150 kg.y -1 according to specific dietary surveys carried out along the French seaside). For moderate consumers of seafood (around 4.6 kg.y -1 ), who probably represent a major part of the population, this internal dose would be around 330 μSv.y -1 . This variable consumption of seafood overshadows all the other causes of variability of these internal dose estimates. (authors)

  9. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  10. Neuroprotective potential of high-dose biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2017-11-01

    A recent controlled trial has established that high-dose biotin supplementation - 100 mg, three times daily - has a stabilizing effect on progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although this effect has been attributed to an optimization of biotin's essential cofactor role in the brain, a case can be made that direct stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by pharmacological concentrations of biotin plays a key role in this regard. The utility of high-dose biotin in MS might reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of cGMP on the cerebral microvasculature, as well on oligodendrocyte differentiation and on Schwann cell production of neurotrophic factors thought to have potential for managing MS. But biotin's ability to boost cGMP synthesis in the brain may have broader neuroprotective potential. In many types of neurons and neural cells, cGMP exerts neurotrophic-mimetic effects - entailing activation of the PI3K-Akt and Ras-ERK pathways - that promote neuron survival and plasticity. Hippocampal long term potentiation requires nitric oxide synthesis, which in turn promotes an activating phosphorylation of CREB via a pathway involving cGMP and protein kinase G (PKG). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid beta suppresses this mechanism by inhibiting sGC activity; agents which exert a countervailing effect by boosting cGMP levels tend to restore effective long-term potentiation in rodent models of AD. Moreover, NO/cGMP suppresses amyloid beta production within the brain by inhibiting expression of amyloid precursor protein and BACE1. In conjunction with cGMP's ability to oppose neuron apoptosis, these effects suggest that high-dose biotin might have potential for the prevention and management of AD. cGMP also promotes neurogenesis, and may lessen stroke risk by impeding atherogenesis and hypertrophic remodeling in the cerebral vasculature. The neuroprotective potential of high-dose biotin likely could be boosted by concurrent administration of brain

  11. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Bernard, S.R.; Pleasant, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The GI tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs was characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Dose equivalent per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body. Cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been considered in the calculations

  12. Performance of thermoluminescent materials for high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texeira, Maria I.; Cecatti, Sonia G.P.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cases involving high-doses of ionizing radiation are becoming increasingly common.The objective of this work was to characterize thermoluminescent materials for the dosimetry of workers exposed to high doses. Samples of TLD-200, TLD-400 and TLD-800 pellets from Thermo Electron Corporation were studied in gamma high-doses. Dose-response curves were obtained for doses between 100 mGy and 100 Gy. The reproducibility, the lower detection limits and dose-response curves were obtained for all three materials. The different kinds of detectors show usefulness for dosimetry of workers exposed accidentally to high doses. (author)

  13. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient

  14. High-dose vitamin C and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Unlu, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, ascorbate is a basic compound that is of great importance with its role in various enzymatic reactions including the synthesis of collagen, as well as with its redox functions. Vitamin C has become the center of interest in cancer studies, in consequence of the facts that connective tissue changes and vitamin C deficiency were first alleged to be associated with cancer in the 1950s; and that high doses of vitamin C was asserted to be cytotoxic for cancer cells, later on. The results of the first study carried out in the 1970s were promising; but afterwards, the studies were ascertained to be faulty. Despite the positive results achieved from some laboratory and animal experiments, randomized clinical trials did not verify those findings, and no clear benefit of vitamin C for cancer treatment could be demonstrated. As for studies, where its use in combination with other cancer treatment regimens was assessed, conflicting results were obtained. Although intake of high doses of vitamin C is alleged to be harmless, based on that it is in the group of water soluble vitamins and is not stored in the body, there are many side effects and drug interactions reported in the literature. For now, it is better to abstain from this treatment, until the benefit of the treatment (if any is clearly demonstrated, considering the potential side effects and interactions.

  15. Investigations on high temperature coking of lignite with the help of radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koennecke, H.G.; Luther, D.; Abendroth, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    The time characteristics and the varying flow characteristics of fine-grained briquettes during the high temperature coking of lignite according to Rammler and Bilkenroth were studied with the help of radionuclide technique. The process parameters (tsub(V), zsub(R), etc.) refer to the different zones of the coke furnace (bunker/dryer, coker/cooler). The different time charakteristics of the coke-grain fractions formed during the BHT-process enables a correlation of the retention time and the quality factors of the coke. The results obtained would enable a better operation of the individual furnaces in the plant and offer the basis for further process developments. (orig.) [de

  16. Design and development of a radio-ecological domestic user friendly code for calculation of radiation doses and concentration due to airborn radionuclides release during the accidental and normal operation in nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shad, A. Haghighi; Allaf, M. Athari [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Masti, D. [Azad Univ., Boushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Research and Developement in BNPP-1; Sepanloo, K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor and Nuclear Safety School; Feghhi, S.A.H. [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Khodadadi, R. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch

    2018-02-15

    A domestic user friendly dynamic radiological dose and model has been developed to estimate radiation doses and stochastic risks due to atmospheric and liquid discharges of radionuclides in the case of a nuclear reactor accident and normal operation. In addition to individual doses from different pathways for different age groups, collective doses and stochastic risks can be calculated by the developed domestic user friendly KIANA Advance Computational Computer Code and model. The current Code can be coupled to any long-range atmospheric dispersion/short term model which can calculate radionuclide concentrations in air and on the ground and in the water surfaces predetermined time intervals or measurement data.

  17. Design and development of a radio-ecological domestic user friendly code for calculation of radiation doses and concentration due to airborn radionuclides release during the accidental and normal operation in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, A. Haghighi; Allaf, M. Athari; Masti, D.; Sepanloo, K.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Khodadadi, R.

    2018-01-01

    A domestic user friendly dynamic radiological dose and model has been developed to estimate radiation doses and stochastic risks due to atmospheric and liquid discharges of radionuclides in the case of a nuclear reactor accident and normal operation. In addition to individual doses from different pathways for different age groups, collective doses and stochastic risks can be calculated by the developed domestic user friendly KIANA Advance Computational Computer Code and model. The current Code can be coupled to any long-range atmospheric dispersion/short term model which can calculate radionuclide concentrations in air and on the ground and in the water surfaces predetermined time intervals or measurement data.

  18. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  19. Chemical dosimetry principles in high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.

    2016-01-01

    In radiation processing, activities of principal concern are process validation and process control. The objective of such formalized procedures is to establish documentary evidence that the irradiation process has achieved the desired results. The key element of such activities is inevitably a well characterized reliable dosimetry system that is traceable to recognized national and international dosimetry standards. Only such dosimetry systems can help establish the required documentary evidence. In addition, industrial radiation processing such as irradiation of foodstuffs and sterilization of health careproducts are both highly regulated, in particular with regard to dose. Besides, dosimetry is necessary for scaling up processes from the research level to the industrial level. Thus, accurate dosimetry is indispensable

  20. Onyx as radiation detector for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Souza, Divanizia N.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of white, black and stripped onyx samples is reported in this work. Onyx is a variety of chalcedony, a form of quartz. The onyx stone is considered nobler than marble. The irradiations were performed using a Gamma-Cell 220 system ( 60 Co). The TL emission curves presented two peaks around 150 °C and 210 °C for all samples. The dose–response curves showed a sublinear behavior between 0.5 Gy and 5 kGy, and the lower detection limit for the white onyx pellets was 1.5 mGy. The main dosimetric characteristics were studied, and the material showed good performance for high dose dosimetry.

  1. The application of high dose food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyn, I. De

    1997-01-01

    During the 1950's to end 1970's the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive 'dried cooked' taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 25 to 45 kGy (depending on the product) at a temperature of between -20 and -40 Centigrade to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions. The product can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. (Author)

  2. The application of high dose food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyn, I. De [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa LTD, Building 2000, P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001, (South Africa)

    1997-12-31

    During the 1950`s to end 1970`s the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive `dried cooked` taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 25 to 45 kGy (depending on the product) at a temperature of between -20 and -40 Centigrade to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions. The product can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. (Author)

  3. INREM II: a computer implementation of recent models for estimating the dose equivalent to organs of man from an inhaled or ingested radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes a computer code, INREM II, which calculates the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the ICRP Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the GI tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide species in the chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of crossfire components of dose when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II is coded in FORTRAN IV and has been compiled and executed on an IBM-360 computer

  4. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  5. Retrospective estimation of middle irradiation doses for population of south Ukraine from radionuclides of Chernobyl accidental release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'jeva, L.Yi.; Grigor'jev, K.V.

    2011-01-01

    The results of retrospective definition of the radiation load to the population of south Ukraine the under abnormal condition Chernobyl release of radionuclide, executed from data of aerophare, spectrometry and dosimetric researches on territory Nikolaev, Odessa, Kirovograd areas and Autonomous Republic of Crimea, conducted by the Nikolaev research laboratory ''Larani'' in 1986 and in subsequent years are presented in the article.

  6. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ - supplementary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Jr, D E; Pleasant, J C; Killough, G G

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe revisions in the SFACTOR computer code and to provide useful documentation for that program. The SFACTOR computer code has been developed to implement current methodologies for computing the average dose equivalent rate S(X reverse arrow Y) to specified target organs in man due to 1 ..mu..Ci of a given radionuclide uniformly distributed in designated source orrgans. The SFACTOR methodology is largely based upon that of Snyder, however, it has been expanded to include components of S from alpha and spontaneous fission decay, in addition to electron and photon radiations. With this methodology, S-factors can be computed for any radionuclide for which decay data are available. The tabulations in Appendix II provide a reference compilation of S-factors for several dosimetrically important radionuclides which are not available elsewhere in the literature. These S-factors are calculated for an adult with characteristics similar to those of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Reference Man. Corrections to tabulations from Dunning are presented in Appendix III, based upon the methods described in Section 2.3. 10 refs.

  7. Distribution coefficient of radionuclides on rocks for performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibutani, Tomoki; Shibata, Masahiro; Suyama, Tadahiro

    1999-11-01

    Distribution coefficients of radionuclides on rocks are selected for safety assessment in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan (H12 Report)'. The categorized types of rock are granitic rocks (crystalline and acidic rocks), basaltic rocks (crystalline and basic rocks), psammitic rocks (neogene sedimentary (soft)), and tuffaceous-pelitic rocks (pre-neogene sedimentary rocks (hard)). The types of groundwater are FRHP (fresh reducing high-pH), FRLP (fresh reducing low-pH), SRHP (saline reducing high-pH), SRLP (saline reducing low-pH), MRNP (mixing reducing neutral-pH) and FOHP (fresh oxidizing high-pH) groundwater. The elements to be surveyed are Ni, Se, Zr, Nb, Tc, Pd, Sn, Cs, Sm, Pb, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. Distribution coefficients are collected from literatures describing batch sorption experimental results, and are selected under consideration of conservativity. (author)

  8. Limitations of high dose carrier based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Stewart; Traini, Daniela; Tweedie, Alan; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Young, Paul M

    2018-06-10

    This study was performed to investigate how increasing the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content within a formulation affects the dispersion of particles and the aerosol performance efficiency of a carrier based dry powder inhalable (DPI) formulation, using a custom dry powder inhaler (DPI) development rig. Five formulations with varying concentrations of API beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) between 1% and 30% (w/w) were formulated as a multi-component carrier system containing coarse lactose and fine lactose with magnesium stearate. The morphology of the formulation and each component were investigated using scanning electron micrographs while the particle size was measured by laser diffraction. The aerosol performance, in terms of aerodynamic diameter, was assessed using the British pharmacopeia Apparatus E cascade impactor (Next generation impactor). Chemical analysis of the API was observed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Increasing the concentration of BDP in the blend resulted in increasing numbers and size of individual agglomerates and densely packed BDP multi-layers on the surface of the lactose carrier. BDP present within the multi-layer did not disperse as individual primary particles but as dense agglomerates, which led to a decrease in aerosol performance and increased percentage of BDP deposition within the Apparatus E induction port and pre-separator. As the BDP concentration in the blends increases, aerosol performance of the formulation decreases, in an inversely proportional manner. Concurrently, the percentage of API deposition in the induction port and pre-separator could also be linked to the amount of micronized particles (BDP and Micronized composite carrier) present in the formulation. The effect of such dose increase on the behaviour of aerosol dispersion was investigated to gain greater insight in the development and optimisation of higher dosed carrier-based formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Radionuclide transport in fractured rock: quantifying releases from final disposal of high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Claudia S. da; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline rock has been considered as a potentially suitable matrix for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository because it is found in very stable geological formations and may have very low permeability. In this study the adopted physical system consists of the rock matrix containing a discrete horizontal fracture in a water saturated porous rock and a system of vertical fractures as a lineament. The transport in the fractures - horizontal and vertical, is assumed to obey a relation convection-diffusion, while the molecular diffusion is considered dominant mechanism of transport in porous rock. In this model the decay chain is considered. We use a code in Fortran 90, where the partial differential equations that describe the movement of radionuclides were discretized by finite differences methods. We use the fully implicit method for temporal discretization schemes. The simulation was performed with relevant data of nuclides in spent fuel for performance assessment in a hypothetical repository, thus quantifying the radionuclides released into the host rock. (author)

  10. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  11. A computer study of radionuclide production in high power accelerators for medical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Riper, K. A.; Mashnik, S. G.; Wilson, W. B.

    2001-05-01

    Methods for radionuclide production calculation in a high power proton accelerator have been developed and applied to study production of 22 isotopes by high-energy protons and neutrons. These methods are readily applicable to accelerator, and reactor, environments other than the particular model we considered and to the production of other radioactive and stable isotopes. We have also developed methods for evaluating cross sections from a wide variety of sources into a single cross section set and have produced an evaluated library covering about a third of all natural elements. These methods also are applicable to an expanded set of reactions. A 684 page detailed report on this study, with 37 tables and 264 color figures is available on the Web at http://t2.lanl.gov/publications/publications.html, or, if not accessible, in hard copy from the authors.

  12. ELDRS Characterization for a Very High Dose Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Kenna, Aaron J.; Thorbourn, Dennis O.; Clark, Karla B.; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of bipolar linear parts which may have Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) is problematic for missions that have very high dose radiation requirements. The accepted standards for evaluating parts that display ELDRS require testing at a very low dose rate which could be prohibitively long for very high dose missions. In this work, a methodology for ELDRS characterization of bipolar parts for mission doses up to 1 Mrad(Si) is evaluated. The procedure employs an initial dose rate of 0.01 rad(Si)/s to a total dose of 50 krad(Si) and then changes to 0.04 rad(Si)/s to a total dose of 1 Mrad(Si). This procedure appears to work well. No change in rate of degradation with dose has been observed when the dose rate is changed from 0.01 to 0.04 rad(Si)/s. This is taken as an indication that the degradation due to the higher dose rate is equivalent to that at the lower dose rate at the higher dose levels, at least for the parts studied to date. In several cases, significant parameter degradation or functional failure not observed at HDR was observed at fairly high total doses (50 to 250 krad(Si)) at LDR. This behavior calls into question the use of dose rate trend data and enhancement factors to predict LDR performance.

  13. Measurement of soil contamination by radionuclides due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and associated estimated cumulative external dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, S.; Kimura, S.; Takatsuji, T.; Nanasawa, K.; Imanaka, T.; Shizuma, K.

    2012-01-01

    Soil sampling was carried out at an early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Samples were taken from areas around FDNPP, at four locations northwest of FDNPP, at four schools and in four cities, including Fukushima City. Radioactive contaminants in soil samples were identified and measured by using a Ge detector and included 129m Te, 129 Te, 131 I, 132 Te, 132 I, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La. The highest soil depositions were measured to the northwest of FDNPP. From this soil deposition data, variations in dose rates over time and the cumulative external doses at the locations for 3 months and 1 y after deposition were estimated. At locations northwest of FDNPP, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition was 4.8–98 μSv/h and the cumulative dose for 1 y was 51 to 1.0 × 10 3 mSv; the highest values were at Futaba Yamada. At the four schools, which were used as evacuation shelters, and in the four urban cities, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition ranged from 0.03 to 3.8 μSv/h and the cumulative doses for 1 y ranged from 3 to 40 mSv. The cumulative dose at Fukushima Niihama Park was estimated as the highest in the four cities. The estimated external dose rates and cumulative doses show that careful countermeasures and remediation will be needed as a result of the accident, and detailed measurements of radionuclide deposition densities in soil will be important input data to conduct these activities.

  14. Development of a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN; Desenvolvimento de um codigo computacional de apoio ao calculo de dose interna para radionuclideos de interesse do IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Thiago Ribeiro

    2011-07-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bioanalysis and assessment of the time of incorporation. The biokinetics models are represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN. Consequently serving as a agile and efficient tool for the designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. The architecture of the system was conceived containing two independent software: CBT - responsible for the setup and manipulation of models and SSID - responsible for the mathematical solution of the models. Four different techniques are offered for the resolution of system of equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods, allowing for comparison of precision and performance of both. The software was developed in C{ne} programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved via SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system replicated the values published by ICRP. (author)

  15. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  16. ACCI38 XL 2: a useful tool for dose assessment in case of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, A.; Merle-Szeremeta, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of its assignments in the field of nuclear risks, the French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) develops tools to assess the impact of nuclear facilities on their environment and surrounding populations. The code ACCI38 XL 2 is a tool dedicated to the assessment of integrated concentrations in the environment and of dosimetric consequences on man, in case of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides (up to 170 radionuclides). This code is widely used by IRSN for studies on accidents, mainly for the analysis of regulatory documents from nuclear operators. The aim of this communication is to present the main features of the model used in the code ACCI38 XL 2, and to give details about the code. After a general presentation of the model, a detailed description of atmospheric dispersion, transfer in the environment and radiological impact is given. Then, some information on parameters and limitations of the model and the code are presented

  17. Specific Activities of Natural Radionuclides and Annual Effective Dose Due to the Intake of Some Types of Children Powdered Milk Available in Baghdad Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Khalaf Rejah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research the specific activity of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were determined by sodium iodide enhanced by thallium NaI(TI detector and assessed the annual effective dose in Dielac 1 and 2 and Nactalia 1 and 2 for children of less than 1 year which are available in Baghdad markets. The specific activity of 40K has the greater value in all the types which is in the range of allowed levels globally that suggested by UNSCEAR. The mean value of annual effective doses were 2.92, 4.005 and 1.6325 mSv/y for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K respectively.

  18. Determinations of 90Sr, 137Cs, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb, 210Po contents in chinese diet and estimations of internal doses due to these radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongda; Wang Shouliang; Meng Wei; Wang Daoping; Zheng Xiujun; Liu Qingfen; Liu Peng

    1993-01-01

    As a part of Chinese Total Diet Survey taken place in 1990, the authors report the determined results on 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Pb and 210 Po contents in various foods of Chinese total diet. Based on obtained dietary composition and the determined contents, the Annual Intakes (AI) and Committed Dose Equivalents (CDE) for the public by ingestion were estimated. It is shown that the total CDE for 6 radionuclides is about 0.24 mSv/a. The food categories and nuclides whose relative contributions to the total are dominant were vegetables, aquatic products and cereal, and 210 Pb, 210 Po, 228 Ra, respectively. The results have updated the data from 1982 survey and have complemented important information for water consumption. The regional difference of dietary compositions and resultant internal doses are discussed as well

  19. Retrospective estimation of middle irraiation doses for population of south Ukraine from radionuclides of Chernobyl accidental release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Grygorieva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of retrospective definition of the radiation load to the population of south Ukraine the under abnormal condition Chernobyl release of radionuclide, executed from data of aerophare, spectrometry and dosimetric researches on territory Nikolaev, Odessa, Kirovograd areas and Autonomous Republic of Crimea, conducted by the Nikolaev research laboratory “Larani” in 1986 and in subsequent years are presented in the article.

  20. Relating β+ radionuclides' properties by order theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, N.Y.; Guillermo Restrepo; Cohen, I.M.; Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires

    2013-01-01

    We studied 27 β + radionuclides taking into account some of their variants encoding information of their production, such as integral yield, threshold energy and energy of projectiles used to generate them; these radionuclides are of current use in clinical diagnostic imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). The study was conducted based on physical, physico-chemical, nuclear, dosimetric and quantum properties, which characterise the β + radionuclides selected, with the aim of finding meaningful relationships among them. In order to accomplish this objective the mathematical methodology known as formal concept analysis was employed. We obtained a set of logical assertions (rules) classified as implications and associations, for the set of β + radionuclides considered. Some of them show that low mass defect is related to high and medium values of maximum β + energy, and with even parity and low mean lives; all these parameters are associated to the dose received by a patient subjected to a PET analysis. (author)

  1. Hygienic assessment of using rocks with high content of natural radionuclides in road construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornilov, A.N.; Ryabchikov, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental investigations on radiation hygienic assessment of the possibilities of using rocks with an increased content of natural radionuclides (NRN) are carried out. At experimental road portions constructed using such rocks, γ-radiation levels have been measured and radioactive contamination of the ad-- jacent territory has been determined. The danger presented by such roads for highway engineering workers and population also has been assessed. The results obtained permit to express a possitive opinion on the use of solid wastes with an increased NRN content for construction of roads with asphalt coating. Rocks with specific α-activity 3 Bq/kg are recommended to be used for any types of road construction, whereas wastes with specific α-activity 3 Bq/kg - only for road construction in an industrial zone, between populated areas and for thoroughfares and highways. The use of wastes with a higher NRN content is unreasonable as it leads to a growth of annular dose to population and excessive exposure of construction workers engaged in highway engineering operations

  2. Long-term dose-response studies of inhaled or injected radionuclides. Biennial report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Miller, S.C.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the scientific progress in, and current status of, life-span studies of the long-term health risks in Beagle dogs of chronic irradiation from internally deposited radionuclides or from an external source. The reporting period for this document is the 2-year period from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1993. Studies that were initiated at three different laboratories (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, ITRI, University of Utah, and Argonne National Laboratory, ANL) are presented here because they are being completed at ITRI. All living dogs in the Utah-initiated studies were transferred to the ITRI facility for the remainder of their life-span observations and measurements in September 1987. This report is the fourth in a series of reports dealing with the current status and progress of both the Utah and ITRI studies. Other life-span studies involving dogs exposed to gamma radiation from an external source were initiated and conducted for many years at ANL. In 1991, the decision was made to discontinue the chronic irradiation of the remaining living dogs and to transfer all remaining dogs to ITRI for care, clinical observations, and pathological observations at death or euthanasia. This report provides the current status of these dogs. Status reports on the Utah and ITRI studies comprise most of this report. The ITRI-related section presents brief statements of project objectives, the general procedures used in these studies, and some study-specific features for each of the 19 studies being conducted with either beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides. Dose- and effect-modifying factors being addressed in these studies include total dose, dose rate, LET, solubility, nonuniformity of dose, species, age, sex, health status, and mode of exposure. Recent additions to experimental protocols for studies in which dogs are still alive involve the collection and analysis of tumor tissues using currently available molecular biology techniques.

  3. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  4. High dose potassium-nitrate chemical dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorda de Cancio, E.M.; Munoz, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    This dosimeter is used to control 10 kGY-order doses (1 Mrad). Nitrate suffers a radiolitic reduction phenomena, which is related to the given dose. The method to use potassium nitrate as dosimeter is described, as well as effects of the temperature of irradiation, pH, nitrate concentration and post-irradiation stability. Nitrate powder was irradiated at a Semi-Industrial Plant, at Centro Atomico Ezeiza, and also in a Gammacell-220 irradiator. The dose rates used were 2,60 and 1,80 KGY/hour, and the given doses varied between 1,0 and 150 KGY. The uncertainty was +-3% in all the range. (author) [es

  5. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, A.J.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project to meet the project objectives. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations. The number of combinations of the alternatives is obviously very large. A ''value of information'' (VOI) decision analysis tool was developed and applied to the problem of selecting a few ''optimal'' sets of alternatives to consider. This VOI analysis relies on both available data and the judgement of technical experts. Input data and the algorithms used are described

  6. Phase chemistry and radionuclide retention of high level radioactive waste tank sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James L.; Brady, Patrick V.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arthur, Sara E.; Hutcherson, Sheila K.; Liu, J.; Qian, M.; Anderson, Howard L.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Experimentation on such sludges is both dangerous and prohibitively expensive so there is a great advantage to developing artificial sludges. The US DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) has funded a program to investigate the feasibility of developing such materials. The following text reports on the success of this program, and suggests that much of the radioisotope inventory left in a tank will not move out into the surrounding environment. Ultimately, such studies may play a significant role in developing safe and cost effective tank closure strategies

  7. '99Mo/99mTc Generator Based on High Radionuclidic Pure Zirconium Molybdate Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.; Mostafa, M.; El-Amir, M.A.; El-Absy, M.A.; Mohamed, O.I.; Farag, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    99 Mo / 99 mTc radioisotope generator was prepared using in-situ precipitated zirconium molybdate chromatographic column. Zirconium molybdate gel matrix was synthesized by precipitation of neutron activation molybdenum-99 from its solution after variety purification processes to prevent contamination of the 99m Tc eluate with cross-contaminants. Greeter than 82.7 ± 0.4 % of the generated 99m Tc was immediately and reproducible eluted by passing 10 ml 0.9 % NaCl solution through the 1 g zirconium molybdate- 99 Mo column matrix at a flow rate of 0.5 ml / min and room temperature with high chemical, radionuclide ( ≥ 99.9 % 99m Tc) and radiochemical purity ( ≥ 97.7 % % as 99 mTcO 4 - ) with ph value suitable for medical uses.

  8. Potential effects of bacteria on radionuclide transport from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Microorganisms can influence radionuclide migration if their concentration are high in comparison with other organic particles. Data on the numbers of microorganisms in undisturbed ground-water have been collected. The average number of cells in the samples from 17 levels in 5 boreholes was 3.0 x 10 5 cells ml -1 . A biofilm experiment indicated an active microbial rock surface population. Radiographic uptake experiments suggest inactive bulk water populations. The bulk water microbial cells in deep ground water might then be inactive cells detached from active biofilms. Enrichment cultures for anaerobic bacteria demonstrated the presence of anaerobic bacteria capable of growth on C-1 compounds with hydrogen and carbon dioxide, presumably methanogenic bacteria. Further, growth in enrichment cultures with sulphate as electron-acceptor and lactate as carbon source proved dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria to be present. (author)

  9. The analysis of impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nerosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was analyzed. On engineering software MATHCAD the program for calculation of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was created. To verify this algorithm the calculation model for MCNP code was established and represented the area consisted of soft biological tissue or any other tissue in which the grid of microsources was incorporated. Using the developed system the value of possible systematic irregular coating of radioactivity on the microsource’s core was analyzed. The distribution of activity along the surface of microsource was simulated to create distribution of absorbed dose rate corresponding to experimental data on radiation injury. The obtained model of microsource with irregular distribution of activity was compared to conventional microsource with core coated regularly along the entire area of the silver stem by main dosimetry characteristics. The results showed that even for extremely irregular distribution of activity the distribution of dose rate produced by microsource in the tumor area was not substantially different from dose-rate field obtained for microsource with regularly coated activity. The differences in dose rates (up to 10% in areas which were the nearest to the center of the grid were significantly lower than its decline from center to periphery of the grid. For spatial distribution of absorbed dose for specific configuration of microsource set and tracing of curves of equal level by selected cut-off the program SEEDPLAN was developed. The developed program represents precisely enough the spatial distribution of selected configuration set of microsources using results of calculation data for absorbed dose around the single microsource as basic data and may be used for optimal planning of brachytherapy with microsources. 

  10. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  11. Development of uncertainty analyses for the transport of radionuclides from a repository for high-level radioactive waste. Stage one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstroem, B.

    1986-10-01

    The escape of radionuclides from a repository for high level waste is described by the near field model LCHCAL and the geosphere models GEO1/SU and NUCDIF. These models are used to calculate the radionuclide outflow to the biosphere. The uncertainties in the input parameters to the near field and geosphere models are handled by the uncertainty analysis models PARVAR and SYVAC/SU. The uncertainty analysis models have been tested on two nuclides, 14 C and 135 Cs, for cases with pure surface sorption and matrix diffusion. In the case of surface sorption five input parameters and for matrix diffusion six input parameters were varied. The results of the uncertainty analyses are presented in the form of histograms, scatter plots, isocontour plots and 3-dimensional plots of the radionuclide release to the biosphere. Also the ten highest maximum release rates and correlation coefficients are presented. (orig.)

  12. ''Low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' in radiation protection: A need to setting criteria for dose classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ''low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' of ionizing radiation are common terms widely used in radiation applications, radiation protection and radiobiology, and natural radiation environment. Reading the title, the papers of this interesting and highly important conference and the related literature, one can simply raise the question; ''What are the levels and/or criteria for defining a low dose or a high dose of ionizing radiation?''. This is due to the fact that the criteria for these terms and for dose levels between these two extreme quantities have not yet been set, so that the terms relatively lower doses or higher doses are usually applied. Therefore, setting criteria for classification of radiation doses in the above mentioned areas seems a vital need. The author while realizing the existing problems to achieve this important task, has made efforts in this paper to justify this need and has proposed some criteria, in particular for the classification of natural radiation areas, based on a system of dose limitation. (author)

  13. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Yan, X.K.; Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of 60 Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of 60 Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0 -3 D 2 . Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy γ-irradiation from a supra-high dose 60 Co gamma-ray accident.

  14. High dose radiotherapy for pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    The results of treatment of 120 pituitary tumours are presented. Based on this experience operable chromophobe adenomas are now treated with 5,000 rads in 4 weeks and inoperable ones receive an additional central dose to 7,500 rads. Pituitary Cushing's tumours are given 10,000 rads in 5 weeks using small fields and acromegalics 5,000 rads to the whole sella and 7,500 to its lower half. The absence of complications at these dose levels is attributed to the use of small fields and the precise application of treatment

  15. High dose radiotherapy for pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, K.W. (Queensland Radium Inst., Herston (Australia))

    1981-11-01

    The results of treatment of 120 pituitary tumours are presented. Based on this experience operable chromophobe adenomas are now treated with 5,000 rads in 4 weeks and inoperable ones receive an additional central dose to 7,500 rads. Pituitary Cushing's tumours are given 10,000 rads in 5 weeks using small fields and acromegalics 5,000 rads to the whole sella and 7,500 to its lower half. The absence of complications at these dose levels is attributed to the use of small fields and the precise application of treatment.

  16. Relative safety profiles of high dose statin regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Escobar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Escobar, Rocio Echarri, Vivencio BarriosDepartment of Cardiology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Recent clinical trials recommend achieving a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of <100 mg/dl in high-risk and <70 mg/dl in very high risk patients. To attain these goals, however, many patients will need statins at high doses. The most frequent side effects related to the use of statins, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and increased levels of transaminases, are unusual. Although low and moderate doses show a favourable profile, there is concern about the tolerability of higher doses. During recent years, numerous trials to analyze the efficacy and tolerability of high doses of statins have been published. This paper updates the published data on the safety of statins at high doses.Keywords: statins, high doses, tolerability, liver, muscle

  17. Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W. L., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

  18. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs

  19. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs.

  20. High dose rate brachytherapy in treatment of high grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Alejo, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Cerro, E. del; Torres, J.J.; Martinez, R.

    1996-01-01

    From May 1994 to June 1995, 18 patients with high grade astrocytomas were entered prospectively on a selective protocol combining surgery, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic interstitial implantation with HDR Iridium 192 and chemotherapy. Only those patients with tumor size 100cc or less average dimension, high grade astrocytoma, Karnofsky 70 or greater, unilateral, circumscribed, unifocal, tumor stable or responding to external radiation and supratentorial were included in the study. Ages ranged from 16 to 69 years. There were 13 males and 5 females. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 3 patients, subtotal resection in 11, and gross total resection in 4 patients. Focal external beam radiation portals included the contrast enhancing mass on CT scan plus a 3 cm margin. The protocol called for minimum tumor dose of 60 Gy to be given in 2 Gy daily fractions. An interstitial brachytherapy boost was to be performed two weeks after the conclusion of external beam radiation. The dose was 30 Gy in 4 fractions. The authors analyze on basis on their personal experience, the possibilities and the limits offered by this therapeutic procedure in neuro-oncology. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically possible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to be effective and may provide for an increase in tumor control in selected cases

  1. Evaluation of the dose uniformity for double-plane high dose rate interstitial breast implants with the use of dose reference points and dose non-uniformity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAjor, T.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Nemeth, G.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dwell time optimizations on dose uniformity characterized by dose values in dose points and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) and analyzed which implant parameters have influence on the DNR. Double-plane breast implants with catheters arranged in triangular pattern were used for the calculations. At a typical breast implant, dose values in dose reference points inside the target volume and volumes enclosed by given isodose surfaces were calculated and compared for non-optimized and optimized implants. The same 6-cm treatment length was used for the comparisons. Using different optimizations plots of dose non-uniformity ratio as a function of catheter separation, source step size, number of catheters, length of active sections were drawn and the minimum DNR values were determined. Optimization resulted in less variation in dose values over dose points through the whole volume and in the central plane only compared to the non-optimized case. At implant configurations consisting of seven catheters with 15-mm separation, 5-mm source step size and various active lengths adapted according to the type of optimization, the no optimization, geometrical (volume mode) and dose point (on dose points and geometry) optimization resulted in similar treatment volumes, but an increased high dose volume was observed due to the optimization. The dose non-uniformity ratio always had the minimum at average dose over dose normalization points, defined in the midpoints between the catheters through the implant volume. The minimum value of DNR depended on catheter separation, source step size, active length and number of catheters. The optimization had only a small influence on DNR. In addition to the reference points in the central plane only, dose points positioned in the whole implant volume can be used for evaluating the dose uniformity of interstitial implants. The dose optimization increases not only the dose uniformity within the implant but

  2. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Itami, Jun

    1994-01-01

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  3. Cutaneous dosimetry at low and high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.

    2009-01-01

    As radiodermatitis is a complication related to the exposure to ionizing radiation after an accidental exposition or a medical examination (radiotherapy or interventional radiology), the author briefly reports an investigation of the response of the human keratinocyte to irradiation for different dose levels, and the search for exposure markers

  4. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  5. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  6. Anthropogenic materials and products containing natural radionuclides. Pt. 2. Examination of radiation doses resulting from occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, A.; Lehmann, K.H.

    1993-11-01

    The radiation doses are determined on the basis of dosimetric scanning of the materials and products and measurement of the ambient dose rates and inhaled doses at the place of work. For all places and conditions exmined, the average annual effective dose (ICRP) is of the order of 20mSv/annum. The substances and products examined are phosphate fertilizers. thoriated tungsten electrodes, or glass gas hoods, respectively, dental material containing uranium, and dental ceramics containing zirconium sands. The report also gives information on the occupational exposure in drinking-water conditioning plants. (Orig./DG) [de

  7. Systems analysis, long-term radionuclide transport, and dose assessments, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico, September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, A.R.; Hunter, R.L.; Davies, P.B.; Borns, D.J.; Reeves, M.; Pickens, J.; Iuzzolino, H.J.

    1990-12-01

    This study supports the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and has two main objectives. First, it describes current ideas about the characteristics and potential impacts of the disturbed-rock zone (DRZ) known to develop with time around excavations at the WIPP horizon. Second, it presents new calculations of radionuclide migration within and from the WIPP repository for steady-state undisturbed conditions and for two cases that consider human intrusion into the repository. At the WIPP, the presence of a DRZ has been confirmed by geophysical studies, gas-flow tests, and direct observations. The DRZ will allow gas or brine from waste-emplacement panels to bypass panel seals and flow into adjacent portions of the underground workings unless preventive measures are taken. Revised calculations of the undisturbed performance of the repository indicate that no radionuclides will be released into the Culebra Dolomite within the regulatory period of 10,000 years. The human-intrusion calculations included here assume a connection between the WIPP repository, an occurrence of pressurized brine within the underlying Castile Formation, and the overlying Culebra Dolomite. 61 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs

  8. Short-lived radionuclides produced on the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron and High-Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of short-lived radionuclides at ORNL includes the preparation of target materials, irradiation on the 86-in. cyclotron and in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and chemical processing to recover and purify the product radionuclides. In some cases the target materials are highly enriched stable isotopes separated on the ORNL calutrons. High-purity 123 I has been produced on the 86-in. cyclotron by irradiating an enriched target of 123 Te in a proton beam. Research on calutron separations has led to a 123 Te product with lower concentrations of 124 Te and 126 Te and, consequently to lower concentrations of the unwanted radionuclides, 124 I and 126 I, in the 123 I product. The 86-in. cyclotron accelerates a beam of protons only but is unique in providing the highest available beam current of 1500 μA at 21 MeV. This beam current produces relatively large quantities of radionuclides such as 123 I and 67 Ga

  9. Statistical behavior of high doses in medical radiodiagnosis; Comportamento estatistico das altas doses em radiodiagnostico medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Adriana Elisa, E-mail: adrianaebarboza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisa@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work has as main purpose statistically estimating occupational exposure in medical diagnostic radiology in cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at national level. For statistical survey of this study, doses of 372 IOE's diagnostic radiology in different Brazilian states were evaluated. Data were extracted from the work of monograph (Research Methodology Of High Doses In Medical Radiodiagnostic) that contains the database's information Sector Management doses of IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The identification of these states allows the Sanitary Surveillance (VISA) responsible, becomes aware of events and work with programs to reduce these events. (author)

  10. measurement of high dose radiation using yellow perspex dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamrin, M Thoyib; Sofyan, Hasnel

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of high dose radiation using yellow perspex dosemeter has been carried out. Dose range used was between 0.1 to 3.0 kGy. Measurement of dose rate against Fricke dosemeter as a standard dose meter From the irradiation of Fricke dosemeter with time variation of 3,6,9,12,15 and 18 minute, it was obtained average dose rate of 955.57 Gy/hour, linear equation of dose was Y= 2.333+15.776 X with its correlation factor r = 0.9999. Measurement result using yellow perspex show that correlation between net optical density and radiation dose was not linear with its equation was ODc exp. [Bo + In(dose).Bi] Value of Bo = -0.215 and Bi=0.5020. From the experiment it was suggested that routine dosimeter (yellow perspex) should be calibrated formerly against standard dosemeters

  11. Methodology of high dose research in medical radiodiagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, Adriana E.; Martins, Cintia P. de S.

    2013-01-01

    This work has as main purpose to study occupational exposure in diagnostic radiology in medical cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at the national level . These doses were recorded by monitoring individual of the occupationally exposed individuals (OEI's). This monitoring of the doses received by ionizing radiation has as main objective to ensure that the principle of dose limitation is respected. In this study it were evaluated doses of 372 OEI's radiology in different Brazilian states. Doses were extracted from the database of Sector Management Doses of the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The information from the database provide reports of doses from several states, which allows to quantify statistically, showing those with the highest doses in four areas: dose greater than or equal to 20 mSv apron and chest and dose greater than or equal to 100 mSv apron and chest. The identification of these states allows the respective Sanitary Surveillance (VISA), be aware of the events and make plans to reduce them. This study clarified the required procedures when there is a record of high dose emphasizing the importance of using protective radiological equipment, dosimeter and provide a safety environment work by maintaining work equipment. Proposes the ongoing training of professionals, emphasizing the relevance of the concepts of radiation protection and the use of the questionnaire with their investigative systematic sequence, which will allow quickly and efficiently the success the investigations

  12. Dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study of the extent of radiation dose received by special work groups in the nuclear power industry. Work groups which chronically get large doses were investigated, using information provided by the industry. The tasks that give high doses to these work groups were examined and techniques described that were found to be particularly successful in reducing dose. Quantitative information on the extent of radiation doses to various work groups shows that significant numbers of workers in several critical groups receive doses greater than 1 and even 2 rem per year, particularly contract personnel and workers at BWR-type plants. The number of radiation workers whose lifetime dose is greater than their age is much less. Although the techniques presented would go some way in reducing dose, it is likely that a sizeable reduction to the high-dose work groups may require development of new dose-reduction techniques as well as major changes in procedures. 10 refs., 26 tabs

  13. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B; Anspaugh, L; Chertok, R; Gofman, J; Harrison, F; Heft, R; Koranda, J; Ng, Y; Phelps, P; Potter, G; Tamplin, A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  14. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.; Anspaugh, L.; Chertok, R.; Gofman, J.; Harrison, F.; Heft, R.; Koranda, J.; Ng, Y.; Phelps, P.; Potter, G.; Tamplin, A.

    1969-01-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  15. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  16. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within C Tracts (C-2, C-3, and C-4) for Land Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis, Jessica M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-26

    Three separate Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAPs) were prepared for tracts C-2, C-3, and C-4. The objective of sampling was to confirm, within the stated statistical confidence limits, that the mean levels of potential radioactive residual contamination in soils in the C Tracts are documented, in appropriate units, and are below the 15 mrem/y (150 μSv/y) Screening Action Levels (SALs). Results show that radionuclide concentration upper-bound 95% confidence levels were close to background levels, with the exception of Pu-239 and Cs-137 being slightly elevated above background, and all measurements were below the ALs and meet the real property release criteria for future construction or recreational use. A follow-up ALARA analysis showed that the costs of cleanup of the soil in areas of elevated concentration and confirmatory sampling would far exceed any benefit from dose reduction.

  17. High Fidelity Ion Beam Simulation of High Dose Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary; Wirth, Brian; Motta, Athur; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Hosemann, Peter; Odette, Robert

    2018-04-30

    Project Objective: The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the capability to predict the evolution of microstructure and properties of structural materials in-reactor and at high doses, using ion irradiation as a surrogate for reactor irradiations. “Properties” includes both physical properties (irradiated microstructure) and the mechanical properties of the material. Demonstration of the capability to predict properties has two components. One is ion irradiation of a set of alloys to yield an irradiated microstructure and corresponding mechanical behavior that are substantially the same as results from neutron exposure in the appropriate reactor environment. Second is the capability to predict the irradiated microstructure and corresponding mechanical behavior on the basis of improved models, validated against both ion and reactor irradiations and verified against ion irradiations. Taken together, achievement of these objectives will yield an enhanced capability for simulating the behavior of materials in reactor irradiations

  18. An evaluation of high-dose jobs for ALARA improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, J. H.; Kim, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that about 70 percent of occupational dose have incurred from maintenance jobs at outage period. To reduce occupational dose, first, the high-dose jobs at the outage period should be identified and evaluated. For this, the database program is used, which contains the ORE data of reference plants, Kori Units 3 and 4. As a result, it is found that the jobs related to steam generator are the highest dose jobs in terms of collective ORE dose. From the analysis of the job procedures of those jobs, the ALARA improvements are also derived

  19. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  20. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  1. Summary of estimated doses and risks resulting from routine radionuclide releases from fast breeder reactor fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Meyer, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess the human health and environment effects associated with operation of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor fuel cycle. In this first phase of the work, emphasis was focused on routine radionuclide releases from reactor and reprocessing facilities. For this study, sites for fifty 1-GW(e) capacity reactors and three reprocessing plants were selected to develop scenarios representative of US power requirements. For both the reactor and reprocessing facility siting schemes selected, relatively small impacts were calculated for locality-specific populations residing within 100 km. Also, the results of these analyses are being used in the identification of research priorities. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-09-01

    The United States is now re-assessing its nuclear waste disposal policy and re-evaluating the option of moving away from the current once-through open fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. In a closed fuel cycle, used fuels will be reprocessed and useful components such as uranium or transuranics will be recovered for reuse. During this process, a variety of waste streams will be generated. Immobilizing these waste streams into appropriate waste forms for either interim storage or long-term disposal is technically challenging. Highly volatile or soluble radionuclides such as iodine ({sup 129}I) and technetium ({sup 99}Tc) are particularly problematic, because both have long half-lives and can exist as gaseous or anionic species that are highly soluble and poorly sorbed by natural materials. Under the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), we have developed a suite of inorganic nanocomposite materials (SNL-NCP) that can effectively entrap various radionuclides, especially for {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc. In particular, these materials have high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation of waste forms incorporates radionuclides as nano-scale inclusions in a host matrix and thus effectively relaxes the constraint of crystal structure on waste loadings. Therefore, the new waste forms have an unprecedented flexibility to accommodate a wide range of radionuclides with high waste loadings and low leaching rates. Specifically, we have developed a general route for synthesizing nanoporous metal oxides from inexpensive inorganic precursors. More than 300 materials have been synthesized and characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area measurements, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The sorption capabilities of the synthesized materials have been quantified by using stable

  3. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-01-01

    The United States is now re-assessing its nuclear waste disposal policy and re-evaluating the option of moving away from the current once-through open fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. In a closed fuel cycle, used fuels will be reprocessed and useful components such as uranium or transuranics will be recovered for reuse. During this process, a variety of waste streams will be generated. Immobilizing these waste streams into appropriate waste forms for either interim storage or long-term disposal is technically challenging. Highly volatile or soluble radionuclides such as iodine ( 129 I) and technetium ( 99 Tc) are particularly problematic, because both have long half-lives and can exist as gaseous or anionic species that are highly soluble and poorly sorbed by natural materials. Under the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD), we have developed a suite of inorganic nanocomposite materials (SNL-NCP) that can effectively entrap various radionuclides, especially for 129 I and 99 Tc. In particular, these materials have high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation of waste forms incorporates radionuclides as nano-scale inclusions in a host matrix and thus effectively relaxes the constraint of crystal structure on waste loadings. Therefore, the new waste forms have an unprecedented flexibility to accommodate a wide range of radionuclides with high waste loadings and low leaching rates. Specifically, we have developed a general route for synthesizing nanoporous metal oxides from inexpensive inorganic precursors. More than 300 materials have been synthesized and characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area measurements, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The sorption capabilities of the synthesized materials have been quantified by using stable isotopes I and

  4. Estimation of Radionuclide Concentrations and Average Annual Committed Effective Dose due to Ingestion for the Population in the Red River Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tran Thi; Bat, Luu Tam; Nhan, Dang Duc; Quang, Nguyen Hao; Cam, Bui Duy; Hung, Luu Viet

    2018-02-16

    Radioactivity concentrations of nuclides of the 232 Th and 238 U radioactive chains and 40 K, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and 239+240 Pu were surveyed for raw and cooked food of the population in the Red River delta region, Vietnam, using α-, γ-spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting techniques. The concentration of 40 K in the cooked food was the highest compared to those of other radionuclides ranging from (23 ± 5) (rice) to (347 ± 50) Bq kg -1 dw (tofu). The 210 Po concentration in the cooked food ranged from its limit of detection (LOD) of 5 mBq kg -1  dw (rice) to (4.0 ± 1.6) Bq kg -1  dw (marine bivalves). The concentrations of other nuclides of the 232 Th and 238 U chains in the food were low, ranging from LOD of 0.02 Bq kg -1  dw to (1.1 ± 0.3) Bq kg -1  dw. The activity concentrations of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and 239+240 Pu in the food were minor compared to that of the natural radionuclides. The average annual committed effective dose to adults in the study region was estimated and it ranged from 0.24 to 0.42 mSv a -1 with an average of 0.32 mSv a -1 , out of which rice, leafy vegetable, and tofu contributed up to 16.2%, 24.4%, and 21.3%, respectively. The committed effective doses to adults due to ingestion of regular diet in the Red River delta region, Vietnam are within the range determined in other countries worldwide. This finding suggests that Vietnamese food is safe for human consumption with respect to radiation exposure.

  5. Acute renal failure in high dose carboplatin chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Kool, G.; de Kraker, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboplatin has been reported to cause acute renal failure when administered in high doses to adult patients. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who was treated with high-dose carboplatin for metastatic parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Acute renal failure developed followed by a slow partial

  6. Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacokinetics in high-dose alkylating chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, G.C. (Corine)

    2008-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy in combination with peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation has been developed as a possible curative treatment modality in several solid tumours. A frequently used high-dose regimen in the Netherlands is the CTC regimen, which is a 4-day course of cyclophosphamide,

  7. Imprecision of dose predictions for radionuclides released to the environment: an application of a Monte Carlo simulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, G; Hoffman, F O

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the imprecision in dose predictions has been performed using current dose assessment models and present knowledge of the variability or uncertainty in model parameter values. The propagation of parameter uncertainties is demonstrated using a Monte Carlo technique for elemental /sup 131/I transported via the pasture-cow-milk-child pathway. The results indicate that when site-specific information is not available the imprecision inherent in the predictions for this pathway is potentially large. Generally, the 99th percentile in thyroid dose for children was predicted to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the median value. The potential consequences of the imprecision in dose for radiation protection purposes are discussed.

  8. Fertility of Tall Girls Treated with High-Dose Estrogen, a Dose-Response Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A. E. J.; Drop, S. L. S.; Laven, J. S. E.; Boot, A. M.

    Context: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of university

  9. Estimation of the transit dose component in high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Lozano Flores, F.J.; Lope Lope, R.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Current high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning systems usually calculate dose only from source stopping positions (stationary component), but fails to account for the administered dose when the source is moving (dynamic component or transit dose). Numerical values of this transit dose depends upon the source velocity, implant geometry, source activity and prescribed dose. In some HDR treatments using particular geometry the transit dose cannot be ignored because it increases the dose at the prescriptions points and also could increase potential late tissue complications as predicted by the linear quadratic model. International protocols recommend to verify this parameter. The aim of this paper has been to establish a procedure for the transit dose calculation for the Gammamed 12i equipment at the RT Department in the Clinical University Hospital (Zaragoza-Spain). A numeric algorithm was implemented based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving HDR source and the calculated results for the entrance-exit transit dose was compared with TLD measurements made in some discrete points. (author) [es

  10. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janek, S; Svensson, R; Jonsson, C; Brahme, A

    2006-01-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11 C and 15 O but also 13 N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12 C, 16 O and 14 N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12 C, 16 O and 14 N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  11. Uranium and Cesium sorption to bentonite colloids in high salinity and carbonate-rich environments: Implications for radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, E. L.; Teutsch, N.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Weisbrod, N.

    2017-12-01

    When radionuclides are leaked into the subsurface due to engineered waste disposal container failure, the ultimate barrier to migration of radionuclides into local aquifers is sorption to the surrounding rock matrix and sediments, which often includes a bentonite backfill. The extent of this sorption is dependent on pH, ionic strength, surface area availability, radionuclide concentration, surface mineral composition, and solution chemistry. Colloidal-sized bentonite particles eroded from the backfill have been shown to facilitate the transport of radionuclides sorbed to them away from their source. Thus, sorption of radionuclides such as uranium and cesium to bentonite surfaces can be both a mobilization or retardation factor. Though numerous studies have been conducted to-date on sorption of radionuclides under low ionic strength and carbonate-poor conditions, there has been little research conducted on the behavior of radionuclides in high salinities and carbonate rich conditions typical of aquifers in the vicinity of some potential nuclear repositories. This study attempts to characterize the sorption properties of U(VI) and Cs to bentonite colloids under these conditions using controlled batch experiments. Results indicated that U(VI) undergoes little to no sorption to bentonite colloids in a high-salinity (TDS= 9000 mg/L) artificial groundwater. This lack of sorption was attributed to the formation of CaUO2(CO3)22- and Ca2UO2(CO3)3 aqueous ions which stabilize the UO22+ ions in solution. In contrast, Cs exhibited greater sorption, the extent to which was influenced greatly by the matrix water's ionic strength and the colloid concentration used. Surprisingly, when both U and Cs were together, the presence of U(VI) in solution decreased Cs sorption, possibly due to the formation of stabilizing CaUO2(CO3)22- anions. The implications of this research are that rather than undergoing colloid-facilitated transport, U(VI) is expected to migrate similarly to a

  12. Statistical behavior of high doses in medical radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, Adriana Elisa

    2014-01-01

    This work has as main purpose statistically estimating occupational exposure in medical diagnostic radiology in cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at national level. For statistical survey of this study, doses of 372 IOE's diagnostic radiology in different Brazilian states were evaluated. Data were extracted from the work of monograph (Research Methodology Of High Doses In Medical Radiodiagnostic) that contains the database's information Sector Management doses of IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The identification of these states allows the Sanitary Surveillance (VISA) responsible, becomes aware of events and work with programs to reduce these events. (author)

  13. Study of teflon pads as high doses dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Ines; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the Teflon, which is used as a binder in the manufacture of dosimetric tablets, for the feasibility of this material as high dose dosemeter. In this paper we used the technique of thermally stimulated luminescence (OSL) to characterize the dosimetric properties of Teflon. Teflon samples were exposed to different doses of radiation, using a source of gamma radiation ( 60 Co). It was obtained dose-response curve between 100 Gy to 50 kGy and reproducibility of OSL response. The preliminary results show that Teflon is a useful material to high dose dosimetry

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  15. Concentrations of radionuclides in cassava growing in high background radiation area and their transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jialin, Huang; Yongru, Zha; Yicao, Guo

    1985-04-01

    The concentrations of several natural radionuclides in common cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) growing in Yangjiang County, a high background radiation area in Guangdong Province, and their uptake from soil and distribution in the plant were investigated. The results show that the concentrations of natural uranium and thorium in cassava root are of the order of 10/sup -6/ g/kg, and those of radium-226, radium-228, lead-210 and polonium-210 are of the order of 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg. The highest level is 9.30 +- 0.30 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg (lead-210), and the lowest is 3.99 +- 0.20 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg (radium-226). The levels of natural uranium, thorium, radium-226 and polonium-210 in cassava are below the limits stipulated by the regulations for food hygiene in China, while the lead-210 level approaches the limit. It is noticeable that the highest level of radium-228 is 7.28 +- 1.03 x 10/sup -11/ Ci/kg, 10.4 times higher than the limit. The transfer of all the nuclides from soil to different parts of cassava shows a pattern contrary to that of he nuclides in the other regions where uranium-and radium-containing waste water and phosphate fertilizer are used in agriculture.

  16. Concentrations of radionuclides in cassava growing in high background radiation area and their transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jialin; Zha Yongru; Guo Yicao

    1985-01-01

    The concentrations of several natural radionuclides in common cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) growing in Yangjiang County, a high background radiation area in Guangdong Province, and their uptake from soil and distribution in the plant were investigated. The results show that the concentrations of natural uranium and thorium in cassava root are of the order of 10 -6 g/kg, and those of radium-226, radium-228, lead-210 and polonium-210 are of the order of 10 -11 Ci/kg. The highest level is 9.30 +- 0.30 x 10 -11 Ci/kg (lead-210), and the lowest is 3.99 +- 0.20 x 10 -11 Ci/kg (radium-226). The levels of natural uranium, thorium, radium-226 and polonium-210 in cassava are below the limits stipulated by the regulations for food hygiene in China, while the lead-210 level approaches the limit. It is noticeable that the highest level of radium-228 is 7.28 +- 1.03 x 10 -11 Ci/kg, 10.4 times higher than the limit. The transfer of all he nuclides from soil to different parts of cassava shows a pattern contrary to that of he nuclides in the other regions where uranium-and radium-containing waste water and phosphate fertilizer are used in agriculture

  17. Radionuclide therapy practice and facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Clarke, S.E.M.; Fischer, M.; Chatal, J.F.; Lewington, V.J.; Nilsson, S.; Troncone, L.; Vieira, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a questionnaire the EANM Task Group Radionuclide Therapy in 1993 collected data on the current practice of radionuclide therapy in European countries. Subsequently, at the request of the EANM Executive Committee, the EANM Radionuclide Therapy Committee has made an inventory of the distribution of facilities for radionuclide therapy and undertaken an assessment of the total number of patients treated throughout Europe and of the types of treatment provides, with the aim of supporting the development of policy to adjust the available capacity to the needs by the year 2000. For this purpose, a second, more detailed questionnaire was sent out the members and national advisors of the Committee (see below), who gathered the data for each country that was a member of the EANM at the time. It is concluded that a wide bariation in therapy practice exists across Europe, particularly in the utilisation of radionuclide therapy, the requirement and availability of proper isolation facilities and the background training of those undertaking therapy. More uniform guidelines and legislation are required, although changes in legislation may have a significant impact in some countries. Although there is wide variation in the therapies used in each country, one the whole it appears that there is an underutilisation of nuclear medicine as a therapeutic modality. A rapidly increasing role may be expected, in particular for oncological indications requiring high-dose radionuclide treatment. Therefore there is an urgent need for a greater number of isolation beds in dedicated centers throughout Europe

  18. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  19. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  20. Committed dose equivalent per intake of unit activity of radionuclides, for four age-groups, concerning the members of the public for the environmental impact evaluation's of radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, F.; Brofferio, C.; Sacripanti, A.

    1983-01-01

    In the present work, with the aim of estimating more realistically the committed dose equivalent for the members of the public in the environmental impact evaluation's of nuclear plants, the authors supply a methodology for calculating the committed dose equivalents for inhalation and ingestion, and the values for fiftheen organs and sixi-three radionuclides, concerning four specific age-groups on the ground of data published by Icrp n.30 part 1, 2, 3

  1. Natural radionuclides, 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb, determined in mineral water springs from Parque das Águas de Caxambu, and assessment of the committed effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghini, Arthur A.; Damatto, Sandra R.; Oliveira, Joselene; Prilip, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The increase of mineral water consumption and its medicinal use results in the necessity of characterization of these waters sources, once that water is a vital part of human diet. In the mineral waters, besides stable elements, responsible of the chemical composition, the presence of natural radionuclides from the 238 U, 232 Th, 235 U series and 40 K gives the radiation property. The incorporation of these radionuclides through the ingestion and external treatment of mineral waters are a very important point, due the ionizing radiation of these radionuclides are harmful to the organism. The largest mineral water park of the world is situated in Brazil, in the city of Caxambu, called Parque das Águas de Caxambu. In this park are 12 fountains distributed in the park, also a tubular well of 60 meters of depth which regularly provide water spouts, geyser, and another spring located inside the Gloria Hotel. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the activity concentrations of the radionuclides 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb in the mineral waters springs collected at the 'Parque das Águas de Caxambu' and in the Gloria Hotel, as well as to estimate the committed effective doses due to the consumption of these waters. In six campaigns, the radionuclides with the highest concentrations were 226 Ra and 228 Ra in the springs D. Ernestina, Beleza and Venâncio. These springs also presented the highest values of the committed effective dose. (author)

  2. WE-DE-201-06: Impact of Temporal Image Coregistration Methods On 3D Internal Dose Calculations in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besemer, A; Marsh, I; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The calculation of 3D internal dose calculations in targeted radionuclide therapy requires the acquisition and temporal coregistration of a serial PET/CT or SPECT/CT images. This work investigates the dosimetric impact of different temporal coregistration methods commonly used for 3D internal dosimetry. Methods: PET/CT images of four mice were acquired at 1, 24, 48, 72, 96, 144 hrs post-injection of {sup 124}I-CLR1404. The therapeutic {sup 131}I-CLR1404 absorbed dose rate (ADR) was calculated at each time point using a Geant4-based MC dosimetry platform using three temporal image coregistration Methods: (1) no coregistration (NC), whole body sequential CT-CT affine coregistration (WBAC), and individual sequential ROI-ROI affine coregistration (IRAC). For NC, only the ROI mean ADR was integrated to obtain ROI mean doses. For WBAC, the CT at each time point was coregistered to a single reference CT. The CT transformations were applied to the corresponding ADR images and the dose was calculated on a voxel-basis within the whole CT volume. For IRAC, each individual ROI was isolated and sequentially coregistered to a single reference ROI. The ROI transformations were applied to the corresponding ADR images and the dose was calculated on a voxel-basis within the ROI volumes. Results: The percent differences in the ROI mean doses were as large as 109%, 88%, and 32%, comparing the WBAC vs. IRAC, NC vs. IRAC, and NC vs. WBAC methods, respectively. The CoV in the mean dose between the all three methods ranged from 2–36%. The pronounced curvature of the spinal cord was not adequately coregistered using WBAC which resulted in large difference between the WBAC and IRAC. Conclusion: The method used for temporal image coregistration can result in large differences in 3D internal dosimetry calculations. Care must be taken to choose the most appropriate method depending on the imaging conditions, clinical site, and specific application. This work is partially funded by

  3. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  4. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  5. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G.; Du, Yong [Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.

  6. Radiophotoluminescence light scope for high-dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Fuminobu; Zushi, Naoki; Sakiyama, Tomoki; Kato, Yushi; Murata, Isao; Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A radiophotoluminescence (RPL) light scope is a remote-sensing technique for measuring in situ the radiation dose in an RPL detector placed at a distance. The RPL light scope is mainly composed of an ultraviolet (UV) pulse laser, telescopic lenses, a photomultiplier tube, and camera modules. In a performance test, some RPL detectors were placed at distances up to 30 m and were illuminated with a pulsed UV laser beam. The photoluminescence responses of the RPL detectors were analyzed using this scope. Their radiation doses were determined from the amplitude of the given component of the photoluminescence responses. The RPL readout could be repeated without fading, and its amplitude exhibited good linearity at a dose ranging from 0.1 to 60 Gy. Furthermore, a two-dimensional distribution of radiation dose was obtained by laser scanning on an RPL detector. It was confirmed that the RPL light scope was a useful remote-sensing tool for high-dose dosimetry. - Highlights: • A radiophotoluminescence (RPL) light scope was developed for high-dose dosimetry. • The RPL light scope has high sensitivity and accuracy in high-dose dosimetry. • Two-dimensional radiation dose distribution was obtained by the RPL light scope.

  7. Relevance of high-dose chemotherapy in solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, EGE; Mulder, NH; van der Graaf, WTA

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of solid tumours. Based on a steep dose-response relationship for especially alkylating agents on tumour cell survival, high-dose chemotherapy was considered of interest for the treatment of solid tumours. Results of phase 1 and 2 studies with

  8. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  9. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  10. High-dose dosimetry using natural silicate minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do; Mendes, Leticia; Watanabe, Shigueo; Rao, Gundu; Lucas, Natasha; Sato, Karina; Barbosa, Renata F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, certain natural silicate minerals such as aquamarine (AB), morganite (PB), goshenite (WB), white jadeite (JW), green jadeite (JG), pink tourmaline (PT) and two varieties of jadeite-like quartz, denoted here by JQ1 and JQ2, were investigated using the thermoluminescence technique to evaluate their potential for use as very-high- and high-dose dosimeters. These minerals respond to high doses of γ-rays of up to 1000 kGy and often to very high doses of up to 3000 kGy. The TL response of these minerals may be considered to be satisfactory for applications in high-dose dosimetry. Investigations of electron paramagnetic resonance and optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry are in progress. (author)

  11. High-dose dosimetry using natural silicate minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do; Mendes, Leticia, E-mail: isatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Rao, Gundu; Lucas, Natasha; Sato, Karina, E-mail: lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear; Barbosa, Renata F., E-mail: profcelta@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Santos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias do Mar

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, certain natural silicate minerals such as aquamarine (AB), morganite (PB), goshenite (WB), white jadeite (JW), green jadeite (JG), pink tourmaline (PT) and two varieties of jadeite-like quartz, denoted here by JQ1 and JQ2, were investigated using the thermoluminescence technique to evaluate their potential for use as very-high- and high-dose dosimeters. These minerals respond to high doses of γ-rays of up to 1000 kGy and often to very high doses of up to 3000 kGy. The TL response of these minerals may be considered to be satisfactory for applications in high-dose dosimetry. Investigations of electron paramagnetic resonance and optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry are in progress. (author)

  12. Seasonal measurement and dose assessment of natural radionuclides in sediments of Darbandikhan Lake in Kurdistan-Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer Jafir, Adeeb; Ahmed, Ali Hassan; Saridan, Wan Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    A total of 100 sediment samples were collected from Darbandikhan Lake and its different resources (spring, stream, and lake) during the four seasons. Spectrometry analysis of HPGe detector was used for measuring the specific activity. The seasonally measured mean activity concentration of 238U, 232Th and40K for sediment samples were 11.9±1.0, 7.8±1.0 and 213.4±3.4 Bq/kg in spring; 9.2±1.1, 7.9±1.0 and 205.8±3.0 Bq/kg in summer; 12.7±1.5, 8.2±1.0 and 188.1±3.1 Bq/kg in autumn; 11.9±1.6, 9.1±1.0 and 218.7±3.0 Bq/kg in winter, respectively. The obtained activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K are all below the recommended values suggested by UNSCEAR (2000) for sediment 35, 30 and 400 Bq/kg, respectively. The ordinary kriging method was used to draw the contour maps using the surfer digital program. RESRAD-BUILD simulation code was used to determine the indoor dose, annual dose rate and cancer risks received and exposed to individuals in the dwellings, which show an increase over a period of 50 years. Two scenario descriptions of changing wall thickness and room dimension were, studied and they shows that the indoor dose and cancer risks increase with wall thicknesses until 50 cm and over a period of 50 years, as well as the increase of room size increases the internal dose and cancer risks inside the buildings. From the analyzed results it was concluded that the sediments in the Darbandikhan Lake has no risks when used in building construction.

  13. Radiation-dose estimates and hazard evaluations for inhaled airborne radionuclides. Annual progress report, July 1981-June 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The objective was to conduct confirmatory research on aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiation dose distribution in animals following inhalation and to provide prediction of health consequences in humans due to airborne radioactivity which might be released in normal operations or under accident conditions during production of nuclear fuel composed of mixed oxides of U and Pu. Four research reports summarize the results of specific areas of research. The first paper details development of a method for determination of specific surface area of small samples of mixed oxide or pure PuO 2 particles. The second paper details the extension of the biomathematical model previously used to describe retention, distribution and excretion of Pu from these mixed oxide aerosols to include a description of Am and U components of these aerosols. The third paper summarizes the biological responses observed in radiation dose pattern studies in which dogs, monkeys and rate received inhalation exposures to either 750 0 C heat treated UO 2 + PuO 2 , 1750 0 C heat-treated (U,Pu)O 2 or 850 0 C heat-treated pure PuO 2 . The fourth paper described dose-response studies in which rats were exposed to (U,Pu)O 2 or pure PuO 2 . This paper updates earlier reports and summarizes the status of animals through approximately 650 days after inhalation

  14. Gamma-dose rates from terrestrial and Chernobyl radionuclides inside and outside settlements in the Bryansk Region, Russia in 1996-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzaev, Valery; Yonehara, Hidenori; Hille, Ralf; Barkovsky, Anatoly; Mishine, Arkady; Sahoo, Sarat Kumar; Kurotaki, Katsumi; Uchiyama, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    In order to estimate current external gamma doses to the population of the Russian territories contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident, absorbed gamma-dose rates in air (DR) were determined at typical urban and suburban locations. The study was performed in the western districts of the Bryansk Region within the areas of 30 settlements (28 villages and 2 towns) with the initial levels of 137 Cs deposition ranging from 13 to 4340 kBq m -2 . In the towns, the living areas considered were private one-story wooden and stone houses. DR values were derived from in situ measurements performed with the help of gamma-dosimeters and gamma-spectrometers as well as from the results of soil samples analysis. In the areas under study, the values of DR from terrestrial radionuclides were 25 ± 6, 24 ± 5, 50 ± 10, 32 ± 6, 54 ± 11, 24 ± 8, 20 ± 6, 25 ± 8, and 18 ± 5 nGy h -1 at locations of kitchen gardens, dirt surfaces, asphalt surfaces, wooden houses, stone houses, grasslands inside settlement, grasslands outside settlement, ploughed fields, and forests, respectively. In 1996-2001, mean normalized (per MBq m -2 of 137 Cs current inventory in soil) values of DR from 137 Cs were 0.41 ± 0.07, 0.26 ± 0.13, 0.15 ± 0.07, 0.10 ± 0.05, 0.05 ± 0.04, 0.48 ± 0.12, 1.04 ± 0.22, 0.37 ± 0.07, and 1.15 ± 0.19 μGy h -1 at the locations of kitchen gardens, dirt surfaces, asphalt surfaces, wooden houses, stone houses, grasslands inside settlement, grasslands outside settlement, ploughed fields, and forests, respectively. The radiometric data from this work and the values of occupancy factors determined for the Russian population by others were used for the assessments of annual effective doses to three selected groups of rural population. The normalized (per MBq m -2 137 Cs current ground deposition) external effective doses to adults from 137 Cs ranged from 0.66 to 2.27 mSv y -1 in the years 1996-2001, in accordance with professional activities and structures of

  15. Radionuclide compositions of spent fuel and high level waste for the uranium and plutonium fuelled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairclough, M.P.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-06-01

    The activities of a selection of radionuclides are presented for three types of reactor fuel of interest in radioactive waste management. The fuel types are for a uranium 'burning' PWR, a plutonium 'burning' PWR using plutonium recycled from spent uranium fuel and a plutonium 'burning' PWR using plutonium which has undergone multiple recycle. (author)

  16. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  17. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  18. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools

  19. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  20. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago

    2017-01-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm -1 and 3271 cm -1 , with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  1. Investigation of PBAT dosimetric properties for high gamma dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elisete L.; Schimitberger, Thiago, E-mail: elisete.cunha@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Oliveira, Cristiana M.; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) is an aliphatic-aromatic copolyester which is biodegradable. It is a non-photoluminescent copolyester that becomes photoluminescent after previous exposure to gamma doses higher than 100 kGy. After the previous high energy irradiation, the material shows the highest photo-stimulated luminescence emission when excited with a LED source at wavelengths ranging from 370 to 405 nm. In this work we investigated the enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) and dosimetric properties of PBAT, after exposure to high doses of gamma radiation ranging from 50 to 4,000 kGy. In this investigation we demonstrate that increasing the PBAT film thickness by 100 μm enhances the PL output by 3.5 times, when irradiated with 500 kGy. Also, besides the already known color green brightness, the PL intensity can also be used for high dose dosimetry purposes for doses ranging from 50 to 750 kGy. The FTIR analysis has demonstrated that the there is a linear relationship between peak intensity and dose for doses ranging from 100 and 2,000 kGy for the absorbance peaks at 3,241 cm{sup -1} and 3271 cm{sup -1}, with linear correlation coefficients of 0.9981 and 0.9992, respectively. The results indicate that PBAT has great potential for applications in bio-imaging devices and high gamma dose dosimetry. (author)

  2. New design targets and new automated technology for the production of radionuclides with high specificity radioactivity in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, A.S.; Kiselev, G.V.

    1997-01-01

    Current demands of industry require the application of radionuclides with high specific radioactivity under low consumption of neutrons. To provide this aim staff of ITEP Reactor Department investigated the different type AEs of start targets for the production of the main radionuclides; Co-60, Ir-192 and others. In first turn the targets of Co and Ir without the block-effect of neutron flux (with low absorption of neutrons) were investigated. The following principal results were received for example for Ir-192: block effect is equal 0.086 for diameter of Ir target mm and is equal 0.615 for diameter Ir target 0.5mm. It means average neutron flux for Ir target diameter 0.5mm and therefore the production of Ir-192 will be at 10 times more than for diameter 6.0mm. To provide the automated technology of the manufacture of radioactive sources with radionuclides with high specific radioactivity it was proposed that the compound targets for the irradiation of ones and for the management with the irradiated targets. Different types of compound targets were analyzed. (authors)

  3. Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose no Brasil High-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carlos Barros Esteves

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose foi introduzida em nosso meio em janeiro de 1991. Desde então, houve uma mudança significativa na abordagem das neoplasias malignas em relação às vantagens do novo método, e também resolução da demanda reprimida de braquiterapia para as neoplasias ginecológicas. Nos primeiros dez anos de atividade, o Brasil tratou, em 31 serviços, 26.436 pacientes com braquiterapia, sendo mais de 50% das pacientes portadoras de neoplasias do colo uterino. Este estudo mostra o número e o perfil de pacientes tratados com esse método e a sua distribuição no território nacional, deixando explícito o benefício da braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose para o Brasil.High-dose rate brachytherapy was first introduced in Brazil in January 1991. Significant changes in the management of malignant neoplasms were observed since utilization of high-dose rate brachytherapy. The high number of gynecological patients awaiting for brachytherapy also decreased during this period. In the first ten years 26,436 patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. More than 50% of these patients presented neoplasms of the uterine cervix. In this study we present the number and profile of the patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy as well as the distribution of these patients in the Brazilian territory, proving the benefit of the use of high-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil.

  4. MODELS SELECTED FOR CALCULATION OF DOSES, HEALTH EFFECTS AND ECONOMIC COSTS DUE TO ACCIDENTAL RADIONUCLIDE RELEASES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D L; Baker, D A; Droppo, J G; McPherson, R B; Napier, B A; Nieves, L A; Soldat, J K

    1980-05-01

    Models are described for use in site-specific environmental consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents of Classes 3 through 9. The models presented relate radioactivity released to resulting doses, health effects, and costs of remedial actions. Specific models are presented for the major exposure pathways of airborne releases, waterborne releases and direct irradiation from activity within the facility buildings, such as the containment. Time-dependent atmospheric dispersion parameters, crop production parameters and other variable parameters are used in the models. The environmental effects are analyzed for several accident start times during the year.

  5. Estimation of risk for lung cancer induced by inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides at very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Sanders, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Results of statistical analyses of data from experiments in which rats were exposed to transuranics by inhalation imply that tumor incidence extrapolated to lower doses is not dependent on the chemical form of the transuranic. Using many questionable assumptions and several alternative models, most of the analyses predicted that irradiation at the current occupational exposure limit of 15 rem/year would increase the tumor incidence in rats to about three times the spontaneous incidence--the spontaneous incidence being defined by a single observed tumor

  6. Pregnancy after high therapeutic doses of iodine-131 in differentiated thyroid cancer: potential risks and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casara, D.; Rubello, D.; Saladini, G.; Piotto, A.; Pelizzo, M.R.; Girelli, M.E.; Busnardo, B.

    1993-01-01

    Seventy female patients who had been treated with high doses of iodine-131 for differented thyroid cancer (DTC) and who had a subsequent pregnancy were evaluated. The global 131 I dose ranged from 1.85 to 16.55 GBq (mean±SD=4.39±25.20 GBq). Age at first therapy ranged from 15 to 36 years (mean±SD=24.3±5.0 years) and the interval from 131 I therapy to pregnancy varied from 2 to 10 years (mean±SD=5.3±2.8 years). The estimated radiation dose to the gonads ranged from 10 to 63 cGy (mean±SD=24.0±13.5 cGy). All patients were treated with L-thyroxine at doses capable of suppressing thyroid-stimulating hormone. Seventy-three children were followed-up and seven pregnancies are still in progress. One child was affected by Fallot's trilogy and three had a low birth weight though with subsequent regular growth; the others were healthy with subsequent regular growth. No newborn with clinical or biochemical thyroid dysfunctions was found. Two spontaneous abortions during the second month of pregnancy were recorded. One of two patients in question subsequently had two healthy children. On the basis of these data, previous administration of high 131 I doses does not appear to be a valid reason for dissuading young female DTC patients from considering pregnancy. However, patients should be advised to avoid pregnancy after 131 I administration for a period sufficient to ensure complete elimination of the radionuclide and to permit confirmation of complete disease remission, i.e. at least 1 year in our opinion. (orig.)

  7. Retrospective analysis of dose delivery in intra-operative high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, M.; Avadhani, J.S.; Malhotra, H.K.; Cunningham, B.; Tripp, P.; Jaggernauth, W.; Podgorsak, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to quantify the inaccuracy in clinical dose delivery due to the incomplete scatter conditions inherent in intra-operative high dose rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy. Methods. Treatment plans of 10 patients previously treated in our facility, which had irregular shapes of treated areas, were used. Treatment geometries reflecting each clinical case were simulated using a phantom assembly with no added build-up on top of the applicator. The treatment planning geometry (full scatter surrounding the applicator) was subsequently simulated for each case by adding bolus on top of the applicator. Results. For geometries representing the clinical IOHDR incomplete scatter environment, measured doses at the 5 mm and 10 mm prescription depths were lower than the corresponding prescribed doses by about 7.7% and 11.1%, respectively. Also, for the two prescription methods, an analysis of the measured dose distributions and their corresponding treatment plans showed average decreases of 1.2 mm and 2.2 mm in depth of prescription dose, respectively. Conclusions. Dosimetric calculations with the assumption of an infinite scatter environment around the applicator and target volume have shown to result in dose delivery errors that significantly decrease the prescription depth for IOHDR treatment.(author)

  8. Proximity correction of high-dosed frame with PROXECCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Hans; Waas, Thomas; Hartmann, Hans

    1994-05-01

    Usefulness of electron beam lithography is strongly related to the efficiency and quality of methods used for proximity correction. This paper addresses the above issue by proposing an extension to the new proximity correction program PROXECCO. The combination of a framing step with PROXECCO produces a pattern with a very high edge accuracy and still allows usage of the fast correction procedure. Making a frame with a higher dose imitates a fine resolution correction where the coarse part is disregarded. So after handling the high resolution effect by means of framing, an additional coarse correction is still needed. Higher doses have a higher contribution to the proximity effect. This additional proximity effect is taken into account with the help of the multi-dose input of PROXECCO. The dose of the frame is variable, depending on the deposited energy coming from backscattering of the proximity. Simulation proves the very high edge accuracy of the applied method.

  9. PEGylation, increasing specific activity and multiple dosing as strategies to improve the risk-benefit profile of targeted radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-DOTA-bombesin analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    growth. The therapeutic efficacy was highest for the PEGylated derivative of high specific activity administered in two fractions (2 × 20 MBq = 40 MBq) at day 0 and day 7 (73% tumour growth inhibition, 3 weeks after therapy). Conclusions PEGylation and increasing the specific activity enhance the pharmacokinetic properties of a 177Lu-labelled BN-based radiopharmaceutical and provide a protocol for targeted radionuclide therapy with a beneficial anti-tumour effectiveness and a favourable risk-profile at the same time. PMID:22681935

  10. Transfer factor of the radionuclides in food crops from high-background radiation area of south west India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, G.; Thampi Thanka kumaran, J.; Allen Gnana raj, G.; Maniyan, C. G.

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to obtain the transfer factor (TF) of long-lived radionuclides because soil type and vegetation can affect TF. We studied the food crops commonly consumed by the general public of Kanyakumari district of south India. The main focus was on rice, fruits, vegetables and tapioca because the consumption of these is high. The soil to rice TF for the radionuclides, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K are 8.8 x 10. -2 , 14.2 x 10. -2 , 5.8 x 10. -2 and 6.3 x 10. -2 , respectively. The TF of tapioca for 226 Ra, 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K are 6.2 x 10 -2 , 11 x 10 -2 , 1.9 x 10 -2 and 8.9 x 10 -2 , respectively. For fruits and vegetables, the TFs are low. In the majority of the crops the non-edible parts accumulate more radionuclides than the edible parts. (authors)

  11. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  12. Dose intercomparison studies for standardization of high-dose dosimetry in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Hoang Hoa; Duong Nguyen Dinh; Kojima, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Irradiation Center of the Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (IC-VAEC) is planning to establish a traceability system for high-dose dosimetry and to provide high-dose standards as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) level in Vietnam. For countries which do not have a standard dosimetry laboratory, the participation in the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the most common means to verify own dosimetry performance with a certain uncertainty. This is, however, only one-direction dose intercomparison with evaluation by IAEA including unknown parameter at participant laboratories. The SSDL level laboratory should have traceability as well as compatibility, ability to evaluate uncertainties of its own dosimetry performance by itself In the present paper, we reviewed our dosimetry performance through two-way dose intercomparison studies and self-evaluation of uncertainty in our dosimetry procedure. The performance of silver dichromate dosimeter as reference transfer dosimeter in IC-VAEC was studied through two-way blind dose intercomparison experiments between the IC-VAEC and JAERI. As another channel of dose intercomparison with IAEA, alanine dosimeters issued by IDAS were simultaneously irradiated with the IC-VAEC dichromate dosimeters at IC-VAEC and analyzed by IAEA. Dose intercomparison between IC-VAEC and JAERI results into a good agreement (better than ±2.5%), and IDAS results also show similar agreement within ±3.0%. The uncertainty was self-estimated on the basis of the JAERI alanine dosimetry, and a preliminary value of about 1.86% at a 68% confidence level is established. The results from these intercomparisons and our estimation of the uncertainty are consistent. We hope that our experience is valuable to other countries which do not have dosimetry standard laboratories and/or are planning to establish them. (author)

  13. Biennial Report on Long-Term Dose-Response Studies of Inhaled or Injected Radionuclides, 1991 - 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    and Radon or Thoron in the Body R. D. LJoyd, G. N. Taylor and S. C. Miller D. L Henshaw, et al. (In Indoor Radon and Lung Cancer: Reality or Myth ? [F. T...In Indoor Radon and Lung Cancer: Reality or Myth ? [F. T. Cross, ed.], Battelle Press, Richland, WA, p. 167, 1992a) calculated the dose-rates to bone...82300 5635 D-ENTERITIS 0.59 1.5 1.9 1.6 3.9 5.3 80288 4866 E-LEIONYOMA, VAGINA 0.54 1.5 1.9 1.5 3.8 5.2 79165 4392 E-RENAL FAILURE 0.44 1.1 1.5 1.2

  14. Radiation dose estimates and hazard evaluations for inhaled airborne radionuclides. Annual progress report, July 1980-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.

    1982-04-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct confirmatory research on aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiation dose distribution in animals following inhalation and to provide prediction of health consequences in humans due to airborne radioactivity which might be released in normal operations or under accident conditions during production of nuclear fuel composed of mixed oxides of U and Pu. Four research reports summarize the results of specific areas of research being conducted. The first presents final results for several types of physical chemical characterization accomplished on samples of aerosols collected at an industrial facility during normal fabrication of mixed oxide fuel. Many of these characterizations were also done on aerosol samples collected during animal inhalation exposure procedures for biological studies using these aerosol materials. The second paper reports on the methods development process used for establishing a capability for measurement of the specific surface area of aerosols, an important determinant in the rate of dissolution of particulates deposited in lung. The third paper provides updated information on the retention, distribution and excretion of Pu after inhalation by Beagles of aerosols of either 750 0 C treated UO 2 + PuO 2 , 1750 0 C treated (U,Pu)O 2 or 850 0 C treated pure PuO 2 . This paper also reports the results of the formulation of a biomathematical model useful in describing the results of these three inhalation studies. The fourth paper describes the early results from two studies in which Fischer-344 rats received inhalation exposure to aerosols of (U,Pu)O 2 or pure PuO 2 to determine the relationship of radiation dose to biological response

  15. Investigation of polymer composite for high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.L.M.; Batista, A.S.M.; Ribeiro, F.A.S.; Santos, A.P.; Faria, L.O.; Oliveira, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the efficacy evaluation of PVDF and nanocomposites of the PVDF films for high gamma dosimetry. Our scope in this first part of our studies is the selection of the most promising film for future dosimetry trials, where the proportionality of response of the selected material will be investigated over a large range of doses and dose rates. Methods: Was prepared nanocomposites made by mixing Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) aiming to find dosimetric properties for applications in high dose dosimetry. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (16.7 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 to 2750 kGy. The UV-Vis and FTIR spectrophotometry have been used to monitor the appearing of C=C conjugated bonds and radio-oxidation of carbon (C=O). Results: FTIR spectrometry has that the absorbance intensities at 1715 cm -1 and 1730 cm -1 can be used for high dosimetry purposes for gamma doses ranging from 400 to 2750 kGy. In this range, it is possible to observe a linear relationship between Abs & Dose. Fading of signal was evaluated for one month and reproducibility in 2000 kGy dose. Conclusion: FTIR spectroscopic data revealed two optical absorption bands at 1715 cm -1 and 1730 cm -1 whose intensities are unambiguously related to gamma delivered dose ranging from 400 kGy to 2750 kGy. (author)

  16. Investigation of polymer composite for high dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, E.L.M.; Batista, A.S.M., E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, F.A.S.; Santos, A.P.; Faria, L.O.; Oliveira, A.H. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the efficacy evaluation of PVDF and nanocomposites of the PVDF films for high gamma dosimetry. Our scope in this first part of our studies is the selection of the most promising film for future dosimetry trials, where the proportionality of response of the selected material will be investigated over a large range of doses and dose rates. Methods: Was prepared nanocomposites made by mixing Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) aiming to find dosimetric properties for applications in high dose dosimetry. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (16.7 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 to 2750 kGy. The UV-Vis and FTIR spectrophotometry have been used to monitor the appearing of C=C conjugated bonds and radio-oxidation of carbon (C=O). Results: FTIR spectrometry has that the absorbance intensities at 1715 cm{sup -1} and 1730 cm{sup -1} can be used for high dosimetry purposes for gamma doses ranging from 400 to 2750 kGy. In this range, it is possible to observe a linear relationship between Abs & Dose. Fading of signal was evaluated for one month and reproducibility in 2000 kGy dose. Conclusion: FTIR spectroscopic data revealed two optical absorption bands at 1715 cm{sup -1} and 1730 cm{sup -1} whose intensities are unambiguously related to gamma delivered dose ranging from 400 kGy to 2750 kGy. (author)

  17. High-dose contrast-enhanced MRI in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koudriavtseva, T. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Pozzilli, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Di Biasi, C. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Iannilli, M. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Trasimeni, G. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Gasperini, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Argentino, C. [Department of Neurosciences, University of Rome ``La Sapienza`` Rome (Italy); Gualdi, G.F. [MR Unit, Clinica Medica 1, University of Rome ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy)

    1996-05-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is effective for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and may provide an outcome measure for testing the efficacy of treatment in clinical trials. To compare the sensitivity of high-dose gadolinium-HP-DO3A with that of a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA, we studied 16 patients with relapsing-remitting MS in the acute phase of the disease. Each underwent two MRI examinations within at most 48 h. The initial MRI study was with a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), and the second one an experimental dose of gadolinium-HP-DO3A (0.3 mmol/kg). No adverse effects were attributed to the contrast media. The high-dose study revealed more enhancing lesions than the standard-dose study (56 vs 38). This difference was found to be more relevant for infratentorial and small lesions. Furthermore, with the higher dose, there was a marked qualitative improvement in the visibility and delineation of the lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. High-dose contrast-enhanced MRI in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtseva, T.; Pozzilli, C.; Di Biasi, C.; Iannilli, M.; Trasimeni, G.; Gasperini, C.; Argentino, C.; Gualdi, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is effective for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and may provide an outcome measure for testing the efficacy of treatment in clinical trials. To compare the sensitivity of high-dose gadolinium-HP-DO3A with that of a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA, we studied 16 patients with relapsing-remitting MS in the acute phase of the disease. Each underwent two MRI examinations within at most 48 h. The initial MRI study was with a standard dose of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), and the second one an experimental dose of gadolinium-HP-DO3A (0.3 mmol/kg). No adverse effects were attributed to the contrast media. The high-dose study revealed more enhancing lesions than the standard-dose study (56 vs 38). This difference was found to be more relevant for infratentorial and small lesions. Furthermore, with the higher dose, there was a marked qualitative improvement in the visibility and delineation of the lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Quezada, Valeria de la Asuncion

    1997-01-01

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  20. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Cac, Franky Eduardo

    2004-10-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192 Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192 Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192 Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192 Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192 Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  1. High reliability - low noise radionuclide signature identification algorithms for border security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu

    Illicit trafficking and smuggling of radioactive materials and special nuclear materials (SNM) are considered as one of the most important recent global nuclear threats. Monitoring the transport and safety of radioisotopes and SNM are challenging due to their weak signals and easy shielding. Great efforts worldwide are focused at developing and improving the detection technologies and algorithms, for accurate and reliable detection of radioisotopes of interest in thus better securing the borders against nuclear threats. In general, radiation portal monitors enable detection of gamma and neutron emitting radioisotopes. Passive or active interrogation techniques, present and/or under the development, are all aimed at increasing accuracy, reliability, and in shortening the time of interrogation as well as the cost of the equipment. Equally important efforts are aimed at advancing algorithms to process the imaging data in an efficient manner providing reliable "readings" of the interiors of the examined volumes of various sizes, ranging from cargos to suitcases. The main objective of this thesis is to develop two synergistic algorithms with the goal to provide highly reliable - low noise identification of radioisotope signatures. These algorithms combine analysis of passive radioactive detection technique with active interrogation imaging techniques such as gamma radiography or muon tomography. One algorithm consists of gamma spectroscopy and cosmic muon tomography, and the other algorithm is based on gamma spectroscopy and gamma radiography. The purpose of fusing two detection methodologies per algorithm is to find both heavy-Z radioisotopes and shielding materials, since radionuclides can be identified with gamma spectroscopy, and shielding materials can be detected using muon tomography or gamma radiography. These combined algorithms are created and analyzed based on numerically generated images of various cargo sizes and materials. In summary, the three detection

  2. Study on radionuclide migration through a buffer material of the repository for high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Masaki; Ohe, Toshiaki

    1989-01-01

    The present report discusses radionuclide migration through a buffer material from the view point of experimental and data analysis. Na-bentonite loosely compacted with dry density of 0.8 - 1 g/cm 3 was contacted with cesium chloride solution of about 100 ppb containing Cs-134 as a tracer at 40degC and at 70degC. After the experiments, the bentonite cake was sliced and cesium distribution in the cake was measured by gamma-spectrometry. Apparent diffusivities of 2∼5 x 10 -7 cm 2 /sec was determined through the analysis method where pore diffusion and adsorption were involved. Numerical solution well described the observed data. The pore diffusion would be clearfied to be a dominant mechanism of the radionuclide migration in the bentonite, through discussing the pore diffusion mechanism and activation energy of the diffusion. This report also discusses the capability of the chemical transport model CHEMTRN for long-term predictions of the radionuclide migration. (author)

  3. An approach to calculating absorbed doses to organs of high radiation sensitivity in diagnostic radioisotope examinations in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniszewska, M.A.; Jankowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented of dose calculations for internal exposures of organ-sources and organ-targets. Variations of absorbed doses depending on sex and age of the patients investigated with the use of radionuclides are discussed. Definitions of the effective and collective dose equivalents are also given. 8 refs., 1 tab. (author)

  4. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  5. Radioecology teaching: evaluation of the background radiation levels from areas with high concentrations of radionuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R M; Okuno, E; Gomes, P R S; Veiga, R; Estellita, L; Mangia, L; Uzeda, D; Soares, T; Facure, A; Brage, J A P; Mosquera, B; Carvalho, C; Santos, A M A

    2004-01-01

    The study of environmental radioactivity is a topic which is not usually included in physics courses in Brazilian and Latin American universities. Consequently, high-school teachers are not able to show experimentally or discuss with their students the effects of exposure to terrestrial radiation. This paper presents a laboratory experiment in a teaching programme on the physics of ionizing radiation. It is based on the evaluation of the background radiation levels from areas with high concentrations of natural or artificial radionuclides in the soil. A brief analysis of the theory behind the technique and a description of some measurements, including their interpretations, are presented

  6. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Moreno, Marta; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Julian, Mikel; Alcalde, Juan; Jurado, Matias

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses ≥70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins ≥1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses ≤50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  7. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C.; Uribe, R. M.; Gomez V, V.; Kobayashi, K.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  8. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  9. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  10. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  11. High-dose buprenorphine: perioperative precautions and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D M; Meyer-Witting, M

    2005-02-01

    Buprenorphine has been in clinical use in anaesthesia for several decades. Recently, the high-dose sublingual formulation (Subutex, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, U.K.) has been increasingly used as maintenance therapy in opioid dependence, as an alternative to methadone and other pharmacological therapies. Buprenorphine has unique pharmacological properties making it well suited for use as a maintenance therapy in opioid dependence. However, these same properties may cause difficulty in the perioperative management of pain. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, attenuating the effects of supplemental illicit or therapeutic opioid agonists. As a result of its high receptor affinity, supplemental opioids do not readily displace buprenorphine from the opioid receptor in standard doses. High-dose buprenorphine has an extended duration of action that prolongs both of these effects. The perioperative management of patients stabilized on high-dose buprenorphine and undergoing surgery requires consideration of the likely analgesic requirements. Where possible the buprenorphine should be continued. Pain management should focus on maximizing non-opioid analgesia, local anaesthesia and non-pharmacological techniques. Where pain may not be adequately relieved by these methods, the addition of a full opioid agonist such as fentanyl or morphine at appropriate doses should be considered, accompanied by close monitoring in a high dependency unit. In situations where this regimen is unlikely to be effective, preoperative conversion to morphine or methadone may be an option. Where available, liaison with a hospital-based alcohol and drug service should always be considered.

  12. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  13. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  14. A novel theory of radiation damage at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.; Stuttgart Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Deviations of radiation damage (in the case of metals usually monitored by the residual electrical resistivity) from proportionality with the irradiation dose have so far been analysed almost exclusively in terms of extensions of models originally developed for small doses. The present theory considers the opposite limit i.e. the quasi-saturated state. It is argued that at high doses the Lueck-Sizmann effect may result in a self-organization of clusters of vacancies and self-interstitials, forming a heterogeneous froth. Possible structures of this froth and its effect on the electrical resistivity of metals are discussed. The model is shown to account for the dependence of the ''saturation resistivity'' on the nature of the irradiation as well as for several other hitherto poorly explained observations. Among them are the electrical-resistivity variation induced by high-dose irradiation with heavy ions, the amorphization of certain alloys by high-dose electron irradiation, and the occurrence of ordered arrays of stacking-fault tetrahedra after in-situ irradiations in high-voltage electron microscopes. (author)

  15. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  16. Effective dose calculation in CT using high sensitivity TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To determine the effective dose for common paediatric CT examinations using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) mea surements. High sensitivity TLD chips (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-IOOH, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) were calibrated on a linac at an energy of 6 MY. A calibration was also performed on a superricial X-ray unit at a kilovoltage energy to validate the megavoltage cali bration for the purpose of measuring doses in the diagnostic energy range. The dose variation across large organs was assessed and a methodology for TLD placement in a 10 year old anthropomorphic phantom developed. Effective dose was calculated from the TLD measured absorbed doses for typical CT examinations after correcting for the TLD energy response and taking into account differences in the mass energy absorption coefficients for different tissues and organs. Results Using new tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose for a CT brain examination on a 10 year old was 1.6 millisieverts (mSv), 4.9 mSv for a CT chest exa ination and 4.7 mSv for a CT abdomen/pelvis examination. These values are lower for the CT brain examination, higher for the CT chest examination and approximately the same for the CT abdomen/ pelvis examination when compared with effective doses calculated using ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors. Conclusions High sensitivity TLDs calibrated with a radiotherapy linac are useful for measuring dose in the diagnostic energy range and overcome limitations of output reproducibility and uniformity asso ciated with traditional TLD calibration on CT scanners or beam quality matched diagnostic X-ray units.

  17. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindstroem, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10{sup -5} per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10{sup -5} per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10{sup -5} Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10{sup -7} Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable

  18. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, Maria; Lindstroem, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10 -8 Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10 -5 per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10 -5 per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10 -5 Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10 -7 Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10 -8 Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable values. In that case almost all

  19. Implementation of high-dose chemical dosimetry for industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, Cirilo Cezar Sant'Anna da

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of methodology for high dose measurements using chemical dosimeters in liquid phase, traceable to the international metrology system, and make available in the country, the standard of high-dose to industrial irradiation facilities and research irradiators, trough the quality program with comparative measurements and direct use of the standard dosimeters in routine. The use of these low cost dosimetry systems in industrial irradiation facilities, assists to the certification requirements and it can reduce the costs with dosimetry for approximately 20% of the total dosimetry costs, using these systems in routine measurements and validation process, largely substituting the imported PMMA dosimeters, among others. (author)

  20. The calculation of absorbed dose rate in freshwater fish from high background natural radioactivity areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Moraes, S.R.; Cavalcante, J.J.V.; Pinto, C.E.C.; Kelecom, A.

    2017-01-01

    Areas of increased radiation may expose biota to radiation doses greater than the world averages, and depending on the magnitude of the exposure causing biota damage. The region of the municipality of Caldas, MG, BR is considered a region of increased natural radioactivity. The present work aims to evaluate the exposure of biota to natural radionuclides in the region of Caldas, MG. In order to evaluate the biota exposure in the region, the concentrations of the natural radionuclides U nat , 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 232 Th and 228 Ra were evaluated in two species of fishes: lambari (Astymax spp.) And traíra (Hoplias spp.). The dose rates of the analyzed fish were: for Astymax spp of 0.08 μGy d -1 and for Hoplias spp of 0.12 μGy∙d -1 . With these dose rate values no measurable deleterious effects are expected in the species studied

  1. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  2. Toxicity studies of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides - Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F F; Boeker, B B; Gillett, N A; Griffith, W C; Lundgren, D L; McClellan, R O; Muggenburg, B A; Snipes, M B

    1988-12-01

    The effects of beta-emitting radionuclides inhaled in either a relatively soluble form ({sup 90}SrCl{sub 2}, {sup 144}CeCl{sub 3}, {sup 91}yl{sub 3}, or {sup 137}CsCl) or in a relatively insoluble form ({sup 90}Y, {sup 91}Y, {sup 144}Ce or {sup 90}Sr in fused aluminosilicate particles [FAP]) have been studied in laboratory animals. The results showed that the total beta dose and the dose-rate pattern can modify both the neoplastic and non-neoplastic effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. In addition, the solubility and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides influence which organs are affected. Effects are seen primarily in organs where the radionuclide is ultimately accumulated, e.g., lung, bone, liver, or tracheobronchial lymph nodes. In addition, effects may be seen in organs where there is little accumulation, but where the radiation dose may still be high, e.g., nasal epithelium and heart. Studies of inhaled {sup 144}Ce-FAP in four different species showed that, compared to mice and dogs, lung tumor risk factors are very low for Syrian hamsters and high for rats. Studies of mice, Syrian hamsters, rats, and dogs repeatedly exposed to aerosols of {sup 144}Ce-FAP showed that lung tumor incidence correlates better with cumulative dose to the lung than with dose rate. Most of the studies in this program are nearing completion and full analyses are in progress. (author)

  3. Natural radionuclides, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb, determined in mineral water springs from Parque das Águas de Caxambu, and assessment of the committed effective doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghini, Arthur A.; Damatto, Sandra R.; Oliveira, Joselene; Prilip, Amanda, E-mail: ameneghini@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The increase of mineral water consumption and its medicinal use results in the necessity of characterization of these waters sources, once that water is a vital part of human diet. In the mineral waters, besides stable elements, responsible of the chemical composition, the presence of natural radionuclides from the {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U series and {sup 40}K gives the radiation property. The incorporation of these radionuclides through the ingestion and external treatment of mineral waters are a very important point, due the ionizing radiation of these radionuclides are harmful to the organism. The largest mineral water park of the world is situated in Brazil, in the city of Caxambu, called Parque das Águas de Caxambu. In this park are 12 fountains distributed in the park, also a tubular well of 60 meters of depth which regularly provide water spouts, geyser, and another spring located inside the Gloria Hotel. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the activity concentrations of the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in the mineral waters springs collected at the 'Parque das Águas de Caxambu' and in the Gloria Hotel, as well as to estimate the committed effective doses due to the consumption of these waters. In six campaigns, the radionuclides with the highest concentrations were {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra in the springs D. Ernestina, Beleza and Venâncio. These springs also presented the highest values of the committed effective dose. (author)

  4. Characterization of Thymol blue Radiochromic dosimeters for high dose applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras M. Aldweri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymol blue (TB solutions and Thymol blue Polyvinyl Alcohol (TB-PVA films have been introduced as Radiochromic dosimeter for high dose applications. The dosimeters were irradiated with gamma ray (60Co source from 5 to 30 kGy for film, and from 0.150 kGy to 4 kGy for solution. The optical density of unirradiated and irradiated TB solution as well as TB-PVA film dosimeters were studied in terms of absorbance at 434 nm using UV/VIS spectrophotometer. The effects of scan temperature, light pre-gamma irradiation, dose rate, relative humidity and stability of the absorbance of solutions and films after irradiation were investigated. We found the dose sensitivity of TB solution and TB-PVA film dosimeters increases significantly with increases of the absorbed dose as well as with the increases of TB dye concentrations. The useful dose range of developed TB solutions and TB-PVA films dosimeters is in the range 0.125–1 kGy and of 5–20 kGy, respectively. Keywords: Dose sensitivity, Radio-chromic dosimeter, Thymol blue, Absorbance, Concentrations

  5. New radionuclide generator systems for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atcher, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A current emphasis in nuclear medicine is to better match the physical lifetime of the radionuclides used in vivo for diagnosis and treatment to the biological lifetime of the diagnostic procedure or to minimize radiation dose to areas other than those to be treated. In many cases the biological lifetime is on the order of minutes. Since the direct production of radionuclides with half lives of minutes requires the user to be near a suitable reactor or accelerator, this study was undertaken to produce short-lived radionuclides indirectly. If a long-lived radionuclide decays into a short-lived radionuclide, quick separation of the daughter activity from the parent enables the user to have a short-lived daughter while freeing him from the constraint of proximity to a cyclotron. Systems where a short-lived daughter is separated from a long-lived parent are called radionuclide generators. Two generator systems were developed for use in nuclear medicine, one in diagnostic work and the other for therapeutic work. The yield and breakthrough characteristics were within the limits required to minimize unnecessary radiation exposure in patients. Two parent radionuclides were produced using 4 He beams available from medium energy cyclotrons. The yield was high enough to produce generators that would be useful in clinical applications

  6. BH3105 type neutron dose equivalent meter of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Enshan; Yang Jianfeng; Zhang Hong; Huang Jiling

    1995-10-01

    It is noted that to design a neutron dose meter of high sensitivity is almost impossible in the frame of traditional designing principle--'absorption net principle'. Based on a newly proposed principle of obtaining neutron dose equi-biological effect adjustment--' absorption stick principle', a brand-new neutron dose-equivalent meter with high neutron sensitivity BH3105 has been developed. Its sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), which is 18∼40 times higher than one of foreign products of the same kind and is 10 4 times higher than that of domestic FJ342 neutron rem-meter. BH3105 has a measurement range from 0.1μSv/h to 1 Sv/h which is 1 or 2 orders wider than that of the other's. It has the advanced properties of gamma-resistance, energy response, orientation, etc. (6 tabs., 5 figs.)

  7. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  8. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  9. Low dose radiation enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation on human glioma cell U251

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chang; Wang Guanjun; Tan Yehui; Jiang Hongyu; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect on the growth of human glioma cell U251 induced by low dose irradiation and low dose irradiation combined with large dose irradiation. Methods: Human glioma cell line U251 and nude mice carried with human glioma were used. The tumor cells and the mice were treated with low dose, high dose, and low dose combined high dose radiation. Cells growth curve, MTT and flow cytometry were used to detect the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the cells; and the tumor inhibition rate was used to assess the growth of tumor in vivo. Results: After low dose irradiation, there was no difference between experimental group and control group in cell count, MTT and flow cytometry. Single high dose group and low dose combined high dose group both show significantly the suppressing effect on tumor cells, the apoptosis increased and there was cell cycle blocked in G 2 period, but there was no difference between two groups. In vivo apparent anti-tumor effect in high dose radiation group and the combining group was observed, and that was more significant in the combining group; the prior low dose radiation alleviated the injury of hematological system. There was no difference between single low dose radiation group and control. Conclusions: There is no significant effect on human glioma cell induced by low dose radiation, and low dose radiation could not induce adaptive response. But in vivo experience, low dose radiation could enhance the anti-tumor effect of high dose radiation and alleviated the injury of hematological system. (authors)

  10. HIGH-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY IN CARCINOMA CERVIX STAGE IIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya Maruthavanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Radiotherapy is the sta